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Sample records for bacterial gene regulation

  1. Single-taxon field measurements of bacterial gene regulation controlling DMSP fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Robidart, Julie; Preston, Christina M; Gifford, Scott M; Durham, Bryndan P; Burns, Andrew S; Ryan, John P; Marin, Roman; Kiene, Ronald P; Zehr, Jonathan P; Scholin, Christopher A; Moran, Mary Ann

    2015-07-01

    The 'bacterial switch' is a proposed regulatory point in the global sulfur cycle that routes dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) to two fundamentally different fates in seawater through genes encoding either the cleavage or demethylation pathway, and affects the flux of volatile sulfur from ocean surface waters to the atmosphere. Yet which ecological or physiological factors might control the bacterial switch remains a topic of considerable debate. Here we report the first field observations of dynamic changes in expression of DMSP pathway genes by a single marine bacterial species in its natural environment. Detection of taxon-specific gene expression in Roseobacter species HTCC2255 during a month-long deployment of an autonomous ocean sensor in Monterey Bay, CA captured in situ regulation of the first gene in each DMSP pathway (dddP and dmdA) that corresponded with shifts in the taxonomy of the phytoplankton community. Expression of the demethylation pathway was relatively greater during a high-DMSP-producing dinoflagellate bloom, and expression of the cleavage pathway was greater in the presence of a mixed diatom and dinoflagellate community [corrected].These field data fit the prevailing hypothesis for bacterial DMSP gene regulation based on bacterial sulfur demand, but also suggest a modification involving oxidative stress response, evidenced as upregulation of catalase via katG, when DMSP is demethylated. PMID:25700338

  2. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  3. CRISPR/Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

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    David eWeiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-based Type II CRISPR-Cas system in the control of endogenous gene expression, a novel form of prokaryotic gene regulation. Cas9 functions in association with two small RNAs to target and alter the stability of an endogenous transcript encoding a bacterial lipoprotein (BLP. Since BLPs are recognized by the host innate immune protein Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, CRISPR-Cas-mediated repression of BLP expression facilitates evasion of TLR2 by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida, and is essential for its virulence. Here we describe the Cas9 regulatory system in detail, as well as data on its role in controlling virulence traits of Neisseria meningitidis and Campylobacter jejuni. We also discuss potential roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in the response to envelope stress and other aspects of bacterial physiology. Since ~45% of bacteria and ~83% of Archaea encode these machineries, the newly appreciated regulatory functions of CRISPR-Cas systems are likely to play broad roles in controlling the pathogenesis and physiology of diverse prokaryotes.

  4. Differential regulation of horizontally acquired and core genome genes by the bacterial modulator H-NS.

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    Rosa C Baños

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal acquisition of DNA by bacteria dramatically increases genetic diversity and hence successful bacterial colonization of several niches, including the human host. A relevant issue is how this newly acquired DNA interacts and integrates in the regulatory networks of the bacterial cell. The global modulator H-NS targets both core genome and HGT genes and silences gene expression in response to external stimuli such as osmolarity and temperature. Here we provide evidence that H-NS discriminates and differentially modulates core and HGT DNA. As an example of this, plasmid R27-encoded H-NS protein has evolved to selectively silence HGT genes and does not interfere with core genome regulation. In turn, differential regulation of both gene lineages by resident chromosomal H-NS requires a helper protein: the Hha protein. Tight silencing of HGT DNA is accomplished by H-NS-Hha complexes. In contrast, core genes are modulated by H-NS homoligomers. Remarkably, the presence of Hha-like proteins is restricted to the Enterobacteriaceae. In addition, conjugative plasmids encoding H-NS variants have hitherto been isolated only from members of the family. Thus, the H-NS system in enteric bacteria presents unique evolutionary features. The capacity to selectively discriminate between core and HGT DNA may help to maintain horizontally transmitted DNA in silent form and may give these bacteria a competitive advantage in adapting to new environments, including host colonization.

  5. Bacterial pathogen gene regulation: a DNA-structure-centred view of a protein-dominated domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J; Colgan, Aoife; Dorman, Matthew J

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to regulate the expression of their genes, especially their virulence genes, have been the subject of intense investigation for several decades. Whole genome sequencing projects, together with more targeted studies, have identified hundreds of DNA-binding proteins that contribute to the patterns of gene expression observed during infection as well as providing important insights into the nature of the gene products whose expression is being controlled by these proteins. Themes that have emerged include the importance of horizontal gene transfer to the evolution of pathogens, the need to impose regulatory discipline upon these imported genes and the important roles played by factors normally associated with the organization of genome architecture as regulatory principles in the control of virulence gene expression. Among these architectural elements is the structure of DNA itself, its variable nature at a topological rather than just at a base-sequence level and its ability to play an active (as well as a passive) part in the gene regulation process. PMID:27252403

  6. Genes as early responders regulate quorum-sensing and control bacterial cooperation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Kelei Zhao

    Full Text Available Quorum-sensing (QS allows bacterial communication to coordinate the production of extracellular products essential for population fitness at higher cell densities. It has been generally accepted that a significant time duration is required to reach appropriate cell density to activate the relevant quiescent genes encoding these costly but beneficial public goods. Which regulatory genes are involved and how these genes control bacterial communication at the early phases are largely un-explored. By determining time-dependent expression of QS-related genes of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aerugionsa, we show that the induction of social cooperation could be critically influenced by environmental factors to optimize the density of population. In particular, small regulatory RNAs (RsmY and RsmZ serving as early responders, can promote the expression of dependent genes (e.g. lasR to boost the synthesis of intracellular enzymes and coordinate instant cooperative behavior in bacterial cells. These early responders, acting as a rheostat to finely modulate bacterial cooperation, which may be quickly activated under environment threats, but peter off when critical QS dependent genes are fully functional for cooperation. Our findings suggest that RsmY and RsmZ critically control the timing and levels of public goods production, which may have implications in sociomicrobiology and infection control.

  7. Genome-wide identification of Hsp70 genes in channel catfish and their regulated expression after bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Xie, Yangjie; Liu, Shikai; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Chen; Li, Yun; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock proteins 70/110 (Hsp70/110) are a family of conserved ubiquitously expressed heat shock proteins which are produced by cells in response to exposure to stressful conditions. Besides the chaperone and housekeeping functions, they are also known to be involved in immune response during infection. In this study, we identified 16 Hsp70/110 geness in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) through in silico analysis using RNA-Seq and genome databases. Among them 12 members of Hsp70 (Hspa) family and 4 members of Hsp110 (Hsph) family were identified. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses provided strong evidence in supporting the orthologies of these HSPs. In addition, we also determined the expression patterns of Hsp70/110 genes after Flavobacterium columnare and Edwardsiella ictaluri infections by meta-analyses, for the first time in channel catfish. Ten out of sixteen genes were significantly up/down-regulated after bacterial challenges. Specifically, nine genes were found significantly expressed in gill after F. columnare infection. Two genes were found significantly expressed in intestine after E. ictaluri infection. Pathogen-specific pattern and tissue-specific pattern were found in the two infections. The significantly regulated expressions of catfish Hsp70 genes after bacterial infections suggested their involvement in immune response in catfish. PMID:26693666

  8. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

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    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  9. Regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes by the small noncoding RNA PcrZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, Nils N; Berghoff, Bork A; Hermanns, Yannick N; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-10-01

    The small RNA PcrZ (photosynthesis control RNA Z) of the facultative phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is induced upon a drop of oxygen tension with similar kinetics to those of genes for components of photosynthetic complexes. High expression of PcrZ depends on PrrA, the response regulator of the PrrB/PrrA two-component system with a central role in redox regulation in R. sphaeroides. In addition the FnrL protein, an activator of some photosynthesis genes at low oxygen tension, is involved in redox-dependent expression of this small (s)RNA. Overexpression of full-length PcrZ in R. sphaeroides affects expression of a small subset of genes, most of them with a function in photosynthesis. Some mRNAs from the photosynthetic gene cluster were predicted to be putative PcrZ targets and results from an in vivo reporter system support these predictions. Our data reveal a negative effect of PcrZ on expression of its target mRNAs. Thus, PcrZ counteracts the redox-dependent induction of photosynthesis genes, which is mediated by protein regulators. Because PrrA directly activates photosynthesis genes and at the same time PcrZ, which negatively affects photosynthesis gene expression, this is one of the rare cases of an incoherent feed-forward loop including an sRNA. Our data identified PcrZ as a trans acting sRNA with a direct regulatory function in formation of photosynthetic complexes and provide a model for the control of photosynthesis gene expression by a regulatory network consisting of proteins and a small noncoding RNA.

  10. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  11. Co-transcriptomic Analysis by RNA Sequencing to Simultaneously Measure Regulated Gene Expression in Host and Bacterial Pathogen

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-24

    Intramacrophage pathogens subvert antimicrobial defence pathways using various mechanisms, including the targeting of host TLR-mediated transcriptional responses. Conversely, TLR-inducible host defence mechanisms subject intramacrophage pathogens to stress, thus altering pathogen gene expression programs. Important biological insights can thus be gained through the analysis of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen during an infection. Traditionally, research methods have involved the use of qPCR, microarrays and/or RNA sequencing to identify transcriptional changes in either the host or the pathogen. Here we describe the application of RNA sequencing using samples obtained from in vitro infection assays to simultaneously quantify both host and bacterial pathogen gene expression changes, as well as general approaches that can be undertaken to interpret the RNA sequencing data that is generated. These methods can be used to provide insights into host TLR-regulated transcriptional responses to microbial challenge, as well as pathogen subversion mechanisms against such responses.

  12. CRISPR-Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sampson, Timothy R.; Weiss, David S.

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-ba...

  13. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  14. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact. PMID:19121038

  15. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

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    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  16. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  17. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature. PMID:26733991

  18. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response: role of bacterial gene expression in temporal regulation of host defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie-Anne Walters

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4. Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways.

  19. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

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    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  20. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  1. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  2. Evolutionary rewiring and reprogramming of bacterial transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Fang-Fang Wang; Wei Qian

    2011-01-01

    Rewiring and reprogramming of transcriptional regulation took place during bacterial speciation. The mechanistic alterations among transcription factors, cis-regulatory elements and target genes confer bacteria novel ability to adapt to stochastic environmental changes. This process is critical to their survival, especially for bacterial pathogens subjected to accelerated evolution. In the past two decades, the investigators not only completed the sequences of numerous bacterial genomes, but also made great progress in understanding the molecular basis of evolution. Here we briefly reviewed the current knowledge on the mechanistic changes among orthologous, paralogous and xenogenic regulatory circuits, which were caused by genetic recombinations such as gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, transposable elements and different genetic contexts. We also discussed the potential impact of this area on theoretical and applied studies of microbes.

  3. Fucose Sensing Regulates Bacterial Intestinal Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Alline R.; Curtis, Meredith M.; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Matthew K Waldor; Moreira, Cristiano G.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota 1 . Successful colonization by pathogens depends on scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria, and precisely regulating expression of virulence genes 2 . The GI pathogen enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression 3–4 . Here we show that these systems control the express...

  4. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    of GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...

  5. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively.

  6. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively. PMID:26545812

  7. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-02-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial diversification and speciation. This review discusses how the recent influx of complete chromosomal sequences of various microorganisms has allowed for a quantitative assessment of the scope, rate and impact of horizontally transmitted information on microbial evolution.

  8. Variance-corrected Michaelis-Menten equation predicts transient rates of single-enzyme reactions and response times in bacterial gene-regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pulkkinen, O

    2016-01-01

    Many chemical reactions in biological cells occur at very low concentrations of constituent molecules. Thus, transcriptional gene-regulation is often controlled by poorly expressed transcription-factors, such as E.coli lac repressor with few tens of copies. Here we study the effects of inherent concentration fluctuations of substrate-molecules on the seminal Michaelis-Menten scheme of biochemical reactions. We present a universal correction to the Michaelis-Menten equation for the reaction-rates. The relevance and validity of this correction for enzymatic reactions and intracellular gene-regulation is demonstrated. Our analytical theory and simulation results confirm that the proposed variance-corrected Michaelis-Menten equation predicts the rate of reactions with remarkable accuracy even in the presence of large non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations. The major advantage of our approach is that it involves only the mean and variance of the substrate-molecule concentration. Our theory is therefore accessi...

  9. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  10. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handfield Martin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4 from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total. Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p -7, 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response.

  11. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  12. Impact of genome reduction on bacterial metabolism and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yus, Eva; Maier, Tobias; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; van Noort, Vera; Yamada, Takuji; Chen, Wei-Hua; Wodke, Judith A H; Güell, Marc; Martínez, Sira; Bourgeois, Ronan; Kühner, Sebastian; Raineri, Emanuele; Letunic, Ivica; Kalinina, Olga V; Rode, Michaela; Herrmann, Richard; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Russell, Robert B; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Bork, Peer; Serrano, Luis

    2009-11-27

    To understand basic principles of bacterial metabolism organization and regulation, but also the impact of genome size, we systematically studied one of the smallest bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A manually curated metabolic network of 189 reactions catalyzed by 129 enzymes allowed the design of a defined, minimal medium with 19 essential nutrients. More than 1300 growth curves were recorded in the presence of various nutrient concentrations. Measurements of biomass indicators, metabolites, and 13C-glucose experiments provided information on directionality, fluxes, and energetics; integration with transcription profiling enabled the global analysis of metabolic regulation. Compared with more complex bacteria, the M. pneumoniae metabolic network has a more linear topology and contains a higher fraction of multifunctional enzymes; general features such as metabolite concentrations, cellular energetics, adaptability, and global gene expression responses are similar, however.

  13. The constancy of gene conservation across divergent bacterial orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Martin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthologous genes are frequently presumed to perform similar functions. However, outside of model organisms, this is rarely tested. One means of inferring changes in function is if there are changes in the level of gene conservation and selective constraint. Here we compare levels of gene conservation across three bacterial groups to test for changes in gene functionality. Findings The level of gene conservation for different orthologous genes is highly correlated across clades, even for highly divergent groups of bacteria. These correlations do not arise from broad differences in gene functionality (e.g. informational genes vs. metabolic genes, but instead seem to result from very specific differences in gene function. Furthermore, these functional differences appear to be maintained over very long periods of time. Conclusion These results suggest that even over broad time scales, most bacterial genes are under a nearly constant level of purifying selection, and that bacterial evolution is thus dominated by selective and functional stasis.

  14. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  15. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens.

  16. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens. PMID:25833324

  17. 拟核结合蛋白与细菌基因的表达调控%Nucleoid-associated Proteins and Their Roles in the Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊祥宇; 王洪海; 谢建平

    2011-01-01

    拟核结合蛋白是细菌遗传物质组织和基因表达调控的关键.细茵基因组压缩为致密的拟核必需有拟核结合蛋白的支撑.拟核结合蛋白、DNA超螺旋和大分子簇在拟核的结构形成中起到重要作用,其中拟核结合蛋白最重要.拟核结合蛋白还影响细茵DNA的复制、重组、转录和修复等多个重要生理过程.作为全局调控因子,拟核结合蛋白是调控细菌适应环境变化所需基因表达的关键.本文总结拟核结合蛋白的结构、功能和调控,特别是其在致病与非致病分枝杆菌中的差别,为寻找新药物靶标提供线索.%One hallmark of bacterial genome is the compact structure called the nucleoid. However, this dense structure poses special challenges for bacteria. The formation of this compressed structure and disentanglement upon particular gene expression requires multiple factors, such as molecular crowding,DNA supercoils and nucleoid-associated proteins (NAP). NAPs are believed to be the most important factors underlying above intricate process. There are many molecules belonging to NAPs, which associate with the chromosomal DNA and facilitate the latter to fold into a compact structure by bridging, bending or wrapping DNA. NAPs are versatile. They also involved in a plethora essential biological processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, DNA recombination and DNA replication. As a global regulator, NAP is pivotal in coordinating the bacterial gene expression to adapt to the environmental fluctuation. The fundamental structure, function and regulation of NAPs are summarized in this paper with particular emphasis on the NAPs difference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria. The prospect of employing these differences to find novel drug targets against tuberculosis is also discussed.

  18. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ho Shin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM. Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  19. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    OpenAIRE

    Bergström Anders; Kristensen Matilde B; Bahl Martin I; Metzdorff Stine B; Fink Lisbeth N; Frøkiær Hanne; Licht Tine R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pu...

  20. Control of intestinal bacterial proliferation in regulation of lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portal-Celhay Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A powerful approach to understanding complex processes such as aging is to use model organisms amenable to genetic manipulation, and to seek relevant phenotypes to measure. Caenorhabditis elegans is particularly suited to studies of aging, since numerous single-gene mutations have been identified that affect its lifespan; it possesses an innate immune system employing evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways affecting longevity. As worms age, bacteria accumulate in the intestinal tract. However, quantitative relationships between worm genotype, lifespan, and intestinal lumen bacterial load have not been examined. We hypothesized that gut immunity is less efficient in older animals, leading to enhanced bacterial accumulation, reducing longevity. To address this question, we evaluated the ability of worms to control bacterial accumulation as a functional marker of intestinal immunity. Results We show that as adult worms age, several C. elegans genotypes show diminished capacity to control intestinal bacterial accumulation. We provide evidence that intestinal bacterial load, regulated by gut immunity, is an important causative factor of lifespan determination; the effects are specified by bacterial strain, worm genotype, and biologic age, all acting in concert. Conclusions In total, these studies focus attention on the worm intestine as a locus that influences longevity in the presence of an accumulating bacterial population. Further studies defining the interplay between bacterial species and host immunity in C. elegans may provide insights into the general mechanisms of aging and age-related diseases.

  1. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  3. Chromatin structure regulates gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jason Cummings

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vlambda pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205, expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vlambda donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vlambda array, and altered the outcome of Vlambda diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences.

  4. Mathematical Models of Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    This talk will focus on examples of mathematical models for the regulation of repressible operons (e.g. the tryptophan operon), inducible operons (e.g. the lactose operon), and the lysis/lysogeny switch in phage λ. These ``simple" gene regulatory elements can display characteristics experimentally of rapid response to perturbations and bistability, and biologically accurate mathematical models capture these aspects of the dynamics. The models, if realistic, are always nonlinear and contain significant time delays due to transcriptional and translational delays that pose substantial problems for the analysis of the possible ranges of dynamics.

  5. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  6. Changes in rhizosphere bacterial gene expression following glyphosate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Molli M; Lorenz, Nicola; Hoilett, Nigel; Lee, Nathan R; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-05-15

    In commercial agriculture, populations and interactions of rhizosphere microflora are potentially affected by the use of specific agrichemicals, possibly by affecting gene expression in these organisms. To investigate this, we examined changes in bacterial gene expression within the rhizosphere of glyphosate-tolerant corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) in response to long-term glyphosate (PowerMAX™, Monsanto Company, MO, USA) treatment. A long-term glyphosate application study was carried out using rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions with soil previously having no history of glyphosate exposure. Rhizosphere soil was collected from the rhizoboxes after four growing periods. Soil microbial community composition was analyzed using microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Total RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil, and samples were analyzed using RNA-Seq analysis. A total of 20-28 million bacterial sequences were obtained for each sample. Transcript abundance was compared between control and glyphosate-treated samples using edgeR. Overall rhizosphere bacterial metatranscriptomes were dominated by transcripts related to RNA and carbohydrate metabolism. We identified 67 differentially expressed bacterial transcripts from the rhizosphere. Transcripts downregulated following glyphosate treatment involved carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and upregulated transcripts involved protein metabolism and respiration. Additionally, bacterial transcripts involving nutrients, including iron, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, were also affected by long-term glyphosate application. Overall, most bacterial and all fungal PLFA biomarkers decreased after glyphosate treatment compared to the control. These results demonstrate that long-term glyphosate use can affect rhizosphere bacterial activities and potentially shift bacterial community composition favoring more glyphosate-tolerant bacteria. PMID:26901800

  7. Changes in rhizosphere bacterial gene expression following glyphosate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Molli M; Lorenz, Nicola; Hoilett, Nigel; Lee, Nathan R; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-05-15

    In commercial agriculture, populations and interactions of rhizosphere microflora are potentially affected by the use of specific agrichemicals, possibly by affecting gene expression in these organisms. To investigate this, we examined changes in bacterial gene expression within the rhizosphere of glyphosate-tolerant corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) in response to long-term glyphosate (PowerMAX™, Monsanto Company, MO, USA) treatment. A long-term glyphosate application study was carried out using rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions with soil previously having no history of glyphosate exposure. Rhizosphere soil was collected from the rhizoboxes after four growing periods. Soil microbial community composition was analyzed using microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Total RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil, and samples were analyzed using RNA-Seq analysis. A total of 20-28 million bacterial sequences were obtained for each sample. Transcript abundance was compared between control and glyphosate-treated samples using edgeR. Overall rhizosphere bacterial metatranscriptomes were dominated by transcripts related to RNA and carbohydrate metabolism. We identified 67 differentially expressed bacterial transcripts from the rhizosphere. Transcripts downregulated following glyphosate treatment involved carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and upregulated transcripts involved protein metabolism and respiration. Additionally, bacterial transcripts involving nutrients, including iron, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, were also affected by long-term glyphosate application. Overall, most bacterial and all fungal PLFA biomarkers decreased after glyphosate treatment compared to the control. These results demonstrate that long-term glyphosate use can affect rhizosphere bacterial activities and potentially shift bacterial community composition favoring more glyphosate-tolerant bacteria.

  8. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  9. Ndk, a novel host-responsive regulator, negatively regulates bacterial virulence through quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua; Xiong, Junzhi; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Xiaomei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Xu, Xiaohui; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Xie, Wei; Sheng, Halei; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Le; Rao, Xiancai; Zhang, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria could adjust gene expression to enable their survival in the distinct host environment. However, the mechanism by which bacteria adapt to the host environment is not well described. In this study, we demonstrated that nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is critical for adjusting the bacterial virulence determinants during infection. Ndk expression was down-regulated in the pulmonary alveoli of a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Knockout of ndk up-regulated transcription factor ExsA-mediated T3S regulon expression and decreased exoproduct-related gene expression through the inhibition of the quorum sensing hierarchy. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the ndk mutant exhibits enhanced cytotoxicity and host pathogenicity by increasing T3SS proteins. Taken together, our data reveal that ndk is a critical novel host-responsive gene required for coordinating P. aeruginosa virulence upon acute infection. PMID:27345215

  10. Ndk, a novel host-responsive regulator, negatively regulates bacterial virulence through quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua; Xiong, Junzhi; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Xiaomei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Xu, Xiaohui; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Xie, Wei; Sheng, Halei; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Le; Rao, Xiancai; Zhang, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria could adjust gene expression to enable their survival in the distinct host environment. However, the mechanism by which bacteria adapt to the host environment is not well described. In this study, we demonstrated that nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is critical for adjusting the bacterial virulence determinants during infection. Ndk expression was down-regulated in the pulmonary alveoli of a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Knockout of ndk up-regulated transcription factor ExsA-mediated T3S regulon expression and decreased exoproduct-related gene expression through the inhibition of the quorum sensing hierarchy. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the ndk mutant exhibits enhanced cytotoxicity and host pathogenicity by increasing T3SS proteins. Taken together, our data reveal that ndk is a critical novel host-responsive gene required for coordinating P. aeruginosa virulence upon acute infection. PMID:27345215

  11. Regulation of Bacterial Virulence by Csr (Rsm) Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Potts, Anastasia H.; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Romeo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional...

  12. Interplay between genetic regulation of phosphate homeostasis and bacterial virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Chekabab, Samuel Mohammed; Harel, Josée; Dozois, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens, including those of humans, animals, and plants, encounter phosphate (Pi)-limiting or Pi-rich environments in the host, depending on the site of infection. The environmental Pi-concentration results in modulation of expression of the Pho regulon that allows bacteria to regulate phosphate assimilation pathways accordingly. In many cases, modulation of Pho regulon expression also results in concomitant changes in virulence phenotypes. Under Pi-limiting conditions, bacteria u...

  13. Evolution of bacterial trp operons and their regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Enrique; Jensen, Roy A; Yanofsky, Charles

    2008-04-01

    Survival and replication of most bacteria require the ability to synthesize the amino acid L-tryptophan whenever it is not available from the environment. In this article we describe the genes, operons, proteins, and reactions involved in tryptophan biosynthesis in bacteria, and the mechanisms they use in regulating tryptophan formation. We show that although the reactions of tryptophan biosynthesis are essentially identical, gene organization varies among species--from whole-pathway operons to completely dispersed genes. We also show that the regulatory mechanisms used for these genes vary greatly. We address the question--what are some potential advantages of the gene organization and regulation variation associated with this conserved, important pathway? PMID:18374625

  14. Gene Expression Variability Underlies Adaptive Resistance in Phenotypically Heterogeneous Bacterial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E; Otoupal, Peter B; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-11-13

    The root cause of the antibiotic resistance crisis is the ability of bacteria to evolve resistance to a multitude of antibiotics and other environmental toxins. The regulation of adaptation is difficult to pinpoint due to extensive phenotypic heterogeneity arising during evolution. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying general bacterial adaptation by evolving wild-type Escherichia coli populations to dissimilar chemical toxins. We demonstrate the presence of extensive inter- and intrapopulation phenotypic heterogeneity across adapted populations in multiple traits, including minimum inhibitory concentration, growth rate, and lag time. To search for a common response across the heterogeneous adapted populations, we measured gene expression in three stress-response networks: the mar regulon, the general stress response, and the SOS response. While few genes were differentially expressed, clustering revealed that interpopulation gene expression variability in adapted populations was distinct from that of unadapted populations. Notably, we observed both increases and decreases in gene expression variability upon adaptation. Sequencing select genes revealed that the observed gene expression trends are not necessarily attributable to genetic changes. To further explore the connection between gene expression variability and adaptation, we propagated single-gene knockout and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) interference strains and quantified impact on adaptation to antibiotics. We identified significant correlations that suggest genes with low expression variability have greater impact on adaptation. This study provides evidence that gene expression variability can be used as an indicator of bacterial adaptive resistance, even in the face of the pervasive phenotypic heterogeneity underlying adaptation. PMID:27623410

  15. Use of bacterially expressed dsRNA to downregulate Entamoeba histolytica gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Solis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modern RNA interference (RNAi methodologies using small interfering RNA (siRNA oligonucleotide duplexes or episomally synthesized hairpin RNA are valuable tools for the analysis of gene function in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. However, these approaches still require time-consuming procedures including transfection and drug selection, or costly synthetic molecules. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an efficient and handy alternative for E. histolytica gene down-regulation mediated by bacterial double-stranded RNA (dsRNA targeting parasite genes. The Escherichia coli strain HT115 which is unable to degrade dsRNA, was genetically engineered to produce high quantities of long dsRNA segments targeting the genes that encode E. histolytica beta-tubulin and virulence factor KERP1. Trophozoites cultured in vitro were directly fed with dsRNA-expressing bacteria or soaked with purified dsRNA. Both dsRNA delivery methods resulted in significant reduction of protein expression. In vitro host cell-parasite assays showed that efficient downregulation of kerp1 gene expression mediated by bacterial dsRNA resulted in significant reduction of parasite adhesion and lytic capabilities, thus supporting a major role for KERP1 in the pathogenic process. Furthermore, treatment of trophozoites cultured in microtiter plates, with a repertoire of eighty-five distinct bacterial dsRNA segments targeting E. histolytica genes with unknown function, led to the identification of three genes potentially involved in the growth of the parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the use of bacterial dsRNA is a powerful method for the study of gene function in E. histolytica. This dsRNA delivery method is also technically suitable for the study of a large number of genes, thus opening interesting perspectives for the identification of novel drug and vaccine targets.

  16. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  17. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Futahashi

    Full Text Available The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  18. Identifying essential genes in bacterial metabolic networks with machine learning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eils Roland

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying essential genes in bacteria supports to identify potential drug targets and an understanding of minimal requirements for a synthetic cell. However, experimentally assaying the essentiality of their coding genes is resource intensive and not feasible for all bacterial organisms, in particular if they are infective. Results We developed a machine learning technique to identify essential genes using the experimental data of genome-wide knock-out screens from one bacterial organism to infer essential genes of another related bacterial organism. We used a broad variety of topological features, sequence characteristics and co-expression properties potentially associated with essentiality, such as flux deviations, centrality, codon frequencies of the sequences, co-regulation and phyletic retention. An organism-wise cross-validation on bacterial species yielded reliable results with good accuracies (area under the receiver-operator-curve of 75% - 81%. Finally, it was applied to drug target predictions for Salmonella typhimurium. We compared our predictions to the viability of experimental knock-outs of S. typhimurium and identified 35 enzymes, which are highly relevant to be considered as potential drug targets. Specifically, we detected promising drug targets in the non-mevalonate pathway. Conclusions Using elaborated features characterizing network topology, sequence information and microarray data enables to predict essential genes from a bacterial reference organism to a related query organism without any knowledge about the essentiality of genes of the query organism. In general, such a method is beneficial for inferring drug targets when experimental data about genome-wide knockout screens is not available for the investigated organism.

  19. Evolution of bacterial trp operons and their regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Merino, Enrique; Jensen, Roy A.; Yanofsky, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Survival and replication of most bacteria require the ability to synthesize the amino acid L-tryptophan whenever it is not available from the environment. In this article we describe the genes, operons, proteins, and reactions involved in tryptophan biosynthesis in bacteria, and the mechanisms they use in regulating tryptophan formation. We show that although the reactions of tryptophan biosynthesis are essentially identical, gene organization varies among species - from whole-pathway operons...

  20. Regulation of the genes involved in nitrification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, D.J.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.

    2003-08-14

    OAK-B135 This project focuses on the characterization of the regulation of the genes involved in nitrification in the bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The key genes in the nitrification pathway, amo and hao, are present in multiple copies in the genome. The promoters for these genes were identified and characterized. It was shown that there were some differences in the transcriptional regulation of the copies of these genes.

  1. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Nakashima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption, knock-in (insertion, and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering.

  2. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WU Chao; LIU Mei; LIU Xu-ri; Hu Guo-cheng; SI Hua-min; SUN Zong-xiu; LIU Wen-zhen; Fu Ya-ping

    2011-01-01

    Antimierobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity.Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis) were integrated into Oryza sativa L.subsp.japonica cv.Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system.PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation,respectively.RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation,and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants.Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with ×anthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae strain CR4,and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4.The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2,Zhe 173 and OS-225.It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  3. Evaluating the consistency of gene sets used in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintle Nathan L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analyses of whole genome expression data require functional information about genes in order to yield meaningful biological conclusions. The Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG are common sources of functionally grouped gene sets. For bacteria, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide alternative, complementary sources of gene sets. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the data obtained from these resources has been performed. Results We define a series of gene set consistency metrics directly related to the most common classes of statistical analyses for gene expression data, and then perform a comprehensive analysis of 3581 Affymetrix® gene expression arrays across 17 diverse bacteria. We find that gene sets obtained from GO and KEGG demonstrate lower consistency than those obtained from the SEED and MicrobesOnline, regardless of gene set size. Conclusions Despite the widespread use of GO and KEGG gene sets in bacterial gene expression data analysis, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide more consistent sets for a wide variety of statistical analyses. Increased use of the SEED and MicrobesOnline gene sets in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data may improve statistical power and utility of expression data.

  4. Bacterial reference genes for gene expression studies by RT-qPCR: survey and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Danilo J P; Santos, Carolina S; Pacheco, Luis G C

    2015-09-01

    The appropriate choice of reference genes is essential for accurate normalization of gene expression data obtained by the method of reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). In 2009, a guideline called the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) highlighted the importance of the selection and validation of more than one suitable reference gene for obtaining reliable RT-qPCR results. Herein, we searched the recent literature in order to identify the bacterial reference genes that have been most commonly validated in gene expression studies by RT-qPCR (in the first 5 years following publication of the MIQE guidelines). Through a combination of different search parameters with the text mining tool MedlineRanker, we identified 145 unique bacterial genes that were recently tested as candidate reference genes. Of these, 45 genes were experimentally validated and, in most of the cases, their expression stabilities were verified using the software tools geNorm and NormFinder. It is noteworthy that only 10 of these reference genes had been validated in two or more of the studies evaluated. An enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology classifications demonstrated that genes belonging to the functional categories of DNA Replication (GO: 0006260) and Transcription (GO: 0006351) rendered a proportionally higher number of validated reference genes. Three genes in the former functional class were also among the top five most stable genes identified through an analysis of gene expression data obtained from the Pathosystems Resource Integration Center. These results may provide a guideline for the initial selection of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in several different bacterial species. PMID:26149127

  5. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations.

  6. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  7. Regulating gene expression : surprises still in store

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Nap, Jan-Peter

    2004-01-01

    Understanding how genes constitute and contribute to the regulatory networks that result in phenotypic diversity is the major challenge of the post-genome era. Recently, it has been shown that major players in gene regulation can be identified by genome-wide linkage analysis of whole-genome gene exp

  8. Quantitative characteristics of gene regulation by small RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erel Levine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of small RNAs (sRNAs have been shown to regulate critical pathways in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In bacteria, regulation by trans-encoded sRNAs is predominantly found in the coordination of intricate stress responses. The mechanisms by which sRNAs modulate expression of its targets are diverse. In common to most is the possibility that interference with the translation of mRNA targets may also alter the abundance of functional sRNAs. Aiming to understand the unique role played by sRNAs in gene regulation, we studied examples from two distinct classes of bacterial sRNAs in Escherichia coli using a quantitative approach combining experiment and theory. Our results demonstrate that sRNA provides a novel mode of gene regulation, with characteristics distinct from those of protein-mediated gene regulation. These include a threshold-linear response with a tunable threshold, a robust noise resistance characteristic, and a built-in capability for hierarchical cross-talk. Knowledge of these special features of sRNA-mediated regulation may be crucial toward understanding the subtle functions that sRNAs can play in coordinating various stress-relief pathways. Our results may also help guide the design of synthetic genetic circuits that have properties difficult to attain with protein regulators alone.

  9. Identification of let-7-regulated oncofetal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyerinas, Benjamin; Park, Sun-Mi; Shomron, Noam;

    2008-01-01

    -regulated at the end of embryonic development. Let-7 is often down-regulated early during cancer development, suggesting that let-7-regulated oncofetal genes (LOG) may become reexpressed in cancer cells. Using comparative bioinformatics, we have identified 12 conserved LOGs that include HMGA2 and IMP-1/CRD-BP. IMP-1...

  10. Structural Mechanisms of Peptide Recognition and Allosteric Modulation of Gene Regulation by the RRNPP Family of Quorum-Sensing Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hackwon; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2016-07-17

    The members of RRNPP family of bacterial regulators sense population density-specific secreted oligopeptides and modulate the expression of genes involved in cellular processes, such as sporulation, competence, virulence, biofilm formation, conjugative plasmid transfer and antibiotic resistance. Signaling by RRNPP regulators include several steps: generation and secretion of the signaling oligopeptides, re-internalization of the signaling molecules into the cytoplasm, signal sensing by the cytosolic RRNPP regulators, signal-specific allosteric structural changes in the regulators, and interaction of the regulators with their respective regulatory target and gene regulation. The recently determined structures of the RRNPP regulators provide insight into the mechanistic aspects for several steps in this signaling circuit. In this review, we discuss the structural principles underlying peptide specificity, regulatory target recognition, and ligand-induced allostery in RRNPP regulators and its impact on gene regulation. Despite the conserved tertiary structure of these regulators, structural analyses revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanism of activation and molecular strategies that couple the peptide-induced allostery to gene regulation. Although these structural studies provide a sophisticated understanding of gene regulation by RRNPP regulators, much needs to be learned regarding the target DNA binding by yet-to-be characterized RNPP regulators and the several aspects of signaling by Rgg regulators. PMID:27283781

  11. Performance of resistance gene pyramids to races of rice bacterial blight in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGKangle; ZHUANGJieyun; WANGHanrong

    1998-01-01

    The effect of gene pyramiding on resistance to bacterial blight (BB) in rice was evahlated among the IR24-based near isogenic lines conraining single resistance gene and gene pyramids containing two, three or lour resistancegenes (see table).

  12. Multiple gene sequence analysis using genes of the bacterial DNA repair pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Rotelok Neto; Carolina Weigert Galvão; Leonardo Magalhães Cruz; Dieval Guizelini; Leilane Caline Silva; Jarem Raul Garcia; Rafael Mazer Etto

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recognize and repair abnormal DNA structures is common to all forms of life. Physiological studies and genomic sequencing of a variety of bacterial species have identified an incredible diversity of DNA repair pathways. Despite the amount of available genes in public database, the usual method to place genomes in a taxonomic context is based mainly on the 16S rRNA or housekeeping genes. Thus, the relationships among genomes remain poorly understood. In this work, an approach of...

  13. Carbon and phosphorus regulating bacterial metabolism in oligotrophic boreal lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, L. O.; Graneli, W.; Daniel, C. B.;

    2011-01-01

    -P and glucose-C alone or in combination (0.01 and 0.3 mg L(-1), respectively) was added to 1.0 mu m filtered lake water and incubated in darkness at 20 degrees C. Additions of glucose (C) and phosphorus (P) alone did not lead to changes in the rates of bacterial metabolic processes, whereas bacterial...... respiration and bacterial production responded positively to C + P enrichment for most of the lakes sampled. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (2.5-28.7%) and low mean value (12%). These variations were not correlated with the DOC concentration. Our results show that heterotrophic bacterial...

  14. GREAT: GENE REGULATION EVALUATION TOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Cátia Maria, 1981-

    2009-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Tecnologias de Informação aplicadas às Ciências Biológicas e Médicas. Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2009 A correcta compreensão de como funcionam os sistemas biológicos depende do estudo dos mecanismos que regulam a expressão genética. Estes mecanismos controlam em que momento e durante quanto tempo é utilizada a informação codificada num gene, e podem actuar em diversas etapas do processo de expressão genética. No presente trabalho, a etapa em análise é ...

  15. Genes but not genomes reveal bacterial domestication of Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Passerini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between "environmental" strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and "domesticated" strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the "domesticated" strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable

  16. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  17. Regulation of bacterial RecA protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    The RecA protein is a recombinase functioning in recombinational DNA repair in bacteria. RecA is regulated at many levels. The expression of the recA gene is regulated within the SOS response. The activity of the RecA protein itself is autoregulated by its own C-terminus. RecA is also regulated by the action of other proteins. To date, these include the RecF, RecO, RecR, DinI, RecX, RdgC, PsiB, and UvrD proteins. The SSB protein also indirectly affects RecA function by competing for ssDNA binding sites. The RecO and RecR, and possibly the RecF proteins, all facilitate RecA loading onto SSB-coated ssDNA. The RecX protein blocks RecA filament extension, and may have other effects on RecA activity. The DinI protein stabilizes RecA filaments. The RdgC protein binds to dsDNA and blocks RecA access to dsDNA. The PsiB protein, encoded by F plasmids, is uncharacterized, but may inhibit RecA in some manner. The UvrD helicase removes RecA filaments from RecA. All of these proteins function in a network that determines where and how RecA functions. Additional regulatory proteins may remain to be discovered. The elaborate regulatory pattern is likely to be reprised for RecA homologues in archaeans and eukaryotes. PMID:17364684

  18. A new experimental approach for studying bacterial genomic island evolution identifies island genes with bacterial host-specific expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickerson Cheryl A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic islands are regions of bacterial genomes that have been acquired by horizontal transfer and often contain blocks of genes that function together for specific processes. Recently, it has become clear that the impact of genomic islands on the evolution of different bacterial species is significant and represents a major force in establishing bacterial genomic variation. However, the study of genomic island evolution has been mostly performed at the sequence level using computer software or hybridization analysis to compare different bacterial genomic sequences. We describe here a novel experimental approach to study the evolution of species-specific bacterial genomic islands that identifies island genes that have evolved in such a way that they are differentially-expressed depending on the bacterial host background into which they are transferred. Results We demonstrate this approach by using a "test" genomic island that we have cloned from the Salmonella typhimurium genome (island 4305 and transferred to a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts of differing evolutionary relationships to S. typhimurium. Systematic analysis of the expression of the island genes in the different hosts compared to proper controls allowed identification of genes with genera-specific expression patterns. The data from the analysis can be arranged in a matrix to give an expression "array" of the island genes in the different bacterial backgrounds. A conserved 19-bp DNA site was found upstream of at least two of the differentially-expressed island genes. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of horizontally-transferred genomic island gene expression in a broad range of Gram negative hosts. We also present evidence in this study that the IS200 element found in island 4305 in S. typhimurium strain LT2 was inserted after the island had already been acquired by the S. typhimurium lineage and that this element is likely not

  19. Classroom Activities to Engage Students and Promote Critical Thinking about Genetic Regulation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Aebli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an interactive activity to mimic bacterial quorum sensing, and a classroom worksheet to promote critical thinking about genetic regulation of the lux operon. The interactive quorum sensing activity engages students and provides a direct visualization of how population density functions to influence light production in bacteria. The worksheet activity consists of practice problems that require students to apply basic knowledge of the lux operon in order to make predictions about genetic complementation experiments, and students must evaluate how genetic mutations in the lux operon affect gene expression and overall phenotype. The worksheet promotes critical thinking and problem solving skills, and emphasizes the roles of diffusible signaling molecules, regulatory proteins, and structural proteins in quorum sensing.

  20. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Nóbrega Dourado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol, respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones and plant exudates (including ethanol in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF, adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss, to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU. Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization, which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  1. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:24688531

  2. mutL Gene:a Spontaneous Molecular Switch to Regulate Bacterial Genetic Stability%mutL基因:自发调节细菌遗传稳定性的分子开关

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芳; 刘树林

    2008-01-01

    MutL is one of the core proteins involved in mismatch repair(MMR).It is a weak AT-Pase and binds nonspecifically to DNA.It has been deemed a"matchmaker"as it interacts with.and in some cases stimulates,the activity of a large number of proteins,such as MutS,MutH,UwD and B clamp.Defects in mutL gene result in significantly increased rates of spontaneous mutation and horncologous recombi_nation in bacteria.Recently,we have identified a deletion of one of three tandem 6 bp repeats within mutL(6 bp AmutL)in Salmonella typhimurium LT7.This defect is associated with genome diversification of LT7 and contributed greatly to genetic instability.As the conversion between mutL and 6 bp △mutL could take place spontaneously,we propose that the mutL gene may play a role as a molecular switch to regulate the function of MMR and,especially,the genetic stability of bacteria in adaptation to changing environments.%MutL是错配修复(mismatch repair,MMR)系统的关键组分之一,它具有较弱的AT-Pase活性并能非特异性结合DNA.由于MutL与其他MMR蛋白如MutS、MutH、UvrD及B clamp等之间存在广泛的相互作用,并能在一定程度上刺激它们活性.因此,MutL被广泛认为是MMR过程中关键的分子媒娘.mutL基因缺陷的菌株具有显著增高的自发突变率和同源重组频率.最近,我们在鼠伤寒沙门菌m高变异株的mutL基因中发现一个6碱基串联重复序列的缺失,这种缺陷型mutL(6h·p△mutL)基因可大大促进细菌基因结构的多样化和遗传的不稳定性,并能与mutL自发相互转化.因此,我们认为,mutL可通过这种转化适时而精确地调控MMR系统功能,从而在细菌进化过程充当自发调控遗传稳定性的分子开关.

  3. Role of bacterial infection in the epigenetic regulation of Wnt antagonist WIF1 by PRC2 protein EZH2

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Badal C.; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Hester, Christina; Greiner, K. Allen; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Anant, Shrikant; Umar, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancer of Zeste Homolog-2 (EZH2) represses gene transcription through histone H3 lysine-27-trimethylation (H3K27me3). Citrobacter rodentium (CR) promotes crypt hyperplasia and tumorigenesis by aberrantly regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We aimed at investigating EZH2’s role in epigenetically regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling following bacterial infection. NIH:Swiss outbred and Apc Min/+ mice were infected with CR (108cfu); BLT1−/−ApcMin/+ mice, AOM/DSS-treated mice and de-identified...

  4. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  5. Primary study on the resistance to bacterial blight (X. oryzae) in Cecropin B gene transgenic rices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAZhihua; HUANGDanian; XUERui; WANGXiaoling; GAOZhenya

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) is one of the major diseases to rice. Antibacterial Cecropin B gene has been cloned and transformed into rice. We studied the resistance to bacterial blight in Cecropin B gene tronsgenic rices.

  6. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Gomez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

  7. Transposable element origins of epigenetic gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisch, Damon; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2011-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are massively abundant and unstable in all plant genomes, but are mostly silent because of epigenetic suppression. Because all known epigenetic pathways act on all TEs, it is likely that the specialized epigenetic regulation of regular host genes (RHGs) was co-opted from this ubiquitous need for the silencing of TEs and viruses. With their internally repetitive and rearranging structures, and the acquisition of fragments of RHGs, the expression of TEs commonly makes antisense RNAs for both TE genes and RHGs. These antisense RNAs, particularly from heterochromatic reservoirs of 'zombie' TEs that are rearranged to form variously internally repetitive structures, may be advantageous because their induction will help rapidly suppress active TEs of the same family. RHG fragments within rapidly rearranging TEs may also provide the raw material for the ongoing generation of miRNA genes. TE gene expression is regulated by both environmental and developmental signals, and insertions can place nearby RHGs under the regulation (both standard and epigenetic) of the TE. The ubiquity of TEs, their frequent preferential association with RHGs, and their ability to be programmed by epigenetic signals all indicate that RGHs have nearly unlimited access to novel regulatory cassettes to assist plant adaptation. PMID:21444239

  8. Steroid hormone signaling is essential to regulate innate immune cells and fight bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Regan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling immunity and development is essential to ensure survival despite changing internal conditions in the organism. Drosophila metamorphosis represents a striking example of drastic and systemic physiological changes that need to be integrated with the innate immune system. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms that coordinate development and immune cell activity in the transition from larva to adult. Here, we reveal that regulation of macrophage-like cells (hemocytes by the steroid hormone ecdysone is essential for an effective innate immune response over metamorphosis. Although it is generally accepted that steroid hormones impact immunity in mammals, their action on monocytes (e.g. macrophages and neutrophils is still not well understood. Here in a simpler model system, we used an approach that allows in vivo, cell autonomous analysis of hormonal regulation of innate immune cells, by combining genetic manipulation with flow cytometry, high-resolution time-lapse imaging and tissue-specific transcriptomic analysis. We show that in response to ecdysone, hemocytes rapidly upregulate actin dynamics, motility and phagocytosis of apoptotic corpses, and acquire the ability to chemotax to damaged epithelia. Most importantly, individuals lacking ecdysone-activated hemocytes are defective in bacterial phagocytosis and are fatally susceptible to infection by bacteria ingested at larval stages, despite the normal systemic and local production of antimicrobial peptides. This decrease in survival is comparable to the one observed in pupae lacking immune cells altogether, indicating that ecdysone-regulation is essential for hemocyte immune functions and survival after infection. Microarray analysis of hemocytes revealed a large set of genes regulated at metamorphosis by EcR signaling, among which many are known to function in cell motility, cell shape or phagocytosis. This study demonstrates an important role for steroid hormone regulation of

  9. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in the Genus Erwinia: Physiology and Regulation of Efflux Pump Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkiniath, J; Ravirala, R; San Francisco, M

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens belonging to the genus Erwinia cause diseases in several economically important plants. Plants respond to bacterial infection with a powerful chemical arsenal and signaling molecules to rid themselves of the microbes. Although our understanding of how Erwinia initiate infections in plants has become clear, a comprehensive understanding of how these bacteria rid themselves of noxious antimicrobial agents during the infection is important. Multidrug efflux pumps are key factors in bacterial resistance toward antibiotics by reducing the level of antimicrobial compounds in the bacterial cell. Erwinia induce the expression of efflux pump genes in response to plant-derived antimicrobials. The capability of Erwinia to co-opt plant defense signaling molecules such as salicylic acid to trigger multidrug efflux pumps might have developed to ensure bacterial survival in susceptible host plants. In this review, we discuss the developments in Erwinia efflux pumps, focusing in particular on efflux pump function and the regulation of efflux pump gene expression. PMID:27571694

  10. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms. PMID:26518266

  11. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms.

  12. Promoter architectures and developmental gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, Vanja; Lenhard, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Core promoters are minimal regions sufficient to direct accurate initiation of transcription and are crucial for regulation of gene expression. They are highly diverse in terms of associated core promoter motifs, underlying sequence composition and patterns of transcription initiation. Distinctive features of promoters are also seen at the chromatin level, including nucleosome positioning patterns and presence of specific histone modifications. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing promoters using next-generation sequencing-based technologies have provided the basis for their classification into functional groups and have shed light on their modes of regulation, with important implications for transcriptional regulation in development. This review discusses the methodology and the results of genome-wide studies that provided insight into the diversity of RNA polymerase II promoter architectures in vertebrates and other Metazoa, and the association of these architectures with distinct modes of regulation in embryonic development and differentiation. PMID:26783721

  13. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  14. Synthetic RNAs for gene regulation: design principles and computational tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eLaganà

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies, but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA, artificial microRNA (a-miR and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  15. Novel TetR family transcriptional factor regulates expression of multiple transport-related genes and affects rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    OpenAIRE

    Huicong Liu; Min Yang; Zheng-Guo He

    2016-01-01

    Transport-related genes significantly affect bacterial antibiotic resistance. However, the effects of these genes and their regulation of bacterial drug resistance in several mycobacterial species, including the fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis, the pathogen M. tuberculosis and M. avium have not been clearly characterized. We identified Ms4022 (MSMEG_4022) as a novel TetR family regulator that activates the expression of seven transport-related genes and affects drug resistance in M. smeg...

  16. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.;

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...

  17. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  18. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Viswakarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, β (also known as δ, and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP/thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220/mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1 may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism.

  19. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  20. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Gorrell, Rebecca J; Steen, Jason A; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Kwok, Terry; Grimmond, Sean M; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Jennings, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes) that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression). In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M) system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion"), via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates). Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis. PMID:22162751

  1. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  2. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRISM...... modeling and three-state versions of the five model structures. The models are all represented as probabilistic logic programs and evaluated using the PRISM machine learning system in terms of statistical information criteria and gene-finding prediction accuracy, in two bacterial genomes. Neither of our......, a probabilistic dialect of Prolog. Results: We evaluate Hidden Markov Model structures for bacterial protein-coding gene potential, including a simple null model structure, three structures based on existing bacterial gene finders and two novel model structures. We test standard versions as well as ADPH length...

  3. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  4. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  5. Molecular methods for bacterial genotyping and analyzed gene regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Yıldırım1, Seval Cing Yıldırım2, Nadir Koçak3

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strain typing is an important process for diagnosis, treatment and epidemiological investigations. Current bacterial strain typing methods may be classified into two main categories: phenotyping and genotyping. Phenotypic characters are the reflection of genetic contents. Genotyping, which refers discrimination of bacterial strains based on their genetic content, has recently become widely used for bacterial strain typing. The methods already used in genotypingof bacteria are quite different from each other. In this review we tried to summarize the basic principles of DNA-based methods used in genotyping of bacteria and describe some important DNA regions that are used in genotyping of bacteria. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011;1(1:42-46.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  7. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  8. Computational design of a Zn2+ receptor that controls bacterial gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, M. A.; Looger, L. L.; Hellinga, H. W.

    2003-09-01

    The control of cellular physiology and gene expression in response to extracellular signals is a basic property of living systems. We have constructed a synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathway in which gene expression is controlled by extracellular Zn2+. In this system a computationally designed Zn2+-binding periplasmic receptor senses the extracellular solute and triggers a two-component signal transduction pathway via a chimeric transmembrane protein, resulting in transcriptional up-regulation of a -galactosidase reporter gene. The Zn2+-binding site in the designed receptor is based on a four-coordinate, tetrahedral primary coordination sphere consisting of histidines and glutamates. In addition, mutations were introduced in a secondary coordination sphere to satisfy the residual hydrogen-bonding potential of the histidines coordinated to the metal. The importance of the secondary shell interactions is demonstrated by their effect on metal affinity and selectivity, as well as protein stability. Three designed protein sequences, comprising two distinct metal-binding positions, were all shown to bind Zn2+ and to function in the cell-based assay, indicating the generality of the design methodology. These experiments demonstrate that biological systems can be manipulated with computationally designed proteins that have drastically altered ligand-binding specificities, thereby extending the repertoire of genetic control by extracellular signals.

  9. Hydrological pulse regulating the bacterial heterotrophic metabolism between Amazonian mainstems and floodplain lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Oliveira Vidal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated in situ rates of bacterial carbon processing in Amazonian floodplain lakes and mainstems, during both high and low water phases (p < 0.05. Our results showed that Bacterial Production (BP was lower and more variable than Bacterial Respiration (BR, determined as total respiration. Bacterial Carbon Demand (BCD was mostly accounted by BR and presented the same pattern that BR in both water phases. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (0.2–23% and low mean value of 3 and 6 %, (in high and low water respectively suggesting that dissolved organic carbon (DOC was mostly allocated to catabolic metabolism. However, BGE was regulated by BP in low water phase. Consequently, changes in BGE showed the same pattern that BP. In addition, the hydrological pulse effects on mainstems and floodplains lakes connectivity were found for BP and BGE in low water. Multiple correlation analyses revealed that indexes of organic matter quality (chlorophyll-a, N stable isotopes and C/N ratios were the strongest seasonal drivers of bacterial carbon metabolism. Our work indicated that: (1 the bacterial metabolism was mostly driven by respiration in Amazonian aquatic ecosystems resulting in low BGE in either high and low water phase; (2 the hydrological pulse regulated

  10. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  11. [Advances in the application research of bacterial ice nucleation active (ina) genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chao-Rong; Sun, Fu-Zai; Zhao, Ting-Chang

    2002-07-01

    For recent years, the research has been focused on the ina gene application in the field of biological ice nucleation. This paper reviewed the application of ina genes in bacterial cell surface display, construction of reporter gene systems, killing insect pests through induced freezing, sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria contaminating foods, breeding of cold resistant varieties. A brief introduction of the ina gene application in killing insect pests in China was also made in this review. PMID:12385233

  12. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  13. Genes regulated by androgen in the rat ventral prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhou; Tufts, Rachel; Haleem, Riffat; Cai, Xiaoyan

    1997-01-01

    Genes that are regulated by androgen in the prostate were studied in the rat. Four of the less than 10 genes that are down-regulated by androgen in the ventral prostate of a 7-day castrated rat were identified; their mRNAs decayed with identical kinetics. Twenty-five of the estimated 56 genes that are up-regulated by androgen in the castrated prostate have been isolated. The up-regulated genes fall into two kinetic types. Early genes are significantly up-regulated by 6.5 hr whereas the delaye...

  14. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ambite

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an

  15. Using bacterial extract along with differential gene expression in Acropora millepora larvae to decouple the processes of attachment and metamorphosis.

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    Nachshon Siboni

    Full Text Available Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP, isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100% with little or no attachment (0-2%. To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI, selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05 in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05 following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that

  16. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  17. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo; Tong, Shurong;

    2011-01-01

    To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene ...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  18. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E

    1993-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated in the carotid body, sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla by hypoxia. We found that a reduction in oxygen tension from 21% to 10% caused a substantial increase (200% at 1 hour and 500% at 6 hours exposure) in the concentration of TH mRNA in carotid body type I cells but not in either the sympathetic ganglia or adrenal gland. In addition, we found that hypercapnia, another natural stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to enhance TH mRNA in type I cells. Removal of the sensory and sympathetic innervation of the carotid body failed to prevent the induction of TH mRNA by hypoxia in type I cells. Our results show that TH gene expression is regulated by hypoxia in the carotid body but not in other peripheral catecholamine synthesizing tissue and that the regulatory mechanism is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:7909954

  19. Seasonal changes in nitrogen-cycle gene abundances and in bacterial communities in acidic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Yeom, Jinki; Han, Jiwon; Kim, Jisun; Park, Woojun

    2012-06-01

    The abundance of genes related to the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle and the microbial community in forest soils (bacteria, archaea, fungi) were quantitatively analyzed via real-time PCR using 11 sets of specific primers amplifying nifH, bacterial amoA, archaeal amoA, narG, nirS, nirK, norB, nosZ, bacterial 16S rRNA gene, archaeal 16S rRNA gene, and the ITS sequence of fungi. Soils were sampled from Bukhan Mountain from September of 2010 to July of 2011 (7 times). Bacteria were the predominant microbial community in all samples. However, the abundance of archaeal amoA was greater than bacterial amoA throughout the year. The abundances of nifH, nirS, nirK, and norB genes changed in a similar pattern, while narG and nosZ appeared in sensitive to the environmental changes. Clone libraries of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were constructed from summer and winter soil samples and these revealed that Acidobacteria was the most predominant phylum in acidic forest soil environments in both samples. Although a specific correlation of environmental factor and gene abundance was not verified by principle component analysis, our data suggested that the combination of biological, physical, and chemical characteristics of forest soils created distinct conditions favoring the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle and that bacterial communities in undisturbed acidic forest soils were quite stable during seasonal change. PMID:22752898

  20. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  1. Gene regulation in parthenocarpic tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Federico; Uratsu, Sandra L; Reagan, Russell L; Chen, Ying; Tricoli, David; Fiehn, Oliver; Rocke, David M; Gasser, Charles S; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2009-01-01

    Parthenocarpy is potentially a desirable trait for many commercially grown fruits if undesirable changes to structure, flavour, or nutrition can be avoided. Parthenocarpic transgenic tomato plants (cv MicroTom) were obtained by the regulation of genes for auxin synthesis (iaaM) or responsiveness (rolB) driven by DefH9 or the INNER NO OUTER (INO) promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana. Fruits at a breaker stage were analysed at a transcriptomic and metabolomic level using microarrays, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a Pegasus III TOF (time of flight) mass spectrometer. Although differences were observed in the shape of fully ripe fruits, no clear correlation could be made between the number of seeds, transgene, and fruit size. Expression of auxin synthesis or responsiveness genes by both of these promoters produced seedless parthenocarpic fruits. Eighty-three percent of the genes measured showed no significant differences in expression due to parthenocarpy. The remaining 17% with significant variation (P parthenocarpy with ovule-specific alteration of auxin synthesis or response driven by the INO promoter could be effectively applied where such changes are commercially desirable. PMID:19700496

  2. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Seth Childers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  3. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

  4. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples.

  5. Exploring the relationship between fractal features and bacterial essential genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Ming, Yu; Li-Cai, Yang; Qian, Zhou; Lu-Lu, Zhao; Zhi-Ping, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Essential genes are indispensable for the survival of an organism in optimal conditions. Rapid and accurate identifications of new essential genes are of great theoretical and practical significance. Exploring features with predictive power is fundamental for this. Here, we calculate six fractal features from primary gene and protein sequences and then explore their relationship with gene essentiality by statistical analysis and machine learning-based methods. The models are applied to all the currently available identified genes in 27 bacteria from the database of essential genes (DEG). It is found that the fractal features of essential genes generally differ from those of non-essential genes. The fractal features are used to ascertain the parameters of two machine learning classifiers: Naïve Bayes and Random Forest. The area under the curve (AUC) of both classifiers show that each fractal feature is satisfactorily discriminative between essential genes and non-essential genes individually. And, although significant correlations exist among fractal features, gene essentiality can also be reliably predicted by various combinations of them. Thus, the fractal features analyzed in our study can be used not only to construct a good essentiality classifier alone, but also to be significant contributors for computational tools identifying essential genes. Project supported by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. ZR2014FM022).

  6. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 gene polymorphism and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Levent; Filik

    2010-01-01

    I read with great interest the article by Gbele et al published in issue 44 of World J Gastroenterol 2009.The results of their study indicate that-2518 Monocyte chemotactic protein-1(MCP-1)genotype AA is a risk factor for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.However,there are some items that need to be discussed.

  7. In vivo endothelial gene regulation in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohet Ralph V

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An authentic survey of the transcript-level response of the diabetic endothelium in vivo is key to understanding diabetic cardiovascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Methods We used streptozotocin to induce a model of type I diabetes in transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter (Tie2-GFP allowing rapid isolation of aortic endothelium. Three weeks after treatment, endothelial cells were isolated from animals with blood glucose > 350 mg/dl. Aortae from the root to the renal bifurcation were rapidly processed by mincing and proteolytic digestion followed by fluorescent activated cell sorting to yield endothelial cell populations of >95% purity. RNA was isolated from >50,000 endothelial cells and subjected to oligo dT amplification prior to transcriptional analysis on microarrays displaying long oligonucleotides representing 32,000 murine transcripts. Five regulated transcripts were selected for analysis by real-time PCR. Results Within replicate microarray experiments, 19 transcripts were apparently dysregulated by at least 70% within diabetic mice. Up-regulation of glycam1, slc36a2, ces3, adipsin and adiponectin was confirmed by real-time PCR. Conclusion By comprehensively examining cellular gene responses in vivo in a whole animal model of type I diabetes, we have identified novel regulation of key endothelial transcripts that likely contribute to the metabolic and pro-inflammatory responses that accompany diabetes.

  8. Ethanolamine Utilization in Bacterial Pathogens: Roles and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Garsin, Danielle A.

    2010-01-01

    Ethanolamine is a compound readily derived from cell membranes that certain bacteria can utilize as a source of carbon and/or nitrogen. The complex biology and chemistry of this process has been investigated since the 1970’s, primarily in one or two species. However, recent investigations into ethanolamine utilization have revealed significant and intriguing differences in gene content and regulatory mechanisms among the bacteria that harbor this catabolic capability. Additionally, many repor...

  9. Regulation of bacterial communities through antimicrobial activity by the coral holobiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvennefors, E Charlotte E; Sampayo, Eugenia; Kerr, Caroline; Vieira, Genyess; Roff, George; Barnes, Andrew C

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between corals and associated bacteria and amongst these bacterial groups are likely to play a key role in coral health. However, the complexity of these interactions is poorly understood. We investigated the functional role of specific coral-associated bacteria in maintaining microbial communities on the coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg 1834) and the ability of coral mucus to support or inhibit bacterial growth. Culture-independent techniques were used to assess bacterial community structures whilst bacterial culture was employed to assess intra- and inter-specific antimicrobial activities of bacteria. Members of Pseudoalteromonas and ribotypes closely related to Vibrio coralliilyticus displayed potent antimicrobial activity against a range of other cultured isolates and grew readily on detached coral mucus. Although such bacterial ribotypes would be expected to have a competitive advantage, they were rare or absent on intact and healthy coral colonies growing in situ (analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing). The most abundant bacterial ribotypes found on healthy corals were Gammaproteobacteria, previously defined as type A coral associates. Our results indicate that this group of bacteria and specific members of the Alphaproteobacteria described here as 'type B associates' may be important functional groups for coral health. We suggest that bacterial communities on coral are kept in check by a combination of host-derived and microbial interactions and that the type A associates in particular may play a key role in maintaining stability of microbial communities on healthy coral colonies. PMID:21984347

  10. Evaluation of the gene encoding the enzyme βHPMEH for the bacterial wilt inhibition caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fernandez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of the devastating bacterial wilt disease that attacks important agricultural crops such as potato, tomato, banana, among others, causing serious yield losses. Control of R. solanacearum is difficult because of its wide range of alternate hosts, its long survival in soil, its biological and genetic variation, the lack of natural resistance sources and the insufficiency of the appropriate chemical control measures. Quorum sensing is the term that describes the phenomenon whereby the accumulation of molecules allows bacteria to know the number of bacteria found in the environment (population density. R. solanacearum has a quorum sensing system for the regulation of the expression of virulence genes; the molecule 3-OH-PAME is the self-regulatory signal. The molecule ΒHPMEH hydrolyzes 3-OH-PAME nullifying the signal of virulence, and thus, the quorum sensing communication in R. solanacearum. In order to evaluate the βhpmeh gene we designed two vectors that express this gene under the control of two different promoters. Both vectors were verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Agroinfiltration assays were used to analyze gene expression and the effect against R. solanacearum in potato (Solanum tuberosum leaves. The results of the transient expression experiments showed that the expression of gene βhpmeh caused a delay in the appearance of symptoms of bacterial wilt and thus is a good candidate for whole genetic plant transformation.

  11. A BAC-bacterial recombination method to generate physically linked multiple gene reporter DNA constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Shiaochin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporter gene mice are valuable animal models for biological research providing a gene expression readout that can contribute to cellular characterization within the context of a developmental process. With the advancement of bacterial recombination techniques to engineer reporter gene constructs from BAC genomic clones and the generation of optically distinguishable fluorescent protein reporter genes, there is an unprecedented capability to engineer more informative transgenic reporter mouse models relative to what has been traditionally available. Results We demonstrate here our first effort on the development of a three stage bacterial recombination strategy to physically link multiple genes together with their respective fluorescent protein (FP reporters in one DNA fragment. This strategy uses bacterial recombination techniques to: (1 subclone genes of interest into BAC linking vectors, (2 insert desired reporter genes into respective genes and (3 link different gene-reporters together. As proof of concept, we have generated a single DNA fragment containing the genes Trap, Dmp1, and Ibsp driving the expression of ECFP, mCherry, and Topaz FP reporter genes, respectively. Using this DNA construct, we have successfully generated transgenic reporter mice that retain two to three gene readouts. Conclusion The three stage methodology to link multiple genes with their respective fluorescent protein reporter works with reasonable efficiency. Moreover, gene linkage allows for their common chromosomal integration into a single locus. However, the testing of this multi-reporter DNA construct by transgenesis does suggest that the linkage of two different genes together, despite their large size, can still create a positional effect. We believe that gene choice, genomic DNA fragment size and the presence of endogenous insulator elements are critical variables.

  12. Overexpression of Bacterial mtlD Gene in Peanut Improves Drought Tolerance through Accumulation of Mannitol

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    Tengale Dipak Bhauso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the changing global environmental scenarios, water scarcity and recurrent drought impose huge reductions to the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. crop yield. In plants, osmotic adjustments associated with efficient free radical scavenging ability during abiotic stress are important components of stress tolerance mechanisms. Mannitol, a compatible solute, is known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals generated during various abiotic stresses, thereby conferring tolerance to water-deficit stress in many plant species. However, peanut plant is not known to synthesize mannitol. Therefore, bacterial mtlD gene coding for mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase under the control of constitutive promoter CaMV35S was introduced and overexpressed in the peanut cv. GG 20 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. A total of eight independent transgenic events were confirmed at molecular level by PCR, Southern blotting, and RT-PCR. Transgenic lines had increased amount of mannitol and exhibited enhanced tolerance in response to water-deficit stress. Improved performance of the mtlD transgenics was indicated by excised-leaf water loss assay and relative water content under water-deficit stress. Better performance of transgenics was due to the ability of the plants to synthesize mannitol. However, regulation of mtlD gene expression in transgenic plants remains to be elucidated.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effect and prostate gene expression profiling of steryl ferulate on experimental rats with non-bacterial prostatitis.

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    Hu, Yinzhou; Xiong, Lina; Huang, Weisu; Cai, Huafang; Luo, Yanxi; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Baiyi

    2014-06-01

    Steryl ferulate (SF) is a bioactive mixture extracted from rice bran and shows higher inhibitory activity against inflammation than the corresponding free sterols. In this study, the aim was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect and prostate gene expression profiling of SF using a Xiaozhiling-induced non-bacterial prostatitis (NBP) rat model. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by prostate weight, prostate index, acid phosphatase, density of lecithin corpuscles (DLC), white blood cell count (WBC), and prostatic histologic section. Prostate gene expression profiling was assessed by a cDNA microarray and validated by quantitative real-time PCR of five selected genes. Pathway analysis and Gene ontology (GO) analysis were applied to determine the roles of these differentially expressed genes involved in these biological pathways or GO terms. SF treatment could significantly inhibit prostate weight, prostate index, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase and WBC, suppress the severity of histological lesion and increase the DLC. Compared with the control group, the SF treatment group contained 238 up-regulated genes and 111 down-regulated genes. GO analysis demonstrated that the most significant expression genes were closely related to the terms of fibrinolysis, inflammatory response, high-density lipoprotein particle, protein-lipid complex, enzyme inhibitor activity, peptidase inhibitor activity and others. Canonical pathway analysis indicated five pathways were significantly regulated, which were associated with inflammation and tumorgenesis. In conclusion, SF may be used as a health supplement to prevent NBP, in that it could inhibit prostate inflammation in NBP patients by affecting the expression of genes in the related GO terms and pathways. PMID:24686498

  14. Computational bacterial genome-wide analysis of phylogenetic profiles reveals potential virulence genes of Streptococcus agalactiae.

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    Frank Po-Yen Lin

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic profile of a gene is a reflection of its evolutionary history and can be defined as the differential presence or absence of a gene in a set of reference genomes. It has been employed to facilitate the prediction of gene functions. However, the hypothesis that the application of this concept can also facilitate the discovery of bacterial virulence factors has not been fully examined. In this paper, we test this hypothesis and report a computational pipeline designed to identify previously unknown bacterial virulence genes using group B streptococcus (GBS as an example. Phylogenetic profiles of all GBS genes across 467 bacterial reference genomes were determined by candidate-against-all BLAST searches,which were then used to identify candidate virulence genes by machine learning models. Evaluation experiments with known GBS virulence genes suggested good functional and model consistency in cross-validation analyses (areas under ROC curve, 0.80 and 0.98 respectively. Inspection of the top-10 genes in each of the 15 virulence functional groups revealed at least 15 (of 119 homologous genes implicated in virulence in other human pathogens but previously unrecognized as potential virulence genes in GBS. Among these highly-ranked genes, many encode hypothetical proteins with possible roles in GBS virulence. Thus, our approach has led to the identification of a set of genes potentially affecting the virulence potential of GBS, which are potential candidates for further in vitro and in vivo investigations. This computational pipeline can also be extended to in silico analysis of virulence determinants of other bacterial pathogens.

  15. Use of Luciferase Genes as Biosensors To Study Bacterial Physiology in the Digestive Tract

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    Corthier, G.; Delorme, C.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Renault, P.

    1998-01-01

    A method based on the use of the bacterial luciferase genes was developed in order to investigate Lactococcus lactis gene expression in the mouse digestive tract. Germfree mice were monoassociated with different strains containing transcriptional fusions of promoters with the luciferase genes. Our results demonstrate that this method is readily applicable to the study of promoter strength and physiology of bacteria in the digestive tract.

  16. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

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    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications.

  17. Steroidal regulation of uterine resistance to bacterial infection in livestock

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    Lewis Gregory S

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Postpartum uterine infections reduce reproductive efficiency and have significant animal welfare and economic consequences. Postpartum uterine infections are classified as nonspecific, but Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Escherichia coli are usually associated with them in cattle and sheep. Pyometra is the most common type of uterine infection in dairy cattle, and it is detected almost exclusively in cows with active corpora lutea. Luteal progesterone typically down-regulates uterine immune functions and prevents the uterus from resisting infections. Progesterone also can down-regulate uterine eicosanoid synthesis. This seems to be a critical event in the onset of uterine infections, because eicosanoids can up-regulate immune cell functions in vitro. In addition, exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha stimulates uterine secretion of prostaglandin F2 alpha and enhances immune functions in vivo. Thus, one may hypothesize that eicosanoids can override the negative effects of progesterone and that the up-regulatory effects of exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha allow the uterus to resolve an infection, regardless of progesterone concentrations. Based on the results of studies to test that hypothesis, cows, sheep, and pigs in various physiological statuses are resistant to intrauterine infusions of Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Escherichia coli, unless progesterone concentrations are increased. In sheep and pigs, exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha stimulates uterine production of prostaglandin F2 alpha and allows the uterus to resolve Arcanobacterium pyogenes-Escherichia coli-induced infections, even when progesterone is maintained at luteal phase concentrations before and after treatment. Prostaglandin F2 alpha is a proinflammatory molecule that stimulates the production of various proinflammatory cytokines, and it may enhance uterine production of leukotriene B4. Proinflammatory cytokines and leukotriene B4 enhance phagocytosis and lymphocyte functions

  18. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

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    Bergström Anders

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pups (N = 8/group from differently colonized dams: Germ-free (GF, conventional specific pathogen free (SPF, monocolonized with either Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (Lb or Escherichia coli Nissle (Ec were analyzed by qPCR on isolated ileal tissue sections from postnatal days 1 and 6 (PND1, PND6 after birth with respect to: (i transcription of specific genes involved in mucus production (Muc1-4, Tff3 and (ii amounts of 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and E. coli. Quantification of 16S rRNA genes was performed to obtain a measure for amounts of colonized bacteria. Results We found a microbiota-independent transcriptional increase of all five mucus genes from PND1 to PND6. Furthermore, the relative level of transcription of certain mucus genes on PND1 was increased by the presence of bacteria. This was observed for Tff3 in the SPF, Ec, and Lb groups; for Muc2 in SPF; and for Muc3 and Muc4 in Ec and Lb, respectively. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA genes levels above the qPCR detection level occurred only on PND6 and only for some of the colonized animals. On PND6, we found significantly lower levels of Muc1, Muc2 and Muc4 gene transcription for Lb animals with detectable Lactobacillus levels as compared to animals with Lactobacillus levels below the detection limit. Conclusions In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3 and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4 mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and

  19. Paralysis and killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli requires the bacterial tryptophanase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanful, Akwasi; Dolan-Livengood, Jennifer M; Lewis, Taiesha; Sheth, Seema; Dezalia, Mark N; Sherman, Melanie A; Kalman, Lisa V; Benian, Guy M; Kalman, Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are major causes of food and water-borne disease. We have developed a genetically tractable model of pathogenic E. coli virulence based on our observation that these bacteria paralyse and kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Paralysis and killing of C. elegans by EPEC did not require direct contact, suggesting that a secreted toxin mediates the effect. Virulence against C. elegans required tryptophan and bacterial tryptophanase, the enzyme catalysing the production of indole and other molecules from tryptophan. Thus, lack of tryptophan in growth media or deletion of tryptophanase gene failed to paralyse or kill C. elegans. While known tryptophan metabolites failed to complement an EPEC tryptophanase mutant when presented extracellularly, complementation was achieved with the enzyme itself expressed either within the pathogen or within a cocultured K12 strains. Thus, an unknown metabolite of tryptophanase, derived from EPEC or from commensal non-pathogenic strains, appears to directly or indirectly regulate toxin production within EPEC. EPEC strains containing mutations in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), a pathogenicity island required for virulence in humans, also displayed attenuated capacity to paralyse and kill nematodes. Furthermore, tryptophanase activity was required for full activation of the LEE1 promoter, and for efficient formation of actin-filled membranous protrusions (attaching and effacing lesions) that form on the surface of mammalian epithelial cells following attachment and which depends on LEE genes. Finally, several C. elegans genes, including hif-1 and egl-9, rendered C. elegans less susceptible to EPEC when mutated, suggesting their involvement in mediating toxin effects. Other genes including sek-1, mek-1, mev-1, pgp-1,3 and vhl-1, rendered C. elegans more

  20. Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters

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    Liang eShi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The porin-cytochrome (Pcc protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr gene clusters of other Fe(III-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides.

  1. A Serine-Threonine Kinase (StkP Regulates Expression of the Pneumococcal Pilus and Modulates Bacterial Adherence to Human Epithelial and Endothelial Cells In Vitro.

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    Jenny A Herbert

    Full Text Available The pneumococcal serine threonine protein kinase (StkP acts as a global regulator in the pneumococcus. Bacterial mutants deficient in StkP are less virulent in animal models of infection. The gene for this regulator is located adjacent to the gene for its cognate phosphatase in the pneumococcal genome. The phosphatase dephosphorylates proteins phosphorylated by StkP and has been shown to regulate a number of key pneumococcal virulence factors and to modulate adherence to eukaryotic cells. The role of StkP in adherence of pneumococci to human cells has not previously been reported. In this study we show StkP represses the pneumococcal pilus, a virulence factor known to be important for bacterial adhesion. In a serotype 4 strain regulation of the pilus by StkP modulates adherence to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung epithelial cells. This suggests that the pneumococcal pilus may play a role in adherence during infections such as meningitis and pneumonia. We show that regulation of the pilus occurs at the population level as StkP alters the number of pili-positive cells within a single culture. As far as we are aware this is the first gene identified outside of the pilus islet that regulates the biphasic expression of the pilus. These findings suggest StkPs role in cell division may be linked to regulation of expression of a cell surface adhesin.

  2. Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux

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    Hinds Jason

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human and animal health is constantly under threat by emerging pathogens that have recently acquired genetic determinants that enhance their survival, transmissibility and virulence. We describe the construction and development of an Active Surveillance of Pathogens (ASP oligonucleotide microarray, designed to 'actively survey' the genome of a given bacterial pathogen for virulence-associated genes. Results The microarray consists of 4958 reporters from 151 bacterial species and include genes for the identification of individual bacterial species as well as mobile genetic elements (transposons, plasmid and phage, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The ASP microarray was validated with nineteen bacterial pathogens species, including Francisella tularensis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ASP microarray identified these bacteria, and provided information on potential antibiotic resistance (eg sufamethoxazole resistance and sulfonamide resistance and virulence determinants including genes likely to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (e.g. an alpha-haemolysin. Conclusion The ASP microarray has potential in the clinic as a diagnostic tool, as a research tool for both known and emerging pathogens, and as an early warning system for pathogenic bacteria that have been recently modified either naturally or deliberately.

  3. Bioinformatic analysis reveals high diversity of bacterial genes for laccase-like enzymes.

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    Luka Ausec

    Full Text Available Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three-domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications.

  4. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals High Diversity of Bacterial Genes for Laccase-Like Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausec, Luka; Zakrzewski, Martha; Goesmann, Alexander; Schlüter, Andreas; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2011-01-01

    Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three- domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications. PMID:22022440

  5. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  6. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  7. Oxygen-­dependent regulation of bacterial lipid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the mechanisms of lipid accumulation in microorganisms is important for several reasons. In addition to providing insight into assembly of biological membranes, lipid accumulation has important applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an attractive organism to study lipid accumulation, as it has the somewhat unique ability to increase membrane production at low O₂ tensions. Under these conditions, R. sphaeroides develops invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane to increase its membrane surface area for housing of the membrane-bound components of its photosynthetic apparatus. Here we use fatty acid levels as a reporter of membrane lipid content. We show that, under low-O₂ and anaerobic conditions, the total fatty acid content per cell increases 3-fold. We also find that the increases in the amount of fatty acid and photosynthetic pigment per cell are correlated as O₂ tensions or light intensity are changed. To ask if lipid and pigment accumulation were genetically separable, we analyzed strains with mutations in known photosynthetic regulatory pathways. While a strain lacking AppA failed to induce photosynthetic pigment-protein complex accumulation, it increased fatty acid content under low O2 conditions. We also found that an intact PrrBA pathway is required for low O2-induced fatty acid accumulation. Our findings suggest a previously unknown role of R. sphaeroides transcriptional regulators in increasing fatty acid and phospholipid accumulation in response to decreased O₂ tension.

  8. Low-shear modeled microgravity: a global environmental regulatory signal affecting bacterial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; LeBlanc, Carly L.; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Hammond, Timothy; Pierson, Duane L.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria inhabit an impressive variety of ecological niches and must adapt constantly to changing environmental conditions. While numerous environmental signals have been examined for their effect on bacteria, the effects of mechanical forces such as shear stress and gravity have only been investigated to a limited extent. However, several important studies have demonstrated a key role for the environmental signals of low shear and/or microgravity in the regulation of bacterial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis [Chem. Rec. 1 (2001) 333; Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 54 (2000) 33; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63 (1997) 4090; J. Ind. Microbiol. 18 (1997) 22; Curr. Microbiol. 34(4) (1997) 199; Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 56(3-4) (2001) 384; Infect Immun. 68(6) (2000) 3147; Cell 109(7) (2002) 913; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68(11) (2002) 5408; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 99(21) (2002) 13807]. The response of bacteria to these environmental signals, which are similar to those encountered during prokaryotic life cycles, may provide insight into bacterial adaptations to physiologically relevant conditions. This review focuses on the current and potential future research trends aimed at understanding the effect of the mechanical forces of low shear and microgravity analogues on different bacterial parameters. In addition, this review also discusses the use of microgravity technology to generate physiologically relevant human tissue models for research in bacterial pathogenesis.

  9. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements.

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    Crystal Jaing

    Full Text Available Emerging known and unknown pathogens create profound threats to public health. Platforms for rapid detection and characterization of microbial agents are critically needed to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. Available detection technologies cannot provide broad functional information about known or novel organisms. As a step toward developing such a system, we have produced and tested a series of high-density functional gene arrays to detect elements of virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Our first generation array targets genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for gene family detection and discrimination. When tested with organisms at varying phylogenetic distances from the four target strains, the array detected orthologs for the majority of targeted gene families present in bacteria belonging to the same taxonomic family. In combination with whole-genome amplification, the array detects femtogram concentrations of purified DNA, either spiked in to an aerosol sample background, or in combinations from one or more of the four target organisms. This is the first report of a high density NimbleGen microarray system targeting microbial antibiotic resistance and virulence mechanisms. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples.

  10. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

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    Bang Dang D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhoea in humans and is considered a commensal of the gastroenteric tract of the avian host. However, little is known about the interaction between C. jejuni and the avian host including the cytokine responses and the expression of the bacterial genes. We have investigated the invasiveness of primary chicken embryo intestinal cells (CEICs by C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origins and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes during co-cultivation. Results C. jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under in vitro culture condition C. jejuni strains of both human and chicken origins can invade avian host cells with a pro-inflammatory response and that the virulence-associated genes of C. jejuni may play a role in this process.

  11. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  12. Y-linked variation for autosomal immune gene regulation has the potential to shape sexually dimorphic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Ian C; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Sexually dimorphic phenotypes arise from the differential expression of male and female shared genes throughout the genome. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which dimorphic regulation manifests and evolves are unclear. Recent work suggests that Y-chromosomes may play an important role, given that Drosophila melanogaster Ys were shown to influence the regulation of hundreds of X and autosomal genes. For Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to facilitate sexually dimorphic evolution, however, it must exist within populations (where selection operates) and influence male fitness. These criteria have seldom been investigated, leaving the potential for dimorphic evolution via YRV unclear. Interestingly, male and female D. melanogaster differ in immune gene regulation. Furthermore, immune gene regulation appears to be influenced by the Y-chromosome, suggesting it may contribute to dimorphic immune evolution. We address this possibility by introgressing Y-chromosomes from a single wild population into an isogenic background (to create Y-lines) and assessing immune gene regulation and bacterial defence. We found that Y-line males differed in their immune gene regulation and their ability to defend against Serratia marcescens. Moreover, gene expression and bacterial defence were positively genetically correlated. These data indicate that the Y-chromosome has the potential to shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic immunity in this system.

  13. Towards allele mining of bacterial wilt disease resistance gene in tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is the most important vegetable commodity of the Philippines. Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one serious constraint in tomato production particularly during off-season planting. A major locus derived from H7996 that confers resistance to bacterial wilt has been mapped in the tomato genome. To validate the biological function of the resistance locus and generate multiple allele -mimics-, targeted mutation was induced in tomato using gamma ray and ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) mutagens. Suitable mutagen treatment was established by evaluating a wide range of mutagen doses/concentrations for a) percent seed germination, b) reduction in plant height, and c) loss of resistance. Six hundred Gy and 1.0% EMS were identified to generate large M1 families of H7996. From 10,000 initial seeds treated with either gamma ray or EMS, a total of 3,663 M1 plants were generated. M2 seeds were harvested from all surviving M1 plants. Several DNA markers have been resourced and are being developed specific to the bacterial wilt resistant gene. In the large M2 population, of H7996, both the phenotypic manifestation of bacterial wilt susceptibility and nucleotide changes in the resistance locus will be evaluated. Large M3 families for the different allele series of the bacterial wilt resistance gene will be established for future high throughput TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) analysis in the gene region

  14. Arabidopsis clade I TGA factors regulate apoplastic defences against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through endoplasmic reticulum-based processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipu Wang

    Full Text Available During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1, following elicitation with salicylic acid (SA, clade I function was shown to be largely independent of NPR1. Unlike mutants in NPR1, tga1-1 tga4-1 plants do not display reductions in steady-state levels of SA-pathway marker genes following treatment with this phenolic signaling metabolite or after challenge with virulent or avirulent P. syringae. By exploiting bacterial strains that have limited capacity to suppress Arabidopsis defence responses, the present study demonstrates that tga1-1 tga4-1 plants are compromised in basal resistance and defective in several apoplastic defence responses, including the oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species, callose deposition, as well as total and apoplastic PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 (PR-1 protein accumulation. Furthermore, analysis of npr1-1 and the tga1-1 tga4-1 npr1-1 triple mutant indicates that clade I TGA factors act substantially independent of NPR1 in mediating disease resistance against these strains of P. syringae. Increased sensitivity to the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin and elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress marker genes encoding ER-resident chaperones in mutant seedlings suggest that loss of apoplastic defence responses is associated with aberrant protein secretion and implicate clade I TGA factors as positive regulators of one or more ER-related secretion pathways.

  15. Novel terpenes generated by heterologous expression of bacterial terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host

    OpenAIRE

    YAMADA, YUUKI; Arima, Shiho; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Johmoto, Kohei; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Eguchi, Tadashi; Shin’ya, Kazuo; Cane, David E.; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Mining of bacterial genome data has revealed numerous presumptive terpene synthases. Heterologous expression of several putative terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host has revealed 13 newly discovered terpenes whose GC-MS and NMR data did not match any known compounds in the spectroscopic databases. Each of the genes encoding the corresponding terpene synthases were silent in their parent microorganisms. Heterologous expression and detailed NMR spectroscopic analysis allowe...

  16. Both msa Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Are Needed for Full Virulence in Bacterial Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Coady, Alison M; Murray, Anthony L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Linda D Rhodes

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in...

  17. Pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation: examples, models and consistent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Elisa N; Shu, Jiang; Cserhati, Matyas F; Weeks, Donald P; Ladunga, Istvan

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory of pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation. To bridge the gap between empirical studies and mathematical models, we integrate pre-existing observations with our meta-analyses of the ENCODE ChIP-Seq experiments. Earlier evidence includes fluctuations in levels, location, activity, and binding of transcription factors, variable DNA motifs, and bursts in gene expression. Stochastic regulation is also indicated by frequently subdued effects of knockout mutants of regulators, their evolutionary losses/gains and massive rewiring of regulatory sites. We report wide-spread pluralistic regulation in ≈800 000 tightly co-expressed pairs of diverse human genes. Typically, half of ≈50 observed regulators bind to both genes reproducibly, twice more than in independently expressed gene pairs. We also examine the largest set of co-expressed genes, which code for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Numerous regulatory complexes are highly significant enriched in ribosomal genes compared to highly expressed non-ribosomal genes. We could not find any DNA-associated, strict sense master regulator. Despite major fluctuations in transcription factor binding, our machine learning model accurately predicted transcript levels using binding sites of 20+ regulators. Our pluralistic and stochastic theory is consistent with partially random binding patterns, redundancy, stochastic regulator binding, burst-like expression, degeneracy of binding motifs and massive regulatory rewiring during evolution.

  18. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities and gene transfer agents in northern South China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA major capsid gene (g5 was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS, temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments.

  19. Host response to respiratory bacterial pathogens as identified by integrated analysis of human gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of infectious death in the world and a major health concern complicated by the rise of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Therapeutics that modulate host genes essential for pathogen infectivity could potentially avoid multi-drug resistance and provide a wider scope of treatment options. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of published human gene expression data generated under challenges from the gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively. We applied a previously described differential gene and pathway enrichment analysis pipeline to publicly available host mRNA GEO datasets resulting from exposure to bacterial infection. We found 72 canonical human pathways common between four GEO datasets, representing P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae. Although the majority of these pathways are known to be involved with immune response, we found several interesting new interactions such as the SUMO1 pathway that might have a role in bacterial infections. Furthermore, 36 host-bacterial pathways were also shared with our previous results for respiratory virus host gene expression. Based on our pathway analysis we propose several drug-repurposing opportunities supported by the literature.

  20. Measurement of bacterial gene expression in vivo by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time RT-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Angen, Øystein;

    2007-01-01

    Due to the relative small number of bacterial pathogens present in an infected host, exploration of pathogen gene expression in vivo is challenging. This study reports the development of a protocol for quantifying bacterial gene expression in vivo in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae using laser ca...... capture microdissection and real-time quantitative RT-PCR....

  1. Regulated genes in mesenchymal stem cells and gastriccancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori Tanabe; Kazuhiko Aoyagi; Hiroshi Yokozaki; Hiroki Sasaki

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the genes regulated in mesenchymalstem cells (MSCs) and diffuse-type gastric cancer (GC),gene expression was analyzed.METHODS: Gene expression of MSCs and diffuse-typeGC cells were analyzed by microarray. Genes relatedto stem cells, cancer and the epithelial-mesenchymaltransition (EMT) were extracted from human genelists using Gene Ontology and reference information.Gene panels were generated, and messenger RNAgene expression in MSCs and diffuse-type GC cells wasanalyzed. Cluster analysis was performed using the NCSSsoftware.RESULTS: The gene expression of regulator of G-proteinsignaling 1 (RGS1) was up-regulated in diffuse-type GCcells compared with MSCs. A panel of stem-cell relatedgenes and genes involved in cancer or the EMT wereexamined. Stem-cell related genes, such as growtharrest-specific 6, musashi RNA-binding protein 2 andhairy and enhancer of split 1 (Drosophila), NOTCHfamily genes and Notch ligands, such as delta-like 1(Drosophila) and Jagged 2, were regulated.CONCLUSION: Expression of RGS1 is up-regulated,and genes related to stem cells and NOTCH signalingare altered in diffuse-type GC compared with MSCs.

  2. Identification of Genes Induced in Lolium multiflorum by Bacterial Wilt Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Asp, Torben; Widmer, Franco;

    2010-01-01

    was hybridized to a cDNA microarray containing 10,000 unique genes from L. perenne. Comparisons and statistical analyses of the gene expression profiles revealed 0, 20, 52 and 124 differentially regulated genes 8, 48, 192 and 288 h after infection compared to non-infected controls and considering a p...

  3. Who Possesses Drug Resistance Genes in the Aquatic Environment? : Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) Resistance Genes among the Bacterial Community in Water Environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru eSuzuki; Mitsuko eOgo; Miller, Todd W.; Akiko eShimizu; Hideshige eTakada; Maria Auxilia eSiringan

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination r...

  4. Nutrient-responsive regulation determines biodiversity in a colicin-mediated bacterial community

    OpenAIRE

    Hol, F.J.H. (Felix); Voges, M.J.; Dekker, C.; Keymer, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antagonistic interactions mediated by antibiotics are strong drivers of bacterial community dynamics which shape biodiversity. Colicin production by Escherichia coli is such an interaction that governs intraspecific competition and is involved in promoting biodiversity. It is unknown how environmental cues affect regulation of the colicin operon and thus influence antibiotic-mediated community dynamics. Results Here, we investigate the community dynamics of colicin-producing, -sens...

  5. Pharmacogenomics genes show varying perceptibility to microRNA regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Vinther, Jeppe; Shomron, Noam

    2011-01-01

    The aim of pharmacogenomics is to identify individual differences in genome and transcriptome composition and their effect on drug efficacy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of the majority of animal genes, including many genes involved in drug...... efficacy. Consequently, differences in the miRNA expression among individuals could be an important factor contributing to differential drug response. Pharmacogenomics genes can be divided into drug target genes termed as pharmacodynamics genes (PD) and genes involved in drug transport and metabolism...... termed as pharmacokinetics genes (PK). To clarify the regulatory potential of miRNAs in pharmacogenomics, we have examined the potential regulation by miRNAs of PK and PD genes....

  6. Discover Gene Specific Local Co-Regulations from Time-Course Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovering gene co-regulatory relationships is one of most important research in DNA microarray data analysis. The problem of gene specific co-regulation discovery is to, for a particular gene of interest (called target gene, identify the condition subsets where strong gene co-regulations of the target gene are observed and its co-regulated genes in these condition subsets. The co-regulations are local in the sense that they occur in some subsets of full experimental conditions. The study on this problem can contribute to better understanding and characterizing the target gene during the biological activity involved. In this paper, we propose an innovative method for finding gene specific co-regulations using genetic algorithm (GA. A sliding window is used to delimit the allowed length of conditions in which gene co-regulations occur and an ad hoc GA, called the progressive GA, is performed in each window position to find those condition subsets having high fitness. It is called progressive because the initial population for the GA in a window position inherits the top-ranked individuals obtained in its preceding window position, enabling the GA to achieve a better accuracy than the non-progressive algorithm. kNN Lookup Table is utilized to substantially speed up fitness evaluation in the GA. Experimental results with a real-life gene expression data demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of our technique in discovering gene specific co-regulations.

  7. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline;

    2007-01-01

    -kappaB activation and cytokine secretion in vitro. Thus, DMBT1 may play an important role in the first line of mucosal defense conferring immune exclusion of bacterial cell wall components. Dysregulated intestinal DMBT1 expression due to mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 gene may be part of the complex pathophysiology......Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...

  8. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bryon; Ellis; Leah; Kaercher; Courtney; Snavely

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene tran-scription. METHODS:Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. RESULTS:Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from thecytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli , two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overex-pressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment.CONCLUSION:These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  9. Phylogeny of bacterial and archaeal genomes using conserved genes: supertrees and supermatrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Morgan Lang

    Full Text Available Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA, as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a "primary concordance" tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes.

  10. [Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  11. (Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  12. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Ingmer, Hanne; Madsen, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhoea in humans and is considered a commensal of the gastroenteric tract of the avian host. However, little is known about the interaction between C. jejuni and the avian host including the cytokine responses and the expression....... jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria......-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s) secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under...

  13. Cloning of a peroxidase gene from cassava with potential as a molecular marker for resistance to bacterial blight

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Filipe Pereira; Goodwin, Paul H.; Larry Erickson

    2003-01-01

    Cassava bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, is considered one of the most important bacterial diseases of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). In order to characterize the cassava genes involved in resistance to this disease, a genomic clone of a cationic peroxidase gene, MEPX1, was isolated by PCR from cassava cultivar MCOL 22. The DNA sequence of MEPX1 showed high homology with other plant peroxidase genes and contained a large intron typical of peroxidase...

  14. The mechanism for RNA recognition by ANTAR regulators of gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati Ramesh

    Full Text Available ANTAR proteins are widespread bacterial regulatory proteins that have RNA-binding output domains and utilize antitermination to control gene expression at the post-initiation level. An ANTAR protein, EutV, regulates the ethanolamine-utilization genes (eut in Enterococcus faecalis. Using this system, we present genetic and biochemical evidence of a general mechanism of antitermination used by ANTARs, including details of the antiterminator structure. The novel antiterminator structure consists of two small hairpins with highly conserved terminal loop residues, both features being essential for successful antitermination. The ANTAR protein dimerizes and associates with its substrate RNA in response to signal-induced phosphorylation. Furthermore, bioinformatic searches using this conserved antiterminator motif identified many new ANTAR target RNAs in phylogenetically diverse bacterial species, some comprising complex regulons. Despite the unrelatedness of the species in which they are found, the majority of the ANTAR-associated genes are thematically related to nitrogen management. These data suggest that the central tenets for gene regulation by ANTAR antitermination occur widely in nature to specifically control nitrogen metabolism.

  15. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J M; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  16. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  17. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  18. Bistable switching asymptotics for the self regulating gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple stochastic model of a self regulating gene that displays bistable switching is analyzed. While on, a gene transcribes mRNA at a constant rate. Transcription factors can bind to the DNA and affect the gene’s transcription rate. Before an mRNA is degraded, it synthesizes protein, which in turn regulates gene activity by influencing the activity of transcription factors. Protein is slowly removed from the system through degradation. Depending on how the protein regulates gene activity, the protein concentration can exhibit noise induced bistable switching. An asymptotic approximation of the mean switching rate is derived that includes the pre exponential factor, which improves upon a previously reported logarithmically accurate approximation. With the improved accuracy, a uniformly accurate approximation of the stationary probability density, describing the gene, mRNA copy number, and protein concentration is also obtained. (paper)

  19. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J;

    2010-01-01

    Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... genes mutants of which had become attenuated or enriched, respectively, during infection. The results point to essential roles for capsular polysaccharides, nutrient uptake, and amino acid biosynthesis in bacterial replication during experimental meningitis. The GAF phenotype of a subset of identified...... of invasive pneumococcal disease is required in order to enable the development of new or adjunctive treatments and/or pneumococcal vaccines that are efficient across serotypes. We applied genomic array footprinting (GAF) in the search for S. pneumoniae genes that are essential during experimental meningitis...

  20. Modeling classic attenuation regulation of gene expression in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily A; Pirogov, Sergey A; Rubanov, Lev I; Seliverstov, Alexander V

    2007-02-01

    A model is proposed primarily for the classical RNA attenuation regulation of gene expression through premature transcription termination. The model is based on the concept of the RNA secondary structure macrostate within the regulatory region between the ribosome and RNA-polymerase, on hypothetical equation describing deceleration of RNA-polymerase by a macrostate and on views of transcription and translation initiation and elongation, under different values of the four basic model parameters which were varied. A special effort was made to select adequate model parameters. We first discuss kinetics of RNA folding and define the concept of the macrostate as a specific parentheses structure used to construct a conventional set of hairpins. The originally developed software that realizes the proposed model offers functionality to fully model RNA secondary folding kinetics. Its performance is compared to that of a public server described in Ref. 1. We then describe the delay in RNA-polymerase shifting to the next base or its premature termination caused by an RNA secondary structure or, herefrom, a macrostate. In this description, essential concepts are the basic and excited states of the polymerase first introduced in Ref. 2: the polymerase shifting to the next base can occur only in the basic state, and its detachment from DNA strand - only in excited state. As to the authors' knowledge, such a model incorporating the above-mentioned attenuation characteristics is not published elsewhere. The model was implemented in an application with command line interface for running in batch mode in Windows and Linux environments, as well as a public web server.(3) The model was tested with a conventional Monte Carlo procedure. In these simulations, the estimate of correlation between the premature transcription termination probability p and concentration c of charged amino acyl-tRNA was obtained as function p(c) for many regulatory regions in many bacterial genomes, as well as

  1. Emergence of Collective Territorial Defense in Bacterial Communities: Horizontal Gene Transfer Can Stabilize Microbiomes

    OpenAIRE

    János Juhász; Attila Kertész-Farkas; Dóra Szabó; Sándor Pongor

    2014-01-01

    Multispecies bacterial communities such as the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract can be remarkably stable and resilient even though they consist of cells and species that compete for resources and also produce a large number of antimicrobial agents. Computational modeling suggests that horizontal transfer of resistance genes may greatly contribute to the formation of stable and diverse communities capable of protecting themselves with a battery of antimicrobial agents while preserving ...

  2. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A.; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days o...

  3. Gene regulation by mRNA editing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenas, J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The commonly cited figure of 10{sup 5} genes in the human genome represents a tremendous underestimate of our capacity to generate distinct gene products with unique functions. Our cells possess an impressive collection of tools for altering the products of a single gene to create a variety of proteins. The different gene products may have related but distinct functions, allowing cells of different types or at different developmental stages to fine-tune their patterns of gene expression. These tools may act in the cytoplasm, as when proteins undergo post-translational modifications, or in the nucleus, in the processing of pre-mRNA. Two forms of intranuclear fine-tuning are well established and widely studied: alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs and alternative polyadenylation site selection. In recent years it has become clear that cells possess yet another tool to create RNA sequence diversity, mRNA editing. The term {open_quotes}editing{close_quotes} is applied to posttranscriptional modifications of a purine or pyrimidine, which alter an mRNA sequence as it is read, for example, by ribosomes. Covalent changes to the structure of nucleotide bases are well known to occur on tRNA and rRNA molecules, but such changes in mRNA sequence are novel in that they have the capacity to change specific protein sequences. 43 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  5. Antibiotic resistance genes occurrence and bacterial community composition in the Liuxi River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguang eXiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in the environment have paid great concern due to their health risk. We investigated antibiotics concentrations (tetracyclines, sulfonamides and fluoroquinolones, ARGs abundances (tetracycline, sulfonamide and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes, and bacterial community composition in sediment and water samples in the Liuxi River, China. Antibiotics concentrations were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. ARGs abundances were quantified by a culture-independent method. Bacterial community composition was analyzed by metagenomic approach based on Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform. Antibiotics concentrations were at the levels of 1.19 to 622 ug kg-1 in sediment samples and below the limit of detection to 127 ng L-1 in water samples. Relative abundances (ARGs copies/16S rRNA gene copies of detected ARGs were at the range of 10-5 to 10-2. The dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia in sediment samples, and were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples. The results indicated that the river environment was contaminated by antibiotics and may be as a reservoir of ARGs. This study provided quantitative data on antibiotics, ARGs and bacterial community composition in the Liuxi River, a geographical location different from the reported studies.

  6. Gene regulation: hacking the network on a sugar high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tom; Wang, Xiao; Collins, James J

    2008-04-11

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Kaplan et al. (2008) determine the input functions for 19 E. coli sugar-utilization genes by using a two-dimensional high-throughput approach. The resulting input-function map reveals that gene network regulation follows non-Boolean, and often nonmonotonic, logic.

  7. Relating periodicity of nucleosome organization and gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Jun; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J.; Qian, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The relationship between nucleosome positioning and gene regulation is fundamental yet complex. Previous studies on genomic nucleosome positions have revealed a correlation between nucleosome occupancy on promoters and gene expression levels. Many of these studies focused on individual nucleosomes, especially those proximal to transcription start sites. To study the collective effect of multiple nucleosomes on the gene expression, we developed a mathematical approach based on auto...

  8. Regulated system for heterologous gene expression in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    OpenAIRE

    Graessle, S.; de Haas, H.; Friedlin, E; Kürnsteiner, H; Stöffler, G; Redl, B

    1997-01-01

    A system for regulated heterologous gene expression in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum was established. This is the first heterologous expression system to be developed for this organism. Expression of a recombinant fungal xylanase gene (xylp) and the cDNA for the human tear lipocalin (LCNI) was achieved by placing the encoding sequences under the control of the repressible acid phosphatase gene (phoA) promoter of P. chrysogenum. Secreted recombinant proteins were detected in t...

  9. Regulation of human protein S gene (PROS1) transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Cornelia de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the transcriptional regulation of the gene for anticoagulant plasma Protein S, PROS1. Protein S is a cofactor for Protein C in the Protein C anticoagulant pathway. The coagulation cascade is negatively regulated by this pathway through inactivation of activ

  10. TBR1 regulates autism risk genes in the developing neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notwell, James H; Heavner, Whitney E; Darbandi, Siavash Fazel; Katzman, Sol; McKenna, William L; Ortiz-Londono, Christian F; Tastad, David; Eckler, Matthew J; Rubenstein, John L R; McConnell, Susan K; Chen, Bin; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-08-01

    Exome sequencing studies have identified multiple genes harboring de novo loss-of-function (LoF) variants in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including TBR1, a master regulator of cortical development. We performed ChIP-seq for TBR1 during mouse cortical neurogenesis and show that TBR1-bound regions are enriched adjacent to ASD genes. ASD genes were also enriched among genes that are differentially expressed in Tbr1 knockouts, which together with the ChIP-seq data, suggests direct transcriptional regulation. Of the nine ASD genes examined, seven were misexpressed in the cortices of Tbr1 knockout mice, including six with increased expression in the deep cortical layers. ASD genes with adjacent cortical TBR1 ChIP-seq peaks also showed unusually low levels of LoF mutations in a reference human population and among Icelanders. We then leveraged TBR1 binding to identify an appealing subset of candidate ASD genes. Our findings highlight a TBR1-regulated network of ASD genes in the developing neocortex that are relatively intolerant to LoF mutations, indicating that these genes may play critical roles in normal cortical development. PMID:27325115

  11. CONJUGAL GENE TRANSFER IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF WATER GRASS (ECHINOCHLORA CRUSGALLI): INFLUENCE OF ROOT EXUDATE AND BACTERIAL ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The premise that genetic exchange is primarily localized in niches characterized by dense bacterial populations and high availability of growth substrates was tested by relating conjugal gene transfer of an RP4 derivative to availability of root exudates and bacterial metabolic a...

  12. Plant defense genes are regulated by ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, J.R.; Davis, R.W.

    1987-08-01

    One of the earliest detectable events during plant-pathogen interaction is a rapid increase in ethylene biosynthesis. This gaseous plant stress hormone may be a signal for plants to activate defense mechanisms against invading pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The effect of ethylene on four plant genes involved in three separate plant defense response pathways was examined; these included (i and ii) genes that encode L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4-coumarate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.12), enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, (iii) the gene encoding chalcone synthase, an enzyme of the flavonoid glycoside pathway, and (iv) the genes encoding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, a major protein component(s) of plant cell walls. Blot hybridization analysis of mRNA from ethylene-treated carrot roots reveals marked increases in the levels of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase mRNA, 4-coumarate CoA ligase mRNA, chalcone synthase mRNA, and certain hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein transcripts. The effect of ethylene on hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation was different from that of wounding. Ethylene induces two hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs (1.8 and 4.0 kilobases), whereas wounding of carrot root leads to accumulation of an additional hydroxyproline-rich mRNA (1.5 kilobases). These results indicate that at least two distinct signals, ethylene and a wound signal, can affect the expression of plant defense-response genes.

  13. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  14. Jasmonate induction of the monoterpene linalool confers resistance to rice bacterial blight and its biosynthesis is regulated by JAZ protein in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shiduku; Hosokawa-Shinonaga, Yumi; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Yamada, Shoko; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is involved in the regulation of host immunity in plants. Recently, we demonstrated that JA signalling has an important role in resistance to rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) in rice. Here, we report that many volatile compounds accumulate in response to exogenous application of JA, including the monoterpene linalool. Expression of linalool synthase was up-regulated by JA. Vapour treatment with linalool induced resistance to Xoo, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing linalool synthase were more resistance to Xoo, presumably due to the up-regulation of defence-related genes in the absence of any treatment. JA-induced accumulation of linalool was regulated by OsJAZ8, a rice jasmonate ZIM-domain protein involving the JA signalling pathway at the transcriptional level, suggesting that linalool plays an important role in JA-induced resistance to Xoo in rice.

  15. Pyramiding blast, bacterial blight and brown planthopper resistance genes in rice restorer lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Zhi-juan; Yang Shu-dong; ZENG Yu-xiang; LIANG Yan; YANG Chang-deng; QIAN Qian

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast, bacterial blight (BB) and brown planthopper (BPH) are the three main pests of rice. This study investigated pyr-amiding genes resistant to blast, BB and BPH to develop restorer lines. Ten new lines with blast, BB and/or BPH resistance genes were developed using marker-assisted selection (MAS) technique and agronomic trait selection (ATS) method. Only HR13 with resistance genes to blast, BB and BPH was obtained. In addition to blast and BB resistance, four lines (HR39, HR41, HR42, HR43) demonstrated moderate resistance to BPH, but MAS for BPH resistance genes were not conducted in developing these four lines. These data suggested that there were unknown elite BPH resistance genes in the Zhongzu 14 donor parent. A more effective defense was demonstrated in the lines withPi1 andPi2 genes although the weather in 2012 was favorable to disease incidence. Blast resistance of the lines with a single resistance gene,Pita, was easily inlfuenced by the weather. Overal, the information obtained through pyramiding multiple resistance genes on developing the restorer lines is helpful for rice resistance breeding.

  16. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  17. Bacterial Adrenergic Sensors Regulate Virulence of Enteric Pathogens in the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano G. Moreira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enteric pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and Citrobacter rodentium, which is largely used as a surrogate EHEC model for murine infections, are exposed to several host neurotransmitters in the gut. An important chemical exchange within the gut involves the neurotransmitters epinephrine and/or norepinephrine, extensively reported to increase virulence gene expression in EHEC, acting through two bacterial adrenergic sensors: QseC and QseE. However, EHEC is unable to establish itself and cause its hallmark lesions, attaching and effacing (AE lesions, on murine enterocytes. To address the role of these neurotransmitters during enteric infection, we employed C. rodentium. Both EHEC and C. rodentium harbor the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE that is necessary for AE lesion formation. Here we show that expression of the LEE, as well as that of other virulence genes in C. rodentium, is also activated by epinephrine and/or norepinephrine. Both QseC and QseE are required for LEE gene activation in C. rodentium, and the qseC and qseE mutants are attenuated for murine infection. C. rodentium has a decreased ability to colonize dopamine β-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh−/− mice, which do not produce epinephrine and norepinephrine. Both adrenergic sensors are required for C. rodentium to sense these neurotransmitters and activate the LEE genes during infection. These data indicate that epinephrine and norepinephrine are sensed by bacterial adrenergic receptors during enteric infection to promote activation of their virulence repertoire. This is the first report of the role of these neurotransmitters during mammalian gastrointestinal (GI infection by a noninvasive pathogen.

  18. Intrinsic limits to gene regulation by global crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Tamar; Prizak, Roshan; Guet, Călin C; Barton, Nicholas H; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation relies on the specificity of transcription factor (TF)-DNA interactions. Limited specificity may lead to crosstalk: a regulatory state in which a gene is either incorrectly activated due to noncognate TF-DNA interactions or remains erroneously inactive. As each TF can have numerous interactions with noncognate cis-regulatory elements, crosstalk is inherently a global problem, yet has previously not been studied as such. We construct a theoretical framework to analyse the effects of global crosstalk on gene regulation. We find that crosstalk presents a significant challenge for organisms with low-specificity TFs, such as metazoans. Crosstalk is not easily mitigated by known regulatory schemes acting at equilibrium, including variants of cooperativity and combinatorial regulation. Our results suggest that crosstalk imposes a previously unexplored global constraint on the functioning and evolution of regulatory networks, which is qualitatively distinct from the known constraints that act at the level of individual gene regulatory elements. PMID:27489144

  19. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  20. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  1. Calcium Regulates the Activity and Structural Stability of Tpr, a Bacterial Calpain-like Peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniec, Dominika; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Sroka, Aneta; Bryzek, Danuta; Bogyo, Matthew; Abrahamson, Magnus; Potempa, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a peptide-fermenting asaccharolytic periodontal pathogen. Its genome contains several genes encoding cysteine peptidases other than gingipains. One of these genes (PG1055) encodes a protein called Tpr (thiol protease) that has sequence similarity to cysteine peptidases of the papain and calpain families. In this study we biochemically characterize Tpr. We found that the 55-kDa Tpr inactive zymogen proteolytically processes itself into active forms of 48, 37, and 33 kDa via sequential truncations at the N terminus. These processed molecular forms of Tpr are associated with the bacterial outer membrane where they are likely responsible for the generation of metabolic peptides required for survival of the pathogen. Both autoprocessing and activity were dependent on calcium concentrations >1 mm, consistent with the protein's activity within the intestinal and inflammatory milieus. Calcium also stabilized the Tpr structure and rendered the protein fully resistant to proteolytic degradation by gingipains. Together, our findings suggest that Tpr is an example of a bacterial calpain, a calcium-responsive peptidase that may generate substrates required for the peptide-fermenting metabolism of P. gingivalis. Aside from nutrient generation, Tpr may also be involved in evasion of host immune response through degradation of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and complement proteins C3, C4, and C5. Taken together, these results indicate that Tpr likely represents an important pathogenesis factor for P. gingivalis.

  2. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Consuelo Gomez; Esther Ramirez, M.; Mercedes Calixto-Galvez; Olivia Medel; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or dru...

  3. Bacterial rotary export ATPases are allosterically regulated by the nucleotide second messenger cyclic-di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E M; Little, Richard H; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M; Malone, Jacob G

    2015-10-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins.

  4. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru eSuzuki; Mitsuko eOgo; Tatsuya eKoike; Hideshige eTakada; Brent eNewman

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3 and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There ...

  5. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no ...

  6. New Kinase Regulation Mechanism Found in HipBA: a Bacterial Persistence Switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evdokimov, A.; Voznesensky, I; Fennell, K; Anderson, M; Smith, J; Fisher, D

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial persistence is the ability of individual cells to randomly enter a period of dormancy during which the cells are protected against antibiotics. In Escherichia coli, persistence is regulated by the activity of a protein kinase HipA and its DNA-binding partner HipB, which is a strong inhibitor of both HipA activity and hip operon transcription. The crystal structure of the HipBA complex was solved by application of the SAD technique to a mercury derivative. In this article, the fortuitous and interesting effect of mercury soaks on the native HipBA crystals is discussed as well as the intriguing tryptophan-binding pocket found on the HipA surface. A HipA-regulation model is also proposed that is consistent with the available structural and biochemical data.

  7. New kinase regulation mechanism found in HipBA: a bacterial persistence switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimov, Artem; Voznesensky, Igor; Fennell, Kimberly; Anderson, Marie; Smith, James F; Fisher, Douglas A

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial persistence is the ability of individual cells to randomly enter a period of dormancy during which the cells are protected against antibiotics. In Escherichia coli, persistence is regulated by the activity of a protein kinase HipA and its DNA-binding partner HipB, which is a strong inhibitor of both HipA activity and hip operon transcription. The crystal structure of the HipBA complex was solved by application of the SAD technique to a mercury derivative. In this article, the fortuitous and interesting effect of mercury soaks on the native HipBA crystals is discussed as well as the intriguing tryptophan-binding pocket found on the HipA surface. A HipA-regulation model is also proposed that is consistent with the available structural and biochemical data. PMID:19622872

  8. OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressed genes in bacterial microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkin Adam P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentially expressed genes are typically identified by analyzing the variation between replicate measurements. These procedures implicitly assume that there are no systematic errors in the data even though several sources of systematic error are known. Results OpWise estimates the amount of systematic error in bacterial microarray data by assuming that genes in the same operon have matching expression patterns. OpWise then performs a Bayesian analysis of a linear model to estimate significance. In simulations, OpWise corrects for systematic error and is robust to deviations from its assumptions. In several bacterial data sets, significant amounts of systematic error are present, and replicate-based approaches overstate the confidence of the changers dramatically, while OpWise does not. Finally, OpWise can identify additional changers by assigning genes higher confidence if they are consistent with other genes in the same operon. Conclusion Although microarray data can contain large amounts of systematic error, operons provide an external standard and allow for reasonable estimates of significance. OpWise is available at http://microbesonline.org/OpWise.

  9. Structure and function of a spectrin-like regulator of bacterial cytokinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, Robert M.; Barrett, Jeffrey R.; Baslé, Arnaud; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hewitt, Lorraine; Solovyova, Alexandra; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Daniel, Richard A.; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Harry, Elizabeth J.; Oakley, Aaron J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Lewis, Richard J.

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial cell division is facilitated by a molecular machine—the divisome—that assembles at mid-cell in dividing cells. The formation of the cytokinetic Z-ring by the tubulin homologue FtsZ is regulated by several factors, including the divisome component EzrA. Here we describe the structure of the 60-kDa cytoplasmic domain of EzrA, which comprises five linear repeats of an unusual triple helical bundle. The EzrA structure is bent into a semicircle, providing the protein with the potential to interact at both N- and C-termini with adjacent membrane-bound divisome components. We also identify at least two binding sites for FtsZ on EzrA and map regions of EzrA that are responsible for regulating FtsZ assembly. The individual repeats, and their linear organization, are homologous to the spectrin proteins that connect actin filaments to the membrane in eukaryotes, and we thus propose that EzrA is the founding member of the bacterial spectrin family.

  10. The NSL complex regulates housekeeping genes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chung Lam

    Full Text Available MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16 acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP-seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2 throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5% of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP-seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication-related Element (DRE. Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription.

  11. Pancreatic regeneration: basic research and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Shigenori, Ota; Ishii, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ueki, Tomomi; Meguro, Makoto; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kojima, Takashi; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Noriyuki; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic regeneration (PR) is an interesting phenomenon that could provide clues as to how the control of diabetes mellitus might be achieved. Due to the different regenerative abilities of the pancreas and liver, the molecular mechanism responsible for PR is largely unknown. In this review, we describe five representative murine models of PR and thirteen humoral mitogens that stimulate β-cell proliferation. We also describe pancreatic ontogenesis, including the molecular transcriptional differences between α-cells and β-cells. Furthermore, we review 14 murine models which carry defects in genes related to key transcription factors for pancreatic ontogenesis to gain further insight into pancreatic development. PMID:26148809

  12. Divergence of gene regulation through chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messing Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms that modify genome structures to give birth and death to alleles are still not well understood. To investigate the causative chromosomal rearrangements, we took advantage of the allelic diversity of the duplicated p1 and p2 genes in maize. Both genes encode a transcription factor involved in maysin synthesis, which confers resistance to corn earworm. However, p1 also controls accumulation of reddish pigments in floral tissues and has therefore acquired a new function after gene duplication. p1 alleles vary in their tissue-specific expression, which is indicated in their allele designation: the first suffix refers to red or white pericarp pigmentation and the second to red or white glume pigmentation. Results Comparing chromosomal regions comprising p1-ww[4Co63], P1-rw1077 and P1-rr4B2 alleles with that of the reference genome, P1-wr[B73], enabled us to reconstruct additive events of transposition, chromosome breaks and repairs, and recombination that resulted in phenotypic variation and chimeric regulatory signals. The p1-ww[4Co63] null allele is probably derived from P1-wr[B73] by unequal crossover between large flanking sequences. A transposon insertion in a P1-wr-like allele and NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining could have resulted in the formation of the P1-rw1077 allele. A second NHEJ event, followed by unequal crossover, probably led to the duplication of an enhancer region, creating the P1-rr4B2 allele. Moreover, a rather dynamic picture emerged in the use of polyadenylation signals by different p1 alleles. Interestingly, p1 alleles can be placed on both sides of a large retrotransposon cluster through recombination, while functional p2 alleles have only been found proximal to the cluster. Conclusions Allelic diversity of the p locus exemplifies how gene duplications promote phenotypic variability through composite regulatory signals. Transposition events increase the level of genomic complexity

  13. Diversity of bacterial dimethylsulfoniopropionate degradation genes in surface seawater of Arctic Kongsfjorden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yin-Xin; Qiao, Zong-Yun; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Luo, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which is the major source of organic sulfur in the world’s oceans, plays a significant role in the global sulfur cycle. This compound is rapidly degraded by marine bacteria either by cleavage to dimethylsulfide (DMS) or demethylation to 3-methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The diversity of genes encoding bacterial demethylation (dmdA) and DMS production (dddL and dddP) were measured in Arctic Kongsfjorden. Both dmdA and dddL genes were detected in all stations along a transect from the outer to the inner fjord, while dddP gene was only found in the outer and middle parts of the fjord. The dmdA gene was completely confined to the Roseobacter clade, while the dddL gene was confined to the genus Sulfitobacter. Although the dddP gene pool was also dominated by homologs from the Roseobacter clade, there were a few dddP genes showing close relationships to both Alphaproteobacter and Gammaproteobacter. The results of this study suggest that the Roseobacter clade may play an important role in DMSP catabolism via both demethylation and cleavage pathways in surface waters of Kongsfjorden during summer.

  14. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  15. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  16. Canine uterine bacterial infection induces upregulation of proteolysis-related genes and downregulation of homeobox and zinc finger factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnvi Hagman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial infection with the severe complication of sepsis is a frequent and serious condition, being a major cause of death worldwide. To cope with the plethora of occurring bacterial infections there is therefore an urgent need to identify molecular mechanisms operating during the host response, in order both to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention and to identify biomarkers for disease. Here we addressed this issue by studying global gene expression in uteri from female dogs suffering from spontaneously occurring uterine bacterial infection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis showed that almost 800 genes were significantly (p2-fold in the uteri of diseased animals. Among these were numerous chemokine and cytokine genes, as well as genes associated with inflammatory cell extravasation, anti-bacterial action, the complement system and innate immune responses, as well as proteoglycan-associated genes. There was also a striking representation of genes associated with proteolysis. Robust upregulation of immunoglobulin components and genes involved in antigen presentation was also evident, indicating elaboration of a strong adaptive immune response. The bacterial infection was also associated with a significant downregulation of almost 700 genes, of which various homeobox and zinc finger transcription factors were highly represented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these finding outline the molecular patterns involved in bacterial infection of the uterus. The study identified altered expression of numerous genes not previously implicated in bacterial disease, and several of these may be evaluated for potential as biomarkers of disease or as therapeutic targets. Importantly, since humans and dogs show genetic similarity and develop diseases that share many characteristics, the molecular events identified here are likely to reflect the corresponding situation in humans afflicted by similar disease.

  17. Benchmarking of methods for identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacterial whole genome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Philip T. L. C.; Zankari, Ea; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2016-01-01

    was compared with the observed phenotypes for all isolates. To challenge further the sensitivity of the in silico methods, the datasets were also down-sampled to 1% of the reads and reanalysed. The best results were obtained by identification of resistance genes by mapping directly against the raw reads......Next generation sequencing (NGS) may be an alternative to phenotypic susceptibility testing for surveillance and clinical diagnosis. However, current bioinformatics methods may be associated with false positives and negatives. In this study, a novel mapping method was developed and benchmarked...... to two different methods in current use for identification of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial WGS data. A novel method, KmerResistance, which examines the co-occurrence of k-mers between the WGS data and a database of resistance genes, was developed. The performance of this method was compared...

  18. Identification of the NAC1-regulated genes in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Wu, Ren-Chin; Herlinger, Alice L; Yap, Kailee; Kim, Jung-Won; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1), encoded by the NACC1 gene, is a transcription co-regulator that plays a multifaceted role in promoting tumorigenesis. However, the NAC1-regulated transcriptome has not been comprehensively defined. In this study, we compared the global gene expression profiles of NAC1-overexpressing SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and NAC1-knockdown SKOV3 cells. We found that NAC1 knockdown was associated with up-regulation of apoptotic genes and down-regulation of genes involved in cell movement, proliferation, Notch signaling, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Among NAC1-regulated genes, FOXQ1 was further characterized because it is involved in cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. NAC1 knockdown decreased FOXQ1 expression and promoter activity. Similarly, inactivation of NAC1 by expression of a dominant-negative construct of NAC1 suppressed FOXQ1 expression. Ectopic expression of NAC1 in NACC1 null cells induced FOXQ1 expression. NAC1 knockdown resulted in decreased cell motility and invasion, whereas constitutive expression of FOXQ1 rescued motility in cells after NAC1 silencing. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed a significant co-up-regulation of NAC1 and FOXQ1 in ovarian carcinoma tissues. On the basis of transcription profiling, we report a group of NAC1-regulated genes that may participate in multiple cancer-related pathways. We further demonstrate that NAC1 is essential and sufficient for activation of FOXQ1 transcription and that the role of NAC1 in cell motility is mediated, at least in part, by FOXQ1.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of transposable element derived human gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Ahsan; Bowen, Nathan J; Conley, Andrew B; Jordan, I King

    2011-04-01

    It was previously thought that epigenetic histone modifications of mammalian transposable elements (TEs) serve primarily to defend the genome against deleterious effects associated with their activity. However, we recently showed that, genome-wide, human TEs can also be epigenetically modified in a manner consistent with their ability to regulate host genes. Here, we explore the ability of TE sequences to epigenetically regulate individual human genes by focusing on the histone modifications of promoter sequences derived from TEs. We found 1520 human genes that initiate transcription from within TE-derived promoter sequences. We evaluated the distributions of eight histone modifications across these TE-promoters, within and between the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, and related their modification status with the cell-type specific expression patterns of the genes that they regulate. TE-derived promoters are significantly enriched for active histone modifications, and depleted for repressive modifications, relative to the genomic background. Active histone modifications of TE-promoters peak at transcription start sites and are positively correlated with increasing expression within cell lines. Furthermore, differential modification of TE-derived promoters between cell lines is significantly correlated with differential gene expression. LTR-retrotransposon derived promoters in particular play a prominent role in mediating cell-type specific gene regulation, and a number of these LTR-promoter genes are implicated in lineage-specific cellular functions. The regulation of human genes mediated by histone modifications targeted to TE-derived promoters is consistent with the ability of TEs to contribute to the epigenomic landscape in a way that provides functional utility to the host genome.

  20. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto-Suárez Mauricio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation of disease resistance mechanisms in cassava. In this study, we identified differentially expressed genes during pathogen attack by subtractive hybridization, using the Differential Subtraction Chain method (DSC. A population of cDNA obtained from infected plants was used as ";treatment"; and a population of cDNA obtained from healthy plants was used as ";control";. 1536 clones were isolated from the resistant varieties (MBRA 685 and SG 107-35. Of these, 110 randomly selected clones were sequenced and a homology search was conducted. The sequence analysis showed that 14 cDNA clones shared homology with plant genes involved in defense responses, 70 clones were either homologous to plant genes of unknown function or showed no homology, representing new genes potentially involved in cassava defense responses. A cDNA microarray was constructed by spotting the clones identified from our subtractive libraries. Other clones potentially involved in cassava defense responses were also included. The cassava defense cDNA microarray was used to confirm the differential expression of the clones. Keywords: cassava, bacterial blight, gene expression, subtractive library, microarrays.

  1. Epigenetics, cellular memory and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henikoff, Steven; Greally, John M

    2016-07-25

    The field described as 'epigenetics' has captured the imagination of scientists and the lay public. Advances in our understanding of chromatin and gene regulatory mechanisms have had impact on drug development, fueling excitement in the lay public about the prospects of applying this knowledge to address health issues. However, when describing these scientific advances as 'epigenetic', we encounter the problem that this term means different things to different people, starting within the scientific community and amplified in the popular press. To help researchers understand some of the misconceptions in the field and to communicate the science accurately to each other and the lay audience, here we review the basis for many of the assumptions made about what are currently referred to as epigenetic processes. PMID:27458904

  2. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaul Rajinder

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia

  3. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenic gene transcription in the liver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirmala Yabaluri; Murali D Bashyam

    2010-09-01

    Glucose homeostasis in mammals is achieved by the actions of counterregulatory hormones, namely insulin, glucagon and glucocorticoids. Glucose levels in the circulation are regulated by the liver, the metabolic centre which produces glucose when it is scarce in the blood. This process is catalysed by two rate-limiting enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) whose gene expression is regulated by hormones. Hormone response units (HRUs) present in the two genes integrate signals from various signalling pathways triggered by hormones. How such domains are arranged in the regulatory region of these two genes, how this complex regulation is accomplished and the latest advancements in the field are discussed in this review.

  4. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  5. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Hagen, Stephen J., E-mail: sjhagen@ufl.edu [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  6. Differential regulation of genes by retrotransposons in rice promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadi, Surendar Reddy; Xu, Zijun; Shaik, Rafi; Driscoll, Kyle; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2015-04-01

    Rice genome harbors genes and promoters with retrotransposon insertions. There is very little information about their function. The effect of retrotransposon insertions in four rice promoter regions on gene regulation, was investigated using promoter-reporter gene constructs with and without retrotransposons. Differences in expression levels of gus and egfp reporter genes in forward orientation and rfp in reverse orientation were evaluated in rice plants with transient expression employing quantitative RT-PCR analysis, histochemical GUS staining, and eGFP and RFP fluorescent microscopy. The presence of SINE in the promoter 1 (P1) resulted in higher expression levels of the reporter genes, whereas the presence of LINE in P2 or gypsy LTR retrotransposon in P3 reduced expression of the reporter genes. Furthermore, the SINE in P1 acts as an enhancer in contrast with the LINE in P2 and the gypsy LTR retrotransposon in P3 which act as silencers. CTAA and CGG motifs in these retrotransposons are the likely candidates for the downregulation compared to TCTT motif (SINE) which is a candidate for the upregulation of gene expression. The effect of retrotransposons on gene regulation correlated with the earlier investigation of conservation patterns of these four retrotransposon insertions in several rice accessions implying their evolutionary significance.

  7. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  8. An Epigenetic Perspective on Developmental Regulation of Seed Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Zhang; Joe Ogas

    2009-01-01

    The developmental program of seeds is promoted by master regulators that are expressed in a seed-specific manner.Ectopic expression studies reveal that expression of these master regulators and other transcriptional regulators is sufficient to promote seed-associated traits,including generation of somatic embryos.Recent work highlights the importance of chromatin-associated factors in restricting expression of seed-specific genes,in particular PcG proteins and ATP-dependent remodelers.This review summarizes what is known regarding factors that promote zygotic and/or somatic embryogenesis and the chromatin machinery that represses their expression.Characterization of the regulation of seedspecific genes reveals that plant chromatin-based repression systems exhibit broad conservation with and surprising differences from animal repression systems.

  9. Molecular nutrition: Interaction of nutrients, gene regulations and performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kan

    2016-07-01

    Nutrition deals with ingestion of foods, digestion, absorption, transport of nutrients, intermediary metabolism, underlying anabolism and catabolism, and excretion of unabsorbed nutrients and metabolites. In addition, nutrition interacts with gene expressions, which are involved in the regulation of animal performances. Our laboratory is concerned with the improvement of animal productions, such as milks, meats and eggs, with molecular nutritional aspects. The present review shows overviews on the nutritional regulation of metabolism, physiological functions and gene expressions to improve animal production in chickens and dairy cows. PMID:27110862

  10. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  11. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  12. Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistance Genes, and Bacterial Community Composition in Fresh Water Aquaculture Environment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Zhang, Tong; Ding, Xueyao; Li, Yafei; Wang, Mianzhi; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-08-01

    Environmental antibiotic resistance has drawn increasing attention due to its great threat to human health. In this study, we investigated concentrations of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides and (fluoro)quinolones) and abundances of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), including tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, and analyzed bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in Guangdong, China. The concentrations of sulfametoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and enrofloxacin were as high as 446 μg kg(-1) and 98.6 ng L(-1) in sediment and water samples, respectively. The relative abundances (ARG copies/16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies) of ARGs (sul1, sul2, sul3, tetM, tetO, tetW, tetS, tetQ, tetX, tetB/P, qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib, and qnrS) were as high as 2.8 × 10(-2). The dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes in sediment samples and Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples. The genera associated with pathogens were also observed, such as Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Clostridium. This study comprehensively investigated antibiotics, ARGs, and bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in China. The results indicated that fish ponds are reservoirs of ARGs and the presence of potential resistant and pathogen-associated taxonomic groups in fish ponds might imply the potential risk to human health.

  13. Source-sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James P J; Wood, A Jamie; Harrison, Ellie; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-07-19

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (Hg(R)) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable Hg(R) captured to the chromosome in P. putida A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57's lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source-sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal Hg(R) in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability. PMID:27385827

  14. Source–sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (HgR) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable HgR captured to the chromosome in P. putida. A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57’s lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida. By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source–sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal HgR in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability. PMID:27385827

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene by glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP increase tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and mRNA levels in pheochromocytoma cultures. The transcriptional activity of the TH gene, as measured by nuclear run-on assay, is also increased when cultures are treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone or agents that increase intracellular cyclic AMP, such as forskolin and 8-BrcAMP. Both inducers effect transcriptional changes within 10 min after treatment and are maximal after 30 min for forskolin and after 60 min for dexamethasone. The 5' flanking sequences of the TH gene were fused to the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), and the hybrid gene was transfected into pheochromocytoma cultures and GH4 pituitary cells. In both cell lines, a region of the TH gene containing bases -272 to +27 conferred induction of CAT by cyclic AMP, but not by glucocorticoid. The same results were found when a region of the TH gene containing -773 to + 27 was used. Thus, the sequences required for induction of TH by cyclic AMP are contained within 272 bases of 5' flanking sequence, but sequences sufficient for glucocorticoid regulation are not contained with 773 bases

  16. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M; Kirti, P B

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2-3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in rice

  17. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  18. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aybey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS activity of psychotropic drugs was tested against four test pathogens using the agar well diffusion method. All drugs showed strong inhibitory effect on the growth of S. typhimurium. Additionally, quorum sensing-regulated behaviors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production were investigated. Most effective drugs on swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production, respectively, were paroxetine and duloxetine; duloxetine; hydroxyzine and venlafaxine; paroxetine and venlafaxine; venlafaxine. Accordingly, psychotropic drugs were shown strongly anti-QS activity by acting as bacterial efflux pump inhibitors and effection on motility and alkaline protease production of P. aeruginosa.

  19. Global identification of target genes regulated by APETALA3 and PISTILLATA floral homeotic gene action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zik, Moriyah; Irish, Vivian F

    2003-01-01

    Identifying the genes regulated by the floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to petal and stamen formation. We have used microarray analysis to conduct a broad survey of genes whose expression is affected by AP3 and PI activity. DNA microarrays consisting of 9216 Arabidopsis ESTs were screened with probes corresponding to mRNAs from different mutant and transgenic lines that misexpress AP3 and/or PI. The microarray results were further confirmed by RNA gel blot analyses. Our results suggest that AP3 and PI regulate a relatively small number of genes, implying that many genes used in petal and stamen development are not tissue specific and likely have roles in other processes as well. We recovered genes similar to previously identified petal- and stamen-expressed genes as well as genes that were not implicated previously in petal and stamen development. A very low percentage of the genes recovered encoded transcription factors. This finding suggests that AP3 and PI act relatively directly to regulate the genes required for the basic cellular processes responsible for petal and stamen morphogenesis.

  20. Differential regulation of GS-GOGAT gene expression by plant growth regulators in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragićević Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary ammonium assimilation is catalyzed by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT pathway in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains five cytosolic GS1 genes (GLN1;1 - GLN1;5, one nuclear gene for chloroplastic GS2 isoform (GLN2, two Fd-GOGAT genes (GLU1 and GLU2 and a GLT1 gene coding for NADH-GOGAT. Even though the regulation of GS and GOGAT isoforms has been extensively studied in response to various environmental and metabolic cues in many plant species, little is known about the effects of phytohormones on their regulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of representative plant growth regulators, kinetin (KIN, abscisic acid (ABA, gibberellic acid (GA3 and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, on the expression of A. thaliana GS and GOGAT genes. The obtained results indicate that GS and GOGAT genes are differentially regulated by growth regulators in shoots and roots. KIN and 2,4-D repressed GS and GOGAT expression in roots, with little effect on transcript levels in shoots. KIN affected all tested genes; 2,4-D was apparently more selective and less potent. ABA induced the expression of GLN1;1 and GLU2 in whole seedlings, while GA3 enhanced the expression of all tested genes in shoots, except GLU2. The observed expression patterns are discussed in relation to physiological roles of investigated plant growth regulators and N-assimilating enzymes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173024

  1. Growth phase and ompR regulation of transcription of microcin B17 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Chico, C; San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1986-09-01

    The synthesis of the peptide antibiotic microcin B17 was shown to occur as the cells entered the stationary phase of growth. This type of growth phase regulation is commonly observed in the production of a number of different bacterial products such as toxins and antibiotics. Microcin B17 synthesis is also dependent on the product of the ompR gene. To determine the role of transcription in this double regulation of microcin B17 production, operon fusions with Mu d1 (Ap lac) were constructed. Insertions were obtained in all four plasmid genes involved in production of microcin B17 (mcbA-D) and in the immunity region. Three classes of fusions were obtained. Fusions into mcbA, mcbB, and mcbC (first class) exhibited an increase in their transcription as the cells approached the stationary phase. These increases as well as basal levels of transcription were dependent on OmpR. Expression of fusions in mcbD and in the immunity region (second class) was also dependent on OmpR, but their expression remained constant throughout growth. One fusion in mcbC (third class) was obtained which was transcribed in the opposite direction than the others. It showed no growth phase regulation and no OmpR dependence. The implications of these results in terms of the transcriptional organization of the mbc genes are discussed.

  2. AI-2-dependent gene regulation in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturdevant Daniel E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoinducer 2 (AI-2, a widespread by-product of the LuxS-catalyzed S-ribosylhomocysteine cleavage reaction in the activated methyl cycle, has been suggested to serve as an intra- and interspecies signaling molecule, but in many bacteria AI-2 control of gene expression is not completely understood. Particularly, we have a lack of knowledge about AI-2 signaling in the important human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. Results To determine the role of LuxS and AI-2 in S. epidermidis, we analyzed genome-wide changes in gene expression in an S. epidermidis luxS mutant and after addition of AI-2 synthesized by over-expressed S. epidermidis Pfs and LuxS enzymes. Genes under AI-2 control included mostly genes involved in sugar, nucleotide, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism, but also virulence-associated genes coding for lipase and bacterial apoptosis proteins. In addition, we demonstrate by liquid chromatography/mass-spectrometry of culture filtrates that the pro-inflammatory phenol-soluble modulin (PSM peptides, key virulence factors of S. epidermidis, are under luxS/AI-2 control. Conclusion Our results provide a detailed molecular basis for the role of LuxS in S. epidermidis virulence and suggest a signaling function for AI-2 in this bacterium.

  3. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Little

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG. Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  4. Regulation of pulmonary and systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide responses in transgenic mice expressing human elafin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J-M; Cunningham, G A; James, R M; McLachlan, G; Haslett, C

    2003-07-01

    The control of lung inflammation is of paramount importance in a variety of acute pathologies, such as pneumonia, the acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. It is becoming increasingly apparent that local innate immune responses in the lung are negatively influenced by systemic inflammation. This is thought to be due to a local deficit in cytokine responses by alveolar macrophages and neutrophils following systemic bacterial infection and the development of a septic response. Recently, using an adenovirus-based strategy which overexpresses the human elastase inhibitor elafin locally in the lung, we showed that elafin is able to prime lung innate immune responses. In this study, we generated a novel transgenic mouse strain expressing human elafin and studied its response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) when the LPS was administered locally in the lungs and systemically. When LPS was delivered to the lungs, we found that mice expressing elafin had lower serum-to-bronchoalveolar lavage ratios of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein 2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, than wild-type mice. There was a concomitant increase in inflammatory cell influx, showing that there was potential priming of innate responses in the lungs. When LPS was given systemically, the mice expressing elafin had reduced levels of serum TNF-alpha compared to the levels in wild-type mice. These results indicate that elafin may have a dual function, promoting up-regulation of local lung innate immunity while simultaneously down-regulating potentially unwanted systemic inflammatory responses in the circulation. PMID:12819058

  5. Querying Co-regulated Genes on Diverse Gene Expression Datasets Via Biclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Eren, Kemal; Bozdağ, Doruk; Kaya, Kamer; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development and increasing popularity of gene expression microarrays have resulted in a number of studies on the discovery of co-regulated genes. One important way of discovering such co-regulations is the query-based search since gene co-expressions may indicate a shared role in a biological process. Although there exist promising query-driven search methods adapting clustering, they fail to capture many genes that function in the same biological pathway because microarray datasets are fraught with spurious samples or samples of diverse origin, or the pathways might be regulated under only a subset of samples. On the other hand, a class of clustering algorithms known as biclustering algorithms which simultaneously cluster both the items and their features are useful while analyzing gene expression data, or any data in which items are related in only a subset of their samples. This means that genes need not be related in all samples to be clustered together. Because many genes only interact under specific circumstances, biclustering may recover the relationships that traditional clustering algorithms can easily miss. In this chapter, we briefly summarize the literature using biclustering for querying co-regulated genes. Then we present a novel biclustering approach and evaluate its performance by a thorough experimental analysis. PMID:26626937

  6. Characterization of a Clp protease gene regulator and the reaeration response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M Sherrid

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB enters a non-replicating state when exposed to low oxygen tension, a condition the bacillus encounters in granulomas during infection. Determining how mycobacteria enter and maintain this state is a major focus of research. However, from a public health standpoint the importance of latent TB is its ability to reactivate. The mechanism by which mycobacteria return to a replicating state upon re-exposure to favorable conditions is not understood. In this study, we utilized reaeration from a defined hypoxia model to characterize the adaptive response of MTB following a return to favorable growth conditions. Global transcriptional analysis identified the approximately 100 gene Reaeration Response, induced relative to both log-phase and hypoxic MTB. This response includes chaperones and proteases, as well as the transcription factor Rv2745c, which we characterize as a Clp protease gene regulator (ClgR orthologue. During reaeration, genes repressed during hypoxia are also upregulated in a wave of transcription that includes genes crucial to transcription, translation and oxidative phosphorylation and culminates in bacterial replication. In sum, this study defines a new transcriptional response of MTB with potential relevance to disease, and implicates ClgR as a regulator involved in resumption of replication following hypoxia.

  7. Autoinducer-2 signaling is involved in regulation of stress-related genes of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Li, Tao; Dai, Shang; Yu, Jiangliu; Chen, Xiuqin; Wang, Liangyan; Wang, Yunguang; Hua, Yuejin; Tian, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) serves as a quorum-sensing signaling molecule that mediates both intraspecies and interspecies communication among bacteria, and plays critical roles in regulating various bacterial behaviors. In the present study, we investigated the functions of AI-2 signaling in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 by construction of the LuxS gene disruption mutant, survival phenotype assay and gene transcription assay. The gene mutant (DRΔLuxS), which was unable to produce AI-2, was significantly more sensitive to both gamma radiation and H2O2 compared with the wild-type strain. Addition of the wild-type-derived spent medium into the cell culture of DRΔLuxS fully restored the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. A higher level of reactive oxygen species accumulated in the mutant compared with the wild type under normal or oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR assays showed that transcriptional levels of stress-related proteins, including catalase, extracellular nuclease, Dps-1 and ABC transporters, were decreased in DRΔLuxS, indicating that AI-2 is involved in regulation of stress-related genes of D. radiodurans. Hence, AI-2 signaling may contribute to the extreme resistance of D. radiodurans to radiation and oxidative stresses.

  8. Emergence of collective territorial defense in bacterial communities: horizontal gene transfer can stabilize microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, János; Kertész-Farkas, Attila; Szabó, Dóra; Pongor, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Multispecies bacterial communities such as the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract can be remarkably stable and resilient even though they consist of cells and species that compete for resources and also produce a large number of antimicrobial agents. Computational modeling suggests that horizontal transfer of resistance genes may greatly contribute to the formation of stable and diverse communities capable of protecting themselves with a battery of antimicrobial agents while preserving a varied metabolic repertoire of the constituent species. In other words horizontal transfer of resistance genes makes a community compatible in terms of exoproducts and capable to maintain a varied and mature metagenome. The same property may allow microbiota to protect a host organism, or if used as a microbial therapy, to purge pathogens and restore a protective environment. PMID:24755769

  9. VERTICAL HEREDITY VS. HORIZONTAL GENE TRANSFER: A CHALLENGE TO BACTERIAL CLASSIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Bailin; QI Ji

    2003-01-01

    The diversity and classification of microbes has been a long-standing issue. Molecular phylogeny of the prokaryotes based on comparison of the 16S rRNA sequences of the small ribosomal subunit has led to a reasonable tree of life in the late 1970s. However, the availability of more and more complete bacterial genomes has brought about complications instead of refinement of the tree. In particular, it turns out that different choice of genes may tell different history. This might be caused by possible horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among species. There is an urgent need to develop phylogenetic methods that make use of whole genome data. We describe a new approach in molecular phylogeny, namely, tree construction based on K-tuple frequency analysis of the genomic sequences. Putting aside the technicalities, we emphasize the transition from randomness to determinism when the string length K increases and try to comment on the challenge mentioned in the title.

  10. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  11. Riemerella anatipestifer M949_1360 Gene Functions on the Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis and Bacterial Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guijing; Wang, Xiaolan; Dou, Yafeng; Wang, Shaohui; Tian, Mingxing; Qi, Jingjing; Li, Tao; Ding, Chan; Wu, Yantao; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer causes septicemic and exudative diseases in poultry, resulting in major economic losses to the duck industry. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as an important virulence factor in Gram-negative bacteria, can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and animal hosts. In this study, we screened out one LPS defective mutant strain RAΔ604 from a random transposon mutant library of R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain CH3, which did not react with the anti-CH3 LPS monoclonal antibody 1C1 in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the genome of RAΔ604 contained a single Tn4351 insert. Then, we found that the M949_1360 gene was inactivated by insertion of the transposon. Using silver staining and western blot analyses, we found that the LPS pattern of RAΔ604 was defective, as compared with that of the wild-type (WT) strain CH3. The mutant strain RAΔ604 showed no significant influence on bacterial growth, while bacterial counting and Live/dead BacLight Bacterial Viability staining revealed that bacterial viability was decreased, as compared with the WT strain CH3. In addition, the abilities of the mutant strain RAΔ604 to adhere and invade Vero cells were significantly decreased. Animal studies revealed that the virulence of the mutant strain RAΔ604 was decreased by more than 200-fold in a duck infection model, as compared with the WT strain CH3. Furthermore, immunization with live bacteria of the mutant strain RAΔ604 protected 87.5% ducks from challenge with R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain WJ4, indicating that the mutant strain RAΔ604 could be used as a potential vaccine candidate in the future. PMID:27500736

  12. Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Matthew L; Stevens, Sarah Lr; Chan, Leong-Keat; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary A; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J; McMahon, Katherine D; Malmstrom, Rex R

    2016-07-01

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Here, from a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005-2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the 'ecotype model' of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment. PMID:26744812

  13. Nitrogen regulates chitinase gene expression in a marine bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpin, Marina; Goodman, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ammonium concentration and nitrogen source regulate promoter activity and use for the transcription of chiA, the major chitinase gene of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S91 and S91CX, an S91 transposon lacZ fusion mutant. The activity of chiA was quantified by beta-galactosidase assay of S91CX cultures con...

  14. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  15. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  16. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  17. Interplay of gene expression noise and ultrasensitive dynamics affects bacterial operon organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christian J Ray

    Full Text Available Bacterial chromosomes are organized into polycistronic cotranscribed operons, but the evolutionary pressures maintaining them are unclear. We hypothesized that operons alter gene expression noise characteristics, resulting in selection for or against maintaining operons depending on network architecture. Mathematical models for 6 functional classes of network modules showed that three classes exhibited decreased noise and 3 exhibited increased noise with same-operon cotranscription of interacting proteins. Noise reduction was often associated with a decreased chance of reaching an ultrasensitive threshold. Stochastic simulations of the lac operon demonstrated that the predicted effects of transcriptional coupling hold for a complex network module. We employed bioinformatic analysis to find overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon organization compared with randomized controls. Among constitutively expressed physically interacting protein pairs, higher coupling frequencies appeared at lower expression levels, where noise effects are expected to be dominant. Our results thereby suggest an important role for gene expression noise, in many cases interacting with an ultrasensitive switch, in maintaining or selecting for operons in bacterial chromosomes.

  18. A plant natriuretic peptide-like gene in the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis may induce hyper-hydration in the plant host: a hypothesis of molecular mimicry

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Muhammed; Seoighe Cathal; Nembaware Victoria; Gehring Chris

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) are systemically mobile molecules that regulate homeostasis at nanomolar concentrations. PNPs are up-regulated under conditions of osmotic stress and PNP-dependent processes include changes in ion transport and increases of H2O uptake into protoplasts and whole tissue. Presentation of the hypothesis The bacterial citrus pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri str. 306 contains a gene encoding a PNP-like protein. We hypothesise that this ...

  19. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial community composition and antibiotic resistance genes in a wastewater treatment plant and its receiving surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junying; Bu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Shan, Zhengjun; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-10-01

    The presence of pathogenic bacteria and the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) may pose big risks to the rivers that receive the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigated the changes of bacterial community and ARGs along treatment processes of one WWTP, and examined the effects of the effluent discharge on the bacterial community and ARGs in the receiving river. Pyrosequencing was applied to reveal bacterial community composition including potential bacterial pathogen, and Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used for profiling ARGs. The results showed that the WWTP had good removal efficiency on potential pathogenic bacteria (especially Arcobacter butzleri) and ARGs. Moreover, the bacterial communities of downstream and upstream of the river showed no significant difference. However, the increase in the abundance of potential pathogens and ARGs at effluent outfall was observed, indicating that WWTP effluent might contribute to the dissemination of potential pathogenic bacteria and ARGs in the receiving river.

  20. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  1. Identifying disease feature genes based on cellular localized gene functional modules and regulation networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; ZHU Jing; GUO Zheng; LI Xia; YANG Da; WANG Lei; RAO Shaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Identifying disease-relevant genes and functional modules, based on gene expression profiles and gene functional knowledge, is of high importance for studying disease mechanisms and subtyping disease phenotypes. Using gene categories of biological process and cellular component in Gene Ontology, we propose an approach to selecting functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes, and identifying the feature functional modules of high disease discriminating abilities. Using the differentially expressed genes in each feature module as the feature genes, we reveal the relevance of the modules to the studied diseases. Using three datasets for prostate cancer, gastric cancer, and leukemia, we have demonstrated that the proposed modular approach is of high power in identifying functionally integrated feature gene subsets that are highly relevant to the disease mechanisms. Our analysis has also shown that the critical disease-relevant genes might be better recognized from the gene regulation network, which is constructed using the characterized functional modules, giving important clues to the concerted mechanisms of the modules responding to complex disease states. In addition, the proposed approach to selecting the disease-relevant genes by jointly considering the gene functional knowledge suggests a new way for precisely classifying disease samples with clear biological interpretations, which is critical for the clinical diagnosis and the elucidation of the pathogenic basis of complex diseases.

  2. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  3. Identification of Master Regulator Genes in Human Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawle, A D; Kebschull, M; Demmer, R T; Papapanou, P N

    2016-08-01

    Analytic approaches confined to fold-change comparisons of gene expression patterns between states of health and disease are unable to distinguish between primary causal disease drivers and secondary noncausal events. Genome-wide reverse engineering approaches can facilitate the identification of candidate genes that may distinguish between causal and associative interactions and may account for the emergence or maintenance of pathologic phenotypes. In this work, we used the algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) to analyze a large gene expression profile data set (313 gingival tissue samples from a cross-sectional study of 120 periodontitis patients) obtained from clinically healthy (n = 70) or periodontitis-affected (n = 243) gingival sites. The generated transcriptional regulatory network of the gingival interactome was subsequently interrogated with the master regulator inference algorithm (MARINA) and gene expression signature data from healthy and periodontitis-affected gingiva. Our analyses identified 41 consensus master regulator genes (MRs), the regulons of which comprised between 25 and 833 genes. Regulons of 7 MRs (HCLS1, ZNF823, XBP1, ZNF750, RORA, TFAP2C, and ZNF57) included >500 genes each. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated differential expression of these regulons in gingival health versus disease with a type 1 error between 2% and 0.5% and with >80% of the regulon genes in the leading edge. Ingenuity pathway analysis showed significant enrichment of 36 regulons for several pathways, while 6 regulons (those of MRs HCLS1, IKZF3, ETS1, NHLH2, POU2F2, and VAV1) were enriched for >10 pathways. Pathways related to immune system signaling and development were the ones most frequently enriched across all regulons. The unbiased analysis of genome-wide regulatory networks can enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of human periodontitis and, after appropriate validation, ultimately identify target molecules of

  4. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  5. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  6. Global regulation of nucleotide biosynthetic genes by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The c-Myc transcription factor is a master regulator and integrates cell proliferation, cell growth and metabolism through activating thousands of target genes. Our identification of direct c-Myc target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP coupled with pair-end ditag sequencing analysis (ChIP-PET revealed that nucleotide metabolic genes are enriched among c-Myc targets, but the role of Myc in regulating nucleotide metabolic genes has not been comprehensively delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that the majority of genes in human purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway were induced and directly bound by c-Myc in the P493-6 human Burkitt's lymphoma model cell line. The majority of these genes were also responsive to the ligand-activated Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein, Myc-ER, in a Myc null rat fibroblast cell line, HO.15 MYC-ER. Furthermore, these targets are also responsive to Myc activation in transgenic mouse livers in vivo. To determine the functional significance of c-Myc regulation of nucleotide metabolism, we sought to determine the effect of loss of function of direct Myc targets inosine monophosphate dehydrogenases (IMPDH1 and IMPDH2 on c-Myc-induced cell growth and proliferation. In this regard, we used a specific IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA and found that MPA dramatically inhibits c-Myc-induced P493-6 cell proliferation through S-phase arrest and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results demonstrate the direct induction of nucleotide metabolic genes by c-Myc in multiple systems. Our finding of an S-phase arrest in cells with diminished IMPDH activity suggests that nucleotide pool balance is essential for c-Myc's orchestration of DNA replication, such that uncoupling of these two processes create DNA replication stress and apoptosis.

  7. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  8. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling of bacterial 16S rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    T-RFLP profiling is a very effective method for comparing many samples in an environmental microbiology study, because fingerprints of microbial diversity can be generated in a sensitive, reproducible, and cost-effective manner. This protocol describes the steps required to generate T-RFLP profiles of the dominant members of a bacterial community, by PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes and three restriction endonuclease digests to generate three different profiles for each sample. The generation of multiple profiles per sample provides enough information to confidently differentiate rich environmental bacterial communities.

  9. Novel TetR family transcriptional factor regulates expression of multiple transport-related genes and affects rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huicong; Yang, Min; He, Zheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Transport-related genes significantly affect bacterial antibiotic resistance. However, the effects of these genes and their regulation of bacterial drug resistance in several mycobacterial species, including the fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis, the pathogen M. tuberculosis and M. avium have not been clearly characterized. We identified Ms4022 (MSMEG_4022) as a novel TetR family regulator that activates the expression of seven transport-related genes and affects drug resistance in M. smegmatis. Overexpression of Ms4022 inhibited M. smegmatis growth and enhanced mycobacterial resistance to the anti-tuberculosis drug rifampicin (RIF). By contrast, the Ms4022-deleted mycobacterial strain has shown sensitive to RIF. Ms4022 recognized three 19 bp non-palindromic motifs containing a 9 bp conserved region at their 5' end and it directly regulated seven transport-related genes, which affects mycobacterial resistance to RIF. Overexpression of three of seven transport-related genes (Ms1448, Ms1613, and Ms5278) inhibited the growth of M. smegmatis. This study improves our understanding of the function of mycobacterial transport-related genes and their regulation of bacterial drug resistance. PMID:27271013

  10. Bacterial ortholog of mammalian translocator protein (TSPO with virulence regulating activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Chapalain

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10(-5 M adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies.

  11. The Extent and Regulation of Lateral Gene Transfer in Natural Microbial Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in bacterial evolution is evident from the retrospective analyses of bacterial genomes, which suggest that a substantial part of bacterial genomes is of foreign origin. Another line of evidence that supports the possibility of rapid adaptation...... of bacteria through lateral gene exchange is the history of antibiotic use by humans. Within a very brief period of the 'antibiotic era' many bacterial pathogens were able to acquire the mechanisms allowing them to withstand the selective pressure of antibiotics. And, finally, field and microcosm studies...

  12. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  13. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  14. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  15. Intron retention-dependent gene regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Paulet, Damien; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hon, Chung-Chau; Lechat, Pierre; Mogensen, Estelle; Moyrand, Frédérique; Proux, Caroline; Barboux, Rony; Bussotti, Giovanni; Hwang, Jungwook; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-01-01

    The biological impact of alternative splicing is poorly understood in fungi, although recent studies have shown that these microorganisms are usually intron-rich. In this study, we re-annotated the genome of C. neoformans var. neoformans using RNA-Seq data. Comparison with C. neoformans var. grubii revealed that more than 99% of ORF-introns are in the same exact position in the two varieties whereas UTR-introns are much less evolutionary conserved. We also confirmed that alternative splicing is very common in C. neoformans, affecting nearly all expressed genes. We also observed specific regulation of alternative splicing by environmental cues in this yeast. However, alternative splicing does not appear to be an efficient method to diversify the C. neoformans proteome. Instead, our data suggest the existence of an intron retention-dependent mechanism of gene expression regulation that is not dependent on NMD. This regulatory process represents an additional layer of gene expression regulation in fungi and provides a mechanism to tune gene expression levels in response to any environmental modification. PMID:27577684

  16. Reconstructing a network of stress-response regulators via dynamic system modeling of gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2008-02-10

    Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene's expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA) to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specific stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably sufficient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  17. Transcriptomics of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in response to the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes reveals candidate fungal defense response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Mathioni

    Full Text Available Plants and animals have evolved a first line of defense response to pathogens called innate or basal immunity. While basal defenses in these organisms are well studied, there is almost a complete lack of understanding of such systems in fungal species, and more specifically, how they are able to detect and mount a defense response upon pathogen attack. Hence, the goal of the present study was to understand how fungi respond to biotic stress by assessing the transcriptional profile of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, when challenged with the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes. Based on microscopic observations of interactions between M. oryzae and wild-type L. enzymogenes strain C3, we selected early and intermediate stages represented by time-points of 3 and 9 hours post-inoculation, respectively, to evaluate the fungal transcriptome using RNA-seq. For comparative purposes, we also challenged the fungus with L. enzymogenes mutant strain DCA, previously demonstrated to be devoid of antifungal activity. A comparison of transcriptional data from fungal interactions with the wild-type bacterial strain C3 and the mutant strain DCA revealed 463 fungal genes that were down-regulated during attack by C3; of these genes, 100 were also found to be up-regulated during the interaction with DCA. Functional categorization of genes in this suite included those with roles in carbohydrate metabolism, cellular transport and stress response. One gene in this suite belongs to the CFEM-domain class of fungal proteins. Another CFEM class protein called PTH11 has been previously characterized, and we found that a deletion in this gene caused advanced lesion development by C3 compared to its growth on the wild-type fungus. We discuss the characterization of this suite of 100 genes with respect to their role in the fungal defense response.

  18. Gene Regulation System of Vasopressin and Corticotoropin-Releasing Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yoshida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurohypophyseal hormones, arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, play a crucial role in the physiological and behavioral response to various kinds of stresses. Both neuropeptides activate the hypophysialpituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, which is a central mediator of the stress response in the body. Conversely, they receive the negative regulation by glucocorticoid, which is an end product of the HPA axis. Vasopressin and CRH are closely linked to immune response; they also interact with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, as for vasopressin, it has another important role, which is the regulation of water balance through its potent antidiuretic effect. Hence, it is conceivable that vasopressin and CRH mediate the homeostatic responses for survival and protect organisms from the external world. A tight and elaborate regulation system of the vasopressin and CRH gene is required for the rapid and flexible response to the alteration of the surrounding environments. Several important regulatory elements have been identified in the proximal promoter region in the vasopressin and CRH gene. Many transcription factors and intracellular signaling cascades are involved in the complicated gene regulation system. This review focuses on the current status of the basic research of vasopressin and CRH. In addition to the numerous known facts about their divergent physiological roles, the recent topics of promoter analyses will be discussed.

  19. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse upstream regulators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. N. Shukla; J. Nagaraju

    2010-09-01

    Sex determination, an integral precursor to sexual reproduction, is required to generate morphologically distinct sexes. The molecular components of sex-determination pathways regulating sexual differentiation have been identified and characterized in different organisms. The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene at the bottom of the sex-determination cascade is the best characterized candidate so far, and is conserved from worms (mab3 of Caenorhabditis elegans) to mammals (Dmrt-1). Studies of dsx homologues from insect species belonging to different orders position them at the bottom of their sex-determination cascade. The dsx homologues are regulated by a series of upstream regulators that show amazing diversity in different insect species. These results support the Wilkin’s hypothesis that evolution of the sex-determination cascade has taken place in reverse order, the bottom most gene being most conserved and the upstream genes having been recruited at different times during evolution. The pre-mRNA of dsx is sex-specifically spliced to encode male or female-specific transcription factors that play an important role in the regulation of sexually dimorphic characters in different insect species. The generalization that dsx is required for somatic sexual differentiation culminated with its functional analysis through transgenesis and knockdown experiments in diverse species of insects. This brief review will focus on the similarities and variations of dsx homologues that have been investigated in insects to date.

  20. Mutual regulation causes co-entrainment between a synthetic oscillator and the bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dies, Marta; Galera-Laporta, Leticia; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2016-04-18

    The correct functioning of cells requires the orchestration of multiple cellular processes, many of which are inherently dynamical. The conditions under which these dynamical processes entrain each other remain unclear. Here we use synthetic biology to address this question in the case of concurrent cellular oscillations. Specifically, we study at the single-cell level the interaction between the cell division cycle and a robust synthetic gene oscillator in Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that cell division is able to partially entrain the synthetic oscillations under normal growth conditions, by driving the periodic replication of the genes involved in the oscillator. Coupling the synthetic oscillations back into the cell cycle via the expression of a key regulator of chromosome replication increases the synchronization between the two periodic processes. A simple computational model allows us to confirm this effect.

  1. Redox proteins of hydroxylating bacterial dioxygenases establish a regulatory cascade that prevents gratuitous induction of tetralin biodegradation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Medina, Milagros; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial dioxygenase systems are multicomponent enzymes that catalyze the initial degradation of many environmentally hazardous compounds. In Sphingopyxis granuli strain TFA tetralin dioxygenase hydroxylates tetralin, an organic contaminant. It consists of a ferredoxin reductase (ThnA4), a ferredoxin (ThnA3) and a oxygenase (ThnA1/ThnA2), forming a NAD(P)H-ThnA4-ThnA3-ThnA1/ThnA2 electron transport chain. ThnA3 has also a regulatory function since it prevents expression of tetralin degradation genes (thn) in the presence of non-metabolizable substrates of the catabolic pathway. This role is of physiological relevance since avoids gratuitous and wasteful production of catabolic enzymes. Our hypothesis for thn regulation implies that ThnA3 exerts its action by diverting electrons towards the regulator ThnY, an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that together with the transcriptional activator ThnR is necessary for thn gene expression. Here we analyze electron transfer among ThnA4, ThnA3 and ThnY by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and determination of midpoint reduction potentials. Our results indicate that when accumulated in its reduced form ThnA3 is able to fully reduce ThnY. In addition, we have reproduced in vitro the regulatory circuit in the proposed physiological direction, NAD(P)H-ThnA4-ThnA3-ThnY. ThnA3 represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent gratuitous induction. PMID:27030382

  2. Redox proteins of hydroxylating bacterial dioxygenases establish a regulatory cascade that prevents gratuitous induction of tetralin biodegradation genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Medina, Milagros; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial dioxygenase systems are multicomponent enzymes that catalyze the initial degradation of many environmentally hazardous compounds. In Sphingopyxis granuli strain TFA tetralin dioxygenase hydroxylates tetralin, an organic contaminant. It consists of a ferredoxin reductase (ThnA4), a ferredoxin (ThnA3) and a oxygenase (ThnA1/ThnA2), forming a NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnA1/ThnA2 electron transport chain. ThnA3 has also a regulatory function since it prevents expression of tetralin degradation genes (thn) in the presence of non-metabolizable substrates of the catabolic pathway. This role is of physiological relevance since avoids gratuitous and wasteful production of catabolic enzymes. Our hypothesis for thn regulation implies that ThnA3 exerts its action by diverting electrons towards the regulator ThnY, an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that together with the transcriptional activator ThnR is necessary for thn gene expression. Here we analyze electron transfer among ThnA4, ThnA3 and ThnY by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and determination of midpoint reduction potentials. Our results indicate that when accumulated in its reduced form ThnA3 is able to fully reduce ThnY. In addition, we have reproduced in vitro the regulatory circuit in the proposed physiological direction, NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnY. ThnA3 represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent gratuitous induction. PMID:27030382

  3. Complex structure and regulation of the ABP/SHBG gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D R; Sullivan, P M; Wang, Y M; Millhorn, D E; Bayliss, D M

    1991-01-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABPs) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in the liver, are encoded by the same gene. We report here that the ABP/SHBG gene is also expressed in fetal rat liver and adult brain. Immunoreactive ABP was localized in the brain and fetal liver and mRNAs were identified in both tissues by northern blot hybridization. Analysis of brain and fetal liver cDNA clones revealed alternatively processed RNAs with sequence characteristics suggesting the encoded proteins could act as competitors of ABP/SHBG binding to cell surface receptors. One cDNA represented a fused transcript of the ABP/SHBG gene and the histidine decarboxylase gene that was apparently formed by a trans-splicing process. Gene sequencing experiments indicate that tissue-specific ABP/SHBG gene promoter-enhancer elements are utilized in testis, brain and fetal liver. These data demonstrate that the structure, RNA transcript processing and likely regulation of the ABP/SHBG gene are very complex. PMID:1958575

  4. Differential gene regulation by the SRC family of coactivators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuaZhang; XiaYi; Xiaojingsun; NaYin; BinShi; HuijianWu; DanWang; GeWu; YongfengShang

    2005-01-01

    SRCs (steroid receptor coactivatorsl are required for nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and are also implicated in the transcription initiation by other transcription factors, such as STATs and NFKB. Despite phenotypic manifestations in gene knockout mice for SRC-1, GRIP1, and AIB1 of the SRC (Steroid Receptor Coactivator) family indicating their differential roles in animal physiology, there is no clear evidence, at the molecular level, to support a functional specificity for these proteins. We demonstrated in this report that two species of SRC coactivators, either as AIBI:GRIP1 or as AIBI:SRC-1 are recruited, possibly through heterodimerization, on the promoter of genes that contain a classical hormone responsive element (HRE). In contrast, on non-HRE-containing gene promoters, on which steroid receptors bind indirectly, either GRIP1 orSRC-1 is recruited as a monomer, depending on the cellular abundance of the protein. Typically, non-HRE-containing genes are early genes activated by steroid receptors, whereas HRE-containing genes are activated later. Our results also showed that SRC proteins contribute to the temporal regulation of gene transcription. In addition, our experiments revealed a positive correlation between AIB1/c-myc overexpression in ER+ breast carcinoma samples, suggesting a possible mechanism for AIB1/n breast cancer carcinogenesis.

  5. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S) and colony forming bacteria assemblages (∼10-1 copies/16S). In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M) was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured) bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M) gene. Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistant (SMXr) and oxytetracycline (OTC) resistant (OTCr) bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M) genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations. PMID:26300864

  6. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

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    Satoru eSuzuki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3 and tet(M, in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S and colony forming bacteria assemblages (approx 10-1 copies/16S. In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M gene. Sulfamethoxazole resistant (SMXr and oxytetracycline resistant (OTCr bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations.

  7. The Regulation of Exosporium-Related Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Kao, Guiwei; Qu, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are spore-forming members of the Bacillus cereus group. Spores of B. cereus group species are encircled by exosporium, which is composed of an external hair-like nap and a paracrystalline basal layer. Despite the extensive studies on the structure of the exosporium-related proteins, little is known about the transcription and regulation of exosporium gene expression in the B. cereus group. Herein, we studied the regulation of several exosporium-related genes in Bt. A SigK consensus sequence is present upstream of genes encoding hair-like nap proteins (bclA and bclB), basal layer proteins (bxpA, bxpB, cotB, and exsY ), and inosine hydrolase (iunH). Mutation of sigK decreased the transcriptional activities of all these genes, indicating that the transcription of these genes is controlled by SigK. Furthermore, mutation of gerE decreased the transcriptional activities of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH but increased the expression of bxpA, and GerE binds to the promoters of bclB, bxpB, cotB, bxpA, and iunH. These results suggest that GerE directly regulates the transcription of these genes, increasing the expression of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH and decreasing that of bxpA. These findings provide insight into the exosporium assembly process at the transcriptional level. PMID:26805020

  8. Structural Basis of Response Regulator Inhibition by a Bacterial Anti-Activator Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Melinda D Baker; Neiditch, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    The complex interplay between the response regulator ComA, the anti-activator RapF, and the signaling peptide PhrF controls competence development in Bacillus subtilis. More specifically, ComA drives the expression of genetic competence genes, while RapF inhibits the interaction of ComA with its target promoters. The signaling peptide PhrF accumulates at high cell density and upregulates genetic competence by antagonizing the interaction of RapF and ComA. How RapF functions mechanistically to...

  9. Androgenic regulation of novel genes in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bernard Robaire; Shayesta Seenundun; Mahsa Hamzeh; Sophie-Anne Lamour

    2007-01-01

    The epididymis is critically dependent on the presence of the testis. Although several hormones, such as retinoids and progestins, and factors secreted directly into the epididymal lumen, such as androgen binding protein and fibroblast growth factor, might play regulatory roles in epididymal function, testosterone (T) and its metabolites,dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2), are accepted as the primary regulators of epididymal structure and functions, with the former playing the greater role. To ascertain the molecular action of androgens on the epididymis,three complementary approaches were pursued to monitor changes in gene expression in response to different hormonal milieux. The first was to establish changes in gene expression along the epididymis as androgenic support is withdrawn. The second was to determine the sequence of responses that occur in an androgen deprived tissue upon re-administration of the two metabolites of T, DHT and E2. The third was to study the effects of androgen withdrawal and re-administration on gene expression in immortalized murine caput epididymidal principal cells. Specific responses were observed under each of these conditions, with an expected major difference in the panoply of genes expressed upon hormone withdrawal and re-administration; however, some key common features were the common roles of genes in insulin like growth factor/epidermal growth factor and the relatively minor and specific effects of E2 as compared to DHT. Together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanisms of androgen regulation in epididymal principal cells.

  10. Computational identification of transcriptionally co-regulated genes, validation with the four ANT isoform genes

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    Dupont Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of gene promoters is essential to understand the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation required under the effects of physiological processes, nutritional intake or pathologies. In higher eukaryotes, transcriptional regulation implies the recruitment of a set of regulatory proteins that bind on combinations of nucleotide motifs. We developed a computational analysis of promoter nucleotide sequences, to identify co-regulated genes by combining several programs that allowed us to build regulatory models and perform a crossed analysis on several databases. This strategy was tested on a set of four human genes encoding isoforms 1 to 4 of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier ANT. Each isoform has a specific tissue expression profile linked to its role in cellular bioenergetics. Results From their promoter sequence and from the phylogenetic evolution of these ANT genes in mammals, we constructed combinations of specific regulatory elements. These models were screened using the full human genome and databases of promoter sequences from human and several other mammalian species. For each of transcriptionally regulated ANT1, 2 and 4 genes, a set of co-regulated genes was identified and their over-expression was verified in microarray databases. Conclusions Most of the identified genes encode proteins with a cellular function and specificity in agreement with those of the corresponding ANT isoform. Our in silico study shows that the tissue specific gene expression is mainly driven by promoter regulatory sequences located up to about a thousand base pairs upstream the transcription start site. Moreover, this computational strategy on the study of regulatory pathways should provide, along with transcriptomics and metabolomics, data to construct cellular metabolic networks.

  11. Exploring regulation genes involved in the expression of L-amino acid oxidase in Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1.

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    Zhiliang Yu

    Full Text Available Bacterial L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO is believed to play important biological and ecological roles in marine niches, thus attracting increasing attention to understand the regulation mechanisms underlying its production. In this study, we investigated genes involved in LAAO production in marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1 using transposon mutagenesis. Of more than 4,000 mutants screened, 15 mutants showed significant changes in LAAO activity. Desired transposon insertion was confirmed in 12 mutants, in which disrupted genes and corresponding functionswere identified. Analysis of LAAO activity and lao gene expression revealed that GntR family transcriptional regulator, methylase, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, TonB-dependent heme-receptor family, Na+/H+ antiporter and related arsenite permease, N-acetyltransferase GCN5, Ketol-acid reductoisomerase and SAM-dependent methytransferase, and their coding genes may be involved in either upregulation or downregulation pathway at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational and/or posttranslational level. The nhaD and sdmT genes were separately complemented into the corresponding mutants with abolished LAAO-activity. The complementation of either gene can restore LAAO activity and lao gene expression, demonstrating their regulatory role in LAAO biosynthesis. This study provides, for the first time, insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating LAAO production in Pseudoalteromonas sp. Rf-1, which is important to better understand biological and ecological roles of LAAO.

  12. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  13. Genes regulated by AoXlnR, the xylanolytic and cellulolytic transcriptional regulator, in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yuji; Sano, Motoaki; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Ko, Taro; Takeuchi, Michio; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    XlnR is a Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator of xylanolytic and cellulolytic genes in Aspergillus. Overexpression of the aoxlnR gene in Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae xlnR gene) resulted in elevated xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities in the culture supernatant, in which nearly 40 secreted proteins were detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis. DNA microarray analysis to identify the transcriptional targets of AoXlnR led to the identification of 75 genes that showed more than fivefold increase in their expression in the AoXlnR overproducer than in the disruptant. Of these, 32 genes were predicted to encode a glycoside hydrolase, highlighting the biotechnological importance of AoXlnR in biomass degradation. The 75 genes included the genes previously identified as AoXlnR targets (xynF1, xynF3, xynG2, xylA, celA, celB, celC, and celD). Thirty-six genes were predicted to be extracellular, which was consistent with the number of proteins secreted, and 61 genes possessed putative XlnR-binding sites (5'-GGCTAA-3', 5'-GGCTAG-3', and 5'-GGCTGA-3') in their promoter regions. Functional annotation of the genes revealed that AoXlnR regulated the expression of hydrolytic genes for degradation of beta-1,4-xylan, arabinoxylan, cellulose, and xyloglucan and of catabolic genes for the conversion of D-xylose to xylulose-5-phosphate. In addition, genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase and L-arabinitol-4- dehydrogenase involved in D-glucose and L-arabinose catabolism also appeared to be targets of AoXlnR.

  14. Selected lactic acid-producing bacterial isolates with the capacity to reduce Salmonella translocation and virulence gene expression in chickens.

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    Xiaojian Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0 and high bile salt (0.3-1.5% and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (10(6-7 CFU/chick or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (10(4 CFU/chick next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1. These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10 in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in

  15. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

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    Marc Daigneault

    Full Text Available Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+ T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+ T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+ T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+ monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+ T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+ T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  16. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment. PMID:25432082

  17. Nucleotide diversity analysis of three major bacterial blight resistance genes in rice.

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    Waikhom Bimolata

    Full Text Available Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS were present in Xa26 (π = 0.01958; SVS = 182 followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and 'G' to 'A' transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima's D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed.

  18. Whole blood gene expression profiling of neonates with confirmed bacterial sepsis

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    Paul Dickinson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal infection remains a primary cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide and yet our understanding of how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Changes in host gene expression in response to infection may occur in any part of the body, with the continuous interaction between blood and tissues allowing blood cells to act as biosensors for the changes. In this study we have used whole blood transcriptome profiling to systematically identify signatures and the pathway biology underlying the pathogenesis of neonatal infection. Blood samples were collected from neonates at the first clinical signs of suspected sepsis alongside age matched healthy control subjects. Here we report a detailed description of the study design, including clinical data collected, experimental methods used and data analysis workflows and which correspond with data in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO data sets (GSE25504. Our data set has allowed identification of a patient invariant 52-gene classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy and lays the foundation for advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis.

  19. Micro-RNA: A New Kind of Gene Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Dan; HU Lan

    2006-01-01

    A group of small RNA molecules, distinct from but related to siRNAs (small interference RNAs) have been identified in a variety of organisms. These small RNAs, called microRNAs (miRNAs), are endogenously encoded approximately 20-24 nt long single-stranded RNAs. They are generally expressed in a highly tissue- or developmental-stage-specific fashion and are post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression in animals and plants. This article summarizes the character, mechanism and analysis method about miRNAs. The current view that miRNAs represent a newly discovered, hidden layer of gene regulation has resulted in high interest among researchers in the discovery of miRNAs, their targets, expression mechanism of action and analysis methods.

  20. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

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    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  1. Regulation of clock-controlled genes in mammals.

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    Katarzyna Bozek

    Full Text Available The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs.Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCKratioBMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, RORalpha and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4alpha. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1 and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1 are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including

  2. Looking for arthritis regulating genes on mouse chromosome 6 & 14

    OpenAIRE

    Popovic, Marjan

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the joints with a complex aetiology affected by largely unknown genetic and environmental factors. Because ~60% of susceptibility to RA is genetically inherited, one way to progress towards understanding of the disease is to identify the disease regulating genes. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is the most commonly used model of RA in mice. After immunisation by a subcutaneous injection of collagen emulsified ...

  3. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  4. Adrenergic regulation of clock gene expression in mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Yamaguchi, Shun; Kobayashi, Masaki; Akiyama, Masashi; Udo, Rhyuta; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Okamura, Hitoshi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2003-01-01

    A main oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) conveys circadian information to the peripheral clock systems for the regulation of fundamental physiological functions. Although polysynaptic autonomic neural pathways between the SCN and the liver were observed in rats, whether activation of the sympathetic nervous system entrains clock gene expression in the liver has yet to be understood. To assess sympathetic innervation from the SCN to liver tissue, we investigated whether inj...

  5. The role of master regulators in gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández Lemus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks present a wide variety of dynamical responses to intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations. Arguably, one of the most important of such coordinated responses is the one of amplification cascades, in which activation of a few key-responsive transcription factors (termed master regulators, MRs lead to a large series of transcriptional activation events. This is so since master regulators are transcription factors controlling the expression of other transcription factor molecules and so on. MRs hold a central position related to transcriptional dynamics and control of gene regulatory networks and are often involved in complex feedback and feedforward loops inducing non-trivial dynamics. Recent studies have pointed out to the myocyte enhancing factor 2C (MEF2C, also known as MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2, polypeptide C as being one of such master regulators involved in the pathogenesis of primary breast cancer. In this work, we perform an integrative genomic analysis of the transcriptional regulation activity of MEF2C and its target genes to evaluate to what extent are these molecules inducing collective responses leading to gene expression deregulation and carcinogenesis. We also analyzed a number of induced dynamic responses, in particular those associated with transcriptional bursts, and nonlinear cascading to evaluate the influence they may have in malignant phenotypes and cancer. Received: 20 Novembre 2014, Accepted: 24 June 2015; Edited by: C. A. Condat, G. J. Sibona; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.070011 Cite as: E Hernández-Lemus, K Baca-López, R Lemus, R García-Herrera, Papers in Physics 7, 070011 (2015

  6. [Insect antimicrobial peptides: structures, properties and gene regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Peng; Lai, Ren

    2010-02-01

    Insect antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important group of insect innate immunity effectors. Insect AMPs are cationic and contain less than 100 amino acid residues. According to structure, insect AMPs can be divided into a limited number of families. The diverse antimicrobial spectrum of insect AMPs may indicate different modes of action. Research on the model organism Drosophila indicate that insect AMPs gene regulation involves multiple signaling pathways and a large number of signaling molecules.

  7. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  8. Reconstructing a Network of Stress-Response Regulators via Dynamic System Modeling of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Sheng Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene’s expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specifi c stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably suffi cient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  9. Defining human insulin-like growth factor I gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Aditi; Alzhanov, Damir; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays an essential role in controlling somatic growth and in regulating multiple physiological processes in humans and other species. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a conserved, secreted 70-amino acid peptide, is a critical mediator of many of the biological effects of GH. Previous studies have demonstrated that GH rapidly and potently promotes IGF-I gene expression in rodents and in some other mammals through the transcription factor STAT5b, leading to accumulation of IGF-I mRNAs and production of IGF-I. Despite this progress, very little is known about how GH or other trophic factors control human IGF1 gene expression, in large part because of the absence of any cellular model systems that robustly express IGF-I. Here, we have addressed mechanisms of regulation of human IGF-I by GH after generating cells in which the IGF1 chromosomal locus has been incorporated into a mouse cell line. Using this model, we found that physiological levels of GH rapidly stimulate human IGF1 gene transcription and identify several potential transcriptional enhancers in chromatin that bind STAT5b in a GH-regulated way. Each of the putative enhancers also activates a human IGF1 gene promoter in reconstitution experiments in the presence of the GH receptor, STAT5b, and GH. Thus we have developed a novel experimental platform that now may be used to determine how human IGF1 gene expression is controlled under different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27406741

  10. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  11. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J

    1996-10-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transcription was studied and found to be regulatable. Examples are the lactose operon, the operon for nisin production, and genes in the proteolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis, as well as xylose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus. Some other operons were specifically targetted with the aim to compare their mode of regulation with known regulatory mechanisms in other well-studied bacteria. These studies, dealing with the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and of the branched chain amino acids in L. lactis, have given new insights in gene regulation and in the occurrence of auxotrophy in these bacteria. Also, nucleotide sequence analyses of a number of lactococcal bacteriophages was recently initiated to, among other things, specifically learn more about regulation of the phage life cycle. Yet another approach in the analysis of regulated genes is the 'random' selection of genetic elements that respond to environmental stimuli and the first of such sequences from lactic acid bacteria have been identified and characterized. The potential of these regulatory elements in fundamental research and practical (industrial) applications will be discussed.

  12. Methods and compositions for regulating gene expression in plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachy, Roger N. (Inventor); Luis, Maria Isabel Ordiz (Inventor); Dai, Shunhong (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel chimeric plant promoter sequences are provided, together with plant gene expression cassettes comprising such sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the chimeric plant promoters comprise the BoxII cis element and/or derivatives thereof. In addition, novel transcription factors are provided, together with nucleic acid sequences encoding such transcription factors and plant gene expression cassettes comprising such nucleic acid sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the novel transcription factors comprise the acidic domain, or fragments thereof, of the RF2a transcription factor. Methods for using the chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors in regulating the expression of at least one gene of interest are provided, together with transgenic plants comprising such chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors.

  13. Regulation of Rubisco gene expression in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, James O; Mure, Christopher M; Yerramsetty, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) incorporates inorganic carbon into an organic form, making this chloroplastic enzyme one of the most essential factors for all life on earth. Despite its central role in photosynthesis, research into regulation of the chloroplast rbcL and nuclear RbcS genes that encode this enzyme has lagged behind other plant gene systems. A major characteristic of kranz-type C4 plants is the accumulation of Rubisco only within chloroplasts of internalized bundle sheath cells that surround the leaf vascular centers. In plants that utilize the less common single cell C4 system, Rubisco accumulates only within one type of dimorphic chloroplasts localized to a specific region of leaf chlorenchyma cells. Understanding regulatory processes that restrict Rubisco gene expression to only one cell type or chloroplast type is a major focus of C4 research. Regulatory steps may include transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational processes. PMID:27026038

  14. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-08-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and differentiation into enteric neurons. Mutations in RET and its ligand GDNF cause Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a complex genetic disorder in which ENCCs fail to colonize variable lengths of the distal bowel. To identify key regulators of ENCCs and the pathways underlying RET signaling, gene expression profiles of untreated and GDNF-treated ENCCs from E14.5 mouse embryos were generated. ENCCs express genes that are involved in both early and late neuronal development, whereas GDNF treatment induced neuronal maturation. Predicted regulators of gene expression in ENCCs include the known HSCR genes Ret and Sox10, as well as Bdnf, App and Mapk10. The regulatory overlap and functional interactions between these genes were used to construct a regulatory network that is underlying ENS development and connects to known HSCR genes. In addition, the adenosine receptor A2a (Adora2a) and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (Npy2r) were identified as possible regulators of terminal neuronal differentiation in GDNF-treated ENCCs. The human orthologue of Npy2r maps to the HSCR susceptibility locus 4q31.3-q32.3, suggesting a role for NPY2R both in ENS development and in HSCR. PMID:27266404

  15. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Miyazaki, Jun [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Nishizawa, Haruki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Kurahashi, Hiroki [Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Wang@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Impaired MTA3, raised CGB5 and Snail expression are associated with preeclampsia. •Knock-down of MTA3 causes up-regulation of CGB5 and Snail genes in BeWo cells. •MTA3 occupies CGB5 and Snail gene promoters in BeWo cells. -- Abstract: Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG β-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3

  16. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Impaired MTA3, raised CGB5 and Snail expression are associated with preeclampsia. •Knock-down of MTA3 causes up-regulation of CGB5 and Snail genes in BeWo cells. •MTA3 occupies CGB5 and Snail gene promoters in BeWo cells. -- Abstract: Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG β-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3

  17. Who possesses drug resistance genes in the aquatic environment?: sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistance genes among the bacterial community in water environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Miller, Todd W.; Shimizu, Akiko; Takada, Hideshige; Siringan, Maria Auxilia T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86% of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10−5–10−2 copy/16S) but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2, and sul3 were detected (10−5–10−3 copy/16S), whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment. PMID:23641240

  18. Who Possesses Drug Resistance Genes in the Aquatic Environment? : Sulfamethoxazole (SMX Resistance Genes among the Bacterial Community in Water Environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in colony forming bacterial assemblages and natural bacterial assemblages. Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86 % of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10-5-10-2 copy/16S but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2 and sul3 were detected (10-5-10-3 copy/16S, whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment.

  19. An optimized, chemically regulated gene expression system for Chlamydomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Ferrante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for algal and cell biology and is used for biotechnological applications, such as molecular farming or biological hydrogen production. The Chlamydomonas metal-responsive CYC6 promoter is repressed by copper and induced by nickel ions. However, induction by nickel is weak in some strains, poorly reversible by chelating agents like EDTA, and causes, at high concentrations, toxicity side effects on Chlamydomonas growth. Removal of these bottlenecks will encourage the wide use of this promoter as a chemically regulated gene expression system. METHODOLOGY: Using a codon-optimized Renilla luciferase as a reporter gene, we explored several strategies to improve the strength and reversibility of CYC6 promoter induction. Use of the first intron of the RBCS2 gene or of a modified TAP medium increases the strength of CYC6 induction up to 20-fold. In the modified medium, induction is also obtained after addition of specific copper chelators, like TETA. At low concentrations (up to 10 microM TETA is a more efficient inducer than Ni, which becomes a very efficient inducer at higher concentrations (50 microM. Neither TETA nor Ni show toxicity effects at the concentrations used. Unlike induction by Ni, induction by TETA is completely reversible by micromolar copper concentrations, thus resulting in a transient "wave" in luciferase activity, which can be repeated in subsequent growth cycles. CONCLUSIONS: We have worked out a chemically regulated gene expression system that can be finely tuned to produce temporally controlled "waves" in gene expression. The use of cassettes containing the CYC6 promoter, and of modified growth media, is a reliable and economically sustainable system for the temporally controlled expression of foreign genes in Chlamydomonas.

  20. Cloning of a peroxidase gene from cassava with potential as a molecular marker for resistance to bacterial blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Luiz Filipe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, is considered one of the most important bacterial diseases of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz. In order to characterize the cassava genes involved in resistance to this disease, a genomic clone of a cationic peroxidase gene, MEPX1, was isolated by PCR from cassava cultivar MCOL 22. The DNA sequence of MEPX1 showed high homology with other plant peroxidase genes and contained a large intron typical of peroxidase genes. The predicted translation product showed a heme-ligand motif, also a characteristic of peroxidases, as well as phosphorylation, myristoylation and glycosylation sites. The amino acid sequence had 75 % homology with two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases. A Southern blot of 17 cassava cultivars, probed with MEPX1, showed multiple hybridization bands. Polymorphisms between cultivars generally reflected geographic origin, but there was also an association with resistance to CBB, indicating that MEPX1 could be a potentially useful marker for this trait.

  1. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  2. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P < 0.05), while those of genes encoding sulfonamide resistance (sul1 and sul2) were increased (P < 0.05) when normalized to 16S rRNA. The abundances of tetracycline resistance genes were correlated (P < 0.05) with the changing concentrations of tetracyclines in the manure. The overall diversity and richness of the bacteria significantly decreased during vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems.

  3. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  4. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  5. Sugar regulation of harvest-related genes in asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K M; Seelye, J F; Irving, D E; Borst, W M; Hurst, P L; King, G A

    1996-07-01

    The signals controlling the abundance of transcripts up-regulated (pTIP27, pTIP31, and pTIP32) or down-regulated (pTIP20 and pTIP21) after harvest in asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) spears were examined. pTIP27 and pTIP31 are known to encode asparagine synthetase (AS) and a beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) homolog, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of pTIP20, pTIP21, and pTIP32 were determined, and they encode histone 3, histone 2B, and an unknown product, respectively. Changes in respiration, soluble sugars, and abundance of the five mRNAs were similar in the tips stored as 30-mm lengths or as part of 180-mm spears. We previously hypothesized that sugars may regulate the level of AS transcripts in asparagus tissue. Asparagus cell cultures were used to test the role of sugar status may regulate the level of AS transcripts in asparagus tissue. Asparagus cell cultures were used to test the role of sugar status in regulating gene expression. Transcript abundance for AS, beta-gal, and pTIP32 was low in cells in sugar-containing medium but increased within 12 h after transferring cells to a sugar-free medium. Histone 3 and histone 2B transcripts were, in general, abundant in cells on sugar-containing medium but declined in abundance when transferred to sugar-free medium. When cells were returned to sugar-containing medium the abundance of transcripts for histone 3 and histone 2B increased, whereas that for AS, beta-gal, and pTIP32 decreased. Soluble sugar levels are known to decline rapidly in the tips of harvested spears. Metabolic regulation by sugar status may have a major influence on gene expression in asparagus spears and other tissue after harvest. PMID:8754687

  6. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  7. Assessment of anaerobic bacterial diversity and its effects on anaerobic system stability and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the link between anaerobic bacterial diversity and, the biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and assessed how amending antibiotic combination and increasing concentration of antibiotics in a stepwise fashion influences the development of resistance genes in anaerobic reactors. The biodegradation, sorption and occurrence of the known antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of erythromycin and tetracycline were investigated using the processes of UV-HPLC and qPCR analysis respectively. Ion Torrent sequencing was used to detect microbial community changes in response to the addition of antibiotics. The overall results indicated that changes in the structure of a microbial community lead to changes in biodegradation capacity, sorption of antibiotics combinations and occurrence of ARGs. The enhanced biodegradation efficiency appeared to generate variations in the structure of the bacterial community. The results suggested that controlling the ultimate Gram-negative bacterial community, especially Acinetobacter-related populations, may promote the successful biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and reduce the occurrence of ARGs. PMID:26897411

  8. Targeted and random bacterial gene disruption using a group II intron (targetron) vector containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jin; Karberg, Michael; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2003-01-01

    Mobile group II introns have been used to develop a novel class of gene targeting vectors, targetrons, which employ base pairing for DNA target recognition and can thus be programmed to insert into any desired target DNA. Here, we have developed a targetron containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker (RAM), which enables one-step bacterial gene disruption at near 100% efficiency after selection. The targetron can be generated via PCR without cloning, and after intron integrati...

  9. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

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    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  10. Simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity in single cells in defined mixtures of pure cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Dalton, Helen M.; Angels, Mark;

    1997-01-01

    A protocol was developed to achieve the simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity at the level of single cells: a chromogenic beta-galactosidase activity assay was combined with in situ hybridization of Fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes to rRNA. The method a...

  11. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  12. Drosha regulates gene expression independently of RNA cleavage function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression.......Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N...

  13. The regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-09-15

    Despite 15 years of intensive research we still do not have an effective treatment for AIDS, the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Recent research is, however, revealing some of the secrets of the replication cycle of this complex retrovirus, and this may lead to the development of novel antiviral compounds. In particular the virus uses strategies for gene expression that seem to be unique in the eukaryotic world. These involve the use of virally encoded regulatory proteins that mediate their effects through interactions with specific viral target sequences present in the messenger RNA rather than in the proviral DNA. If there are no cellular counterparts of these RNA-dependent gene-regulation pathways then they offer excellent targets for the development of antiviral compounds. The viral promoter is also subject to complex regulation by combinations of cellular factors that may be functional in different cell types and at different cell states. Selective interference of specific cellular factors may also provide a route to inhibiting viral replication without disrupting normal cellular functions. The aim of this review is to discuss the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression and, as far as it is possible, to relate the observations to viral pathogenesis. Some areas of research into the regulation of HIV-1 replication have generated controversy and rather than rehearsing this controversy we have imposed our own bias on the field. To redress the balance and to give a broader view of HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis we refer you to a number of excellent reviews [Cullen, B. R. (1992) Microbiol. Rev. 56, 375-394; Levy, J. A. (1993) Microbiol. Rev. 57, 183-394; Antoni, B. A., Stein, S. & Rabson, A. B. (1994) Adv. Virus Res. 43, 53-145; Rosen, C. A. & Fenyoe, E. M. (1995) AIDS (Phila.) 9, S1-S3]. PMID:8856047

  14. Biodegradation of atrazine in transgenic plants expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase (atzA) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Samac, Deborah A; Shapir, Nir; Wackett, Lawrence P; Vance, Carroll P; Olszewski, Neil E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2005-09-01

    Atrazine is one of the most widely used herbicides in the USA. Atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA), the first enzyme in a six-step pathway leading to the mineralization of atrazine in Gram-negative soil bacteria, catalyses the hydrolytic dechlorination and detoxification of atrazine to hydroxyatrazine. In this study, we investigated the potential use of transgenic plants expressing atzA to take up, dechlorinate and detoxify atrazine. Alfalfa, Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco were transformed with a modified bacterial atzA gene, p-atzA, under the control of the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. All transgenic plant species actively expressed p-atzA and grew over a wide range of atrazine concentrations. Thin layer chromatography analyses indicated that in planta expression of p-atzA resulted in the production of hydroxyatrazine. Hydroponically grown transgenic tobacco and alfalfa dechlorinated atrazine to hydroxyatrazine in leaves, stems and roots. Moreover, p-atzA was found to be useful as a conditional-positive selection system to isolate alfalfa and Arabidopsis transformants following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Our work suggests that the in planta expression of p-atzA may be useful for the development of plants for the phytoremediation of atrazine-contaminated soils and soil water, and as a marker gene to select for the integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. PMID:17173634

  15. Identification of molecular markers linked to rice bacterial blight resistance genes from Oryza meyeriana

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    Jing WANG,Chen CHENG,Yanru ZHOU,Yong YANG,Qiong MEI,Junmin LI,Ye CHENG,Chengqi YAN,Jianping CHEN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Y73 is a progeny of asymmetric somatic hybridization between Oryza sativa cv. Dalixiang and the wild rice species Oryza meyeriana. Inoculation with a range of strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae showed that Y73 had inherited a high level of resistance to rice bacterial blight (BB from its wild parent. An F2 population of 7125 individuals was constructed from the cross between Y73 and a BB-susceptible cultivar IR24. After testing 615 SSR and STS markers covering the 12 rice chromosomes, 186 markers were selected that showed polymorphism between Y73 and IR24. Molecular markers linked to the BB resistance genes in Y73 were scanned using the F2 population and the polymorphic markers. The SSR marker RM128 on chromosome 1, the STS marker R03D159 on chromosome 3 and the STS marker R05D104 on chromosome 5 were found to be linked to the rice BB resistance genes in Y73.

  16. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  17. A plant gene up-regulated at rust infection sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Roberts, James K; Mitchell, Heidi J; Zhang, Ren; Lawrence, Gregory J; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Pryor, Tony J

    2002-05-01

    Expression of the fis1 gene from flax (Linum usitatissimum) is induced by a compatible rust (Melampsora lini) infection. Infection of transgenic plants containing a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene under the control of the fis1 promoter showed that induction is highly localized to those leaf mesophyll cells within and immediately surrounding rust infection sites. The level of induction reflects the extent of fungal growth. In a strong resistance reaction, such as the hypersensitive fleck mediated by the L6 resistance gene, there is very little fungal growth and a microscopic level of GUS expression. Partially resistant flax leaves show levels of GUS expression that were intermediate to the level observed in the fully susceptible infection. Sequence and deletion analysis using both transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens expression and stable transformation assays have shown that the rust-inducible fis1 promoter is contained within a 580-bp fragment. Homologs of fis1 were identified in expressed sequence tag databases of a range of plant species including dicots, monocots, and a gymnosperm. Homologous genes isolated from maize (Zea mays; mis1), barley (Hordeum vulgare; bis1), wheat (Triticum aestivum; wis1), and Arabidopsis encode proteins that are highly similar (76%-82%) to the FIS1 protein. The Arabidopsis homologue has been reported to encode a delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase that is involved in the catabolism of proline to glutamate. RNA-blot analysis showed that mis1 in maize and the bis1 homolog in barley are both up-regulated by a compatible infection with the corresponding species-specific rust. The rust-induced genes homologous to fis1 are present in many plants. The promoters of these genes have potential roles for the engineering of synthetic rust resistance genes by targeting transgene expression to the sites of rust infection.

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are a heterogenous group of disorders that are related to alterations in nervous system function. The genetic background of neurological diseases is heterogenous and may include chromosomal aberrations, specific gene mutations and epigenetic defects. This review is aimed at presenting of selected diseases that are associated with different epigenetic alterations. The imprinting defects on chromosome 15 are the cause of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes that both are characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay and specific behavioral phenotype. Besides the imprinting defect, these diseases can also be caused by deletion of chromosome 15 or uniparental disomy. Aberrant epigenetic regulation is also specific for Fragile X syndrome that is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene that leads to global methylation of the promoter region and repression of FMR1 transcription. A number of neurological diseases, mainly associated with intellectual impairment, may be caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in epigenetic regulation. The number of such diseases is rapidly growing thanks to the implementation of genomic sequencing for the identification of their molecular causes. One of the best known diseases linked to defects in epigenetic modifiers is Rett syndrome caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene or its variant - Rett-like syndrome caused by a mutation in CDKL5 or FOXG1 genes. As the epigenetic signature is potentially reversible, much attention is focused on possible therapies with drugs that influence DNA or histone modifications. This is especially important in the case of neurological disorders in which epigenetic changes are observed as the effect of the disease.

  19. DMPD: Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16095970 Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. Jefferies CA, Fit...zgerald KA. Trends Mol Med. 2005 Sep;11(9):403-11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Interferon gene regulation: not all road...s lead to Tolls. PubmedID 16095970 Title Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to

  20. [ANALYSIS OF THE ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENE POLYMORPHISM AND ARTERIAL HYPOTENSION IN PREMATURE INFANTS WITH EARLY ONSET BACTERIAL INFECTIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, E; Pokhylko, V; Chernyavskaya, Yu; Kalyuzka, E; Poltoropavlov, V

    2015-11-01

    The rate of neonatal sepsis is not reduced varying inversely proportional to the gestational age at birth, and may reach 60% in the most immature infants. The high mortality rate of this disease and adverse neurological effects are associated with the development of cardiovascular changes and shock. The main leadership role in the regulation of blood pressure and blood volume in the body plays a renin-angiotensin system. Synthesis of angiotensin-converting enzyme is regulated by the ACE gene. The aim of the study was to identify and analyze the associations between the development of arterial hypotension in premature infants and insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene. We conducted a prospective cohort study, which included 118 prematurely born children with early onset bacterial infections (n=57 with clinical manifestations in the form of hypotension, n=61 without hypotension). Both groups were genotyped to determine the insertion-deletion polymorphism ACE gene. We compared the clinical, laboratory and instrumental parameters in premature infants with hypotension and II, ID, DD genotype of the ACE gene. Also an analysis of the associations between different genotypes of ACE gene and the development of arterial hypotension in prematurely born children was conducted. The distribution of neonates in relation to the three polymorphic variants of ACE gene with respect to I/D polymorphism was identical among the study groups. The study found that children with a variety of I/D polymorphic variants of ACE gene had no significant differences in hemodynamic parameters. The rate of hemodynamic support use did not differ in both groups. The study of the associations between the ACE gene polymorphism and major ultrasound, Doppler indices that characterized both systemic and organ hemodynamics, revealed no significant differences in mean values of all the criteria that have been studied. It can be concluded no effect of I/D polymorphism of ACE gene on the

  1. A plant natriuretic peptide-like gene in the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis may induce hyper-hydration in the plant host: a hypothesis of molecular mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Muhammed

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs are systemically mobile molecules that regulate homeostasis at nanomolar concentrations. PNPs are up-regulated under conditions of osmotic stress and PNP-dependent processes include changes in ion transport and increases of H2O uptake into protoplasts and whole tissue. Presentation of the hypothesis The bacterial citrus pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri str. 306 contains a gene encoding a PNP-like protein. We hypothesise that this bacterial protein can alter plant cell homeostasis and thus is likely to represent an example of molecular mimicry that enables the pathogen to manipulate plant responses in order to bring about conditions favourable to the pathogen such as the induced plant tissue hyper-hydration seen in the wet edged lesions associated with Xanthomonas axonopodis infection. Testing the hypothesis We found a Xanthomonas axonopodis PNP-like protein that shares significant sequence similarity and identical domain organisation with PNPs. We also observed a significant excess of conserved residues between the two proteins within the domain previously identified as being sufficient to induce biological activity. Structural modelling predicts identical six stranded double-psi β barrel folds for both proteins thus supporting the hypothesis of similar modes of action. No significant similarity between the Xanthomonas axonopodis protein and other bacterial proteins from GenBank was found. Sequence similarity of the Xanthomonas axonopodis PNP-like protein with the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A, shared domain organisation and incongruent phylogeny suggest that the PNP-gene may have been acquired by the bacteria in an ancient lateral gene transfer event. Finally, activity of a recombinant Xanthomonas axonopodis protein in plant tissue and changes in symptoms induced by a Xanthomonas axonopodis mutant with a knocked-out PNP-like gene will be experimental proof of molecular mimicry

  2. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-05-25

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle.

  3. Regulation of virulence gene expression in pathogenic Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Ripio, M T; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    1996-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between host and pathogen are characteristic of infections caused by intracellular bacteria. This has favoured the evolution of highly effective control systems by which these pathogens regulate the expression of different virulence factors during sequential steps of the infection process. In the case of the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, these steps involve internalization by eukaryotic cells, lysis of the resulting phagosome, replication as well as movement within the host cytoplasm, direct cell-to-cell spread, and subsequent lysis of a double-membrane vacuole when entering neighbouring cells. Virulence factors which are involved in each of these steps have been identified and the expression of these factors is subject to a co-ordinate and differential control exerted by the major listerial virulence regulator PrfA. This protein belongs to the Crp/Fnr-family of transcriptional activators and recognizes specific target sequences in promoter regions of several listerial virulence genes. Differential expression of these genes during sequential steps of the infection seems to be at least partially mediated by different binding affinities of PrfA to its target sequences. Activity of PrfA-dependent genes and of prfA itself is under the control of several environmental variables which are used by the pathogen to recognize its transition from the free environment into a eukaryotic host.

  4. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  5. Sludge as a potential important source of antibiotic resistance genes in both the bacterial and bacteriophage fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Cáceres, William; Melgarejo, Ana; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Stoll, Claudia; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-07-01

    The emergence and prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment is a serious global health concern. ARGs found in bacteria can become mobilized in bacteriophage particles in the environment. Sludge derived from secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) constitutes a concentrated pool of bacteria and phages that are removed during the treatment process. This study evaluates the prevalence of ARGs in the bacterial and phage fractions of anaerobic digested sludge; five ARGs (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, qnrA, qnrS, and sul1) are quantified by qPCR. Comparison between the wastewater and sludge revealed a shift in the prevalence of ARGs (blaTEM and sul1 became more prevalent in sludge), suggesting there is a change in the bacterial and phage populations from wastewater to those selected during the secondary treatment and the later anaerobic mesophilic digestion of the sludge. ARGs densities were higher in the bacterial than in the phage fraction, with high densities in both fractions; particularly for blaTEM and sul1 (5 and 8 log10 gene copies (GC)/g, respectively, in bacterial DNA; 5.5 and 4.4 log10 GC/g, respectively, in phage DNA). These results question the potential agricultural uses of treated sludge, as it could contribute to the spread of ARGs in the environment and have an impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving ecosystem.

  6. Bacterial diversity in Philippine fermented mustard (burong mustasa) as revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcia, L L H; Estacio, R C; Dalmacio, L M M

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies on the bacterial profile of burong mustasa, a traditional Philippine fermented food, had been conducted using culture-dependent techniques. Since these methods may underestimate the total microbiota of a sample, a culture-independent study was done to determine the bacterial diversity in burong mustasa through molecular biology techniques. Bacterial DNA was isolated from fermented mustard samples at different stages of fermentation. The isolated genomic DNA was amplified by PCR using specific primers for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA). The 1.5 kb amplicons obtained were subjected to nested PCR using primers for the internal variable region of the 16S rDNA. The 585 bp nested PCR amplicons were then subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to separate the different bacteria present in each sample. Distinct and unique bands in the DGGE profile were excised, reamplified, purified and sequenced for bacterial identification. Molecular cloning of the 1.5 kb 16S rDNA was also performed using the pGEM-T Easy Vector System. The cloned gene was sequenced for bacterial identification. The identified microbiota in burong mustasa at different stages of fermentation include lactic acid bacteria and several uncultured bacteria (initial up to the final stages); acetic acid bacteria (middle stage); and Streptobacillus and Fusobacterium species (initial stage). The potential probiotic bacteria found in burong mustasa are Weissella and Lactobacillus. PMID:22146686

  7. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ziuzina

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence

  8. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziuzina, Dana; Boehm, Daniela; Patil, Sonal; Cullen, P J; Bourke, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B) and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence for the inhibition

  9. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziuzina, Dana; Boehm, Daniela; Patil, Sonal; Cullen, P. J.; Bourke, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B) and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated ‘inpack’ using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence for the

  10. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the Deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E.; Queiroz, A.; Serrão Santos, R.; Bettencourt, R.

    2013-11-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterised by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio bacteria. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as a non-pathogenic bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from infected animals by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h to 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the bacterium inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly evident for proteins of 18-20 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarity was found. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that immune genes, as well as experimental

  11. Association between Toll-like receptor 9 gene polymorphisms and risk of bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Shi, H P; Li, F J

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Toll-like receptor 9 gene (TLR9) (TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836) influenced susceptibility to bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population. The study comprised 126 patients with bacterial meningitis and 252 control subjects, all of whom were recruited from the Tuberculosis Hospital of Shanxi Province. Genotyping of TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836 was performed by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with the AA genotype were associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis compared with those with the GG genotype (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19-0.95; P = 0.03). In a recessive model, the AA genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of bacterial meningitis compared with the GG+GA genotype (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-0.99; P = 0.04). However, no significant differences were observed in the association between the TLR9-1237 rs5743836 polymorphism and the risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant, dominant, or recessive models. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest an association between the TLR9+2848 polymorphism and a reduced risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant and recessive models. PMID:27525854

  12. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  13. ApoM: gene regulation and effects on HDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars B; Christoffersen, Christina; Ahnström, Josefin;

    2009-01-01

    and glucose metabolism. Although the concentration of plasma apoM correlates with that of cholesterol, apoM was not identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in two prospective studies. In genetically modified mice, however, changes in plasma apoM concentration caused quantitative and qualitative......The recently discovered apolipoprotein M (apoM) is a plasma protein of the lipocalin family associated with the lipoproteins (mainly high-density lipoproteins, or HDLs). Expression of the apoM gene in the liver is regulated by transcription factors that control key steps in hepatic lipid...... changes in HDLs, and overexpression of the apoM gene reduced atherosclerosis. In conclusion, it seems that apoM plays a part in lipoprotein metabolism; however, the biological impact of apoM in humans remains to be determined....

  14. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  15. Lipocalin 2: a new mechanoresponding gene regulating bone homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Nadia; Capulli, Mattia; Piperni, Sara Gemini; Cappariello, Alfredo; Lau, Patrick; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Heer, Martina; Teti, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical loading represents a crucial factor in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. Its reduction causes loss of bone mass, eventually leading to osteoporosis. In a previous global transcriptome analysis performed in mouse calvarial osteoblasts subjected to simulated microgravity, the most upregulated gene compared to unit gravity condition was Lcn2, encoding the adipokine Lipocalin 2 (LCN2), whose function in bone metabolism is poorly known. To investigate the mechanoresponding properties of LCN2, we evaluated LCN2 levels in sera of healthy volunteers subjected to bed rest, and found a significant time-dependent increase of this adipokine compared to time 0. We then evaluated the in vivo LCN2 regulation in mice subjected to experimentally-induced mechanical unloading by (1) tail suspension, (2) muscle paralysis by botulin toxin A (Botox), or (3) genetically-induced muscular dystrophy (MDX mice), and observed that Lcn2 expression was upregulated in the long bones of all of them, whereas physical exercise counteracted this increase. Mechanistically, in primary osteoblasts transfected with LCN2-expression-vector (OBs-Lcn2) we observed that Runx2 and its downstream genes, Osterix and Alp, were transcriptionally downregulated, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was less prominent versus empty-vector transduced osteoblasts (OBs-empty). OBs-Lcn2 also exhibited an increase of the Rankl/Opg ratio and IL-6 mRNA, suggesting that LCN2 could link poor differentiation of osteoblasts to enhanced osteoclast stimulation. In fact, incubation of purified mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells with conditioned media from OBs-Lcn2 cultures, or their coculture with OBs-Lcn2, improved osteoclastogenesis compared to OBs-empty, whereas treatment with recombinant LCN2 had no effect. In conclusion, our data indicate that LCN2 is a novel osteoblast mechanoresponding gene and that its regulation could be central to the pathological response of the bone tissue to low mechanical forces.

  16. Epigenetic control of virulence gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a LysR-type transcription regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Turner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation within an isogenic bacterial population is thought to ensure the survival of a subset of cells in adverse conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa variably expresses several phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and the production of CupA fimbriae. Here we describe a previously unidentified bistable switch in P. aeruginosa. This switch controls the expression of a diverse set of genes, including aprA, which encodes the secreted virulence factor alkaline protease. We present evidence that bistable expression of PA2432, herein named bexR (bistable expression regulator, which encodes a LysR-type transcription regulator, controls this switch. In particular, using DNA microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter gene fusions, we identify genes directly under the control of BexR and show that these genes are bistably expressed. Furthermore, we show that bexR is itself bistably expressed and positively autoregulated. Finally, using single-cell analyses of a GFP reporter fusion, we present evidence that positive autoregulation of bexR is necessary for bistable expression of the BexR regulon. Our findings suggest that a positive feedback loop involving a LysR-type transcription regulator serves as the basis for an epigenetic switch that controls virulence gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

  17. Up-regulation of SNCA gene expression: implications to synucleinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafierro, L; Chiba-Falek, O

    2016-07-01

    Synucleinopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that share a common pathological lesion of intracellular protein inclusions largely composed by aggregates of alpha-synuclein protein. Accumulating evidence, including genome wide association studies, has implicated alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene in the etiology of synucleinopathies. However, the precise variants within SNCA gene that contribute to the sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and other synucleinopathies and their molecular mechanisms of action remain elusive. It has been suggested that SNCA expression levels are critical for the development of these diseases. Here, we review several model systems that have been developed to advance the understanding of the role of SNCA expression levels in the etiology of synucleinopathies. We also describe different molecular mechanisms that regulate SNCA gene expression and discuss possible strategies for SNCA down-regulation as means for therapeutic approaches. Finally, we highlight some examples that underscore the relationships between the genetic association findings and the regulatory mechanisms of SNCA expression, which suggest that genetic variability in SNCA locus is directly responsible, at least in part, to the changes in gene expression and explain the reported associations of SNCA with synucleinopathies. Future studies utilizing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived neuronal lines and genome editing by CRISPR/Cas9, will allow us to validate, characterize, and manipulate the effects of particular cis-genetic variants on SNCA expression. Moreover, this model system will enable us to compare different neuronal and glial lineages involved in synucleinopathies representing an attractive strategy to elucidate-common and specific-SNCA-genetic variants, regulatory mechanisms, and vulnerable expression levels underlying synucleinopathy spectrum disorders. This forthcoming

  18. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma, E-mail: maia.angelova@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: asma.benhalim@northumbria.ac.uk [Intelligent Modelling Lab, School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 1XE (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  19. The diabetes susceptibility gene Clec16a regulates mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimanpour, Scott A.; Gupta, Aditi; Bakay, Marina; Ferrari, Alana M.; Groff, David N.; Fadista, João; Spruce, Lynn A; Kushner, Jake A.; Groop, Leif; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Kaufman, Brett A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Stoffers, Doris A.

    2014-01-01

    Clec16a has been identified as a disease susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and adrenal dysfunction, but its function is unknown. Here we report that Clec16a is a membrane-associated endosomal protein that interacts with E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1. Loss of Clec16a leads to an increase in the Nrdp1 target Parkin, a master regulator of mitophagy. Islets from mice with pancreas-specific deletion of Clec16a have abnormal mitochondria with reduced oxygen consumption and ATP...

  20. From biophysics to evolutionary genetics: statistical aspects of gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lässig Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is an introductory review on how genes interact to produce biological functions. Transcriptional interactions involve the binding of proteins to regulatory DNA. Specific binding sites can be identified by genomic analysis, and these undergo a stochastic evolution process governed by selection, mutations, and genetic drift. We focus on the links between the biophysical function and the evolution of regulatory elements. In particular, we infer fitness landscapes of binding sites from genomic data, leading to a quantitative evolutionary picture of regulation.

  1. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  2. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  3. TaCPK2-A, a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene that is required for wheat powdery mildew resistance enhances bacterial blight resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shuaifeng; Li, Aili; Tang, Lichuan; Yin, Lingjie; Wu, Liang; Lei, Cailin; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Guanghuai; Zhai, Wenxue; Wei, Yuming; Zheng, Youliang; Lan, Xiujin; Mao, Long

    2013-08-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are important Ca2+ signalling components involved in complex immune and stress signalling networks; but the knowledge of CPK gene functions in the hexaploid wheat is limited. Previously, TaCPK2 was shown to be inducible by powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis tritici, Bgt) infection in wheat. Here, its functions in disease resistance are characterized further. This study shows the presence of defence-response and cold-response cis-elements on the promoters of the A subgenome homoeologue (TaCPK2-A) and D subgenome homoeologue (TaCPK2-D), respectively. Their expression patterns were then confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) using genome-specific primers, where TaCPK2-A was induced by Bgt treatment while TaCPK2-D mainly responded to cold treatment. Downregulation of TaCPK2-A by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) causes loss of resistance to Bgt in resistant wheat lines, indicating that TaCPK2-A is required for powdery mildew resistance. Furthermore, overexpression of TaCPK2-A in rice enhanced bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xoo) resistance. qRT-PCR analysis showed that overexpression of TaCPK2-A in rice promoted the expression of OsWRKY45-1, a transcription factor involved in both fungal and bacterial resistance by regulating jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signalling genes. The opposite effect was found in wheat TaCPK2-A VIGS plants, where the homologue of OsWRKY45-1 was significantly repressed. These data suggest that modulation of WRKY45-1 and associated defence-response genes by CPK2 genes may be the common mechanism for multiple disease resistance in grass species, which may have undergone subfunctionalization in promoters before the formation of hexaploid wheat. PMID:23918959

  4. Use of bacterial two-hybrid system to investigate the molecular interaction between the regulators NifA and NifL of Enterobacter cloacae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO; Gongxian(廖贡献); YU; Guanqiao(俞冠翘); SHEN; Shanjiong(SHEN; Sanchiun,; 沈善炯); ZHU; Jiabi(朱家璧)

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the nitrogen fixation (nif ) genes is tightly regulated by two proteins NifA and NifL in the (-subdivision of the proteobacteria. NifA is a transcriptional activator, which can be inactivated by NifL in the presence of oxygen or excess fixed nitrogen. A direct interaction between E. cloacae NifL and NifA was detected using the bacterial two-hybrid system. This interaction was accelerated in the presence of fixed nitrogen, while oxygen had no effect. NifL proteins, with their C-terminus being deleted, completely lost the ability to interact with NifA. The data suggest that the C-terminal domain of NifL acts as a sensor of the nitrogen status of the cell and mediates interaction with NifA.

  5. Structural basis of response regulator inhibition by a bacterial anti-activator protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda D Baker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex interplay between the response regulator ComA, the anti-activator RapF, and the signaling peptide PhrF controls competence development in Bacillus subtilis. More specifically, ComA drives the expression of genetic competence genes, while RapF inhibits the interaction of ComA with its target promoters. The signaling peptide PhrF accumulates at high cell density and upregulates genetic competence by antagonizing the interaction of RapF and ComA. How RapF functions mechanistically to inhibit ComA activity and how PhrF in turn antagonizes the RapF-ComA interaction were unknown. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of RapF in complex with the ComA DNA binding domain. Along with biochemical and genetic studies, the X-ray crystal structure reveals how RapF mechanistically regulates ComA function. Interestingly, we found that a RapF surface mimics DNA to block ComA binding to its target promoters. Furthermore, RapF is a monomer either alone or in complex with PhrF, and it undergoes a conformational change upon binding to PhrF, which likely causes the dissociation of ComA from the RapF-ComA complex. Finally, we compare the structure of RapF complexed with the ComA DNA binding domain and the structure of RapH complexed with Spo0F. This comparison reveals that RapF and RapH have strikingly similar overall structures, and that they have evolved different, non-overlapping surfaces to interact with diverse cellular targets. To our knowledge, the data presented here reveal the first atomic level insight into the inhibition of response regulator DNA binding by an anti-activator. Compounds that affect the interaction of Rap and Rap-like proteins with their target domains could serve to regulate medically and commercially important phenotypes in numerous Bacillus species, such as sporulation in B. anthracis and sporulation and the production of Cry protein endotoxin in B. thuringiensis.

  6. A laser pointer driven microheater for precise local heating and conditional gene regulation in vivo. Microheater driven gene regulation in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Achermann Marc; Shen Meng-Chieh; Placinta Mike; Karlstrom Rolf O

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Tissue heating has been employed to study a variety of biological processes, including the study of genes that control embryonic development. Conditional regulation of gene expression is a particularly powerful approach for understanding gene function. One popular method for mis-expressing a gene of interest employs heat-inducible heat shock protein (hsp) promoters. Global heat shock of hsp-promoter-containing transgenic animals induces gene expression throughout all tissu...

  7. Gene expression in human hippocampus from cocaine abusers identifies genes which regulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah C Mash

    Full Text Available The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine "rush". Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC = 2.0; p<0.05. RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4. The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction.

  8. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Geoffrey N; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes-promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation-as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the "tumor suppressor" activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2-the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR-the calciostat-is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  9. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general. PMID:26745428

  10. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general.

  11. Specificity determinants for autoproteolysis of LexA, a key regulator of bacterial SOS mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Birdwell, L Dillon; Kohli, Rahul M

    2014-05-20

    Bacteria utilize the tightly regulated stress response (SOS) pathway to respond to a variety of genotoxic agents, including antimicrobials. Activation of the SOS response is regulated by a key repressor-protease, LexA, which undergoes autoproteolysis in the setting of stress, resulting in derepression of SOS genes. Remarkably, genetic inactivation of LexA's self-cleavage activity significantly decreases acquired antibiotic resistance in infection models and renders bacteria hypersensitive to traditional antibiotics, suggesting that a mechanistic study of LexA could help inform its viability as a novel target for combating acquired drug resistance. Despite structural insights into LexA, a detailed knowledge of the enzyme's protease specificity is lacking. Here, we employ saturation and positional scanning mutagenesis on LexA's internal cleavage region to analyze >140 mutants and generate a comprehensive specificity profile of LexA from the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (LexAPa). We find that the LexAPa active site possesses a unique mode of substrate recognition. Positions P1-P3 prefer small hydrophobic residues that suggest specific contacts with the active site, while positions P5 and P1' show a preference for flexible glycine residues that may facilitate the conformational change that permits autoproteolysis. We further show that stabilizing the β-turn within the cleavage region enhances LexA autoproteolytic activity. Finally, we identify permissive positions flanking the scissile bond (P4 and P2') that are tolerant to extensive mutagenesis. Our studies shed light on the active site architecture of the LexA autoprotease and provide insights that may inform the design of probes of the SOS pathway.

  12. An exceptional horizontal gene transfer in plastids: gene replacement by a distant bacterial paralog and evidence that haptophyte and cryptophyte plastids are sisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Jeffrey D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT to the plant mitochondrial genome has recently been shown to occur at a surprisingly high rate; however, little evidence has been found for HGT to the plastid genome, despite extensive sequencing. In this study, we analyzed all genes from sequenced plastid genomes to unearth any neglected cases of HGT and to obtain a measure of the overall extent of HGT to the plastid. Results Although several genes gave strongly supported conflicting trees under certain conditions, we are confident of HGT in only a single case beyond the rubisco HGT already reported. Most of the conflicts involved near neighbors connected by long branches (e.g. red algae and their secondary hosts, where phylogenetic methods are prone to mislead. However, three genes – clpP, ycf2, and rpl36 – provided strong support for taxa moving far from their organismal position. Further taxon sampling of clpP and ycf2 resulted in rejection of HGT due to long-branch attraction and a serious error in the published plastid genome sequence of Oenothera elata, respectively. A single new case, a bacterial rpl36 gene transferred into the ancestor of the cryptophyte and haptophyte plastids, appears to be a true HGT event. Interestingly, this rpl36 gene is a distantly related paralog of the rpl36 type found in other plastids and most eubacteria. Moreover, the transferred gene has physically replaced the native rpl36 gene, yet flanking genes and intergenic regions show no sign of HGT. This suggests that gene replacement somehow occurred by recombination at the very ends of rpl36, without the level and length of similarity normally expected to support recombination. Conclusion The rpl36 HGT discovered in this study is of considerable interest in terms of both molecular mechanism and phylogeny. The plastid acquisition of a bacterial rpl36 gene via HGT provides the first strong evidence for a sister-group relationship between haptophyte and

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Bacterial Persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...

  14. Ascorbic Acid and Gene Expression: Another Example of Regulation of Gene Expression by Small Molecules?

    OpenAIRE

    Belin, Sophie; Kaya, Ferdinand; Burtey, Stéphane; Fontes, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C, AA) has long been considered a food supplement necessary for life and for preventing scurvy. However, it has been reported that other small molecules such as retinoic acid (vitamin A) and different forms of calciferol (vitamin D) are directly involved in regulating the expression of numerous genes. These molecules bind to receptors that are differentially expressed in the embryo and are therefore crucial signalling molecules in vertebrate development. The question is...

  15. Whole gene family expression and drought stress regulation of aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandersson, Erik; Fraysse, Laure; Sjövall-Larsen, Sara; Gustavsson, Sofia; Fellert, Maria; Karlsson, Maria; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per

    2005-10-01

    Since many aquaporins (AQPs) act as water channels, they are thought to play an important role in plant water relations. It is therefore of interest to study the expression patterns of AQP isoforms in order to further elucidate their involvement in plant water transport. We have monitored the expression patterns of all 35 Arabidopsis AQPs in leaves, roots and flowers by cDNA microarrays, specially designed for AQPs, and by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (Q-RT-PCR). This showed that many AQPs are pre-dominantly expressed in either root or flower organs, whereas no AQP isoform seem to be leaf specific. Looking at the AQP subfamilies, most plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and some tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) have a high level of expression, while NOD26-like proteins (NIPs) are present at a much lower level. In addition, we show that PIP transcripts are generally down-regulated upon gradual drought stress in leaves, with the exception of AtPIP1;4 and AtPIP2;5, which are up-regulated. AtPIP2;6 and AtSIP1;1 are constitutively expressed and not significantly affected by the drought stress. The transcriptional down-regulation of PIP genes upon drought stress could also be observed on the protein level. PMID:16235111

  16. Human Specific Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, regulated primarily by the transcription of its catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is critical for controlling cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis by maintaining telomere length. Although there is a high conservation between human and mouse TERT genes, the regulation of their transcription is significantly different in these two species. Whereas mTERT expression is widely detected in adult mice, hTERT is expressed at extremely low levels in most adult human tissues and cells. As a result, mice do not exhibit telomere-mediated replicative aging, but telomere shortening is a critical factor of human aging and its stabilization is essential for cancer development in humans. The chromatin environment and epigenetic modifications of the hTERT locus, the binding of transcriptional factors to its promoter, and recruitment of nucleosome modifying complexes all play essential roles in restricting its transcription in different cell types. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of TERT regulation in human and mouse tissues and cells, and during cancer development.

  17. Mobile gene silencing in Arabidopsis is regulated by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Liang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants and nematodes, RNAi can spread from cells from which it is initiated to other cells in the organism. The underlying mechanism controlling the mobility of RNAi signals is not known, especially in the case of plants. A genetic screen designed to recover plants impaired in the movement but not the production or effectiveness of the RNAi signal identified RCI3, which encodes a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-producing type III peroxidase, as a key regulator of silencing mobility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Silencing initiated in the roots of rci3 plants failed to spread into leaf tissue or floral tissue. Application of exogenous H2O2 reinstated the spread in rci3 plants and accelerated it in wild-type plants. The addition of catalase or MnO2, which breaks down H2O2, slowed the spread of silencing in wild-type plants. We propose that endogenous H2O2, under the control of peroxidases, regulates the spread of gene silencing by altering plasmodesmata permeability through remodelling of local cell wall structure, and may play a role in regulating systemic viral defence.

  18. The type III secreted protein BspR regulates the virulence genes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

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    Jun Kurushima

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the causative agents of whooping cough. These pathogenic species share a number of virulence genes, including the gene locus for the type III secretion system (T3SS that delivers effector proteins. To identify unknown type III effectors in Bordetella, secreted proteins in the bacterial culture supernatants of wild-type B. bronchiseptica and an isogenic T3SS-deficient mutant were compared with iTRAQ-based, quantitative proteomic analysis method. BB1639, annotated as a hypothetical protein, was identified as a novel type III secreted protein and was designated BspR (Bordetella secreted protein regulator. The virulence of a BspR mutant (ΔbspR in B. bronchiseptica was significantly attenuated in a mouse infection model. BspR was also highly conserved in B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, suggesting that BspR is an essential virulence factor in these three Bordetella species. Interestingly, the BspR-deficient strain showed hyper-secretion of T3SS-related proteins. Furthermore, T3SS-dependent host cell cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity were also enhanced in the absence of BspR. By contrast, the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and adenylate cyclase toxin was completely abolished in the BspR-deficient strain. Finally, we demonstrated that BspR is involved in the iron-responsive regulation of T3SS. Thus, Bordetella virulence factors are coordinately but inversely controlled by BspR, which functions as a regulator in response to iron starvation.

  19. Characterization and expression analysis of a peptidoglycan recognition protein gene, SmPGRP2 in mucosal tissues of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) following bacterial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linan; Gao, Chengbin; Liu, Fengqiao; Song, Lin; Su, Baofeng; Li, Chao

    2016-09-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition receptor proteins (PGRPs), a group of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), can recognize peptidoglycan (PGN) of the bacteria cell wall and play an important role in host immune defense against pathogen infection. They are highly structurally conserved through evolution, but with different function in innate immunity between invertebrates and vertebrates. In teleost fish, several PGRPs have been characterized recently. They have both amidase activity and bactericidal activity and are involved in indirectly killing bacteria and regulating multiple signaling pathways. However, the knowledge of PGRPs in mucosal immunity of teleost fish is still limited. In this study, we identified a PGRPs gene (SmPGRP2) of turbot and investigated its expression patterns in mucosal tissues after challenge with Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus iniae and Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. Phylogenetic analysis showed the strongest relationship of turbot PGRP to halibut, which was consistent with their phylogenetic relationships. In addition, SmPGRP2 was ubiquitously expressed in turbot tissues, and constitutive expression levels were higher in classical immune tissues (including liver, spleen, and head-kidney) than mucosal tissues (intestine, gill and skin). After bacterial challenge, the expression of SmPGRP2 was induced and showed a general trend of up-regulation in mucosal tissues, except in intestine following V. anguillarum infection. These different expression patterns varied depending on both pathogen and tissue type, suggesting its distinct roles in the host immune response to bacterial pathogen. PMID:27461422

  20. Occurrence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Bacterial Markers in a Tropical River Receiving Hospital and Urban Wastewaters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Devarajan

    Full Text Available The occurrence of emerging biological contaminants including antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and Faecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB is still little investigated in developing countries under tropical conditions. In this study, the total bacterial load, the abundance of FIB (E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (ENT, Pseudomonas spp. and ARGs (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaNDM and aadA were quantified using quantitative PCR in the total DNA extracted from the sediments recovered from hospital outlet pipes (HOP and the Cauvery River Basin (CRB, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India. The abundance of bacterial marker genes were 120, 104 and 89 fold higher for the E. coli, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp., respectively at HOP when compared with CRB. The ARGs aadA and blaTEM were most frequently detected in higher concentration than other ARGs at all the sampling sites. The ARGs blaSHV and blaNDM were identified in CRB sediments contaminated by hospital and urban wastewaters. The ARGs abundance strongly correlated (r ≥ 0.36, p < 0.05, n = 45 with total bacterial load and E. coli in the sediments, indicating a common origin and extant source of contamination. Tropical aquatic ecosystems receiving wastewaters can act as reservoir of ARGs, which could potentially be transferred to susceptible bacterial pathogens at these sites.

  1. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexia Jiang

    Full Text Available Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB. In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III. Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating

  2. Cloning and expression of bacterial genes coding amino acid dehydrogenases (oxidoreductases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The synthesis of 15N-labeled amino acids from the corresponding α-ketoacids can be accomplished in vitro using bacterial NAD-dependent amino acid dehydrogenases. The example of alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) and leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) will be presented here. Both enzymes belong to NAD dependent oxidoreductase family. AlaDH or L-alanine NAD-oxidoreductase (EC 1.4.1.1) promotes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-alanine to pyruvate (pyruvic acid). LeuDH or L-leucine NAD-oxidoreductase (EC 1.4.1.9) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of many related L-amino acids to corresponding α-ketoacids. The bacterial genes encoding AlaDH from Bacillus subtilis and LeuDH from Bacillus stearothermophilus were cloned separately in pET21b vector, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. The [15N]L-alanine was synthesized by reductive amination of pyruvate, in the presence of 15NH4Cl, NADH, AlaDH and glucose dehydrogenase. The [15N]L-leucine, [15N]L-isoleucine, [15N]L-norleucine, [15N]L-valine and [15N]L-norvaline were produced in the same conditions using LeuDH, as a catalyst, and α- ketoisocaproate, DL-α-keto-β-methyl-n-valerate, α-ketocaproate, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketovalerate, respectively, as substrates. In all cases, the reaction mixtures included glucose dehydrogenase for NADH regeneration with glucose as electron donor. The NADH renewal is more convenient with glucose dehydrogenase than other methods described before using formate dehydrogenase or alcohol dehydrogenase. The glucose dehydrogenase is very active and do not inhibit 15N-labeled amino acid synthesis. As determined by mass spectroscopy, the 15N-labeled amino acids were synthesized with yields between 60% and 95%. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of recombinant amino acid dehydrogenases for in vitro synthesis of 15N-labeled amino acids. (author)

  3. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate...... genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune......-mediated processes (p-value Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures...

  4. Gene expression dosage regulation in an allopolyploid fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Matos

    Full Text Available How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ''diploidization'' could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles' samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression. Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5. Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock

  5. Regulation of dorsal gene expression in Xenopus by the ventralizing homeodomain gene Vox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, A E; Clements, W K; Kimelman, D

    1999-07-15

    Patterning in the vertebrate embryo is controlled by an interplay between signals from the dorsal organizer and the ventrally expressed BMPs. Here we examine the function of Vox, a homeodomain-containing gene that is activated by the ventralizing signal BMP-4. Inhibition of BMP signaling using a dominant negative BMP receptor (DeltaBMPR) leads to the ectopic activation of dorsal genes in the ventral marginal zone, and this activation is prevented by co-injection of Vox. chordin is the most strongly activated of those genes that are up-regulated by DeltaBMPR and is the gene most strongly inhibited by Vox expression. We demonstrate that Vox acts as a transcriptional repressor, showing that the activity of native Vox is mimicked by a Vox-repressor fusion (VoxEnR) and that a Vox-activator fusion (VoxG4A) acts as an antimorph, causing the formation of a partial secondary axis when expressed on the ventral side of the embryo. Although Vox can ectopically activate BMP-4 expression in whole embryos, we see no activation of BMP-4 by VoxG4A, demonstrating that this activation is indirect. Using a hormone-inducible version of VoxG4A, we find that a critical time window for Vox function is during the late blastula period. Using this construct, we demonstrate that only a subset of dorsal genes is directly repressed by Vox, revealing that there are different modes of regulation for organizer genes. Since the major direct target for Vox repression is chordin, we propose that Vox acts in establishing a BMP-4 morphogen gradient by restricting the expression domain of chordin. PMID:10395789

  6. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  7. Regulation of virulence gene expression resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae interactions in chronic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Cope

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a common inflammatory disease of the sinonasal cavity mediated, in part, by polymicrobial communities of bacteria. Recent molecular studies have confirmed the importance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi in CRS. Here, we hypothesize that interaction between S. pneumoniae and NTHi mixed-species communities cause a change in bacterial virulence gene expression. We examined CRS as a model human disease to validate these polymicrobial interactions. Clinical strains of S. pneumoniae and NTHi were grown in mono- and co-culture in a standard biofilm assay. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR (RTqPCR was used to measure gene expression of key virulence factors. To validate these results, we investigated the presence of the bacterial RNA transcripts in excised human tissue from patients with CRS. Consequences of physical or chemical interactions between microbes were also investigated. Transcription of NTHi type IV pili was only expressed in co-culture in vitro, and expression could be detected ex vivo in diseased tissue. S. pneumoniae pyruvate oxidase was up-regulated in co-culture, while pneumolysin and pneumococcal adherence factor A were down-regulated. These results were confirmed in excised human CRS tissue. Gene expression was differentially regulated by physical contact and secreted factors. Overall, these data suggest that interactions between H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae involve physical and chemical mechanisms that influence virulence gene expression of mixed-species biofilm communities present in chronically diseased human tissue. These results extend previous studies of population-level virulence and provide novel insight into the importance of S. pneumoniae and NTHi in CRS.

  8. Identification and gene prediction of a 24 kb region containing xa5, a recessive bacterial blight resistance gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Yiming; JIANG Guanghuai; CHEN Xuewei; XIA Zhihui; LI Xiaobing; ZHU Lihuang; ZHAI Wenxue

    2003-01-01

    Rice xa5 gene provides recessive, race-specific resistance to bacterial blight disease caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and has great value for research and breeding. In an effort to clone xa5, an F2 population of 4892 individuals was developed from the xa5 near isogenic lines, IR24 and IRBB5. A fine mapping procedure was conducted and tightly linked RFLP markers were used to screen a BAC library of IRBB56, a resistant rice line containing the xa5 gene. A 213 kb contig covering the xa5 locus was constructed. According to the sequences from the International Rice Genome Sequening Project (IRGSP), the Chinese Superhybrid Rice Genome Project (SRGP) and some sub-clones of the contig, twelve SSLP and CAPS markers were developed for fine mapping. The xa5 gene was mapped to a 0.3 cM interval between markers K5 and T4, which spanned an interval of approximately 24 kb, co-segregating with marker T2. Sequence analysis of the 24 kb region revealed that an ABC transporter and a basal transcription factor (TFIIa) were potential candidates for the xa5 resistance gene product. The molecular mechanism by which the xa5 gene provides recessive, race-specific resistance to bacterial blight will be elucidated by the functional tests of the 24 kb DNA and the candidate genes.

  9. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Mu Peng; Xiaoxue Zi; Qiuyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacte...

  10. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Qaisar

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators.

  11. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Uzma; Luo, Liming; Haley, Cecily L; Brady, Sean F; Carty, Nancy L; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC) contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators. PMID:23646138

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  13. Automated optogenetic feedback control for precise and robust regulation of gene expression and cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Rullan, Marc; Aoki, Stephanie K; Buchmann, Peter; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of gene expression can have far-reaching implications for biotechnological applications and biological discovery. Thanks to the advantages of light, optogenetics has emerged as an ideal technology for this task. Current state-of-the-art methods for optical expression control fail to combine precision with repeatability and cannot withstand changing operating culture conditions. Here, we present a novel fully automatic experimental platform for the robust and precise long-term optogenetic regulation of protein production in liquid Escherichia coli cultures. Using a computer-controlled light-responsive two-component system, we accurately track prescribed dynamic green fluorescent protein expression profiles through the application of feedback control, and show that the system adapts to global perturbations such as nutrient and temperature changes. We demonstrate the efficacy and potential utility of our approach by placing a key metabolic enzyme under optogenetic control, thus enabling dynamic regulation of the culture growth rate with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and biotechnology. PMID:27562138

  14. Automated optogenetic feedback control for precise and robust regulation of gene expression and cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Rullan, Marc; Aoki, Stephanie K.; Buchmann, Peter; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of gene expression can have far-reaching implications for biotechnological applications and biological discovery. Thanks to the advantages of light, optogenetics has emerged as an ideal technology for this task. Current state-of-the-art methods for optical expression control fail to combine precision with repeatability and cannot withstand changing operating culture conditions. Here, we present a novel fully automatic experimental platform for the robust and precise long-term optogenetic regulation of protein production in liquid Escherichia coli cultures. Using a computer-controlled light-responsive two-component system, we accurately track prescribed dynamic green fluorescent protein expression profiles through the application of feedback control, and show that the system adapts to global perturbations such as nutrient and temperature changes. We demonstrate the efficacy and potential utility of our approach by placing a key metabolic enzyme under optogenetic control, thus enabling dynamic regulation of the culture growth rate with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and biotechnology. PMID:27562138

  15. Dynamical Processes in Ageing, Gene Regulation and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss

    project we constructed a mathematical model and showed that if DNA damage is primarily caused by geno-toxic agents, it would be advantageous for cells to have a fragile DNA repair mechanism. The second part of my Ph.D. thesis covers gene regulation. In the first project we show how RNA polymerase can be...... unstable activation and stable repression is a requirement for the motif to produce oscillations. The last part of this thesis studies the emergence of communication networks. In this study we constructed a simple e-mail game. E-mails from two session with 16 players, who had never met before, showed how...... players develop favourite communication partners. We observed how this dynamic caused a communication network to form. By quantifying the information flow in this network, we were able to shown how that the network functions as an anti-exploration mechanism against "information leeches"....

  16. Cloning and analysis of genes regulating plant cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this work are to identify, clone and analyze genes involved in the regulation of plant cell growth. To do this, we have induced tumors on Arabidopsis thaliana by exposing seed or germinating seedlings to ionizing radiation. The tumors which developed on the plants derived from these seed were excised and established in culture. Unlike normal tissue explants, the tumors are able to grow on hormone-free medium suggesting changes in growth control (either hormonal or other) induced by the radiation exposure. This progress report describes work aimed at characterizing these tumors at the physiological and cellular levels and at determining the molecular basis of the changes leading to the tumorous phenotype

  17. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia: a molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Shull, G E; Dedman, J R; Millhorn, D E

    1997-11-01

    Oxygen is a strict requirement for cell function. The cellular mechanisms by which organisms detect and respond to changes in oxygen tension remain a major unanswered question in pulmonary physiology. Part of the difficulty in addressing this question is due to the limited scope of experiments that can be performed in vivo. In the past few years, several laboratories have begun to make progress in this area, using a variety of cell culture model systems and sophisticated genetic manipulations. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of regulation of gene expression by hypoxia, and describe novel experimental approaches that promise to broaden our understanding of how cells and whole organisms respond to alterations in O2 tension. PMID:9407603

  18. Pneumococcal hydrogen peroxide-induced stress signaling regulates inflammatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, Maria; Hudel, Martina; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Garcia, Ernesto; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Lucas, Rudolf; Chakraborty, Trinad; Pillich, Helena

    2015-01-15

    Microbial infections can induce aberrant responses in cellular stress pathways, leading to translational attenuation, metabolic restriction, and activation of oxidative stress, with detrimental effects on cell survival. Here we show that infection of human airway epithelial cells with Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and regulation of their respective target genes. We identify pneumococcal H2O2 as the causative agent for these responses, as both catalase-treated and pyruvate oxidase-deficient bacteria lacked these activities. Pneumococcal H2O2 induced nuclear NF-κB translocation and transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of translational arrest and ER stress by salubrinal or of MAPK signaling pathways attenuate cytokine transcription. These results provide strong evidence for the notion that inhibition of translation is an important host pathway in monitoring harmful pathogen-associated activities, thereby enabling differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. PMID:25183769

  19. FAT10, a gene up-regulated in various cancers, is cell-cycle regulated

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Dongwei; Lim Chuan-Bian; Lee Caroline GL

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background FAT10 is a member of the ubiquitin-like-modifier family of proteins. Over-expression of the FAT10 gene was observed in the tumors of several epithelial cancers. High FAT10 expression was found to lead to increased chromosome instability via the reduction in the kinetochore localization of MAD2 during the prometaphase stage of the cell-cycle. FAT10 expression was also previously reported to be regulated by cytokines and p53. Results Here, we report that FAT10 expression is ...

  20. Phosphorylation Events in the Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Influence Global Gene Expression and Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga a...

  1. Molecular cloning of the crr gene and evidence that it is the structural gene for IIIGlc, a phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system.

    OpenAIRE

    Meadow, N.D.; Saffen, D W; Dottin, R P; Roseman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Sugar substrates of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system (PTS) normally prevent bacterial cells from utilizing sugars that are not substrates of this system (diauxic growth, "the glucose effect"). We have previously shown that this type of PTS-mediated repression can be completely reversed by a single mutation, designated crr. Two lines of evidence are presented in this report showing that crr is the structural gene for IIIGlc, one of the proteins of the PTS. First, homog...

  2. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple. The purpose of the present study was to quantify rootstock-mediated differences in scion fire blight susceptibility and to identify transcripts in the scion whose expression levels correlated with this response. Results Rootstock influence on scion fire blight resistance was quantified by inoculating three-year old, orchard-grown apple trees, consisting of 'Gala' scions grafted to a range of rootstocks, with E. amylovora. Disease severity was measured by the extent of shoot necrosis over time. 'Gala' scions grafted to G.30 or MM.111 rootstocks showed the lowest rates of necrosis, while 'Gala' on M.27 and B.9 showed the highest rates of necrosis. 'Gala' scions on M.7, S.4 or M.9F56 had intermediate necrosis rates. Using an apple DNA microarray representing 55,230 unique transcripts, gene expression patterns were compared in healthy, un-inoculated, greenhouse-grown 'Gala' scions on the same series of rootstocks. We identified 690 transcripts whose steady-state expression levels correlated with the degree of fire blight susceptibility of the scion/rootstock combinations. Transcripts known to be differentially expressed during E. amylovora infection were disproportionately represented among these transcripts. A second-generation apple microarray representing 26,000 transcripts was developed and was used to test these correlations in an orchard-grown population of trees segregating for fire blight resistance. Of the 690 transcripts originally identified using the first-generation array, 39 had expression levels that correlated with fire blight resistance in the breeding population. Conclusions Rootstocks had significant effects on the fire blight

  3. Ingested plant miRNAs regulate gene expression in animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hervé Vaucheret; Yves Chupeau

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of genetic material or epigenetic information transferred from one organism to another is an important biological question.A recent study demonstrated that plant small RNAs acquired orally through food intake directly influence gene expression in animals after migration through the plasma and delivery to specific organs.Non-protein coding RNAs,and in particular small RNAs,were recently revealed as master chief regulators of gene expression in all organisms.Endogenous small RNAs come in different flavors,depending on their mode of biogenesis.Most microRNAs (miRNA)and short interferring RNAs (siRNA)derive from long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors that are processed into small RNA duplexes,20 to 25-nt long,by RNaselll enzymes called Dicer [1].One strand of small RNA duplexes is loaded onto an Argonaute protein that executes silencing by cleaving or repressing the translation of homologous mRNA [2].In certain species,RNA cleavage is followed by DNA methylation and/or histone modification,leading to heritable epigenetic modification [3].

  4. [Regulation pattern of the FRUITFULL (FUL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tingting; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2010-11-01

    FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box gene that functions early in controlling flowering time, meristem identity and cauline leaf morphology and later in carpel and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to clarify the regulation of FUL expression the upstream regulatory region, -2148 bp - +96 bp and the first intron of the FUL gene were cloned, and vectors with a series of deletion of FUL promoter, and the ones fused with the first intron were constructed. Vectors harboring the fusion of cis-acting elements with the constitutive promoters of TUBULIN and ACTIN were also constructed. Beta-Glucuronidase activity assays of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that two cis-elements were involved in the repression of FUL expression, with one of the two being probably the binding site of the transcriptional factor AP1. And the two CArG boxes played a important role in FUL initiation particularly. Furthermore, the first intron of FUL was shown to participate in the development of carpel and stamen as an enhancer.

  5. Bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus efficiently package various bacterial genes and mobile genetic elements including SCCmec with different frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašlaňová, Ivana; Doškař, Jiří; Varga, Marian; Kuntová, Lucie; Mužík, Jan; Malúšková, Denisa; Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human and veterinary pathogen in which new strains with increasing virulence and antimicrobial resistance occur due to acquiring new genes by horizontal transfer. It is generally accepted that temperate bacteriophages play a major role in gene transfer. In this study, we proved the presence of various bacterial genes of the S. aureus COL strain directly within the phage particles via qPCR and quantified their packaging frequency. Non-parametric statistical analysis showed that transducing bacteriophages φ11, φ80 and φ80α of serogroup B, in contrast to serogroup A bacteriophage φ81, efficiently package selected chromosomal genes localized in 4 various loci of the chromosome and 8 genes carried on variable elements, such as staphylococcal cassette chromosome SCCmec, staphylococcal pathogenicity island SaPI1, genomic islands vSaα and vSaβ, and plasmids with various frequency. Bacterial gene copy number per ng of DNA isolated from phage particles ranged between 1.05 × 10(2) for the tetK plasmid gene and 3.86 × 10(5) for the SaPI1 integrase gene. The new and crucial finding that serogroup B bacteriophages can package concurrently ccrA1 (1.16 × 10(4)) and mecA (1.26 × 10(4)) located at SCCmec type I into their capsids indicates that generalized transduction plays an important role in the evolution and emergence of new methicillin-resistant clones.

  6. INFLUENCE OF ROOT EXUDATES AND BACTERIAL METABOLIC ACTIVITY ON APPARENT CONJUGAL GENE TRANSFER FREQUENCIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF WATER GRASS (ECHINOCLORA CRUSGALLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The premise that genetic exchange is primarily localized in niches characterized by dense bacterial populations and high availability of growth substrates was tested by relating conjugal gene transfer of an RP4 derivative to availability of root exudates and bacterial metabolic a...

  7. Heme regulates the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chimaeric genes containing 5'-flanking soybean leghemoglobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A; Villadsen, IS

    1986-01-01

    The TM1 yeast mutant was transformed with a 2 micron-derived plasmid (YEp24) which carries a chimaeric gene containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene fused to the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the soybean leghemoglobin (Lb) c3 gene. Expression of the chimaeric...... CAT gene is controlled specifically by heme at a post-transcriptional level, most likely by regulating the efficiencies of translation. Expression of another chimaeric gene consisting of the neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) gene fused to only the 5'-flanking region of the Lbc3 gene is regulated...

  8. Regulation of gene expression in vertebrate skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvajal, Jaime J., E-mail: jaime.carvajal@icr.ac.uk; Rigby, Peter W.J., E-mail: peter.rigby@icr.ac.uk

    2010-11-01

    During embryonic development the integration of numerous synergistic signalling pathways turns a single cell into a multicellular organism with specialized cell types and highly structured, organized tissues. To achieve this, cells must grow, proliferate, differentiate and die according to their spatiotemporal position. Unravelling the mechanisms by which a cell adopts the correct fate in response to its local environment remains one of the fundamental goals of biological research. In vertebrates skeletal myogenesis is coordinated by the activation of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in response to signals that are interpreted by their associated regulatory elements in different precursor cells during development. The MRFs trigger a cascade of transcription factors and downstream structural genes, ultimately resulting in the generation of one of the fundamental histotypes. In this review we discuss the regulation of the different MRFs in relation to their position in the myogenic cascade, the changes in the general transcriptional machinery during muscle differentiation and the emerging importance of miRNA regulation in skeletal myogenesis.

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  10. BPhyOG: An interactive server for genome-wide inference of bacterial phylogenies based on overlapping genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Kui

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes (OGs in bacterial genomes are pairs of adjacent genes of which the coding sequences overlap partly or entirely. With the rapid accumulation of sequence data, many OGs in bacterial genomes have now been identified. Indeed, these might prove a consistent feature across all microbial genomes. Our previous work suggests that OGs can be considered as robust markers at the whole genome level for the construction of phylogenies. An online, interactive web server for inferring phylogenies is needed for biologists to analyze phylogenetic relationships among a set of bacterial genomes of interest. Description BPhyOG is an online interactive server for reconstructing the phylogenies of completely sequenced bacterial genomes on the basis of their shared overlapping genes. It provides two tree-reconstruction methods: Neighbor Joining (NJ and Unweighted Pair-Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA. Users can apply the desired method to generate phylogenetic trees, which are based on an evolutionary distance matrix for the selected genomes. The distance between two genomes is defined by the normalized number of their shared OG pairs. BPhyOG also allows users to browse the OGs that were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships. It provides detailed annotation for each OG pair and the features of the component genes through hyperlinks. Users can also retrieve each of the homologous OG pairs that have been determined among 177 genomes. It is a useful tool for analyzing the tree of life and overlapping genes from a genomic standpoint. Conclusion BPhyOG is a useful interactive web server for genome-wide inference of any potential evolutionary relationship among the genomes selected by users. It currently includes 177 completely sequenced bacterial genomes containing 79,855 OG pairs, the annotation and homologous OG pairs of which are integrated comprehensively. The reliability of phylogenies complemented by

  11. An Effective Tri-Clustering Algorithm Combining Expression Data with Gene Regulation Information

    OpenAIRE

    Ao Li; David Tuck

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Bi-clustering algorithms aim to identify sets of genes sharing similar expression patterns across a subset of conditions. However direct interpretation or prediction of gene regulatory mechanisms may be difficult as only gene expression data is used. Information about gene regulators may also be available, most commonly about which transcription factors may bind to the promoter region and thus control the expression level of a gene. Thus a method to integrate gene expression and g...

  12. Activation of p38α in T cells regulates the intestinal host defense against attaching and effacing bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Eun-Jin; Bang, Bo Ram; Kang, Seung-Goo; Ma, Jianhui; Otsuka, Motoyuki; Kang, Jiman; Stahl, Martin; Han, Jiahuai; Xiao, Changchun; Vallance, Bruce A.; Kang, Young Jun

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal infections by attaching and effacing (A/E) bacterial pathogens cause severe colitis and bloody diarrhea. Although p38α in intestine epithelial cells (IEC) plays an important role in promoting protection against A/E bacteria by regulating T cell recruitment, its impact on immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we show that activation of p38α in T cells is critical for the clearance of the A/E pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Mice deficient of p38α in T cells, but not in mac...

  13. Development of bacterial spot on near-isogenic lines of bell pepper carrying gene pyramids composed of defeated major resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousik, C S; Ritchie, D F

    1999-11-01

    ABSTRACT Disease severity caused by races 1 through 6 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria on eight near-isogenic lines (isolines) of Early Calwonder (ECW) with three major resistance genes (Bs1, Bs2, and Bs3) in different combinations was evaluated in the greenhouse and field. Strains representing races 1, 3, 4, and 6 caused similar high levels of disease severity, followed by races 2 and 5 on susceptible ECW. Race 3 caused severe disease on all isolines lacking resistance gene Bs2. Race 4, which defeats Bs1 and Bs2, caused less disease on isoline ECW-12R (carries Bs1 + Bs2), than on isolines ECW, ECW-10R (carries Bs1), and ECW-20R (carries Bs2). Similar results were obtained with race 4 strains in field studies conducted during 1997 and 1998. In greenhouse studies, race 6, which defeats all three major genes, caused less disease on isoline ECW-13R (carries Bs1 + Bs3) and ECW-123R (carries Bs1 + Bs2 + Bs3) than on isolines ECW, ECW-10R, ECW-20R, and ECW-30R (carries Bs3), but not on ECW-23R (carries Bs2 + Bs3). In greenhouse studies with commercial hybrids, strains of races 4 and 6 caused less disease on Boynton Bell (carries Bs1 + Bs2) than on Camelot (carries no known resistance genes), King Arthur (carries Bs1), and X3R Camelot (carries Bs2). Race 6 caused less disease on hybrid R6015 (carries Bs1 + Bs2 + Bs3) and Sentinel (carries Bs1 + Bs3) than on Camelot. Residual effects were not as evident in field studies with race 6 strains. Defeated major resistance genes deployed in specific gene combinations (i.e., gene pyramids) were associated with less area under the disease progress curve than when genes were deployed individually in isolines of ECW or commercial hybrids. Successful management of bacterial spot of pepper is achieved incrementally by integrating multiple tactics. Although there is evidence of residual effects from defeated genes, these effects alone likely will not provide acceptable bacterial spot control in commercial production fields

  14. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bettencourt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterized by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio strains. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as an irrelevant bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from animals dissected at 12 h and 24 h post-infection times by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h and 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the microorganism species inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly around a protein area, of 18 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarities were found. Multivariate

  15. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B., E-mail: Sanne.Hermsen@rivm.nl [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pronk, Tessa E. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den [Centre for Environmental Quality, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ven, Leo T.M. van der [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  16. Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Heitzer, Armin; Digrazia, Philip M.

    1991-01-01

    An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has shown great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. This technique was used to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene and toluene/xylene degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed.

  17. HrpA, a DEAH-box RNA helicase, is involved in global gene regulation in the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan Salman-Dilgimen

    Full Text Available Spirochetes causing Lyme borreliosis are obligate parasites that can only be found in a tick vector or a vertebrate host. The ability to survive in these two disparate environments requires up and downregulation of specific genes by regulatory circuits that remain largely obscure. In this work on the Lyme spirochete, B. burgdorferi, we show that a disruption of the hrpA gene, which encodes a putative RNA helicase, results in a complete loss in the ability of the spirochetes to infect mice by needle inoculation. Studies of protein expression in culture by 2D gels revealed a change in the expression of 33 proteins in hrpA clones relative to the wild-type parent. Quantitative characterization of protein expression by iTRAQ analysis revealed a total of 187 differentially regulated proteins in an hrpA background: 90 downregulated and 97 upregulated. Forty-two of the 90 downregulated and 65 of the 97 upregulated proteins are not regulated under any conditions by the previously reported regulators in B. burgdorferi (bosR, rrp2, rpoN, rpoS or rrp1. Downregulated and upregulated proteins also fell into distinct functional categories. We conclude that HrpA is part of a new and distinct global regulatory pathway in B. burgdorferi gene expression. Because an HrpA orthologue is present in many bacteria, its participation in global regulation in B. burgdorferi may have relevance in other bacterial species where its function remains obscure. We believe this to be the first report of a role for an RNA helicase in a global regulatory pathway in bacteria. This finding is particularly timely with the recent growth of the field of RNA regulation of gene expression and the ability of RNA helicases to modulate RNA structure and function.

  18. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  19. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  20. Variable effects of oxytetracycline on antibiotic resistance gene abundance and the bacterial community during aerobic composting of cow manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xun; Sun, Wei; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Jia-Jun; Yin, Ya-Nan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-09-01

    Livestock manure is often subjected to aerobic composting but little is known about the variation in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the composting process under different concentrations of antibiotics. This study compared the effects of three concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC; 10, 60, and 200mg/kg) on ARGs and the succession of the bacterial community during composting. Very similar trends were observed in the relative abundances (RAs) of each ARG among the OTC treatments and the control during composting. After composting, the RAs of tetC, tetX, sul1, sul2, and intI1 increased 2-43 times, whereas those of tetQ, tetM, and tetW declined by 44-99%. OTC addition significantly increased the absolute abundances and RAs of tetC and intI1, while 200mg/kg OTC also enhanced those of tetM, tetQ, and drfA7. The bacterial community could be grouped according to the composting time under different treatments. The highest concentration of OTC had a more persistent effect on the bacterial community. In the present study, the succession of the bacterial community appeared to have a greater influence on the variation of ARGs during composting than the presence of antibiotics. Aerobic composting was not effective in reducing most of the ARGs, and thus the compost product should be considered as an important reservoir for ARGs. PMID:27179201

  1. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-09-24

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  2. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-10-01

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future. PMID:26404329

  3. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate......The coastal upwelling system off central Namibia is one of the most productive regions of the oceans and is characterized by frequently occurring shelf anoxia with severe effects for the benthic life and fisheries. We present data on water column dissolved oxygen, sulfide, nitrate and nitrite, pore...... water profiles for dissolved,sulfide and sulfate, S-35-sulfate reduction rates, as well as bacterial counts of large sulfur bacteria from 20 stations across the continental shelf and slope. The stations covered two transects and included the inner shelf with its anoxic and extremely oxygen...

  4. Global Regulation of Virulence Determinants During Plant Colonization in the Bacterial Phytopathogen, Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    OpenAIRE

    Burbank, Lindsey

    2014-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the etiological agent of Stewart's wilt, is a bacterial pathogen of sweet corn which colonizes both the apoplast and xylem tissues. During the initial stages of the infection process, the pathogen forms water-soaked lesions through lysis of the plant cells, followed by colonization of the xylem tissue where it can grow to high cell densities and form biofilms. Biofilm formation within the xylem vessels can block water flow, causing the characteristic wiltin...

  5. Regulation of Pulmonary and Systemic Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Responses in Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Elafin

    OpenAIRE

    Sallenave, J-M; Cunningham, G A; James, R M; McLachlan, G.; Haslett, C

    2003-01-01

    The control of lung inflammation is of paramount importance in a variety of acute pathologies, such as pneumonia, the acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. It is becoming increasingly apparent that local innate immune responses in the lung are negatively influenced by systemic inflammation. This is thought to be due to a local deficit in cytokine responses by alveolar macrophages and neutrophils following systemic bacterial infection and the development of a septic response. Recent...

  6. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    OpenAIRE

    Aynur Aybey; Alev Usta; Elif Demirkan

    2014-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) activity of psychotropic drugs was tested aga...

  7. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. PMID:26814126

  8. Identification of up-regulated genes in human uterine leiomyoma by suppression subtractive hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In searching for differentially expressed genes in human uterine leiomyomas (ULs), suppression sub-tractive hybridization was used to construct an UL up-regulated library, which turned out to represent 88genes. After two rounds of screening by reverse Northern analysis, twenty genes were proved to be up-regulated, including seventeen known genes and three genes with unknown function. All these genes werefirstly associated with UL. Three genes with notable difference were selected for Northern confirmationOur results proved the authenticity of the twenty genes. One gene named Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) showedup-regulation in 4/6 of the patients and investigation of tissue distribution indicated that it had obviousexpression in prostate, testis, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.

  9. The intrinsic cephalosporin resistome of Listeria monocytogenes in the context of stress response, gene regulation, pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk-Balska, A; Markiewicz, Z

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsic resistance to antibiotics is a serious therapeutic problem in the case of many bacterial species. The Gram-positive human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is intrinsically resistant to broad spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics, which are commonly used in therapy of bacterial infections. Besides three penicillin-binding proteins the intrinsic cephalosporin resistome of L. monocytogenes includes multidrug resistance transporter transporters, proteins involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and modification, cell envelope proteins with structural or general detoxification function, cytoplasmic proteins with unknown function and regulatory proteins. Analysis of the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the intrinsic resistance of L. monocytogenes to cephalosporins highlights the high complexity of control of the intrinsic resistance phenotype. The regulation of the transcription of the intrinsic resistome determinants involves the activity of eight regulators, namely LisR, CesR, LiaR, VirR, σ(B) , σ(H) , σ(L) and PrfA, of which the most prominent role play LisR, CesR and σ(B) . Furthermore, the vast majority of the intrinsic resistome determinants contribute to the tolerance of different stress conditions and virulence. A study indicates that O-acetyltransferase OatA is the most promising candidate for co-drug development since an agent targeting OatA should sensitize L. monocytogenes to certain antibiotics, therefore improving the efficacy of listeriosis treatment as well as food preservation measures. PMID:26509460

  10. Expression of bacterial genes in transgenic tobacco: methods, applications and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Jube, Sandro; Borthakur, Dulal

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco is the most commonly used plant for expression of transgenes from a variety of organisms, because it is easily grown and transformed, it provides abundant amounts of fresh tissue and has a well-established cell culture system. Many bacterial proteins involved in the synthesis of commercial products are currently engineered for production in tobacco. Bacterial enzymes synthesized in tobacco can enhance protection against abiotic stresses and diseases, and provide a system to test appli...

  11. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community composition in a river influenced by a wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Marti

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance represents a global health problem, requiring better understanding of the ecology of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs, their selection and their spread in the environment. Antibiotics are constantly released to the environment through wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluents. We investigated, therefore, the effect of these discharges on the prevalence of ARGs and bacterial community composition in biofilm and sediment samples of a receiving river. We used culture-independent approaches such as quantitative PCR to determine the prevalence of eleven ARGs and 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing to examine the composition of bacterial communities. Concentration of antibiotics in WWTP influent and effluent were also determined. ARGs such as qnrS, bla TEM, bla CTX-M, bla SHV, erm(B, sul(I, sul(II, tet(O and tet(W were detected in all biofilm and sediment samples analyzed. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the relative abundance of ARGs in biofilm samples collected downstream of the WWTP discharge. We also found significant differences with respect to community structure and composition between upstream and downstream samples. Therefore, our results indicate that WWTP discharges may contribute to the spread of ARGs into the environment and may also impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving river.

  12. Development of Gene-Pyramid Lines of the Elite Restorer Line, RPHR-1005 Possessing Durable Bacterial Blight and Blast Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash Kumar, V; Balachiranjeevi, C H; Bhaskar Naik, S; Rambabu, R; Rekha, G; Harika, G; Hajira, S K; Pranathi, K; Anila, M; Kousik, M; Vijay Kumar, S; Yugander, A; Aruna, J; Dilip Kumar, T; Vijaya Sudhakara Rao, K; Hari Prasad, A S; Madhav, M S; Laha, G S; Balachandran, S M; Prasad, M S; Viraktamath, B C; Ravindra Babu, V; Sundaram, R M

    2016-01-01

    RPHR-1005, the stable restorer line of the popular medium slender (MS) grain type rice hybrid, DRRH-3 was improved in this study for resistance against bacterial blight (BB) and blast diseases through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). In this study, four major resistance genes (i.e., Xa21 and Xa33 for BB resistance and Pi2 and Pi54 for blast resistance) have been transferred to RPHR-1005 using RPBio Patho-1 (possessing Xa21 + Pi2), RPBio Patho-2 (possessing Xa21 + Pi54) and FBR1-15EM (possessing Xa33) as the donors. Foreground selection was carried out using PCR-based molecular markers specific for the target resistance genes and the major fertility restorer genes, Rf3 and Rf4, while background selection was carried out using a set of parental polymorphic rice SSR markers and backcrossing was continued uptoBC2 generation. At BC2F2, plants possessing the gene combination- Xa21 + Pi2, Xa21 + Pi54 and Xa33 in homozygous condition and with >92% recovery of the recurrent parent genome (RPG) were identified and intercrossed to combine all the four resistance genes. Twenty-two homozygous, pyramid lines of RPHR-1005 comprising of three single-gene containing lines, six 2-gene containing lines, eight 3-gene containing lines, and five 4-gene containing lines were identified among the double intercross lines at F3 generation (DICF3). They were then evaluated for their resistance against BB and blast, fertility restoration ability and for key agro-morphological traits. While single gene containing lines were resistant to either BB or blast, the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene pyramid lines showed good level of resistance against both and/or either of the two diseases. Most of the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene containing pyramid lines showed yield levels and other key agro-morphological and grain quality traits comparable to the original recurrent parent and showed complete fertility restoration ability, with a few showing higher yield as compared to RPHR-1005. Further, the

  13. Development of Gene-Pyramid Lines of the Elite Restorer Line, RPHR-1005 Possessing Durable Bacterial Blight and Blast Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash Kumar, V; Balachiranjeevi, C H; Bhaskar Naik, S; Rambabu, R; Rekha, G; Harika, G; Hajira, S K; Pranathi, K; Anila, M; Kousik, M; Vijay Kumar, S; Yugander, A; Aruna, J; Dilip Kumar, T; Vijaya Sudhakara Rao, K; Hari Prasad, A S; Madhav, M S; Laha, G S; Balachandran, S M; Prasad, M S; Viraktamath, B C; Ravindra Babu, V; Sundaram, R M

    2016-01-01

    RPHR-1005, the stable restorer line of the popular medium slender (MS) grain type rice hybrid, DRRH-3 was improved in this study for resistance against bacterial blight (BB) and blast diseases through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). In this study, four major resistance genes (i.e., Xa21 and Xa33 for BB resistance and Pi2 and Pi54 for blast resistance) have been transferred to RPHR-1005 using RPBio Patho-1 (possessing Xa21 + Pi2), RPBio Patho-2 (possessing Xa21 + Pi54) and FBR1-15EM (possessing Xa33) as the donors. Foreground selection was carried out using PCR-based molecular markers specific for the target resistance genes and the major fertility restorer genes, Rf3 and Rf4, while background selection was carried out using a set of parental polymorphic rice SSR markers and backcrossing was continued uptoBC2 generation. At BC2F2, plants possessing the gene combination- Xa21 + Pi2, Xa21 + Pi54 and Xa33 in homozygous condition and with >92% recovery of the recurrent parent genome (RPG) were identified and intercrossed to combine all the four resistance genes. Twenty-two homozygous, pyramid lines of RPHR-1005 comprising of three single-gene containing lines, six 2-gene containing lines, eight 3-gene containing lines, and five 4-gene containing lines were identified among the double intercross lines at F3 generation (DICF3). They were then evaluated for their resistance against BB and blast, fertility restoration ability and for key agro-morphological traits. While single gene containing lines were resistant to either BB or blast, the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene pyramid lines showed good level of resistance against both and/or either of the two diseases. Most of the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene containing pyramid lines showed yield levels and other key agro-morphological and grain quality traits comparable to the original recurrent parent and showed complete fertility restoration ability, with a few showing higher yield as compared to RPHR-1005. Further, the

  14. The adjacent positioning of co-regulated gene pairs is widely conserved across eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnone James T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordinated cell growth and development requires that cells regulate the expression of large sets of genes in an appropriate manner, and one of the most complex and metabolically demanding pathways that cells must manage is that of ribosome biogenesis. Ribosome biosynthesis depends upon the activity of hundreds of gene products, and it is subject to extensive regulation in response to changing cellular conditions. We previously described an unusual property of the genes that are involved in ribosome biogenesis in yeast; a significant fraction of the genes exist on the chromosomes as immediately adjacent gene pairs. The incidence of gene pairing can be as high as 24% in some species, and the gene pairs are found in all of the possible tandem, divergent, and convergent orientations. Results We investigated co-regulated gene sets in S. cerevisiae beyond those related to ribosome biogenesis, and found that a number of these regulons, including those involved in DNA metabolism, heat shock, and the response to cellular stressors were also significantly enriched for adjacent gene pairs. We found that as a whole, adjacent gene pairs were more tightly co-regulated than unpaired genes, and that the specific gene pairing relationships that were most widely conserved across divergent fungal lineages were correlated with those genes that exhibited the highest levels of transcription. Finally, we investigated the gene positions of ribosome related genes across a widely divergent set of eukaryotes, and found a significant level of adjacent gene pairing well beyond yeast species. Conclusion While it has long been understood that there are connections between genomic organization and transcriptional regulation, this study reveals that the strategy of organizing genes from related, co-regulated pathways into pairs of immediately adjacent genes is widespread, evolutionarily conserved, and functionally significant.

  15. Regulation of Metformin Response by Breast Cancer Associated Gene 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Buac

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a master regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, has emerged as a promising molecular target in the prevention of breast cancer. Clinical trials using the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved, AMPK-activating, antidiabetic drug metformin are promising in this regard, but the question of why metformin is protective for some women but not others still remains. Breast cancer associated gene 2 (BCA2/Rabring7/RNF115, a novel Really Interesting New Gene (RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase, is overexpressed in >50% of breast tumors. Herein, we report that BCA2 is an endogenous inhibitor of AMPK activation in breast cancer cells and that BCA2 inhibition increases the efficacy of metformin. BCA2 overexpression inhibited both basal and inducible Thr172 phosphorylation/activation of AMPKα1, while BCA2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA enhanced phosphorylated AMPKα1 (pAMPKα1. The AMPK-suppressive function of BCA2 requires its E3 ligase-specific RING domain, suggesting that BCA2 targets some protein controlling (dephosphorylation of AMPKα1 for degradation. Activation of AMPK by metformin triggered a growth inhibitory signal but also increased BCA2 protein levels, which correlated with AKT activation and could be curbed by an AMPK inhibitor, suggesting a potential feedback mechanism from pAMPKα1 to pAkt to BCA2. Finally, BCA2 siRNA, or inhibition of its upstream stabilizing kinase AKT, increased the growth inhibitory effect of metformin in multiple breast cancer cell lines, supporting the conclusion that BCA2 weakens metformin's efficacy. Our data suggest that metformin in combination with a BCA2 inhibitor may be a more effective breast cancer treatment strategy than metformin alone.

  16. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; ZHOU Hui

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) hold a central place In protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein, thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules. In recent years, however, various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond par-ticipating in protein synthesis. When suffering from certain nutritional stresses, tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged, and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression, so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses. In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells, the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs. On the other hand, this retrograde action effectively re-duces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation. Quite recently, various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense. Under certain physiological or environmental stresses, they are specifically cleaved into fragments of differ-ent lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm. These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon. Instead, a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced, which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression. Inves-tigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier, which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic informa-tion.

  17. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs(tRNAs) hold a central place in protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein,thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules.In recent years,however,various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond participating in protein synthesis.When suffering from certain nutritional stresses,tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged,and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression,so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses.In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells,the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs.On the other hand,this retrograde action effectively reduces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation.Quite recently,various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense.Under certain physiological or environmental stresses,they are specifically cleaved into fragments of different lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm.These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon.Instead,a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced,which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression.Investigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier,which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic information.

  18. Gravity regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (GENARA experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Carnero-D&íaz, Eugénie; Medina, Francisco Javier; Gasset, Gilbert; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Graziana, Annick; Mazars, Christian; Le Disquet, Isabelle; Eche, Brigitte; Grat, Sabine; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2012-07-01

    In higher plants, post-embryonic development is possible through the expression of a set of genes constituting the morphogenetic program that contribute to the production of tissues and organs during the whole plant life cycle. Plant development is mainly controlled by internal factors such as phytohormones, as well as by environmental factors, among which gravity plays a key role (gravi-morphogenetic program). The GENARA space experiment has been designed with the goal of contributing to a better understanding of this gravi-morphogenetic program through the identification and characterization of some gravity regulated proteins (GR proteins) by using quantitative proteomic methods, and through the study of the impact of plant hormones on the expression of this program. Among plant hormones, auxin is the major regulator of organogenesis. In fact, it affects numerous plant developmental processes, e.g. cell division and elongation, autumnal loss of leaves, and the formation of buds, roots, flowers and fruits. Furthermore, it also plays a key role in the mechanisms of different tropisms (including gravitropism) that modulate fundamental features of plant growth. The expression of significant genes involved in auxin transport and in auxin signal perception in root cells is being studied in space-grown seedlings and compared with the corresponding ground controls. This experiment was scheduled to be performed in The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a new facility for plant cultivation and Plant Molecular Biology studies, at ISS. However only one aspect of this experiment was flown and concerns the qualitative and quantitative changes in membrane proteins supposed to be mainly associated with cell signaling and has been called GENARA A. The second part dealing with the function of auxin in the gravi-morphogenetic program and the alterations induced by microgravity will be studied through mutants affected on biosynthesis, transport or perception of auxin in a

  19. miR2Gene: pattern discovery of single gene, multiple genes, and pathways by enrichment analysis of their microRNA regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Chengxiang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, a number of tools have been developed to explore microRNAs (miRNAs by analyzing their target genes. However, a reverse problem, that is, inferring patterns of protein-coding genes through their miRNA regulators, has not been explored. As various miRNA annotation data become available, exploring gene patterns by analyzing the prior knowledge of their miRNA regulators is becoming more feasible. Results In this study, we developed a tool, miR2Gene, for this purpose. Various sets of miRNAs, according to prior rules such as function, associated disease, tissue specificity, family, and cluster, were integrated with miR2Gene. For given genes, miR2Gene evaluates the enrichment of the predicted miRNAs that regulate them in each miRNA set. This tool can be used for single genes, multiple genes, and KEGG pathways. For the KEGG pathway, genes with enriched miRNA sets are highlighted according to various rules. We confirmed the usefulness of miR2Gene through case studies. Conclusions miR2Gene represents a novel and useful tool that integrates miRNA knowledge for protein-coding gene analysis. miR2Gene is freely available at http://cmbi.hsc.pku.edu.cn/mir2gene.

  20. The Change-Over of Yin-yang and Gene Regulation in Kidney Deficiency Syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fei-xia; HE Li-qun

    2009-01-01

    The present paper studies gene regulation in kidney deficiency syndromes from the simple Nephrotic Syndrome and with the principle of positive-negative regulation to control the change-over ofyin-yang, the modern molecular biological techniques can be used, such as gene chip, representational difference analysis (RDA) and gene sequence analysis, so as to investigate the inner relationship between the genes and kidney deficiency syndromes and prove the effect given by these genes on the pathophysiological status of change-over ofyin-yang in kidney deficiency syndromes.This philosophical approach and method can also be adopted for studies of the related genes in other TCM syndromes.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of bone sialoprotein gene expression by Osx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Huang, Yehong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chi

    2016-08-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. It is due to unbalance between bone formation and bone resorption. Bone formation is a complex process which involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. Osteoblasts produce a characteristic extracellular collagenous matrix that subsequently becomes mineralized. Osterix (Osx) is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation. Bone sialoprotein (Bsp) is a member of the SIBLING gene family. Expression of Bsp correlates with the differentiation of osteoblasts and the onset of mineralization. Our preliminary data showed that Bsp was abolished in Osx-null mice; however, the detailed mechanism of Osx regulation on Bsp is not fully understood. In this study, regulation of Bsp expression by Osx was further characterized. It was shown that overexpression of Osx led to Bsp upregulation. Inhibition of Osx by small interfering RNA resulted in Bsp downregulation in osteoblast. Transfection assay demonstrated that Osx was able to activate Bsp promoter reporter in a dose-dependent manner. To define minimal region of Bsp promoter activated by Osx, a series of deletion mutants of Bsp promoter were generated, and the minimal region was narrowed down to the proximal 100 bp. Point-mutagenesis studies showed that one GC-rich site was required for Bsp promoter activation by Osx. ChIP assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx associated with native Bsp promoter in primary osteoblasts. Our observations provide evidence that Osx targets Bsp expression directly. PMID:27261434

  2. Transcriptional responses of Italian ryegrass during interaction with Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis reveal novel candidate genes for bacterial wilt resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Asp, Torben; Widmer, Franko;

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis (Xtg) causes bacterial wilt, a severe disease of forage grasses such as Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). In order to gain a more detailed understanding of the genetic control of resistance mechanisms and to provide prerequisites for marker assisted...... selection, the partial transcriptomes of two Italian ryegrass genotypes, one resistant and one susceptible to bacterial wilt were compared at four time points after Xtg infection. A cDNA microarray developed from a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) expressed sequence tag set consisting of 9,990 unique...... genes was used for transcriptome analysis in Italian ryegrass. An average of 4,487 (45%) of the perennial ryegrass sequences spotted on the cDNA microarray were detected by cross-hybridisation to Italian ryegrass. Transcriptome analyses of the resistant versus the susceptible genotype revealed...

  3. Seasonal changes in bacterial and archaeal gene expression patterns across salinity gradients in the Columbia River coastal margin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria W Smith

    Full Text Available Through their metabolic activities, microbial populations mediate the impact of high gradient regions on ecological function and productivity of the highly dynamic Columbia River coastal margin (CRCM. A 2226-probe oligonucleotide DNA microarray was developed to investigate expression patterns for microbial genes involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the CRCM. Initial experiments with the environmental microarrays were directed toward validation of the platform and yielded high reproducibility in multiple tests. Bioinformatic and experimental validation also indicated that >85% of the microarray probes were specific for their corresponding target genes and for a few homologs within the same microbial family. The validated probe set was used to query gene expression responses by microbial assemblages to environmental variability. Sixty-four samples from the river, estuary, plume, and adjacent ocean were collected in different seasons and analyzed to correlate the measured variability in chemical, physical and biological water parameters to differences in global gene expression profiles. The method produced robust seasonal profiles corresponding to pre-freshet spring (April and late summer (August. Overall relative gene expression was high in both seasons and was consistent with high microbial abundance measured by total RNA, heterotrophic bacterial production, and chlorophyll a. Both seasonal patterns involved large numbers of genes that were highly expressed relative to background, yet each produced very different gene expression profiles. April patterns revealed high differential gene expression in the coastal margin samples (estuary, plume and adjacent ocean relative to freshwater, while little differential gene expression was observed along the river-to-ocean transition in August. Microbial gene expression profiles appeared to relate, in part, to seasonal differences in nutrient availability and potential resource competition

  4. Multi-scale modeling of gene regulation of morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Kaandorp; D. Botman; C. Tamulonis; R Dries

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a spatio-temporal gene regulatory network for early gastrulation in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We measure gene expression during early gastrulation using a gene expression quantification tool. We measure gene expression during early gastrulation when the emb

  5. First report on the bacterial diversity in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) by using 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Honghai; Liu, Guangshuai; Sha, Weilai

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial community in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) based on the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Fecal samples were collected from five healthy unrelated dholes captured from Qilian Mountain in Gansu province of China. The diversity of the fecal bacteria community was investigated by constructing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene clone library. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified by using universal bacterial primers 27F and 1492R. A total of 275 chimera-free near full length 16S rRNA gene sequences were collected, and 78 non-redundant bacteria phylotypes (operational taxonomical units, OTUs) were identified according to the 97 % sequence similarity. Forty-two OTUs (53.8 %) showed less than 98 % sequence similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequences reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that dhole bacterial community comprised five different phyla, with the majority of sequences being classified within the phylum Bacteroidetes (64.7 %), followed by Firmicutes (29.8 %), Fusobacteria (4.7 %),Proteobacteria (0.4 %), and Actinobacteria (0.4 %). The only order Bacteroidales in phylum Bacteroidetes was the most abundant bacterial group in the intestinal bacterial community of dholes. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the two most diverse bacterial phyla with 46.2 and 44.9 % of OTUs contained, respectively. Bacteroidales and Clostridiales were the two most diverse bacterial orders that contained 44.9 and 39.7 % of OTUs, respectively.

  6. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  7. Identification of self-consistent modulons from bacterial microarray expression data with the help of structured regulon gene sets

    KAUST Repository

    Permina, Elizaveta A.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of bacterial modulons from series of gene expression measurements on microarrays is a principal problem, especially relevant for inadequately studied but practically important species. Usage of a priori information on regulatory interactions helps to evaluate parameters for regulatory subnetwork inference. We suggest a procedure for modulon construction where a seed regulon is iteratively updated with genes having expression patterns similar to those for regulon member genes. A set of genes essential for a regulon is used to control modulon updating. Essential genes for a regulon were selected as a subset of regulon genes highly related by different measures to each other. Using Escherichia coli as a model, we studied how modulon identification depends on the data, including the microarray experiments set, the adopted relevance measure and the regulon itself. We have found that results of modulon identification are highly dependent on all parameters studied and thus the resulting modulon varies substantially depending on the identification procedure. Yet, modulons that were identified correctly displayed higher stability during iterations, which allows developing a procedure for reliable modulon identification in the case of less studied species where the known regulatory interactions are sparse. Copyright © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  8. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  9. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a non-culture method of defining the specific bacterial etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li-Ping; Bian, Long-Yan; Xu, Min; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired respiratory tract infection following tracheal intubation. The most common hospital-acquired infection among patients with acute respiratory failure, VAP is associated with a mortality rate of 20-30%. The standard bacterial culture method for identifying the etiology of VAP is not specific, timely, or accurate in identifying the bacterial pathogens. This study used 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing to identify and quantify the pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract and oropharyngeal samples of 55 VAP patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has served as a valuable tool in bacterial identification, particularly when other biochemical, molecular, or phenotypic identification techniques fail. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed in parallel with the standard bacterial culture method to identify and quantify bacteria present in the collected patient samples. Sequence analysis showed the colonization of multidrug-resistant strains in VAP secretions. Further, this method identified Prevotella, Proteus, Aquabacter, and Sphingomonas bacterial genera that were not detected by the standard bacterial culture method. Seven categories of bacteria, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, were detectable by both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and standard bacterial culture methods. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a significantly higher sensitivity in detecting Streptococcus and Pseudomonas when compared to standard bacterial culture. Together, these data present 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a novel VAP diagnosis tool that will further enable pathogen-specific treatment of VAP.

  10. Comparison of tryptophan biosynthetic operon regulation in different Gram-positive bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Yanofsky, Charles; Merino, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    The tryptophan biosynthetic operon has been widely used as a model system for studying transcription regulation. In Bacillus subtilis, the trp operon is primarily regulated by a tryptophan-activated RNA-binding protein, TRAP. Here we show that in many other Gram-positive species the trp operon is regulated differently, by tRNA(Trp) sensing by the RNA-based T-box mechanism, with T-boxes arranged in tandem. Our analyses reveal an apparent relationship between trp operon organization and the specific regulatory mechanism(s) used. PMID:17555843

  11. Analysis of the LacI family regulators of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937, involvement in the bacterial phytopathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gijsegem, Frédérique; Wlodarczyk, Aleksandra; Cornu, Amandine; Reverchon, Sylvie; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, Nicole

    2008-11-01

    Analysis of the regulators of the LacI family was performed in order to identify those potentially involved in pathogenicity of Erwinia chrysanthemi (Dickeya dadantii). Among the 18 members of the LacI family, the function of 11 members is either known or predicted and only 7 members have, as yet, no proposed function. Inactivation of these seven genes, called lfaR, lfbR, lfcR, lfdR, lfeR, lffR, and lfgR, demonstrated that four of them are important for plant infection. The lfaR and lfcR mutants showed a reduced virulence on chicory, Saintpaulia sp., and Arabidopsis. The lfeR mutant showed a reduced virulence on Arabidopsis. The lfdR mutant was more efficient than the wild-type strain in initiating maceration on Saintpaulia sp. The genetic environment of each regulator was examined to detect adjacent genes potentially involved in a common function. Construction of transcriptional fusions in these neighboring genes demonstrated that five regulators, LfaR, LfcR, LfeR, LffR, and LfgR, act as repressors of adjacent genes. Analysis of these fusions also indicated that the genes controlled by LfaR, LfcR, LfgR, and LffR are expressed during plant infection. Moreover, addition of crude plant extracts to culture medium demonstrated that the expression of the LfaR- and LfgR-controlled genes is specifically induced by plant components. PMID:18842096

  12. Tagging RAPD markers to a bacterial blight resistance gene in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The somaclonal mutant HX_3 has shown a broad spectrum resistance to bacterial blight. To study the inheritance of the bacterial blight resistance in HX_3, a cross was made between HX_3 and a susceptible cultivar Longtefu A. The F2 population of 418 plants was inoculated with Chinese bacterial blight strain Zhe 173 (pathotype Ⅳ ). Results showed that the F2 progenies segregated in a ratio of 3R∶ 1S (324 resistant plants and 94 susceptible plants). From the plants tested, 114 individuals (86 resistant and 28 susceptible) were chosen randomly for RAPD analysis. Twelve highly resistant and 12 highly susceptible plants were selected to form a resistant pool and a susceptible pool, respectively.

  13. ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling, but is not required for bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Liu, Jinghua

    2010-05-15

    Activation of TLR signaling is critical for host innate immunity against bacterial infection. Previous studies reported that the ST2 receptor, a member of the Toll\\/IL-1 receptor superfamily, functions as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling and maintains LPS tolerance. However, it is undetermined whether ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling and furthermore, whether a TLR2 agonist, bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance is dependent on ST2. In this study, we show that BLP stimulation-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and immunocomplex formation of TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) were significantly enhanced in ST2-deficient macrophages compared with those in wild-type controls. Furthermore, overexpression of ST2 dose-dependently attenuated BLP-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting a negative regulatory role of ST2 in TLR2 signaling. A moderate but significantly attenuated production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on a second BLP stimulation was observed in BLP-pretreated, ST2-deficient macrophages, which is associated with substantially reduced IRAK-1 protein expression and downregulated TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation. ST2-deficient mice, when pretreated with a nonlethal dose of BLP, benefitted from an improved survival against a subsequent lethal BLP challenge, indicating BLP tolerance develops in the absence of the ST2 receptor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ST2 acts as a negative regulator of TLR2 signaling, but is not required for BLP-induced tolerance.

  14. Gene expression profiling of hormonal regulation related to the residual feed intake of Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Y M; Yang, Z; Wu, F; Han, Z Y; Wang, G L

    2015-09-11

    An accumulation of over a decade of research in cattle has shown that genetic selection for decreased residual feed intake (RFI), defined as the difference between an animal's actual feed intake and its expected feed intake, is a viable option for improving feed efficiency and reducing the feed requirements of herds, thereby improving the profitability of cattle producers. Hormonal regulation is one of the most important factors in feed intake. To determine the relationship between hormones and feed efficiency, we performed gene expression profiling of jugular vein serum on hormonal regulation of Chinese Holstein cattle with low and high RFI coefficients. 857 differential expression genes (from 24683 genes) were found. Among these, 415 genes were up-regulated and 442 genes were down-regulated in the low RFI group. The gene ontology (GO) search revealed 6 significant terms and 64 genes associated with hormonal regulation, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) selected the adipocytokine signaling pathway, insulin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the study indicated that the molecular expression of genes associated with hormonal regulation differs in dairy cows, depending on their RFI coefficients, and that these differences may be related to the molecular regulation of the leptin-NPY and insulin signaling pathways. PMID:26231801

  15. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  16. Autogenous regulation of splicing of the transcript of a yeast ribosomal protein gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Dabeva, M. D.; Post-Beittenmiller, M A; Warner, J R

    1986-01-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  17. Identification of the key regulating genes of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) by network and gene ontology analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaiasl, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is one of the reasons for infertility that not only affects both older and young women. Ovarian reserve assessment can be used as a new prognostic tool for infertility treatment decision making. Here, up- and down-regulated gene expression profiles of granulosa cells were analysed to generate a putative interaction map of the involved genes. In addition, gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to get insight intol the biological processes and molecular functions of involved proteins in DOR. Eleven up-regulated genes and nine down-regulated genes were identified and assessed by constructing interaction networks based on their biological processes. PTGS2, CTGF, LHCGR, CITED, SOCS2, STAR and FSTL3 were the key nodes in the up-regulated networks, while the IGF2, AMH, GREM, and FOXC1 proteins were key in the down-regulated networks. MIRN101-1, MIRN153-1 and MIRN194-1 inhibited the expression of SOCS2, while CSH1 and BMP2 positively regulated IGF1 and IGF2. Ossification, ovarian follicle development, vasculogenesis, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and golgi apparatus are the major differential groups between up-regulated and down-regulated genes in DOR. Meta-analysis of publicly available transcriptomic data highlighted the high coexpression of CTGF, connective tissue growth factor, with the other key regulators of DOR. CTGF is involved in organ senescence and focal adhesion pathway according to GO analysis. These findings provide a comprehensive system biology based insight into the aetiology of DOR through network and gene ontology analyses. PMID:27324248

  18. Regulation of Helicobacter pylori adherence by gene conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Talarico, Sarah; Whitefield, Shawn E.; Fero, Jutta; Haas, Rainer; Salama, Nina R.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversification of Helicobacter pylori adhesin genes may allow adaptation of adherence properties to facilitate persistence despite host defenses. The sabA gene encodes an adhesin that binds sialyl-Lewis antigens on inflamed gastric tissue. We found variability in the copy number and locus of the sabA gene and the closely related sabB and omp27 genes due to gene conversion among 51 North American pediatric H. pylori strains. We determined that sabB to sabA gene conversion is predomina...

  19. Gene Network Analysis and Functional Studies of Senescence-associated Genes Reveal Novel Regulators of Arabidopsis Leaf Senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghai Li; Jinying Peng; Xing Wen; Hongwei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Plant leaf senescence has been recognized as the last phase of plant development,a highly ordered process regulated by genes known as senescence associated genes (SAGs).However,the function of most of SAGs in regulating leaf senescence as well as regulators of those functionally known SAGs are still unclear.We have previously developed a curated database of genes potentially associated with leaf senescence,the Leaf Senescence Database (LSD).In this study,we built gene networks to identify common regulators of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana using promoting or delaying senescence genes in LSD.Our results demonstrated that plant hormones cytokinin,auxin,nitric oxide as well as small molecules,such as Ca2+,delay leaf senescence.By contrast,ethylene,ABA,SA and JA as well as small molecules,such as oxygen,promote leaf senescence,altogether supporting the idea that phytohormones play a critical role in regulating leaf senescence.Functional analysis of candidate SAGs in LSD revealed that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY75 and a Cys2/His2-type transcription factor AZF2 are positive regulators of leaf senescence and loss-of-function of WRKY75 or AZF2 delayed leaf senescence.We also found that silencing of a protein phosphatase,AtMKP2,promoted early senescence.Collectively,LSD can serve as a comprehensive resource for systematic study of the molecular mechanism of leaf senescence as well as offer candidate genes for functional analyses.

  20. Symmetry in the Language of Gene Expression: A Survey of Gene Promoter Networks in Multiple Bacterial Species and Non-σ Regulons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M. Turcic

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The language of gene expression displays topological symmetry. An important step during gene expression is the binding of transcriptional proteins to DNA promoters adjacent to a gene. Some proteins bind to many promoters in a genome, defining a regulon of genes wherein each promoter might vary in DNA sequence relative to the average consensus. Here we examine the linguistic organization of gene promoter networks, wherein each node in the network represents a promoter and links between nodes represent the extent of base pair-sharing. Prior work revealed a fractal nucleus in several σ-factor regulons from Escherichia coli. We extend these findings to show fractal nuclei in gene promoter networks from three bacterial species, E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We surveyed several non-σ transcription factors from these species and found that many contain a nucleus that is both visually and numerically fractal. Promoter footprint size scaled as a negative power-law with both information entropy and fractal dimension, while the latter two parameters scaled positively and linearly. The fractal dimension of the diffuse networks (dB = ~1.7 was close to that expected of a diffusion limited aggregation process, confirming prior predictions as to a possible mechanism for development of this structure.

  1. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  2. Macrobrachium rosenbergii cathepsin L: molecular characterization and gene expression in response to viral and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Gnanam, Annie J; Muthukrishnan, Dhanaraj; Thirumalai, Muthukumaresan Kuppusamy; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Milton, James; Kasi, Marimuthu

    2013-11-01

    Cathepsin L (MrCathL) was identified from a constructed cDNA library of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrCathL full-length cDNA is 1161 base pairs (bp) with an ORF of 1026bp which encodes a polypeptide of 342 amino acid (aa) long. The eukaryotic cysteine proteases, histidine and asparagine active site residues were identified in the aa sequence of MrCathL at 143-154, 286-296 and 304-323, respectively. The pair wise clustalW analysis of MrCathL showed the highest similarity (97%) with the homologous cathepsin L from Macrobrachium nipponense and the lowest similarity (70%) from human. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clusters of the invertebrates and vertebrates cathepsin L in the phylogenetic tree. MrCathL and cathepsin L from M. nipponense were clustered together, formed a sister group to cathepsin L of Penaeus monodon, and finally clustered to Lepeophtheirus salmonis. High level of (P<0.05) MrCathL gene expression was noticed in haemocyte and lowest in eyestalk. Furthermore, the MrCathL gene expression in M. rosenbergii was up-regulated in haemocyte by virus [M. rosenbergii nodovirus (MrNV) and white spot syndrome baculovirus (WSBV)] and bacteria (Vibrio harveyi and Aeromonas hydrophila). The recombinant MrCathL exhibited a wide range of activity in various pH between 3 and 10 and highest at pH 7.5. Cysteine proteinase (stefin A, stefin B and antipain) showed significant influence (100%) on recombinant MrCathL enzyme activity. The relative activity and residual activity of recombinant MrCathL against various metal ions or salts and detergent tested at different concentrations. These results indicated that the metal ions, salts and detergent had an influence on the proteinase activity of recombinant MrCathL. Conclusively, the results of this study imply that MrCathL has high pH stability and is fascinating object for further research on the function of cathepsin L in prawn innate immune system.

  3. Bacterial Bile Metabolising Gene Abundance in Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis and Type 2 Diabetes Metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G.; Martoni, Christopher J.; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L.

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to determine the importance of bile acid modification genes in the gut microbiome of inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetic patients. We used publicly available metagenomic datasets from the Human Microbiome Project and the MetaHIT consortium, and determined the abundance of bile salt hydrolase gene (bsh), 7 alpha-dehydroxylase gene (adh) and 7-alpha hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene (hsdh) in fecal bacteria in diseased populations of Crohn's disease (CD), Ulc...

  4. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia.

  5. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia. PMID:26111599

  6. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Nanakorn, W. [The Crown Property Bureau, 173 Nakhonratchasrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  7. Bacterial community structure in High-Arctic snow and freshwater as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette K.; Søborg, Ditte A.; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed;

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow over sea ice and an ice-covered freshwater lake were examined by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of cultivated isolates. Both the pyrosequence and cultivation data indicated that the phylogenetic composition...

  8. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection

  9. LitMiner and WikiGene: identifying problem-related key players of gene regulation using publication abstracts

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Holger; Döhr, Stefanie; Grote, Korbinian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Werner, Thomas; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Schneider, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    The LitMiner software is a literature data-mining tool that facilitates the identification of major gene regulation key players related to a user-defined field of interest in PubMed abstracts. The prediction of gene-regulatory relationships is based on co-occurrence analysis of key terms within the abstracts. LitMiner predicts relationships between key terms from the biomedical domain in four categories (genes, chemical compounds, diseases and tissues). Owing to the limitations (no direction,...

  10. A general system for generating unlabelled gene replacements in bacterial chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, K.; Buist, G.; Bolhuis, A.; Berge, A. ten; Kiel, J.; Mierau, I.; Dabrowska, M.; Venema, G.; Kok, J.

    1996-01-01

    A general system is described that facilitates gene replacements such that the recombinant strains are not labelled with antibiotic resistance genes. The method is based on the conditional replication of derivatives of the lactococcal plasmid pWV01, which lacks the repA gene encoding the replication

  11. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  12. Bacterial global regulators DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghanian, Mohammad; Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-02-18

    Collisions between paused transcription elongation complexes and replication forks inevitably happen, which may lead to collapse of replication fork and could be detrimental to cells. Bacterial transcription factor DksA and its cofactor alarmone ppGpp were proposed to contribute to prevention of such collisions, although the mechanism of this activity remains elusive. Here we show that DksA/ppGpp do not destabilise transcription elongation complexes or inhibit their backtracking, as was proposed earlier. Instead, we show, both in vitro and in vivo, that DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription elongation by slowing down misincorporation events. As misincorporation events cause temporary pauses, contribution to fidelity suggests the mechanism by which DksA/ppGpp contribute to prevention of collisions of transcription elongation complexes with replication forks. DksA is only the second known accessory factor, after transcription factor Gre, that increases fidelity of RNA synthesis in bacteria.

  13. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Del Moral-Chávez, Víctor; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for 'neighborhood' genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments. PMID:26527724

  14. Growth Phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetellae are Gram negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, is a human-restricted variant of Bordetella bronchiseptica, which infects a broad range of mammals causing chronic and often asymptomatic infections. Growth phase dependent gen...

  15. Hormonal Regulation and Expression Profiles of Wheat Genes Involved during Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Sipla Aggarwal; Vishnu Shukla; Kaushal Kumar Bhati; Mandeep Kaur; Shivani Sharma; Anuradha Singh; Shrikant Mantri; Ajay Kumar Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) biosynthesis pathway genes were reported from multiple crop species. PA accumulation was enhanced during grain filling and at that time, hormones like Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3) interplay to control the process of seed development. Regulation of wheat PA pathway genes has not yet been reported in seeds. In an attempt to find the clues for the regulation by hormones, the promoter region of wheat PA pathway genes was analyzed for the presence of cis-elements...

  16. Light-