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Sample records for bacterial gene regulation

  1. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  2. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

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    Viveka eVadyvaloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experiment

  4. Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul; Pilyugin, Sergei S

    2007-01-21

    When bacteria are grown in a batch culture containing a mixture of two growth-limiting substrates, they exhibit a rich spectrum of substrate consumption patterns including diauxic growth, simultaneous consumption, and bistable growth. In previous work, we showed that a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution captures all the substrate consumption patterns [Narang, A., 1998a. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 59, 116-121, Narang, A., 2006. Comparitive analysis of some models of gene regulation in mixed-substrate microbial growth, J. Theor. Biol. 242, 489-501]. In this work, we construct the bifurcation diagram of the minimal model, which shows the substrate consumption pattern at any given set of parameter values. The bifurcation diagram explains several general properties of mixed-substrate growth. (1) In almost all the cases of diauxic growth, the "preferred" substrate is the one that, by itself, supports a higher specific growth rate. In the literature, this property is often attributed to the optimality of regulatory mechanisms. Here, we show that the minimal model, which accounts for induction and growth only, displays the property under fairly general conditions. This suggests that the higher growth rate of the preferred substrate is an intrinsic property of the induction and dilution kinetics. It can be explained mechanistically without appealing to optimality principles. (2) The model explains the phenotypes of various mutants containing lesions in the regions encoding for the operator, repressor, and peripheral enzymes. A particularly striking phenotype is the "reversal of the diauxie" in which the wild-type and mutant strains consume the very same two substrates in opposite order. This phenotype is difficult to explain in terms of molecular mechanisms, such as inducer exclusion or CAP activation, but it turns out to be a natural

  5. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

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    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  6. CRISPR/Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

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    David eWeiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-based Type II CRISPR-Cas system in the control of endogenous gene expression, a novel form of prokaryotic gene regulation. Cas9 functions in association with two small RNAs to target and alter the stability of an endogenous transcript encoding a bacterial lipoprotein (BLP. Since BLPs are recognized by the host innate immune protein Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, CRISPR-Cas-mediated repression of BLP expression facilitates evasion of TLR2 by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida, and is essential for its virulence. Here we describe the Cas9 regulatory system in detail, as well as data on its role in controlling virulence traits of Neisseria meningitidis and Campylobacter jejuni. We also discuss potential roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in the response to envelope stress and other aspects of bacterial physiology. Since ~45% of bacteria and ~83% of Archaea encode these machineries, the newly appreciated regulatory functions of CRISPR-Cas systems are likely to play broad roles in controlling the pathogenesis and physiology of diverse prokaryotes.

  7. Differential regulation of horizontally acquired and core genome genes by the bacterial modulator H-NS.

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    Rosa C Baños

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal acquisition of DNA by bacteria dramatically increases genetic diversity and hence successful bacterial colonization of several niches, including the human host. A relevant issue is how this newly acquired DNA interacts and integrates in the regulatory networks of the bacterial cell. The global modulator H-NS targets both core genome and HGT genes and silences gene expression in response to external stimuli such as osmolarity and temperature. Here we provide evidence that H-NS discriminates and differentially modulates core and HGT DNA. As an example of this, plasmid R27-encoded H-NS protein has evolved to selectively silence HGT genes and does not interfere with core genome regulation. In turn, differential regulation of both gene lineages by resident chromosomal H-NS requires a helper protein: the Hha protein. Tight silencing of HGT DNA is accomplished by H-NS-Hha complexes. In contrast, core genes are modulated by H-NS homoligomers. Remarkably, the presence of Hha-like proteins is restricted to the Enterobacteriaceae. In addition, conjugative plasmids encoding H-NS variants have hitherto been isolated only from members of the family. Thus, the H-NS system in enteric bacteria presents unique evolutionary features. The capacity to selectively discriminate between core and HGT DNA may help to maintain horizontally transmitted DNA in silent form and may give these bacteria a competitive advantage in adapting to new environments, including host colonization.

  8. A combination of independent transcriptional regulators shapes bacterial virulence gene expression during infection.

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    Samuel A Shelburne

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulatory networks are fundamental to how microbes alter gene expression in response to environmental stimuli, thereby playing a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis. However, understanding how bacterial transcriptional regulatory networks function during host-pathogen interaction is limited. Recent studies in group A Streptococcus (GAS suggested that the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA influences many of the same genes as the control of virulence (CovRS two-component gene regulatory system. To provide new information about the CcpA and CovRS networks, we compared the CcpA and CovR transcriptomes in a serotype M1 GAS strain. The transcript levels of several of the same genes encoding virulence factors and proteins involved in basic metabolic processes were affected in both DeltaccpA and DeltacovR isogenic mutant strains. Recombinant CcpA and CovR bound with high-affinity to the promoter regions of several co-regulated genes, including those encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Compared to the wild-type parental strain, DeltaccpA and DeltacovRDeltaccpA isogenic mutant strains were significantly less virulent in a mouse myositis model. Inactivation of CcpA and CovR alone and in combination led to significant alterations in the transcript levels of several key GAS virulence factor encoding genes during infection. Importantly, the transcript level alterations in the DeltaccpA and DeltacovRDeltaccpA isogenic mutant strains observed during infection were distinct from those occurring during growth in laboratory medium. These data provide new knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which pathogenic bacteria respond to environmental signals to regulate virulence factor production and basic metabolic processes during infection.

  9. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

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    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  10. Regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes by the small noncoding RNA PcrZ.

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    Mank, Nils N; Berghoff, Bork A; Hermanns, Yannick N; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-10-02

    The small RNA PcrZ (photosynthesis control RNA Z) of the facultative phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is induced upon a drop of oxygen tension with similar kinetics to those of genes for components of photosynthetic complexes. High expression of PcrZ depends on PrrA, the response regulator of the PrrB/PrrA two-component system with a central role in redox regulation in R. sphaeroides. In addition the FnrL protein, an activator of some photosynthesis genes at low oxygen tension, is involved in redox-dependent expression of this small (s)RNA. Overexpression of full-length PcrZ in R. sphaeroides affects expression of a small subset of genes, most of them with a function in photosynthesis. Some mRNAs from the photosynthetic gene cluster were predicted to be putative PcrZ targets and results from an in vivo reporter system support these predictions. Our data reveal a negative effect of PcrZ on expression of its target mRNAs. Thus, PcrZ counteracts the redox-dependent induction of photosynthesis genes, which is mediated by protein regulators. Because PrrA directly activates photosynthesis genes and at the same time PcrZ, which negatively affects photosynthesis gene expression, this is one of the rare cases of an incoherent feed-forward loop including an sRNA. Our data identified PcrZ as a trans acting sRNA with a direct regulatory function in formation of photosynthetic complexes and provide a model for the control of photosynthesis gene expression by a regulatory network consisting of proteins and a small noncoding RNA.

  11. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

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    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  12. Co-transcriptomic Analysis by RNA Sequencing to Simultaneously Measure Regulated Gene Expression in Host and Bacterial Pathogen

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-24

    Intramacrophage pathogens subvert antimicrobial defence pathways using various mechanisms, including the targeting of host TLR-mediated transcriptional responses. Conversely, TLR-inducible host defence mechanisms subject intramacrophage pathogens to stress, thus altering pathogen gene expression programs. Important biological insights can thus be gained through the analysis of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen during an infection. Traditionally, research methods have involved the use of qPCR, microarrays and/or RNA sequencing to identify transcriptional changes in either the host or the pathogen. Here we describe the application of RNA sequencing using samples obtained from in vitro infection assays to simultaneously quantify both host and bacterial pathogen gene expression changes, as well as general approaches that can be undertaken to interpret the RNA sequencing data that is generated. These methods can be used to provide insights into host TLR-regulated transcriptional responses to microbial challenge, as well as pathogen subversion mechanisms against such responses.

  13. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  14. Gene expression regulation in retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by viral RNA and viral/bacterial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Anton; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with systemic and local inflammation. Various studies suggested that viral or bacterial infection may aggravate retinal inflammation in the aged retina. We compared the effects of synthetic viral RNA (poly(I:C)) and viral/bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN) on the expression of genes known to be involved in the development of AMD in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with poly(I:C; 500 µg/ml) or CpG-ODN (500 nM). Alterations in gene expression and protein secretion were determined with real-time RT–PCR and ELISA, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transduction molecules was revealed by western blotting. Results Poly(I:C) induced gene expression of the pattern recognition receptor TLR3, transcription factors (HIF-1α, p65/NF-κB), the angiogenic factor bFGF, inflammatory factors (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-2), and complement factors (C5, C9, CFB). Poly(I:C) also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK proteins, and the secretion of bFGF and TNFα from the cells. CpG-ODN induced moderate gene expression of transcription factors (p65/NF-κB, NFAT5) and complement factors (C5, C9), while it had no effect on the expression of various TLR, angiogenic factor, and inflammatory factor genes. The activities of various signal transduction pathways and transcription factors were differentially involved in mediating the poly(I:C)-induced transcriptional activation of distinct genes. Conclusions The widespread effects of viral RNA, and the restricted effects of viral/bacterial DNA, on the gene expression pattern of RPE cells may suggest that viral RNA rather than viral/bacterial DNA induces physiologic alterations of RPE cells, which may aggravate inflammation in the aged retina. The data also suggest that selective inhibition of distinct signal transduction pathways or individual transcription factors may not be effective to inhibit

  15. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

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    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  16. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  17. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response: role of bacterial gene expression in temporal regulation of host defense responses.

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    Kathie-Anne Walters

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4. Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways.

  18. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    the different regulatory mechanisms affect system dynamics. We have designed a synthetic gene regulatory network (GRN) in bacterial cells that enables us to study the dynamics of GRNs. The results presented in this PhD thesis show that model equations based on the established mechanisms of action of each...... of a particular type of regulatory mechanism. The synthetic system presented in this thesis is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to allow a direct comparison of the dynamic behaviors of gene regulatory networks that employ different mechanisms of regulation. In addition to studying the dynamic behavior...... of GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...

  19. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types...

  20. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

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    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  1. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  2. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

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    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  3. Evolutionary rewiring and reprogramming of bacterial transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Fang-Fang Wang; Wei Qian

    2011-01-01

    Rewiring and reprogramming of transcriptional regulation took place during bacterial speciation. The mechanistic alterations among transcription factors, cis-regulatory elements and target genes confer bacteria novel ability to adapt to stochastic environmental changes. This process is critical to their survival, especially for bacterial pathogens subjected to accelerated evolution. In the past two decades, the investigators not only completed the sequences of numerous bacterial genomes, but also made great progress in understanding the molecular basis of evolution. Here we briefly reviewed the current knowledge on the mechanistic changes among orthologous, paralogous and xenogenic regulatory circuits, which were caused by genetic recombinations such as gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, transposable elements and different genetic contexts. We also discussed the potential impact of this area on theoretical and applied studies of microbes.

  4. Regulated Gene Therapy.

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    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  5. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

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    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively.

  6. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  7. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-02-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial diversification and speciation. This review discusses how the recent influx of complete chromosomal sequences of various microorganisms has allowed for a quantitative assessment of the scope, rate and impact of horizontally transmitted information on microbial evolution.

  8. Variance-corrected Michaelis-Menten equation predicts transient rates of single-enzyme reactions and response times in bacterial gene-regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pulkkinen, O

    2016-01-01

    Many chemical reactions in biological cells occur at very low concentrations of constituent molecules. Thus, transcriptional gene-regulation is often controlled by poorly expressed transcription-factors, such as E.coli lac repressor with few tens of copies. Here we study the effects of inherent concentration fluctuations of substrate-molecules on the seminal Michaelis-Menten scheme of biochemical reactions. We present a universal correction to the Michaelis-Menten equation for the reaction-rates. The relevance and validity of this correction for enzymatic reactions and intracellular gene-regulation is demonstrated. Our analytical theory and simulation results confirm that the proposed variance-corrected Michaelis-Menten equation predicts the rate of reactions with remarkable accuracy even in the presence of large non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations. The major advantage of our approach is that it involves only the mean and variance of the substrate-molecule concentration. Our theory is therefore accessi...

  9. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-06

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  10. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

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    Handfield Martin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4 from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total. Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p -7, 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response.

  11. Integration host factor assembly at the cohesive end site of the bacteriophage lambda genome: implications for viral DNA packaging and bacterial gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Saurarshi J; Yang, Teng-Chieh; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2014-12-09

    Integration host factor (IHF) is an Escherichia coli protein involved in (i) condensation of the bacterial nucleoid and (ii) regulation of a variety of cellular functions. In its regulatory role, IHF binds to a specific sequence to introduce a strong bend into the DNA; this provides a duplex architecture conducive to the assembly of site-specific nucleoprotein complexes. Alternatively, the protein can bind in a sequence-independent manner that weakly bends and wraps the duplex to promote nucleoid formation. IHF is also required for the development of several viruses, including bacteriophage lambda, where it promotes site-specific assembly of a genome packaging motor required for lytic development. Multiple IHF consensus sequences have been identified within the packaging initiation site (cos), and we here interrogate IHF-cos binding interactions using complementary electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) approaches. IHF recognizes a single consensus sequence within cos (I1) to afford a strongly bent nucleoprotein complex. In contrast, IHF binds weakly but with positive cooperativity to nonspecific DNA to afford an ensemble of complexes with increasing masses and levels of condensation. Global analysis of the EMS and AUC data provides constrained thermodynamic binding constants and nearest neighbor cooperativity factors for binding of IHF to I1 and to nonspecific DNA substrates. At elevated IHF concentrations, the nucleoprotein complexes undergo a transition from a condensed to an extended rodlike conformation; specific binding of IHF to I1 imparts a significant energy barrier to the transition. The results provide insight into how IHF can assemble specific regulatory complexes in the background of extensive nonspecific DNA condensation.

  12. Impact of genome reduction on bacterial metabolism and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yus, Eva; Maier, Tobias; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; van Noort, Vera; Yamada, Takuji; Chen, Wei-Hua; Wodke, Judith A H; Güell, Marc; Martínez, Sira; Bourgeois, Ronan; Kühner, Sebastian; Raineri, Emanuele; Letunic, Ivica; Kalinina, Olga V; Rode, Michaela; Herrmann, Richard; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Russell, Robert B; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Bork, Peer; Serrano, Luis

    2009-11-27

    To understand basic principles of bacterial metabolism organization and regulation, but also the impact of genome size, we systematically studied one of the smallest bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A manually curated metabolic network of 189 reactions catalyzed by 129 enzymes allowed the design of a defined, minimal medium with 19 essential nutrients. More than 1300 growth curves were recorded in the presence of various nutrient concentrations. Measurements of biomass indicators, metabolites, and 13C-glucose experiments provided information on directionality, fluxes, and energetics; integration with transcription profiling enabled the global analysis of metabolic regulation. Compared with more complex bacteria, the M. pneumoniae metabolic network has a more linear topology and contains a higher fraction of multifunctional enzymes; general features such as metabolite concentrations, cellular energetics, adaptability, and global gene expression responses are similar, however.

  13. Regulation of noise in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical processes leading to the synthesis of new proteins are random, as they typically involve a small number of diffusing molecules. They lead to fluctuations in the number of proteins in a single cell as a function of time and to cell-to-cell variability of protein abundances. These in turn can lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Phenotypic heterogeneity may have important consequences for the development of multicellular organisms and the fitness of bacterial colonies, raising the question of how it is regulated. Here we review the experimental evidence that transcriptional regulation affects noise in gene expression, and discuss how the noise strength is encoded in the architecture of the promoter region. We discuss how models based on specific molecular mechanisms of gene regulation can make experimentally testable predictions for how changes to the promoter architecture are reflected in gene expression noise.

  14. Interaction between resource identity and bacterial community composition regulates bacterial respiration in aquatic ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. F. Pires

    Full Text Available Abstract Resource identity and composition structure bacterial community, which in turn determines the magnitude of bacterial processes and ecological services. However, the complex interaction between resource identity and bacterial community composition (BCC has been poorly understood so far. Using aquatic microcosms, we tested whether and how resource identity interacts with BCC in regulating bacterial respiration and bacterial functional diversity. Different aquatic macrophyte leachates were used as different carbon resources while BCC was manipulated through successional changes of bacterial populations in batch cultures. We observed that the same BCC treatment respired differently on each carbon resource; these resources also supported different amounts of bacterial functional diversity. There was no clear linear pattern of bacterial respiration in relation to time succession of bacterial communities in all leachates, i.e. differences on bacterial respiration between different BCC were rather idiosyncratic. Resource identity regulated the magnitude of respiration of each BCC, e.g. Ultricularia foliosa leachate sustained the greatest bacterial functional diversity and lowest rates of bacterial respiration in all BCC. We conclude that both resource identity and the BCC interact affecting the pattern and the magnitude of bacterial respiration in aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens.

  16. 拟核结合蛋白与细菌基因的表达调控%Nucleoid-associated Proteins and Their Roles in the Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊祥宇; 王洪海; 谢建平

    2011-01-01

    拟核结合蛋白是细菌遗传物质组织和基因表达调控的关键.细茵基因组压缩为致密的拟核必需有拟核结合蛋白的支撑.拟核结合蛋白、DNA超螺旋和大分子簇在拟核的结构形成中起到重要作用,其中拟核结合蛋白最重要.拟核结合蛋白还影响细茵DNA的复制、重组、转录和修复等多个重要生理过程.作为全局调控因子,拟核结合蛋白是调控细菌适应环境变化所需基因表达的关键.本文总结拟核结合蛋白的结构、功能和调控,特别是其在致病与非致病分枝杆菌中的差别,为寻找新药物靶标提供线索.%One hallmark of bacterial genome is the compact structure called the nucleoid. However, this dense structure poses special challenges for bacteria. The formation of this compressed structure and disentanglement upon particular gene expression requires multiple factors, such as molecular crowding,DNA supercoils and nucleoid-associated proteins (NAP). NAPs are believed to be the most important factors underlying above intricate process. There are many molecules belonging to NAPs, which associate with the chromosomal DNA and facilitate the latter to fold into a compact structure by bridging, bending or wrapping DNA. NAPs are versatile. They also involved in a plethora essential biological processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, DNA recombination and DNA replication. As a global regulator, NAP is pivotal in coordinating the bacterial gene expression to adapt to the environmental fluctuation. The fundamental structure, function and regulation of NAPs are summarized in this paper with particular emphasis on the NAPs difference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria. The prospect of employing these differences to find novel drug targets against tuberculosis is also discussed.

  17. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  18. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Otoupal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment

  19. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ho Shin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM. Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  20. LATERAL GENE TRANSFER AND THE HISTORY OF BACTERIAL GENOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Ochman

    2006-02-22

    The aims of this research were to elucidate the role and extent of lateral transfer in the differentiation of bacterial strains and species, and to assess the impact of gene transfer on the evolution of bacterial genomes. The ultimate goal of the project is to examine the dynamics of a core set of protein-coding genes (i.e., those that are distributed universally among Bacteria) by developing conserved primers that would allow their amplification and sequencing in any bacterial taxa. In addition, we adopted a bioinformatic approach to elucidate the extent of lateral gene transfer in sequenced genome.

  1. A destabilized bacterial luciferase for dynamic gene expression studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S.; Wilgus, John R.; Chewning, Christopher S.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Fusions of genetic regulatory elements with reporter genes have long been used as tools for monitoring gene expression and have become a major component in synthetic gene circuit implementation. A major limitation of many of these systems is the relatively long half-life of the reporter protein(s), which prevents monitoring both the initiation and the termination of transcription in real-time. Furthermore, when used as components in synthetic gene circuits, the long time constants associated with reporter protein decay may significantly degrade circuit performance. In this study, short half-life variants of LuxA and LuxB from Photorhabdus luminescens were constructed in Escherichia coli by inclusion of an 11-amino acid carboxy-terminal tag that is recognized by endogenous tail-specific proteases. Results indicated that the addition of the C-terminal tag affected the functional half-life of the holoenzyme when the tag was added to luxA or to both luxA and luxB, but modification of luxB alone did not have a significant effect. In addition, it was also found that alteration of the terminal three amino acid residues of the carboxy-terminal tag fused to LuxA generated variants with half-lives of intermediate length in a manner similar to that reported for GFP. This report is the first instance of the C-terminal tagging approach for the regulation of protein half-life to be applied to an enzyme or monomer of a multi-subunit enzyme complex and will extend the utility of the bacterial luciferase reporter genes for the monitoring of dynamic changes in gene expression. PMID:19003433

  2. Dynamics of immune system gene expression upon bacterial challenge and wounding in a social insect (Bombus terrestris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Silvio; Popp, Mario; Lattorff, H Michael G

    2011-03-29

    The innate immune system which helps individuals to combat pathogens comprises a set of genes representing four immune system pathways (Toll, Imd, JNK and JAK/STAT). There is a lack of immune genes in social insects (e.g. honeybees) when compared to Diptera. Potentially, this might be compensated by an advanced system of social immunity (synergistic action of several individuals). The bumble bee, Bombus terrestris, is a primitively eusocial species with an annual life cycle and colonies headed by a single queen. We used this key pollinator to study the temporal dynamics of immune system gene expression in response to wounding and bacterial challenge.Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) (abaecin, defensin 1, hymenoptaecin) were strongly up-regulated by wounding and bacterial challenge, the latter showing a higher impact on the gene expression level. Sterile wounding down-regulated TEP A, an effector gene of the JAK/STAT pathway, and bacterial infection influenced genes of the Imd (relish) and JNK pathway (basket). Relish was up-regulated within the first hour after bacterial challenge, but decreased strongly afterwards. AMP expression following wounding and bacterial challenge correlates with the expression pattern of relish whereas correlated expression with dorsal was absent. Although expression of AMPs was high, continuous bacterial growth was observed throughout the experiment.Here we demonstrate for the first time the temporal dynamics of immune system gene expression in a social insect. Wounding and bacterial challenge affected the innate immune system significantly. Induction of AMP expression due to wounding might comprise a pre-adaptation to accompanying bacterial infections. Compared with solitary species this social insect exhibits reduced immune system efficiency, as bacterial growth could not be inhibited. A negative feedback loop regulating the Imd-pathway is suggested. AMPs, the end product of the Imd-pathway, inhibited the up-regulation of the transcription

  3. Dynamics of immune system gene expression upon bacterial challenge and wounding in a social insect (Bombus terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Erler

    Full Text Available The innate immune system which helps individuals to combat pathogens comprises a set of genes representing four immune system pathways (Toll, Imd, JNK and JAK/STAT. There is a lack of immune genes in social insects (e.g. honeybees when compared to Diptera. Potentially, this might be compensated by an advanced system of social immunity (synergistic action of several individuals. The bumble bee, Bombus terrestris, is a primitively eusocial species with an annual life cycle and colonies headed by a single queen. We used this key pollinator to study the temporal dynamics of immune system gene expression in response to wounding and bacterial challenge.Antimicrobial peptides (AMP (abaecin, defensin 1, hymenoptaecin were strongly up-regulated by wounding and bacterial challenge, the latter showing a higher impact on the gene expression level. Sterile wounding down-regulated TEP A, an effector gene of the JAK/STAT pathway, and bacterial infection influenced genes of the Imd (relish and JNK pathway (basket. Relish was up-regulated within the first hour after bacterial challenge, but decreased strongly afterwards. AMP expression following wounding and bacterial challenge correlates with the expression pattern of relish whereas correlated expression with dorsal was absent. Although expression of AMPs was high, continuous bacterial growth was observed throughout the experiment.Here we demonstrate for the first time the temporal dynamics of immune system gene expression in a social insect. Wounding and bacterial challenge affected the innate immune system significantly. Induction of AMP expression due to wounding might comprise a pre-adaptation to accompanying bacterial infections. Compared with solitary species this social insect exhibits reduced immune system efficiency, as bacterial growth could not be inhibited. A negative feedback loop regulating the Imd-pathway is suggested. AMPs, the end product of the Imd-pathway, inhibited the up-regulation of the

  4. Control of intestinal bacterial proliferation in regulation of lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portal-Celhay Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A powerful approach to understanding complex processes such as aging is to use model organisms amenable to genetic manipulation, and to seek relevant phenotypes to measure. Caenorhabditis elegans is particularly suited to studies of aging, since numerous single-gene mutations have been identified that affect its lifespan; it possesses an innate immune system employing evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways affecting longevity. As worms age, bacteria accumulate in the intestinal tract. However, quantitative relationships between worm genotype, lifespan, and intestinal lumen bacterial load have not been examined. We hypothesized that gut immunity is less efficient in older animals, leading to enhanced bacterial accumulation, reducing longevity. To address this question, we evaluated the ability of worms to control bacterial accumulation as a functional marker of intestinal immunity. Results We show that as adult worms age, several C. elegans genotypes show diminished capacity to control intestinal bacterial accumulation. We provide evidence that intestinal bacterial load, regulated by gut immunity, is an important causative factor of lifespan determination; the effects are specified by bacterial strain, worm genotype, and biologic age, all acting in concert. Conclusions In total, these studies focus attention on the worm intestine as a locus that influences longevity in the presence of an accumulating bacterial population. Further studies defining the interplay between bacterial species and host immunity in C. elegans may provide insights into the general mechanisms of aging and age-related diseases.

  5. Information Integration and Energy Expenditure in Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Javier; Wong, Felix; DePace, Angela; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-06-30

    The quantitative concepts used to reason about gene regulation largely derive from bacterial studies. We show that this bacterial paradigm cannot explain the sharp expression of a canonical developmental gene in response to a regulating transcription factor (TF). In the absence of energy expenditure, with regulatory DNA at thermodynamic equilibrium, information integration across multiple TF binding sites can generate the required sharpness, but with strong constraints on the resultant "higher-order cooperativities." Even with such integration, there is a "Hopfield barrier" to sharpness; for n TF binding sites, this barrier is represented by the Hill function with the Hill coefficient n. If, however, energy is expended to maintain regulatory DNA away from thermodynamic equilibrium, as in kinetic proofreading, this barrier can be breached and greater sharpness achieved. Our approach is grounded in fundamental physics, leads to testable experimental predictions, and suggests how a quantitative paradigm for eukaryotic gene regulation can be formulated.

  6. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  7. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

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    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  9. Chromatin structure regulates gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jason Cummings

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vlambda pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205, expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vlambda donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vlambda array, and altered the outcome of Vlambda diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences.

  10. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  11. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  12. Changes in rhizosphere bacterial gene expression following glyphosate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Molli M; Lorenz, Nicola; Hoilett, Nigel; Lee, Nathan R; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-05-15

    In commercial agriculture, populations and interactions of rhizosphere microflora are potentially affected by the use of specific agrichemicals, possibly by affecting gene expression in these organisms. To investigate this, we examined changes in bacterial gene expression within the rhizosphere of glyphosate-tolerant corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) in response to long-term glyphosate (PowerMAX™, Monsanto Company, MO, USA) treatment. A long-term glyphosate application study was carried out using rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions with soil previously having no history of glyphosate exposure. Rhizosphere soil was collected from the rhizoboxes after four growing periods. Soil microbial community composition was analyzed using microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Total RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil, and samples were analyzed using RNA-Seq analysis. A total of 20-28 million bacterial sequences were obtained for each sample. Transcript abundance was compared between control and glyphosate-treated samples using edgeR. Overall rhizosphere bacterial metatranscriptomes were dominated by transcripts related to RNA and carbohydrate metabolism. We identified 67 differentially expressed bacterial transcripts from the rhizosphere. Transcripts downregulated following glyphosate treatment involved carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and upregulated transcripts involved protein metabolism and respiration. Additionally, bacterial transcripts involving nutrients, including iron, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, were also affected by long-term glyphosate application. Overall, most bacterial and all fungal PLFA biomarkers decreased after glyphosate treatment compared to the control. These results demonstrate that long-term glyphosate use can affect rhizosphere bacterial activities and potentially shift bacterial community composition favoring more glyphosate-tolerant bacteria.

  13. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  14. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  15. Interplay of Noisy Gene Expression and Dynamics Explains Patterns of Bacterial Operon Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized into operons -- sets of genes co-transcribed into polycistronic messenger RNA. Hypotheses explaining the emergence and maintenance of operons include proportional co-regulation, horizontal transfer of intact ``selfish'' operons, emergence via gene duplication, and co-production of physically interacting proteins to speed their association. We hypothesized an alternative: operons can reduce or increase intrinsic gene expression noise in a manner dependent on the post-translational interactions, thereby resulting in selection for or against operons in depending on the network architecture. We devised five classes of two-gene network modules and show that the effects of operons on intrinsic noise depend on class membership. Two classes exhibit decreased noise with co-transcription, two others reveal increased noise, and the remaining one does not show a significant difference. To test our modeling predictions we employed bioinformatic analysis to determine the relationship gene expression noise and operon organization. The results confirm the overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon architectures and provide evidence against other hypotheses. Our results thereby suggest a central role for gene expression noise in selecting for or maintaining operons in bacterial chromosomes. This demonstrates how post-translational network dynamics may provide selective pressure for organizing bacterial chromosomes, and has practical consequences for designing synthetic gene networks. This work is supported by National Institutes of Health grant 1R01GM096189-01.

  16. Down-regulation of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) gene expression in the colon of piglets is linked to bacterial protein fermentation and pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villodre Tudela, Carmen; Boudry, Christelle; Stumpff, Friederike; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert

    2015-02-28

    The present study investigated the influence of bacterial metabolites on monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expression in pigs using in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro approaches. Piglets (n 24) were fed high-protein (26 %) or low-protein (18 %) diets with or without fermentable carbohydrates. Colonic digesta samples were analysed for a broad range of bacterial metabolites. The expression of MCT1, TNF-α, interferon γ (IFN-γ) and IL-8 was determined in colonic tissue. The expression of MCT1 was lower and of TNF-α and IL-8 was higher with high-protein diets (P< 0·05). MCT1 expression was positively correlated with l-lactate, whereas negatively correlated with NH₃ and putrescine (P< 0·05). The expression of IL-8 and TNF-α was negatively correlated with l-lactate and positively correlated with NH₃ and putrescine, whereas the expression of IFN-γ was positively correlated with histamine and 4-ethylphenol (P< 0·05). Subsequently, porcine colonic tissue and Caco-2 cells were incubated with Na-butyrate, NH₄Cl or TNF-α as selected bacterial metabolites or mediators of inflammation. Colonic MCT1 expression was higher after incubation with Na-butyrate (P< 0·05) and lower after incubation with NH₄Cl or TNF-α (P< 0·05). Incubation of Caco-2 cells with increasing concentrations of these metabolites confirmed the up-regulation of MCT1 expression by Na-butyrate (linear, P< 0·05) and down-regulation by TNF-α and NH₄Cl (linear, P< 0·05). The high-protein diet decreased the expression of MCT1 in the colon of pigs, which appears to be linked to NH₃- and TNF-α-mediated signalling.

  17. Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services).

  18. Use of bacterially expressed dsRNA to downregulate Entamoeba histolytica gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Solis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modern RNA interference (RNAi methodologies using small interfering RNA (siRNA oligonucleotide duplexes or episomally synthesized hairpin RNA are valuable tools for the analysis of gene function in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. However, these approaches still require time-consuming procedures including transfection and drug selection, or costly synthetic molecules. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an efficient and handy alternative for E. histolytica gene down-regulation mediated by bacterial double-stranded RNA (dsRNA targeting parasite genes. The Escherichia coli strain HT115 which is unable to degrade dsRNA, was genetically engineered to produce high quantities of long dsRNA segments targeting the genes that encode E. histolytica beta-tubulin and virulence factor KERP1. Trophozoites cultured in vitro were directly fed with dsRNA-expressing bacteria or soaked with purified dsRNA. Both dsRNA delivery methods resulted in significant reduction of protein expression. In vitro host cell-parasite assays showed that efficient downregulation of kerp1 gene expression mediated by bacterial dsRNA resulted in significant reduction of parasite adhesion and lytic capabilities, thus supporting a major role for KERP1 in the pathogenic process. Furthermore, treatment of trophozoites cultured in microtiter plates, with a repertoire of eighty-five distinct bacterial dsRNA segments targeting E. histolytica genes with unknown function, led to the identification of three genes potentially involved in the growth of the parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the use of bacterial dsRNA is a powerful method for the study of gene function in E. histolytica. This dsRNA delivery method is also technically suitable for the study of a large number of genes, thus opening interesting perspectives for the identification of novel drug and vaccine targets.

  19. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for butanetriol production using bacterial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-11-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (butanetriol) is a useful precursor for the synthesis of the energetic material butanetriol trinitrate and several pharmaceutical compounds. Bacterial synthesis of butanetriol from xylose or arabinose takes place in a pathway that requires four enzymes. To produce butanetriol in plants by expressing bacterial enzymes, we cloned native bacterial or codon optimized synthetic genes under different promoters into a binary vector and stably transformed Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic lines expressing introduced genes were analyzed for the production of butanetriol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Soil-grown transgenic plants expressing these genes produced up to 20 µg/g of butanetriol. To test if an exogenous supply of pentose sugar precursors would enhance the butanetriol level, transgenic plants were grown in a medium supplemented with either xylose or arabinose and the amount of butanetriol was quantified. Plants expressing synthetic genes in the arabinose pathway showed up to a forty-fold increase in butanetriol levels after arabinose was added to the medium. Transgenic plants expressing either bacterial or synthetic xylose pathways, or the arabinose pathway showed toxicity symptoms when xylose or arabinose was added to the medium, suggesting that a by-product in the pathway or butanetriol affected plant growth. Furthermore, the metabolite profile of plants expressing arabinose and xylose pathways was altered. Our results demonstrate that bacterial pathways that produce butanetriol can be engineered into plants to produce this chemical. This proof-of-concept study for phytoproduction of butanetriol paves the way to further manipulate metabolic pathways in plants to enhance the level of butanetriol production.

  20. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  1. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Futahashi

    Full Text Available The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  2. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by compl...

  3. Identifying essential genes in bacterial metabolic networks with machine learning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eils Roland

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying essential genes in bacteria supports to identify potential drug targets and an understanding of minimal requirements for a synthetic cell. However, experimentally assaying the essentiality of their coding genes is resource intensive and not feasible for all bacterial organisms, in particular if they are infective. Results We developed a machine learning technique to identify essential genes using the experimental data of genome-wide knock-out screens from one bacterial organism to infer essential genes of another related bacterial organism. We used a broad variety of topological features, sequence characteristics and co-expression properties potentially associated with essentiality, such as flux deviations, centrality, codon frequencies of the sequences, co-regulation and phyletic retention. An organism-wise cross-validation on bacterial species yielded reliable results with good accuracies (area under the receiver-operator-curve of 75% - 81%. Finally, it was applied to drug target predictions for Salmonella typhimurium. We compared our predictions to the viability of experimental knock-outs of S. typhimurium and identified 35 enzymes, which are highly relevant to be considered as potential drug targets. Specifically, we detected promising drug targets in the non-mevalonate pathway. Conclusions Using elaborated features characterizing network topology, sequence information and microarray data enables to predict essential genes from a bacterial reference organism to a related query organism without any knowledge about the essentiality of genes of the query organism. In general, such a method is beneficial for inferring drug targets when experimental data about genome-wide knockout screens is not available for the investigated organism.

  4. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Nakashima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption, knock-in (insertion, and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering.

  5. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WU Chao; LIU Mei; LIU Xu-ri; Hu Guo-cheng; SI Hua-min; SUN Zong-xiu; LIU Wen-zhen; Fu Ya-ping

    2011-01-01

    Antimierobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity.Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis) were integrated into Oryza sativa L.subsp.japonica cv.Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system.PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation,respectively.RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation,and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants.Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with ×anthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae strain CR4,and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4.The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2,Zhe 173 and OS-225.It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  6. Evaluating the consistency of gene sets used in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintle Nathan L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analyses of whole genome expression data require functional information about genes in order to yield meaningful biological conclusions. The Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG are common sources of functionally grouped gene sets. For bacteria, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide alternative, complementary sources of gene sets. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the data obtained from these resources has been performed. Results We define a series of gene set consistency metrics directly related to the most common classes of statistical analyses for gene expression data, and then perform a comprehensive analysis of 3581 Affymetrix® gene expression arrays across 17 diverse bacteria. We find that gene sets obtained from GO and KEGG demonstrate lower consistency than those obtained from the SEED and MicrobesOnline, regardless of gene set size. Conclusions Despite the widespread use of GO and KEGG gene sets in bacterial gene expression data analysis, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide more consistent sets for a wide variety of statistical analyses. Increased use of the SEED and MicrobesOnline gene sets in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data may improve statistical power and utility of expression data.

  7. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations.

  8. A processed noncoding RNA regulates an altruistic bacterial antiviral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Tim R; Pei, Xue Y; Short, Francesca L; Fineran, Peter C; Humphreys, David P; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2011-02-01

    The ≥ 10³⁰ bacteriophages on Earth relentlessly drive adaptive coevolution, forcing the generation of protective mechanisms in their bacterial hosts. One such bacterial phage-resistance system, ToxIN, consists of a protein toxin (ToxN) that is inhibited in vivo by a specific RNA antitoxin (ToxI); however, the mechanisms for this toxicity and inhibition have not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of the ToxN-ToxI complex from Pectobacterium atrosepticum, determined to 2.75-Å resolution. ToxI is a 36-nucleotide noncoding RNA pseudoknot, and three ToxI monomers bind to three ToxN monomers to generate a trimeric ToxN-ToxI complex. Assembly of this complex is mediated entirely through extensive RNA-protein interactions. Furthermore, a 2'-3' cyclic phosphate at the 3' end of ToxI, and catalytic residues, identify ToxN as an endoRNase that processes ToxI from a repetitive precursor but is regulated by its own catalytic product.

  9. Weak Coherence in Abundance Patterns Between Bacterial Classes and Their Constituent OTUs Along a Regulated River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Salazar, Guillem; Logares, Ramiro; Proia, Lorenzo; Gasol, Josep M.; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Deductions about the ecology of high taxonomic bacterial ranks (i.e., phylum, class, order) are often based on their abundance patterns, yet few studies have quantified how accurately variations in abundance of these bacterial groups represent the dynamics of the taxa within them. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we investigated whether the changes in abundance of six dominant bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Beta-/Alpha-/Gamma-proteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria) along a large dam-regulated river are reflected by those of their constituent Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs; 97% similarity level). The environmental impact generated by the reservoirs promoted clear compositional shifts in all bacterial classes that resulted from changes in the abundance of individual OTUs rather than from the appearance of new taxa along the river. Abundance patterns at the class level represented the dynamics of only a small but variable proportion of their constituting OTUs, which were not necessarily the most abundant ones. Within most classes, we detected sub-groups of OTUs showing contrasting responses to reservoir-induced environmental changes. Overall, we show that the patterns observed at the class level fail to capture the dynamics of a significant fraction of their constituent members, calling for caution when the ecological attributes of high-ranks are to be interpreted. PMID:26635761

  10. Quantitative characteristics of gene regulation by small RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erel Levine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of small RNAs (sRNAs have been shown to regulate critical pathways in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In bacteria, regulation by trans-encoded sRNAs is predominantly found in the coordination of intricate stress responses. The mechanisms by which sRNAs modulate expression of its targets are diverse. In common to most is the possibility that interference with the translation of mRNA targets may also alter the abundance of functional sRNAs. Aiming to understand the unique role played by sRNAs in gene regulation, we studied examples from two distinct classes of bacterial sRNAs in Escherichia coli using a quantitative approach combining experiment and theory. Our results demonstrate that sRNA provides a novel mode of gene regulation, with characteristics distinct from those of protein-mediated gene regulation. These include a threshold-linear response with a tunable threshold, a robust noise resistance characteristic, and a built-in capability for hierarchical cross-talk. Knowledge of these special features of sRNA-mediated regulation may be crucial toward understanding the subtle functions that sRNAs can play in coordinating various stress-relief pathways. Our results may also help guide the design of synthetic genetic circuits that have properties difficult to attain with protein regulators alone.

  11. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Ingmer, Hanne; Madsen, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    of the bacterial genes. We have investigated the invasiveness of primary chicken embryo intestinal cells (CEICs) by C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origins and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes during co-cultivation. Results C......-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s) secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under...

  12. Identification of let-7-regulated oncofetal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyerinas, Benjamin; Park, Sun-Mi; Shomron, Noam;

    2008-01-01

    -regulated at the end of embryonic development. Let-7 is often down-regulated early during cancer development, suggesting that let-7-regulated oncofetal genes (LOG) may become reexpressed in cancer cells. Using comparative bioinformatics, we have identified 12 conserved LOGs that include HMGA2 and IMP-1/CRD-BP. IMP-1...

  13. Performance of resistance gene pyramids to races of rice bacterial blight in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGKangle; ZHUANGJieyun; WANGHanrong

    1998-01-01

    The effect of gene pyramiding on resistance to bacterial blight (BB) in rice was evahlated among the IR24-based near isogenic lines conraining single resistance gene and gene pyramids containing two, three or lour resistancegenes (see table).

  14. Simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes: more reliable method of Helicobacter pylori detection in microbial rich dental plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saima; Idrees, Muhammad; Izhar, Mateen; Butt, Arshad Kamal; Khan, Ayyaz Ali

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) assay is considered superior to other methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity; however, it also has limitations when sample under study is microbial rich dental plaque. The type of gene targeted and number of primers used for bacterial detection in dental plaque samples can have a significant effect on the results obtained as there are a number of closely related bacterial species residing in plaque biofilm. Also due to high recombination rate of H. pylori some of the genes might be down regulated or absent. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of H. pylori colonization of dental plaque by simultaneously amplifying two genes of the bacterium. One hundred dental plaque specimens were collected from dyspeptic patients before their upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and presence of H. pylori was determined through PCR assay using primers targeting two different genes of the bacterium. Eighty-nine of the 100 samples were included in final analysis. With simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes 51.6% of the dental plaque samples were positive for H. pylori while this prevalence increased to 73% when only one gene amplification was used for bacterial identification. Detection of H. pylori in dental plaque samples is more reliable when two genes of the bacterium are simultaneously amplified as compared to one gene amplification only.

  15. Negative regulation of bacterial quorum sensing tunes public goods cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Schuster, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) often coordinates the expression of other, generally more costly public goods involved in virulence and nutrient acquisition. In many Proteobacteria, the basic QS circuitry consists of a synthase that produces a diffusible acyl-homoserine lactone and a cognate receptor that activates public goods expression. In some species, the circuitry also contains negative regulators that have the potential to modulate the timing and magnitude of activation. In this study, we experimentally investigated the contribution of this regulatory function to the evolutionary stability of public goods cooperation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We compared fitness and public goods expression rates of strains lacking either qteE or qscR, each encoding a distinct negative regulator, with those of the wild-type parent and a signal-blind receptor mutant under defined growth conditions. We found that (1) qteE and qscR mutations behave virtually identically and have a stronger effect on the magnitude than on the timing of expression, (2) high expression in qteE and qscR mutants imposes a metabolic burden under nutrient conditions that advance induction and (3) high expression in qteE and qscR mutants increases population growth when QS is required, but also permits invasion by both wild-type and receptor mutant strains. Our data indicate that negative regulation of QS balances the costs and benefits of public goods by attenuating expression after transition to the induced state. As the cells cannot accurately assess the amount of cooperation needed, such bet-hedging would be advantageous in changing parasitic and nonparasitic environments.

  16. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  17. Carbon and phosphorus regulating bacterial metabolism in oligotrophic boreal lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, L. O.; Graneli, W.; Daniel, C. B.;

    2011-01-01

    -P and glucose-C alone or in combination (0.01 and 0.3 mg L(-1), respectively) was added to 1.0 mu m filtered lake water and incubated in darkness at 20 degrees C. Additions of glucose (C) and phosphorus (P) alone did not lead to changes in the rates of bacterial metabolic processes, whereas bacterial...... respiration and bacterial production responded positively to C + P enrichment for most of the lakes sampled. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (2.5-28.7%) and low mean value (12%). These variations were not correlated with the DOC concentration. Our results show that heterotrophic bacterial...

  18. Arabidopsis Clade I TGA Factors Regulate Apoplastic Defences against the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through Endoplasmic Reticulum-Based Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipu Wang; Pierre R Fobert

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae . Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), f...

  19. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  20. Regulation of gene expression by Goodwin's loop with many genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analysis of a long Goodwin's loop containing many genes. The genes form a closed series. The rate of transcription of any gene is up or down regulated by theprotein product of the preceding gene. We describe the loop with a system of ordinary differential equations of order s. Oscillatory solutions of the system are possible at the odd number of repressions and any number of inductions if the product of all Hill's coefficients, related to both repressions and inductions, is larger than:

  1. Genes but not genomes reveal bacterial domestication of Lactococcus lactis.

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    Delphine Passerini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between "environmental" strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and "domesticated" strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the "domesticated" strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable

  2. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

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    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  3. Classroom Activities to Engage Students and Promote Critical Thinking about Genetic Regulation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing

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    Kimberly Aebli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an interactive activity to mimic bacterial quorum sensing, and a classroom worksheet to promote critical thinking about genetic regulation of the lux operon. The interactive quorum sensing activity engages students and provides a direct visualization of how population density functions to influence light production in bacteria. The worksheet activity consists of practice problems that require students to apply basic knowledge of the lux operon in order to make predictions about genetic complementation experiments, and students must evaluate how genetic mutations in the lux operon affect gene expression and overall phenotype. The worksheet promotes critical thinking and problem solving skills, and emphasizes the roles of diffusible signaling molecules, regulatory proteins, and structural proteins in quorum sensing.

  4. A new experimental approach for studying bacterial genomic island evolution identifies island genes with bacterial host-specific expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickerson Cheryl A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic islands are regions of bacterial genomes that have been acquired by horizontal transfer and often contain blocks of genes that function together for specific processes. Recently, it has become clear that the impact of genomic islands on the evolution of different bacterial species is significant and represents a major force in establishing bacterial genomic variation. However, the study of genomic island evolution has been mostly performed at the sequence level using computer software or hybridization analysis to compare different bacterial genomic sequences. We describe here a novel experimental approach to study the evolution of species-specific bacterial genomic islands that identifies island genes that have evolved in such a way that they are differentially-expressed depending on the bacterial host background into which they are transferred. Results We demonstrate this approach by using a "test" genomic island that we have cloned from the Salmonella typhimurium genome (island 4305 and transferred to a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts of differing evolutionary relationships to S. typhimurium. Systematic analysis of the expression of the island genes in the different hosts compared to proper controls allowed identification of genes with genera-specific expression patterns. The data from the analysis can be arranged in a matrix to give an expression "array" of the island genes in the different bacterial backgrounds. A conserved 19-bp DNA site was found upstream of at least two of the differentially-expressed island genes. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of horizontally-transferred genomic island gene expression in a broad range of Gram negative hosts. We also present evidence in this study that the IS200 element found in island 4305 in S. typhimurium strain LT2 was inserted after the island had already been acquired by the S. typhimurium lineage and that this element is likely not

  5. Insulin gene: organisation, expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, E; Philippe, J

    1996-06-01

    Insulin, a major hormone of the endocrine pancreas, plays a key role in the control of glucose homeostasis. This review discusses the mechanisms of cell-specific expression and regulation of the insulin gene. Whereas expression is restricted to islet beta-cells in adults, the insulin gene is more widely expressed at several embryonic stages, although the role of extrapancreatic expression is still unclear. beta-cell-specific expression relies on the interactions of 5'-flanking sequence motifs of the promoter with a number of ubiquitous and islet-specific transcription factors. IEF1 and IPF-1, by their binding to the E and A boxes, respectively, of the insulin gene promoter, appear to be the major determinants of beta-cell-specific expression. IEF1 is a heterodimer of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, whereas IPF-1 belongs to the homeodomain-containing family. beta-cell specific determinants are conserved throughout evolution, although the human insulin gene 5'-flanking sequence also contains a polymorphic minisatellite which is unique to primates and may play a role in insulin gene regulation. Glucose modulates insulin gene transcription, with multiple elements of the promoter involved in glucose responsiveness. Remarkably, IPF-1 and IEF1 are involved in both beta-cell-specific expression and glucose regulation of the insulin gene. cAMP also regulates insulin gene transcription through a CRE, in response to various hormonal stimuli. On the whole, recent studies have provided a better understanding of beta-cell differentiation and function.

  6. The TRANSFAC system on gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, E; Chen, X; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Hehl, R; Liebich, I; Krull, M; Matys, V; Michael, H; Ohnhäuser, R; Prüss, M; Schacherer, F; Thiele, S; Urbach, S

    2001-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors and their DNA-binding sites and profiles (http://www.gene-regulation.de/) has been quantitatively extended and supplemented by a number of modules. These modules give information about pathologically relevant mutations in regulatory regions and transcription factor genes (PathoDB), scaffold/matrix attached regions (S/MARt DB), signal transduction (TRANSPATH) and gene expression sources (CYTOMER). Altogether, these distinct database modules constitute the TRANSFAC system. They are accompanied by a number of program routines for identifying potential transcription factor binding sites or for localizing individual components in the regulatory network of a cell.

  7. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  8. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Nóbrega Dourado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol, respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones and plant exudates (including ethanol in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF, adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss, to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU. Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization, which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  9. Steroid hormone signaling is essential to regulate innate immune cells and fight bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Regan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling immunity and development is essential to ensure survival despite changing internal conditions in the organism. Drosophila metamorphosis represents a striking example of drastic and systemic physiological changes that need to be integrated with the innate immune system. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms that coordinate development and immune cell activity in the transition from larva to adult. Here, we reveal that regulation of macrophage-like cells (hemocytes by the steroid hormone ecdysone is essential for an effective innate immune response over metamorphosis. Although it is generally accepted that steroid hormones impact immunity in mammals, their action on monocytes (e.g. macrophages and neutrophils is still not well understood. Here in a simpler model system, we used an approach that allows in vivo, cell autonomous analysis of hormonal regulation of innate immune cells, by combining genetic manipulation with flow cytometry, high-resolution time-lapse imaging and tissue-specific transcriptomic analysis. We show that in response to ecdysone, hemocytes rapidly upregulate actin dynamics, motility and phagocytosis of apoptotic corpses, and acquire the ability to chemotax to damaged epithelia. Most importantly, individuals lacking ecdysone-activated hemocytes are defective in bacterial phagocytosis and are fatally susceptible to infection by bacteria ingested at larval stages, despite the normal systemic and local production of antimicrobial peptides. This decrease in survival is comparable to the one observed in pupae lacking immune cells altogether, indicating that ecdysone-regulation is essential for hemocyte immune functions and survival after infection. Microarray analysis of hemocytes revealed a large set of genes regulated at metamorphosis by EcR signaling, among which many are known to function in cell motility, cell shape or phagocytosis. This study demonstrates an important role for steroid hormone regulation of

  10. Primary study on the resistance to bacterial blight (X. oryzae) in Cecropin B gene transgenic rices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAZhihua; HUANGDanian; XUERui; WANGXiaoling; GAOZhenya

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) is one of the major diseases to rice. Antibacterial Cecropin B gene has been cloned and transformed into rice. We studied the resistance to bacterial blight in Cecropin B gene tronsgenic rices.

  11. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots.

  12. Impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial surface properties and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Srinivasa Ranga, Vijay Penagonda; Mao, Yongjun; Chen, Kevin; Qiao, Hanzi

    2008-03-01

    Genetic markers have been in popular use for tracing microbial movement in the environment. However, the impact of genetic marker insertion on microbial surface properties and consequent transport is often ignored. For this research, we investigated the impact of luminescence-based genetic marker insertion on bacterial surface properties and transport. Typical Gram-positive bacterial strains of Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mitis and Micrococcus luteus were used as model bacterial strains in this research. We manipulated gene transfer to observe the impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial surface properties based on contact angle measurements, and we conducted column experiments to evaluate the impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial transport. After lux gene insertion, bacterial interactions with the porous media increased, demonstrating stronger deposition potential in the porous media. Accordingly, retention of the daughter strains increased. Lux gene insertion also resulted in an increase in bacterial dispersion and equilibrium adsorption in the porous media. The bacterial deposition coefficient was found to correlate with the free energy of interactions between bacteria and the porous media.

  13. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms.

  14. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  15. Synthetic RNAs for gene regulation: design principles and computational tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eLaganà

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies, but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA, artificial microRNA (a-miR and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  16. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.;

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...

  17. Bacterial genes in the aphid genome: absence of functional gene transfer from Buchnera to its host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruo Nikoh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is typical of obligate symbionts. In cellular organelles, this reduction partly reflects transfer of ancestral bacterial genes to the host genome, but little is known about gene transfer in other obligate symbioses. Aphids harbor anciently acquired obligate mutualists, Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria, which have highly reduced genomes (420-650 kb, raising the possibility of gene transfer from ancestral Buchnera to the aphid genome. In addition, aphids often harbor other bacteria that also are potential sources of transferred genes. Previous limited sampling of genes expressed in bacteriocytes, the specialized cells that harbor Buchnera, revealed that aphids acquired at least two genes from bacteria. The newly sequenced genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, presents the first opportunity for a complete inventory of genes transferred from bacteria to the host genome in the context of an ancient obligate symbiosis. Computational screening of the entire A. pisum genome, followed by phylogenetic and experimental analyses, provided strong support for the transfer of 12 genes or gene fragments from bacteria to the aphid genome: three LD-carboxypeptidases (LdcA1, LdcA2,psiLdcA, five rare lipoprotein As (RlpA1-5, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiD, 1,4-beta-N-acetylmuramidase (bLys, DNA polymerase III alpha chain (psiDnaE, and ATP synthase delta chain (psiAtpH. Buchnera was the apparent source of two highly truncated pseudogenes (psiDnaE and psiAtpH. Most other transferred genes were closely related to genes from relatives of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria. At least eight of the transferred genes (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5, bLys appear to be functional, and expression of seven (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5 are highly upregulated in bacteriocytes. The LdcAs and RlpAs appear to have been duplicated after transfer. Our results excluded the hypothesis that genome reduction in Buchnera has been accompanied by gene transfer to the

  18. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  19. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  20. The population genetics of cooperative gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Alexander J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in gene regulatory networks drive the evolution of phenotypic diversity both within and between species. Rewiring of transcriptional networks is achieved either by changes to transcription factor binding sites or by changes to the physical interactions among transcription factor proteins. It has been suggested that the evolution of cooperative binding among factors can facilitate the adaptive rewiring of a regulatory network. Results We use a population-genetic model to explore when cooperative binding of transcription factors is favored by evolution, and what effects cooperativity then has on the adaptive re-writing of regulatory networks. We consider a pair of transcription factors that regulate multiple targets and overlap in the sets of target genes they regulate. We show that, under stabilising selection, cooperative binding between the transcription factors is favoured provided the amount of overlap between their target genes exceeds a threshold. The value of this threshold depends on several population-genetic factors: strength of selection on binding sites, cost of pleiotropy associated with protein-protein interactions, rates of mutation and population size. Once it is established, we find that cooperative binding of transcription factors significantly accelerates the adaptive rewiring of transcriptional networks under positive selection. We compare our qualitative predictions to systematic data on Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factors, their binding sites, and their protein-protein interactions. Conclusions Our study reveals a rich set of evolutionary dynamics driven by a tradeoff between the beneficial effects of cooperative binding at targets shared by a pair of factors, and the detrimental effects of cooperative binding for non-shared targets. We find that cooperative regulation will evolve when transcription factors share a sufficient proportion of their target genes. These findings help to

  1. Glycerophosphorylcholine regulates Haemophilus influenzae glpQ gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrousan, Enas; Fan, Xin

    2015-05-01

    An important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface of the host is the phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of its lipopolysaccharides, which promotes adherence to the host cells. Haemophilus influenzae is able to use glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) from host for ChoP synthesis. Utilization of GPC requires glpQ, which encodes a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme. In this study, we investigate the transcriptional regulation of glpQ gene using real-time PCR and transcriptional fusion of H. influenzae glpQ promoter to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene. The glpQ promoter activities were examined under environmental conditions including changes in temperature, oxygen, high salt and minimal growth medium. Our data showed that under room temperature and anaerobic conditions, the glpQ gene expression levels were significantly higher than under other growth conditions. In addition, the glpQ gene expression levels were upregulated in the presence of GPC. These results suggest that H. influenzae may upregulate glpQ expression in response to different environments it encounters during infection, from the airway surfaces (room temperature) to deep tissues (anaerobic). Upregulation of glpQ by GPC may allow efficient use of abundant GPC from mammalian cells by H. influenzae as a source of nutrient and for ChoP decoration of lipopolysaccharide that facilitates bacterial adhesion to host cells and growth during infection.

  2. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Del Campo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  3. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  4. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Viswakarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, β (also known as δ, and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP/thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220/mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1 may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism.

  5. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  6. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  7. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases.

  8. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRIS...

  9. Molecular methods for bacterial genotyping and analyzed gene regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Yıldırım1, Seval Cing Yıldırım2, Nadir Koçak3

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strain typing is an important process for diagnosis, treatment and epidemiological investigations. Current bacterial strain typing methods may be classified into two main categories: phenotyping and genotyping. Phenotypic characters are the reflection of genetic contents. Genotyping, which refers discrimination of bacterial strains based on their genetic content, has recently become widely used for bacterial strain typing. The methods already used in genotypingof bacteria are quite different from each other. In this review we tried to summarize the basic principles of DNA-based methods used in genotyping of bacteria and describe some important DNA regions that are used in genotyping of bacteria. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011;1(1:42-46.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  11. Hydrological pulse regulating the bacterial heterotrophic metabolism between Amazonian mainstems and floodplain lakes

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    Luciana Oliveira Vidal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated in situ rates of bacterial carbon processing in Amazonian floodplain lakes and mainstems, during both high and low water phases (p < 0.05. Our results showed that Bacterial Production (BP was lower and more variable than Bacterial Respiration (BR, determined as total respiration. Bacterial Carbon Demand (BCD was mostly accounted by BR and presented the same pattern that BR in both water phases. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (0.2–23% and low mean value of 3 and 6 %, (in high and low water respectively suggesting that dissolved organic carbon (DOC was mostly allocated to catabolic metabolism. However, BGE was regulated by BP in low water phase. Consequently, changes in BGE showed the same pattern that BP. In addition, the hydrological pulse effects on mainstems and floodplains lakes connectivity were found for BP and BGE in low water. Multiple correlation analyses revealed that indexes of organic matter quality (chlorophyll-a, N stable isotopes and C/N ratios were the strongest seasonal drivers of bacterial carbon metabolism. Our work indicated that: (1 the bacterial metabolism was mostly driven by respiration in Amazonian aquatic ecosystems resulting in low BGE in either high and low water phase; (2 the hydrological pulse regulated

  12. Redox regulation, gene expression and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yoko; Tanaka, Masashi; Honda, Shuji

    2010-07-01

    Lifespan can be lengthened by genetic and environmental modifications. Study of these might provide valuable insights into the mechanism of aging. Low doses of radiation and short-term exposure to heat and high concentrations of oxygen prolong the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These might be caused by adaptive responses to harmful environmental conditions. Single-gene mutations have been found to extend lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. So far, the best-characterized system is the C. elegans mutant in the daf-2, insulin/IGF-I receptor gene that is the component of the insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway. The mutant animals live twice as long as the wild type. The insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway regulates the activity of DAF-16, a FOXO transcription factor. However, the unified explanation for the function of DAF-16 transcription targets in the lifespan extension is not yet fully established. As both of the Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) isoforms (sod-2 and sod-3) are found to be targets of DAF-16, we attempted to assess their functions in regulating lifespan and oxidative stress responsivity. We show that the double deletions of sod-2 and sod-3 genes induced oxidative-stress sensitivity but do not shorten lifespan in the daf-2 mutant background, indicating that oxidative stress is not necessarily a limiting factor for longevity. Furthermore, the deletion in the sod-3 gene lengthens lifespan in the daf-2 mutant. We conclude that the MnSOD systems in C. elegans fine-tune the insulin/IGF-I-signaling based regulation of longevity by acting not as anti-oxidants but as physiological-redox-signaling modulators.

  13. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  14. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF......-kappaB activation and cytokine secretion in vitro. Thus, DMBT1 may play an important role in the first line of mucosal defense conferring immune exclusion of bacterial cell wall components. Dysregulated intestinal DMBT1 expression due to mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 gene may be part of the complex pathophysiology...

  15. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo; Tong, Shurong

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed......To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  16. IL-10 Function, Regulation, and in Bacterial Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazlett, Linda D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; McClellan, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system protects the host from pathogenic microbes, but tight regulation of the evoked response is requisite to limit bystander damage. The interleukin (IL)-10 family of cytokines, composed of 9 members: IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26, and 3 distantly related members, IL-28A, IL-28B, and IL-29, plays a central role in this regulation. IL-10 family cytokines emerged before the adaptive immune response and elicit diverse host defense mechanisms, especially from epithelial ce...

  17. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  18. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase.

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    W Seth Childers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  19. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  20. Using bacterial extract along with differential gene expression in Acropora millepora larvae to decouple the processes of attachment and metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachshon Siboni

    Full Text Available Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP, isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100% with little or no attachment (0-2%. To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI, selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05 in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05 following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that

  1. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  2. Harnessing single cell sorting to identify cell division genes and regulators in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Burke

    Full Text Available Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development.

  3. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 gene polymorphism and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Levent; Filik

    2010-01-01

    I read with great interest the article by Gbele et al published in issue 44 of World J Gastroenterol 2009.The results of their study indicate that-2518 Monocyte chemotactic protein-1(MCP-1)genotype AA is a risk factor for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.However,there are some items that need to be discussed.

  4. Exploring the relationship between fractal features and bacterial essential genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Ming, Yu; Li-Cai, Yang; Qian, Zhou; Lu-Lu, Zhao; Zhi-Ping, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Essential genes are indispensable for the survival of an organism in optimal conditions. Rapid and accurate identifications of new essential genes are of great theoretical and practical significance. Exploring features with predictive power is fundamental for this. Here, we calculate six fractal features from primary gene and protein sequences and then explore their relationship with gene essentiality by statistical analysis and machine learning-based methods. The models are applied to all the currently available identified genes in 27 bacteria from the database of essential genes (DEG). It is found that the fractal features of essential genes generally differ from those of non-essential genes. The fractal features are used to ascertain the parameters of two machine learning classifiers: Naïve Bayes and Random Forest. The area under the curve (AUC) of both classifiers show that each fractal feature is satisfactorily discriminative between essential genes and non-essential genes individually. And, although significant correlations exist among fractal features, gene essentiality can also be reliably predicted by various combinations of them. Thus, the fractal features analyzed in our study can be used not only to construct a good essentiality classifier alone, but also to be significant contributors for computational tools identifying essential genes. Project supported by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. ZR2014FM022).

  5. [Effect of plasmid pKM101 on the expression of bacterial genes not related to DNa metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skavronskaya, A G; Tiganova, I G; Andreeva, I V; Rusina, O Iu

    1999-02-01

    An experimental system ensuring fusion of bacterial genes to the lac operon of the Mu dl(Aplac) phage was used. Fusion operons in which the lac operon was under the control of promoters of the elt gene, responsible for synthesis of the LT toxin, of the tetracyclin-resistance tet gene, and sfiA gene encoding filament production, was studied. Using this experimental system, plasmid pKM101 was shown to be capable of activating the expression of the above Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium genes, which is manifested as the activation of beta-galactosidase synthesis. The activation of the elt gene expression by the pKM101 plasmid was also confirmed in experiments on detecting the LT toxin synthesized by bacteria carrying this plasmid. Effect of the plasmid on the activation of elt operon expression, unlike the effect of this plasmid on mutability, does not depend on the functioning of the lexA and recA genes, i.e., this is not a SOS-regulated process. The mutant plasmid pGW12, a derivative of pKM101, deficient in the mucAB genes responsible for mutagenesis, causes a more pronounced activation of the elt gene than plasmid pKM101.

  6. SLAM is a microbial sensor that regulates bacterial phagosome functions in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Scott B; Romero, Xavier; Ma, Chunyan; Wang, Guoxing; Faubion, William A; Liao, Gongxian; Compeer, Ewoud; Keszei, Marton; Rameh, Lucia; Wang, Ninghai; Boes, Marianne; Regueiro, Jose R; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Terhorst, Cox

    2010-10-01

    Phagocytosis is a pivotal process by which macrophages eliminate microorganisms after recognition by pathogen sensors. Here we unexpectedly found that the self ligand and cell surface receptor SLAM functioned not only as a costimulatory molecule but also as a microbial sensor that controlled the killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. SLAM regulated activity of the NADPH oxidase NOX2 complex and phagolysosomal maturation after entering the phagosome, following interaction with the bacterial outer membrane proteins OmpC and OmpF. SLAM recruited a complex containing the intracellular class III phosphatidylinositol kinase Vps34, its regulatory protein kinase Vps15 and the autophagy-associated molecule beclin-1 to the phagosome, which was responsible for inducing the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate, a regulator of both NOX2 function and phagosomal or endosomal fusion. Thus, SLAM connects the gram-negative bacterial phagosome to ubiquitous cellular machinery responsible for the control of bacterial killing.

  7. Endogenous methanol regulates mammalian gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V Komarova

    Full Text Available We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis.

  8. Evaluation of the gene encoding the enzyme βHPMEH for the bacterial wilt inhibition caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

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    Elizabeth Fernandez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of the devastating bacterial wilt disease that attacks important agricultural crops such as potato, tomato, banana, among others, causing serious yield losses. Control of R. solanacearum is difficult because of its wide range of alternate hosts, its long survival in soil, its biological and genetic variation, the lack of natural resistance sources and the insufficiency of the appropriate chemical control measures. Quorum sensing is the term that describes the phenomenon whereby the accumulation of molecules allows bacteria to know the number of bacteria found in the environment (population density. R. solanacearum has a quorum sensing system for the regulation of the expression of virulence genes; the molecule 3-OH-PAME is the self-regulatory signal. The molecule ΒHPMEH hydrolyzes 3-OH-PAME nullifying the signal of virulence, and thus, the quorum sensing communication in R. solanacearum. In order to evaluate the βhpmeh gene we designed two vectors that express this gene under the control of two different promoters. Both vectors were verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Agroinfiltration assays were used to analyze gene expression and the effect against R. solanacearum in potato (Solanum tuberosum leaves. The results of the transient expression experiments showed that the expression of gene βhpmeh caused a delay in the appearance of symptoms of bacterial wilt and thus is a good candidate for whole genetic plant transformation.

  9. Overexpression of Bacterial mtlD Gene in Peanut Improves Drought Tolerance through Accumulation of Mannitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhauso, Tengale Dipak; Radhakrishnan, Thankappan; Kumar, Abhay; Mishra, Gyan Prakash; Dobaria, Jentilal Ramjibhai; Patel, Kirankumar; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat

    2014-01-01

    In the changing global environmental scenarios, water scarcity and recurrent drought impose huge reductions to the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) crop yield. In plants, osmotic adjustments associated with efficient free radical scavenging ability during abiotic stress are important components of stress tolerance mechanisms. Mannitol, a compatible solute, is known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals generated during various abiotic stresses, thereby conferring tolerance to water-deficit stress in many plant species. However, peanut plant is not known to synthesize mannitol. Therefore, bacterial mtlD gene coding for mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase under the control of constitutive promoter CaMV35S was introduced and overexpressed in the peanut cv. GG 20 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. A total of eight independent transgenic events were confirmed at molecular level by PCR, Southern blotting, and RT-PCR. Transgenic lines had increased amount of mannitol and exhibited enhanced tolerance in response to water-deficit stress. Improved performance of the mtlD transgenics was indicated by excised-leaf water loss assay and relative water content under water-deficit stress. Better performance of transgenics was due to the ability of the plants to synthesize mannitol. However, regulation of mtlD gene expression in transgenic plants remains to be elucidated. PMID:25436223

  10. Overexpression of Bacterial mtlD Gene in Peanut Improves Drought Tolerance through Accumulation of Mannitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengale Dipak Bhauso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the changing global environmental scenarios, water scarcity and recurrent drought impose huge reductions to the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. crop yield. In plants, osmotic adjustments associated with efficient free radical scavenging ability during abiotic stress are important components of stress tolerance mechanisms. Mannitol, a compatible solute, is known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals generated during various abiotic stresses, thereby conferring tolerance to water-deficit stress in many plant species. However, peanut plant is not known to synthesize mannitol. Therefore, bacterial mtlD gene coding for mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase under the control of constitutive promoter CaMV35S was introduced and overexpressed in the peanut cv. GG 20 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. A total of eight independent transgenic events were confirmed at molecular level by PCR, Southern blotting, and RT-PCR. Transgenic lines had increased amount of mannitol and exhibited enhanced tolerance in response to water-deficit stress. Improved performance of the mtlD transgenics was indicated by excised-leaf water loss assay and relative water content under water-deficit stress. Better performance of transgenics was due to the ability of the plants to synthesize mannitol. However, regulation of mtlD gene expression in transgenic plants remains to be elucidated.

  11. Macrofauna regulate heterotrophic bacterial carbon and nitrogen incorporation in low-oxygen sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, W.R.; Veuger, B.; Witte, U.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) currently impinge upon >1 million km(2) of sea floor and are predicted to expand with climate change. We investigated how changes in oxygen availability, macrofaunal biomass and retention of labile organic matter (OM) regulate heterotrophic bacterial C and N incorporation

  12. A BAC-bacterial recombination method to generate physically linked multiple gene reporter DNA constructs

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    Gong Shiaochin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporter gene mice are valuable animal models for biological research providing a gene expression readout that can contribute to cellular characterization within the context of a developmental process. With the advancement of bacterial recombination techniques to engineer reporter gene constructs from BAC genomic clones and the generation of optically distinguishable fluorescent protein reporter genes, there is an unprecedented capability to engineer more informative transgenic reporter mouse models relative to what has been traditionally available. Results We demonstrate here our first effort on the development of a three stage bacterial recombination strategy to physically link multiple genes together with their respective fluorescent protein (FP reporters in one DNA fragment. This strategy uses bacterial recombination techniques to: (1 subclone genes of interest into BAC linking vectors, (2 insert desired reporter genes into respective genes and (3 link different gene-reporters together. As proof of concept, we have generated a single DNA fragment containing the genes Trap, Dmp1, and Ibsp driving the expression of ECFP, mCherry, and Topaz FP reporter genes, respectively. Using this DNA construct, we have successfully generated transgenic reporter mice that retain two to three gene readouts. Conclusion The three stage methodology to link multiple genes with their respective fluorescent protein reporter works with reasonable efficiency. Moreover, gene linkage allows for their common chromosomal integration into a single locus. However, the testing of this multi-reporter DNA construct by transgenesis does suggest that the linkage of two different genes together, despite their large size, can still create a positional effect. We believe that gene choice, genomic DNA fragment size and the presence of endogenous insulator elements are critical variables.

  13. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications.

  14. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  15. Paralysis and killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli requires the bacterial tryptophanase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanful, Akwasi; Dolan-Livengood, Jennifer M; Lewis, Taiesha; Sheth, Seema; Dezalia, Mark N; Sherman, Melanie A; Kalman, Lisa V; Benian, Guy M; Kalman, Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are major causes of food and water-borne disease. We have developed a genetically tractable model of pathogenic E. coli virulence based on our observation that these bacteria paralyse and kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Paralysis and killing of C. elegans by EPEC did not require direct contact, suggesting that a secreted toxin mediates the effect. Virulence against C. elegans required tryptophan and bacterial tryptophanase, the enzyme catalysing the production of indole and other molecules from tryptophan. Thus, lack of tryptophan in growth media or deletion of tryptophanase gene failed to paralyse or kill C. elegans. While known tryptophan metabolites failed to complement an EPEC tryptophanase mutant when presented extracellularly, complementation was achieved with the enzyme itself expressed either within the pathogen or within a cocultured K12 strains. Thus, an unknown metabolite of tryptophanase, derived from EPEC or from commensal non-pathogenic strains, appears to directly or indirectly regulate toxin production within EPEC. EPEC strains containing mutations in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), a pathogenicity island required for virulence in humans, also displayed attenuated capacity to paralyse and kill nematodes. Furthermore, tryptophanase activity was required for full activation of the LEE1 promoter, and for efficient formation of actin-filled membranous protrusions (attaching and effacing lesions) that form on the surface of mammalian epithelial cells following attachment and which depends on LEE genes. Finally, several C. elegans genes, including hif-1 and egl-9, rendered C. elegans less susceptible to EPEC when mutated, suggesting their involvement in mediating toxin effects. Other genes including sek-1, mek-1, mev-1, pgp-1,3 and vhl-1, rendered C. elegans more

  16. Genome-wide gene responses in a transgenic rice line carrying the maize resistance gene Rxo1 to the rice bacterial streak pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola

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    Fu Bin-Ying

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-host resistance in rice to its bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc, mediated by a maize NBS-LRR type R gene, Rxo1 shows a typical hypersensitive reaction (HR phenotype, but the molecular mechanism(s underlying this type of non-host resistance remain largely unknown. Results A microarray experiment was performed to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying HR of rice to Xoc mediated by Rxo1 using a pair of transgenic and non-transgenic rice lines. Our results indicated that Rxo1 appeared to function in the very early step of the interaction between rice and Xoc, and could specifically activate large numbers of genes involved in signaling pathways leading to HR and some basal defensive pathways such as SA and ET pathways. In the former case, Rxo1 appeared to differ from the typical host R genes in that it could lead to HR without activating NDR1. In the latter cases, Rxo1 was able to induce a unique group of WRKY TF genes and a large set of genes encoding PPR and RRM proteins that share the same G-box in their promoter regions with possible functions in post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions In conclusion, Rxo1, like most host R genes, was able to trigger HR against Xoc in the heterologous rice plants by activating multiple defensive pathways related to HR, providing useful information on the evolution of plant resistance genes. Maize non-host resistance gene Rxo1 could trigger the pathogen-specific HR in heterologous rice, and ultimately leading to a localized programmed cell death which exhibits the characteristics consistent with those mediated by host resistance genes, but a number of genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat and RNA recognition motif protein were found specifically up-regulated in the Rxo1 mediated disease resistance. These results add to our understanding the evolution of plant resistance genes.

  17. Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters

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    Liang eShi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The porin-cytochrome (Pcc protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr gene clusters of other Fe(III-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides.

  18. Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinds Jason

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human and animal health is constantly under threat by emerging pathogens that have recently acquired genetic determinants that enhance their survival, transmissibility and virulence. We describe the construction and development of an Active Surveillance of Pathogens (ASP oligonucleotide microarray, designed to 'actively survey' the genome of a given bacterial pathogen for virulence-associated genes. Results The microarray consists of 4958 reporters from 151 bacterial species and include genes for the identification of individual bacterial species as well as mobile genetic elements (transposons, plasmid and phage, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The ASP microarray was validated with nineteen bacterial pathogens species, including Francisella tularensis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ASP microarray identified these bacteria, and provided information on potential antibiotic resistance (eg sufamethoxazole resistance and sulfonamide resistance and virulence determinants including genes likely to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (e.g. an alpha-haemolysin. Conclusion The ASP microarray has potential in the clinic as a diagnostic tool, as a research tool for both known and emerging pathogens, and as an early warning system for pathogenic bacteria that have been recently modified either naturally or deliberately.

  19. Multivalent nanofibers of a controlled length: regulation of bacterial cell agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Il-Soo; Huang, Zhegang; Lee, Myongsoo

    2012-09-12

    Control of the size and shape of molecular assemblies on the nanometer scale in aqueous solutions is very important for the regulation of biological functions. Among the well-defined supramolecular structures of organic amphiphiles, one-dimensional nanofibers have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in biocompatible materials. Although much progress has been made in the field of self-assembled nanofibers, the ability to control the fiber length remains limited. The approach for control of the fiber length presented herein overcomes this limitation through the coassembly of amphiphilic rod-coil molecules in which the crystallinity of the aromatic segment can be regulated by π-π stacking interactions. The introduction of carbohydrate segments into the fiber exterior endows the nanofibers with the ability to adhere to bacterial cells. Notably, the fiber length systematically regulates the agglutination and proliferation of bacterial cells exposed to these fibers.

  20. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements.

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    Crystal Jaing

    Full Text Available Emerging known and unknown pathogens create profound threats to public health. Platforms for rapid detection and characterization of microbial agents are critically needed to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. Available detection technologies cannot provide broad functional information about known or novel organisms. As a step toward developing such a system, we have produced and tested a series of high-density functional gene arrays to detect elements of virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Our first generation array targets genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for gene family detection and discrimination. When tested with organisms at varying phylogenetic distances from the four target strains, the array detected orthologs for the majority of targeted gene families present in bacteria belonging to the same taxonomic family. In combination with whole-genome amplification, the array detects femtogram concentrations of purified DNA, either spiked in to an aerosol sample background, or in combinations from one or more of the four target organisms. This is the first report of a high density NimbleGen microarray system targeting microbial antibiotic resistance and virulence mechanisms. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples.

  1. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    1993-01-01

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from cul

  2. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

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    Bang Dang D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhoea in humans and is considered a commensal of the gastroenteric tract of the avian host. However, little is known about the interaction between C. jejuni and the avian host including the cytokine responses and the expression of the bacterial genes. We have investigated the invasiveness of primary chicken embryo intestinal cells (CEICs by C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origins and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes during co-cultivation. Results C. jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under in vitro culture condition C. jejuni strains of both human and chicken origins can invade avian host cells with a pro-inflammatory response and that the virulence-associated genes of C. jejuni may play a role in this process.

  3. Genome-wide identification of genes regulated by the Rcs phosphorelay system in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongping; Qi, Mingsheng; Calla, Bernarda; Korban, Schuyler S; Clough, Steven J; Cock, Peter J A; Sundin, George W; Toth, Ian; Zhao, Youfu

    2012-01-01

    The exopolysaccharide amylovoran is one of the major pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight of apples and pears. We have previously demonstrated that the RcsBCD phosphorelay system is essential for virulence by controlling amylovoran biosynthesis. We have also found that the hybrid sensor kinase RcsC differentially regulates amylovoran production in vitro and in vivo. To further understand how the Rcs system regulates E. amylovora virulence gene expression, we conducted genome-wide microarray analyses to determine the regulons of RcsB and RcsC in liquid medium and on immature pear fruit. Array analyses identified a total of 648 genes differentially regulated by RcsCB in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with our previous findings, RcsB acts as a positive regulator in both conditions, while RcsC positively controls expression of amylovoran biosynthetic genes in vivo but negatively controls expression in vitro. Besides amylovoran biosynthesis and regulatory genes, cell-wall and cell-envelope (membrane) as well as regulatory genes were identified as the major components of the RcsBC regulon, including many novel genes. We have also demonstrated that transcripts of rcsA, rcsC, and rcsD genes but not the rcsB gene were up-regulated when bacterial cells were grown in minimal medium or following infection of pear fruits compared with those grown in Luria Bertani medium. Furthermore, using the genome of E. amylovora ATCC 49946, a hidden Markov model predicted 60 genes with a candidate RcsB binding site in the intergenic region, 28 of which were identified in the microarray assay. Based on these findings as well as previous reported data, a working model has been proposed to illustrate how the Rcs phosphorelay system regulates virulence gene expression in E. amylovora.

  4. Hfq regulates the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

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    Mawatari Kazuaki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hfq gene is conserved in a wide variety of bacteria and Hfq is involved in many cellular functions such as stress responses and the regulation of gene expression. It has also been reported that Hfq is involved in bacterial pathogenicity. However, it is not clear whether Hfq regulates virulence in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. To evaluate this, we investigated the effect of Hfq on the expression of virulence-associated genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH, which is considered to be an important virulence factor in V. parahaemolyticus, using an hfq deletion mutant. Results The production of TDH in the hfq deletion mutant was much higher than in the parental strain. Quantification of tdh promoter activity and mRNA demonstrated that transcription of the tdh gene was up-regulated in the mutant strain. The hfq-complemented strain had a normal (parental amount of tdh expression. The transcriptional activity of tdhA was particularly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that Hfq is closely associated with the expression level of the tdh gene. Interestingly, other genes involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus, such as VP1680, vopC, and vopT, were also up-regulated in the mutant strain. Conclusion Hfq regulates the expression of virulence-associated factors such as TDH and may be involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function. PMID:28046014

  6. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  7. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  8. Evolvability and hierarchy in rewired bacterial gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isalan, Mark; Lemerle, Caroline; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Beltrao, Pedro; Horn, Carsten; Raineri, Emanuele; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Serrano, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing DNA from several organisms has revealed that duplication and drift of existing genes have primarily molded the contents of a given genome. Though the effect of knocking out or over-expressing a particular gene has been studied in many organisms, no study has systematically explored the effect of adding new links in a biological network. To explore network evolvability, we constructed 598 recombinations of promoters (including regulatory regions) with different transcription or σ-factor genes in Escherichia coli, added over a wild-type genetic background. Here we show that ~95% of new networks are tolerated by the bacteria, that very few alter growth, and that expression level correlates with factor position in the wild-type network hierarchy. Most importantly, we find that certain networks consistently survive over the wild-type under various selection pressures. Therefore new links in the network are rarely a barrier for evolution and can even confer a fitness advantage. PMID:18421347

  9. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies.

  10. Polyamine analogues targeting epigenetic gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Marton, Laurence J; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2009-11-04

    Over the past three decades the metabolism and functions of the polyamines have been actively pursued as targets for antineoplastic therapy. Interactions between cationic polyamines and negatively charged nucleic acids play a pivotal role in DNA stabilization and RNA processing that may affect gene expression, translation and protein activity. Our growing understanding of the unique roles that the polyamines play in chromatin regulation, and the discovery of novel proteins homologous with specific regulatory enzymes in polyamine metabolism, have led to our interest in exploring chromatin remodelling enzymes as potential therapeutic targets for specific polyamine analogues. One of our initial efforts focused on utilizing the strong affinity that the polyamines have for chromatin to create a backbone structure, which could be combined with active-site-directed inhibitor moieties of HDACs (histone deacetylases). Specific PAHAs (polyaminohydroxamic acids) and PABAs (polyaminobenzamides) polyamine analogues have demonstrated potent inhibition of the HDACs, re-expression of p21 and significant inhibition of tumour growth. A second means of targeting the chromatin-remodelling enzymes with polyamine analogues was facilitated by the recent identification of flavin-dependent LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1). The existence of this enzyme demonstrated that histone lysine methylation is a dynamic process similar to other histone post-translational modifications. LSD1 specifically catalyses demethylation of mono- and di-methyl Lys4 of histone 3, key positive chromatin marks associated with transcriptional activation. Structural and catalytic similarities between LSD1 and polyamine oxidases facilitated the identification of biguanide, bisguanidine and oligoamine polyamine analogues that are potent inhibitors of LSD1. Cellular inhibition of LSD1 by these unique compounds led to the re-activation of multiple epigenetically silenced genes important in tumorigenesis. The use of

  11. Y-linked variation for autosomal immune gene regulation has the potential to shape sexually dimorphic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Ian C; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Sexually dimorphic phenotypes arise from the differential expression of male and female shared genes throughout the genome. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which dimorphic regulation manifests and evolves are unclear. Recent work suggests that Y-chromosomes may play an important role, given that Drosophila melanogaster Ys were shown to influence the regulation of hundreds of X and autosomal genes. For Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to facilitate sexually dimorphic evolution, however, it must exist within populations (where selection operates) and influence male fitness. These criteria have seldom been investigated, leaving the potential for dimorphic evolution via YRV unclear. Interestingly, male and female D. melanogaster differ in immune gene regulation. Furthermore, immune gene regulation appears to be influenced by the Y-chromosome, suggesting it may contribute to dimorphic immune evolution. We address this possibility by introgressing Y-chromosomes from a single wild population into an isogenic background (to create Y-lines) and assessing immune gene regulation and bacterial defence. We found that Y-line males differed in their immune gene regulation and their ability to defend against Serratia marcescens. Moreover, gene expression and bacterial defence were positively genetically correlated. These data indicate that the Y-chromosome has the potential to shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic immunity in this system.

  12. The bacterial two-hybrid system uncovers the involvement of acetylation in regulating of Lrp activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Qin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nε-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat - or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (deacetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36 in helix-turn-helix (HTH DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  13. The Bacterial Two-Hybrid System Uncovers the Involvement of Acetylation in Regulating of Lrp Activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ran; Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qiufen; Li, Shuxian; Cui, Zhongli; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    N𝜀-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat – or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (de)acetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36) in helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:27909434

  14. Bacterial community composition and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Aslam, Zubair; Kim, Seon Won; Lee, Seon-Woo; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial communities and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost (VC) were investigated to clarify the influence of earthworms on the inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi in VC. The spore germination of Fusarium moniliforme was reduced in VC aqueous extracts prepared from paper sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS). The bacterial communities were examined by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. Unique clones selected from 16S rRNA libraries of FS and VC on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fell into the major lineages of the domain bacteria Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Among culture isolates, Actinobacteria dominated in VC, while almost equal numbers of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were present in FS. Analysis of chitinolytic isolates and chitinase gene diversity revealed that chitinolytic bacterial communities were enriched in VC. Populations of bacteria that inhibited plant fungal pathogens were higher in VC than in FS and particularly chitinolytic isolates were most active against the target fungi.

  15. Both msa Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Are Needed for Full Virulence in Bacterial Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Coady, Alison M; Murray, Anthony L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Rhodes, Linda D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in...

  16. Bacterial Human Virulence Genes across Diverse Habitats As Assessed by In silico Analysis of Environmental Metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Ditte A; Hendriksen, Niels B; Kilian, Mogens;

    2016-01-01

    and glacial ice. Homologs to 16 bacterial human virulence genes, involved in urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal diseases, skin diseases, and wound and systemic infections, showed global ubiquity. A principal component analysis did not demonstrate clear trends across the metagenomes with respect...

  17. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities and gene transfer agents in northern South China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA major capsid gene (g5 was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS, temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments.

  18. Measurement of bacterial gene expression in vivo by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time RT-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Angen, Øystein

    2007-01-01

    Due to the relative small number of bacterial pathogens present in an infected host, exploration of pathogen gene expression in vivo is challenging. This study reports the development of a protocol for quantifying bacterial gene expression in vivo in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae using laser ca...

  19. Pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation: examples, models and consistent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Elisa N; Shu, Jiang; Cserhati, Matyas F; Weeks, Donald P; Ladunga, Istvan

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory of pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation. To bridge the gap between empirical studies and mathematical models, we integrate pre-existing observations with our meta-analyses of the ENCODE ChIP-Seq experiments. Earlier evidence includes fluctuations in levels, location, activity, and binding of transcription factors, variable DNA motifs, and bursts in gene expression. Stochastic regulation is also indicated by frequently subdued effects of knockout mutants of regulators, their evolutionary losses/gains and massive rewiring of regulatory sites. We report wide-spread pluralistic regulation in ≈800 000 tightly co-expressed pairs of diverse human genes. Typically, half of ≈50 observed regulators bind to both genes reproducibly, twice more than in independently expressed gene pairs. We also examine the largest set of co-expressed genes, which code for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Numerous regulatory complexes are highly significant enriched in ribosomal genes compared to highly expressed non-ribosomal genes. We could not find any DNA-associated, strict sense master regulator. Despite major fluctuations in transcription factor binding, our machine learning model accurately predicted transcript levels using binding sites of 20+ regulators. Our pluralistic and stochastic theory is consistent with partially random binding patterns, redundancy, stochastic regulator binding, burst-like expression, degeneracy of binding motifs and massive regulatory rewiring during evolution.

  20. Mechanisms of mammalian zinc-regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly A; Valentine, Ruth A; Coneyworth, Lisa J; Mathers, John C; Ford, Dianne

    2008-12-01

    Mechanisms through which gene expression is regulated by zinc are central to cellular zinc homoeostasis. In this context, evidence for the involvement of zinc dyshomoeostasis in the aetiology of diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and cancer, highlights the importance of zinc-regulated gene expression. Mechanisms elucidated in bacteria and yeast provide examples of different possible modes of zinc-sensitive gene regulation, involving the zinc-regulated binding of transcriptional activators and repressors to gene promoter regions. A mammalian transcriptional regulatory mechanism that mediates zinc-induced transcriptional up-regulation, involving the transcription factor MTF1 (metal-response element-binding transcription factor 1), has been studied extensively. Gene responses in the opposite direction (reduced mRNA levels in response to increased zinc availability) have been observed in mammalian cells, but a specific transcriptional regulatory process responsible for such a response has yet to be identified. Examples of single zinc-sensitive transcription factors regulating gene expression in opposite directions are emerging. Although zinc-induced transcriptional repression by MTF1 is a possible explanation in some specific instances, such a mechanism cannot account for repression by zinc of all mammalian genes that show this mode of regulation, indicating the existence of as yet uncharacterized mechanisms of zinc-regulated transcription in mammalian cells. In addition, recent findings reveal a role for effects of zinc on mRNA stability in the regulation of specific zinc transporters. Our studies on the regulation of the human gene SLC30A5 (solute carrier 30A5), which codes for the zinc transporter ZnT5, have revealed that this gene provides a model system by which to study both zinc-induced transcriptional down-regulation and zinc-regulated mRNA stabilization.

  1. Regulated genes in mesenchymal stem cells and gastriccancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori Tanabe; Kazuhiko Aoyagi; Hiroshi Yokozaki; Hiroki Sasaki

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the genes regulated in mesenchymalstem cells (MSCs) and diffuse-type gastric cancer (GC),gene expression was analyzed.METHODS: Gene expression of MSCs and diffuse-typeGC cells were analyzed by microarray. Genes relatedto stem cells, cancer and the epithelial-mesenchymaltransition (EMT) were extracted from human genelists using Gene Ontology and reference information.Gene panels were generated, and messenger RNAgene expression in MSCs and diffuse-type GC cells wasanalyzed. Cluster analysis was performed using the NCSSsoftware.RESULTS: The gene expression of regulator of G-proteinsignaling 1 (RGS1) was up-regulated in diffuse-type GCcells compared with MSCs. A panel of stem-cell relatedgenes and genes involved in cancer or the EMT wereexamined. Stem-cell related genes, such as growtharrest-specific 6, musashi RNA-binding protein 2 andhairy and enhancer of split 1 (Drosophila), NOTCHfamily genes and Notch ligands, such as delta-like 1(Drosophila) and Jagged 2, were regulated.CONCLUSION: Expression of RGS1 is up-regulated,and genes related to stem cells and NOTCH signalingare altered in diffuse-type GC compared with MSCs.

  2. Gain and loss of phototrophic genes revealed by comparison of two Citromicrobium bacterial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zheng

    Full Text Available Proteobacteria are thought to have diverged from a phototrophic ancestor, according to the scattered distribution of phototrophy throughout the proteobacterial clade, and so the occurrence of numerous closely related phototrophic and chemotrophic microorganisms may be the result of the loss of genes for phototrophy. A widespread form of bacterial phototrophy is based on the photochemical reaction center, encoded by puf and puh operons that typically are in a 'photosynthesis gene cluster' (abbreviated as the PGC with pigment biosynthesis genes. Comparison of two closely related Citromicrobial genomes (98.1% sequence identity of complete 16S rRNA genes, Citromicrobium sp. JL354, which contains two copies of reaction center genes, and Citromicrobium strain JLT1363, which is chemotrophic, revealed evidence for the loss of phototrophic genes. However, evidence of horizontal gene transfer was found in these two bacterial genomes. An incomplete PGC (pufLMC-puhCBA in strain JL354 was located within an integrating conjugative element, which indicates a potential mechanism for the horizontal transfer of genes for phototrophy.

  3. Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, A.M.; Murray, A.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Rhodes, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Laccase activity is proportional to the abundance of bacterial laccase-like genes in soil from subtropical arable land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuzhen; Su, Yirong; Dong, Mingzhe; He, Xunyang; Kumaresan, Deepak; O'Donnell, Anthony G; Wu, Jinshui; Chen, Xiangbi

    2015-12-01

    Laccase enzymes produced by both soil bacteria and fungi play important roles in refractory organic matter turnover in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated the abundance and diversity of fungal laccase genes and bacterial laccase-like genes in soil from subtropical arable lands, and identified which microbial group was associated with laccase activity. Compared with fungal laccase genes, the bacterial laccase-like genes had greater abundance, richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity. More importantly, laccase activity can be explained almost exclusively by the bacterial laccase-like genes, and their abundance had significant linear relationship with laccase activity. Thus, bacterial laccase-like gene has great potential to be used as a sensitive indicator of laccase enzyme for refractory organic matter turnover in subtropical arable lands.

  5. Phylogeny of bacterial and archaeal genomes using conserved genes: supertrees and supermatrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Morgan Lang

    Full Text Available Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA, as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a "primary concordance" tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes.

  6. Regulation of male fertility by X-linked genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ke; Yang, Fang; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem, affecting men and women about equally. Mouse genetic studies demonstrate that more than 200 genes specifically or predominantly regulate fertility. However, few genetic causes of infertility in humans have been identified. Here, we focus on the regulation of male fertility by X-linked, germ cell-specific genes. Previous genomic studies reveal that the mammalian X chromosome is enriched for genes expressed in early spermatogenesis. Recent genetic studies in mice show that X-linked, germ cell-specific genes, such as A-kinase anchor protein 4 (Akap4), nuclear RNA export factor 2 (Nxf2), TBP-associated factor 7l (Taf7l), and testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11), indeed play important roles in the regulation of male fertility. Moreover, we find that the Taf7l Tex11 double-mutant males exhibit much more severe defects in meiosis than either single mutant, suggesting that these 2 X-linked genes regulate male meiosis synergistically. The X-linked, germ cell-specific genes are particularly attractive in the study of male infertility in humans. Because males are hemizygous for X-linked genes, loss-of-function mutations in the single-copy X-linked genes, unlike in autosomal genes, would not be masked by a normal allele. The genetic studies of X-linked, germ cell-specific genes in mice have laid a foundation for mutational analysis of their human orthologues in infertile men.

  7. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Ingmer, Hanne; Madsen, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhoea in humans and is considered a commensal of the gastroenteric tract of the avian host. However, little is known about the interaction between C. jejuni and the avian host including the cytokine responses and the expression....... jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria......-free media from another co-cultivation experiment also increased the expression of the virulence-associated genes in the C. jejuni chicken isolate, indicating that the expression of bacterial genes is regulated by component(s) secreted upon co-cultivation of bacteria and CEICs. Conclusion We show that under...

  8. Federal Regulation of Gene Therapy: Who Will Save our Germline?

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This paper will attempt to address some of these more complex issues involving human gene therapy and the encompassing regulations. The first section will deal with the science of gene therapy and will briefly touch upon the scientific hurdles that remain for scientists in this field, as this is important to understanding many of the ethical issues. This section will be divided into a basic genetic overview, a description of somatic gene therapy, and a summary of germline gene therapy. The se...

  9. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bryon; Ellis; Leah; Kaercher; Courtney; Snavely

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene tran-scription. METHODS:Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. RESULTS:Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from thecytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli , two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overex-pressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment.CONCLUSION:These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  10. (Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  11. [Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  12. RirA is the iron response regulator of the rhizobactin 1021 biosynthesis and transport genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguier, Caroline; O Cuív, Páraic; Clarke, Paul; O'Connell, Michael

    2005-05-15

    The genes encoding the biosynthesis and transport of rhizobactin 1021, a siderophore produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti, are negatively regulated by iron. Mutagenesis of rirA, the rhizobial iron regulator, resulted in abolition of the iron responsive regulation of the biosynthesis and transport genes. Bioassay analysis revealed that the siderophore is produced in the presence of iron in a rirA mutant. RNA analysis and GFP fusions supported the conclusion that RirA is the mediator of iron-responsive transcriptional repression of the two transcripts encoding the biosynthesis and transport genes. RirA in S. meliloti appears to fulfil the role often observed for Fur in other bacterial species. The regulator was found to mediate the iron-responsive expression of two additional genes, smc02726 and dppA1, repressing the former while activating the latter. The rirA mutant nodulated the host plant Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and fixed nitrogen as effectively as the wild type.

  13. Structure, circadian regulation and bioinformatic analysis of the unique sigma factor gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew L; Smith, Annette C; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Purton, Saul; Herrin, David L

    2004-01-01

    In higher plants, the transcription of plastid genes is mediated by at least two types of RNA polymerase (RNAP); a plastid-encoded bacterial RNAP in which promoter specificity is conferred by nuclear-encoded sigma factors, and a nuclear-encoded phage-like RNAP. Green algae, however, appear to possess only the bacterial enzyme. Since transcription of much, if not most, of the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is regulated by the circadian clock and the nucleus, we sought to identify sigma factor genes that might be responsible for this regulation. We describe a nuclear gene (RPOD) that is predicted to encode an 80 kDa protein that, in addition to a predicted chloroplast transit peptide at the N-terminus, has the conserved motifs (2.1- 4.2) diagnostic of bacterial sigma-70 factors. We also identified two motifs not previously recognized for sigma factors, adjacent PEST sequences and a leucine zipper, both suggested to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PEST sequences were also found in approximately 40% of sigma factors examined, indicating they may be of general significance. Southern blot hybridization and BLAST searches of the genome and EST databases suggest that RPODmay be the only sigma factor gene in C. reinhardtii. The levels of RPODmRNA increased 2- 3-fold in the mid-to-late dark period of light-dark cycling cells, just prior to, or coincident with, the peak in chloroplast transcription. Also, the dark-period peak in RPOD mRNA persisted in cells shifted to continuous light or continuous dark for at least one cycle, indicating that RPODis under circadian clock control. These results suggest that regulation of RPODexpression contributes to the circadian clock's control of chloroplast transcription.

  14. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  15. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yontao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP. The pipeline (i reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Results Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between

  16. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  17. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles

    OpenAIRE

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were ...

  18. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Cassava bacterial blight (CBB) caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation ...

  19. Antibiotic resistance genes occurrence and bacterial community composition in the Liuxi River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguang eXiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in the environment have paid great concern due to their health risk. We investigated antibiotics concentrations (tetracyclines, sulfonamides and fluoroquinolones, ARGs abundances (tetracycline, sulfonamide and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes, and bacterial community composition in sediment and water samples in the Liuxi River, China. Antibiotics concentrations were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. ARGs abundances were quantified by a culture-independent method. Bacterial community composition was analyzed by metagenomic approach based on Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform. Antibiotics concentrations were at the levels of 1.19 to 622 ug kg-1 in sediment samples and below the limit of detection to 127 ng L-1 in water samples. Relative abundances (ARGs copies/16S rRNA gene copies of detected ARGs were at the range of 10-5 to 10-2. The dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia in sediment samples, and were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples. The results indicated that the river environment was contaminated by antibiotics and may be as a reservoir of ARGs. This study provided quantitative data on antibiotics, ARGs and bacterial community composition in the Liuxi River, a geographical location different from the reported studies.

  20. Evolution of variation in presence and absence of genes in bacterial pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Andrew R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes exhibit a remarkable degree of variation in the presence and absence of genes, which probably extends to the level of individual pathways. This variation may be a consequence of the significant evolutionary role played by horizontal gene transfer, but might also be explained by the loss of genes through mutation. A challenge is to understand why there would be variation in gene presence within pathways if they confer a benefit only when complete. Results Here, we develop a mathematical model to study how variation in pathway content is produced by horizontal transfer, gene loss and partial exposure of a population to a novel environment. Conclusions We discuss the possibility that variation in gene presence acts as cryptic genetic variation on which selection acts when the appropriate environment occurs. We find that a high level of variation in gene presence can be readily explained by decay of the pathway through mutation when there is no longer exposure to the selective environment, or when selection becomes too weak to maintain the genes. In the context of pathway variation the role of horizontal gene transfer is probably the initial introduction of a complete novel pathway rather than in building up the variation in a genome without the pathway.

  1. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  2. Transcriptionally regulated, prostate-targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2009-07-02

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American males today. Novel and effective treatment such as gene therapy is greatly desired. The early viral based gene therapy uses tissue-nonspecific promoters, which causes unintended toxicity to other normal tissues. In this chapter, we will review the transcriptionally regulated gene therapy strategy for prostate cancer treatment. We will describe the development of transcriptionally regulated prostate cancer gene therapy in the following areas: (1) Comparison of different routes for best viral delivery to the prostate; (2) Study of transcriptionally regulated, prostate-targeted viral vectors: specificity and activity of the transgene under several different prostate-specific promoters were compared in vitro and in vivo; (3) Selection of therapeutic transgenes and strategies for prostate cancer gene therapy (4) Oncolytic virotherapy for prostate cancer. In addition, the current challenges and future directions in this field are also discussed.

  3. Modeling classic attenuation regulation of gene expression in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily A; Pirogov, Sergey A; Rubanov, Lev I; Seliverstov, Alexander V

    2007-02-01

    A model is proposed primarily for the classical RNA attenuation regulation of gene expression through premature transcription termination. The model is based on the concept of the RNA secondary structure macrostate within the regulatory region between the ribosome and RNA-polymerase, on hypothetical equation describing deceleration of RNA-polymerase by a macrostate and on views of transcription and translation initiation and elongation, under different values of the four basic model parameters which were varied. A special effort was made to select adequate model parameters. We first discuss kinetics of RNA folding and define the concept of the macrostate as a specific parentheses structure used to construct a conventional set of hairpins. The originally developed software that realizes the proposed model offers functionality to fully model RNA secondary folding kinetics. Its performance is compared to that of a public server described in Ref. 1. We then describe the delay in RNA-polymerase shifting to the next base or its premature termination caused by an RNA secondary structure or, herefrom, a macrostate. In this description, essential concepts are the basic and excited states of the polymerase first introduced in Ref. 2: the polymerase shifting to the next base can occur only in the basic state, and its detachment from DNA strand - only in excited state. As to the authors' knowledge, such a model incorporating the above-mentioned attenuation characteristics is not published elsewhere. The model was implemented in an application with command line interface for running in batch mode in Windows and Linux environments, as well as a public web server.(3) The model was tested with a conventional Monte Carlo procedure. In these simulations, the estimate of correlation between the premature transcription termination probability p and concentration c of charged amino acyl-tRNA was obtained as function p(c) for many regulatory regions in many bacterial genomes, as well as

  4. Bacterial pathogens activate a common inflammatory pathway through IFNλ regulation of PDCD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor S Cohen

    Full Text Available The type III interferon (IFNλ receptor IL-28R is abundantly expressed in the respiratory tract and has been shown essential for host defense against some viral pathogens, however no data are available concerning its role in the innate immune response to bacterial pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced significant production of IFNλ in the lung, and clearance of these bacteria from the lung was significantly increased in IL-28R null mice compared to controls. Improved bacterial clearance correlated with reduced lung pathology and a reduced ratio of pro- vs anti-inflammatory cytokines in the airway. In human epithelial cells IFNλ inhibited miR-21 via STAT3 resulting in upregulation of PDCD4, a protein known to promote inflammatory signaling. In vivo 18 hours following infection with either pathogen, miR-21 was significantly reduced and PDCD4 increased in the lungs of wild type compared to IL-28R null mice. Infection of PDCD4 null mice with USA300 resulted in improved clearance, reduced pathology, and reduced inflammatory cytokine production. These data suggest that during bacterial pneumonia IFNλ promotes inflammation by inhibiting miR-21 regulation of PDCD4.

  5. Tissue Specific and Hormonal Regulation of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    cAMP responsive region located at -200 to -99 bp in CRH. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMfER OF PAGES Breast Cancer gene regulation, transcription, placenta...known mediators of labor, and it may also the stress response. The peptide sequence and expression of potentiate the effect of oxytocin on uterine...regulation of other rodent trophoblast genes has 220 not yet been investigated. 2. Robinson BG, Arbiser JL, Emanuel RL, Majzoub JA 1989 Species- 3008

  6. Jasmonate induction of the monoterpene linalool confers resistance to rice bacterial blight and its biosynthesis is regulated by JAZ protein in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shiduku; Hosokawa-Shinonaga, Yumi; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Yamada, Shoko; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is involved in the regulation of host immunity in plants. Recently, we demonstrated that JA signalling has an important role in resistance to rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) in rice. Here, we report that many volatile compounds accumulate in response to exogenous application of JA, including the monoterpene linalool. Expression of linalool synthase was up-regulated by JA. Vapour treatment with linalool induced resistance to Xoo, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing linalool synthase were more resistance to Xoo, presumably due to the up-regulation of defence-related genes in the absence of any treatment. JA-induced accumulation of linalool was regulated by OsJAZ8, a rice jasmonate ZIM-domain protein involving the JA signalling pathway at the transcriptional level, suggesting that linalool plays an important role in JA-induced resistance to Xoo in rice.

  7. Functional diversity of bacterial genes associated with aromatic hydrocarbon degradation in anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gomes Germano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the catabolic gene diversity for the bacterial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE and their biochar (BC. Functional diversity analyses in ADE soils can provide information on how adaptive microorganisms may influence the fertility of soils and what is their involvement in biogeochemical cycles. For this, clone libraries containing the gene encoding for the alpha subunit of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (α-ARHD bacterial gene were constructed, totaling 800 clones. These libraries were prepared from samples of an ADE soil under two different land uses, located at the Caldeirão Experimental Station - secondary forest (SF and agriculture (AG -, and the biochar (SF_BC and AG_BC, respectively. Heterogeneity estimates indicated greater diversity in BC libraries; and Venn diagrams showed more unique operational protein clusters (OPC in the SF_BC library than the ADE soil, which indicates that specific metabolic processes may occur in biochar. Phylogenetic analysis showed unidentified dioxygenases in ADE soils. Libraries containing functional gene encoding for the alpha subunit of the aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHD gene from biochar show higher diversity indices than those of ADE under secondary forest and agriculture.

  8. De-regulation of common housekeeping genes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurmbach Elisa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumorigenesis is associated with changes in gene expression and involves many pathways. Dysregulated genes include "housekeeping" genes that are often used for normalization for quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR, which may lead to unreliable results. This study assessed eight stages of hepatitis C virus (HCV induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC to search for appropriate genes for normalization. Results Gene expression profiles using microarrays revealed differential expression of most "housekeeping" genes during the course of HCV-HCC, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and beta-actin (ACTB, genes frequently used for normalization. QPCR reactions confirmed the regulation of these genes. Using them for normalization had strong effects on the extent of differential expressed genes, leading to misinterpretation of the results. Conclusion As shown here in the case of HCV-induced HCC, the most constantly expressed gene is the arginine/serine-rich splicing factor 4 (SFRS4. The utilization of at least two genes for normalization is robust and advantageous, because they can compensate for slight differences of their expression when not co-regulated. The combination of ribosomal protein large 41 (RPL41 and SFRS4 used for normalization led to very similar results as SFRS4 alone and is a very good choice for reference in this disease as shown on four differentially expressed genes.

  9. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial Adrenergic Sensors Regulate Virulence of Enteric Pathogens in the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano G. Moreira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enteric pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and Citrobacter rodentium, which is largely used as a surrogate EHEC model for murine infections, are exposed to several host neurotransmitters in the gut. An important chemical exchange within the gut involves the neurotransmitters epinephrine and/or norepinephrine, extensively reported to increase virulence gene expression in EHEC, acting through two bacterial adrenergic sensors: QseC and QseE. However, EHEC is unable to establish itself and cause its hallmark lesions, attaching and effacing (AE lesions, on murine enterocytes. To address the role of these neurotransmitters during enteric infection, we employed C. rodentium. Both EHEC and C. rodentium harbor the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE that is necessary for AE lesion formation. Here we show that expression of the LEE, as well as that of other virulence genes in C. rodentium, is also activated by epinephrine and/or norepinephrine. Both QseC and QseE are required for LEE gene activation in C. rodentium, and the qseC and qseE mutants are attenuated for murine infection. C. rodentium has a decreased ability to colonize dopamine β-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh−/− mice, which do not produce epinephrine and norepinephrine. Both adrenergic sensors are required for C. rodentium to sense these neurotransmitters and activate the LEE genes during infection. These data indicate that epinephrine and norepinephrine are sensed by bacterial adrenergic receptors during enteric infection to promote activation of their virulence repertoire. This is the first report of the role of these neurotransmitters during mammalian gastrointestinal (GI infection by a noninvasive pathogen.

  11. Bacterial rotary export ATPases are allosterically regulated by the nucleotide second messenger cyclic-di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E M; Little, Richard H; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M; Malone, Jacob G

    2015-10-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins.

  12. Gene regulation by mRNA editing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenas, J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The commonly cited figure of 10{sup 5} genes in the human genome represents a tremendous underestimate of our capacity to generate distinct gene products with unique functions. Our cells possess an impressive collection of tools for altering the products of a single gene to create a variety of proteins. The different gene products may have related but distinct functions, allowing cells of different types or at different developmental stages to fine-tune their patterns of gene expression. These tools may act in the cytoplasm, as when proteins undergo post-translational modifications, or in the nucleus, in the processing of pre-mRNA. Two forms of intranuclear fine-tuning are well established and widely studied: alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs and alternative polyadenylation site selection. In recent years it has become clear that cells possess yet another tool to create RNA sequence diversity, mRNA editing. The term {open_quotes}editing{close_quotes} is applied to posttranscriptional modifications of a purine or pyrimidine, which alter an mRNA sequence as it is read, for example, by ribosomes. Covalent changes to the structure of nucleotide bases are well known to occur on tRNA and rRNA molecules, but such changes in mRNA sequence are novel in that they have the capacity to change specific protein sequences. 43 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Calcium Regulates the Activity and Structural Stability of Tpr, a Bacterial Calpain-like Peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniec, Dominika; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Sroka, Aneta; Bryzek, Danuta; Bogyo, Matthew; Abrahamson, Magnus; Potempa, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a peptide-fermenting asaccharolytic periodontal pathogen. Its genome contains several genes encoding cysteine peptidases other than gingipains. One of these genes (PG1055) encodes a protein called Tpr (thiol protease) that has sequence similarity to cysteine peptidases of the papain and calpain families. In this study we biochemically characterize Tpr. We found that the 55-kDa Tpr inactive zymogen proteolytically processes itself into active forms of 48, 37, and 33 kDa via sequential truncations at the N terminus. These processed molecular forms of Tpr are associated with the bacterial outer membrane where they are likely responsible for the generation of metabolic peptides required for survival of the pathogen. Both autoprocessing and activity were dependent on calcium concentrations >1 mm, consistent with the protein's activity within the intestinal and inflammatory milieus. Calcium also stabilized the Tpr structure and rendered the protein fully resistant to proteolytic degradation by gingipains. Together, our findings suggest that Tpr is an example of a bacterial calpain, a calcium-responsive peptidase that may generate substrates required for the peptide-fermenting metabolism of P. gingivalis. Aside from nutrient generation, Tpr may also be involved in evasion of host immune response through degradation of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and complement proteins C3, C4, and C5. Taken together, these results indicate that Tpr likely represents an important pathogenesis factor for P. gingivalis.

  14. Gene regulation: hacking the network on a sugar high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tom; Wang, Xiao; Collins, James J

    2008-04-11

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Kaplan et al. (2008) determine the input functions for 19 E. coli sugar-utilization genes by using a two-dimensional high-throughput approach. The resulting input-function map reveals that gene network regulation follows non-Boolean, and often nonmonotonic, logic.

  15. Pharmacogenomics genes show varying perceptibility to microRNA regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Vinther, Jeppe; Shomron, Noam

    2011-01-01

    The aim of pharmacogenomics is to identify individual differences in genome and transcriptome composition and their effect on drug efficacy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of the majority of animal genes, including many genes involved in drug...

  16. Horizontal gene transfer of a bacterial insect toxin gene into the Epichloë fungal symbionts of grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Karen V.; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M.; Belanger, Faith C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is recognized as an important factor in genome evolution, particularly when the newly acquired gene confers a new capability to the recipient species. We identified a gene similar to the makes caterpillars floppy (mcf1 and mcf2) insect toxin genes in Photorhabdus, bacterial symbionts of nematodes, in the genomes of the Epichloë fungi, which are intercellular symbionts of grasses. Infection by Epichloë spp. often confers insect resistance to the grass hosts, largely due to the production of fungal alkaloids. A mcf-like gene is present in all of the Epichloë genome sequences currently available but in no other fungal genomes. This suggests the Epichloë genes were derived from a single lineage-specific HGT event. Molecular dating was used to estimate the time of the HGT event at between 7.2 and 58.8 million years ago. The mcf-like coding sequence from Epichloë typhina subsp. poae was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. E. coli cells expressing the Mcf protein were toxic to black cutworms (Agrotis ipsilon), whereas E. coli cells containing the vector only were non-toxic. These results suggest that the Epichloë mcf-like genes may be a component, in addition to the fungal alkaloids, of the insect resistance observed in Epichloë-infected grasses. PMID:24990771

  17. Regulation of human protein S gene (PROS1) transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Cornelia de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the transcriptional regulation of the gene for anticoagulant plasma Protein S, PROS1. Protein S is a cofactor for Protein C in the Protein C anticoagulant pathway. The coagulation cascade is negatively regulated by this pathway through inactivation of activ

  18. IGF-Regulated Genes in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Burgess, A.W., and Ward, C.W. (2002) Cell 110(6), 763-773 53. Sambrook, J., Maniatis , T., and Fritsch, E.F. (1989) Molecular cloning : a laboratory...triplicate arrays that each contain >12,000 sequence-verified, non-redundant human cDNA clones . Data were analyzed by accepted means of normalization...this award. Review of the field-published in Genes, Chromosomes, and Cancer 36: 113-120 (2003) The IGFI Receptor Gene: A Molecular Target for

  19. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W; Donahue, Deborah L; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  20. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  1. Putrescine regulating by stress-responsive MAPK cascade contributes to bacterial pathogen defense in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Hwa; Yoo, Seung-Jin; Min, Kwang-Hyun; Nam, Seung-Hee; Cho, Baik Ho; Yang, Kwang-Yeol

    2013-08-09

    Polyamines in plants are involved in various physiological and developmental processes including abiotic and biotic stress responses. We investigated the expression of ADCs, which are key enzymes in putrescine (Put) biosynthesis, and roles of Put involving defense response in Arabidopsis. The increased expression of ADC1 and ADC2, and the induction of Put were detected in GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic Arabidopsis, whereas, their performance was partially compromised in GVG-NtMEK2(DD)/mpk3 and GVG-NtMEK2(DD)/mpk6 mutant following DEX treatment. The expression of ADC2 was highly induced by Pst DC3000 inoculation, while the transcript levels of ADC1 were slightly up-regulated. Compared to the WT plant, Put content in the adc2 knock-out mutant was reduced after Pst DC3000 inoculation, and showed enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infection. The adc2 mutant exhibited reduced expression of PR-1 after bacterial infection and the growth of the pathogen was about 4-fold more than that in the WT plant. Furthermore, the disease susceptibility of the adc2 mutant was recovered by the addition of exogenous Put. Taken together, these results suggest that Arabidopsis MPK3 and MPK6 play a positive role in the regulation of Put biosynthesis, and that Put contributes to bacterial pathogen defense in Arabidopsis.

  2. Pyramiding blast, bacterial blight and brown planthopper resistance genes in rice restorer lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Zhi-juan; Yang Shu-dong; ZENG Yu-xiang; LIANG Yan; YANG Chang-deng; QIAN Qian

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast, bacterial blight (BB) and brown planthopper (BPH) are the three main pests of rice. This study investigated pyr-amiding genes resistant to blast, BB and BPH to develop restorer lines. Ten new lines with blast, BB and/or BPH resistance genes were developed using marker-assisted selection (MAS) technique and agronomic trait selection (ATS) method. Only HR13 with resistance genes to blast, BB and BPH was obtained. In addition to blast and BB resistance, four lines (HR39, HR41, HR42, HR43) demonstrated moderate resistance to BPH, but MAS for BPH resistance genes were not conducted in developing these four lines. These data suggested that there were unknown elite BPH resistance genes in the Zhongzu 14 donor parent. A more effective defense was demonstrated in the lines withPi1 andPi2 genes although the weather in 2012 was favorable to disease incidence. Blast resistance of the lines with a single resistance gene,Pita, was easily inlfuenced by the weather. Overal, the information obtained through pyramiding multiple resistance genes on developing the restorer lines is helpful for rice resistance breeding.

  3. Design and engineering of intracellular-metabolite-sensing/regulation gene circuits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Li, Sijin; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-throughput phenotyping tools is lagging far behind the rapid advances of genotype generation methods. To bridge this gap, we report a new strategy for design, construction, and fine-tuning of intracellular-metabolite-sensing/regulation gene circuits by repurposing bacterial transcription factors and eukaryotic promoters. As proof of concept, we systematically investigated the design and engineering of bacterial repressor-based xylose-sensing/regulation gene circuits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrated that numerous properties, such as induction ratio and dose-response curve, can be fine-tuned at three different nodes, including repressor expression level, operator position, and operator sequence. By applying these gene circuits, we developed a cell sorting based, rapid and robust high-throughput screening method for xylose transporter engineering and obtained a sugar transporter HXT14 mutant with 6.5-fold improvement in xylose transportation capacity. This strategy should be generally applicable and highly useful for evolutionary engineering of proteins, pathways, and genomes in S. cerevisiae.

  4. Computing and Applying Atomic Regulons to Understand Gene Expression and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Faria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding gene function and regulation is essential for the interpretation prediction and ultimate design of cell responses to changes in the environment. An important step toward meeting the challenge of understanding gene function and regulation is the identification of sets of genes that are always co-expressed. These gene sets Atomic Regulons ARs represent fundamental units of function within a cell and could be used to associate genes of unknown function with cellular processes and to enable rational genetic engineering of cellular systems. Here we describe an approach for inferring ARs that leverages large-scale expression data sets gene context and functional relationships among genes. We computed ARs for Escherichia coli based on 907 gene expression experiments and compared our results with gene clusters produced by two prevalent data-driven methods: hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering. We compared ARs and purely data-driven gene clusters to the curated set of regulatory interactions for E. coli found in RegulonDB showing that ARs are more consistent with gold standard regulons than are data-driven gene clusters. We further examined the consistency of ARs and data-driven gene clusters in the context of gene interactions predicted by Context Likelihood of Relatedness CLR analysis finding that the ARs show better agreement with CLR predicted interactions. We determined the impact of increasing amounts of expression data on AR construction and find that while more data improve ARs it is not necessary to use the full set of gene expression experiments available for E. coli to produce high quality ARs. In order to explore the conservation of co-regulated gene sets across different organisms we computed ARs for Shewanella oneidensis Pseudomonas aeruginosa Thermus thermophilus and Staphylococcus aureus each of which represents increasing degrees of phylogenetic distance from E. coli. Comparison of the organism-specific ARs showed

  5. Influence of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) on bacterial virulence and transcriptional regulation of allS by CRP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jian; Tan, Bin; Yang, Shiya; Luo, Mei; Xia, Huiming; Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Xipeng; Yang, Xianxian; Yang, Ruifu; Li, Yingli; Qiu, Jingfu

    2016-11-15

    cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is one of the most important transcriptional regulators, which can regulate large quantities of operons in different bacteria. The gene allS was well-known as allantoin-utilizing capability and involving in bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The specific DNA recognition motif of transcription regulator CRP was found in allS promoter region. Therefore, this study is aimed to investigate the function of CRP on virulence and its transcriptional regulation mechanism to gene allS in K. pneumoniae. The wild-type (WT) K. pneumoniae NTUH-2044, crp knockout (Kp-Δcrp) and the complemented knockout (KpC-Δcrp) strains were used to determine the function of crp gene. The lacZ fusion, qRT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays were performed to study the transcriptional regulation of CRP on allS. The result showed a decreased virulence in crp knockout strain. Complement through supplementing crp fragment in expression plasmid partially restore virulence of knockout bacteria. The CRP could bind to the allS promoter-proximal region and the binding site was further refined to be located from 60bp to 94bp upstream of the allS promoter. Based on these results, we proposed that CRP is an essential virulence regulator and knock out of crp gene will result in reduced virulence in K. pneumoniae. In the meantime, the transcription of gene allS is positively regulated by CRP via directly binding to upstream of allS promoter.

  6. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...

  7. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ananda Chitra; Jayanthy, C.; Nagarajan, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP) is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr) locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objecti...

  8. OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressed genes in bacterial microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkin Adam P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentially expressed genes are typically identified by analyzing the variation between replicate measurements. These procedures implicitly assume that there are no systematic errors in the data even though several sources of systematic error are known. Results OpWise estimates the amount of systematic error in bacterial microarray data by assuming that genes in the same operon have matching expression patterns. OpWise then performs a Bayesian analysis of a linear model to estimate significance. In simulations, OpWise corrects for systematic error and is robust to deviations from its assumptions. In several bacterial data sets, significant amounts of systematic error are present, and replicate-based approaches overstate the confidence of the changers dramatically, while OpWise does not. Finally, OpWise can identify additional changers by assigning genes higher confidence if they are consistent with other genes in the same operon. Conclusion Although microarray data can contain large amounts of systematic error, operons provide an external standard and allow for reasonable estimates of significance. OpWise is available at http://microbesonline.org/OpWise.

  9. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  10. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  11. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  12. Hypoxia-regulated target genes implicated in tumor metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ya-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia is an important microenvironmental factor that induces cancer metastasis. Hypoxia/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α regulates many important steps of the metastatic processes, especially epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT that is one of the crucial mechanisms to cause early stage of tumor metastasis. To have a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia-regulated metastasis, various hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes are categorized into different classes including transcription factors, histone modifiers, enzymes, receptors, kinases, small GTPases, transporters, adhesion molecules, surface molecules, membrane proteins, and microRNAs. Different roles of these target genes are described with regards to their relationship to hypoxia-induced metastasis. We hope that this review will provide a framework for further exploration of hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes and a comprehensive view of the metastatic picture induced by hypoxia.

  13. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching.

  14. Bacterial intra-species gene loss occurs in a largely clocklike manner mostly within a pool of less conserved and constrained genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-10-13

    Gene loss is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial gene content. Gene loss may occur as a result of shifts in environment leading to changes in the intensity and/or directionality of selection applied for the maintenance of specific genes. Gene loss may also occur in a more neutral manner, when gene functions are lost that were not subject to strong selection to be maintained, irrespective of changes to environment. Here, we used a pangenome-based approach to investigate patterns of gene loss across 15 bacterial species. We demonstrate that gene loss tends to occur mostly within a pool of genes that are less constrained within species, even in those strains from which they are not lost, and less conserved across bacterial species. Our results indicate that shifts in selection, resulting from shifts in environment are not required to explain the majority of gene loss events occurring within a diverse collection of bacterial species. Caution should therefore be taken when attributing differences in gene content to differences in environment.

  15. Identification of sdiA-regulated genes in a mouse commensal strain of Enterobacter cloacae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Dyszel, Jessica L; Gonzalez, Juan F; Ali, Mohamed M; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria determine their population density using quorum sensing. The most intensively studied mechanism of quorum sensing utilizes proteins of the LuxI family to synthesize a signaling molecule of the acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) type, and a protein of the LuxR family to bind AHL and regulate transcription. Genes regulated by quorum sensing often encode functions that are most effective when a group of bacteria are working cooperatively (e.g., luminescence, biofilm formation, host interactions). Bacteria in the Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter genera do not encode an AHL synthase but they do encode an AHL receptor of the LuxR family, SdiA. Instead of detecting their own AHL synthesis, these organisms use SdiA to detect the AHLs synthesized by other bacterial species. In this study, we used a genetic screen to identify AHL-responsive genes in a commensal Enterobacter cloacae strain that was isolated from a laboratory mouse. The genes include a putative type VI secretion system, copA (a copper transporter), and fepE (extends O-antigen chain length). A new transposon mutagenesis strategy and suicide vectors were used to construct an sdiA mutant of E. cloacae. The AHL-responsiveness of all fusions was entirely sdiA-dependent, although some genes were regulated by sdiA in the absence of AHL.

  16. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  17. The NSL complex regulates housekeeping genes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chung Lam

    Full Text Available MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16 acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP-seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2 throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5% of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP-seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication-related Element (DRE. Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription.

  18. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto-Suárez Mauricio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation of disease resistance mechanisms in cassava. In this study, we identified differentially expressed genes during pathogen attack by subtractive hybridization, using the Differential Subtraction Chain method (DSC. A population of cDNA obtained from infected plants was used as ";treatment"; and a population of cDNA obtained from healthy plants was used as ";control";. 1536 clones were isolated from the resistant varieties (MBRA 685 and SG 107-35. Of these, 110 randomly selected clones were sequenced and a homology search was conducted. The sequence analysis showed that 14 cDNA clones shared homology with plant genes involved in defense responses, 70 clones were either homologous to plant genes of unknown function or showed no homology, representing new genes potentially involved in cassava defense responses. A cDNA microarray was constructed by spotting the clones identified from our subtractive libraries. Other clones potentially involved in cassava defense responses were also included. The cassava defense cDNA microarray was used to confirm the differential expression of the clones. Keywords: cassava, bacterial blight, gene expression, subtractive library, microarrays.

  19. Identification of Genes Regulated by Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    phase entry, M., Kanai, F., Zhou, B.B., Chung, J.H., and Rathbun, G.A. histone gene expression, and Cajal Body maintenance in hu- 2002. Determination...substrates of ubiquitin ligases. 6 Body Development of a library of F-box proteins We previously reported the identification of 33 human F-box proteins...FLAG anti- effect of the T62A mutation on cyclin E degradation through bodies , and immune complexes were immunoblotted with anti-Myc the Thr35 ° degron

  20. Pancreatic regeneration: basic research and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Shigenori, Ota; Ishii, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ueki, Tomomi; Meguro, Makoto; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kojima, Takashi; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Noriyuki; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic regeneration (PR) is an interesting phenomenon that could provide clues as to how the control of diabetes mellitus might be achieved. Due to the different regenerative abilities of the pancreas and liver, the molecular mechanism responsible for PR is largely unknown. In this review, we describe five representative murine models of PR and thirteen humoral mitogens that stimulate β-cell proliferation. We also describe pancreatic ontogenesis, including the molecular transcriptional differences between α-cells and β-cells. Furthermore, we review 14 murine models which carry defects in genes related to key transcription factors for pancreatic ontogenesis to gain further insight into pancreatic development.

  1. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaul Rajinder

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa SoxR does not conform to the archetypal paradigm for SoxR-dependent regulation of the bacterial oxidative stress adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Marco; Zurita, Juan; Ferreras, Julian A; Worgall, Stefan; Larone, Davise H; Shi, Lei; Campagne, Fabien; Quadri, Luis E N

    2005-05-01

    SoxR is a transcriptional regulator that controls an oxidative stress response in Escherichia coli. The regulator is primarily activated by superoxide anion-dependent oxidation. Activated SoxR turns on transcription of a single gene, soxS, which encodes a transcriptional regulator that activates a regulon that includes dozens of oxidative stress response genes. SoxR homologues have been identified in many bacterial species, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the expected SoxR partner, SoxS, has not been found in P. aeruginosa. Thus, the primary gene target(s) of P. aeruginosa SoxR is unknown and the involvement of this regulator in the oxidative stress response of the bacterium remains unclear. We utilized transcriptome profiling to identify the P. aeruginosa SoxR regulon and constructed and characterized an unmarked P. aeruginosa DeltasoxR mutant. We provide evidence indicating that P. aeruginosa SoxR activates a six-gene regulon in response to O(2)(.-)-induced stress. The regulon includes three transcriptional units: (i) the recently identified mexGHI-ompD four-gene operon, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump system involved in quorum-sensing signal homeostasis; (ii) gene PA3718, encoding a probable efflux pump; and (iii) gene PA2274, encoding a probable monooxygenase. We also demonstrate that P. aeruginosa SoxR is not a key regulatory player in the oxidative stress response. Finally, we show that P. aeruginosa SoxR is required for virulence in a mouse model of intrapulmonary infection. These results demonstrate that the E. coli-based SoxRS paradigm does not hold in P. aeruginosa and foster new hypotheses for the possible physiological role of P. aeruginosa SoxR.

  3. Identification of the NAC1-regulated genes in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Wu, Ren-Chin; Herlinger, Alice L; Yap, Kailee; Kim, Jung-Won; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1), encoded by the NACC1 gene, is a transcription co-regulator that plays a multifaceted role in promoting tumorigenesis. However, the NAC1-regulated transcriptome has not been comprehensively defined. In this study, we compared the global gene expression profiles of NAC1-overexpressing SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and NAC1-knockdown SKOV3 cells. We found that NAC1 knockdown was associated with up-regulation of apoptotic genes and down-regulation of genes involved in cell movement, proliferation, Notch signaling, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Among NAC1-regulated genes, FOXQ1 was further characterized because it is involved in cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. NAC1 knockdown decreased FOXQ1 expression and promoter activity. Similarly, inactivation of NAC1 by expression of a dominant-negative construct of NAC1 suppressed FOXQ1 expression. Ectopic expression of NAC1 in NACC1 null cells induced FOXQ1 expression. NAC1 knockdown resulted in decreased cell motility and invasion, whereas constitutive expression of FOXQ1 rescued motility in cells after NAC1 silencing. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed a significant co-up-regulation of NAC1 and FOXQ1 in ovarian carcinoma tissues. On the basis of transcription profiling, we report a group of NAC1-regulated genes that may participate in multiple cancer-related pathways. We further demonstrate that NAC1 is essential and sufficient for activation of FOXQ1 transcription and that the role of NAC1 in cell motility is mediated, at least in part, by FOXQ1.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of transposable element derived human gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Ahsan; Bowen, Nathan J; Conley, Andrew B; Jordan, I King

    2011-04-01

    It was previously thought that epigenetic histone modifications of mammalian transposable elements (TEs) serve primarily to defend the genome against deleterious effects associated with their activity. However, we recently showed that, genome-wide, human TEs can also be epigenetically modified in a manner consistent with their ability to regulate host genes. Here, we explore the ability of TE sequences to epigenetically regulate individual human genes by focusing on the histone modifications of promoter sequences derived from TEs. We found 1520 human genes that initiate transcription from within TE-derived promoter sequences. We evaluated the distributions of eight histone modifications across these TE-promoters, within and between the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, and related their modification status with the cell-type specific expression patterns of the genes that they regulate. TE-derived promoters are significantly enriched for active histone modifications, and depleted for repressive modifications, relative to the genomic background. Active histone modifications of TE-promoters peak at transcription start sites and are positively correlated with increasing expression within cell lines. Furthermore, differential modification of TE-derived promoters between cell lines is significantly correlated with differential gene expression. LTR-retrotransposon derived promoters in particular play a prominent role in mediating cell-type specific gene regulation, and a number of these LTR-promoter genes are implicated in lineage-specific cellular functions. The regulation of human genes mediated by histone modifications targeted to TE-derived promoters is consistent with the ability of TEs to contribute to the epigenomic landscape in a way that provides functional utility to the host genome.

  5. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-10-29

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were cloned from total DNA of Paederus fuscipes beetles, which use this compound for chemical defense. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster and adjacent regions revealed the presence of ORFs with typical bacterial architecture and homologies. The ped cluster, which is present only in beetle specimens with high pederin content, is located on a 54-kb region bordered by transposase pseudogenes and encodes a mixed modular polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Notably, none of the modules contains regions with homology to acyltransferase domains, but two copies of isolated monodomain acyltransferase genes were found at the upstream end of the cluster. In line with an involvement in pederin biosynthesis, the upstream cluster region perfectly mirrors pederin structure. The unexpected presence of additional polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules reveals surprising insights into the evolutionary relationship between pederin-type pathways in beetles and sponges.

  6. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Hagen, Stephen J., E-mail: sjhagen@ufl.edu [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  7. Metal-dependent gene regulation in the causative agent of Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan eTroxell

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb is the causative agent of Lyme disease transmitted to humans by ticks of the Ixodes spp. Bb is a unique bacterial pathogen because it does not require iron (Fe2+ for its metabolism. Bb encodes a ferritin-like Dps homolog called NapA (also called BicA, which can bind Fe or copper (Cu2+, and a manganese (Mn2+ transport protein, BmtA; both proteins are required for colonization of the tick vector, but BmtA is also required for the murine host. This demonstrates that Bb’s metal homeostasis is a critical facet of the complex enzootic life cycle between the arthropod and murine hosts. Although metals are known to influence the expression of virulence determinants during infection, it is unknown how or if metals regulate virulence in Bb. Recent evidence demonstrates that Bb modulates the intracellular Mn2+ and zinc (Zn2+ content and, in turn, these metals regulate gene expression through influencing the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur homolog Borrelia Oxidative Stress Regulator (BosR. This mini-review focuses on the burgeoning study of metal-dependent gene regulation within Bb.

  8. Metal-dependent gene regulation in the causative agent of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxell, Bryan; Yang, X Frank

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is the causative agent of Lyme disease transmitted to humans by ticks of the Ixodes spp. Bb is a unique bacterial pathogen because it does not require iron (Fe(2+)) for its metabolism. Bb encodes a ferritin-like Dps homolog called NapA (also called BicA), which can bind Fe or copper (Cu(2+)), and a manganese (Mn(2+)) transport protein, Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA); both proteins are required for colonization of the tick vector, but BmtA is also required for the murine host. This demonstrates that Bb's metal homeostasis is a critical facet of the complex enzootic life cycle between the arthropod and murine hosts. Although metals are known to influence the expression of virulence determinants during infection, it is unknown how or if metals regulate virulence in Bb. Recent evidence demonstrates that Bb modulates the intracellular Mn(2+) and zinc (Zn(2+)) content and, in turn, these metals regulate gene expression through influencing the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) homolog Borrelia Oxidative Stress Regulator (BosR). This mini-review focuses on the burgeoning study of metal-dependent gene regulation within Bb.

  9. Bacterial phytase: potential application, in vivo function and regulation of its synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Konietzny

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise release of phosphate from phytate, the major storage form of phosphate in plant seeds and pollen, is initiated by a class of enzymes that have been collectively called phytases. The classification is solely due to the in vitro capability of these enzymes to accept phytate as a substrate. Phytases have been studied intensively in recent years because of the great interest in such enzymes for reducing phytate content in animal feed and food for human consumption. They have a wide distribution in plants, microorganisms, and in some animal tissues. Due to several biological characteristics, such as substrate specificity, resistance to proteolysis and catalytic efficiency, bacterial phytases have considerable potential in commercial applications. In bacteria, phytase is an inducible enzyme and its expression is subjected to a complex regulation, but phytase formation is not controlled uniformly among different bacteria. It was suggested that phytase is not required for balanced growth of bacterial cells, but may be synthesised in response to a nutrient or energy limitation.

  10. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  11. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

  12. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aybey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS activity of psychotropic drugs was tested against four test pathogens using the agar well diffusion method. All drugs showed strong inhibitory effect on the growth of S. typhimurium. Additionally, quorum sensing-regulated behaviors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production were investigated. Most effective drugs on swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production, respectively, were paroxetine and duloxetine; duloxetine; hydroxyzine and venlafaxine; paroxetine and venlafaxine; venlafaxine. Accordingly, psychotropic drugs were shown strongly anti-QS activity by acting as bacterial efflux pump inhibitors and effection on motility and alkaline protease production of P. aeruginosa.

  13. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible Pars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  14. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  15. Front-Loaded Linezolid Regimens Result in Increased Killing and Suppression of the Accessory Gene Regulator System of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Brian T.; Brown, Tanya; Parasrampuria, Ridhi; Daniel A Brazeau; Forrest, Alan; Kelchlin, Pamela A.; Holden, Patricia N.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Hanna, Debra; Bulitta, Jurgen B.

    2012-01-01

    Front loading is a strategy used to optimize the pharmacodynamic profile of an antibiotic through the administration of high doses early in therapy for a short duration. Our aims were to evaluate the impact of front loading of linezolid regimens on bacterial killing and suppression of resistance and on RNAIII, the effector molecule of the accessory gene regulator system (encoded by agr) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Time-killing experiments over 48 h were utilized for...

  16. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J

    2010-01-01

    Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... of invasive pneumococcal disease is required in order to enable the development of new or adjunctive treatments and/or pneumococcal vaccines that are efficient across serotypes. We applied genomic array footprinting (GAF) in the search for S. pneumoniae genes that are essential during experimental meningitis...

  17. Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistance Genes, and Bacterial Community Composition in Fresh Water Aquaculture Environment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Zhang, Tong; Ding, Xueyao; Li, Yafei; Wang, Mianzhi; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-08-01

    Environmental antibiotic resistance has drawn increasing attention due to its great threat to human health. In this study, we investigated concentrations of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides and (fluoro)quinolones) and abundances of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), including tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, and analyzed bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in Guangdong, China. The concentrations of sulfametoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and enrofloxacin were as high as 446 μg kg(-1) and 98.6 ng L(-1) in sediment and water samples, respectively. The relative abundances (ARG copies/16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies) of ARGs (sul1, sul2, sul3, tetM, tetO, tetW, tetS, tetQ, tetX, tetB/P, qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib, and qnrS) were as high as 2.8 × 10(-2). The dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes in sediment samples and Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples. The genera associated with pathogens were also observed, such as Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Clostridium. This study comprehensively investigated antibiotics, ARGs, and bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in China. The results indicated that fish ponds are reservoirs of ARGs and the presence of potential resistant and pathogen-associated taxonomic groups in fish ponds might imply the potential risk to human health.

  18. Identification and expression profiles of multiple genes in Nile tilapia in response to bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Aksoy, Mediha; Klesius, Phillip H; Li, Yuehong; Mu, Xingjiang; Srivastava, Kunwar; Reddy, Gopal

    2011-11-15

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to bacterial infection, suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization technique was used to identify upregulated genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post infection with Aeromonas hydrophila. A total of 31 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified from 192 clones of the subtractive cDNA library. Quantitative PCR revealed that nine of the 31 ESTs were significantly (ptilapia at 6h post infection with A. hydrophila at an injection dose of 10(5)CFU per fish (≈ 20% mortality). Of the nine upregulated genes, four were also significantly (ptilapia at 6h post infection with A. hydrophila at an injection dose of 10(6)CFU per fish (≈ 60% mortality). Of the four genes induced by A. hydrophila at both injection doses, three were also significantly (ptilapia at 6h post infection with Streptococcus iniae at doses of 10(6) and at 10(5)CFU per fish (≈ 70% and ≈ 30% mortality, respectively). The three genes induced by both bacteria included EST 2A05 (similar to adenylate kinase domain containing protein 1), EST 2G11 (unknown protein, shared similarity with Salmo salar IgH locus B genomic sequence with e value of 0.02), and EST 2H04 (unknown protein). Significant upregulation of these genes in Nile tilapia following bacterial infections suggested that they might play important roles in host response to infections of A. hydrophila and S. iniae.

  19. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenic gene transcription in the liver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirmala Yabaluri; Murali D Bashyam

    2010-09-01

    Glucose homeostasis in mammals is achieved by the actions of counterregulatory hormones, namely insulin, glucagon and glucocorticoids. Glucose levels in the circulation are regulated by the liver, the metabolic centre which produces glucose when it is scarce in the blood. This process is catalysed by two rate-limiting enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) whose gene expression is regulated by hormones. Hormone response units (HRUs) present in the two genes integrate signals from various signalling pathways triggered by hormones. How such domains are arranged in the regulatory region of these two genes, how this complex regulation is accomplished and the latest advancements in the field are discussed in this review.

  20. Different Polycomb group complexes regulate common target genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevich, Grigory; Leroy, Olivier; Akinci, Umut; Schubert, Daniel; Clarenz, Oliver; Goodrich, Justin; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Köhler, Claudia

    2006-09-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins convey epigenetic inheritance of repressed transcriptional states. Although the mechanism of the action of PcG is not completely understood, methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) is important in establishing PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. We show that the plant PcG target gene PHERES1 is regulated by histone trimethylation on H3K27 residues mediated by at least two different PcG complexes in plants, containing the SET domain proteins MEDEA or CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. Furthermore, we identify FUSCA3 as a potential PcG target gene and show that FUSCA3 is regulated by MEDEA and CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. We propose that different PcG complexes regulate a common set of target genes during the different stages of plant development.

  1. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  2. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard H; Grenga, Lucia; Saalbach, Gerhard; Howat, Alexandra M; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Trampari, Eleftheria; Malone, Jacob G

    2016-02-01

    Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG). Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  3. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Little

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG. Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  4. Differential regulation of genes by retrotransposons in rice promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadi, Surendar Reddy; Xu, Zijun; Shaik, Rafi; Driscoll, Kyle; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2015-04-01

    Rice genome harbors genes and promoters with retrotransposon insertions. There is very little information about their function. The effect of retrotransposon insertions in four rice promoter regions on gene regulation, was investigated using promoter-reporter gene constructs with and without retrotransposons. Differences in expression levels of gus and egfp reporter genes in forward orientation and rfp in reverse orientation were evaluated in rice plants with transient expression employing quantitative RT-PCR analysis, histochemical GUS staining, and eGFP and RFP fluorescent microscopy. The presence of SINE in the promoter 1 (P1) resulted in higher expression levels of the reporter genes, whereas the presence of LINE in P2 or gypsy LTR retrotransposon in P3 reduced expression of the reporter genes. Furthermore, the SINE in P1 acts as an enhancer in contrast with the LINE in P2 and the gypsy LTR retrotransposon in P3 which act as silencers. CTAA and CGG motifs in these retrotransposons are the likely candidates for the downregulation compared to TCTT motif (SINE) which is a candidate for the upregulation of gene expression. The effect of retrotransposons on gene regulation correlated with the earlier investigation of conservation patterns of these four retrotransposon insertions in several rice accessions implying their evolutionary significance.

  5. An Epigenetic Perspective on Developmental Regulation of Seed Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Zhang; Joe Ogas

    2009-01-01

    The developmental program of seeds is promoted by master regulators that are expressed in a seed-specific manner.Ectopic expression studies reveal that expression of these master regulators and other transcriptional regulators is sufficient to promote seed-associated traits,including generation of somatic embryos.Recent work highlights the importance of chromatin-associated factors in restricting expression of seed-specific genes,in particular PcG proteins and ATP-dependent remodelers.This review summarizes what is known regarding factors that promote zygotic and/or somatic embryogenesis and the chromatin machinery that represses their expression.Characterization of the regulation of seedspecific genes reveals that plant chromatin-based repression systems exhibit broad conservation with and surprising differences from animal repression systems.

  6. Regulation of Insulin Gene Transcription by Multiple Histone Acetyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin gene transcription is mainly regulated by a 340-bp promoter region upstream of the transcription start site by beta-cell-enriched transcription factors Pdx-1, MafA, and NeuroD1. Previous studies have shown that histone H4 hyperacetylation is important for acute up-regulation of insulin gene transcription. Until now, only the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein p300 has been shown to be involved in this histone H4 acetylation event. In this report we investigated...

  7. Every which way--nanos gene regulation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    Nanos is an essential factor of germ line success in all animals tested. This gene encodes a Zn-finger RNA-binding protein that in complex with its partner pumilio binds to and changes the fate of several known transcripts. We summarize here the documented functions of Nanos in several key organisms, and then emphasize echinoderms as a working model for how nanos expression is regulated. Nanos presence outside of the target cells is often detrimental to the animal, and in sea urchins, nanos expression appears to be regulated at every step of transcription, and post-transcriptional activity, making this gene product exciting, every which way.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T [Univ. of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  9. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  10. Abiotic surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Vidal, O; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P

    1999-10-01

    To get further information on bacterial surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12, random insertion mutagenesis with Mu dX, a mini-Mu carrying the promoterless lacZ gene, was performed with an ompR234 adherent strain, and a simple screen was developed to assess changes in gene expression in biofilm cells versus planktonic cells. This screen revealed that major changes in the pattern of gene expression occur during biofilm development: the transcription of 38% of the genes was affected within biofilms. Different cell functions were more expressed in sessile bacteria: the OmpC porin, the high-affinity transport system of glycine betaine (encoded by the proU operon), the colanic acid exopolysaccharide (wca locus, formerly called cps), tripeptidase T (pepT), and the nickel high-affinity transport system (nikA). On the other hand, the syntheses of flagellin (fliC) and of a putative protein of 92 amino acids (f92) were both reduced in biofilms. Such a genetic reprogramming of gene expression in biofilms seems to result from changes in multiple environmental physicochemical conditions. In this work, we show that bacteria within biofilms encounter higher-osmolarity conditions, greater oxygen limitation, and higher cell density than in the liquid phase.

  11. A gene expression atlas of the central nervous system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shiaoching; Zheng, Chen; Doughty, Martin L; Losos, Kasia; Didkovsky, Nicholas; Schambra, Uta B; Nowak, Norma J; Joyner, Alexandra; Leblanc, Gabrielle; Hatten, Mary E; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2003-10-30

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains a remarkable array of neural cells, each with a complex pattern of connections that together generate perceptions and higher brain functions. Here we describe a large-scale screen to create an atlas of CNS gene expression at the cellular level, and to provide a library of verified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors and transgenic mouse lines that offer experimental access to CNS regions, cell classes and pathways. We illustrate the use of this atlas to derive novel insights into gene function in neural cells, and into principal steps of CNS development. The atlas, library of BAC vectors and BAC transgenic mice generated in this screen provide a rich resource that allows a broad array of investigations not previously available to the neuroscience community.

  12. VERTICAL HEREDITY VS. HORIZONTAL GENE TRANSFER: A CHALLENGE TO BACTERIAL CLASSIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Bailin; QI Ji

    2003-01-01

    The diversity and classification of microbes has been a long-standing issue. Molecular phylogeny of the prokaryotes based on comparison of the 16S rRNA sequences of the small ribosomal subunit has led to a reasonable tree of life in the late 1970s. However, the availability of more and more complete bacterial genomes has brought about complications instead of refinement of the tree. In particular, it turns out that different choice of genes may tell different history. This might be caused by possible horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among species. There is an urgent need to develop phylogenetic methods that make use of whole genome data. We describe a new approach in molecular phylogeny, namely, tree construction based on K-tuple frequency analysis of the genomic sequences. Putting aside the technicalities, we emphasize the transition from randomness to determinism when the string length K increases and try to comment on the challenge mentioned in the title.

  13. Novel terpenes generated by heterologous expression of bacterial terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuuki; Arima, Shiho; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Johmoto, Kohei; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Eguchi, Tadashi; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-06-01

    Mining of bacterial genome data has revealed numerous presumptive terpene synthases. Heterologous expression of several putative terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host has revealed 13 newly discovered terpenes whose GC-MS and NMR data did not match with any known compounds in spectroscopic databases. Each of the genes encoding the corresponding terpene synthases were silent in their parent microorganisms. Heterologous expression and detailed NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed assignment of the structures of 13 new cyclic terpenes. Among these newly identified compounds, two were found to be linear triquinane sesquiterpenes that have never previously been isolated from bacteria or any other source. The remaining 11 new compounds were shown to be diterpene hydrocarbons and alcohol, including hydropyrene (1), hydropyrenol (2), tsukubadiene (11) and odyverdienes A (12) and B (13) each displaying a novel diterpene skeleton that had not previously been reported.

  14. Benchmarking of methods for identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacterial whole genome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Philip T. L. C.; Zankari, Ea; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) may be an alternative to phenotypic susceptibility testing for surveillance and clinical diagnosis. However, current bioinformatics methods may be associated with false positives and negatives. In this study, a novel mapping method was developed and benchmarked...... to two different methods in current use for identification of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial WGS data. A novel method, KmerResistance, which examines the co-occurrence of k-mers between the WGS data and a database of resistance genes, was developed. The performance of this method was compared...... with two previously described methods; ResFinder and SRST2, which use an assembly/BLAST method and BWA, respectively, using two datasets with a total of 339 isolates, covering five species, originating from the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and Danish pig farms. The predicted resistance...

  15. Growth phase and ompR regulation of transcription of microcin B17 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Chico, C; San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1986-09-01

    The synthesis of the peptide antibiotic microcin B17 was shown to occur as the cells entered the stationary phase of growth. This type of growth phase regulation is commonly observed in the production of a number of different bacterial products such as toxins and antibiotics. Microcin B17 synthesis is also dependent on the product of the ompR gene. To determine the role of transcription in this double regulation of microcin B17 production, operon fusions with Mu d1 (Ap lac) were constructed. Insertions were obtained in all four plasmid genes involved in production of microcin B17 (mcbA-D) and in the immunity region. Three classes of fusions were obtained. Fusions into mcbA, mcbB, and mcbC (first class) exhibited an increase in their transcription as the cells approached the stationary phase. These increases as well as basal levels of transcription were dependent on OmpR. Expression of fusions in mcbD and in the immunity region (second class) was also dependent on OmpR, but their expression remained constant throughout growth. One fusion in mcbC (third class) was obtained which was transcribed in the opposite direction than the others. It showed no growth phase regulation and no OmpR dependence. The implications of these results in terms of the transcriptional organization of the mbc genes are discussed.

  16. Differential regulation of GS-GOGAT gene expression by plant growth regulators in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragićević Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary ammonium assimilation is catalyzed by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT pathway in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains five cytosolic GS1 genes (GLN1;1 - GLN1;5, one nuclear gene for chloroplastic GS2 isoform (GLN2, two Fd-GOGAT genes (GLU1 and GLU2 and a GLT1 gene coding for NADH-GOGAT. Even though the regulation of GS and GOGAT isoforms has been extensively studied in response to various environmental and metabolic cues in many plant species, little is known about the effects of phytohormones on their regulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of representative plant growth regulators, kinetin (KIN, abscisic acid (ABA, gibberellic acid (GA3 and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, on the expression of A. thaliana GS and GOGAT genes. The obtained results indicate that GS and GOGAT genes are differentially regulated by growth regulators in shoots and roots. KIN and 2,4-D repressed GS and GOGAT expression in roots, with little effect on transcript levels in shoots. KIN affected all tested genes; 2,4-D was apparently more selective and less potent. ABA induced the expression of GLN1;1 and GLU2 in whole seedlings, while GA3 enhanced the expression of all tested genes in shoots, except GLU2. The observed expression patterns are discussed in relation to physiological roles of investigated plant growth regulators and N-assimilating enzymes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173024

  17. Global identification of target genes regulated by APETALA3 and PISTILLATA floral homeotic gene action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zik, Moriyah; Irish, Vivian F

    2003-01-01

    Identifying the genes regulated by the floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to petal and stamen formation. We have used microarray analysis to conduct a broad survey of genes whose expression is affected by AP3 and PI activity. DNA microarrays consisting of 9216 Arabidopsis ESTs were screened with probes corresponding to mRNAs from different mutant and transgenic lines that misexpress AP3 and/or PI. The microarray results were further confirmed by RNA gel blot analyses. Our results suggest that AP3 and PI regulate a relatively small number of genes, implying that many genes used in petal and stamen development are not tissue specific and likely have roles in other processes as well. We recovered genes similar to previously identified petal- and stamen-expressed genes as well as genes that were not implicated previously in petal and stamen development. A very low percentage of the genes recovered encoded transcription factors. This finding suggests that AP3 and PI act relatively directly to regulate the genes required for the basic cellular processes responsible for petal and stamen morphogenesis.

  18. Gene regulation by engineered CRISPR-Cas systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineran, Peter C; Dy, Ron L

    2014-04-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays and their CRISPR associated (Cas) proteins constitute adaptive immune systems in bacteria and archaea that provide protection from bacteriophages, plasmids and other mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Recently, the ability to direct these systems to DNA in a sequence-specific manner has led to the emergence of new technologies for engineered gene regulation in bacteria and eukaryotes. These systems have the potential to enable facile high-throughput functional genomics studies aimed at identifying gene function and will be a crucial tool for synthetic biology. Here, we review the recent engineering of these systems for controlling gene expression.

  19. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  20. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Listeria: Genome evolution is characterized by limited gene acquisition and limited gene loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Melissa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial genus Listeria contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, including the pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, both of which carry homologous virulence gene clusters such as the prfA cluster and clusters of internalin genes. Initial evidence for multiple deletions of the prfA cluster during the evolution of Listeria indicates that this genus provides an interesting model for studying the evolution of virulence and also presents practical challenges with regard to definition of pathogenic strains. Results To better understand genome evolution and evolution of virulence characteristics in Listeria, we used a next generation sequencing approach to generate draft genomes for seven strains representing Listeria species or clades for which genome sequences were not available. Comparative analyses of these draft genomes and six publicly available genomes, which together represent the main Listeria species, showed evidence for (i a pangenome with 2,032 core and 2,918 accessory genes identified to date, (ii a critical role of gene loss events in transition of Listeria species from facultative pathogen to saprotroph, even though a consistent pattern of gene loss seemed to be absent, and a number of isolates representing non-pathogenic species still carried some virulence associated genes, and (iii divergence of modern pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species and strains, most likely circa 47 million years ago, from a pathogenic common ancestor that contained key virulence genes. Conclusions Genome evolution in Listeria involved limited gene loss and acquisition as supported by (i a relatively high coverage of the predicted pan-genome by the observed pan-genome, (ii conserved genome size (between 2.8 and 3.2 Mb, and (iii a highly syntenic genome. Limited gene loss in Listeria did include loss of virulence associated genes, likely associated with multiple transitions to a saprotrophic lifestyle. The genus

  1. Interplay of gene expression noise and ultrasensitive dynamics affects bacterial operon organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christian J Ray

    Full Text Available Bacterial chromosomes are organized into polycistronic cotranscribed operons, but the evolutionary pressures maintaining them are unclear. We hypothesized that operons alter gene expression noise characteristics, resulting in selection for or against maintaining operons depending on network architecture. Mathematical models for 6 functional classes of network modules showed that three classes exhibited decreased noise and 3 exhibited increased noise with same-operon cotranscription of interacting proteins. Noise reduction was often associated with a decreased chance of reaching an ultrasensitive threshold. Stochastic simulations of the lac operon demonstrated that the predicted effects of transcriptional coupling hold for a complex network module. We employed bioinformatic analysis to find overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon organization compared with randomized controls. Among constitutively expressed physically interacting protein pairs, higher coupling frequencies appeared at lower expression levels, where noise effects are expected to be dominant. Our results thereby suggest an important role for gene expression noise, in many cases interacting with an ultrasensitive switch, in maintaining or selecting for operons in bacterial chromosomes.

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of a ubiquitin gene ( Ub L40 ) in the haemocytes of Crassostrea hongkongensis under bacterial challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dingkun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin, a highly conserved stress-related protein, is assigned multiple functions, such as DNA processing, protein degradation, and ribosome synthesis. The Crassostrea hongkongensis ubiquitin gene (designated ChUb L40 ) was cloned by a combination of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of ChUb L40 is 496 bp in length, consisting of a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 75 bp and an open reading frame of 387 bp encoding a ubiquitin fusion protein of 128 amino acids. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of ChUb L40 reveals that Ub L40 is highly conservative during evolution. The expression patterns of ChUb L40 gene in various tissues were examined by real-time PCR. The expression level of ChUb L40 in haemocytes is down-regulated at 4 h and gradually returned to its original level from 6 h to 24 h after Vibrio alginolyticus challenge. Our results suggest that ChUb L40 is ubiquitously expressed and plays an important role in immune defense against bacterial challenge.

  3. TRANSFAC and its module TRANSCompel: transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, V; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Fricke, E; Liebich, I; Land, S; Barre-Dirrie, A; Reuter, I; Chekmenev, D; Krull, M; Hornischer, K; Voss, N; Stegmaier, P; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Saxel, H; Kel, A E; Wingender, E

    2006-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors, their binding sites, nucleotide distribution matrices and regulated genes as well as the complementing database TRANSCompel on composite elements have been further enhanced on various levels. A new web interface with different search options and integrated versions of Match and Patch provides increased functionality for TRANSFAC. The list of databases which are linked to the common GENE table of TRANSFAC and TRANSCompel has been extended by: Ensembl, UniGene, EntrezGene, HumanPSD and TRANSPRO. Standard gene names from HGNC, MGI and RGD, are included for human, mouse and rat genes, respectively. With the help of InterProScan, Pfam, SMART and PROSITE domains are assigned automatically to the protein sequences of the transcription factors. TRANSCompel contains now, in addition to the COMPEL table, a separate table for detailed information on the experimental EVIDENCE on which the composite elements are based. Finally, for TRANSFAC, in respect of data growth, in particular the gain of Drosophila transcription factor binding sites (by courtesy of the Drosophila DNase I footprint database) and of Arabidopsis factors (by courtesy of DATF, Database of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors) has to be stressed. The here described public releases, TRANSFAC 7.0 and TRANSCompel 7.0, are accessible under http://www.gene-regulation.com/pub/databases.html.

  4. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  5. Plant microRNAs: master regulator of gene expression mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Riddhi; Paul, Soumitra

    2015-11-01

    Several signaling molecules critically regulate the physiological responses in plants. Among them, miRNAs, generally 21-24 nucleotides long, are widely distributed in different plant species and play as key signaling intermediates in diverse physiological responses. The mature miRNAs are synthesized from MIR genes by RNA polymerase II and processed by Dicer-like (DCL) protein family members associated with some accessory protein molecules. The processed miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm from the nucleus by specific group of transporters and incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) for specific mRNA cleavage. MicroRNAs can suppress the diverse gene expression, depending on the sequence complementarity of the target transcript except of its own gene. Besides, miRNAs can modulate the gene expression by DNA methylation and translational inhibition of the target transcript. Different classes of DCLs and Argonaute proteins (AGOs) help the miRNAs-mediated gene silencing mechanism in plants.

  6. AI-2-dependent gene regulation in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturdevant Daniel E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoinducer 2 (AI-2, a widespread by-product of the LuxS-catalyzed S-ribosylhomocysteine cleavage reaction in the activated methyl cycle, has been suggested to serve as an intra- and interspecies signaling molecule, but in many bacteria AI-2 control of gene expression is not completely understood. Particularly, we have a lack of knowledge about AI-2 signaling in the important human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. Results To determine the role of LuxS and AI-2 in S. epidermidis, we analyzed genome-wide changes in gene expression in an S. epidermidis luxS mutant and after addition of AI-2 synthesized by over-expressed S. epidermidis Pfs and LuxS enzymes. Genes under AI-2 control included mostly genes involved in sugar, nucleotide, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism, but also virulence-associated genes coding for lipase and bacterial apoptosis proteins. In addition, we demonstrate by liquid chromatography/mass-spectrometry of culture filtrates that the pro-inflammatory phenol-soluble modulin (PSM peptides, key virulence factors of S. epidermidis, are under luxS/AI-2 control. Conclusion Our results provide a detailed molecular basis for the role of LuxS in S. epidermidis virulence and suggest a signaling function for AI-2 in this bacterium.

  7. Responses of bacterial community and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling to biochar, compost and combined amendments in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haipeng; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Chen, Jin; Xu, Jijun; Dai, Juan; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Ming; Xu, Piao; Zhou, Yaoyu; Li, Fei; Hu, Liang; Wan, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Biochar and compost are seen as two attractive waste management options and are used for soil amendment and pollution remediation. The interaction between biochar and composting may improve the potential benefits of biochar and compost. We investigated soil physicochemical properties, bacterial community, bacterial 16S rRNA, and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling of the soil remedied with nothing (S), compost (SC), biochar (SB), a mixture of compost and biochar (SBC), composted biochar (SBced), and a composted mixture of biochar and biomass (SBCing). The results were that all amendments (1) increased the bacterial community richness (except SB) and SBCing showed the greatest efficiency; (2) increased the bacterial community diversity (SBCing > SBC > SC > SBced > SB > S); and (3) changed the gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA, nirK, nirS, and nosZ genes of bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). All amendments (except SB) could increase the gene copy number of 16S rRNA, and SBCing had the greatest efficiency. The changes of soil bacterial community richness and diversity and the gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA, nirK, nirS, nosZ, AOA, and AOB would affect carbon and nitrogen cycling of the ecosystem and also implied that BCing had the greatest efficiency on soil amendment.

  8. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial community composition and antibiotic resistance genes in a wastewater treatment plant and its receiving surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junying; Bu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Shan, Zhengjun; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-10-01

    The presence of pathogenic bacteria and the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) may pose big risks to the rivers that receive the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigated the changes of bacterial community and ARGs along treatment processes of one WWTP, and examined the effects of the effluent discharge on the bacterial community and ARGs in the receiving river. Pyrosequencing was applied to reveal bacterial community composition including potential bacterial pathogen, and Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used for profiling ARGs. The results showed that the WWTP had good removal efficiency on potential pathogenic bacteria (especially Arcobacter butzleri) and ARGs. Moreover, the bacterial communities of downstream and upstream of the river showed no significant difference. However, the increase in the abundance of potential pathogens and ARGs at effluent outfall was observed, indicating that WWTP effluent might contribute to the dissemination of potential pathogenic bacteria and ARGs in the receiving river.

  9. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  10. Nitrogen regulates chitinase gene expression in a marine bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpin, Marina; Goodman, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ammonium concentration and nitrogen source regulate promoter activity and use for the transcription of chiA, the major chitinase gene of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S91 and S91CX, an S91 transposon lacZ fusion mutant. The activity of chiA was quantified by beta-galactosidase assay of S91CX cultures con...

  11. Bacterial ortholog of mammalian translocator protein (TSPO with virulence regulating activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Chapalain

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10(-5 M adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies.

  12. Development of resistant tomato population with bacterial canker resistance genes from interspecific hybrids by the support of embryo rescue

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin KABAŞ; Esin ARI; Sinan ZENGİN; Hülya İLBİ; AYSAN, Yeşim; Asu OĞUZ

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial canker is one of the most important diseases causing economic yield loss in tomato production areas in the world. The best way to control for this disease is to use resistant varieties. However, there are few studies on variety breeding studies of this disease compared with other disease resistant breeding studies. In this study we aimed to improve inbred lines carrying bacterial canker resistance genes to use in the breeding of resistant varieties. Susceptible inbred line AK1 (S. e...

  13. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  14. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  15. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  16. Late multiple organ surge in interferon-regulated target genes characterizes staphylococcal enterotoxin B lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A Ferreyra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial superantigens are virulence factors that cause toxic shock syndrome. Here, the genome-wide, temporal response of mice to lethal intranasal staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB challenge was investigated in six tissues. RESULTS: The earliest responses and largest number of affected genes occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, spleen, and lung tissues with the highest content of both T-cells and monocyte/macrophages, the direct cellular targets of SEB. In contrast, the response of liver, kidney, and heart was delayed and involved fewer genes, but revealed a dominant genetic program that was seen in all 6 tissues. Many of the 85 uniquely annotated transcripts participating in this shared genomic response have not been previously linked to SEB. Nine of the 85 genes were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR in every tissue/organ at 24 h. These 85 transcripts, up-regulated in all tissues, annotated to the interferon (IFN/antiviral-response and included genes belonging to the DNA/RNA sensing system, DNA damage repair, the immunoproteasome, and the ER/metabolic stress-response and apoptosis pathways. Overall, this shared program was identified as a type I and II interferon (IFN-response and the promoters of these genes were highly enriched for IFN regulatory matrices. Several genes whose secreted products induce the IFN pathway were up-regulated at early time points in PBMCs, spleen, and/or lung. Furthermore, IFN regulatory factors including Irf1, Irf7 and Irf8, and Zbp1, a DNA sensor/transcription factor that can directly elicit an IFN innate immune response, participated in this host-wide SEB signature. CONCLUSION: Global gene-expression changes across multiple organs implicated a host-wide IFN-response in SEB-induced death. Therapies aimed at IFN-associated innate immunity may improve outcome in toxic shock syndromes.

  17. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  18. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  19. Microbial taxa and functional genes shift in degraded soil with bacterial wilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongchun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Shu; Qi, Gaofu; He, Zhili; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    Soil degradation is a serious global problem, but little is known about how soil microbial communities respond to soil degradation as well as their feedback to ecosystem functioning. In this study, we found the microbial community composition, structure and functional potential significantly altered in the degraded soils with bacterial wilt (termed as degraded soils). Compared with healthy soils, OTU richness of beneficial microorganisms were significantly decreased, but OTU richness of pathogenic microorganisms were significantly increased in the degraded soils. Functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0) analysis showed the functional metabolic potential of genes involved in stress, virulence, sulfur cycle, metal resistance, degradation of plant cell wall was significantly increased in the degraded soils. Increased functional metabolic potential of these genes may be related to the acidification and severe plant disease of degraded soils. Biological activity of degraded soils was obviously decreased with weakened soil enzyme activities when compared to the healthy soils. Soil pH and enzyme activities were negatively correlated with the abundance of genes involved in sulfur cycle, virulence, and stress responses. This study provides new insights into our understanding of soil microbial community responses to soil degradation. PMID:28051173

  20. Bacterial pathogen gene abundance and relation to recreational water quality at seven Great Lakes beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Ryan J; Wijesinghe, Rasanthi U; Haack, Sheridan K; Fogarty, Lisa R; Tucker, Taaja R; Riley, Stephen C

    2014-12-16

    Quantitative assessment of bacterial pathogens, their geographic variability, and distribution in various matrices at Great Lakes beaches are limited. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to test for genes from E. coli O157:H7 (eaeO157), shiga-toxin producing E. coli (stx2), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), Shigella spp. (ipaH), and a Salmonella enterica-specific (SE) DNA sequence at seven Great Lakes beaches, in algae, water, and sediment. Overall, detection frequencies were mapA>stx2>ipaH>SE>eaeO157. Results were highly variable among beaches and matrices; some correlations with environmental conditions were observed for mapA, stx2, and ipaH detections. Beach seasonal mean mapA abundance in water was correlated with beach seasonal mean log10 E. coli concentration. At one beach, stx2 gene abundance was positively correlated with concurrent daily E. coli concentrations. Concentration distributions for stx2, ipaH, and mapA within algae, sediment, and water were statistically different (Non-Detect and Data Analysis in R). Assuming 10, 50, or 100% of gene copies represented viable and presumably infective cells, a quantitative microbial risk assessment tool developed by Michigan State University indicated a moderate probability of illness for Campylobacter jejuni at the study beaches, especially where recreational water quality criteria were exceeded. Pathogen gene quantification may be useful for beach water quality management.

  1. Deciphering c-MYC-regulated genes in two distinct tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Ewan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor MYC is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, including both replication and apoptosis. Differences in MYC-regulated gene expression responsible for such opposing outcomes in vivo remain obscure. To address this we have examined time-dependent changes in global gene expression in two transgenic mouse models in which MYC activation, in either skin suprabasal keratinocytes or pancreatic islet β-cells, promotes tissue expansion or involution, respectively. Results Consistent with observed phenotypes, expression of cell cycle genes is increased in both models (albeit enriched in β-cells, as are those involved in cell growth and metabolism, while expression of genes involved in cell differentiation is down-regulated. However, in β-cells, which unlike suprabasal keratinocytes undergo prominent apoptosis from 24 hours, there is up-regulation of genes associated with DNA-damage response and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, including Atr, Arf, Bax and Cycs. In striking contrast, this is not the case for suprabasal keratinocytes, where pro-apoptotic genes such as Noxa are down-regulated and key anti-apoptotic pathways (such as Igf1-Akt and those promoting angiogenesis are up-regulated. Moreover, dramatic up-regulation of steroid hormone-regulated Kallikrein serine protease family members in suprabasal keratinocytes alone could further enhance local Igf1 actions, such as through proteolysis of Igf1 binding proteins. Conclusions Activation of MYC causes cell growth, loss of differentiation and cell cycle entry in both β-cells and suprabasal keratinocytes in vivo. Apoptosis, which is confined to β-cells, may involve a combination of a DNA-damage response and downstream activation of pro-apoptotic signalling pathways, including Cdc2a and p19Arf/p53, and downstream targets. Conversely, avoidance of apoptosis in suprabasal keratinocytes may result primarily from the activation of key anti

  2. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling of bacterial 16S rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    T-RFLP profiling is a very effective method for comparing many samples in an environmental microbiology study, because fingerprints of microbial diversity can be generated in a sensitive, reproducible, and cost-effective manner. This protocol describes the steps required to generate T-RFLP profiles of the dominant members of a bacterial community, by PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes and three restriction endonuclease digests to generate three different profiles for each sample. The generation of multiple profiles per sample provides enough information to confidently differentiate rich environmental bacterial communities.

  3. ApoM: gene regulation and effects on HDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars B; Christoffersen, Christina; Ahnström, Josefin;

    2009-01-01

    The recently discovered apolipoprotein M (apoM) is a plasma protein of the lipocalin family associated with the lipoproteins (mainly high-density lipoproteins, or HDLs). Expression of the apoM gene in the liver is regulated by transcription factors that control key steps in hepatic lipid and gluc......The recently discovered apolipoprotein M (apoM) is a plasma protein of the lipocalin family associated with the lipoproteins (mainly high-density lipoproteins, or HDLs). Expression of the apoM gene in the liver is regulated by transcription factors that control key steps in hepatic lipid...... changes in HDLs, and overexpression of the apoM gene reduced atherosclerosis. In conclusion, it seems that apoM plays a part in lipoprotein metabolism; however, the biological impact of apoM in humans remains to be determined....

  4. Homeostatic regulation of supercoiling sensitivity coordinates transcription of the bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Nicolas; Mavathur, Ramesh; Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2006-07-01

    Regulation of cellular growth implies spatiotemporally coordinated programmes of gene transcription. A central question, therefore, is how global transcription is coordinated in the genome. The growth of the unicellular organism Escherichia coli is associated with changes in both the global superhelicity modulated by cellular topoisomerase activity and the relative proportions of the abundant DNA-architectural chromatin proteins. Using a DNA-microarray-based approach that combines mutations in the genes of two important chromatin proteins with induced changes of DNA superhelicity, we demonstrate that genomic transcription is tightly associated with the spatial distribution of supercoiling sensitivity, which in turn depends on chromatin proteins. We further demonstrate that essential metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of growth respond distinctly to changes of superhelicity. We infer that a homeostatic mechanism organizing the supercoiling sensitivity is coordinating the growth-phase-dependent transcription of the genome.

  5. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Olga L; Kunda, Marina S; Ryzhova, Natalia N; Aksenova, Ekaterina I; Semenov, Andrey N; Romanova, Yulia M; Gintsburg, Alexandr L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A "lacking biofilm production" (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  6. Genetic regulation of spy gene expression in Escherichia coli in the presence of protein unfolding agent ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Ghosh, Tamoghna; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2014-09-10

    In a living cell, folding of proteins is assisted by molecular chaperones and other folding helpers. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), recently an ATP independent chaperon 'Spy' was discovered which is highly up-regulated in the presence of protein unfolding agents like ethanol, butanol and tannic acid. Two response regulators; BaeR and CpxR have been recognized as transcriptional regulators of spy gene. However, the mechanism of genetic regulation of spy under protein denaturants like ethanol has not been studied in detail so far. Based on a combination of genetic, molecular biology and biochemical experimental data, we propose that BaeR protein is the primary regulator of spy gene in response to ethanol stress in E. coli. In addition, we expanded the experimental spectrum and validated that regulation of spy gene in the presence of zinc and copper metal stress is primarily via BaeR and CpxR regulators respectively. We also performed in-silico analysis to identify the homologs of Spy protein and their cognate regulatory elements in bacterial species belonging to enterobacteriaceae family. Based on the unique ATP-independent chaperone nature and genetic regulation of spy we also propose its importance in biosensor development and facilitated production of properly folded recombinant proteins.

  7. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  8. Pathway-specific regulation revisited: cross-regulation of multiple disparate gene clusters by PAS-LuxR transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Cláudia M; Payero, Tamara D; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Barreales, Eva G; de Pedro, Antonio; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2015-06-01

    PAS-LuxR regulators are highly conserved proteins devoted to the control of antifungal production by binding to operators located in given promoters of polyene biosynthetic genes. The canonical operator of PimM, archetype of this class of regulators, has been used here to search for putative targets of orthologous protein PteF in the genome of Streptomyces avermitilis, finding 97 putative operators outside the pentaene filipin gene cluster (pte). The processes putatively affected included genetic information processing; energy, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism; DNA replication and repair; morphological differentiation; secondary metabolite biosynthesis; and transcriptional regulation, among others. Seventeen of these operators were selected, and their binding to PimM DNA-binding domain was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Strikingly, the protein bound all predicted operators suggesting a direct control over targeted processes. As a proof of concept, we studied the biosynthesis of the ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin whose gene cluster included two operators. Regulator mutants showed a severe loss of oligomycin production, whereas gene complementation of the mutant restored phenotype, and gene duplication in the wild-type strain boosted oligomycin production. Comparative gene expression analyses in parental and mutant strains by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of selected olm genes corroborated production results. These results demonstrate that PteF is able to cross-regulate the biosynthesis of two related secondary metabolites, filipin and oligomycin, but might be extended to all the processes indicated above. This study highlights the complexity of the network of interactions in which PAS-LuxR regulators are involved and opens new possibilities for the manipulation of metabolite production in Streptomycetes.

  9. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed.

  10. Identifying disease feature genes based on cellular localized gene functional modules and regulation networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; ZHU Jing; GUO Zheng; LI Xia; YANG Da; WANG Lei; RAO Shaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Identifying disease-relevant genes and functional modules, based on gene expression profiles and gene functional knowledge, is of high importance for studying disease mechanisms and subtyping disease phenotypes. Using gene categories of biological process and cellular component in Gene Ontology, we propose an approach to selecting functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes, and identifying the feature functional modules of high disease discriminating abilities. Using the differentially expressed genes in each feature module as the feature genes, we reveal the relevance of the modules to the studied diseases. Using three datasets for prostate cancer, gastric cancer, and leukemia, we have demonstrated that the proposed modular approach is of high power in identifying functionally integrated feature gene subsets that are highly relevant to the disease mechanisms. Our analysis has also shown that the critical disease-relevant genes might be better recognized from the gene regulation network, which is constructed using the characterized functional modules, giving important clues to the concerted mechanisms of the modules responding to complex disease states. In addition, the proposed approach to selecting the disease-relevant genes by jointly considering the gene functional knowledge suggests a new way for precisely classifying disease samples with clear biological interpretations, which is critical for the clinical diagnosis and the elucidation of the pathogenic basis of complex diseases.

  11. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  12. Global regulation of nucleotide biosynthetic genes by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The c-Myc transcription factor is a master regulator and integrates cell proliferation, cell growth and metabolism through activating thousands of target genes. Our identification of direct c-Myc target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP coupled with pair-end ditag sequencing analysis (ChIP-PET revealed that nucleotide metabolic genes are enriched among c-Myc targets, but the role of Myc in regulating nucleotide metabolic genes has not been comprehensively delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that the majority of genes in human purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway were induced and directly bound by c-Myc in the P493-6 human Burkitt's lymphoma model cell line. The majority of these genes were also responsive to the ligand-activated Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein, Myc-ER, in a Myc null rat fibroblast cell line, HO.15 MYC-ER. Furthermore, these targets are also responsive to Myc activation in transgenic mouse livers in vivo. To determine the functional significance of c-Myc regulation of nucleotide metabolism, we sought to determine the effect of loss of function of direct Myc targets inosine monophosphate dehydrogenases (IMPDH1 and IMPDH2 on c-Myc-induced cell growth and proliferation. In this regard, we used a specific IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA and found that MPA dramatically inhibits c-Myc-induced P493-6 cell proliferation through S-phase arrest and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results demonstrate the direct induction of nucleotide metabolic genes by c-Myc in multiple systems. Our finding of an S-phase arrest in cells with diminished IMPDH activity suggests that nucleotide pool balance is essential for c-Myc's orchestration of DNA replication, such that uncoupling of these two processes create DNA replication stress and apoptosis.

  13. Redox proteins of hydroxylating bacterial dioxygenases establish a regulatory cascade that prevents gratuitous induction of tetralin biodegradation genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Medina, Milagros; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial dioxygenase systems are multicomponent enzymes that catalyze the initial degradation of many environmentally hazardous compounds. In Sphingopyxis granuli strain TFA tetralin dioxygenase hydroxylates tetralin, an organic contaminant. It consists of a ferredoxin reductase (ThnA4), a ferredoxin (ThnA3) and a oxygenase (ThnA1/ThnA2), forming a NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnA1/ThnA2 electron transport chain. ThnA3 has also a regulatory function since it prevents expression of tetralin degradation genes (thn) in the presence of non-metabolizable substrates of the catabolic pathway. This role is of physiological relevance since avoids gratuitous and wasteful production of catabolic enzymes. Our hypothesis for thn regulation implies that ThnA3 exerts its action by diverting electrons towards the regulator ThnY, an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that together with the transcriptional activator ThnR is necessary for thn gene expression. Here we analyze electron transfer among ThnA4, ThnA3 and ThnY by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and determination of midpoint reduction potentials. Our results indicate that when accumulated in its reduced form ThnA3 is able to fully reduce ThnY. In addition, we have reproduced in vitro the regulatory circuit in the proposed physiological direction, NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnY. ThnA3 represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent gratuitous induction. PMID:27030382

  14. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Daigneault

    Full Text Available Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+ T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+ T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+ T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+ monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+ T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+ T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  15. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3 and tet(M, in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S and colony forming bacteria assemblages (approx 10-1 copies/16S. In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M gene. Sulfamethoxazole resistant (SMXr and oxytetracycline resistant (OTCr bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations.

  16. Achieving HIV-1 Control through RNA-Directed Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Klemm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection has been transformed by combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART, changing a universally fatal infection into a controllable infection. However, major obstacles for an HIV-1 cure exist. The HIV latent reservoir, which exists in resting CD4+ T cells, is not impacted by ART, and can reactivate when ART is interrupted or ceased. Additionally, multi-drug resistance can arise. One alternate approach to conventional HIV-1 drug treatment that is being explored involves gene therapies utilizing RNA-directed gene regulation. Commonly known as RNA interference (RNAi, short interfering RNA (siRNA induce gene silencing in conserved biological pathways, which require a high degree of sequence specificity. This review will provide an overview of the silencing pathways, the current RNAi technologies being developed for HIV-1 gene therapy, current clinical trials, and the challenges faced in progressing these treatments into clinical trials.

  17. Testing the infinitely many genes model for the evolution of the bacterial core genome and pangenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R Eric; Higgs, Paul G

    2012-11-01

    When groups of related bacterial genomes are compared, the number of core genes found in all genomes is usually much less than the mean genome size, whereas the size of the pangenome (the set of genes found on at least one of the genomes) is much larger than the mean size of one genome. We analyze 172 complete genomes of Bacilli and compare the properties of the pangenomes and core genomes of monophyletic subsets taken from this group. We then assess the capabilities of several evolutionary models to predict these properties. The infinitely many genes (IMG) model is based on the assumption that each new gene can arise only once. The predictions of the model depend on the shape of the evolutionary tree that underlies the divergence of the genomes. We calculate results for coalescent trees, star trees, and arbitrary phylogenetic trees of predefined fixed branch length. On a star tree, the pangenome size increases linearly with the number of genomes, as has been suggested in some previous studies, whereas on a coalescent tree, it increases logarithmically. The coalescent tree gives a better fit to the data, for all the examples we consider. In some cases, a fixed phylogenetic tree proved better than the coalescent tree at reproducing structure in the gene frequency spectrum, but little improvement was gained in predictions of the core and pangenome sizes. Most of the data are well explained by a model with three classes of gene: an essential class that is found in all genomes, a slow class whose rate of origination and deletion is slow compared with the time of divergence of the genomes, and a fast class showing rapid origination and deletion. Although the majority of genes originating in a genome are in the fast class, these genes are not retained for long periods, and the majority of genes present in a genome are in the slow or essential classes. In general, we show that the IMG model is useful for comparison with experimental genome data both for species level and

  18. Reconstructing a network of stress-response regulators via dynamic system modeling of gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2008-02-10

    Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene's expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA) to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specific stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably sufficient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  19. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  20. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  1. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse upstream regulators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. N. Shukla; J. Nagaraju

    2010-09-01

    Sex determination, an integral precursor to sexual reproduction, is required to generate morphologically distinct sexes. The molecular components of sex-determination pathways regulating sexual differentiation have been identified and characterized in different organisms. The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene at the bottom of the sex-determination cascade is the best characterized candidate so far, and is conserved from worms (mab3 of Caenorhabditis elegans) to mammals (Dmrt-1). Studies of dsx homologues from insect species belonging to different orders position them at the bottom of their sex-determination cascade. The dsx homologues are regulated by a series of upstream regulators that show amazing diversity in different insect species. These results support the Wilkin’s hypothesis that evolution of the sex-determination cascade has taken place in reverse order, the bottom most gene being most conserved and the upstream genes having been recruited at different times during evolution. The pre-mRNA of dsx is sex-specifically spliced to encode male or female-specific transcription factors that play an important role in the regulation of sexually dimorphic characters in different insect species. The generalization that dsx is required for somatic sexual differentiation culminated with its functional analysis through transgenesis and knockdown experiments in diverse species of insects. This brief review will focus on the similarities and variations of dsx homologues that have been investigated in insects to date.

  2. Gene Regulation System of Vasopressin and Corticotoropin-Releasing Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yoshida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurohypophyseal hormones, arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, play a crucial role in the physiological and behavioral response to various kinds of stresses. Both neuropeptides activate the hypophysialpituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, which is a central mediator of the stress response in the body. Conversely, they receive the negative regulation by glucocorticoid, which is an end product of the HPA axis. Vasopressin and CRH are closely linked to immune response; they also interact with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, as for vasopressin, it has another important role, which is the regulation of water balance through its potent antidiuretic effect. Hence, it is conceivable that vasopressin and CRH mediate the homeostatic responses for survival and protect organisms from the external world. A tight and elaborate regulation system of the vasopressin and CRH gene is required for the rapid and flexible response to the alteration of the surrounding environments. Several important regulatory elements have been identified in the proximal promoter region in the vasopressin and CRH gene. Many transcription factors and intracellular signaling cascades are involved in the complicated gene regulation system. This review focuses on the current status of the basic research of vasopressin and CRH. In addition to the numerous known facts about their divergent physiological roles, the recent topics of promoter analyses will be discussed.

  3. Brucella abortus: pathogenicity and gene regulation of virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Rivas-Solano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus is a zoonotic intracellular facultative pathogen belonging to the subdivision α2 of class Proteobacteria. It causes a worldwide distributed zoonotic disease called brucellosis. The main symptoms are abortion and sterility in cattle, as well as an undulant febrile condition in humans. In endemic regions like Central America, brucellosis has a high socioeconomic impact. A basic research project was recently conducted at the ITCR with the purpose of studying gene regulation of virulence, structure and immunogenicity in B. abortus. The present review was written as part of this project. B. abortus virulence seems to be determined by its ability to invade, survive and replicate inside professional and non-professional phagocytes. It reaches its intracellular replicative niche without the activation of host antimicrobial mechanisms of innate immunity. It also has gene regulation mechanisms for a rapid adaptation to an intracellular environment such as the two-component signal transduction system BvrR/BvrS and the quorum sensing regulator called Vjbr, as well as other transcription factors. All of them integrate a complex gene regulation network.

  4. Selected lactic acid-producing bacterial isolates with the capacity to reduce Salmonella translocation and virulence gene expression in chickens.

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    Xiaojian Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0 and high bile salt (0.3-1.5% and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (10(6-7 CFU/chick or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (10(4 CFU/chick next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1. These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10 in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in

  5. Cadmium-regulated gene fusions in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, S; Kukuk, M L; Wilson, T L; Feng, S F; Pearson, M M; Fisher, M A

    2000-08-01

    To study the mechanisms soil bacteria use to cope with elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the environment, a mutagenesis with the lacZ-based reporter gene transposon Tn5B20 was performed. Random gene fusions in the genome of the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ATCC 13525 were used to create a bank of 5,000 P. fluorescens mutants. This mutant bank was screened for differential gene expression in the presence of the toxic metal cadmium. Fourteen mutants were identified that responded with increased or reduced gene expression to the presence of cadmium. The mutants were characterized with respect to their metal-dependent gene expression and their metal tolerance. Half the identified mutants reacted with differential gene expression specifically to the metal cadmium, whereas some of the other mutants also responded to elevated concentrations of copper and zinc ions. One of the mutants, strain C8, also showed increased gene expression in the presence of the solvent ethanol, but otherwise no overlap between cadmium-induced gene expression and general stress response was detected. Molecular analysis of the corresponding genetic loci was performed using arbitrary polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing and comparison of the deduced protein products with sequences deposited in genetic databases. Some of the genetic loci targeted by the transposon did not show any similarities to any known genes; thus, they may represent 'novel' loci. The hypothesis that genes that are differentially expressed in the presence of heavy metals play a role in metal tolerance was verified for one of the mutants. This mutant, strain C11, was hypersensitive to cadmium and zinc ions. In mutant C11, the transposon had inserted into a genetic region displaying similarity to genes encoding the sensor/regulator protein pairs of two-component systems that regulate gene expression in metal-resistant bacteria, including czcRS of Ralstonia eutropha, czrRS of Pseudomonas

  6. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment.

  7. Nucleotide diversity analysis of three major bacterial blight resistance genes in rice.

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    Waikhom Bimolata

    Full Text Available Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS were present in Xa26 (π = 0.01958; SVS = 182 followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and 'G' to 'A' transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima's D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed.

  8. Whole blood gene expression profiling of neonates with confirmed bacterial sepsis

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    Paul Dickinson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal infection remains a primary cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide and yet our understanding of how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Changes in host gene expression in response to infection may occur in any part of the body, with the continuous interaction between blood and tissues allowing blood cells to act as biosensors for the changes. In this study we have used whole blood transcriptome profiling to systematically identify signatures and the pathway biology underlying the pathogenesis of neonatal infection. Blood samples were collected from neonates at the first clinical signs of suspected sepsis alongside age matched healthy control subjects. Here we report a detailed description of the study design, including clinical data collected, experimental methods used and data analysis workflows and which correspond with data in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO data sets (GSE25504. Our data set has allowed identification of a patient invariant 52-gene classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy and lays the foundation for advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis.

  9. Differential gene regulation by the SRC family of coactivators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuaZhang; XiaYi; Xiaojingsun; NaYin; BinShi; HuijianWu; DanWang; GeWu; YongfengShang

    2005-01-01

    SRCs (steroid receptor coactivatorsl are required for nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and are also implicated in the transcription initiation by other transcription factors, such as STATs and NFKB. Despite phenotypic manifestations in gene knockout mice for SRC-1, GRIP1, and AIB1 of the SRC (Steroid Receptor Coactivator) family indicating their differential roles in animal physiology, there is no clear evidence, at the molecular level, to support a functional specificity for these proteins. We demonstrated in this report that two species of SRC coactivators, either as AIBI:GRIP1 or as AIBI:SRC-1 are recruited, possibly through heterodimerization, on the promoter of genes that contain a classical hormone responsive element (HRE). In contrast, on non-HRE-containing gene promoters, on which steroid receptors bind indirectly, either GRIP1 orSRC-1 is recruited as a monomer, depending on the cellular abundance of the protein. Typically, non-HRE-containing genes are early genes activated by steroid receptors, whereas HRE-containing genes are activated later. Our results also showed that SRC proteins contribute to the temporal regulation of gene transcription. In addition, our experiments revealed a positive correlation between AIB1/c-myc overexpression in ER+ breast carcinoma samples, suggesting a possible mechanism for AIB1/n breast cancer carcinogenesis.

  10. The Regulation of Exosporium-Related Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Kao, Guiwei; Qu, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are spore-forming members of the Bacillus cereus group. Spores of B. cereus group species are encircled by exosporium, which is composed of an external hair-like nap and a paracrystalline basal layer. Despite the extensive studies on the structure of the exosporium-related proteins, little is known about the transcription and regulation of exosporium gene expression in the B. cereus group. Herein, we studied the regulation of several exosporium-related genes in Bt. A SigK consensus sequence is present upstream of genes encoding hair-like nap proteins (bclA and bclB), basal layer proteins (bxpA, bxpB, cotB, and exsY ), and inosine hydrolase (iunH). Mutation of sigK decreased the transcriptional activities of all these genes, indicating that the transcription of these genes is controlled by SigK. Furthermore, mutation of gerE decreased the transcriptional activities of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH but increased the expression of bxpA, and GerE binds to the promoters of bclB, bxpB, cotB, bxpA, and iunH. These results suggest that GerE directly regulates the transcription of these genes, increasing the expression of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH and decreasing that of bxpA. These findings provide insight into the exosporium assembly process at the transcriptional level. PMID:26805020

  11. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  12. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  13. Translational regulation of human p53 gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, L.; Minden, M D; Benchimol, S

    1996-01-01

    In blast cells obtained from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, p53 mRNA was present in all the samples examined while the expression of p53 protein was variable from patient to patient. Mutations in the p53 gene are infrequent in this disease and, hence, variable protein expression in the majority of the samples cannot be accounted for by mutation. In this study, we examined the regulation of p53 gene expression in human leukemic blasts and characterized the p53 transcripts in these c...

  14. Multiple Catalase Genes Are Differentially Regulated in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Laura; Aguirre, Jesús

    2001-01-01

    Detoxification of hydrogen peroxide is a fundamental aspect of the cellular antioxidant responses in which catalases play a major role. Two differentially regulated catalase genes, catA and catB, have been studied in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we have characterized a third catalase gene, designated catC, which predicts a 475-amino-acid polypeptide containing a peroxisome-targeting signal. With a molecular mass of 54 kDa, CatC shows high similarity to other small-subunit monofunctional catalas...

  15. Genes regulated by AoXlnR, the xylanolytic and cellulolytic transcriptional regulator, in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yuji; Sano, Motoaki; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Ko, Taro; Takeuchi, Michio; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    XlnR is a Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator of xylanolytic and cellulolytic genes in Aspergillus. Overexpression of the aoxlnR gene in Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae xlnR gene) resulted in elevated xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities in the culture supernatant, in which nearly 40 secreted proteins were detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis. DNA microarray analysis to identify the transcriptional targets of AoXlnR led to the identification of 75 genes that showed more than fivefold increase in their expression in the AoXlnR overproducer than in the disruptant. Of these, 32 genes were predicted to encode a glycoside hydrolase, highlighting the biotechnological importance of AoXlnR in biomass degradation. The 75 genes included the genes previously identified as AoXlnR targets (xynF1, xynF3, xynG2, xylA, celA, celB, celC, and celD). Thirty-six genes were predicted to be extracellular, which was consistent with the number of proteins secreted, and 61 genes possessed putative XlnR-binding sites (5'-GGCTAA-3', 5'-GGCTAG-3', and 5'-GGCTGA-3') in their promoter regions. Functional annotation of the genes revealed that AoXlnR regulated the expression of hydrolytic genes for degradation of beta-1,4-xylan, arabinoxylan, cellulose, and xyloglucan and of catabolic genes for the conversion of D-xylose to xylulose-5-phosphate. In addition, genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase and L-arabinitol-4- dehydrogenase involved in D-glucose and L-arabinose catabolism also appeared to be targets of AoXlnR.

  16. Micro-RNA: A New Kind of Gene Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Dan; HU Lan

    2006-01-01

    A group of small RNA molecules, distinct from but related to siRNAs (small interference RNAs) have been identified in a variety of organisms. These small RNAs, called microRNAs (miRNAs), are endogenously encoded approximately 20-24 nt long single-stranded RNAs. They are generally expressed in a highly tissue- or developmental-stage-specific fashion and are post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression in animals and plants. This article summarizes the character, mechanism and analysis method about miRNAs. The current view that miRNAs represent a newly discovered, hidden layer of gene regulation has resulted in high interest among researchers in the discovery of miRNAs, their targets, expression mechanism of action and analysis methods.

  17. Oxygen regulated gene expression in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1994-01-01

    In facultatively anaerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, oxygen and other electron acceptors fundamentally influence catabolic and anabolic pathways. E. coli is able to grow aerobically by respiration and in the absence of O2 by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, nitrite, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide as acceptors or by fermentation. The expression of the various catabolic pathways occurs according to a hierarchy with 3 or 4 levels. Aerobic respiration at the highest level is followed by nitrate respiration (level 2), anaerobic respiration with the other acceptors (level 3) and fermentation. In other bacteria, different regulatory cascades with other underlying principles can be observed. Regulation of anabolism in response to O2 availability is important, too. It is caused by different requirements of cofactors or coenzymes in aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and by the requirement for different O2-independent biosynthetic routes under anoxia. The regulation mainly occurs at the transcriptional level. In E. coli, 4 global regulatory systems are known to be essential for the aerobic/anaerobic switch and the described hierarchy. A two-component sensor/regulator system comprising ArcB (sensor) and ArcA (transcriptional regulator) is responsible for regulation of aerobic metabolism. The FNR protein is a transcriptional sensor-regulator protein which regulates anaerobic respiratory genes in response to O2 availability. The gene activator FhlA regulates fermentative formate and hydrogen metabolism with formate as the inductor. ArcA/B and FNR directly respond to O2, FhlA indirectly by decreased levels of formate in the presence of O2. Regulation of nitrate/nitrite catabolism is effected by two 2-component sensor/regulator systems NarX(Q)/NarL(P) in response to nitrate/nitrite. Co-operation of the different regulatory systems at the target promoters which are in part under dual (or manifold) transcriptional control causes the expression

  18. Reconstructing a Network of Stress-Response Regulators via Dynamic System Modeling of Gene Regulation

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    Wei-Sheng Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene’s expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specifi c stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably suffi cient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  19. Cognitive analysis of schizophrenia risk genes that function as epigenetic regulators of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Laura; Cosgrove, Donna; Clarkson, Christopher; Harold, Denise; Kendall, Kimberley; Richards, Alex; Mantripragada, Kiran; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James; Hartmann, Annette; Konte, Betina; Rujescu, Dan; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Rea, Stephen; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek W

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are an important heritable and dynamic means of regulating various genomic functions, including gene expression, to orchestrate brain development, adult neurogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. These processes when perturbed are thought to contribute to schizophrenia pathophysiology. A core feature of schizophrenia is cognitive dysfunction. For genetic disorders where cognitive impairment is more severe such as intellectual disability, there are a disproportionally high number of genes involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Evidence now supports some shared genetic aetiology between schizophrenia and intellectual disability. GWAS have identified 108 chromosomal regions associated with schizophrenia risk that span 350 genes. This study identified genes mapping to those loci that have epigenetic functions, and tested the risk alleles defining those loci for association with cognitive deficits. We developed a list of 350 genes with epigenetic functions and cross-referenced this with the GWAS loci. This identified eight candidate genes: BCL11B, CHD7, EP300, EPC2, GATAD2A, KDM3B, RERE, SATB2. Using a dataset of Irish psychosis cases and controls (n = 1235), the schizophrenia risk SNPs at these loci were tested for effects on IQ, working memory, episodic memory, and attention. Strongest associations were for rs6984242 with both measures of IQ (P = 0.001) and episodic memory (P = 0.007). We link rs6984242 to CHD7 via a long range eQTL. These associations were not replicated in independent samples. Our study highlights that a number of genes mapping to risk loci for schizophrenia may function as epigenetic regulators of gene expression but further studies are required to establish a role for these genes in cognition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The evolution of combinatorial gene regulation in fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Tuch, Brian B.; Galgoczy, David J.; Hernday, Aaron D.; Hao Li; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2008-01-01

    It is widely suspected that gene regulatory networks are highly plastic. The rapid turnover of transcription factor binding sites has been predicted on theoretical grounds and has been experimentally demonstrated in closely related species. We combined experimental approaches with comparative genomics to focus on the role of combinatorial control in the evolution of a large transcriptional circuit in the fungal lineage. Our study centers on Mcm1, a transcriptional regulator that, in combinati...

  1. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  2. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  3. The role of master regulators in gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández Lemus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks present a wide variety of dynamical responses to intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations. Arguably, one of the most important of such coordinated responses is the one of amplification cascades, in which activation of a few key-responsive transcription factors (termed master regulators, MRs lead to a large series of transcriptional activation events. This is so since master regulators are transcription factors controlling the expression of other transcription factor molecules and so on. MRs hold a central position related to transcriptional dynamics and control of gene regulatory networks and are often involved in complex feedback and feedforward loops inducing non-trivial dynamics. Recent studies have pointed out to the myocyte enhancing factor 2C (MEF2C, also known as MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2, polypeptide C as being one of such master regulators involved in the pathogenesis of primary breast cancer. In this work, we perform an integrative genomic analysis of the transcriptional regulation activity of MEF2C and its target genes to evaluate to what extent are these molecules inducing collective responses leading to gene expression deregulation and carcinogenesis. We also analyzed a number of induced dynamic responses, in particular those associated with transcriptional bursts, and nonlinear cascading to evaluate the influence they may have in malignant phenotypes and cancer. Received: 20 Novembre 2014, Accepted: 24 June 2015; Edited by: C. A. Condat, G. J. Sibona; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.070011 Cite as: E Hernández-Lemus, K Baca-López, R Lemus, R García-Herrera, Papers in Physics 7, 070011 (2015

  4. [Insect antimicrobial peptides: structures, properties and gene regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Peng; Lai, Ren

    2010-02-01

    Insect antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important group of insect innate immunity effectors. Insect AMPs are cationic and contain less than 100 amino acid residues. According to structure, insect AMPs can be divided into a limited number of families. The diverse antimicrobial spectrum of insect AMPs may indicate different modes of action. Research on the model organism Drosophila indicate that insect AMPs gene regulation involves multiple signaling pathways and a large number of signaling molecules.

  5. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  6. Who Possesses Drug Resistance Genes in the Aquatic Environment? : Sulfamethoxazole (SMX Resistance Genes among the Bacterial Community in Water Environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in colony forming bacterial assemblages and natural bacterial assemblages. Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86 % of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10-5-10-2 copy/16S but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2 and sul3 were detected (10-5-10-3 copy/16S, whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment.

  7. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang; Zhang, Zhijian

    2015-11-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P < 0.05), while those of genes encoding sulfonamide resistance (sul1 and sul2) were increased (P < 0.05) when normalized to 16S rRNA. The abundances of tetracycline resistance genes were correlated (P < 0.05) with the changing concentrations of tetracyclines in the manure. The overall diversity and richness of the bacteria significantly decreased during vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems.

  8. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  9. Assessment of anaerobic bacterial diversity and its effects on anaerobic system stability and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the link between anaerobic bacterial diversity and, the biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and assessed how amending antibiotic combination and increasing concentration of antibiotics in a stepwise fashion influences the development of resistance genes in anaerobic reactors. The biodegradation, sorption and occurrence of the known antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of erythromycin and tetracycline were investigated using the processes of UV-HPLC and qPCR analysis respectively. Ion Torrent sequencing was used to detect microbial community changes in response to the addition of antibiotics. The overall results indicated that changes in the structure of a microbial community lead to changes in biodegradation capacity, sorption of antibiotics combinations and occurrence of ARGs. The enhanced biodegradation efficiency appeared to generate variations in the structure of the bacterial community. The results suggested that controlling the ultimate Gram-negative bacterial community, especially Acinetobacter-related populations, may promote the successful biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and reduce the occurrence of ARGs.

  10. The rgg0182 gene encodes a transcriptional regulator required for the full Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311 thermal adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertin Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus thermophilus is an important starter strain for the production of yogurt and cheeses. The analysis of sequenced genomes of four strains of S. thermophilus indicates that they contain several genes of the rgg familly potentially encoding transcriptional regulators. Some of the Rgg proteins are known to be involved in bacterial stress adaptation. Results In this study, we demonstrated that Streptococcus thermophilus thermal stress adaptation required the rgg0182 gene which transcription depends on the culture medium and the growth temperature. This gene encoded a protein showing similarity with members of the Rgg family transcriptional regulator. Our data confirmed that Rgg0182 is a transcriptional regulator controlling the expression of its neighboring genes as well as chaperones and proteases encoding genes. Therefore, analysis of a Δrgg0182 mutant revealed that this protein played a role in the heat shock adaptation of Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311. Conclusions These data showed the importance of the Rgg0182 transcriptional regulator on the survival of S. thermophilus during dairy processes and more specifically during changes in temperature.

  11. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J

    1996-10-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transcription was studied and found to be regulatable. Examples are the lactose operon, the operon for nisin production, and genes in the proteolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis, as well as xylose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus. Some other operons were specifically targetted with the aim to compare their mode of regulation with known regulatory mechanisms in other well-studied bacteria. These studies, dealing with the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and of the branched chain amino acids in L. lactis, have given new insights in gene regulation and in the occurrence of auxotrophy in these bacteria. Also, nucleotide sequence analyses of a number of lactococcal bacteriophages was recently initiated to, among other things, specifically learn more about regulation of the phage life cycle. Yet another approach in the analysis of regulated genes is the 'random' selection of genetic elements that respond to environmental stimuli and the first of such sequences from lactic acid bacteria have been identified and characterized. The potential of these regulatory elements in fundamental research and practical (industrial) applications will be discussed.

  12. Globalisation reaches gene regulation: the case for vertebrate limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Aimée

    2005-08-01

    Analysis of key regulators of vertebrate limb development has revealed that the cis-regulatory regions controlling their expression are often located several hundred kilobases upstream of the transcription units. These far up- or down-stream cis-regulatory regions tend to reside within rather large, functionally and structurally unrelated genes. Molecular analysis is beginning to reveal the complexity of these large genomic landscapes, which control the co-expression of clusters of diverse genes by this novel type of long-range and globally acting cis-regulatory region. An increasing number of spontaneous mutations in vertebrates, including humans, are being discovered inactivating or altering such global control regions. Thereby, the functions of a seemingly distant but essential gene are disrupted rather than the closest.

  13. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Miyazaki, Jun [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Nishizawa, Haruki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Kurahashi, Hiroki [Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Wang@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Impaired MTA3, raised CGB5 and Snail expression are associated with preeclampsia. •Knock-down of MTA3 causes up-regulation of CGB5 and Snail genes in BeWo cells. •MTA3 occupies CGB5 and Snail gene promoters in BeWo cells. -- Abstract: Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG β-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3

  14. An optimized, chemically regulated gene expression system for Chlamydomonas.

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    Paola Ferrante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for algal and cell biology and is used for biotechnological applications, such as molecular farming or biological hydrogen production. The Chlamydomonas metal-responsive CYC6 promoter is repressed by copper and induced by nickel ions. However, induction by nickel is weak in some strains, poorly reversible by chelating agents like EDTA, and causes, at high concentrations, toxicity side effects on Chlamydomonas growth. Removal of these bottlenecks will encourage the wide use of this promoter as a chemically regulated gene expression system. METHODOLOGY: Using a codon-optimized Renilla luciferase as a reporter gene, we explored several strategies to improve the strength and reversibility of CYC6 promoter induction. Use of the first intron of the RBCS2 gene or of a modified TAP medium increases the strength of CYC6 induction up to 20-fold. In the modified medium, induction is also obtained after addition of specific copper chelators, like TETA. At low concentrations (up to 10 microM TETA is a more efficient inducer than Ni, which becomes a very efficient inducer at higher concentrations (50 microM. Neither TETA nor Ni show toxicity effects at the concentrations used. Unlike induction by Ni, induction by TETA is completely reversible by micromolar copper concentrations, thus resulting in a transient "wave" in luciferase activity, which can be repeated in subsequent growth cycles. CONCLUSIONS: We have worked out a chemically regulated gene expression system that can be finely tuned to produce temporally controlled "waves" in gene expression. The use of cassettes containing the CYC6 promoter, and of modified growth media, is a reliable and economically sustainable system for the temporally controlled expression of foreign genes in Chlamydomonas.

  15. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  16. Effects of bidirectional regulation on noises in gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiudeng; Tao, Yi

    2010-03-14

    To investigate the effects of bidirectional regulation on the noise in protein concentration, a theoretical and simple three-gene network model is considered. The basic idea behind this model is from Paulsson's proposition (J. Paulsson, Phys. Life Rev. 2005, 2, 157-175), where the synthesis and degradation of a mRNA species corresponding to a target protein are regulated directly and indirectly by a certain sigma-factor, and a random increase in the concentration of the sigma-factor should increase both the synthesis and degradation rates of the mRNA species (bidirectional regulation). Using the standard Omega-expansion technique (linear noise approximation) and Monte Carlo simulation, our main results show clearly that for the steady-state statistics the effects of the noise of the sigma-factor on the stochastic fluctuation of the target protein could partially cancel out.

  17. Mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are identified as a class of non-protein regulators and a new source for broad control of gene expression in eukaryotes. The past years have witnessed substantial progress in understanding miRNA functions and mechanisms, although a few controversies remain. Various hypotheses and models have been suggested for the mechanisms of miRNA repression, including translational inhibition at the level of initiation or elongation, rapid degradation of the nascent peptide, mRNA degradation, and mRNA sequestration into P bodies (processing bodies) and SGs (stress granules) for degradation or/and storage. Recently, some noncanonical miRNA regulation, such as miRNA activation and de-repression of miRNA inhibition, have been uncovered. This review discusses some recent advances about how miRNAs regulate their targets and various modes of miRNA function.

  18. Simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity in single cells in defined mixtures of pure cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Dalton, Helen M.; Angels, Mark;

    1997-01-01

    A protocol was developed to achieve the simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity at the level of single cells: a chromogenic beta-galactosidase activity assay was combined with in situ hybridization of Fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes to rRNA. The method a...

  19. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  20. Identification of molecular markers linked to rice bacterial blight resistance genes from Oryza meyeriana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing WANG,Chen CHENG,Yanru ZHOU,Yong YANG,Qiong MEI,Junmin LI,Ye CHENG,Chengqi YAN,Jianping CHEN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Y73 is a progeny of asymmetric somatic hybridization between Oryza sativa cv. Dalixiang and the wild rice species Oryza meyeriana. Inoculation with a range of strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae showed that Y73 had inherited a high level of resistance to rice bacterial blight (BB from its wild parent. An F2 population of 7125 individuals was constructed from the cross between Y73 and a BB-susceptible cultivar IR24. After testing 615 SSR and STS markers covering the 12 rice chromosomes, 186 markers were selected that showed polymorphism between Y73 and IR24. Molecular markers linked to the BB resistance genes in Y73 were scanned using the F2 population and the polymorphic markers. The SSR marker RM128 on chromosome 1, the STS marker R03D159 on chromosome 3 and the STS marker R05D104 on chromosome 5 were found to be linked to the rice BB resistance genes in Y73.

  1. Housefly Larva Vermicomposting Efficiently Attenuates Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Swine Manure, with Concomitant Bacterial Population Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Gilbert, Jack A.; Li, Haibo; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Meng; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Qiansheng; Yuan, Junxiang

    2015-01-01

    Manure from swine treated with antimicrobials as feed additives is a major source for the expansion of the antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) reservoir in the environment. Vermicomposting via housefly larvae (Musca domestica) can be efficiently used to treat manure and regenerate biofertilizer, but few studies have investigated its effect on ARG attenuation. Here, we tracked the abundances of 9 ARGs and the composition and structure of the bacterial communities in manure samples across 6 days of full-scale manure vermicomposting. On day 6, the abundances of genes encoding tetracycline resistance [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)] were reduced (P vermicomposting, accompanied by a 100 times increase in the relative abundance of Flavobacteriaceae spp. Variations in the abundances of ARGs were correlated with the changing microbial community structure and the relative abundances of the family Ruminococcaceae, class Bacilli, or phylum Proteobacteria. Vermicomposting, as a waste management practice, can reduce the overall abundance of ARGs. More research is warranted to assess the use of this waste management practice as a measure to attenuate the dissemination of antimicrobial residues and ARGs from livestock production before vermicompost can be safely used as biofertilizer in agroecosystems. PMID:26296728

  2. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  3. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  4. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ziuzina

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence

  5. A plant natriuretic peptide-like gene in the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis may induce hyper-hydration in the plant host: a hypothesis of molecular mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Muhammed

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs are systemically mobile molecules that regulate homeostasis at nanomolar concentrations. PNPs are up-regulated under conditions of osmotic stress and PNP-dependent processes include changes in ion transport and increases of H2O uptake into protoplasts and whole tissue. Presentation of the hypothesis The bacterial citrus pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri str. 306 contains a gene encoding a PNP-like protein. We hypothesise that this bacterial protein can alter plant cell homeostasis and thus is likely to represent an example of molecular mimicry that enables the pathogen to manipulate plant responses in order to bring about conditions favourable to the pathogen such as the induced plant tissue hyper-hydration seen in the wet edged lesions associated with Xanthomonas axonopodis infection. Testing the hypothesis We found a Xanthomonas axonopodis PNP-like protein that shares significant sequence similarity and identical domain organisation with PNPs. We also observed a significant excess of conserved residues between the two proteins within the domain previously identified as being sufficient to induce biological activity. Structural modelling predicts identical six stranded double-psi β barrel folds for both proteins thus supporting the hypothesis of similar modes of action. No significant similarity between the Xanthomonas axonopodis protein and other bacterial proteins from GenBank was found. Sequence similarity of the Xanthomonas axonopodis PNP-like protein with the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A, shared domain organisation and incongruent phylogeny suggest that the PNP-gene may have been acquired by the bacteria in an ancient lateral gene transfer event. Finally, activity of a recombinant Xanthomonas axonopodis protein in plant tissue and changes in symptoms induced by a Xanthomonas axonopodis mutant with a knocked-out PNP-like gene will be experimental proof of molecular mimicry

  6. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate...... genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune......-mediated processes (p-value genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures...

  7. Identification of differentially regulated genes in human patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Pratik; Bai, Haiqing; Swartz, Michael F; Alfieris, George M; Dean, David A

    2016-07-27

    In order to identify differentially expressed genes that are specific to the ductus arteriosus, 18 candidate genes were evaluated in matched ductus arteriosus and aortic samples from infants with coarctation of the aorta. The cell specificity of the gene's promoters was assessed by performing transient transfection studies in primary cells derived from several patients. Segments of ductus arteriosus and aorta were isolated from infants requiring repair for coarctation of the aorta and used for mRNA quantitation and culturing of cells. Differences in expression were determined by quantitative PCR using the ΔΔCt method. Promoter regions of six of these genes were cloned into luciferase reporter plasmids for transient transfection studies in matched human ductus arteriosus and aorta cells. Transcription factor AP-2b and phospholipase A2 were significantly up-regulated in ductus arteriosus compared to aorta in whole tissues and cultured cells, respectively. In transient transfection experiments, Angiotensin II type 1 receptor and Prostaglandin E receptor 4 promoters consistently gave higher expression in matched ductus arteriosus versus aorta cells from multiple patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that several genes are differentially expressed in ductus arteriosus and that their promoters may be used to drive ductus arteriosus-enriched transgene expression.

  8. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  9. Turning the gene tap off; implications of regulating gene expression for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, James F; Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2008-03-01

    Cancer poses a tremendous therapeutic challenge worldwide, highlighting the critical need for developing novel therapeutics. A promising cancer treatment modality is gene therapy, which is a form of molecular medicine designed to introduce into target cells genetic material with therapeutic intent. Anticancer gene therapy strategies currently used in preclinical models, and in some cases in the clinic, include proapoptotic genes, oncolytic/replicative vectors, conditional cytotoxic approaches, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of growth factor signaling, inactivation of oncogenes, inhibition of tumor invasion and stimulation of the immune system. The translation of these novel therapeutic modalities from the preclinical setting to the clinic has been driven by encouraging preclinical efficacy data and advances in gene delivery technologies. One area of intense research involves the ability to accurately regulate the levels of therapeutic gene expression to achieve enhanced efficacy and provide the capability to switch gene expression off completely if adverse side effects should arise. This feature could also be implemented to switch gene expression off when a successful therapeutic outcome ensues. Here, we will review recent developments related to the engineering of transcriptional switches within gene delivery systems, which could be implemented in clinical gene therapy applications directed at the treatment of cancer.

  10. [Participation of the antibiotics of Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis in the regulation of bacterial spore formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, A A; Korolev, V I

    1979-03-01

    Sporulation and antibiotic production, as well as the effect of exogenic antibacterial substances on bacterial sporogenesis were studied in various strains of Bac. pumilus and Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis. The bacteria were grown on a solid sporulation medium with and without the antibiotics. After 5-day incubation the presence of refractyl spores was determined with a phase-contrast method. It was found that in the strains of Bac. pumilus producing antibacterial substances the sporulation was normal. The loss of the capacity for synthesizing such substances resulted in asporegenicity or oligosporogenicity. This allowed a conclusion on existence of phenomenological connection between sporulation and antibiotic production. The study of the antibiotic effect on bacterial sporogenesis showed negative results which are discussed in the paper along two directions: (1) the antibiotics did not probably participate in regulation of the bacteria cell differentiation, (2) the antibiotics regulated the bacterial sporogenesis though their effect was not as yet detected because of methodical difficulties. Therefore, the problem of the antibiotic participation in regulation of sporulation in Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis remains open.

  11. A bacterial view of the periodic table: genes and proteins for toxic inorganic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Simon; Phung, Le T

    2005-12-01

    Essentially all bacteria have genes for toxic metal ion resistances and these include those for Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+ Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO3(2-), Tl+ and Zn2+. The largest group of resistance systems functions by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. Fewer involve enzymatic transformations (oxidation, reduction, methylation, and demethylation) or metal-binding proteins (for example, metallothionein SmtA, chaperone CopZ and periplasmic silver binding protein SilE). Some of the efflux resistance systems are ATPases and others are chemiosmotic ion/proton exchangers. For example, Cd2+-efflux pumps of bacteria are either inner membrane P-type ATPases or three polypeptide RND chemiosmotic complexes consisting of an inner membrane pump, a periplasmic-bridging protein and an outer membrane channel. In addition to the best studied three-polypeptide chemiosmotic system, Czc (Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2), others are known that efflux Ag+, Cu+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Resistance to inorganic mercury, Hg2+ (and to organomercurials, such as CH3Hg+ and phenylmercury) involve a series of metal-binding and membrane transport proteins as well as the enzymes mercuric reductase and organomercurial lyase, which overall convert more toxic to less toxic forms. Arsenic resistance and metabolizing systems occur in three patterns, the widely-found ars operon that is present in most bacterial genomes and many plasmids, the more recently recognized arr genes for the periplasmic arsenate reductase that functions in anaerobic respiration as a terminal electron acceptor, and the aso genes for the periplasmic arsenite oxidase that functions as an initial electron donor in aerobic resistance to arsenite.

  12. The evolution of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) as a real-time bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted.

  13. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted. PMID:22368493

  14. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Sayler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted.

  15. Sludge as a potential important source of antibiotic resistance genes in both the bacterial and bacteriophage fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Cáceres, William; Melgarejo, Ana; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Stoll, Claudia; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-07-01

    The emergence and prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment is a serious global health concern. ARGs found in bacteria can become mobilized in bacteriophage particles in the environment. Sludge derived from secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) constitutes a concentrated pool of bacteria and phages that are removed during the treatment process. This study evaluates the prevalence of ARGs in the bacterial and phage fractions of anaerobic digested sludge; five ARGs (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, qnrA, qnrS, and sul1) are quantified by qPCR. Comparison between the wastewater and sludge revealed a shift in the prevalence of ARGs (blaTEM and sul1 became more prevalent in sludge), suggesting there is a change in the bacterial and phage populations from wastewater to those selected during the secondary treatment and the later anaerobic mesophilic digestion of the sludge. ARGs densities were higher in the bacterial than in the phage fraction, with high densities in both fractions; particularly for blaTEM and sul1 (5 and 8 log10 gene copies (GC)/g, respectively, in bacterial DNA; 5.5 and 4.4 log10 GC/g, respectively, in phage DNA). These results question the potential agricultural uses of treated sludge, as it could contribute to the spread of ARGs in the environment and have an impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving ecosystem.

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are a heterogenous group of disorders that are related to alterations in nervous system function. The genetic background of neurological diseases is heterogenous and may include chromosomal aberrations, specific gene mutations and epigenetic defects. This review is aimed at presenting of selected diseases that are associated with different epigenetic alterations. The imprinting defects on chromosome 15 are the cause of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes that both are characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay and specific behavioral phenotype. Besides the imprinting defect, these diseases can also be caused by deletion of chromosome 15 or uniparental disomy. Aberrant epigenetic regulation is also specific for Fragile X syndrome that is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene that leads to global methylation of the promoter region and repression of FMR1 transcription. A number of neurological diseases, mainly associated with intellectual impairment, may be caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in epigenetic regulation. The number of such diseases is rapidly growing thanks to the implementation of genomic sequencing for the identification of their molecular causes. One of the best known diseases linked to defects in epigenetic modifiers is Rett syndrome caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene or its variant - Rett-like syndrome caused by a mutation in CDKL5 or FOXG1 genes. As the epigenetic signature is potentially reversible, much attention is focused on possible therapies with drugs that influence DNA or histone modifications. This is especially important in the case of neurological disorders in which epigenetic changes are observed as the effect of the disease.

  17. Adrenal glucocorticoids regulate adipsin gene expression in genetically obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, B M; Lowell, B; Napolitano, A; Dubuc, P; Barton, D; Francke, U; Groves, D L; Cook, K S; Flier, J S

    1989-01-25

    Adipsin expression at the protein and mRNA levels is greatly reduced in several distinct syndromes of obesity in the mouse: genetic obesity due to the db/db and ob/ob genes, and a chemically induced model secondary to neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate. We considered first the possibility that the adipsin gene might be identical to the db or ob locus and the lowered expression of this protein might result from a mutation in this gene. We show here that the adipsin structural gene is located on chromosome 10 and hence is physically distinct from any obesity genes so far identified in the mouse. A major role for the adrenal gland and adrenal glucocorticoids in the aberrant regulation of adipsin in these models of obesity is indicated by several experiments. Adrenalectomy of the ob/ob mouse raises the circulating levels of adipsin protein and the amount of this mRNA in epididymal fat pads (5-fold), although neither is increased to the levels seen in lean controls. Exogenous administration of corticosterone completely blocks the effects of adrenalectomy on adipsin, suggesting that the effect of this endocrine ablation is through reduction of adrenal glucocorticoids. Corticosterone administration also causes suppression in the levels of adipsin mRNA and protein in lean mice, although this decrease is never as severe as that seen in obese mice. The effect of exogenous corticosterone in lean mice occurs within 2 days and hence is not secondary to the obesity which these hormones eventually elicit. These results indicate that glucocorticoids can regulate adipsin expression in vivo and strongly suggest that the hyperglucocorticoid state seen in certain obese models plays a significant role in lowering adipsin mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative analysis of these experiments suggests that other as yet unknown neuroendocrine factors also function to suppress adipsin in obesity.

  18. Growth phase-dependent gene regulation in vivo in Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeYoung, M.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal genes are strongly regulated dependent on growth phase in all organisms, but this regulation is poorly understood in Archaea. Moreover, very little is known about growth phase-dependent gene regulation in Archaea. SSV1-based lacS reporter gene constructs containing the Sulfolobus 16S/23S r

  19. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the Deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E.; Queiroz, A.; Serrão Santos, R.; Bettencourt, R.

    2013-11-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterised by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio bacteria. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as a non-pathogenic bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from infected animals by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h to 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the bacterium inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly evident for proteins of 18-20 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarity was found. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that immune genes, as well as experimental

  20. Gene Regulation, Modulation, and Their Applications in Gene Expression Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Flores

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Common microarray and next-generation sequencing data analysis concentrate on tumor subtype classification, marker detection, and transcriptional regulation discovery during biological processes by exploring the correlated gene expression patterns and their shared functions. Genetic regulatory network (GRN based approaches have been employed in many large studies in order to scrutinize for dysregulation and potential treatment controls. In addition to gene regulation and network construction, the concept of the network modulator that has significant systemic impact has been proposed, and detection algorithms have been developed in past years. Here we provide a unified mathematic description of these methods, followed with a brief survey of these modulator identification algorithms. As an early attempt to extend the concept to new RNA regulation mechanism, competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA, into a modulator framework, we provide two applications to illustrate the network construction, modulation effect, and the preliminary finding from these networks. Those methods we surveyed and developed are used to dissect the regulated network under different modulators. Not limit to these, the concept of “modulation” can adapt to various biological mechanisms to discover the novel gene regulation mechanisms.

  1. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  2. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-05-25

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle.

  3. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  4. Regulation of virulence gene expression in pathogenic Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Ripio, M T; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    1996-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between host and pathogen are characteristic of infections caused by intracellular bacteria. This has favoured the evolution of highly effective control systems by which these pathogens regulate the expression of different virulence factors during sequential steps of the infection process. In the case of the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, these steps involve internalization by eukaryotic cells, lysis of the resulting phagosome, replication as well as movement within the host cytoplasm, direct cell-to-cell spread, and subsequent lysis of a double-membrane vacuole when entering neighbouring cells. Virulence factors which are involved in each of these steps have been identified and the expression of these factors is subject to a co-ordinate and differential control exerted by the major listerial virulence regulator PrfA. This protein belongs to the Crp/Fnr-family of transcriptional activators and recognizes specific target sequences in promoter regions of several listerial virulence genes. Differential expression of these genes during sequential steps of the infection seems to be at least partially mediated by different binding affinities of PrfA to its target sequences. Activity of PrfA-dependent genes and of prfA itself is under the control of several environmental variables which are used by the pathogen to recognize its transition from the free environment into a eukaryotic host.

  5. Structural basis of response regulator inhibition by a bacterial anti-activator protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda D Baker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex interplay between the response regulator ComA, the anti-activator RapF, and the signaling peptide PhrF controls competence development in Bacillus subtilis. More specifically, ComA drives the expression of genetic competence genes, while RapF inhibits the interaction of ComA with its target promoters. The signaling peptide PhrF accumulates at high cell density and upregulates genetic competence by antagonizing the interaction of RapF and ComA. How RapF functions mechanistically to inhibit ComA activity and how PhrF in turn antagonizes the RapF-ComA interaction were unknown. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of RapF in complex with the ComA DNA binding domain. Along with biochemical and genetic studies, the X-ray crystal structure reveals how RapF mechanistically regulates ComA function. Interestingly, we found that a RapF surface mimics DNA to block ComA binding to its target promoters. Furthermore, RapF is a monomer either alone or in complex with PhrF, and it undergoes a conformational change upon binding to PhrF, which likely causes the dissociation of ComA from the RapF-ComA complex. Finally, we compare the structure of RapF complexed with the ComA DNA binding domain and the structure of RapH complexed with Spo0F. This comparison reveals that RapF and RapH have strikingly similar overall structures, and that they have evolved different, non-overlapping surfaces to interact with diverse cellular targets. To our knowledge, the data presented here reveal the first atomic level insight into the inhibition of response regulator DNA binding by an anti-activator. Compounds that affect the interaction of Rap and Rap-like proteins with their target domains could serve to regulate medically and commercially important phenotypes in numerous Bacillus species, such as sporulation in B. anthracis and sporulation and the production of Cry protein endotoxin in B. thuringiensis.

  6. Use of bacterial two-hybrid system to investigate the molecular interaction between the regulators NifA and NifL of Enterobacter cloacae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖贡献; 俞冠翘; 沈善炯; 朱家璧

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the nitrogen fixation (nif ) genes is tightly regulated by two proteins NifA and NifL in the (-subdivision of the proteobacteria. NifA is a transcriptional activator, which can be inactivated by NifL in the presence of oxygen or excess fixed nitrogen. A direct interaction between E. cloacae NifL and NifA was detected using the bacterial two-hybrid system. This interaction was accelerated in the presence of fixed nitrogen, while oxygen had no effect. NifL proteins, with their C-terminus being deleted, completely lost the ability to interact with NifA. The data suggest that the C-terminal domain of NifL acts as a sensor of the nitrogen status of the cell and mediates interaction with NifA.

  7. Inflammation-related genes up-regulated in schizophrenia brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuger Johan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple studies have shown that brain gene expression is disturbed in subjects suffering from schizophrenia. However, disentangling disease effects from alterations caused by medication is a challenging task. The main goal of this study is to find transcriptional alterations in schizophrenia that are independent of neuroleptic treatment. Methods We compared the transcriptional profiles in brain autopsy samples from 55 control individuals with that from 55 schizophrenic subjects, subdivided according to the type of antipsychotic medication received. Results Using global and high-resolution mRNA quantification techniques, we show that genes involved in immune response (GO:0006955 are up regulated in all groups of patients, including those not treated at the time of death. In particular, IFITM2, IFITM3, SERPINA3, and GBP1 showed increased mRNA levels in schizophrenia (p-values from qPCR ≤ 0.01. These four genes were co-expressed in both schizophrenic subjects and controls. In-vitro experiments suggest that these genes are expressed in both oligodendrocyte and endothelial cells, where transcription is inducible by the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-α and IFN-γ. Conclusion Although the modified genes are not classical indicators of chronic or acute inflammation, our results indicate alterations of inflammation-related pathways in schizophrenia. In addition, the observation in oligodendrocyte cells suggests that alterations in inflammatory-related genes may have consequences for myelination. Our findings encourage future research to explore whether anti-inflammatory agents can be used in combination with traditional antipsychotics for a more efficient treatment of schizophrenia.

  8. Lipocalin 2: a new mechanoresponding gene regulating bone homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Nadia; Capulli, Mattia; Piperni, Sara Gemini; Cappariello, Alfredo; Lau, Patrick; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Heer, Martina; Teti, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical loading represents a crucial factor in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. Its reduction causes loss of bone mass, eventually leading to osteoporosis. In a previous global transcriptome analysis performed in mouse calvarial osteoblasts subjected to simulated microgravity, the most upregulated gene compared to unit gravity condition was Lcn2, encoding the adipokine Lipocalin 2 (LCN2), whose function in bone metabolism is poorly known. To investigate the mechanoresponding properties of LCN2, we evaluated LCN2 levels in sera of healthy volunteers subjected to bed rest, and found a significant time-dependent increase of this adipokine compared to time 0. We then evaluated the in vivo LCN2 regulation in mice subjected to experimentally-induced mechanical unloading by (1) tail suspension, (2) muscle paralysis by botulin toxin A (Botox), or (3) genetically-induced muscular dystrophy (MDX mice), and observed that Lcn2 expression was upregulated in the long bones of all of them, whereas physical exercise counteracted this increase. Mechanistically, in primary osteoblasts transfected with LCN2-expression-vector (OBs-Lcn2) we observed that Runx2 and its downstream genes, Osterix and Alp, were transcriptionally downregulated, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was less prominent versus empty-vector transduced osteoblasts (OBs-empty). OBs-Lcn2 also exhibited an increase of the Rankl/Opg ratio and IL-6 mRNA, suggesting that LCN2 could link poor differentiation of osteoblasts to enhanced osteoclast stimulation. In fact, incubation of purified mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells with conditioned media from OBs-Lcn2 cultures, or their coculture with OBs-Lcn2, improved osteoclastogenesis compared to OBs-empty, whereas treatment with recombinant LCN2 had no effect. In conclusion, our data indicate that LCN2 is a novel osteoblast mechanoresponding gene and that its regulation could be central to the pathological response of the bone tissue to low mechanical forces.

  9. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    for maintaining genomic integrity. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pattern of cerebral DNA repair enzyme regulation after stress through the quantification of a targeted range of gene products involved in different types of DNA repair. 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either......Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  10. Combinatorial Gene Regulation through Kinetic Control of the Transcription Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Clarissa; DePace, Angela H; Sánchez, Álvaro

    2017-01-25

    Cells decide when, where, and to what level to express their genes by "computing" information from transcription factors (TFs) binding to regulatory DNA. How is the information contained in multiple TF-binding sites integrated to dictate the rate of transcription? The dominant conceptual and quantitative model is that TFs combinatorially recruit one another and RNA polymerase to the promoter by direct physical interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to explore kinetic control, an alternative model in which combinatorial gene regulation can result from TFs working on different kinetic steps of the transcription cycle. Kinetic control can generate a wide range of analog and Boolean computations without requiring the input TFs to be simultaneously bound to regulatory DNA. We propose experiments that will illuminate the role of kinetic control in transcription and discuss implications for deciphering the cis-regulatory "code."

  11. Cholera toxin structure, gene regulation and pathophysiological and immunological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J; Holmgren, J

    2008-05-01

    Many notions regarding the function, structure and regulation of cholera toxin expression have remained essentially unaltered in the last 15 years. At the same time, recent findings have generated additional perspectives. For example, the cholera toxin genes are now known to be carried by a non-lytic bacteriophage, a previously unsuspected condition. Understanding of how the expression of cholera toxin genes is controlled by the bacterium at the molecular level has advanced significantly and relationships with cell-density-associated (quorum-sensing) responses have recently been discovered. Regarding the cell intoxication process, the mode of entry and intracellular transport of cholera toxin are becoming clearer. In the immunological field, the strong oral immunogenicity of the non-toxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) has been exploited in the development of a now widely licensed oral cholera vaccine. Additionally, CTB has been shown to induce tolerance against co-administered (linked) foreign antigens in some autoimmune and allergic diseases.

  12. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  13. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  14. Role of histone deacetylases in gene regulation at nuclear lamina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice C Milon

    Full Text Available Theoretical models suggest that gene silencing at the nuclear periphery may involve "closing" of chromatin by transcriptional repressors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs. Here we provide experimental evidence confirming these predictions. Histone acetylation, chromatin compactness, and gene repression in lamina-interacting multigenic chromatin domains were analyzed in Drosophila S2 cells in which B-type lamin, diverse HDACs, and lamina-associated proteins were downregulated by dsRNA. Lamin depletion resulted in decreased compactness of the repressed multigenic domain associated with its detachment from the lamina and enhanced histone acetylation. Our data reveal the major role for HDAC1 in mediating deacetylation, chromatin compaction, and gene silencing in the multigenic domain, and an auxiliary role for HDAC3 that is required for retention of the domain at the lamina. These findings demonstrate the manifold and central involvement of class I HDACs in regulation of lamina-associated genes, illuminating a mechanism by which these enzymes can orchestrate normal and pathological development.

  15. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  16. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marcello

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE. These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function.

  17. From biophysics to evolutionary genetics: statistical aspects of gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lässig Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is an introductory review on how genes interact to produce biological functions. Transcriptional interactions involve the binding of proteins to regulatory DNA. Specific binding sites can be identified by genomic analysis, and these undergo a stochastic evolution process governed by selection, mutations, and genetic drift. We focus on the links between the biophysical function and the evolution of regulatory elements. In particular, we infer fitness landscapes of binding sites from genomic data, leading to a quantitative evolutionary picture of regulation.

  18. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma, E-mail: maia.angelova@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: asma.benhalim@northumbria.ac.uk [Intelligent Modelling Lab, School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 1XE (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  19. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  20. Insights into the Regulation of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities by Application of Bio-organic Fertilizer in Pseudostellaria heterophylla Monoculture Regime

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    Linkun Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The biomass and quality of Pseudostellariae heterophylla suffers a significant decline under monoculture. Since rhizosphere microbiome plays crucial roles in soil health, deep pyrosequencing combined with qPCR was applied to characterize the composition and structure of soil bacterial community under monoculture and different amendments. The results showed compared with the first-year planted (FP, second-year monoculture of P. heterophylla (SP led to a significant decline in yield and resulted in a significant increase in Fusarium oxysporum but a decline in Burkholderia spp. Bio-organic fertilizer (MT formulated by combining antagonistic bacteria with organic matter could significantly promote the yield by regulating rhizosphere bacterial community. However, organic fertilizer (MO without antagonistic bacteria could not suppress Fusarium wilt. Multivariate statistics analysis showed a distinct separation between the healthy samples (FP and MT and the unhealthy samples (SP and MO, suggesting a strong relationship between soil microbial community and plant performance. Furthermore, we found the application of bio-organic fertilizer MT could significantly increase the bacterial community diversity and restructure microbial community with relatively fewer pathogenic F. oxysporum and more beneficial Burkholderia spp. In conclusion, the application of novel bio-organic fertilizer could effectively suppress Fusarium wilt by enriching the antagonistic bacteria and enhancing the bacterial diversity.

  1. Specificity determinants for autoproteolysis of LexA, a key regulator of bacterial SOS mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Birdwell, L Dillon; Kohli, Rahul M

    2014-05-20

    Bacteria utilize the tightly regulated stress response (SOS) pathway to respond to a variety of genotoxic agents, including antimicrobials. Activation of the SOS response is regulated by a key repressor-protease, LexA, which undergoes autoproteolysis in the setting of stress, resulting in derepression of SOS genes. Remarkably, genetic inactivation of LexA's self-cleavage activity significantly decreases acquired antibiotic resistance in infection models and renders bacteria hypersensitive to traditional antibiotics, suggesting that a mechanistic study of LexA could help inform its viability as a novel target for combating acquired drug resistance. Despite structural insights into LexA, a detailed knowledge of the enzyme's protease specificity is lacking. Here, we employ saturation and positional scanning mutagenesis on LexA's internal cleavage region to analyze >140 mutants and generate a comprehensive specificity profile of LexA from the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (LexAPa). We find that the LexAPa active site possesses a unique mode of substrate recognition. Positions P1-P3 prefer small hydrophobic residues that suggest specific contacts with the active site, while positions P5 and P1' show a preference for flexible glycine residues that may facilitate the conformational change that permits autoproteolysis. We further show that stabilizing the β-turn within the cleavage region enhances LexA autoproteolytic activity. Finally, we identify permissive positions flanking the scissile bond (P4 and P2') that are tolerant to extensive mutagenesis. Our studies shed light on the active site architecture of the LexA autoprotease and provide insights that may inform the design of probes of the SOS pathway.

  2. SUPERMAN, a regulator of floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, J L; Sakai, H; Jack, T; Weigel, D; Mayer, U; Meyerowitz, E M

    1992-03-01

    We describe a locus, SUPERMAN, mutations in which result in extra stamens developing at the expense of the central carpels in the Arabidopsis thaliana flower. The development of superman flowers, from initial primordium to mature flower, is described by scanning electron microscopy. The development of doubly and triply mutant strains, constructed with superman alleles and previously identified homeotic mutations that cause alterations in floral organ identity, is also described. Essentially additive phenotypes are observed in superman agamous and superman apetala2 double mutants. The epistatic relationships observed between either apetala3 or pistillata and superman alleles suggest that the SUPERMAN gene product could be a regulator of these floral homeotic genes. To test this, the expression patterns of AGAMOUS and APETALA3 were examined in superman flowers. In wild-type flowers, APETALA3 expression is restricted to the second and third whorls where it is required for the specification of petals and stamens. In contrast, in superman flowers, APETALA3 expression expands to include most of the cells that would normally constitute the fourth whorl. This ectopic APETALA3 expression is proposed to be one of the causes of the development of the extra stamens in superman flowers. The spatial pattern of AGAMOUS expression remains unaltered in superman flowers as compared to wild-type flowers. Taken together these data indicate that one of the functions of the wild-type SUPERMAN gene product is to negatively regulate APETALA3 in the fourth whorl of the flower. In addition, superman mutants exhibit a loss of determinacy of the floral meristem, an effect that appears to be mediated by the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA gene products.

  3. Shh regulates chick Ebf1 gene expression in somite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Allen, Steve; McGonnell, Imelda; Mansour, Ali A; Otto, Anthony; Patel, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    The chick early B-cell factor 1 (cEbf1) is a member of EBF family of helix loop helix transcription factors. Recently, we have proved that cEbf1 expression in feather is regulated by Shh. It is therefore possible that the somitic expression of cEbf1 is controlled by Shh signals from the notochord. To assess this hypothesis, the expression profile of cEbf1 was first detailed in somites of chick embryos (from HH8 to HH28). cEbf1 expression was mainly localised in the medial sclerotome and later around the vertebral cartilage anlagen of body and pedicles. Tissue manipulations (notochord ablation) and Shh gain and loss of function experiments were then performed to analyse whether the notochord and/or Shh regulate cEbf1 expression. Results from these experiments confirmed our hypothesis that the medial somitic expression of cEbf1 is regulated by Shh from the notochord. In conclusion, cEbf1 gene is considered as a medial sclerotome marker, downstream to and regulated by the notochord derived Shh, which may be functionally involved in somitogenesis.

  4. Effect of different biochars on antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community during chicken manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Erping; Wu, Ying; Zuo, Yiru; Chen, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Rice straw biochar (RSB) and mushroom biochar (MB) were added to lab-scale chicken manure composting to evaluate their effects on the behaviors of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and on total and bio-available heavy metals (Cu, Zn and As). The associated bacterial community was characterized by 16SrRNA high-throughput sequencing. The abundance of pathogenic bacteria was also calculated. At the end of the control composting experiment, the average removal rate of ARGs was 0.86 log units and the removal rate of pathogenic bacteria was 57.1%. MB addition resulted in a higher removal rate than that in the control composting experiment. However, RSB addition yielded opposite results, which may be due to the higher abundance of Erysipelotrichaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Family_XI_Incertae_Sedis (belonging to Firmicutes carrying and disseminating ARGs) and pathogenic bacteria carrying ARGs. Furthermore, the correlations between bio-available heavy metals and ARGs were more obvious than those between total heavy metals and ARGs.

  5. Neuronal identity genes regulated by super-enhancers are preferentially down-regulated in the striatum of Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Mayada; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Keime, Céline; Parmentier, Frédéric; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence; Néri, Christian; Davidson, Irwin; Merienne, Karine

    2015-06-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with extensive down-regulation of genes controlling neuronal function, particularly in the striatum. Whether altered epigenetic regulation underlies transcriptional defects in HD is unclear. Integrating RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq), we show that down-regulated genes in HD mouse striatum associate with selective decrease in H3K27ac, a mark of active enhancers, and RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII). In addition, we reveal that decreased genes in HD mouse striatum display a specific epigenetic signature, characterized by high levels and broad patterns of H3K27ac and RNAPII. Our results indicate that this signature is that of super-enhancers, a category of broad enhancers regulating genes defining tissue identity and function. Specifically, we reveal that striatal super-enhancers display extensive H3K27 acetylation within gene bodies, drive transcription characterized by low levels of paused RNAPII, regulate neuronal function genes and are enriched in binding motifs for Gata transcription factors, such as Gata2 regulating striatal identity genes. Together, our results provide evidence for preferential down-regulation of genes controlled by super-enhancers in HD striatum and indicate that enhancer topography is a major parameter determining the propensity of a gene to be deregulated in a neurodegenerative disease.

  6. Allochthonous carbon is a major regulator to bacterial growth and community composition in subarctic freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, Toni; Peura, Sari; Cusson, Mathieu; Rautio, Milla

    2016-09-01

    In the subarctic region, climate warming and permafrost thaw are leading to emergence of ponds and to an increase in mobility of catchment carbon. As carbon of terrestrial origin is increasing in subarctic freshwaters the resource pool supporting their microbial communities and metabolism is changing, with consequences to overall aquatic productivity. By sampling different subarctic water bodies for a one complete year we show how terrestrial and algal carbon compounds vary in a range of freshwaters and how differential organic carbon quality is linked to bacterial metabolism and community composition. We show that terrestrial drainage and associated nutrients supported higher bacterial growth in ponds and river mouths that were influenced by fresh terrestrial carbon than in large lakes with carbon from algal production. Bacterial diversity, however, was lower at sites influenced by terrestrial carbon inputs. Bacterial community composition was highly variable among different water bodies and especially influenced by concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fulvic acids, proteins and nutrients. Furthermore, a distinct preference was found for terrestrial vs. algal carbon among certain bacterial tribes. The results highlight the contribution of the numerous ponds to cycling of terrestrial carbon in the changing subarctic and arctic regions.

  7. [Ribozyme riboswitch based gene expression regulation systems for gene therapy applications: progress and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-Xian; Wang, Jia-wen; Lin, Jun-sheng; Diao, Yong

    2014-11-01

    Robust and efficient control of therapeutic gene expression is needed for timing and dosing of gene therapy drugs in clinical applications. Ribozyme riboswitch provides a promising building block for ligand-controlled gene-regulatory system, based on its property that exhibits tunable gene regulation, design modularity, and target specificity. Ribozyme riboswitch can be used in various gene delivery vectors. In recent years, there have been breakthroughs in extending ribozyme riboswitch's application from gene-expression control to cellular function and fate control. High throughput screening platforms were established, that allow not only rapid optimization of ribozyme riboswitch in a microbial host, but also straightforward transfer of selected devices exhibiting desired activities to mammalian cell lines in a predictable manner. Mathematical models were employed successfully to explore the performance of ribozyme riboswitch quantitively and its rational design predictably. However, to progress toward gene therapy relevant applications, both precision rational design of regulatory circuits and the biocompatibility of regulatory ligand are still of crucial importance.

  8. MUNC13-4 protein regulates the oxidative response and is essential for phagosomal maturation and bacterial killing in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfregola, Jlenia; Johnson, Jennifer Linda; Meijler, Michael M; Napolitano, Gennaro; Catz, Sergio Daniel

    2012-12-28

    Neutrophils use diverse mechanisms to kill pathogens including phagocytosis, exocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and neutrophil extracellular traps. These mechanisms rely on their ability to mobilize intracellular organelles and to deliver granular cargoes to specific cellular compartments or into the extracellular milieu, but the molecular mechanisms regulating vesicular trafficking in neutrophils are not well understood. MUNC13-4 is a RAB27A effector that coordinates exocytosis in hematopoietic cells, and its deficiency is associated with the human immunodeficiency familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 3. In this work, we have established an essential role for MUNC13-4 in selective vesicular trafficking, phagosomal maturation, and intracellular bacterial killing in neutrophils. Using neutrophils from munc13-4 knock-out (KO) mice, we show that MUNC13-4 is necessary for the regulation of p22(phox)-expressing granule trafficking to the plasma membrane and regulates extracellular ROS production. MUNC13-4 was also essential for the regulation of intracellular ROS production induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa despite normal trafficking of p22(phox)-expressing vesicles toward the phagosome. Importantly, in the absence of MUNC13-4, phagosomal maturation was impaired as observed by the defective delivery of azurophilic granules and multivesicular bodies to the phagosome. Significantly, this mechanism was intact in RAB27A KO neutrophils. Intracellular bacterial killing was markedly impaired in MUNC13-4 KO neutrophils. MUNC13-4-deficient cells showed a significant increase in neutrophil extracellular trap formation but were unable to compensate for the impaired bacterial killing. Altogether, these findings characterize novel functions of MUNC13-4 in the innate immune response of the neutrophil and have direct implications for the understanding of immunodeficiencies in patients with MUNC13-4 deficiency.

  9. Multidirectional chemical signalling between Mammalian hosts, resident microbiota, and invasive pathogens: neuroendocrine hormone-induced changes in bacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolos, Michail H; Khan, C M Anjam

    2014-01-01

    Host-pathogen communication appears to be crucial in establishing the outcome of bacterial infections. There is increasing evidence to suggest that this communication can take place by bacterial pathogens sensing and subsequently responding to host neuroendocrine (NE) stress hormones. Bacterial pathogens have developed mechanisms allowing them to eavesdrop on these communication pathways within their hosts. These pathogens can use intercepted communication signals to adjust their fitness to persist and cause disease in their hosts. Recently, there have been numerous studies highlighting the ability of NE hormones to act as an environmental cue for pathogens, helping to steer their responses during host infection. Host NE hormone sensing can take place indirectly or directly via bacterial adrenergic receptors (BARs). The resulting changes in bacterial gene expression can be of strategic benefit to the pathogen. Furthermore, it is intriguing that not only can bacteria sense NE stress hormones but they are also able to produce key signalling molecules known as autoinducers. The rapid advances in our knowledge of the human microbiome, and its impact on health and disease highlights the potential importance of communication between the microbiota, pathogens and the host. It is indeed likely that the microbiota input significantly in the neuroendocrinological homeostasis of the host by catabolic, anabolic, and signalling processes. The arrival of unwanted guests, such as bacterial pathogens, clearly has a major impact on these delicately balanced interactions. Unravelling the pathways involved in interkingdom communication between invading bacterial pathogens, the resident microbiota, and hosts, may provide novel targets in our continuous search for new antimicrobials to control disease.

  10. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  11. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Fuxjager

    Full Text Available Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus, zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata, and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus. Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  12. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia at the clinic. Recent GWAS identified several variants associated with AF, but they account for <10% of heritability. Gene-gene interaction is assumed to account for a significant portion of missing heritability. Among GWAS loci for AF, only three were replicated in the Chinese Han population, including SNP rs2106261 (G/A substitution in ZFHX3, rs2200733 (C/T substitution near PITX2c, and rs3807989 (A/G substitution in CAV1. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three AF loci. We demonstrated significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 in three independent populations and combined population with 2,020 cases/5,315 controls. Compared to non-risk genotype GGCC, two-locus risk genotype AATT showed the highest odds ratio in three independent populations and the combined population (OR=5.36 (95% CI 3.87-7.43, P=8.00×10-24. The OR of 5.36 for AATT was significantly higher than the combined OR of 3.31 for both GGTT and AACC, suggesting a synergistic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI analysis also revealed significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 when exposed two copies of risk alleles (RERI=2.87, P<1.00×10-4 or exposed to one additional copy of risk allele (RERI=1.29, P<1.00×10-4. The INTERSNP program identified significant genotypic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 under an additive by additive model (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.74-0.97, P=0.02. Mechanistically, PITX2c negatively regulates expression of miR-1, which negatively regulates expression of ZFHX3, resulting in a positive regulation of ZFHX3 by PITX2c; ZFHX3 positively regulates expression of PITX2C, resulting in a cyclic loop of cross-regulation between ZFHX3 and PITX2c. Both ZFHX3 and PITX2c regulate expression of NPPA, TBX5 and NKX2.5. These results suggest that cyclic cross-regulation of gene expression is a molecular basis for gene-gene

  13. The type III secreted protein BspR regulates the virulence genes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

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    Jun Kurushima

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the causative agents of whooping cough. These pathogenic species share a number of virulence genes, including the gene locus for the type III secretion system (T3SS that delivers effector proteins. To identify unknown type III effectors in Bordetella, secreted proteins in the bacterial culture supernatants of wild-type B. bronchiseptica and an isogenic T3SS-deficient mutant were compared with iTRAQ-based, quantitative proteomic analysis method. BB1639, annotated as a hypothetical protein, was identified as a novel type III secreted protein and was designated BspR (Bordetella secreted protein regulator. The virulence of a BspR mutant (ΔbspR in B. bronchiseptica was significantly attenuated in a mouse infection model. BspR was also highly conserved in B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, suggesting that BspR is an essential virulence factor in these three Bordetella species. Interestingly, the BspR-deficient strain showed hyper-secretion of T3SS-related proteins. Furthermore, T3SS-dependent host cell cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity were also enhanced in the absence of BspR. By contrast, the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and adenylate cyclase toxin was completely abolished in the BspR-deficient strain. Finally, we demonstrated that BspR is involved in the iron-responsive regulation of T3SS. Thus, Bordetella virulence factors are coordinately but inversely controlled by BspR, which functions as a regulator in response to iron starvation.

  14. Mobile gene silencing in Arabidopsis is regulated by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Liang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants and nematodes, RNAi can spread from cells from which it is initiated to other cells in the organism. The underlying mechanism controlling the mobility of RNAi signals is not known, especially in the case of plants. A genetic screen designed to recover plants impaired in the movement but not the production or effectiveness of the RNAi signal identified RCI3, which encodes a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-producing type III peroxidase, as a key regulator of silencing mobility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Silencing initiated in the roots of rci3 plants failed to spread into leaf tissue or floral tissue. Application of exogenous H2O2 reinstated the spread in rci3 plants and accelerated it in wild-type plants. The addition of catalase or MnO2, which breaks down H2O2, slowed the spread of silencing in wild-type plants. We propose that endogenous H2O2, under the control of peroxidases, regulates the spread of gene silencing by altering plasmodesmata permeability through remodelling of local cell wall structure, and may play a role in regulating systemic viral defence.

  15. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB enhances bacterial virulence by inhibiting autophagy in a zebrafish infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ting; Gao, Song; Xu, Guang-Mei; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shu-Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause gastroenteritis and systemic infection in a wide range of hosts. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB is closely related to bacterial virulence in different cells and animal models, and the encoded protein acts as an intracellular toxin required for ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. However, until now there is no report about the pathogenecity of spvB gene on zebrafish. Due to the outstanding advantages of zebrafish in analyzing bacteria-host interactions, a S. typhimurium infected zebrafish model was set up here to study the effect of spvB on autophagy and intestinal pathogenesis in vivo. We found that spvB gene could decrease the LD50 of S. typhimurium, and the strain carrying spvB promoted bacterial proliferation and aggravated the intestinal damage manifested by the narrowed intestines, fallen microvilli, blurred epithelium cell structure and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Results demonstrated the enhanced virulence induced by spvB in zebrafish. In spvB-mutant strain infected zebrafish, the levels of Lc3 turnover and Beclin1 expression increased, and the double-membraned autophagosome structures were observed, suggesting that spvB can inhibit autophagy activity. In summary, our results indicate that S. typhimurium strain containing spvB displays more virulence, triggering an increase in bacterial survival and intestine injuries by suppressing autophagy for the first time. This model provides novel insights into the role of Salmonella plasmid virulence gene in bacterial pathogenesis, and can help to further elucidate the relationship between bacteria and host immune response.

  16. Enrichment of provitamin A content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by introduction of the bacterial carotenoid biosynthetic genes CrtB and CrtI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Zeng, Jian; Li, Yin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Ling; Miao, Yingjie; Deng, Pengyi; Yuan, Cuihong; Ma, Cheng; Chen, Xi; Zang, Mingli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kexiu; Chang, Junli; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2014-06-01

    Carotenoid content is a primary determinant of wheat nutritional value and affects its end-use quality. Wheat grains contain very low carotenoid levels and trace amounts of provitamin A content. In order to enrich the carotenoid content in wheat grains, the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (CrtB) and carotene desaturase gene (CrtI) were transformed into the common wheat cultivar Bobwhite. Expression of CrtB or CrtI alone slightly increased the carotenoid content in the grains of transgenic wheat, while co-expression of both genes resulted in a darker red/yellow grain phenotype, accompanied by a total carotenoid content increase of approximately 8-fold achieving 4.76 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, a β-carotene increase of 65-fold to 3.21 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, and a provitamin A content (sum of α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) increase of 76-fold to 3.82 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight. The high provitamin A content in the transgenic wheat was stably inherited over four generations. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that enhancement of provitamin A content in transgenic wheat was also a result of the highly coordinated regulation of endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic genes, suggesting a metabolic feedback regulation in the wheat carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. These transgenic wheat lines are not only valuable for breeding wheat varieties with nutritional benefits for human health but also for understanding the mechanism regulating carotenoid biosynthesis in wheat endosperm.

  17. Joint analysis of bacterial DNA methylation, predicted promoter and regulation motifs for biological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in long-read, single molecule real-time sequencing technology and analysis software over the last two years has enabled the efficient production of closed bacterial genome sequences. However, consistent annotation of these genomes has lagged behind the ability to create them, while the avai...

  18. Interactions among genes influencing bacterial recognition increase IBD risk in a population-based New Zealand cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Ivonne; Huebner, Claudia; Browning, Brian L; Gearry, Richard B; Barclay, Murray L; Kennedy, Martin; Roberts, Rebecca; Shelling, Andrew N; Philpott, Martin; Han, Dug Yeo; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial sensing is crucial for appropriate response by the innate and adaptive immune system against invading microorganisms. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in bacterial recognition, CARD15 and TLR4, increased the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a New Zealand Caucasian case-control cohort. We now consider the effects of SNPs in CD14, TLR9, and BPI, analyzed individually, in association with one another, and with SNPs in CARD15 or TLR4 in this same population group. SNPs in CD14 (c.-159 C>T), TLR9 (c.-1237T>C) and BPI (c.645A>G) showed no significant allele or genotype frequency differences between IBD cases and controls. Genotype-phenotype mapping reveals an association with BPI and ileocolonic Crohn's disease (CD) as well as an association with CD14 and early-onset ulcerative colitis (UC). Genotype interaction analyses using three different statistical approaches provided significant evidence of interaction for the following combinations: CARD15/TLR4 (CD and UC), CARD15/CD14 (CD and UC), CD14/TLR4 (UC only), and CD14/BPI (UC only). A trend for an association between BPI and TLR4 was observed in UC patients, but failed to reach statistical significance. Our findings support the idea of gene-gene interactions for genes involved in closely related pathways (i.e. bacterial detection). There is evidence that carrying two SNPs in genes may lead to statistical significance for genes and SNPs that do not otherwise confirm as risk alleles for disease aetiology when analysed alone.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  20. Xnrs and activin regulate distinct genes during Xenopus development: activin regulates cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Ramis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mesoderm of the amphibian embryo is formed through an inductive interaction in which vegetal cells of the blastula-staged embryo act on overlying equatorial cells. Candidate mesoderm-inducing factors include members of the transforming growth factor type beta family such as Vg1, activin B, the nodal-related proteins and derrière. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Microarray analysis reveals different functions for activin B and the nodal-related proteins during early Xenopus development. Inhibition of nodal-related protein function causes the down-regulation of regionally expressed genes such as chordin, dickkopf and XSox17alpha/beta, while genes that are mis-regulated in the absence of activin B tend to be more widely expressed and, interestingly, include several that are involved in cell cycle regulation. Consistent with the latter observation, cells of the involuting dorsal axial mesoderm, which normally undergo cell cycle arrest, continue to proliferate when the function of activin B is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations reveal distinct functions for these two classes of the TGF-beta family during early Xenopus development, and in doing so identify a new role for activin B during gastrulation.

  1. Identification and gene prediction of a 24 kb region containing xa5, a recessive bacterial blight resistance gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Yiming; JIANG Guanghuai; CHEN Xuewei; XIA Zhihui; LI Xiaobing; ZHU Lihuang; ZHAI Wenxue

    2003-01-01

    Rice xa5 gene provides recessive, race-specific resistance to bacterial blight disease caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and has great value for research and breeding. In an effort to clone xa5, an F2 population of 4892 individuals was developed from the xa5 near isogenic lines, IR24 and IRBB5. A fine mapping procedure was conducted and tightly linked RFLP markers were used to screen a BAC library of IRBB56, a resistant rice line containing the xa5 gene. A 213 kb contig covering the xa5 locus was constructed. According to the sequences from the International Rice Genome Sequening Project (IRGSP), the Chinese Superhybrid Rice Genome Project (SRGP) and some sub-clones of the contig, twelve SSLP and CAPS markers were developed for fine mapping. The xa5 gene was mapped to a 0.3 cM interval between markers K5 and T4, which spanned an interval of approximately 24 kb, co-segregating with marker T2. Sequence analysis of the 24 kb region revealed that an ABC transporter and a basal transcription factor (TFIIa) were potential candidates for the xa5 resistance gene product. The molecular mechanism by which the xa5 gene provides recessive, race-specific resistance to bacterial blight will be elucidated by the functional tests of the 24 kb DNA and the candidate genes.

  2. Gene expression dosage regulation in an allopolyploid fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Matos

    Full Text Available How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ''diploidization'' could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles' samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression. Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5. Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock

  3. Mapping the genetic architecture of gene regulation in whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Schramm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess whether whole blood expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs with effects in cis and trans are robust and can be used to identify regulatory pathways affecting disease susceptibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed whole-genome eQTL analyses in 890 participants of the KORA F4 study and in two independent replication samples (SHIP-TREND, N = 976 and EGCUT, N = 842 using linear regression models and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: In the KORA F4 study, 4,116 cis-eQTLs (defined as SNP-probe pairs where the SNP is located within a 500 kb window around the transcription unit and 94 trans-eQTLs reached genome-wide significance and overall 91% (92% of cis-, 84% of trans-eQTLs were confirmed in at least one of the two replication studies. Different study designs including distinct laboratory reagents (PAXgene™ vs. Tempus™ tubes did not affect reproducibility (separate overall replication overlap: 78% and 82%. Immune response pathways were enriched in cis- and trans-eQTLs and significant cis-eQTLs were partly coexistent in other tissues (cross-tissue similarity 40-70%. Furthermore, four chromosomal regions displayed simultaneous impact on multiple gene expression levels in trans, and 746 eQTL-SNPs have been previously reported to have clinical relevance. We demonstrated cross-associations between eQTL-SNPs, gene expression levels in trans, and clinical phenotypes as well as a link between eQTLs and human metabolic traits via modification of gene regulation in cis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that whole blood is a robust tissue for eQTL analysis and may be used both for biomarker studies and to enhance our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying gene-disease associations.

  4. Gene expression of ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 of the honeybee in ovary and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R K; Takeuchi, H; Matsuo, Y; Kubo, T

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate studies of hormonal control in the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), a cDNA for a honeybee homologue of the ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 (AmE74) was isolated and its expression was analysed. Northern blot analysis indicated strong expression in the adult queen abdomen, and no significant expression in the adult drone and worker abdomens. In situ hybridization demonstrated that this gene was expressed selectively in the ovary and gut in the queen abdomen. Furthermore, this gene was also expressed selectively in subsets of mushroom body interneurones in the brain of the adult worker bees. These findings suggest that AmE74 is involved in neural function as well as in reproduction in adult honeybees.

  5. Regulation of virulence gene expression resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae interactions in chronic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Cope

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a common inflammatory disease of the sinonasal cavity mediated, in part, by polymicrobial communities of bacteria. Recent molecular studies have confirmed the importance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi in CRS. Here, we hypothesize that interaction between S. pneumoniae and NTHi mixed-species communities cause a change in bacterial virulence gene expression. We examined CRS as a model human disease to validate these polymicrobial interactions. Clinical strains of S. pneumoniae and NTHi were grown in mono- and co-culture in a standard biofilm assay. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR (RTqPCR was used to measure gene expression of key virulence factors. To validate these results, we investigated the presence of the bacterial RNA transcripts in excised human tissue from patients with CRS. Consequences of physical or chemical interactions between microbes were also investigated. Transcription of NTHi type IV pili was only expressed in co-culture in vitro, and expression could be detected ex vivo in diseased tissue. S. pneumoniae pyruvate oxidase was up-regulated in co-culture, while pneumolysin and pneumococcal adherence factor A were down-regulated. These results were confirmed in excised human CRS tissue. Gene expression was differentially regulated by physical contact and secreted factors. Overall, these data suggest that interactions between H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae involve physical and chemical mechanisms that influence virulence gene expression of mixed-species biofilm communities present in chronically diseased human tissue. These results extend previous studies of population-level virulence and provide novel insight into the importance of S. pneumoniae and NTHi in CRS.

  6. CLUSEAN: a computer-based framework for the automated analysis of bacterial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T; Rausch, C; Lopez, P; Hoof, I; Gaykova, V; Huson, D H; Wohlleben, W

    2009-03-10

    Bacterial secondary metabolites are an important source of antimicrobial and cytostatic drugs. These molecules are often synthesized in a stepwise fashion by multimodular megaenzymes that are encoded in clusters of genes encoding enzymes for precursor supply and modification. In this work,we present an open source software pipeline, CLUSEAN (CLUster SEquence ANalyzer) that helps to annotate and analyze such gene clusters. CLUSEAN integrates standard analysis tools, like BLAST and HMMer, with specific tools for the identification of the functional domains and motifs in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS)/type I polyketide synthases (PKS) and the prediction of specificities of NRPS.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a...

  8. Characterization of new bacterial catabolic genes and mobile genetic elements by high throughput genetic screening of a soil metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Franqueville, Laure; Ausec, Luka; Xu, Zhuofei; Delmont, Tom O; Dunon, Vincent; Cagnon, Christine; Mandic-Mulec, Ines; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-11-20

    A mix of oligonucleotide probes was used to hybridize soil metagenomic DNA from a fosmid clone library spotted on high density membranes. The pooled radio-labeled probes were designed to target genes encoding glycoside hydrolases GH18, dehalogenases, bacterial laccases and mobile genetic elements (integrases from integrons and insertion sequences). Positive hybridizing spots were affiliated to the corresponding clones in the library and the metagenomic inserts were sequenced. After assembly and annotation, new coding DNA sequences related to genes of interest were identified with low protein similarity against the closest hits in databases. This work highlights the sensitivity of DNA/DNA hybridization techniques as an effective and complementary way to recover novel genes from large metagenomic clone libraries. This study also supports that some of the identified catabolic genes might be associated with horizontal transfer events.

  9. Automated optogenetic feedback control for precise and robust regulation of gene expression and cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Rullan, Marc; Aoki, Stephanie K.; Buchmann, Peter; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of gene expression can have far-reaching implications for biotechnological applications and biological discovery. Thanks to the advantages of light, optogenetics has emerged as an ideal technology for this task. Current state-of-the-art methods for optical expression control fail to combine precision with repeatability and cannot withstand changing operating culture conditions. Here, we present a novel fully automatic experimental platform for the robust and precise long-term optogenetic regulation of protein production in liquid Escherichia coli cultures. Using a computer-controlled light-responsive two-component system, we accurately track prescribed dynamic green fluorescent protein expression profiles through the application of feedback control, and show that the system adapts to global perturbations such as nutrient and temperature changes. We demonstrate the efficacy and potential utility of our approach by placing a key metabolic enzyme under optogenetic control, thus enabling dynamic regulation of the culture growth rate with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and biotechnology. PMID:27562138

  10. Bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus efficiently package various bacterial genes and mobile genetic elements including SCCmec with different frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašlaňová, Ivana; Doškař, Jiří; Varga, Marian; Kuntová, Lucie; Mužík, Jan; Malúšková, Denisa; Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human and veterinary pathogen in which new strains with increasing virulence and antimicrobial resistance occur due to acquiring new genes by horizontal transfer. It is generally accepted that temperate bacteriophages play a major role in gene transfer. In this study, we proved the presence of various bacterial genes of the S. aureus COL strain directly within the phage particles via qPCR and quantified their packaging frequency. Non-parametric statistical analysis showed that transducing bacteriophages φ11, φ80 and φ80α of serogroup B, in contrast to serogroup A bacteriophage φ81, efficiently package selected chromosomal genes localized in 4 various loci of the chromosome and 8 genes carried on variable elements, such as staphylococcal cassette chromosome SCCmec, staphylococcal pathogenicity island SaPI1, genomic islands vSaα and vSaβ, and plasmids with various frequency. Bacterial gene copy number per ng of DNA isolated from phage particles ranged between 1.05 × 10(2) for the tetK plasmid gene and 3.86 × 10(5) for the SaPI1 integrase gene. The new and crucial finding that serogroup B bacteriophages can package concurrently ccrA1 (1.16 × 10(4)) and mecA (1.26 × 10(4)) located at SCCmec type I into their capsids indicates that generalized transduction plays an important role in the evolution and emergence of new methicillin-resistant clones.

  11. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia A.; Feliciano, Joana R.; Pita, Tiago; Guerreiro, Soraia I.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Their eradication is very difficult due to the high level of intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Bcc bacteria have large and complex genomes, composed of two to four replicons, with variable numbers of insertion sequences. The complexity of Bcc genomes confers a high genomic plasticity to these bacteria, allowing their adaptation and survival to diverse habitats, including the human host. In this work, we review results from recent studies using omics approaches to elucidate in vivo adaptive strategies and virulence gene regulation expression of Bcc bacteria when infecting the human host or subject to conditions mimicking the stressful environment of the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:28106859

  12. Cardiovascular disease-related genes and regulation by diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2009-11-01

    Diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) such as alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid are associated with decreased incidence and severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD). At least some of the beneficial effects of these dietary fatty acids are mediated by metabolites such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, thromboxanes, and resolvins. The effects of n-3 PUFAs often differ from those of other fatty acids with very similar structures, such as linoleic acid and arachidonic acid (n-6 PUFAs) and their corresponding metabolites. This article reviews the evidence that specific receptors exist for fatty acids or their metabolites that are able to regulate gene expression and coordinately affect metabolic or signaling pathways associated with CVD. Four nuclear receptor subfamilies that respond to dietary and endogenous ligands and have implications for CVD are emphasized in this article: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, retinoid X receptors, liver X receptors, and the farnesoid X receptor.

  13. BPhyOG: An interactive server for genome-wide inference of bacterial phylogenies based on overlapping genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Kui

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes (OGs in bacterial genomes are pairs of adjacent genes of which the coding sequences overlap partly or entirely. With the rapid accumulation of sequence data, many OGs in bacterial genomes have now been identified. Indeed, these might prove a consistent feature across all microbial genomes. Our previous work suggests that OGs can be considered as robust markers at the whole genome level for the construction of phylogenies. An online, interactive web server for inferring phylogenies is needed for biologists to analyze phylogenetic relationships among a set of bacterial genomes of interest. Description BPhyOG is an online interactive server for reconstructing the phylogenies of completely sequenced bacterial genomes on the basis of their shared overlapping genes. It provides two tree-reconstruction methods: Neighbor Joining (NJ and Unweighted Pair-Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA. Users can apply the desired method to generate phylogenetic trees, which are based on an evolutionary distance matrix for the selected genomes. The distance between two genomes is defined by the normalized number of their shared OG pairs. BPhyOG also allows users to browse the OGs that were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships. It provides detailed annotation for each OG pair and the features of the component genes through hyperlinks. Users can also retrieve each of the homologous OG pairs that have been determined among 177 genomes. It is a useful tool for analyzing the tree of life and overlapping genes from a genomic standpoint. Conclusion BPhyOG is a useful interactive web server for genome-wide inference of any potential evolutionary relationship among the genomes selected by users. It currently includes 177 completely sequenced bacterial genomes containing 79,855 OG pairs, the annotation and homologous OG pairs of which are integrated comprehensively. The reliability of phylogenies complemented by

  14. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple. The purpose of the present study was to quantify rootstock-mediated differences in scion fire blight susceptibility and to identify transcripts in the scion whose expression levels correlated with this response. Results Rootstock influence on scion fire blight resistance was quantified by inoculating three-year old, orchard-grown apple trees, consisting of 'Gala' scions grafted to a range of rootstocks, with E. amylovora. Disease severity was measured by the extent of shoot necrosis over time. 'Gala' scions grafted to G.30 or MM.111 rootstocks showed the lowest rates of necrosis, while 'Gala' on M.27 and B.9 showed the highest rates of necrosis. 'Gala' scions on M.7, S.4 or M.9F56 had intermediate necrosis rates. Using an apple DNA microarray representing 55,230 unique transcripts, gene expression patterns were compared in healthy, un-inoculated, greenhouse-grown 'Gala' scions on the same series of rootstocks. We identified 690 transcripts whose steady-state expression levels correlated with the degree of fire blight susceptibility of the scion/rootstock combinations. Transcripts known to be differentially expressed during E. amylovora infection were disproportionately represented among these transcripts. A second-generation apple microarray representing 26,000 transcripts was developed and was used to test these correlations in an orchard-grown population of trees segregating for fire blight resistance. Of the 690 transcripts originally identified using the first-generation array, 39 had expression levels that correlated with fire blight resistance in the breeding population. Conclusions Rootstocks had significant effects on the fire blight

  15. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  16. Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Heitzer, Armin; Digrazia, Philip M.

    1991-01-01

    An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has shown great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. This technique was used to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene and toluene/xylene degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed.

  17. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V

    2014-01-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? While bacteria display a myriad of morphologies 1 , the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk 2,3 . The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct sub-cellul...

  18. Piperine metabolically regulates peritoneal resident macrophages to potentiate their functions against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Xu, Li-Hui; Huang, Mei-Yun; Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Hou, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zi-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-10-20

    Pepper, a daily-used seasoning for promoting appetite, is widely used in folk medicine for treating gastrointestinal diseases. Piperine is the major alkaloid in pepper and possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the mechanism for linking metabolic and medicinal activities of piperine remains unknown. Here we report that piperine robustly boosts mTORC1 activity by recruiting more system L1 amino acid transporter (SLC7A5/SLC3A2) to the cell membrane, thus promoting amino acid metabolism. Piperine-induced increase of mTORC1 activity in resident peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs) is correlated with enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α upon LPS stimulation. Such an enhancement of cytokine production could be abrogated by inhibitors of the mTOR signaling pathway, indicating mTOR's action in this process. Moreover, piperine treatment protected resident pMΦs from bacterium-induced apoptosis and disappearance, and increased their bacterial phagocytic ability. Consequently, piperine administration conferred mice resistance against bacterial infection and even sepsis. Our data highlight that piperine has the capacity to metabolically reprogram peritoneal resident macrophages to fortify their innate functions against bacterial infection.

  19. [Regulation pattern of the FRUITFULL (FUL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tingting; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2010-11-01

    FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box gene that functions early in controlling flowering time, meristem identity and cauline leaf morphology and later in carpel and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to clarify the regulation of FUL expression the upstream regulatory region, -2148 bp - +96 bp and the first intron of the FUL gene were cloned, and vectors with a series of deletion of FUL promoter, and the ones fused with the first intron were constructed. Vectors harboring the fusion of cis-acting elements with the constitutive promoters of TUBULIN and ACTIN were also constructed. Beta-Glucuronidase activity assays of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that two cis-elements were involved in the repression of FUL expression, with one of the two being probably the binding site of the transcriptional factor AP1. And the two CArG boxes played a important role in FUL initiation particularly. Furthermore, the first intron of FUL was shown to participate in the development of carpel and stamen as an enhancer.

  20. Ingested plant miRNAs regulate gene expression in animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hervé Vaucheret; Yves Chupeau

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of genetic material or epigenetic information transferred from one organism to another is an important biological question.A recent study demonstrated that plant small RNAs acquired orally through food intake directly influence gene expression in animals after migration through the plasma and delivery to specific organs.Non-protein coding RNAs,and in particular small RNAs,were recently revealed as master chief regulators of gene expression in all organisms.Endogenous small RNAs come in different flavors,depending on their mode of biogenesis.Most microRNAs (miRNA)and short interferring RNAs (siRNA)derive from long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors that are processed into small RNA duplexes,20 to 25-nt long,by RNaselll enzymes called Dicer [1].One strand of small RNA duplexes is loaded onto an Argonaute protein that executes silencing by cleaving or repressing the translation of homologous mRNA [2].In certain species,RNA cleavage is followed by DNA methylation and/or histone modification,leading to heritable epigenetic modification [3].

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  2. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bettencourt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterized by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio strains. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as an irrelevant bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from animals dissected at 12 h and 24 h post-infection times by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h and 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the microorganism species inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly around a protein area, of 18 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarities were found. Multivariate

  3. Cloning and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of the bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitor tirandamycin from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO1666.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xuhua; Wang, Zhongwen; Wang, Bo; Ma, Junying; Huang, Hongbo; Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si; Zhang, Changsheng; Ju, Jianhua

    2011-03-18

    Tirandamycins are bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitors holding great potential for antibacterial agent design. To elucidate the biosynthetic machinery and generate new derivatives, the tirandamycin biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned and sequenced from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO1666. The biosynthetic gene cluster of tirandamycin spans a DNA region of ∼56kb and consists of 15 open reading frames (ORFs) which encode three type I polyketide synthases (TrdAI, AII, AIII), one non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (TrdD), one phosphopantetheinyl transferase (TrdM), one Type II thioesterase (TrdB), one FAD-dependent oxidoreductase (TrdL), one cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (TrdI), three proteins related to resistance and regulations (TrdHJK), and four proteins with unknown function (TrdCEFG). To investigate the roles of the genes played in the biosynthetic machinery, seven genes (trdAI and trdBDFHIK) were inactivated via in frame replacement with an apramycin gene cassette using λ-RED recombination technology. The ΔtrdAI and ΔtrdD mutants targeting the ketosynthase and adenylation domain of TrdAI and TrdD, respectively, abolished the production of tirandamycins, confirming their involvement in the tirandamycin biosynthesis. TrdH showed high homology to LuxR family transcriptional regulatory proteins, disruption of which abolished the production of tirandamycins, indicating that TrdH is a positive regulator for tirandamycin biosynthesis. On the other hand, TrdK showed high homology to TetR-family transcriptional regulatory proteins, disruption of which significantly increased the yields of tirandamycins almost one-fold, implicating that TrdK is a negative regulator for tirandamycin biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene trdI resulted in the accumulation of the intermediate tirandamycin C (3) and a trace amount of new product tirandamycin C2 (5). A model of tirandamycin biosynthesis was proposed based on bioinformatics analyses, gene inactivation experiments and

  4. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-09-24

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  5. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  6. Orthogonal Cas9 proteins for RNA-guided gene regulation and editing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Esvelt, Kevin; Mali, Prashant

    2017-03-07

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including use of multiple orthogonal Cas9 proteins to simultaneously and independently regulate corresponding genes or simultaneously and independently edit corresponding genes.

  7. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community composition in a river influenced by a wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Marti

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance represents a global health problem, requiring better understanding of the ecology of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs, their selection and their spread in the environment. Antibiotics are constantly released to the environment through wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluents. We investigated, therefore, the effect of these discharges on the prevalence of ARGs and bacterial community composition in biofilm and sediment samples of a receiving river. We used culture-independent approaches such as quantitative PCR to determine the prevalence of eleven ARGs and 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing to examine the composition of bacterial communities. Concentration of antibiotics in WWTP influent and effluent were also determined. ARGs such as qnrS, bla TEM, bla CTX-M, bla SHV, erm(B, sul(I, sul(II, tet(O and tet(W were detected in all biofilm and sediment samples analyzed. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the relative abundance of ARGs in biofilm samples collected downstream of the WWTP discharge. We also found significant differences with respect to community structure and composition between upstream and downstream samples. Therefore, our results indicate that WWTP discharges may contribute to the spread of ARGs into the environment and may also impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving river.

  8. Fate of tetracycline, sulfonamide and fluoroquinolone resistance genes and the changes in bacterial diversity during composting of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Xu, Delin; Zhao, Zhenyong; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2012-12-01

    This study monitored the abundance of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) and the bacterial diversity during composting of swine manure spiked with chlortetracycline, sulfadiazine and ciprofloxacin at two different levels and a control without antibiotics. Resistance genes of tetracycline (tetQ, tetW, tetC, tetG, tetZ and tetY), sulfonamide (sul1, sul2, dfrA1 and dfrA7) and fluoroquinolone (gyrA and parC) represented 0.02-1.91%, 0.67-10.28% and 0.00005-0.0002%, respectively, of the total 16S rDNA copies in the initial composting mass. After 28-42 days of composting, these ARGs, except parC, were undetectable in the composting mass indicating that composting is a potential method of manure management. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of bacterial 16S rDNA of the composting mass indicated that the addition of antibiotics up to 100, 20 and 20mg/kg of chlortetracycline, sulfadiazine and ciprofloxacin, respectively, elicited only a transient perturbation and the bacterial diversity was restored in due course of composting.

  9. HrpA, a DEAH-box RNA helicase, is involved in global gene regulation in the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan Salman-Dilgimen

    Full Text Available Spirochetes causing Lyme borreliosis are obligate parasites that can only be found in a tick vector or a vertebrate host. The ability to survive in these two disparate environments requires up and downregulation of specific genes by regulatory circuits that remain largely obscure. In this work on the Lyme spirochete, B. burgdorferi, we show that a disruption of the hrpA gene, which encodes a putative RNA helicase, results in a complete loss in the ability of the spirochetes to infect mice by needle inoculation. Studies of protein expression in culture by 2D gels revealed a change in the expression of 33 proteins in hrpA clones relative to the wild-type parent. Quantitative characterization of protein expression by iTRAQ analysis revealed a total of 187 differentially regulated proteins in an hrpA background: 90 downregulated and 97 upregulated. Forty-two of the 90 downregulated and 65 of the 97 upregulated proteins are not regulated under any conditions by the previously reported regulators in B. burgdorferi (bosR, rrp2, rpoN, rpoS or rrp1. Downregulated and upregulated proteins also fell into distinct functional categories. We conclude that HrpA is part of a new and distinct global regulatory pathway in B. burgdorferi gene expression. Because an HrpA orthologue is present in many bacteria, its participation in global regulation in B. burgdorferi may have relevance in other bacterial species where its function remains obscure. We believe this to be the first report of a role for an RNA helicase in a global regulatory pathway in bacteria. This finding is particularly timely with the recent growth of the field of RNA regulation of gene expression and the ability of RNA helicases to modulate RNA structure and function.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B., E-mail: Sanne.Hermsen@rivm.nl [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pronk, Tessa E. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den [Centre for Environmental Quality, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ven, Leo T.M. van der [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  11. Development of Gene-Pyramid Lines of the Elite Restorer Line, RPHR-1005 Possessing Durable Bacterial Blight and Blast Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash Kumar, V; Balachiranjeevi, C H; Bhaskar Naik, S; Rambabu, R; Rekha, G; Harika, G; Hajira, S K; Pranathi, K; Anila, M; Kousik, M; Vijay Kumar, S; Yugander, A; Aruna, J; Dilip Kumar, T; Vijaya Sudhakara Rao, K; Hari Prasad, A S; Madhav, M S; Laha, G S; Balachandran, S M; Prasad, M S; Viraktamath, B C; Ravindra Babu, V; Sundaram, R M

    2016-01-01

    RPHR-1005, the stable restorer line of the popular medium slender (MS) grain type rice hybrid, DRRH-3 was improved in this study for resistance against bacterial blight (BB) and blast diseases through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). In this study, four major resistance genes (i.e., Xa21 and Xa33 for BB resistance and Pi2 and Pi54 for blast resistance) have been transferred to RPHR-1005 using RPBio Patho-1 (possessing Xa21 + Pi2), RPBio Patho-2 (possessing Xa21 + Pi54) and FBR1-15EM (possessing Xa33) as the donors. Foreground selection was carried out using PCR-based molecular markers specific for the target resistance genes and the major fertility restorer genes, Rf3 and Rf4, while background selection was carried out using a set of parental polymorphic rice SSR markers and backcrossing was continued uptoBC2 generation. At BC2F2, plants possessing the gene combination- Xa21 + Pi2, Xa21 + Pi54 and Xa33 in homozygous condition and with >92% recovery of the recurrent parent genome (RPG) were identified and intercrossed to combine all the four resistance genes. Twenty-two homozygous, pyramid lines of RPHR-1005 comprising of three single-gene containing lines, six 2-gene containing lines, eight 3-gene containing lines, and five 4-gene containing lines were identified among the double intercross lines at F3 generation (DICF3). They were then evaluated for their resistance against BB and blast, fertility restoration ability and for key agro-morphological traits. While single gene containing lines were resistant to either BB or blast, the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene pyramid lines showed good level of resistance against both and/or either of the two diseases. Most of the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene containing pyramid lines showed yield levels and other key agro-morphological and grain quality traits comparable to the original recurrent parent and showed complete fertility restoration ability, with a few showing higher yield as compared to RPHR-1005. Further, the

  12. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. Arbeitman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation.

  13. Two adjacent and similar TetR family transcriptional regulator genes, SAV577 and SAV576, co-regulate avermectin production in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis is an important bacterial species used for industrial production of avermectins, a family of broad-spectrum anthelmintic agents. We previously identified the protein SAV576, a TetR family transcriptional regulator (TFR), as a downregulator of avermectin biosynthesis that acts by controlling transcription of its major target gene SAV575 (which encodes cytochrome P450/NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase) and ave genes. SAV577, another TFR gene, encodes a SAV577 protein that displays high amino acid homology with SAV576. In this study, we examined the effect of SAV577 on avermectin production and the relationships between SAV576 and SAV577. SAV577 downregulated avermectin biosynthesis indirectly, similarly to SAV576. SAV576 and SAV577 both directly repressed SAV575 transcription, and reciprocally repressed each other's expression. SAV575 transcription levels in various S. avermitilis strains were correlated with avermectin production levels. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that SAV576 and SAV577 compete for the same binding regions, and that DNA-binding affinity of SAV576 is much stronger than that of SAV577. GST pull-down assays revealed no direct interaction between the two proteins. Taken together, these findings suggest that SAV577 regulates avermectin production in S. avermitilis by a mechanism similar to that of SAV576, and that the role of SAV576 is dominant over that of SAV577. This is the first report of two adjacent and similar TFR genes that co-regulate antibiotic production in Streptomyces.

  14. Two adjacent and similar TetR family transcriptional regulator genes, SAV577 and SAV576, co-regulate avermectin production in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Guo

    Full Text Available Streptomyces avermitilis is an important bacterial species used for industrial production of avermectins, a family of broad-spectrum anthelmintic agents. We previously identified the protein SAV576, a TetR family transcriptional regulator (TFR, as a downregulator of avermectin biosynthesis that acts by controlling transcription of its major target gene SAV575 (which encodes cytochrome P450/NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase and ave genes. SAV577, another TFR gene, encodes a SAV577 protein that displays high amino acid homology with SAV576. In this study, we examined the effect of SAV577 on avermectin production and the relationships between SAV576 and SAV577. SAV577 downregulated avermectin biosynthesis indirectly, similarly to SAV576. SAV576 and SAV577 both directly repressed SAV575 transcription, and reciprocally repressed each other's expression. SAV575 transcription levels in various S. avermitilis strains were correlated with avermectin production levels. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that SAV576 and SAV577 compete for the same binding regions, and that DNA-binding affinity of SAV576 is much stronger than that of SAV577. GST pull-down assays revealed no direct interaction between the two proteins. Taken together, these findings suggest that SAV577 regulates avermectin production in S. avermitilis by a mechanism similar to that of SAV576, and that the role of SAV576 is dominant over that of SAV577. This is the first report of two adjacent and similar TFR genes that co-regulate antibiotic production in Streptomyces.

  15. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes.

  16. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  17. Identification of up-regulated genes in human uterine leiomyoma by suppression subtractive hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In searching for differentially expressed genes in human uterine leiomyomas (ULs), suppression sub-tractive hybridization was used to construct an UL up-regulated library, which turned out to represent 88genes. After two rounds of screening by reverse Northern analysis, twenty genes were proved to be up-regulated, including seventeen known genes and three genes with unknown function. All these genes werefirstly associated with UL. Three genes with notable difference were selected for Northern confirmationOur results proved the authenticity of the twenty genes. One gene named Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) showedup-regulation in 4/6 of the patients and investigation of tissue distribution indicated that it had obviousexpression in prostate, testis, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.

  18. From Gene Regulation to Gene Function: Regulatory Networks in Bacillus Subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Moszer

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis is a sporulating Gram-positive bacterium that lives primarily in the soil and associated water sources. The publication of the B. subtilis genome sequence and subsequent systematic functional analysis and gene regulation programmes, together with an extensive understanding of its biochemistry and physiology, makes this micro-organism a prime candidate in which to model regulatory networks in silico. In this paper we discuss combined molecular biological and bioinformatical approaches that are being developed to model this organism’s responses to changes in its environment.

  19. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  20. ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling, but is not required for bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Liu, Jinghua

    2010-05-15

    Activation of TLR signaling is critical for host innate immunity against bacterial infection. Previous studies reported that the ST2 receptor, a member of the Toll\\/IL-1 receptor superfamily, functions as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling and maintains LPS tolerance. However, it is undetermined whether ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling and furthermore, whether a TLR2 agonist, bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance is dependent on ST2. In this study, we show that BLP stimulation-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and immunocomplex formation of TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) were significantly enhanced in ST2-deficient macrophages compared with those in wild-type controls. Furthermore, overexpression of ST2 dose-dependently attenuated BLP-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting a negative regulatory role of ST2 in TLR2 signaling. A moderate but significantly attenuated production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on a second BLP stimulation was observed in BLP-pretreated, ST2-deficient macrophages, which is associated with substantially reduced IRAK-1 protein expression and downregulated TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation. ST2-deficient mice, when pretreated with a nonlethal dose of BLP, benefitted from an improved survival against a subsequent lethal BLP challenge, indicating BLP tolerance develops in the absence of the ST2 receptor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ST2 acts as a negative regulator of TLR2 signaling, but is not required for BLP-induced tolerance.

  1. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs(tRNAs) hold a central place in protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein,thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules.In recent years,however,various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond participating in protein synthesis.When suffering from certain nutritional stresses,tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged,and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression,so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses.In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells,the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs.On the other hand,this retrograde action effectively reduces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation.Quite recently,various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense.Under certain physiological or environmental stresses,they are specifically cleaved into fragments of different lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm.These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon.Instead,a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced,which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression.Investigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier,which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic information.

  2. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; ZHOU Hui

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) hold a central place In protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein, thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules. In recent years, however, various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond par-ticipating in protein synthesis. When suffering from certain nutritional stresses, tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged, and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression, so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses. In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells, the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs. On the other hand, this retrograde action effectively re-duces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation. Quite recently, various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense. Under certain physiological or environmental stresses, they are specifically cleaved into fragments of differ-ent lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm. These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon. Instead, a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced, which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression. Inves-tigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier, which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic informa-tion.

  3. First report on the bacterial diversity in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) by using 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Honghai; Liu, Guangshuai; Sha, Weilai

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial community in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) based on the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Fecal samples were collected from five healthy unrelated dholes captured from Qilian Mountain in Gansu province of China. The diversity of the fecal bacteria community was investigated by constructing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene clone library. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified by using universal bacterial primers 27F and 1492R. A total of 275 chimera-free near full length 16S rRNA gene sequences were collected, and 78 non-redundant bacteria phylotypes (operational taxonomical units, OTUs) were identified according to the 97 % sequence similarity. Forty-two OTUs (53.8 %) showed less than 98 % sequence similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequences reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that dhole bacterial community comprised five different phyla, with the majority of sequences being classified within the phylum Bacteroidetes (64.7 %), followed by Firmicutes (29.8 %), Fusobacteria (4.7 %),Proteobacteria (0.4 %), and Actinobacteria (0.4 %). The only order Bacteroidales in phylum Bacteroidetes was the most abundant bacterial group in the intestinal bacterial community of dholes. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the two most diverse bacterial phyla with 46.2 and 44.9 % of OTUs contained, respectively. Bacteroidales and Clostridiales were the two most diverse bacterial orders that contained 44.9 and 39.7 % of OTUs, respectively.

  4. Expression cloning of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes by histochemical screening of genomic libraries onto an indicator medium containing phenolphthalein diphosphate and methyl green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M L; Rossolini, G M; Lombardi, G; Chiesurin, A; Satta, G

    1997-02-01

    A system for expression cloning of bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes has been developed, and its potential has been investigated. The system is based on histochemical screening of bacterial genomic libraries, constructed in an Escherichia coli multicopy plasmid vector, for phosphatase-producing clones using an indicator medium (named TPMG) made of Tryptose-Phosphate agar supplemented with the phosphatase substrate phenolphthalein diphosphate and the stain methyl green. To test the performance of this system, three genomic libraries were constructed from bacterial strains of different species which showed different patterns of phosphatase activity, and were screened using the TPMG medium. Following a partial screening, three different phosphatase-encoding genes (respectively encoding a class A non-specific acid phosphatase, an acid-hexose phosphatase and a non-specific alkaline phosphatase) were shotgun-cloned from the above libraries, indicating that the TPMG-based expression cloning system can be useful for rapid isolation of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes.

  5. Differential regulation of two period genes in the Xenopus eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, M; Wang, Y; Steenhard, B M; Besharse, J C

    2000-10-20

    The recent identification and analysis of mammalian homologues of the well characterized Drosophila circadian clock gene, Period (Per), has led to the idea that key features of vertebrate circadian rhythmicity are conserved at the molecular level. The Xenopus laevis retina contains a circadian clock mechanism that can be studied in vitro. To study the rhythmic expression of Per in the Xenopus retina, we used a degenerate RT-PCR strategy to obtain cDNA clones covering the entire 1427 amino acid coding region of a Xenopus homologue of Per2 and a partial cDNA sequence for a Xenopus homologue of Per1. Northern blot analysis shows that xPer1 and xPer2 transcripts are expressed most abundantly in the eye and the brain. However, rhythmic expression of xPer2 transcripts in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is light dependent and occurs only under 12 h light/12 h dark (LD) conditions, not in constant dark (DD). In contrast, xPer1 mRNA accumulation is rhythmic under both LD and DD conditions. Light dependent regulation of xPer2 mRNA and circadian regulation of xPer1 mRNA in the Xenopus retina differs from that in Drosophila and mammals. Light dependence of xPer2 mRNA levels and the offset phase relationship of the xPer2 rhythm to that for xPer1 suggests a role for xPer2 in circadian entrainment.

  6. The Change-Over of Yin-yang and Gene Regulation in Kidney Deficiency Syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fei-xia; HE Li-qun

    2009-01-01

    The present paper studies gene regulation in kidney deficiency syndromes from the simple Nephrotic Syndrome and with the principle of positive-negative regulation to control the change-over ofyin-yang, the modern molecular biological techniques can be used, such as gene chip, representational difference analysis (RDA) and gene sequence analysis, so as to investigate the inner relationship between the genes and kidney deficiency syndromes and prove the effect given by these genes on the pathophysiological status of change-over ofyin-yang in kidney deficiency syndromes.This philosophical approach and method can also be adopted for studies of the related genes in other TCM syndromes.

  7. The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility genes NOD1 and NOD2 have conserved anti-bacterial roles in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan H. Oehlers

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, in the form of Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, is a debilitating chronic immune disorder of the intestine. A complex etiology resulting from dysfunctional interactions between the intestinal immune system and its microflora, influenced by host genetic susceptibility, makes disease modeling challenging. Mutations in NOD2 have the highest disease-specific risk association for CD, and a related gene, NOD1, is associated with UC. NOD1 and NOD2 encode intracellular bacterial sensor proteins acting as innate immune triggers, and represent promising therapeutic targets. The zebrafish has the potential to aid in modeling genetic and environmental aspects of IBD pathogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of the Nod signaling components in the zebrafish larval intestine. The nod1 and nod2 genes are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and neutrophils together with the Nod signaling pathway genes ripk2, a20, aamp, cd147, centaurin b1, erbin and grim-19. Using a zebrafish embryo Salmonella infection model, morpholino-mediated depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 reduced the ability of embryos to control systemic infection. Depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 decreased expression of dual oxidase in the intestinal epithelium and impaired the ability of larvae to reduce intracellular bacterial burden. This work highlights the potential use of zebrafish larvae in the study of components of IBD pathogenesis.

  8. The presence of the putative Gardnerella vaginalis sialidase A gene in vaginal specimens is associated with bacterial vaginosis biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespers, Vicky; Van den Bulck, Magelien; Buyze, Jozefien; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a difficult-to-treat recurrent condition in which health-associated lactobacilli are outnumbered by other anaerobic bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis. Certain genotypes of G. vaginalis can produce sialidase, while others cannot. Sialidase is known to facilitate the destruction of the protective mucus layer on the vaginal epithelium by hydrolysis of sialic acid on the glycans of mucous membranes. This process possibly facilitates adhesion of bacterial cells on the epithelium since it has been linked with the development of biofilm in other pathogenic conditions. Although it has not been demonstrated yet, it is probable that G. vaginalis benefits from this mechanism by attaching to the vaginal epithelium to initiate biofilm development. In this study, using vaginal specimens of 120 women enrolled in the Ring Plus study, we assessed the association between the putative G. vaginalis sialidase A gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the diagnosis of BV according to Nugent score, and the occurrence of a BV-associated biofilm dominated by G. vaginalis by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). We detected the putative sialidase A gene in 75% of the G. vaginalis-positive vaginal specimens and found a strong association (p<0.001) between the presence of a G. vaginalis biofilm, the diagnosis of BV according to Nugent and the detection of high loads of the G. vaginalis sialidase A gene in the vaginal specimens. These results could redefine diagnosis of BV, and in addition might guide research for new treatment. PMID:28241058

  9. Genome Analysis of a Zygomycete Fungus Choanephora cucurbitarum Elucidates Necrotrophic Features Including Bacterial Genes Related to Plant Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byoungnam; Park, Ji-Hyun; Park, Hongjae; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Choi, In-Geol

    2017-01-01

    A zygomycete fungus, Choanephora cucurbitarum is a plant pathogen that causes blossom rot in cucurbits and other plants. Here we report the genome sequence of Choanephora cucurbitarum KUS-F28377 isolated from squash. The assembled genome has a size of 29.1 Mbp and 11,977 protein-coding genes. The genome analysis indicated that C. cucurbitarum may employ a plant pathogenic mechanism similar to that of bacterial plant pathogens. The genome contained 11 genes with a Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor-like domain, which plays an important role in the defense against plant immunity. This domain has been found only in bacterial genomes. Carbohydrate active enzyme analysis detected 312 CAZymes in this genome where carbohydrate esterase family 6, rarely found in dikaryotic fungal genomes, was comparatively enriched. The comparative genome analysis showed that the genes related to sexual communication such as the biosynthesis of β-carotene and trisporic acid were conserved and diverged during the evolution of zygomycete genomes. Overall, these findings will help us to understand how zygomycetes are associated with plants. PMID:28091548

  10. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  11. Inactivation, complementation, and heterologous expression of encP, a novel bacterial phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longkuan; Moore, Bradley S

    2002-09-06

    The enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, which catalyzes the nonoxidative deamination of l-phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid, is ubiquitously distributed in plants. We now report its characterization for the first time in a bacterium. The phenylalanine ammonia-lyase homologous gene encP from the "Streptomyces maritimus" enterocin biosynthetic gene cluster was functionally characterized and shown to encode the first enzyme in the pathway to the enterocin polyketide synthase starter unit benzoyl-coenzyme A. The disruption of the encP gene completely inhibited the production of cinnamate and enterocin, whereas complementation of the mutant with benzoyl-coenzyme A pathway intermediates or with the wild-type gene encP restored the formation of the benzoate-primed polyketide antibiotic enterocin. Heterologous expression of the encP gene under the control of the ermE* promoter in Streptomyces coelicolor furthermore led to the production of cinnamic acid in the fermented cultures, confirming that the encP gene indeed encodes a novel bacterial phenylalanine ammonia-lyase.

  12. Identification of self-consistent modulons from bacterial microarray expression data with the help of structured regulon gene sets

    KAUST Repository

    Permina, Elizaveta A.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of bacterial modulons from series of gene expression measurements on microarrays is a principal problem, especially relevant for inadequately studied but practically important species. Usage of a priori information on regulatory interactions helps to evaluate parameters for regulatory subnetwork inference. We suggest a procedure for modulon construction where a seed regulon is iteratively updated with genes having expression patterns similar to those for regulon member genes. A set of genes essential for a regulon is used to control modulon updating. Essential genes for a regulon were selected as a subset of regulon genes highly related by different measures to each other. Using Escherichia coli as a model, we studied how modulon identification depends on the data, including the microarray experiments set, the adopted relevance measure and the regulon itself. We have found that results of modulon identification are highly dependent on all parameters studied and thus the resulting modulon varies substantially depending on the identification procedure. Yet, modulons that were identified correctly displayed higher stability during iterations, which allows developing a procedure for reliable modulon identification in the case of less studied species where the known regulatory interactions are sparse. Copyright © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  13. Role of Hfq in iron-dependent and -independent gene regulation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, J R; McClure, Ryan; Lopez, Delia; Green, Olivia; Reinhard, Bjorn; Genco, Caroline

    2010-08-01

    In Neisseria meningitidis, iron-responsive gene regulation is mediated primarily by the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein. When complexed with iron, Fur represses gene expression by preventing transcription initiation. Fur can also indirectly activate gene expression via the repression of regulatory small RNAs (sRNA). One such Fur- and iron-regulated sRNA, NrrF, was previously identified in N. meningitidis and shown to repress expression of the sdhA and sdhC genes encoding subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex. In the majority of Gram-negative bacteria, sRNA-mediated regulation requires a cofactor RNA-binding protein (Hfq) for proper gene regulation and stabilization. In this study, we examined the role of Hfq in NrrF-mediated regulation of the succinate dehydrogenase genes in N. meningitidis and the effect of an hfq mutation on iron-responsive gene regulation more broadly. We first demonstrated that the stability of NrrF, as well as the regulation of sdhC and sdhA in vivo, was unaltered in the hfq mutant. Secondly, we established that iron-responsive gene regulation of the Fur-regulated sodB gene was dependent on Hfq. Finally, we demonstrated that in N. meningitidis, Hfq functions in a global manner to control expression of many ORFs and intergenic regions via iron-independent mechanisms. Collectively these studies demonstrate that in N. meningitidis, iron- and NrrF-mediated regulation of sdhC and sdhA can occur independently of Hfq, although Hfq functions more globally to control regulation of other N. meningitidis genes primarily by iron-independent mechanisms.

  14. Tagging RAPD markers to a bacterial blight resistance gene in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The somaclonal mutant HX_3 has shown a broad spectrum resistance to bacterial blight. To study the inheritance of the bacterial blight resistance in HX_3, a cross was made between HX_3 and a susceptible cultivar Longtefu A. The F2 population of 418 plants was inoculated with Chinese bacterial blight strain Zhe 173 (pathotype Ⅳ ). Results showed that the F2 progenies segregated in a ratio of 3R∶ 1S (324 resistant plants and 94 susceptible plants). From the plants tested, 114 individuals (86 resistant and 28 susceptible) were chosen randomly for RAPD analysis. Twelve highly resistant and 12 highly susceptible plants were selected to form a resistant pool and a susceptible pool, respectively.

  15. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a non-culture method of defining the specific bacterial etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li-Ping; Bian, Long-Yan; Xu, Min; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired respiratory tract infection following tracheal intubation. The most common hospital-acquired infection among patients with acute respiratory failure, VAP is associated with a mortality rate of 20-30%. The standard bacterial culture method for identifying the etiology of VAP is not specific, timely, or accurate in identifying the bacterial pathogens. This study used 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing to identify and quantify the pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract and oropharyngeal samples of 55 VAP patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has served as a valuable tool in bacterial identification, particularly when other biochemical, molecular, or phenotypic identification techniques fail. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed in parallel with the standard bacterial culture method to identify and quantify bacteria present in the collected patient samples. Sequence analysis showed the colonization of multidrug-resistant strains in VAP secretions. Further, this method identified Prevotella, Proteus, Aquabacter, and Sphingomonas bacterial genera that were not detected by the standard bacterial culture method. Seven categories of bacteria, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, were detectable by both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and standard bacterial culture methods. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a significantly higher sensitivity in detecting Streptococcus and Pseudomonas when compared to standard bacterial culture. Together, these data present 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a novel VAP diagnosis tool that will further enable pathogen-specific treatment of VAP.