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Sample records for bacterial enhancer binding

  1. Dissecting the ATP hydrolysis pathway of bacterial enhancer-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Daniel; Joly, Nicolas; Pape, Tillmann; Rappas, Mathieu; Schumacher, Jorg; Buck, Martin; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2008-02-01

    bEBPs (bacterial enhancer-binding proteins) are AAA+ (ATPase associated with various cellular activities) transcription activators that activate gene transcription through a specific bacterial sigma factor, sigma(54). Sigma(54)-RNAP (RNA polymerase) binds to promoter DNA sites and forms a stable closed complex, unable to proceed to transcription. The closed complex must be remodelled using energy from ATP hydrolysis provided by bEBPs to melt DNA and initiate transcription. Recently, large amounts of structural and biochemical data have produced insights into how ATP hydrolysis within the active site of bEBPs is coupled to the re-modelling of the closed complex. In the present article, we review some of the key nucleotides, mutations and techniques used and how they have contributed towards our understanding of the function of bEBPs.

  2. Functional roles of the pre-sensor I insertion sequence in an AAA+ bacterial enhancer binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Patricia C; Schumacher, Jörg; Amartey, Samuel; Ghosh, Tamaswati; Burgis, Timothy A; Zhang, Xiaodong; Nixon, B Tracy; Buck, Martin

    2009-08-01

    Molecular machines belonging to the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases use NTP hydrolysis to remodel their versatile substrates. The presence of an insertion sequence defines the major phylogenetic pre-sensor I insertion (pre-SIi) AAA+ superclade. In the bacterial sigma(54)-dependent enhancer binding protein phage shock protein F (PspF) the pre-SIi loop adopts different conformations depending on the nucleotide-bound state. Single amino acid substitutions within the dynamic pre-SIi loop of PspF drastically change the ATP hydrolysis parameters, indicating a structural link to the distant hydrolysis site. We used a site-specific protein-DNA proximity assay to measure the contribution of the pre-SIi loop in sigma(54)-dependent transcription and demonstrate that the pre-SIi loop is a major structural feature mediating nucleotide state-dependent differential engagement with Esigma(54). We suggest that much, if not all, of the action of the pre-SIi loop is mediated through the L1 loop and relies on a conserved molecular switch, identified in a crystal structure of one pre-SIi variant and in accordance with the high covariance between some pre-SIi residues and distinct residues outside the pre-SIi sequence.

  3. Bacterial mutants for enhanced succinate production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, G.J.E.; Beauprez, J.J.R.; Foulquie, M.M.R.; Heijnen, J.J.; Maertens, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for obtaining enhanced metabolite production in micro-organisms, and to mutants and/or transformants obtained with said method. More particularly, it relates to bacterial mutants and/or transformants for enhanced succinate production, especially mutants and/

  4. Presence of a highly efficient binding to bacterial contamination can distort data from binding studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcar, V.J. (Department of Anatomy, University of Sydney, N.S.W. (Australia))

    1990-12-01

    {sup 3}HGABA at low concentrations (5-10 nM) was bound by what appeared to be a GABA receptor binding site in bacterial contamination originating from a batch of distilled water. Under experimental conditions similar to those usually employed in {sup 3}HGABA binding studies, the apparent binding displayed a very high specific component and a high efficiency in terms of {sup 3}HGABA bound per mg of protein. The binding was blocked by muscimol but not by isoguvacine, SR95531 and nipecotic acid. These characteristics suggest that the presence of such spurious binding in the experiments using 3H-labeled ligands in brain homogenates may not always be very obvious and, moreover, it can result in subtle, but serious, distortions of data from such studies, which may not be immediately recognized.

  5. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  6. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  7. Dispersal networks for enhancing bacterial degradation in heterogeneous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banitz, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.banitz@ufz.de [Department of Ecological Modelling, UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wick, Lukas Y.; Fetzer, Ingo [Department of Environmental Microbiology, UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Frank, Karin [Department of Ecological Modelling, UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Harms, Hauke [Department of Environmental Microbiology, UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Johst, Karin [Department of Ecological Modelling, UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Successful biodegradation of organic soil pollutants depends on their bioavailability to catabolically active microorganisms. In particular, environmental heterogeneities often limit bacterial access to pollutants. Experimental and modelling studies revealed that fungal networks can facilitate bacterial dispersal and may thereby improve pollutant bioavailability. Here, we investigate the influence of such bacterial dispersal networks on biodegradation performance under spatially heterogeneous abiotic conditions using a process-based simulation model. To match typical situations in polluted soils, two types of abiotic conditions are studied: heterogeneous bacterial dispersal conditions and heterogeneous initial resource distributions. The model predicts that networks facilitating bacterial dispersal can enhance biodegradation performance for a wide range of these conditions. Additionally, the time horizon over which this performance is assessed and the network's spatial configuration are key factors determining the degree of biodegradation improvement. Our results support the idea of stimulating the establishment of fungal mycelia for enhanced bioremediation of polluted soils. - Highlights: > Bacterial dispersal networks can considerably improve biodegradation performance. > They facilitate bacterial access to dispersal-limited areas and remote resources. > Abiotic conditions, time horizon and network structure govern the improvements. > Stimulating the establishment of fungal mycelia promises enhanced soil remediation. - Simulation modelling demonstrates that fungus-mediated bacterial dispersal can considerably improve the bioavailability of organic pollutants under spatially heterogeneous abiotic conditions typical for water-unsaturated soils.

  8. Refined multivalent display of bacterial spore-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Kim, Jenny Morana; Creeger, Yehuda; Armitage, Bruce Alan

    2009-05-07

    A multiple antigen peptide display scaffold was used to create multivalent versions of a heptapeptide selected previously by phage display to bind to Bacillus subtilis spores. A simple flow cytometric assay was developed in which a biotinylated form of the peptide was first bound to fluorescent streptavidin, then the fluorescent streptavidin-peptide complex was bound to spores before introduction into the cytometer. This assay clearly demonstrated that the tetravalent scaffold enhanced the affinity for B. subtilis spores by greater than 1 and 2 orders of magnitude when compared to divalent and monovalent analogues, respectively. However, variations in the number and flexibility of spacer residues within the scaffold did not significantly affect the binding affinity of the tetravalent peptides. Similar to prior reports, these multivalent scaffolds are effective most likely because they mimic the multivalent display of the original peptide library on the phage coat. Moreover, the tetravalent peptides can be readily integrated into a variety of heterogeneous and homogeneous spore-detection assay formats.

  9. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  10. Variations in the binding pocket of an inhibitor of the bacterial division protein FtsZ across genotypes and species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria calls for new approaches to drug-target selection and drug development. Targeting the mechanisms of action of proteins involved in bacterial cell division bypasses problems associated with increasingly ineffective variants of older antibiotics; to this end, the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ is a promising target. Recent work on its allosteric inhibitor, PC190723, revealed in vitro activity on Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ and in vivo antimicrobial activities. However, the mechanism of drug action and its effect on FtsZ in other bacterial species are unclear. Here, we examine the structural environment of the PC190723 binding pocket using PocketFEATURE, a statistical method that scores the similarity between pairs of small-molecule binding sites based on 3D structure information about the local microenvironment, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We observed that species and nucleotide-binding state have significant impacts on the structural properties of the binding site, with substantially disparate microenvironments for bacterial species not from the Staphylococcus genus. Based on PocketFEATURE analysis of MD simulations of S. aureus FtsZ bound to GTP or with mutations that are known to confer PC190723 resistance, we predict that PC190723 strongly prefers to bind Staphylococcus FtsZ in the nucleotide-bound state. Furthermore, MD simulations of an FtsZ dimer indicated that polymerization may enhance PC190723 binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a drug-binding pocket can vary significantly across species, genetic perturbations, and in different polymerization states, yielding important information for the further development of FtsZ inhibitors.

  11. Binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial transformation in relation to DNA transport and competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae (also called Diplococcus pneumoniae) is discussed. This species will serve as a model with which to compare transformation in other bacterial species, particularly Bacillus subtilis and Haemophilus influenzae, with emphasis on the many similarities as well as differences.

  12. Enhancement of anion binding in lanthanide optical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2013-11-19

    In the design of molecular sensors, researchers exploit binding interactions that are usually defined in terms of topology and charge complementarity. The formation of complementary arrays of highly cooperative, noncovalent bonding networks facilitates protein-ligand binding, leading to motifs such as the "lock-and-key". Synthetic molecular sensors often employ metal complexes as key design elements as a way to construct a binding site with the desired shape and charge to achieve target selectivity. In transition metal complexes, coordination number, structure and ligand dynamics are governed primarily by a combination of inner-sphere covalent and outer-sphere noncovalent interactions. These interactions provide a rich variable space that researchers can use to tune structure, stability, and dynamics. In contrast, lanthanide(III)-ligand complex formation and ligand-exchange dynamics are dominated by reversible electrostatic and steric interactions, because the unfilled f shell is shielded by the larger, filled d shell. Luminescent lanthanides such as terbium, europium, dysprosium, and samarium display many photophysical properties that make them excellent candidates for molecular sensor applications. Complexes of lanthanide ions act as receptors that exhibit a detectable change in metal-based luminescence upon binding of an anion. In our work on sensors for detection of dipicolinate, the unique biomarker of bacterial spores, we discovered that the incorporation of an ancillary ligand (AL) can enhance binding constants of target anions to lanthanide ions by as much as two orders of magnitude. In this Account, we show that selected ALs in lanthanide/anion systems greatly improve sensor performance for medical, planetary science, and biodefense applications. We suggest that the observed anion binding enhancement could result from an AL-induced increase in positive charge at the lanthanide ion binding site. This effect depends on lanthanide polarizability, which can be

  13. Localization-enhanced biexciton binding in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    The influence of excitonic localization on the binding energy of biexcitons is investigated for quasi-three-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional AlxGa1-xAs structures. An increase of the biexciton binding energy is observed for localization energies comparable to or larger than the free biexcito...

  14. Fermented liquid feed enhances bacterial diversity in piglet intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Kiyoshi; Ohmori, Hideyuki; Aminov, Rustam I; Kobashi, Yuri; Kawashima, Tomoyuki

    2010-02-01

    Because of limitations imposed on the antibiotic use in animal industry, there is a need for alternatives to maintain the efficiency of production. One of them may be the use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) but how it affects gut ecology is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of three diets, standard dry feed (control), dry feed supplemented with antibiotics, and fermented liquid feed (FLF, fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum), on gut bacterial diversity in piglets. The structure of the ileal and caecal communities was estimated by sequencing the SSU rRNA gene libraries. Antibiotic-supplemented feed slightly increased bacterial diversity in the ileum but reduced it in the caecum while in FLF-fed animals bacterial diversity was elevated. The majority of bacterial sequences in the ileum of all three groups belonged to lactobacilli (92-98%). In the caecum the lactobacilli were still dominant in control and antibiotic-fed animals (59% and 64% of total bacterial sequences, respectively) but in FLF-fed animals they fell to 31% with the concomitant increase in the Firmicutes diversity represented by the Dorea, Coprococcus, Roseburia and Faecalibacterium genera. Thus FLF affects the gut ecology in a different way than antibiotics and contributes to the enhanced bacterial diversity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  16. An AP1 binding site upstream of the kappa immunoglobulin intron enhancer binds inducible factors and contributes to expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanke, J T; Marcuzzi, A; Podzorski, R P; Van Ness, B

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene requires developmental- and tissue-specific regulation by trans-acting factors which interact with two distinct enhancer elements. A new protein-DNA interaction has been identified upstream of the intron enhancer, within the matrix-associated region of the J-C intron. The binding activity is greatly inducible in pre-B cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 but specific complexes are found at all stages of B cell development tested. The footprinted binding site is homologous to the consensus AP1 motif. The protein components of this complex are specifically competed by an AP1 consensus motif and were shown by supershift to include c-Jun and c-Fos, suggesting that this binding site is an AP1 motif and that the Jun and Fos families of transcription factors play a role in the regulation of the kappa light chain gene. Mutation of the AP1 motif in the context of the intron enhancer was shown to decrease enhancer-mediated activation of the promoter in both pre-B cells induced with LPS and constitutive expression in mature B cells. Images PMID:7816634

  17. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  18. Enhanced diffusion of tracer particles in dilute bacterial suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2014-04-28

    Swimming bacteria create long-range velocity fields that stir a large volume of fluid and move around passive particles dispersed in the fluid. Recent experiments and simulations have shown that long-time mean-squared displacement of passive particles in a bath of swimming bacteria exhibits diffusive behaviour with an effective diffusion coefficient significantly larger than its thermal counterpart. A comprehensive theoretical prediction of this effective diffusion coefficient and the understanding of the enhancement mechanism remain a challenge. Here, we adapt the kinetic theory by Lin et al., J. Fluid Mech., 2011, 669, 167 developed for 'squirmers' to the bacterial case to quantitatively predict enhanced diffusivity of tracer particles in dilute two- and three-dimensional suspensions of swimming bacteria. We demonstrate that the effective diffusion coefficient is a product of the bacterial number density, their swimming speed, a geometric factor characterising the velocity field created by a single bacterium, and a numerical factor. We show that the numerical factor is, in fact, a rather strong function of the system parameters, most notably the run length of the bacteria, and that these dependencies have to be taken into account to quantitatively predict the enhanced diffusivity. We perform molecular-dynamics-type simulations to confirm the conclusions of the kinetic theory. Our results are in good agreement with the values of enhanced diffusivity measured in recent two- and three-dimensional experiments.

  19. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  20. Bacterial effector binding to ribosomal protein s3 subverts NF-kappaB function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Gao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteric bacterial pathogens cause food borne disease, which constitutes an enormous economic and health burden. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC causes a severe bloody diarrhea following transmission to humans through various means, including contaminated beef and vegetable products, water, or through contact with animals. EHEC also causes a potentially fatal kidney disease (hemolytic uremic syndrome for which there is no effective treatment or prophylaxis. EHEC and other enteric pathogens (e.g., enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia utilize a type III secretion system (T3SS to inject virulence proteins (effectors into host cells. While it is known that T3SS effectors subvert host cell function to promote diarrheal disease and bacterial transmission, in many cases, the mechanisms by which these effectors bind to host proteins and disrupt the normal function of intestinal epithelial cells have not been completely characterized. In this study, we present evidence that the E. coli O157:H7 nleH1 and nleH2 genes encode T3SS effectors that bind to the human ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3, a subunit of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappaB transcriptional complexes. NleH1 and NleH2 co-localized with RPS3 in the cytoplasm, but not in cell nuclei. The N-terminal region of both NleH1 and NleH2 was required for binding to the N-terminus of RPS3. NleH1 and NleH2 are autophosphorylated Ser/Thr protein kinases, but their binding to RPS3 is independent of kinase activity. NleH1, but not NleH2, reduced the nuclear abundance of RPS3 without altering the p50 or p65 NF-kappaB subunits or affecting the phosphorylation state or abundance of the inhibitory NF-kappaB chaperone IkappaBalpha NleH1 repressed the transcription of a RPS3/NF-kappaB-dependent reporter plasmid, but did not inhibit the transcription of RPS3-independent reporters. In contrast, NleH2 stimulated RPS3-dependent transcription, as well

  1. Mutational analysis of hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, W G; Choudhary, N R; Council, S E; Collins, E J; Leduc, I

    2013-07-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most living organisms. To acquire iron from their environment, Gram-negative bacteria use TonB-dependent transporters that bind host proteins at the bacterial surface and transport iron or heme to the periplasm via the Ton machinery. TonB-dependent transporters are barrel-shaped outer membrane proteins with 22 transmembrane domains, 11 surface-exposed loops, and a plug domain that occludes the pore. To identify key residues of TonB-dependent transporters involved in hemoglobin binding and heme transport and thereby locate putative protective epitopes, the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi HgbA was used as a model of iron/heme acquisition from hemoglobin. Although all extracellular loops of HgbA are required by H. ducreyi to use hemoglobin as a source of iron/heme, we previously demonstrated that hemoglobin binding by HgbA only involves loops 5 and 7. Using deletion, substitution, and site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to differentiate hemoglobin binding and heme acquisition by HgbA. Deletion or substitution of the GYEAYNRQWWA region of loop 5 and alanine replacement of selected histidines affected hemoglobin binding by HgbA. Conversely, mutation of the phenylalanine in the loop 7 FRAP domain or substitution of the NRQWWA motif of loop 5 significantly abrogated utilization of heme from hemoglobin. Our findings show that hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor involve specific motifs of HgbA.

  2. The innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; Ariyananda, Lushanti De Zoysa; Melnyk, James E; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian Nod2 is an intracellular protein that is implicated in the innate immune response to the bacterial cell wall and is associated with the development of Crohn's disease, Blau syndrome, and gastrointestinal cancers. Nod2 is required for an immune response to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an immunostimulatory fragment of bacterial cell wall, but it is not known whether MDP binds directly to Nod2. We report the expression and purification of human Nod2 from insect cells. Using novel MDP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), we provide the first biochemical evidence for a direct, high-affinity interaction between Nod2 and MDP.

  3. A method for in vivo identification of bacterial small RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jonathan; Djapgne, Louise; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-12-01

    Small bacterial regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) have gained immense appreciation over the last decade for their roles in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation of numerous physiological processes. Several proteins contribute to sRNA stability and regulation, most notably the Hfq RNA-binding protein. However, not all sRNAs rely on Hfq for their stability. It is therefore likely that other proteins contribute to the stability and function of certain bacterial sRNAs. Here, we describe a methodology for identifying in vivo-binding proteins of sRNAs, developed using the iron-responsive PrrF and PrrH sRNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. RNA was isolated from iron-depleted cultures, which were irradiated to cross-link nucleoprotein complexes. Subsequently, PrrF- and PrrH-protein complexes were enriched using cDNA "bait", and enriched RNA-protein complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify PrrF and PrrH associated proteins. This method identified Hfq as a potential PrrF- and PrrH-binding protein. Interestingly, Hfq was identified more often in samples probed with the PrrF cDNA "bait" as compared to the PrrH cDNA "bait", suggesting Hfq has a stronger binding affinity for the PrrF sRNAs in vivo. Hfq binding to the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs was validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified Hfq protein from P. aeruginosa. As such, this study demonstrates that in vivo cross-linking coupled with sequence-specific affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SSAC-MS/MS) is an effective methodology for unbiased identification of bacterial sRNA-binding proteins.

  4. Super-Resolution Microscopy and Tracking of DNA-Binding Proteins in Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to detect individual fluorescent molecules inside living cells has enabled a range of powerful microscopy techniques that resolve biological processes on the molecular scale. These methods have also transformed the study of bacterial cell biology, which was previously obstructed by the limited spatial resolution of conventional microscopy. In the case of DNA-binding proteins, super-resolution microscopy can visualize the detailed spatial organization of DNA replication, transcription, and repair processes by reconstructing a map of single-molecule localizations. Furthermore, DNA binding activities can be observed directly by tracking protein movement in real time. This allows identifying subpopulations of DNA-bound and diffusing proteins, and can be used to measure DNA-binding times in vivo. This chapter provides a detailed protocol for super-resolution microscopy and tracking of DNA-binding proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The protocol covers the construction of cell strains and describes data acquisition and analysis procedures, such as super-resolution image reconstruction, mapping single-molecule tracks, computing diffusion coefficients to identify molecular subpopulations with different mobility, and analysis of DNA-binding kinetics. While the focus is on the study of bacterial chromosome biology, these approaches are generally applicable to other molecular processes and cell types. PMID:27283312

  5. What is an antidepressant binding site doing in a bacterial transporter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gary

    2007-09-21

    LeuT is a bacterial amino acid transporter belonging to a large family of membrane proteins, including the neurotransmitter transporters that are targets for antidepressant drugs. The high-resolution structure of LeuT has provided an important model for understanding structure and function in this family. Two recent papers found that LeuT can bind tricyclic antidepressants, raising the possibility that it may also serve as a model for the pharmacological properties of neurotransmitter transporters.

  6. Activation of AMPK enhances neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Won; Jiang, Shaoning; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Stigler, William S; Gao, Yong; Deshane, Jessy; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2013-11-08

    An inability of neutrophils to eliminate invading microorganisms is frequently associated with severe infection and may contribute to the high mortality rates associated with sepsis. In the present studies, we examined whether metformin and other 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators affect neutrophil motility, phagocytosis and bacterial killing. We found that activation of AMPK enhanced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo, and also counteracted the inhibition of chemotaxis induced by exposure of neutrophils to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1 or blockade of AMPK activation through treatment of neutrophils with the AMPK inhibitor compound C diminished neutrophil chemotaxis. In addition to their effects on chemotaxis, treatment of neutrophils with metformin or aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) improved phagocytosis and bacterial killing, including more efficient eradication of bacteria in a mouse model of peritonitis-induced sepsis. Immunocytochemistry showed that, in contrast to LPS, metformin or AICAR induced robust actin polymerization and distinct formation of neutrophil leading edges. Although LPS diminished AMPK phosphorylation, metformin or AICAR was able to partially decrease the effects of LPS/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) engagement on downstream signaling events, particularly LPS-induced IκBα degradation. The IκB kinase (IKK) inhibitor PS-1145 diminished IκBα degradation and also prevented LPS-induced inhibition of chemotaxis. These results suggest that AMPK activation with clinically approved agents, such as metformin, may facilitate bacterial eradication in sepsis and other inflammatory conditions associated with inhibition of neutrophil activation and chemotaxis.

  7. Vitamin C enhances bacterial cellulose production in Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshk, Sherif M A S

    2014-01-01

    Influence of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) on bacterial cellulose (BC) production and crystal structure was studied using four strains of Gluconacetobacter xylinus (ATCC 10245, IFO 13693, 13772 and 13773). BC productivity of all strains was increased in presence of vitamin C (0.5% w/w), the average BC production reached 0.47 g/30 ml compared with 0.25 g/30 ml without vitamin C. Enhanced productivity is associated with a decrease in gluconic acid concentration that is produced from Gluconacetobacter xylinus during BC production. X-ray results showed that the crystallinity index of BC produced in presence of ascorbic acid was the lowest with remarkable change in d-spacing. These results were confirmed by using solid state (13)CNMR. The increase in BC yield in presence of vitamin C is due to its antioxidant behavior and confirms our past work on lignosulfonate influence on BC.

  8. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna (Cornell); (UCB); (Duke)

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  9. Structural insights into alginate binding by bacterial cell-surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtrirath, Kanate; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-02

    A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 inducibly forms a mouth-like pit on the cell surface in the presence of alginate and directly incorporates polymers into the cytoplasm via the pit and ABC transporter. Among the bacterial proteins involved in import of alginate, a cell-surface EfeO-like Algp7 shows an ability to bind alginate, suggesting its contribution to accumulate alginate in the pit. Here, we show identification of its positively charged cluster involved in alginate binding using X-ray crystallography, docking simulation, and site-directed mutagenesis. The tertiary structure of Algp7 was determined at a high resolution (1.99Å) by molecular replacement, although no alginates were included in the structure. Thus, an in silico model of Algp7/oligoalginate was constructed by docking simulation using atomic coordinates of Algp7 and alginate oligosaccharides, where some charged residues were found to be potential candidates for alginate binding. Site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and five purified mutants K68A, K69A, E194A, N221A, and K68A/K69A were subjected to a binding assay. UV absorption difference spectroscopy along with differential scanning fluorimetry analysis indicated that K68A/K69A exhibited a significant reduction in binding affinity with alginate than wild-type Algp7. Based on these data, Lys68/Lys69 residues of Algp7 probably play an important role in binding alginate.

  10. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes.

  11. Identification of a novel bacterial outer membrane interleukin-1Β-binding protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamari Paino

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI, was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control

  12. Bacterial chromosome segregation: structure and DNA binding of the Soj dimer — a conserved biological switch

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Butler, P Jonathan; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Soj and Spo0J of the Gram-negative hyperthermophile Thermus thermophilus belong to the conserved ParAB family of bacterial proteins implicated in plasmid and chromosome partitioning. Spo0J binds to DNA near the replication origin and localises at the poles following initiation of replication. Soj oscillates in the nucleoid region in an ATP- and Spo0J-dependent fashion. Here, we show that Soj undergoes ATP-dependent dimerisation in solution and forms nucleoprotein filaments with DNA. Crystal s...

  13. Human tandem-repeat-type galectins bind bacterial non-βGal polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knirel, Yu A.; Gabius, H.-J.; Blixt, Klas Ola;

    2014-01-01

    ), prompted us to establish an array with bacterial polysaccharides. We addressed the question whether sugar determinants other than β-galactosides may be docking sites, using human galectins-4, -8, and -9. Positive controls with histo-blood group ABH-epitopes and the E. coli 086 polysaccharide ascertained...... the suitability of the set-up. Significant signal generation, depending on type of galectin and polysacchride, was obtained. Presence of cognate β-galactoside-related epitopes within a polysaccharide chain or its branch will not automatically establish binding properties, and structural constellations lacking...

  14. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  15. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  16. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  17. Antimicrobial Peptide Potency is Facilitated by Greater Conformational Flexibility when Binding to Gram-negative Bacterial Inner Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Sarah-Beth T. A.; Vermeer, Louic S.; Ferguson, Philip M.; Kozlowska, Justyna; Davy, Matthew; Bui, Tam T.; Drake, Alex F.; Lorenz, Christian D.; Mason, A. James

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a key determinant of their abilities to exert diverse bactericidal effects. Here we present a molecular level understanding of the initial target membrane interaction for two cationic α-helical AMPs that share structural similarities but have a ten-fold difference in antibacterial potency towards Gram-negative bacteria. The binding and insertion from solution of pleurocidin or magainin 2 to membranes representing the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, comprising a mixture of 128 anionic and 384 zwitterionic lipids, is monitored over 100 ns in all atom molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the membrane interaction on both the peptide and lipid constituents are considered and compared with new and published experimental data obtained in the steady state. While both magainin 2 and pleurocidin are capable of disrupting bacterial membranes, the greater potency of pleurocidin is linked to its ability to penetrate within the bacterial cell. We show that pleurocidin displays much greater conformational flexibility when compared with magainin 2, resists self-association at the membrane surface and penetrates further into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. Conformational flexibility is therefore revealed as a key feature required of apparently α-helical cationic AMPs for enhanced antibacterial potency.

  18. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  19. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  20. Structural aspects of nucleotide ligand binding by a bacterial 2H phosphoesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Petri

    2017-01-01

    The 2H phosphoesterase family contains enzymes with two His-X-Ser/Thr motifs in the active site. 2H enzymes are found in all kingdoms of life, sharing little sequence identity despite the conserved overall fold and active site. For many 2H enzymes, the physiological function is unknown. Here, we studied the structure of the 2H family member LigT from Escherichia coli both in the apo form and complexed with different active-site ligands, including ATP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, phosphate, and NADP+. Comparisons to the well-characterized vertebrate myelin enzyme 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) highlight specific features of the catalytic cycle and substrate recognition in both enzymes. The role played by the helix α7, unique to CNPases within the 2H family, is apparently taken over by Arg130 in the bacterial enzyme. Other residues and loops lining the active site groove are likely to be important for RNA substrate binding. We visualized conformational changes related to ligand binding, as well as the position of the nucleophilic water molecule. We also present a low-resolution model of E. coli LigT bound to tRNA in solution, and provide a model for RNA binding by LigT, involving flexible loops lining the active site cavity. Taken together, our results both aid in understanding the common features of 2H family enzymes and help highlight the distinct features in the 2H family members, which must result in different reaction mechanisms. Unique aspects in different 2H family members can be observed in ligand recognition and binding, and in the coordination of the nucleophilic water molecule and the reactive phosphate moiety. PMID:28141848

  1. Silver nanoparticle-doped zirconia capillaries for enhanced bacterial filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Julia; Köser, Jan; Lindner, Patrick; Lüder, Christian; Beutel, Sascha; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-03-01

    Membrane clogging and biofilm formation are the most serious problems during water filtration. Silver nanoparticle (Agnano) coatings on filtration membranes can prevent bacterial adhesion and the initiation of biofilm formation. In this study, Agnano are immobilized via direct reduction on porous zirconia capillary membranes to generate a nanocomposite material combining the advantages of ceramics being chemically, thermally and mechanically stable with nanosilver, an efficient broadband bactericide for water decontamination. The filtration of bacterial suspensions of the fecal contaminant Escherichia coli reveals highly efficient bacterial retention capacities of the capillaries of 8 log reduction values, fulfilling the requirements on safe drinking water according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Maximum bacterial loading capacities of the capillary membranes are determined to be 3×10(9)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface until back flushing is recommendable. The immobilized Agnano remain accessible and exhibit strong bactericidal properties by killing retained bacteria up to maximum bacterial loads of 6×10(8)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface and the regenerated membranes regain filtration efficiencies of 95-100%. Silver release is moderate as only 0.8% of the initial silver loading is leached during a three-day filtration experiment leading to average silver contaminant levels of 100μg/L.

  2. Dimerisation and structural integrity of Heparin Binding Hemagglutinin A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: implications for bacterial agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Carla; Carullo, Paola; Pedone, Emilia; Graziano, Giuseppe; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Berisio, Rita

    2010-03-19

    Heparin Binding Hemagglutinin A (HBHA) is hitherto the sole virulence factor associated with tuberculosis dissemination from the lungs, the site of primary infection, to epithelial cells. We have previously reported the solution structure of HBHA, a dimeric and elongated molecule. Since oligomerisation of HBHA is associated with its ability to induce bacterial agglutination, we investigated this process using experimental and modelling techniques. We here identified a short segment of HBHA whose presence is mandatory for the stability of folded conformation, whose denaturation is a reversible two-state process. Our data suggest that agglutination-driven cell-cell interactions do not occur via association of HBHA monomers, nor via association of HBHA dimers and open the scenario to a possible trans-dimerisation process.

  3. Microbial interactions chapter: binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    Genetic transformation of bacteria by DNA released from cells of a related strain is discussed. The mechanism by which the giant information-bearing molecules of DNA are transported into the bacterial cell was investigated. It was concluded that the overall process of DNA uptake consists of two main steps, binding of donor DNA to the outside of the cell and entry of the bound DNA into the cell. Each step is discussed in detail. Inasmuch as these phenomena occur at the cell surface, they are related to structures and functions of the cell wall and membrane. In addition, the development of competence, that is the formation of cell surface structures allowing DNA uptake, is examined from both a physiological and evolutionary point of view. Genetic transfer mediated by free DNA is an obvious and important form of cellular interaction. The development of competence involves another, quite distinct system of interaction between bacterial cells. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, and Hemophilus influenzae were used as the test organisms. 259 references.

  4. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  5. Remodeling a DNA-binding protein as a specific in vivo inhibitor of bacterial secretin PulD

    OpenAIRE

    Mouratou, Barbara; Schaeffer, Francis; Guilvout, Ingrid; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a class of proteins that binds selected polypeptides with high specificity and affinity. Use of the protein scaffold of Sac7d, belonging to a protein family that binds various ligands, overcomes limitations inherent in the use of antibodies as intracellular inhibitors: it lacks disulfide bridges, is small and stable, and can be produced in large amounts. An in vitro combinatorial/selection approach generated specific, high-affinity (up to 140 pM) binders against bacterial outer ...

  6. Receptor-binding domain of ephrin-A1: production in bacterial expression system and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, O V; Sharonov, G V; Tikhonov, R V; Kolosov, P M; Astapova, M V; Yakimov, S A; Tagvey, A I; Korchagina, A A; Bocharova, O V; Wulfson, A N; Feofanov, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-12-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ligands, the ephrins, perform an important regulatory function in tissue organization, as well as participate in malignant transformation of cells. Ephrin-A1, a ligand of A class Eph receptors, is a modulator of tumor growth and progression, and the mechanism of its action needs detailed investigation. Here we report on the development of a system for bacterial expression of an ephrin-A1 receptor-binding domain (eA1), a procedure for its purification, and its renaturation with final yield of 50 mg/liter of culture. Functional activity of eA1 was confirmed by immunoblotting, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. It is shown that monomeric non-glycosylated receptor-binding domain of ephrin-A1 is able to activate cellular EphA2 receptors, stimulating their phosphorylation. Ligand eA1 can be used to study the features of ephrin-A1 interactions with different A class Eph receptors. The created expression cassette is suitable for the development of ligands with increased activity and selectivity and experimental systems for the delivery of cytotoxins into tumor cells that overexpress EphA2 or other class A Eph receptors.

  7. Binding domains of Bacillus anthracis phage endolysins recognize cell culture age-related features on the bacterial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Mundra, Ruchir V; Mehta, Krunal K; Pangule, Ravindra C; Wu, Xia; Glatfelter, Willing S; Chen, Zijing; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriolytic enzymes often possess a C-terminal binding domain that recognizes specific motifs on the bacterial surface and a catalytic domain that cleaves covalent linkages within the cell wall peptidoglycan. PlyPH, one such lytic enzyme of bacteriophage origin, has been reported to be highly effective against Bacillus anthracis, and can kill up to 99.99% of the viable bacteria. The bactericidal activity of this enzyme, however, appears to be strongly dependent on the age of the bacterial culture. Although highly bactericidal against cells in the early exponential phase, the enzyme is substantially less effective against stationary phase cells, thus limiting its application in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the binding domain of PlyPH may differ in affinity to cells in different Bacillus growth stages and may be primarily responsible for the age-restricted activity. We therefore employed an in silico approach to identify phage lysins differing in their specificity for the bacterial cell wall. Specifically we focused our attention on Plyβ, an enzyme with improved cell wall-binding ability and age-independent bactericidal activity. Although PlyPH and Plyβ have dissimilar binding domains, their catalytic domains are highly homologous. We characterized the biocatalytic mechanism of Plyβ by identifying the specific bonds cleaved within the cell wall peptidoglycan. Our results provide an example of the diversity of phage endolysins and the opportunity for these biocatalysts to be used for broad-based protection from bacterial pathogens.

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi EbfC defines a newly-identified, widespread family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Sean P; Bykowski, Tomasz; Cooley, Anne E; Burns, Logan H; Babb, Kelly; Brissette, Catherine A; Bowman, Amy; Rotondi, Matthew; Miller, M Clarke; DeMoll, Edward; Lim, Kap; Fried, Michael G; Stevenson, Brian

    2009-04-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, encodes a novel type of DNA-binding protein named EbfC. Orthologs of EbfC are encoded by a wide range of bacterial species, so characterization of the borrelial protein has implications that span the eubacterial kingdom. The present work defines the DNA sequence required for high-affinity binding by EbfC to be the 4 bp broken palindrome GTnAC, where 'n' can be any nucleotide. Two high-affinity EbfC-binding sites are located immediately 5' of B. burgdorferi erp transcriptional promoters, and binding of EbfC was found to alter the conformation of erp promoter DNA. Consensus EbfC-binding sites are abundantly distributed throughout the B. burgdorferi genome, occurring approximately once every 1 kb. These and other features of EbfC suggest that this small protein and its orthologs may represent a distinctive type of bacterial nucleoid-associated protein. EbfC was shown to bind DNA as a homodimer, and site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that EbfC and its orthologs appear to bind DNA via a novel alpha-helical 'tweezer'-like structure.

  9. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Laboratory of Applied Structural Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Wataru [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murata, Kousaku, E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  10. Enhancement of mouse sperm motility by trophinin-binding peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophinin is an intrinsic membrane protein that forms a complex in the cytoplasm with bystin and tastin, linking it microtubule-associated motor dynein (ATPase in some cell types. Previously, we found that human sperm tails contain trophinin, bystin and tastin proteins, and that trophinin-binding GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide enhanced motility of human sperm. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine trophinin protein in mouse spermatozoa from wild type mouse, by using spermatozoa from trophinin null mutant mice as a negative control. Multivalent 8-branched GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide or GWRQ-MAPS, was chemically synthesized, purified by HPLC and its structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Effect of GWRQ-MAPS on mouse spermatozoa from wild type and trophinin null mutant was assessed by a computer-assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Results Anti-trophinin antibody stained the principal (central piece of the tail of wild type mouse sperm, whereas the antibody showed no staining on trophinin null sperm. Phage particles displaying GWRQ bound to the principal piece of sperm tail from wild type but not trophinin null mice. GWRQ-MAPS enhanced motility of spermatozoa from wild type but not trophinin null mice. CASA showed that GWRQ-MAPS enhanced both progressive motility and rapid motility in wild type mouse sperm. Conclusions Present study established the expression of trophinin in the mouse sperm tail and trophinin-dependent effect of GWRQ-MAPS on sperm motility. GWRQ causes a significant increase in sperm motility.

  11. HIV-Enhancing Factors Are Secreted by Reproductive Epithelia upon Inoculation with Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Diaz, Camila; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Amy L; Cole, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common reproductive infection in which commensal vaginal lactobacilli are displaced by a mixed population of pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis increases susceptibility to HIV, and it has been suggested that host innate immune responses to pathogenic bacteria contribute to enhanced infection, yet the cellular mechanisms mediating the increased HIV susceptibility remain uncharacterized. We evaluated the HIV-enhancing effects of bacterial vaginosis by inoculating endocervical epithelia with Atopobium vaginae, a bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and assaying secreted factors for HIV-enhancing activity. When epithelia and A. vaginae were cocultured, we observed increased HIV-enhancing activity mediated by secreted low molecular weight factors. From this complex mixture we identified several upregulated host proteins, which functioned in combination to enhance HIV infection. These studies suggest that the host immune response to bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria results in the release of HIV-enhancing factors. The combined activity of bacterial vaginosis-induced proteins likely mediates HIV enhancement.

  12. Development of Phage-Based Antibody Fragment Reagents for Affinity Enrichment of Bacterial Immunoglobulin G Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säll, Anna; Sjöholm, Kristoffer; Waldemarson, Sofia; Happonen, Lotta; Karlsson, Christofer; Persson, Helena; Malmström, Johan

    2015-11-06

    Disease and death caused by bacterial infections are global health problems. Effective bacterial strategies are required to promote survival and proliferation within a human host, and it is important to explore how this adaption occurs. However, the detection and quantification of bacterial virulence factors in complex biological samples are technically demanding challenges. These can be addressed by combining targeted affinity enrichment of antibodies with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-SRM MS). However, many virulence factors have evolved properties that make specific detection by conventional antibodies difficult. We here present an antibody format that is particularly well suited for detection and analysis of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding virulence factors. As proof of concept, we have generated single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies that specifically target the IgG-binding surface proteins M1 and H of Streptococcus pyogenes. The binding ability of the developed scFv is demonstrated against both recombinant soluble protein M1 and H as well as the intact surface proteins on a wild-type S. pyogenes strain. Additionally, the capacity of the developed scFv antibodies to enrich their target proteins from both simple and complex backgrounds, thereby allowing for detection and quantification with LC-SRM MS, was demonstrated. We have established a workflow that allows for affinity enrichment of bacterial virulence factors.

  13. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-07

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome.

  14. Enhanced human receptor binding by H5 haemagglutinins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Xiao, Haixia; Martin, Stephen R.; Coombs, Peter J.; Liu, Junfeng; Collins, Patrick J.; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Walker, Philip A.; Lin, Yi Pu; McCauley, John W.; Gamblin, Steven J.; John J Skehel

    2014-01-01

    Mutant H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from humans that have increased human receptor avidity. We have compared the receptor binding properties of these mutants with those of wild-type viruses, and determined the structures of their haemagglutinins in complex with receptor analogues. Mutants from Vietnam bind tighter to human receptor by acquiring basic residues near the receptor binding site. They bind more weakly to avian receptor because they lack specific interactions between As...

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic aci...

  16. 2'-Substitution of cocaine selectively enhances dopamine and norepinephrine transporter binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, T W; Avor, K; Singh, S; Hall, N; Chan, H M; Basmadjian, G P

    1997-11-10

    Few studies have characterized the effect of substituents at the 2'-position of cocaine on transporter binding potency and selectivity. We synthesized 2'-OH-, 2'-F- and 2'-acetoxy-cocaines and compared their binding potencies for rat dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters to cocaine, 3'-OH-, 4'-OH-, 2'-OH,4'-I-cocaine derivatives, and to the transporter selective ligands WIN 35,428, nisoxetine and paroxetine. Unlike most substitutions, 2'-OH- and 2'-acetoxy-groups increased cocaine's binding potency for the dopamine transporter (10- and 4-fold, respectively). These substituents also enhanced binding to the norepinephrine transporter (52- and 35-fold, respectively) but had less effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter binding. 2'-Hydroxylation also enhanced binding of 4'-I cocaine, an analog with low DA binding potency. The ability of 2'-substituents to substantially increase cocaine binding potency and to alter selectivity for brain transporters indicates the potential importance of the 2'-position in transporter binding.

  17. Depletion of dendritic cells enhances innate anti-bacterial host defense through modulation of phagocyte homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella E Autenrieth

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells play an important role in the initiation and modulation of the adaptive immune response. However, their role in the innate immune response against bacterial infections is not completely defined. Here we have analyzed the role of DCs and their impact on the innate anti-bacterial host defense in an experimental infection model of Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye. We used CD11c-diphtheria toxin (DT mice to deplete DCs prior to severe infection with Ye. DC depletion significantly increased animal survival after Ye infection. The bacterial load in the spleen of DC-depleted mice was significantly lower than that of control mice throughout the infection. DC depletion was accompanied by an increase in the serum levels of CXCL1, G-CSF, IL-1α, and CCL2 and an increase in the numbers of splenic phagocytes. Functionally, splenocytes from DC-depleted mice exhibited an increased bacterial killing capacity compared to splenocytes from control mice. Cellular studies further showed that this was due to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by neutrophils. Adoptive transfer of neutrophils from DC-depleted mice into control mice prior to Ye infection reduced the bacterial load to the level of Ye-infected DC-depleted mice, suggesting that the increased number of phagocytes with additional ROS production account for the decreased bacterial load. Furthermore, after incubation with serum from DC-depleted mice splenocytes from control mice increased their bacterial killing capacity, most likely due to enhanced ROS production by neutrophils, indicating that serum factors from DC-depleted mice account for this effect. In summary, we could show that DC depletion triggers phagocyte accumulation in the spleen and enhances their anti-bacterial killing capacity upon bacterial infection.

  18. Bacterial Cellulose-Binding Domain Modulates in Vitro Elongation of Different Plant Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpigel, Etai; Roiz, Levava; Goren, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant cellulose-binding domain (CBD) derived from the cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium cellulovorans was found to modulate the elongation of different plant cells in vitro. In peach (Prunus persica L.) pollen tubes, maximum elongation was observed at 50 μg mL−1 CBD. Pollen tube staining with calcofluor showed a loss of crystallinity in the tip zone of CBD-treated pollen tubes. At low concentrations CBD enhanced elongation of Arabidopsis roots. At high concentrations CBD dramatically inhibited root elongation in a dose-responsive manner. Maximum effect on root hair elongation was at 100 μg mL−1, whereas root elongation was inhibited at that concentration. CBD was found to compete with xyloglucan for binding to cellulose when CBD was added first to the cellulose, before the addition of xyloglucan. When Acetobacter xylinum L. was used as a model system, CBD was found to increase the rate of cellulose synthase in a dose-responsive manner, up to 5-fold compared with the control. Electron microscopy examination of the cellulose ribbons produced by A. xylinum showed that CBD treatment resulted in a splayed ribbon composed of separate fibrillar subunits, compared with a thin, uniform ribbon in the control. PMID:9701575

  19. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, A.L.; Dassa, E.; Orelle, C.; Chen, J. (Purdue)

    2010-07-27

    HisP, the proteins suspected to energize these transporters, shared as much as 32% identity in amino acid residues when their sequences were aligned (171). Later, it was found that several bacterial proteins involved in uptake of nutrients, export of toxins, cell division, bacterial nodulation of plants, and DNA repair displayed the same similarity in their sequences (127, 196). This led to the notion that the conserved protein, which had been shown to bind ATP (198, 201), would probably energize the systems mentioned above by coupling the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport. The latter was demonstrated with the maltose and histidine transporters by use of isolated membrane vesicles (105, 379) and purified transporters reconstituted into proteoliposomes (30, 98). The determination of the sequence of the first eukaryotic protein strongly similar to these bacterial transporters (the P-glycoprotein, involved in resistance of cancer cells to multiple drugs) (169, 179) demonstrated that these proteins were not restricted to prokaryotes. Two names, 'traffic ATPases' (15) and the more accepted name 'ABC transporters' (193, 218), were proposed for members of this new superfamily. ABC systems can be divided into three main functional categories, as follows. Importers mediate the uptake of nutrients in prokaryotes. The nature of the substrates that are transported is very wide, including mono- and oligosaccharides, organic and inorganic ions, amino acids, peptides, ironsiderophores, metals, polyamine cations, opines, and vitamins. Exporters are involved in the secretion of various molecules, such as peptides, lipids, hydrophobic drugs, polysaccharides, and proteins, including toxins such as hemolysin. The third category of systems is apparently not involved in transport, with some members being involved in translation of mRNA and in DNA repair. Despite the large, diverse population of substrates handled and the difference in the polarity of transport

  20. A common theme in interaction of bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins with immunoglobulins illustrated in the equine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Melanie J; Meehan, Mary; Owen, Peter; Woof, Jenny M

    2008-06-20

    The M protein of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi known as fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP) is a cell wall-associated protein with antiphagocytic activity that binds IgG. Recombinant versions of the seven equine IgG subclasses were used to investigate the subclass specificity of FgBP. FgBP bound predominantly to equine IgG4 and IgG7, with little or no binding to the other subclasses. Competitive binding experiments revealed that FgBP could inhibit the binding of staphylococcal protein A and streptococcal protein G to both IgG4 and IgG7, implicating the Fc interdomain region in binding to FgBP. To identify which of the two IgG Fc domains contributed to the interaction with FgBP, we tested two human IgG1/IgA1 domain swap mutants and found that both domains are required for full binding, with the CH3 domain playing a critical role. The binding site for FgBP was further localized using recombinant equine IgG7 antibodies with single or double point mutations to residues lying at the CH2-CH3 interface. We found that interaction of FgBP with equine IgG4 and IgG7 was able to disrupt C1q binding and antibody-mediated activation of the classical complement pathway, demonstrating an effective means by which S. equi may evade the immune response. The mode of interaction of FgBP with IgG fits a common theme for bacterial Ig-binding proteins. Remarkably, for those interactions studied in detail, it emerges that all the Ig-binding proteins target the CH2-CH3 domain interface, regardless of specificity for IgG or IgA, streptococcal or staphylococcal origin, or host species (equine or human).

  1. Exploiting Receptor Competition to Enhance Nanoparticle Binding Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programed to bind biological targets depending on the receptors they express, providing a general mechanism exploited in various technologies, from selective drug delivery to biosensing. For binding to be highly selective, ligands should exclusively interact with specific targeted receptors, because the formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to nonspecific binding and potentially harmful behavior. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is used here to describe how competition between different receptors together with multivalent effects can be harnessed to design ligand-functionalized nanoparticles insensitive to the presence of untargeted receptors, preventing nonspecific binding.

  2. Fructose-enhanced reduction of bacterial growth on nanorough surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmus NG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Naside Gozde Durmus1, Erik N Taylor1, Fatih Inci3,4, Kim M Kummer1, Keiko M Tarquinio5, Thomas J Webster1,21School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine (BAMM Laboratory, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, MA, USA; 4Istanbul Technical University, Molecular Biology-Genetics and Biotechnology Program, Mobgam, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Patients on mechanical ventilators for extended periods of time often face the risk of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia. During the ventilation process, patients incapable of breathing are intubated with polyvinyl chloride (PVC endotracheal tubes (ETTs. PVC ETTs provide surfaces where bacteria can attach and proliferate from the contaminated oropharyngeal space to the sterile bronchoalveolar area. To overcome this problem, ETTs can be coated with antimicrobial agents. However, such coatings may easily delaminate during use. Recently, it has been shown that changes in material topography at the nanometer level can provide antibacterial properties. In addition, some metabolites, such as fructose, have been found to increase the efficiency of antibiotics used to treat Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections. In this study, we combined the antibacterial effect of nanorough ETT topographies with sugar metabolites to decrease bacterial growth and biofilm formation on ETTs. We present for the first time that the presence of fructose on the nanorough surfaces decreases the number of planktonic S. aureus bacteria in the solution and biofilm formation on the surface after 24 hours. We thus envision that this method has the potential to impact the future of surface engineering of

  3. Metal ion enhanced binding of AMD3100 to Asp262 in the CXCR4 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Lars Ole; Jakobsen, Janus S; Jensen, Kasper P;

    2003-01-01

    +), Zn(2+), or Ni(2+) into the cyclam rings of the compound. The rank order of the transition metal ions correlated with the calculated binding energy between free acetate and the metal ions coordinated in a cyclam ring. Construction of AMD3100 substituted with only a single Cu(2+) or Ni(2+) ion...... demonstrated that the increase in binding affinity of the metal ion substituted bicyclam is achieved through an enhanced interaction of just one of the ring systems. Mutational analysis of potential metal ion binding residues in the main ligand binding crevice of the CXCR4 receptor showed that although binding...... of the bicyclam is dependent on both Asp(171) and Asp(262), the enhancing effect of the metal ion was selectively eliminated by substitution of Asp(262) located at the extracellular end of TM-VI. It is concluded that the increased binding affinity of the metal ion substituted AMD3100 is obtained through enhanced...

  4. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types...

  5. The Solution Structure, Binding Properties, and Dynamics of the Bacterial Siderophore-binding Protein FepB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, Byron C. H.; Otten, Renee; Krewulak, Karla D.; Mulder, Frans A.A.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) FepB plays a key role in transporting the catecholate siderophore ferric enterobactin from the outer to the inner membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. The solution structures of the 34-kDa apo- and holo-FepB from Escherichia coli, solved by NMR, represent the fir

  6. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  7. Systematic dissection of genomic features determining transcription factor binding and enhancer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sharon R.; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Engreitz, Jesse; Melnikov, Alexandre; Rogov, Peter; Tewhey, Ryan; Isakova, Alina; Deplancke, Bart; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers regulate gene expression through the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to cognate motifs. Various features influence TF binding and enhancer function—including the chromatin state of the genomic locus, the affinities of the binding site, the activity of the bound TFs, and interactions among TFs. However, the precise nature and relative contributions of these features remain unclear. Here, we used massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) involving 32,115 natural and synthetic enhancers, together with high-throughput in vivo binding assays, to systematically dissect the contribution of each of these features to the binding and activity of genomic regulatory elements that contain motifs for PPARγ, a TF that serves as a key regulator of adipogenesis. We show that distinct sets of features govern PPARγ binding vs. enhancer activity. PPARγ binding is largely governed by the affinity of the specific motif site and higher-order features of the larger genomic locus, such as chromatin accessibility. In contrast, the enhancer activity of PPARγ binding sites depends on varying contributions from dozens of TFs in the immediate vicinity, including interactions between combinations of these TFs. Different pairs of motifs follow different interaction rules, including subadditive, additive, and superadditive interactions among specific classes of TFs, with both spatially constrained and flexible grammars. Our results provide a paradigm for the systematic characterization of the genomic features underlying regulatory elements, applicable to the design of synthetic regulatory elements or the interpretation of human genetic variation. PMID:28137873

  8. Characterization of the hydrophobic substrate-binding site of the bacterial beta class glutathione transferase from Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine; Allocati, Nerino

    2010-09-01

    Since their discovery, bacterial glutathione (GSH)transferases have been characterized in terms of their ability to catalyse a variety of different reactions on a large set of toxic molecules of xenobiotic or endobiotic origin. Furthermore the contribution of different residues in the GSH-binding site to GSH activation has been extensively investigated. Little is known, however, about the contribution to catalysis and overall stability of single residues shaping the hydrophobic co-substrate binding site (H-site). Here we tackle this problem by site-directed mutagenesis of residues facing the H-site in the bacterial beta class GSH transferase from Proteus mirabilis. We investigate the behaviour of these mutants under a variety of conditions and analyse their activity against several co-substrates, representative of the different reactions catalyzed by bacterial GSH transferases. Our work shows that mutations at the H-site can be used to modulate activity at the level of the different catalytic mechanisms operating on the chosen substrates, each mutation showing a different fingerprint. This work paves the way for future studies aimed at improving the catalytic properties of beta class GSH transferases against selected substrates for bioremediation purposes.

  9. Cholesterol binding by the bacterial type III translocon is essential for virulence effector delivery into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Richard D; Cain, Robert J; McGhie, Emma J; Phillips, Neil; Garner, Matthew J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2005-05-01

    A ubiquitous early step in infection of man and animals by enteric bacterial pathogens like Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is the translocation of virulence effector proteins into mammalian cells via specialized type III secretion systems (TTSSs). Translocated effectors subvert the host cytoskeleton and stimulate signalling to promote bacterial internalization or survival. Target cell plasma membrane cholesterol is central to pathogen-host cross-talk, but the precise nature of its critical contribution remains unknown. Using in vitro cholesterol-binding assays, we demonstrate that Salmonella (SipB) and Shigella (IpaB) TTSS translocon components bind cholesterol with high affinity. Direct visualization of cell-associated fluorescently labelled SipB and parallel immunogold transmission electron microscopy revealed that cholesterol levels limit both the amount and distribution of plasma membrane-integrated translocon. Correspondingly, cholesterol depletion blocked effector translocation into cultured mammalian cells by not only the related Salmonella and Shigella TTSSs, but also the more divergent EPEC system. The data reveal that cholesterol-dependent association of the bacterial TTSS translocon with the target cell plasma membrane is essential for translocon activation and effector delivery into mammalian cells.

  10. Expression and purification of a novel thermophilic bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding protein and enhancement the synthesis of DNA and cDNA%新型超耐热菌的单链DNA结合蛋白表达和纯化及其增强DNA、cDNA的合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾晓伟; 张国辉; 史海燕

    2012-01-01

    目的 表达和纯化一种新的来自于超耐热菌(thermococcus kodakarensis) KOD1的单链DNA结合蛋白(缩写为kod-ssb),并探讨其对DNA、cDNA合成的影响.方法 采用Transrtta(DE3)表达kod-ssb,用镍柱亲和层析纯化,经SDS-PAGE分析检测表达纯化后的kod-ssb.使用PCR及qRT/qPCR检测kod-ssb对DNA、cDNA合成的影响.结果 将质粒pET11a-kod转化Transetta(DE3)中,得到重组菌株Transetta(pET11a-kod),经IPTG诱导.由SDS-PAGE分析可见表达的约40×103的特异条带;使用人类β球蛋白基因作为模板分别扩增5 kbp,9 kbp和13 kbp目的片段,结果加了kod-ssb的PCR目的片段比没加的产量高很多,而且kod-ssb显著降低了PCR反应的非特异性扩增.以流感细胞培养上清抽提的RNA为模板,实施RT-/qPCR反应.结果加kod的平均Ct值是19.42,而没加的为22.15.结论 kod-ssb在未来将被用于增强DNA和cDNA的合成.%Objective Express a novel species of single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) derived from Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1,abbreviated kod-ssb.And evaluate the effect of kod-ssb on PCR-based DNA amplification and reverse transcription.Methods We express kod-ssb with the Transrtta (DE3),and kod-ssb was purified by affinity chromatography on a Ni2 + Sepharose column,detected by SDS-PAGE.To evaluate the effect of kod-ssb on PCR-based DNA amplification,the human beta globin gene was used as template to amplify a 5-kb,9-kb and 13-kb.And to detect the effect of kod-ssb on reverse transcription,we used RNA from flu cell culture supernatant extraction as templates to implement qRT-PCR reaction.Results The plasmid pET11 a-kod was transformed into Transetta (DE3) and the recombinant strain Transetta(pET11a-kod)was obtained.The kod-ssb was highly expressed when the recombinant strain Transetta(pET11a-kod)was induced by IPTG.The specific protein was detected by SDS-PAGE.To confirm that kod-ssb can enhance target DNA synthesis and reduce PCR by-products,5-,9-,and 13-kb human beta

  11. Swapping FAD binding motifs between plastidic and bacterial ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Matías A; Botti, Horacio; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2011-03-29

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are grouped in two classes, plastidic with an extended FAD conformation and high catalytic rates and bacterial with a folded flavin nucleotide and low turnover rates. The 112-123 β-hairpin from a plastidic FNR and the carboxy-terminal tryptophan of a bacterial FNR, suggested to be responsible for the FAD differential conformation, were mutually exchanged. The plastidic FNR lacking the β-hairpin was unable to fold properly. An extra tryptophan at the carboxy terminus, emulating the bacterial FNR, resulted in an enzyme with decreased affinity for FAD and reduced diaphorase and ferredoxin-dependent cytochrome c reductase activities. The insertion of the β-hairpin into the corresponding position of the bacterial FNR increased FAD affinity but did not affect its catalytic properties. The same insertion with simultaneous deletion of the carboxy-terminal tryptophan produced a bacterial chimera emulating the plastidic architecture with an increased k(cat) and an increased catalytic efficiency for the diaphorase activity and a decrease in the enzyme's ability to react with its substrates ferredoxin and flavodoxin. Crystallographic structures of the chimeras showed no significant changes in their overall structure, although alterations in the FAD conformations were observed. Plastidic and bacterial FNRs thus reveal differential effects of key structural elements. While the 112-123 β-hairpin modulates the catalytic efficiency of plastidic FNR, it seems not to affect the bacterial FNR behavior, which instead can be improved by the loss of the C-terminal tryptophan. This report highlights the role of the FAD moiety conformation and the structural determinants involved in stabilizing it, ultimately modulating the functional output of FNRs.

  12. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  13. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  14. Effect of uncoupler on assembly pathway for pigment-binding protein of bacterial photosynthetic membranes. [Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierstein, R.; Drews, G.

    1986-10-01

    The uncoupler carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used to investigate membrane protein assembly in the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. As found for Escherichia coli and mitochondrial proteins, assembly across the bacterial photosynthetic membranes was sensitive to CCCP. At uncoupler concentrations which were sufficient to block the export of the periplasmic cytochrome c/sub 2/ and an outer membrane protein, the integration of pigment-binding protein into the photosynthetic apparatus was abolished. The unassembled protein was detected on the inner surface of the intracytoplasmic membrane. After inactivation of CCCP, accumulated protein continued insertion into the membrane. The data suggest that after binding to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane (i), translocation of protein into a transmembrane orientation takes place (ii), which is a prerequisite for the formation of a functional pigment-protein complex (iii).

  15. A full-length group 1 bacterial sigma factor adopts a compact structure incompatible with DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Edmund C; Shekhtman, Alexander; Dutta, Kaushik; Pratt, Matthew R; Cowburn, David; Darst, Seth; Muir, Tom W

    2008-10-20

    The sigma factors are the key regulators of bacterial transcription initiation. Through direct read-out of promoter DNA sequence, they recruit the core RNA polymerase to sites of initiation, thereby dictating the RNA polymerase promoter-specificity. The group 1 sigma factors, which direct the vast majority of transcription initiation during log phase growth and are essential for viability, are autoregulated by an N-terminal sequence known as sigma1.1. We report the solution structure of Thermotoga maritima sigmaA sigma1.1. We additionally demonstrate by using chemical crosslinking strategies that sigma1.1 is in close proximity to the promoter recognition domains of sigmaA. We therefore propose that sigma1.1 autoinhibits promoter DNA binding of free sigmaA by stabilizing a compact organization of the sigma factor domains that is unable to bind DNA.

  16. Perinatal Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Enhances Susceptibility to Viral and Secondary Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn A. Claude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS leads to increased incidence of infections of the lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to determine whether perinatal exposure to ETS increases the incidence, morbidity and severity of respiratory influenza infection and whether a secondary bacterial challenge at the peak of a pre-existing viral infection creates an enhanced host-pathogen susceptibility to an opportunistic infection. Timed-pregnant female Balb/c mice were exposed to either ETS for 6 h/day, 7 d/week beginning on gestation day 14 and continuing with the neonates to 6 weeks of age. Control animals were exposed to filtered air (FA. At the end of exposure, mice were intranasally inoculated with a murine-adapted influenza A. One week later, an intranasal inoculation of S. aureus bacteria was administered. The respective treatment groups were: bacteria only, virus only or virus+bacteria for both FA and ETS-exposed animals for a total of six treatment groups. Animal behavior and body weights were documented daily following infection. Mice were necropsied 1-day post-bacterial infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell analysis demonstrated perinatal exposure to ETS, compared to FA, leads to delayed but enhanced clinical symptoms and enhanced total cell influx into the lungs associated with viral infection followed by bacterial challenge. Viral infection significantly increases the number of neutrophils entering the lungs following bacterial challenge with either FA or ETS exposure, while the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes is significantly enhanced only by perinatal ETS exposure. There is a significant increase in peribronchiolar inflammation following viral infection in pups exposed to ETS compared with pups exposed to FA, but no change is noted in the degree of lung injury between FA and ETS-exposed animals following bacterial challenge. The data suggests perinatal exposure to ETS

  17. N-terminal truncation enables crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of the FedF bacterial adhesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerpel, Maia; Van Molle, Inge [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Brys, Lea [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie, E-mail: bouckaej@vub.ac.be [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The N-terminal receptor-binding domain of the FedF adhesin from enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. This required the deletion of its first 14 residues, which are also cleaved off naturally. FedF is the two-domain tip adhesin of F18 fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Bacterial adherence, mediated by the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of FedF to carbohydrate receptors on intestinal microvilli, causes diarrhoea and oedema disease in newly weaned piglets and induces the secretion of Shiga toxins. A truncate containing only the receptor-binding domain of FedF was found to be further cleaved at its N-terminus. Reconstruction of this N-terminal truncate rendered FedF amenable to crystallization, resulting in crystals with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 36.20, b = 74.64, c = 99.03 Å that diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution. The binding specificity of FedF was screened for on a glycan array, exposing 264 glycoconjugates, to identify specific receptors for cocrystallization with FedF.

  18. Locating the route of entry and binding sites of benzocaine and phenytoin in a bacterial voltage gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lewis J; Corry, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites.

  19. Locating the route of entry and binding sites of benzocaine and phenytoin in a bacterial voltage gated sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis J Martin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites.

  20. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using Gluconacetobacter hansenii NCIM 2529 strain under shaking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Bhavna V; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a biopolymer, due to its unique properties is valuable for production of vital products in food, textile, medicine, and agriculture. In the present study, the optimal fermentation conditions for enhanced BC production by Gluconacetobacter hansenii NCIM 2529 were investigated under shaking conditions. The investigation on media components and culture parameters revealed that 2 % (w/v) sucrose as carbon source, 0.5 % (w/v) potassium nitrate as nitrogen source, 0.4 % (w/v) disodium phosphate as phosphate source, 0.04 % (w/v) magnesium sulfate, and 0.8 % (w/v) calcium chloride as trace elements, pH5.0, temperature 25 °C, and agitation speed 170 rpm with 6 days of fermentation period are optimal for maximum BC production. Production of BC using optimized media components and culture parameters was 1.66 times higher (5.0 g/l) than initial non optimized media (3.0 g/l). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum and comparison with the available literature suggests that the produced component by G. hansenii in the present study is pure bacterial cellulose. The specific action of cellulase out of the investigated hydrolytic enzymes (cellulase, amylase, and protease) further confirmed purity of the produced BC. These findings give insight into conditions necessary for enhanced production of bacterial cellulose, which can be used for a variety of applications.

  1. Regulating Prostate Cancer Sensitivity to Chemotherapy through Translational Control of CCAAT Enhancer Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    as a result of multiple adaptations, including AR gene amplification, abnormal AR activation or enhanced steroidogenesis.2 These changes are acquired...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0209 TITLE: Regulating Prostate Cancer Sensitivity to Chemotherapy through Translational Control of CCAAT Enhancer ... Enhancer Binding Proteins 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0209 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David J. Barakat, Samuel R

  2. Aminoglycosylation can enhance the G-quadruplex binding activity of epigallocatechin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Bai

    Full Text Available With the aim of enhancing G-quadruplex binding activity, two new glucosaminosides (16, 18 of penta-methylated epigallocatechin were synthesized by chemical glycosylation. Subsequent ESI-TOF-MS analysis demonstrated that these two glucosaminoside derivatives exhibit much stronger binding activity to human telomeric DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes than their parent structure (i.e., methylated EGC (14 as well as natural epigallocatechin (EGC, 6. The DNA G-quadruplex binding activity of 16 and 18 is even more potent than strong G-quadruplex binder quercetin, which has a more planar structure. These two synthetic compounds also showed a higher binding strength to human telomeric RNA G-quadruplex than its DNA counterpart. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship revealed that the more basic compound, 16, has a higher binding capacity with DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes than its N-acetyl derivative, 18, suggesting the importance of the basicity of the aminoglycoside for G-quadruplex binding activity. Molecular docking simulation predicted that the aromatic ring of 16 π-stacks with the aromatic ring of guanine nucleotides, with the glucosamine moiety residing in the groove of G-quadruplex. This research indicates that glycosylation of natural products with aminosugar can significantly enhance their G-quadruplex binding activities, thus is an effective way to generate small molecules targeting G-quadruplexes in nucleic acids. In addition, this is the first report that green tea catechin can bind to nucleic acid G-quadruplex structures.

  3. Thin stillage supplementation greatly enhances bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Ren-Han

    2012-09-01

    Thin stillage (TS), a wastewater from rice wine distillery can well sustain the growth of Gluconacetobacter xylinus for production of bacterial cellulose (BC). When used as a supplement to the traditional BC production medium (Hestrin and Schramm medium), the enhancement of BC production increased with the amount of TS supplemented in a static culture of G. xylinus. When TS was employed to replace distilled water for preparing HS medium (100%TS-HS medium), the BC production in this 100%TS-HS medium was enhanced 2.5-fold to a concentration of 10.38 g/l with sugar to BC conversion yield of 57% after 7 days cultivation. The cost-free TS as a supplement in BC production medium not only can greatly enhance the BC production, but also can effectively dispose the nuisance wastewater of rice wine distillery.

  4. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, B;

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are required for repair, recombination and replication in all organisms. Eukaryotic SSBs are regulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues. To our knowledge, phosphorylation of SSBs in bacteria has not been reported. A systematic search ...

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  6. Vibrational fingerprinting of bacterial pathogens by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premasiri, W. Ranjith; Moir, D. T.; Ziegler, Lawrence D.

    2005-05-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of vegetative whole-cell bacteria were obtained using in-situ grown gold nanoparticle cluster-covered silicon dioxide substrates excited at 785 nm. SERS spectra of Gram-negative bacteria; E. coli and S. typhimurium, and Gram-positive bacteria; B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringeinsis and B. anthracis Sterne, have been observed. Raman enhancement factors of ~104-105 per cell are found for both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria on this novel SERS substrate. The bacterial SERS spectra are species specific and exhibit greater species differentiation and reduced spectral congestion than their corresponding non-SERS (bulk) Raman spectra. Fluorescence observed in the 785 nm excited bulk Raman emission of Bacillus species is not apparent in the corresponding SERS spectra. The surface enhancement effect allows the observation of Raman spectra at the single cell level excited by low incident laser powers (blood serum, has an observable effect on the bacterial SERS spectra. However, reproducible, species specific SERS vibrational fingerprints are still obtained. The potential of SERS for detection and identification of bacteria with species specificity on these gold nanoparticle coated substrates is demonstrated by these results.

  7. Hacking RNA: Hakai promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing the RNA-binding function of PSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Angélica; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Gorospe, Myriam

    2009-11-15

    Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the E-cadherin complex, plays a crucial role in lowering cell-cell contacts in epithelial cells, a hallmark feature of tumor progression. Recently, Hakai was also found to interact with PSF (PTB-associated splicing factor). While PSF can function as a DNA-binding protein with a tumor suppressive function, its association with Hakai promotes PSF's RNA-binding ability and post-transcriptional influence on target mRNAs. Hakai overexpression enhanced the binding of PSF to mRNAs encoding cancer-related proteins, while knockdown of Hakai reduced the RNA-binding ability of PSF. Furthermore, the knockdown of PSF suppressed Hakai-induced cell proliferation. Thus, Hakai can affect the oncogenic phenotype both by altering E-cadherin-based intercellular adhesions and by increasing PSF's ability to bind RNAs that promote cancer-related gene expression.

  8. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-[alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Percy H.; Scherle, Peggy A.; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Voss, Matthew E.; Liu, Rui-qin; Thompson III, Lorin A.; Xu, Meizhong; Lo, Yvonne C.; Li, Zhong; Strzemienski, Paul; Yang, Gengjie; Falahatpishen, Nikoo; Farrow, Neil A.; Tebben, Andrew J.; Underwood, Denis; Trzaskos, James M.; Friedman, Steven M.; Newton, Robert C.; Decicco, Carl P. (DuPont)

    2010-03-05

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-{alpha} to TNFRc1 (IC{sub 50} = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of I{kappa}-B in Ramos cells (IC{sub 50} = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 {micro}M. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are 'photochemically enhanced' inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 mM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-{alpha} to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-{alpha}-TNFRc1 interaction.

  9. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P H; Scherle, P A; Muckelbauer, J K; Voss, M E; Liu, R Q; Thompson, L A; Tebben, A J; Solomon, K A; Lo, Y C; Li, Z; Strzemienski, P; Yang, G; Falahatpisheh, N; Xu, M; Wu, Z; Farrow, N A; Ramnarayan, K; Wang, J; Rideout, D; Yalamoori, V; Domaille, P; Underwood, D J; Trzaskos, J M; Friedman, S M; Newton, R C; Decicco, C P; Muckelbauer, J A

    2001-10-09

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-alpha to TNFRc1 (IC(50) = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of Ikappa-B in Ramos cells (IC(50) = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 microM. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are "photochemically enhanced" inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 microM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-alpha to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-alpha-TNFRc1 interaction.

  10. A strategy to enhance the binding affinity of fluorophore-aptamer pairs for RNA tagging with neomycin conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongho; Lee, Kyung Hyun; Rao, Jianghong

    2012-10-14

    Fluorogenic sulforhodamine-neomycin conjugates have been designed and synthesized for RNA tagging. Conjugates were fluorescently activated by binding to RNA aptamers and exhibited greater than 250-400 fold enhancement in binding affinity relative to corresponding unconjugated fluorophores.

  11. Bacterial-binding chitosan microspheres for gastric infection treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Inês C; Magalhães, Ana; Fernandes, Mariana; Rodrigues, Inês V; Reis, Celso A; Martins, M Cristina L

    2013-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes the gastric mucosa of over 50% of the world population, causing several pathologies, such as gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Since current antibiotic treatments are inefficient in 20% of cases alternative therapies are needed. This work reports the ability of chitosan microspheres to adhere to H. pylori and prevent/remove H. pylori colonization. Adhesion of H. pylori strains with different functional adhesins (BabA and/or SabA) to chitosan microspheres (diameter 167 ± 27 μm) occurs at both pH 2.6 and 6.0, but is higher at pH 6.0. Bacterial adhesion to a gastric cell line expressing sialylated carbohydrates (SabA receptors) was performed at the same pH values using H. pylori strains with and without SabA. At both pH values addition of microspheres to gastric cells before and after pre-incubation with H. pylori decreased bacterial adhesion to cells. Furthermore, the chitosan microspheres were non-cytotoxic. These findings reveal the potential of chitosan microspheres as an alternative or complementary treatment for H. pylori gastric eradication or prevention of H. pylori colonization.

  12. Identification of second arginine-glycine-aspartic acid motif of ovine vitronectin as the complement C9 binding site and its implication in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T, Prasada Rao; T, Lakshmi Prasanth; R, Parvathy; S, Murugavel; Devi, Karuna; Joshi, Paritosh

    2017-02-02

    Vitronectin (Vn), a multifunctional protein of blood and extracellular matrix interacts with complement C9. This interaction may modulate innate immunity. Details of Vn-C9 interaction are limited. An assessment of Vn-C9 interaction was made employing goat homologous system. Vn binding to C9 was observed in three different assays. Using recombinant fragments, the C9 binding was mapped to the N-terminus of Vn. Site directed mutagenesis was performed to alter the second RGD sequence (RGD-2) of Vn. Change of R to G or D to A in RGD-2 caused significant decrease in Vn binding to C9 whereas change of R to G in the first RGD motif (RGD-1) had no effect on Vn binding to C9. These results imply that the RGD-2 of goat Vn is involved in C9 binding. In competitive binding assay, the presence of soluble RGD peptide inhibited Vn binding to C9 whereas heparin had no effect. Vn binding to C9 in terms of bacterial pathogenesis was also evaluated. Serum dependent inhibition of E. coli growth was significantly reverted when Vn or its N-fragment were included in the assay. The C-fragment, which did not support C9 binding, also partly nullified serum dependent inhibition of bacterial growth probably through other serum component(s).

  13. A man-made ATP-binding protein evolved independent of nature causes abnormal growth in bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Stomel

    Full Text Available Recent advances in de novo protein evolution have made it possible to create synthetic proteins from unbiased libraries that fold into stable tertiary structures with predefined functions. However, it is not known whether such proteins will be functional when expressed inside living cells or how a host organism would respond to an encounter with a non-biological protein. Here, we examine the physiology and morphology of Escherichia coli cells engineered to express a synthetic ATP-binding protein evolved entirely from non-biological origins. We show that this man-made protein disrupts the normal energetic balance of the cell by altering the levels of intracellular ATP. This disruption cascades into a series of events that ultimately limit reproductive competency by inhibiting cell division. We now describe a detailed investigation into the synthetic biology of this man-made protein in a living bacterial organism, and the effect that this protein has on normal cell physiology.

  14. Pipecolic acid enhances resistance to bacterial infection and primes salicylic acid and nicotine accumulation in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Adghough, Drissia; Stahl, Elia; Návarová, Hana; Zeier, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. We have recently identified pipecolic acid (Pip), a lysine-derived non-protein amino acid, as a critical regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and basal immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Arabidopsis, Pip acts as an endogenous mediator of defense amplification and priming. For instance, Pip conditions plants for effective biosynthesis of the phenolic defense signal salicylic acid (SA), accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin, and expression of defense-related genes. Here, we show that tobacco plants respond to leaf infection by the compatible bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci (Pstb) with a significant accumulation of several amino acids, including Lys, branched-chain, aromatic, and amide group amino acids. Moreover, Pstb strongly triggers, alongside the biosynthesis of SA and increases in the defensive alkaloid nicotine, the production of the Lys catabolites Pip and α-aminoadipic acid. Exogenous application of Pip to tobacco plants provides significant protection to infection by adapted Pstb or by non-adapted, hypersensitive cell death-inducing P. syringae pv maculicola. Pip thereby primes tobacco for rapid and strong accumulation of SA and nicotine following bacterial infection. Thus, our study indicates that the role of Pip as an amplifier of immune responses is conserved between members of the rosid and asterid groups of eudicot plants and suggests a broad practical applicability for Pip as a natural enhancer of plant disease resistance.

  15. A bacterial protein enhances the release and efficacy of liposomal cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ian; Huang, Xin; Bettegowda, Chetan; Diaz, Luis A; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert

    2006-11-24

    Clostridium novyi-NT is an anaerobic bacterium that can infect hypoxic regions within experimental tumors. Because C. novyi-NT lyses red blood cells, we hypothesized that its membrane-disrupting properties could be exploited to enhance the release of liposome-encapsulated drugs within tumors. Here, we show that treatment of mice bearing large, established tumors with C. novyi-NT plus a single dose of liposomal doxorubicin often led to eradication of the tumors. The bacterial factor responsible for the enhanced drug release was identified as a previously unrecognized protein termed liposomase. This protein could potentially be incorporated into diverse experimental approaches for the specific delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors.

  16. The Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adherence protein promotes bacterial internalization by keratinocytes independent of fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bur, Stephanie; Preissner, Klaus T; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, the leading causal pathogen of skin infections, is strongly associated with skin atopy, and a number of bacterial adhesins allow the microbe to adhere to and invade eukaryotic cells. One of these adhesive molecules is the multifunctional extracellular adherence protein (Eap), which is overexpressed in situ in authentic human wounds and was shown to delay wound healing in experimental models. Yet, its role during invasion of keratinocytes is not clearly defined. By using a gentamicin/lysostaphin protection assay we demonstrate here that preincubation of HaCaT cells or primary keratinocytes with Eap results in a concentration-dependent significant increase in staphylococcal adhesion, followed by an even more pronounced internalization of bacteria by eukaryotic cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that Eap increased both the number of infected eukaryotic cells and the bacterial load per infected cell. Moreover, treatment of keratinocytes with Eap strongly enhanced the internalization of coagulase-negative staphylococci, as well as of E. coli, and markedly promoted staphylococcal invasion into extended-culture keratinocytes, displaying expression of keratin 10 and involucrin as differentiation markers. Thus, wound-related staphylococcal Eap may provide a major cellular invasin function, thereby enhancing the pathogen's ability to hide from the host immune system during acute and chronic skin infection.

  17. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  18. Probing the potential of apigenin liposomes in enhancing bacterial membrane perturbation and integrity loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kacoli; Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Das, Subhayan; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-09-01

    Along with discovery of new antibacterial agents, it is important to develop novel drug delivery systems to effectively deliver drugs within bacterial cells for enhanced therapeutic activity. Liposomes have been extensively investigated as pharmaceutical carriers for improvement of therapeutic index of antimicrobial agents. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of free and liposomal formulation of apigenin, a plant based isoflavone and elucidate the mode of action. Distearoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes were prepared having nano-range particle size (104.3±1.8 nm), narrow particle distribution (0.204) and high encapsulation efficiency of apigenin (89.9±2.31%). Antibacterial activity of apigenin and efficacy of liposome-mediated apigenin delivery were determined from minimum inhibitory concentration values. Interaction studies using electron microscopy revealed adherence and fusion of liposomal apigenin with the bacteria causing membrane perturbation through reactive oxygen species generation which was evaluated by epi-fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting. The interaction of apigenin liposomes with bacterial membrane increased intracellular drug concentration and thus, can be employed to deliver apigenin within cells to augment its antibacterial activity. Increased efficacy and hemocompatibility of this formulation paves way for future evaluation of underlying molecular mechanisms and in vivo testing for enhanced therapeutic effects.

  19. Zebrafish CD59 has both bacterial-binding and inhibiting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Wu, Jie; Liu, Shousheng; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    CD59, known as protectin, usually plays roles as a regulatory inhibitor of complement, but it also exhibits activities independent of its function as a complement inhibitor. This study reported the identification and characterization of an ortholog of mammalian cd59 from zebrafish Danio rerio, which is similar to known cd59 in terms of both amino acid sequence and genomic structure as well as synteny conservation. We showed that zebrafish cd59 was maternally expressed in early embryos and expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with most abundant expression in the brain. We further showed that recombinant zebrafish CD59 was capable of binding to both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as the microbial signature molecules LPS and LTA. In addition we demonstrated that recombinant zebrafish CD59 displayed slight antimicrobial activity capable of inhibiting the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. All these data indicate that zebrafish CD59 can not only binds to the bacteria and their signature molecules LPS and LTA but can also inhibit their growth, a novel role assigned to CD59.

  20. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is used to study the Raman spectra and peak shifts the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) on substrates having two different geometries; one with a single stranded sequence and one with double stranded sequence. The Raman signals of the deoxyribonucleic acids on both substrates are enhanced and specific peaks of bases are identified. These results are highly reproducible and have promising applications in low cost nucleic acid detection.

  1. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  2. Scl binds to primed enhancers in mesoderm to regulate hematopoietic and cardiac fate divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Org, Tõnis; Duan, Dan; Ferrari, Roberto; Montel-Hagen, Amelie; Van Handel, Ben; Kerényi, Marc A; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pellegrini, Matteo; Orkin, Stuart H; Kurdistani, Siavash K; Mikkola, Hanna Ka

    2015-03-12

    Scl/Tal1 confers hemogenic competence and prevents ectopic cardiomyogenesis in embryonic endothelium by unknown mechanisms. We discovered that Scl binds to hematopoietic and cardiac enhancers that become epigenetically primed in multipotent cardiovascular mesoderm, to regulate the divergence of hematopoietic and cardiac lineages. Scl does not act as a pioneer factor but rather exploits a pre-established epigenetic landscape. As the blood lineage emerges, Scl binding and active epigenetic modifications are sustained in hematopoietic enhancers, whereas cardiac enhancers are decommissioned by removal of active epigenetic marks. Our data suggest that, rather than recruiting corepressors to enhancers, Scl prevents ectopic cardiogenesis by occupying enhancers that cardiac factors, such as Gata4 and Hand1, use for gene activation. Although hematopoietic Gata factors bind with Scl to both activated and repressed genes, they are dispensable for cardiac repression, but necessary for activating genes that enable hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development. These results suggest that a unique subset of enhancers in lineage-specific genes that are accessible for regulators of opposing fates during the time of the fate decision provide a platform where the divergence of mutually exclusive fates is orchestrated.

  3. Stapling monomeric GCN4 peptides allows for DNA binding and enhanced cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Ruiz García, Yara; Louage, Benoit; De Geest, Bruno G; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-04-01

    The basic DNA recognition region of the GCN4 protein comprising 23 amino acids has been modified to contain two optimally positioned cysteines which have been linked and stapled using cross-linkers of suitable lengths. This results in stapled peptides with a stabilized α-helical conformation which allows for DNA binding and concurrent enhancement of cellular uptake.

  4. The chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha gene. Cloning, characterisation and tissue distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Gringhuis, SI; Ab, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha (cC/EBP alpha). The coding region and 1.5 kb of 5' flanking DNA form a CpG island. Comparison of the chicken C/EBP alpha sequence to the homologous proteins of other species reveals several ev

  5. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...

  6. Nonlinearity arising from noncooperative transcription factor binding enhances negative feedback and promotes genetic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, Iván M; Oates, Andrew C; Morelli, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of multiple binding sites in the promoter of a genetic oscillator. We evaluate the regulatory function of a promoter with multiple binding sites in the absence of cooperative binding, and consider different hypotheses for how the number of bound repressors affects transcription rate. Effective Hill exponents of the resulting regulatory functions reveal an increase in the nonlinearity of the feedback with the number of binding sites. We identify optimal configurations that maximize the nonlinearity of the feedback. We use a generic model of a biochemical oscillator to show that this increased nonlinearity is reflected in enhanced oscillations, with larger amplitudes over wider oscillatory ranges. Although the study is motivated by genetic oscillations in the zebrafish segmentation clock, our findings may reveal a general principle for gene regulation.

  7. Expressing a bacterial mercuric ion binding protein in plant for phytoremediation of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ju-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chein, Mei-Fang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Endo, Ginro; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2009-01-30

    A specific mercuric ion binding protein (MerP) originating from transposon TnMERI1 of Bacillus megaterium strain MB1 isolated from Minamata Bay displayed good adsorption capability for a variety of heavy metals. In this study, the Gram-positive MerP protein was expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis to create a model system for phytoremediation of heavy metals. Under control of an actin promoter, the transgenic Arabidpsis showed higher tolerance and accumulation capacity for mercury, cadium and lead when compared with the control plant. Results from confocal microscopy analysis also indicate that MerP was localized at the cell membrane and vesicles of plant cells. The developed transgenic plants possessing excellent metal-accumulative ability could have potential applications in decontamination of heavy metals.

  8. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  9. Solid-state NMR [13C,15N] resonance assignments of the nucleotide-Binding Domain of a bacterial Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cukkemane, A.A.; Nand, D.; Gradmann, S.H.E.; Weingarth, M.H.; Kaupp, U.B.; Baldus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Channels regulated by cyclic nucleotides are key signalling proteins in several biological pathways. The regulatory aspect is conferred by a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). We report resonance assignments of the CNBD of a bacterial mlCNG channel obtained using 2D and 3D solid-sta

  10. Secondary Structure Preferences of Mn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Khrustaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used. Major Mn2+ binders are aspartic acid (6.82% of Asp residues, histidine (14.76% of His residues, and glutamic acid (3.51% of Glu residues. We found out that the motif of secondary structure “beta strand-major binder-random coil” is overrepresented around all the three major Mn2+ binders. That motif may be followed by either alpha helix or beta strand. Beta strands near Mn2+ binding residues should be stable because they are enriched by such beta formers as valine and isoleucine, as well as by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues characteristic to beta sheet. In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. On the other hand, the percentage of Mn2+ sites with at least one amino acid in the “beta strand-major binder-random coil” motif of secondary structure (77.88% does not depend on genomic GC-content.

  11. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Asit [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Biswas, Bhabananda [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Sarkar, Binoy, E-mail: binoy.sarkar@unisa.edu.au [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Patra, Ashok K. [Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@newcastle.edu.au [Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L{sup −1} metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L{sup −1}), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72–78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP–bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. - Highlights: • Surface tailored organobentonite synthesised and characterised • Modified clay adsorbs Cd and reduces toxicity to Mycobacterium gilvum. • It creates congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. • It enhances phenanthrene biodegradation in metal co-contaminated condition.

  12. Uncovering the Transmembrane Metal Binding Site of the Novel Bacterial Major Facilitator Superfamily-Type Copper Importer CcoA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahia Khalfaoui-Hassani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uptake and trafficking of metals and their delivery to their respective metalloproteins are important processes. Cells need precise control of each step to avoid exposure to excessive metal concentrations and their harmful consequences. Copper (Cu is a required micronutrient used as a cofactor in proteins. However, in large amounts, it can induce oxidative damage; hence, Cu homeostasis is indispensable for cell survival. Biogenesis of respiratory heme-Cu oxygen (HCO reductases includes insertion of Cu into their catalytic subunits to form heme-Cu binuclear centers. Previously, we had shown that CcoA is a major facilitator superfamily (MFS-type bacterial Cu importer required for biogenesis of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3-Cox. Here, using Rhodobacter capsulatus, we focused on the import and delivery of Cu to cbb3-Cox. By comparing the CcoA amino acid sequence with its homologues from other bacterial species, we located several well-conserved Met, His, and Tyr residues that might be important for Cu transport. We determined the topology of the transmembrane helices that carry these residues to establish that they are membrane embedded, and substituted for them amino acids that do not ligand metal atoms. Characterization of these mutants for their uptake of radioactive 64Cu and cbb3-Cox activities demonstrated that Met233 and His261 of CcoA are essential and Met237 and Met265 are important, whereas Tyr230 has no role for Cu uptake or cbb3-Cox biogenesis. These findings show for the first time that CcoA-mediated Cu import relies on conserved Met and His residues that could act as metal ligands at the membrane-embedded Cu binding domain of this transporter.

  13. Enhanced binding of antibodies generated during chronic HIV infection to mucus component MUC16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Fahrbach, Kelly; Smith, Archer; Mahan, Alison; Karim, Marcus; Licht, Anna; Zvonar, Ivan; Tedesco, Jacquelynn; Anderson, Meegan; Chapel, Anais; Suscovich, Todd; Malaspina, David; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Kim, Arthur; Lauer, Georg; Altfeld, Marcus; Pillai, Shiv; Szleifer, Igal; Kelleher, Neil L.; Kiser, Patrick F.; Hope, Thomas J.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of HIV across mucosal barriers accounts for the majority of HIV infections worldwide. Thus, efforts aimed at enhancing protective immunity at these sites are a top priority, including increasing virus-specific antibodies (Abs) and antiviral activity at mucosal sites. Mucin proteins, including the largest cell-associated mucin, MUC16, help form mucus to provide a physical barrier to incoming pathogens. Here we describe a natural interaction between Abs and MUC16 that is enhanced in specific disease settings such as chronic HIV infection. Binding to MUC16 was independent of IgG subclass, but strongly associated with shorter Ab glycan profiles, with agalactosylated (G0) Abs demonstrating the highest binding to MUC16. Binding of Abs to epithelial cells was diminished following MUC16-knockdown, and the MUC16 N-linked glycans were critical for binding. Further, agalactosylated VRC01 captured HIV more efficiently in MUC16. These data point to a novel opportunity to enrich Abs at mucosal sites by targeting Abs to MUC16 through changes in Fc-glycosylation, potentially blocking viral movement and sequestering the virus far from the epithelial border. Thus, next-generation vaccines or monoclonal therapeutics may enhance protective immunity by tuning Ab glycosylation to promote the enrichment of Abs at mucosal barriers. PMID:26960182

  14. Enhanced delignification of steam-pretreated poplar by a bacterial laccase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Hu, Jinguang; Regner, Matthew R; Round, James W; Ralph, John; Saddler, John N; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2017-02-07

    The recalcitrance of woody biomass, particularly its lignin component, hinders its sustainable transformation to fuels and biomaterials. Although the recent discovery of several bacterial ligninases promises the development of novel biocatalysts, these enzymes have largely been characterized using model substrates: direct evidence for their action on biomass is lacking. Herein, we report the delignification of woody biomass by a small laccase (sLac) from Amycolatopsis sp. 75iv3. Incubation of steam-pretreated poplar (SPP) with sLac enhanced the release of acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL) by ~6-fold, and reduced the amount of acid-soluble lignin by ~15%. NMR spectrometry revealed that the APPL was significantly syringyl-enriched relative to the original material (~16:1 vs. ~3:1), and that sLac preferentially oxidized syringyl units and altered interunit linkage distributions. sLac's substrate preference among monoaryls was also consistent with this observation. In addition, sLac treatment reduced the molar mass of the APPL by over 50%, as determined by gel-permeation chromatography coupled with multi-angle light scattering. Finally, sLac acted synergistically with a commercial cellulase cocktail to increase glucose production from SPP ~8%. Overall, this study establishes the lignolytic activity of sLac on woody biomass and highlights the biocatalytic potential of bacterial enzymes.

  15. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control.

  16. Enhanced delignification of steam-pretreated poplar by a bacterial laccase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Hu, Jinguang; Regner, Matthew R.; Round, James W.; Ralph, John; Saddler, John N.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2017-01-01

    The recalcitrance of woody biomass, particularly its lignin component, hinders its sustainable transformation to fuels and biomaterials. Although the recent discovery of several bacterial ligninases promises the development of novel biocatalysts, these enzymes have largely been characterized using model substrates: direct evidence for their action on biomass is lacking. Herein, we report the delignification of woody biomass by a small laccase (sLac) from Amycolatopsis sp. 75iv3. Incubation of steam-pretreated poplar (SPP) with sLac enhanced the release of acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL) by ~6-fold, and reduced the amount of acid-soluble lignin by ~15%. NMR spectrometry revealed that the APPL was significantly syringyl-enriched relative to the original material (~16:1 vs. ~3:1), and that sLac preferentially oxidized syringyl units and altered interunit linkage distributions. sLac’s substrate preference among monoaryls was also consistent with this observation. In addition, sLac treatment reduced the molar mass of the APPL by over 50%, as determined by gel-permeation chromatography coupled with multi-angle light scattering. Finally, sLac acted synergistically with a commercial cellulase cocktail to increase glucose production from SPP ~8%. Overall, this study establishes the lignolytic activity of sLac on woody biomass and highlights the biocatalytic potential of bacterial enzymes. PMID:28169340

  17. High Dynamic Range Color Image Enhancement Using Fuzzy Logic and Bacterial Foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range images contain both the underexposed and the overexposed regions. The enhancement of the underexposed and the overexposed regions is the main concern of this paper. Two new transformation functions are proposed to modify the fuzzy membership values of under and the overexposed regions of an image respectively.For the overexposed regions, a rectangular hyperbolic function is used while for the underexposed regions, an S-function is applied. The shape and range of these functions can be controlled by the parameters involved, which are optimized using the bacterial foraging optimization algorithm so as to obtain the enhanced image. The hue, saturation, and intensity (HSV color space is employed for the purpose of enhancement, where the hue component is preserved to keep the original color composition intact. This approach is applicable to a degraded image of mixed type. On comparison, the proposed transforms yield better results than the existing transformation functions17 for both the underexposed and the overexposed regions.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(5, pp.462-472, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.1184

  18. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  19. Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 Mediates Pathogen Resistance and Virulence Function of a Bacterial Effector in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialin; Shine, M B; Gao, Qing-Ming; Navarre, Duroy; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan; Hu, Guohua; Kachroo, Aardra

    2014-05-28

    Enhanced disease susceptibility1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient4 (PAD4) are well-known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1-like (GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b) proteins and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean (Glycine max). Consistent with their significant structural conservation to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) counterparts, constitutive expression of GmEDS1 or GmPAD4 complemented the pathogen resistance defects of Arabidopsis eds1 and pad4 mutants, respectively. Interestingly, however, the GmEDS1 and GmPAD4 did not complement pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation in the eds1/pad4 mutants. Furthermore, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins were unable to complement the turnip crinkle virus coat protein-mediated activation of the Arabidopsis R protein Hypersensitive reaction to Turnip crinkle virus (HRT), even though both interacted with HRT. Silencing GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b or GmPAD4 reduced basal and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation and enhanced soybean susceptibility to virulent pathogens. The GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b and GmPAD4 genes were also required for Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea2 (Rpg2)-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Notably, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins interacted with the cognate bacterial effector AvrA1 and were required for its virulence function in rpg2 plants. Together, these results show that despite significant structural similarities, conserved defense signaling components from diverse plants can differ in their functionalities. In addition, we demonstrate a role for GmEDS1 in regulating the virulence function of a bacterial effector.

  20. B cells moderate inflammatory progression and enhance bacterial containment upon pulmonary challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John

    2007-06-01

    Though much is known about the function of T lymphocytes in the adaptive immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, comparably little is understood regarding the corresponding role of B lymphocytes. Indicating B cells as components of lymphoid neogenesis during pulmonary tuberculosis, we have identified ectopic germinal centers (GCs) in the lungs of infected mice. B cells in these pulmonary lymphoid aggregates express peanut agglutinin and GL7, two markers of GC B cells, as well as CXCR5, and migrate in response to the lymphoid-associated chemokine CXCL13 ex vivo. CXCL13 is negatively regulated by the presence of B cells, as its production is elevated in lungs of B cell-deficient (B cell(-/-)) mice. Upon aerosol with 100 CFU of M. tuberculosis Erdman, B cell(-/-) mice have exacerbated immunopathology corresponding with elevated pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils. Infected B cell(-/-) mice show increased production of IL-10 in the lungs, whereas IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-10R remain unchanged from wild type. B cell(-/-) mice have enhanced susceptibility to infection when aerogenically challenged with 300 CFU of M. tuberculosis corresponding with elevated bacterial burden in the lungs but not in the spleen or liver. Adoptive transfer of B cells complements the phenotypes of B cell(-/-) mice, confirming a role for B cells in both modulation of the host response and optimal containment of the tubercle bacillus. As components of ectopic GCs, moderators of inflammatory progression, and enhancers of local immunity against bacterial challenge, B cells may have a greater role in the host defense against M. tuberculosis than previously thought.

  1. Protein L. A bacterial Ig-binding protein that activates human basophils and mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patella, V; Casolaro, V; Björck, L; Marone, G

    1990-11-01

    Peptostreptococcus magnus strain 312 (10(6) to 10(8)/ml), which synthesizes a protein capable of binding to kappa L chains of human Ig (protein L), stimulated the release of histamine from human basophils in vitro. P. magnus strain 644, which does not synthesize protein L, did not induce histamine secretion. Soluble protein L (3 x 10(-2) to 3 micrograms/ml) induced histamine release from human basophils. The characteristics of the release reaction were similar to those of rabbit IgG anti-Fc fragment of human IgE (anti-IgE): it was Ca2(+)- and temperature-dependent, optimal release occurring at 37 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 mM extracellular Ca2+. There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.82; p less than 0.001) between the maximal percent histamine release induced by protein L and that induced by anti-IgE, as well as between protein L and protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (r = 0.52; p less than 0.01). Preincubation of basophils with either protein L or anti-IgE resulted in complete cross-desensitization to a subsequent challenge with the heterologous stimulus. IgE purified from myeloma patients PS and PP (lambda-chains) blocked anti-IgE-induced histamine release but failed to block the histamine releasing activity of protein L. In contrast, IgE purified from myeloma patient ADZ (kappa-chains) blocked both anti-IgE- and protein L-induced releases, whereas human polyclonal IgG selectively blocked protein L-induced secretion. Protein L acted as a complete secretagogue, i.e., it activated basophils to release sulfidopeptide leukotriene C4 as well as histamine. Protein L (10(-1) to 3 micrograms/ml) also induced the release of preformed (histamine) and de novo synthesized mediators (leukotriene C4 and/or PGD2) from mast cells isolated from lung parenchyma and skin tissues. Intradermal injections of protein L (0.01 to 10 micrograms/ml) in nonallergic subjects caused a dose-dependent wheal-and-flare reaction. Protein L activates human basophils and mast cells in

  2. Efficacy of coating activated carbon with milk proteins to prevent binding of bacterial cells from foods for PCR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opet, Nathan J; Levin, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    Foods contaminated with pathogens are common sources of illness. Currently, the most common and sensitive rapid detection method involves the PCR. However, food matrices are complex and contain inhibitors that limit the sensitivity of the PCR. The use of coated activated carbon can effectively facilitate the removal of PCR inhibitors without binding targeted bacterial cells from food samples. With the use of activated carbon coated with milk proteins, a cell recovery at pH 7.0 of 95.7%±2.0% was obtained, compared to control uncoated activated carbon, which yielded a cell recovery of only 1.1%±0.8%. In addition, the milk protein coated activated carbon was able to absorb similar amounts of soluble compounds as uncoated activated carbon, with the exception of bovine hemoglobin. This suggests that the use of milk proteins to coat activated carbon may therefore serve as a suitable replacement for bentonite in the coating of activated carbon, which has previously been used for the removal of PCR inhibitors from food.

  3. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis.

  4. Double-Stranded RNA-Binding Protein 4 Is Required for Resistance Signaling against Viral and Bacterial Pathogens

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    Shifeng Zhu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant viruses often encode suppressors of host RNA silencing machinery, which occasionally function as avirulence factors that are recognized by host resistance (R proteins. For example, the Arabidopsis R protein, hypersensitive response to TCV (HRT, recognizes the turnip crinkle virus (TCV coat protein (CP. HRT-mediated resistance requires the RNA-silencing component double-stranded RNA-binding protein 4 (DRB4 even though it neither is associated with the accumulation of TCV-specific small RNA nor requires the RNA silencing suppressor function of CP. HRT interacts with the cytosolic fraction of DRB4. Interestingly, TCV infection both increases the cytosolic DRB4 pool and inhibits the HRT-DRB4 interaction. The virulent R8A CP derivative, which induces a subset of HRT-derived responses, also disrupts this interaction. The differential localization of DRB4 in the presence of wild-type and R8A CP implies the importance of subcellular compartmentalization of DRB4. The requirement of DRB4 in resistance to bacterial infection suggests a universal role in R-mediated defense signaling.

  5. Enzyme-adenylate structure of a bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a minimized DNA-binding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Rothweiler, Ulli; Leiros, Hanna Kirsti Schrøder

    2014-11-01

    DNA ligases are a structurally diverse class of enzymes which share a common catalytic core and seal breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of double-stranded DNA via an adenylated intermediate. Here, the structure and activity of a recombinantly produced ATP-dependent DNA ligase from the bacterium Psychromonas sp. strain SP041 is described. This minimal-type ligase, like its close homologues, is able to ligate singly nicked double-stranded DNA with high efficiency and to join cohesive-ended and blunt-ended substrates to a more limited extent. The 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme-adenylate complex reveals no unstructured loops or segments, and suggests that this enzyme binds the DNA without requiring full encirclement of the DNA duplex. This is in contrast to previously characterized minimal DNA ligases from viruses, which use flexible loop regions for DNA interaction. The Psychromonas sp. enzyme is the first structure available for the minimal type of bacterial DNA ligases and is the smallest DNA ligase to be crystallized to date.

  6. The meningococcal vaccine candidate neisserial surface protein A (NspA binds to factor H and enhances meningococcal resistance to complement.

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    Lisa A Lewis

    Full Text Available Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH to fH-binding protein (fHbp is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a approximately 17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA, a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS, or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6-7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components.

  7. EXPRESSION OF BACTERIAL PROTEIN-A IN TOBACCO LEADS TO ENHANCED RESISTANCE TO STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Roy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is the most commonly used plant for expression of transgenes from a variety of organisms because it can be easily grown and transformed, it provides abundant amounts of fresh tissue and has a well-established cell culture system. As bacterial enzymes can be synthesized in tobacco, here we explore the possibility of in planta expression of staphylococcal protein-A(PA which is an antibody, an important group among biopharmaceuticals. In our study we have shown that the tobacco plants harboring PA gene could combat the crown gall infection and also effective in resisting abiotic stress conditions. Transgenic plants when subjected to interact with wild variety of Agrobacterium shows its enhanced capability to resist the gall formation. And when transgenic tobacco plants were grown in presence of 200mM NaCl and/or MG(Methylglyoxal solution, shows their increased tolerance towards salinity stress and high MG stress. So far transgenic tobacco plants are concerned, improvements in the expression of recombinant proteins and their recovery from tobacco may also enhance production and commercial use of this protein.

  8. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirci Ali

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L. The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93% and similar crystal size (5.2 nm to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to

  9. Target-specific capture enhances sensitivity of electrochemical detection of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayank; Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Halford, Colin; Lewinski, Michael A; Landaw, Elliot M; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2011-12-01

    We report the concentration and purification of bacterial 16S rRNA by the use of a biotinylated DNA target-specific capture (TSC) probe. For both cultivated bacterial and urine specimens from urinary tract infection patients, TSC resulted in a 5- to 8-fold improvement in the sensitivity of bacterial detection in a 16S rRNA electrochemical sensor assay.

  10. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis.

  11. Design of an insulin analog with enhanced receptor binding selectivity: rationale, structure, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Wan, Zhu-li; Whittaker, Linda; Xu, Bin; Phillips, Nelson B; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Whittaker, Jonathan; Weiss, Michael A

    2009-11-13

    Insulin binds with high affinity to the insulin receptor (IR) and with low affinity to the type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGFR). Such cross-binding, which reflects homologies within the insulin-IGF signaling system, is of clinical interest in relation to the association between hyperinsulinemia and colorectal cancer. Here, we employ nonstandard mutagenesis to design an insulin analog with enhanced affinity for the IR but reduced affinity for the IGFR. Unnatural amino acids were introduced by chemical synthesis at the N- and C-capping positions of a recognition alpha-helix (residues A1 and A8). These sites adjoin the hormone-receptor interface as indicated by photocross-linking studies. Specificity is enhanced more than 3-fold on the following: (i) substitution of Gly(A1) by D-Ala or D-Leu, and (ii) substitution of Thr(A8) by diaminobutyric acid (Dab). The crystal structure of [D-Ala(A1),Dab(A8)]insulin, as determined within a T(6) zinc hexamer to a resolution of 1.35 A, is essentially identical to that of human insulin. The nonstandard side chains project into solvent at the edge of a conserved receptor-binding surface shared by insulin and IGF-I. Our results demonstrate that modifications at this edge discriminate between IR and IGFR. Because hyperinsulinemia is typically characterized by a 3-fold increase in integrated postprandial insulin concentrations, we envisage that such insulin analogs may facilitate studies of the initiation and progression of cancer in animal models. Future development of clinical analogs lacking significant IGFR cross-binding may enhance the safety of insulin replacement therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  12. Homodimerization enhances both sensitivity and dynamic range of the ligand-binding domain of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryany, Eugene; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Liu, Jian; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2016-12-01

    Cooperativity in ligand binding is a key emergent property of protein oligomers. Positive cooperativity (higher affinity for subsequent binding events than for initial binding) is frequent. However, the symmetrically homodimeric ligand-binding domain (LBD) of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 exhibits negative cooperativity. To investigate its origin and functional significance, we measured the response to glutamate in vitro of wild-type and C140S LBD as a function of the extent of dimerization. Our results indicate that homodimerization enhances the affinity of the first, but not the second, binding site, relative to the monomer, giving the dimeric receptor both greater sensitivity and a broader dynamic range.

  13. Decreased activity and enhanced nuclear export of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein beta during inhibition of adipogenesis by ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Kam M; Chumley, Michael J; Hanson, Janean M; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2002-07-01

    To identify novel molecular mechanisms by which ceramide regulates cell differentiation, we examined its effect on adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Hormonal stimulation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes induced formation of triacylglycerol-laden adipocytes over 7 days; in part, via the co-ordinated action of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins alpha, beta and delta (C/EBP-alpha, -beta and -delta) and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). The addition of exogenous N-acetylsphingosine (C2-ceramide) or increasing endogenous ceramide levels inhibited the expression of C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma, and blocked adipocyte development. C2-ceramide did not decrease the cellular expression of C/EBPbeta, which is required for expression of C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma, but significantly blocked its transcriptional activity from a promoter construct after 24 h. The ceramide-induced decrease in the transcriptional activity of C/EBPbeta correlated with a strong decrease in its phosphorylation, DNA-binding ability and nuclear localization at 24 h. However, ceramide did not change the nuclear level of C/EBPbeta after a period of 4 or 16 h, suggesting that it was not affecting nuclear import. CRM1 (more recently named 'exportin-1') is a nuclear membrane protein that regulates protein export from the nucleus by binding to a specific nuclear export sequence. Leptomycin B is an inhibitor of CRM1/exportin-1, and reversed the ceramide-induced decrease in nuclear C/EBPbeta at 24 h. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that ceramide may inhibit adipogenesis, at least in part, by enhancing dephosphorylation and premature nuclear export of C/EBPbeta at a time when its maximal transcriptional activity is required to drive adipogenesis.

  14. RNA Detection in Live Bacterial Cells Using Fluorescent Protein Complementation Triggered by Interaction of Two RNA Aptamers with Two RNA-Binding Peptides

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    Charles R. Cantor

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Many genetic and infectious diseases can be targeted at the RNA level as RNA is more accessible than DNA. We seek to develop new approaches for detection and tracking RNA in live cells, which is necessary for RNA-based diagnostics and therapy. We recently described a method for RNA visualization in live bacterial cells based on fluorescent protein complementation [1-3]. The RNA is tagged with an RNA aptamer that binds an RNA-binding protein with high affinity. This RNA-binding protein is expressed as two split fragments fused to the fragments of a split fluorescent protein. In the presence of RNA the fragments of the RNA-binding protein bind the aptamer and bring together the fragments of the fluorescent protein, which results in its re-assembly and fluorescence development [1-3]. Here we describe a new version of the RNA labeling method where fluorescent protein complementation is triggered by paired interactions of two different closely-positioned RNA aptamers with two different RNA-binding viral peptides. The new method, which has been developed in bacteria as a model system, uses a smaller ribonucleoprotein complementation complex, as compared with the method using split RNA-binding protein, and it can potentially be applied to a broad variety of RNA targets in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We also describe experiments exploring background fluorescence in these RNA detection systems and conditions that improve the signal-to-background ratio.

  15. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs+) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs+ uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs+, chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs+ tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs+ concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs+. Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs+ tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs+ by inhibiting Cs+ entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  16. Fusion of binding domains to Thermobifida cellulosilytica cutinase to tune sorption characteristics and enhancing PET hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribitsch, Doris; Yebra, Antonio Orcal; Zitzenbacher, Sabine; Wu, Jing; Nowitsch, Susanne; Steinkellner, Georg; Greimel, Katrin; Doliska, Ales; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Gruber, Christian C; Gruber, Karl; Schwab, Helmut; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin; Acero, Enrique Herrero; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-06-10

    A cutinase from Thermomyces cellullosylitica (Thc_Cut1), hydrolyzing the synthetic polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET), was fused with two different binding modules to improve sorption and thereby hydrolysis. The binding modules were from cellobiohydrolase I from Hypocrea jecorina (CBM) and from a polyhydroxyalkanoate depolymerase from Alcaligenes faecalis (PBM). Although both binding modules have a hydrophobic nature, it was possible to express the proteins in E. coli . Both fusion enzymes and the native one had comparable kcat values in the range of 311 to 342 s(-1) on pNP-butyrate, while the catalytic efficiencies kcat/Km decreased from 0.41 s(-1)/ μM (native enzyme) to 0.21 and 0.33 s(-1)/μM for Thc_Cut1+PBM and Thc_Cut1+CBM, respectively. The fusion enzymes were active both on the insoluble PET model substrate bis(benzoyloxyethyl) terephthalate (3PET) and on PET although the hydrolysis pattern was differed when compared to Thc_Cut1. Enhanced adsorption of the fusion enzymes was visible by chemiluminescence after incubation with a 6xHisTag specific horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled probe. Increased adsorption to PET by the fusion enzymes was confirmed with Quarz Crystal Microbalance (QCM-D) analysis and indeed resulted in enhanced hydrolysis activity (3.8× for Thc_Cut1+CBM) on PET, as quantified, based on released mono/oligomers.

  17. Impact of bacterial vaginosis, as assessed by nugent criteria and hormonal status on glycosidases and lectin binding in cervicovaginal lavage samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J Moncla

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of hormonal status and bacterial vaginosis (BV on the glycosidases present and glycosylation changes as assessed by lectin binding to cervicovaginal lavage constituents. Frozen cervicovaginal lavage samples from a completed study examining the impact of reproductive hormones on the physicochemical properties of vaginal fluid were utilized for the present study. In the parent study, 165 women were characterized as having BV, intermediate or normal microflora using the Nugent criteria. The presence of glycosidases in the samples was determined using quantitative 4-methyl-umbelliferone based assays, and glycosylation was assessed using enzyme linked lectin assays (ELLA. Women with BV had elevated sialidase, α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase and α-glucosidase activities compared to intermediate or normal women (P<0.001, 0.003, 0.006 and 0.042 respectively. The amount of sialic acid (Sambucus nigra, P = 0.003 and high mannose (griffithsin, P<0.001 were reduced, as evaluated by lectin binding, in women with BV. When the data were stratified according to hormonal status, α-glucosidase and griffithsin binding were decreased among postmenopausal women (P<0.02 when compared to premenopausal groups. These data suggest that both hormonal status and BV impact the glycosidases and lectin binding sites present in vaginal fluid. The sialidases present at increased levels in women with BV likely reduce the number of sialic acid binding sites. Other enzymes likely reduce griffithsin binding. The alterations in the glycosidase content, high mannose and sialic acid binding sites in the cervicovaginal fluid associated with bacterial vaginosis may impact susceptibility to viruses, such as HIV, that utilize glycans as a portal of entry.

  18. Phagosomal degradation increases TLR access to bacterial ligands and enhances macrophage sensitivity to bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrea J.; Arruda, Andrea; Reyes, Christopher N.; Kaplan, Amber T.; Shimada, Takahiro; Shimada, Kenichi; Arditi, Moshe; Liu, George; Underhill, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Signaling by innate immune receptors initiates and orchestrates the overall immune responses to infection. Macrophage receptors recognizing pathogens can be broadly grouped into surface receptors and receptors restricted to intracellular compartments, such as phagosomes and the cytoplasm. There is an expectation that ingestion and degradation of microorganisms by phagocytes contributes to activation of intracellular innate receptors, although direct demonstrations of this are rare and many model ligands are studied in soluble form, outside of their microbial context. By comparing a wild-type strain of Staphylococcus aureus and a lysozyme-sensitive mutant, we have been able to directly address the role of degradation of live bacteria by mouse macrophages in determining the overall innate cellular inflammatory response. Our investigations revealed a biphasic response to S. aureus that consisted of an initial signal resulting from the engagement of surface TLR2, followed by a later, second wave on inflammatory gene induction. This second wave of inflammatory signaling was dependent on and correlated with the timing of bacterial degradation in phagosomes. We found that TLR2 signaling followed by TLR2/TLR9 signaling enhanced sensitivity to small numbers of bacteria. We further found that treating wild-type bacteria with the peptidoglycan synthesis-inhibiting antibiotic vancomycin made S. aureus more susceptible to degradation and resulted in increased inflammatory responses, similar to those observed for mutant degradation-sensitive bacteria. PMID:22031762

  19. SCM, a novel M-like protein from Streptococcus canis, binds (mini)-plasminogen with high affinity and facilitates bacterial transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulde, Marcus; Rohde, Manfred; Hitzmann, Angela; Preissner, Klaus T; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan Singh; Bergmann, Simone

    2011-03-15

    Streptococcus canis is an important zoonotic pathogen capable of causing serious invasive diseases in domestic animals and humans. In the present paper we report the binding of human plasminogen to S. canis and the recruitment of proteolytically active plasmin on its surface. The binding receptor for plasminogen was identified as a novel M-like protein designated SCM (S. canis M-like protein). SPR (surface plasmon resonance) analyses, radioactive dot-blot analyses and heterologous expression on the surface of Streptococcus gordonii confirmed the plasminogen-binding capability of SCM. The binding domain was located within the N-terminus of SCM, which specifically bound to the C-terminal part of plasminogen (mini-plasminogen) comprising kringle domain 5 and the catalytic domain. In the presence of urokinase, SCM mediated plasminogen activation on the bacterial surface that was inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and lysine amino acid analogues. Surface-bound plasmin effectively degraded purified fibrinogen as well as fibrin clots, resulting in the dissolution of fibrin thrombi. Electron microscopic illustration and time-lapse imaging demonstrated bacterial transmigration through fibrinous thrombi. The present study has led, for the first time, to the identification of SCM as a novel receptor for (mini)-plasminogen mediating the fibrinolytic activity of S. canis.

  20. Salt-enhanced chemical weathering of building materials and bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate as a treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, M.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Jroundi, F.; Gonzalez-Muñoz, M. T.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2012-04-01

    Salt weathering is an important mechanism contributing to the degradation and loss of stone building materials. In addition to the physical weathering resulting from crystallization pressure, the presence of salts in solution greatly enhances the chemical weathering potential of pore waters. Flow through experiments quantify the dissolution rates of calcite and quartz grains (63-125 micrometer diameter) when subjected to 1.0 ionic strength solutions of MgSO4, MgCl, Na2SO4 or NaCl. Results indicate that the identity of the cation is the primary control over the dissolution rate of both calcite and quartz substrates, with salt-enhanced dissolution occurring most rapidly in Mg2+ bearing solutions. It has been observed that weathering rates of rocks in nature, as well as building stones, are slowed down by naturally occurring or artificially produced patinas. These tend to be bacterially produced, durable mineralized coatings that lend some degree of protection to the underlying stone surface [1]. Our research shows that bacterially produced carbonate coatings can be quite effective at reducing chemical weathering of stone by soluble salts. The calcite-producing-bacteria used in this study were isolated from stone monuments in Granada, Spain [2] and cultivated in an organic-rich culture medium on a variety of artificial and natural substrates (including limestone, marble, sandstone, quartz, calcite single crystals, glass cover-slips, and sintered porous glass). Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used to image bacterial calcite growth and biofilm formation. In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) enabled calculation of dissolution rates of untreated and bacterially treated surfaces. 2D-XRD showed the mineralogy and crystallographic orientation of bacterial calcium carbonate. Results indicate that bacterially produced calcite crystals form a coherent, mechanically resistant surface layer in perfect crystallographic continuity with the calcite substrate (self

  1. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is up-regulated in bacterial endocarditis and binds to components of vegetations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Renner, Marcus; Helmke, Burkhard M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacterial endocarditis is a frequent infectious cardiac disease, especially in patients with congenital or acquired heart defects. It is characterized by bacterial colonization of the heart valves and the appearance of vegetations consisting of fibrin, blood cells, and bacteria. The gl...

  2. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation. METHODS: Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene. RESULTS: B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats. CONCLUSIONS: B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to

  3. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  4. Parameters that enhance the bacterial expression of active plant polyphenol oxidases.

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    Mareike E Dirks-Hofmeister

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs, EC 1.10.3.1 are type-3 copper proteins that enzymatically convert diphenolic compounds into their corresponding quinones. Although there is significant interest in these enzymes because of their role in food deterioration, the lack of a suitable expression system for the production of soluble and active plant PPOs has prevented detailed investigations of their structure and activity. Recently we developed a bacterial expression system that was sufficient for the production of PPO isoenzymes from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale. The system comprised the Escherichia coli Rosetta 2 (DE3 [pLysSRARE2] strain combined with the pET-22b(+-vector cultivated in auto-induction medium at a constant low temperature (26 °C. Here we describe important parameters that enhance the production of active PPOs using dandelion PPO-2 for proof of concept. Low-temperature cultivation was essential for optimal yields, and the provision of CuCl2 in the growth medium was necessary to produce an active enzyme. By increasing the copper concentration in the production medium to 0.2 mM, the yield in terms of PPO activity per mol purified protein was improved 2.7-fold achieving a v(max of 0.48 ± 0.1 µkat per mg purified PPO-2 for 4-methylcatechol used as a substrate. This is likely to reflect the replacement of an inactive apo-form of the enzyme with a correctly-folded, copper-containing counterpart. We demonstrated the transferability of the method by successfully expressing a PPO from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum showing that our optimized system is suitable for the analysis of further plant PPOs. Our new system therefore provides greater opportunities for the future of research into this economically-important class of enzymes.

  5. Bacterial strains from floodplain soils perform different plant-growth promoting processes and enhance cowpea growth

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    Elaine Martins da Costa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Certain nodulating nitrogen-fixing bacteria in legumes and other nodule endophytes perform different plant-growth promoting processes. The objective of this study was to evaluate 26 bacterial strains isolated from cowpea nodules grown in floodplain soils in the Brazilian savannas, regarding performance of plant-growth promoting processes and ability to enhance cowpea growth. We also identified these strains by 16S rRNA sequencing. The following processes were evaluated: free-living biological nitrogen fixation (BNF, solubilization of calcium, aluminum and iron phosphates and production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA. The abilities to nodulate and promote cowpea growth were evaluated in Leonard jars. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified 60 % of the strains as belonging to genus Paenibacillus. The following four genera were also identified: Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, Enterobacter and Pseudomonas. None of the strains fixed N2 free-living. Among the strains, 80 % solubilized Ca phosphate and one solubilized Al phosphate and none solubilized Fe phosphate. The highest IAA concentrations (52.37, 51.52 and 51.00 μg mL−1 were obtained in the 79 medium with tryptophan by Enterobacter strains UFPI B5-7A, UFPI B5-4 and UFPI B5-6, respectively. Only eight strains nodulated cowpea, however, all increased production of total dry matter. The fact that the strains evaluated perform different biological processes to promote plant growth indicates that these strains have potential use in agricultural crops to increase production and environmental sustainability.

  6. WAVE binds Ena/VASP for enhanced Arp2/3 complex-based actin assembly.

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    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Noguera, Philippe; Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Manzi, John; Faqir, Fahima; Lamora, Audrey; Guérin, Christophe; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WAVE complex is the main activator of the Arp2/3 complex for actin filament nucleation and assembly in the lamellipodia of moving cells. Other important players in lamellipodial protrusion are Ena/VASP proteins, which enhance actin filament elongation. Here we examine the molecular coordination between the nucleating activity of the Arp2/3 complex and the elongating activity of Ena/VASP proteins for the formation of actin networks. Using an in vitro bead motility assay, we show that WAVE directly binds VASP, resulting in an increase in Arp2/3 complex-based actin assembly. We show that this interaction is important in vivo as well, for the formation of lamellipodia during the ventral enclosure event of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. Ena/VASP's ability to bind F-actin and profilin-complexed G-actin are important for its effect, whereas Ena/VASP tetramerization is not necessary. Our data are consistent with the idea that binding of Ena/VASP to WAVE potentiates Arp2/3 complex activity and lamellipodial actin assembly.

  7. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  8. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chung-ke [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tzong-Huah [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biochemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chu-Ya [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-heng [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse, E-mail: jthuang@chem.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  9. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

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    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  10. Bioorganic fertilizer enhances soil suppressive capacity against bacterial wilt of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijuan; Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Shuangri; Chai, Rushan; Huang, Weiqing; Liu, Xingxing; Tang, Caixian; Zhang, Yongsong

    2015-01-01

    Tomato bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most destructive soil-borne diseases. Many strategies have been taken to improve soil suppressiveness against this destructive disease, but limited success has been achieved. In this study, a novel bioorganic fertilizer revealed a higher suppressive ability against bacterial wilt compared with several soil management methods in the field over four growing seasons from March 2011 to July 2013. The application of the bioorganic fertilizer significantly (Pfertilizer increased soil pH value, electric conductivity, organic carbon, NH4+-N, NO3--N and available K content, microbial activities and microbial biomass carbon content, which were positively related with soil suppressiveness. Bacterial and actinomycete populations assessed using classical plate counts were highest, whereas R. solanacearum and fungal populations were lowest in soil applied with the bioorganic fertilizer. Microbial community diversity and richness were assessed using denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis profile analysis. The soil treated with the bioorganic fertilizer exhibited higher bacterial community diversity but lower fungal community diversity. Redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community diversity and richness negatively related with bacterial wilt suppressiveness, while fungal community richness positively correlated with R. solanacearum population. We concluded that the alteration of soil physicochemical and biological properties in soil treated with the bioorganic fertilizer induced the soil suppressiveness against tomato bacterial wilt.

  11. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Stephen M; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-04-15

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2/SCP-x/L-FABP null mice and hepatocytes. Taken together

  12. Musicians have enhanced audiovisual multisensory binding: experience-dependent effects in the double-flash illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2016-10-01

    Musical training is associated with behavioral and neurophysiological enhancements in auditory processing for both musical and nonmusical sounds (e.g., speech). Yet, whether the benefits of musicianship extend beyond enhancements to auditory-specific skills and impact multisensory (e.g., audiovisual) processing has yet to be fully validated. Here, we investigated multisensory integration of auditory and visual information in musicians and nonmusicians using a double-flash illusion, whereby the presentation of multiple auditory stimuli (beeps) concurrent with a single visual object (flash) induces an illusory perception of multiple flashes. We parametrically varied the onset asynchrony between auditory and visual events (leads and lags of ±300 ms) to quantify participants' "temporal window" of integration, i.e., stimuli in which auditory and visual cues were fused into a single percept. Results show that musically trained individuals were both faster and more accurate at processing concurrent audiovisual cues than their nonmusician peers; nonmusicians had a higher susceptibility for responding to audiovisual illusions and perceived double flashes over an extended range of onset asynchronies compared to trained musicians. Moreover, temporal window estimates indicated that musicians' windows (audiovisual binding. Collectively, findings indicate a more refined binding of auditory and visual cues in musically trained individuals. We conclude that experience-dependent plasticity of intensive musical experience extends beyond simple listening skills, improving multimodal processing and the integration of multiple sensory systems in a domain-general manner.

  13. Fatty-acid binding proteins modulate sleep and enhance long-term memory consolidation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Gerstner

    Full Text Available Sleep is thought to be important for memory consolidation, since sleep deprivation has been shown to interfere with memory processing. However, the effects of augmenting sleep on memory formation are not well known, and testing the role of sleep in memory enhancement has been limited to pharmacological and behavioral approaches. Here we test the effect of overexpressing the brain-type fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7 on sleep and long-term memory (LTM formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Transgenic flies carrying the murine Fabp7 or the Drosophila homologue dFabp had reduced baseline sleep but normal LTM, while Fabp induction produced increases in both net sleep and LTM. We also define a post-training consolidation "window" that is sufficient for the observed Fabp-mediated memory enhancement. Since Fabp overexpression increases consolidated daytime sleep bouts, these data support a role for longer naps in improving memory and provide a novel role for lipid-binding proteins in regulating memory consolidation concurrently with changes in behavioral state.

  14. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

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    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  15. Crystal structure of Hfq from Bacillus subtilis in complex with SELEX-derived RNA aptamer: insight into RNA-binding properties of bacterial Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Baba, Seiki; Fujimoto, Mai; Kawai, Gota; Kumasaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial Hfq is a protein that plays an important role in the regulation of genes in cooperation with sRNAs. Escherichia coli Hfq (EcHfq) has two or more sites that bind RNA(s) including U-rich and/or the poly(A) tail of mRNA. However, functional and structural information about Bacillus subtilis Hfq (BsHfq) including the RNA sequences that specifically bind to it remain unknown. Here, we describe RNA aptamers including fragment (AG)3A that are recognized by BsHfq and crystal structures of the BsHfq–(AG)3A complex at 2.2 Å resolution. Mutational and structural studies revealed that the RNA fragment binds to the distal site, one of the two binding sites on Hfq, and identified amino acid residues that are critical for sequence-specific interactions between BsHfq and (AG)3A. In particular, R32 appears to interact with G bases in (AG)3A. Poly(A) also binds to the distal site of EcHfq, but the overall RNA structure and protein–RNA interaction patterns engaged in the R32 residues of BsHfq–(AG)3A differ from those of EcHfq–poly(A). These findings provide novel insight into how the Hfq homologue recognizes RNA. PMID:22053080

  16. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits ( sup 3 H) dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M. (N.Y.U. Medical Center, New York (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of ({sup 3}H) dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances ({sup 3}H)DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+){minus} pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine.

  17. Bioremediation of contaminated marine sediments can enhance metal mobility due to changes of bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, Viviana; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation strategies applied to contaminated marine sediments can induce important changes in the mobility and bioavailability of metals with potential detrimental consequences on ecosystem health. In this study we investigated changes of bacterial abundance and diversity (by a combination of molecular fingerprinting and next generation sequencing analyses) during biostimulation experiments carried out on anoxic marine sediments characterized by high metal content. We provide evidence that the addition of organic (lactose and/or acetate) and/or inorganic compounds to contaminated sediments determines a significant increase of bacterial growth coupled with changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition. Experimental systems supplied only with organic substrates were characterized by an increase of the relative importance of sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae with a concomitant decrease of taxa affiliated with Flavobacteriaceae. An opposite effect was observed in the experimental treatments supplied also with inorganic nutrients. The increase of bacterial metabolism coupled with the increase of bacterial taxa affiliated with Flavobacteriaceae were reflected in a significant decrease of Cd and Zn associated with sedimentary organic matter and Pb and As associated with the residual fraction of the sediment. However, independently from the experimental conditions investigated no dissolution of metals occurred, suggesting a role of bacterial assemblages in controlling metal solubilization processes. Overall results of this study have allowed to identify key biogeochemical interactions influencing the metal behavior and provide new insights for a better understanding of the potential consequences of bio-treatments on the metal fate in contaminated marine sediments.

  18. Genome dynamics of short oligonucleotides: the example of bacterial DNA uptake enhancing sequences.

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    Mohammed Bakkali

    Full Text Available Among the many bacteria naturally competent for transformation by DNA uptake-a phenomenon with significant clinical and financial implications- Pasteurellaceae and Neisseriaceae species preferentially take up DNA containing specific short sequences. The genomic overrepresentation of these DNA uptake enhancing sequences (DUES causes preferential uptake of conspecific DNA, but the function(s behind this overrepresentation and its evolution are still a matter for discovery. Here I analyze DUES genome dynamics and evolution and test the validity of the results to other selectively constrained oligonucleotides. I use statistical methods and computer simulations to examine DUESs accumulation in Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae genomes. I analyze DUESs sequence and nucleotide frequencies, as well as those of all their mismatched forms, and prove the dependence of DUESs genomic overrepresentation on their preferential uptake by quantifying and correlating both characteristics. I then argue that mutation, uptake bias, and weak selection against DUESs in less constrained parts of the genome combined are sufficient enough to cause DUESs accumulation in susceptible parts of the genome with no need for other DUES function. The distribution of overrepresentation values across sequences with different mismatch loads compared to the DUES suggests a gradual yet not linear molecular drive of DNA sequences depending on their similarity to the DUES. Other genomically overrepresented sequences, both pro- and eukaryotic, show similar distribution of frequencies suggesting that the molecular drive reported above applies to other frequent oligonucleotides. Rare oligonucleotides, however, seem to be gradually drawn to genomic underrepresentation, thus, suggesting a molecular drag. To my knowledge this work provides the first clear evidence of the gradual evolution of selectively constrained oligonucleotides, including repeated, palindromic and protein

  19. The nucleotide-binding site of bacterial translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) as a metabolic sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milon, P.; Tischenko, E.V.; Tomsic, J.; Caserta, E.; Folkers, G.E.; La Teana, A.; Rodnina, M.V.; Pon, C.L.; Boelens, R.; Gualerzi, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Translational initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a guanine nucleotide-binding protein that can bind guanosine 3′,5′-(bis) diphosphate (ppGpp), an alarmone involved in stringent response in bacteria. In cells growing under optimal conditions, the GTP concentration is very high, and that of ppGpp very low.

  20. A Bacterial Pathogen Displaying Temperature-Enhanced Virulence of the Microalga Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Teaghan J; Bramucci, Anna R; Yakimovich, Kurt M; Case, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a globally abundant microalga that plays a significant role in biogeochemical cycles. Over the next century, sea surface temperatures are predicted to increase drastically, which will likely have significant effects on the survival and ecology of E. huxleyi. In a warming ocean, this microalga may become increasingly vulnerable to pathogens, particularly those with temperature-dependent virulence. Ruegeria is a genus of Rhodobacteraceae whose population size tracks that of E. huxleyi throughout the alga's bloom-bust lifecycle. A representative of this genus, Ruegeria sp. R11, is known to cause bleaching disease in a red macroalga at elevated temperatures. To investigate if the pathogenicity of R11 extends to microalgae, it was co-cultured with several cell types of E. huxleyi near the alga's optimum (18°C), and at an elevated temperature (25°C) known to induce virulence in R11. The algal populations were monitored using flow cytometry and pulse-amplitude modulated fluorometry. Cultures of algae without bacteria remained healthy at 18°C, but lower cell counts in control cultures at 25°C indicated some stress at the elevated temperature. Both the C (coccolith-bearing) and S (scale-bearing swarming) cell types of E. huxleyi experienced a rapid decline resulting in apparent death when co-cultured with R11 at 25°C, but had no effect on N (naked) cell type at either temperature. R11 had no initial negative impact on C and S type E. huxleyi population size or health at 18°C, but caused death in older co-cultures. This differential effect of R11 on its host at 18 and 25°C suggest it is a temperature-enhanced opportunistic pathogen of E. huxleyi. We also detected caspase-like activity in dying C type cells co-cultured with R11, which suggests that programmed cell death plays a role in the death of E. huxleyi triggered by R11 - a mechanism induced by viruses (EhVs) and implicated in E. huxleyi bloom collapse. Given that E. huxleyi has recently been

  1. Protein-protein binding detection with nanoparticle photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (NP-PCEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Tian, Limei; Chen, Weili; Yu, Hojeong; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel microscopy-based biosensing approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect protein-protein binding with the functionalized nanoparticles as tags. This imaging approach utilizes the measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC biosensor in the presence of individual nanoparticles. Moreover, it substantially increases the sensitivity of the imaging approach through tunable localized surface plasmon resonant frequency of the nanoparticle matching with the resonance of the PC biosensor. Experimental demonstrations of photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (PCEM) imaging with single nanoparticle resolution are supported by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer simulations. The ability to detect the surface adsorption of individual nanoparticles as tags offers a route to single molecule biosensing with photonic crystal biosensor in the future.

  2. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  3. Deficiency of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-epsilon reduces atherosclerotic lesions in LDLR-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko Okamoto

    Full Text Available The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs are transcription factors involved in hematopoietic cell development and induction of several inflammatory mediators. C/EBPε is expressed only in myeloid cells including monocytes/macrophages. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder of the vascular wall and circulating immune cells such as monocytes/macrophages. Mice deficient in the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor (Ldlr-/- fed on a high cholesterol diet (HCD show elevated blood cholesterol levels and are widely used as models to study human atherosclerosis. In this study, we generated Ldlr and Cebpe double-knockout (llee mice and compared their atherogenic phenotypes to Ldlr single deficient (llEE mice after HCD. Macrophages from llee mice have reduced lipid uptake by foam cells and impaired phagokinetic motility in vitro compared to macrophages from llEE mice. Also, compared to llEE mice, llee mice have alterations of lipid metabolism, and reduced atheroma and obesity, particularly the males. Peritoneal macrophages of llee male mice have reduced mRNA expression of FABP4, a fatty acid binding protein implicated in atherosclerosis. Overall, our study suggests that the myeloid specific factor C/EBPε is involved in systemic lipid metabolism and that silencing of C/EBPε could decrease the development of atherosclerosis.

  4. Detection of Biomolecular Binding Through Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR by Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To amplify the difference in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR spectra of gold nano-islands due to intermolecular binding events, gold nanoparticles were used. LSPR-based optical biosensors consisting of gold nano-islands were readily made on glass substrates using evaporation and heat treatment. Streptavidin (STA and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (Bio-BSA were chosen as the model receptor and the model analyte, respectively, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection method. Using this model system, we were able to enhance the sensitivity in monitoring the binding of Bio-BSA to gold nano-island surfaces functionalized with STA through the addition of gold nanoparticle-STA conjugates. In addition, SU-8 well chips with gold nano-island surfaces were fabricated through a conventional UV patterning method and were then utilized for image detection using the attenuated total reflection mode. These results suggest that the gold nano-island well chip may have the potential to be used for multiple and simultaneous detection of various bio-substances.

  5. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP, a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Reuten

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST, SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome, which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems.

  6. Rational Mutagenesis of Cyclodextrin Glucanotransferase at the Calcium Binding Regions for Enhancement of Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Mau Goh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies related to the engineering of calcium binding sites of CGTase are limited. The calcium binding regions that are known for thermostability function were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in this study. The starting gene-protein is a variant of CGTase Bacillus sp. G1, reported earlier and denoted as “parent CGTase” herein. Four CGTase variants (S182G, S182E, N132R and N28R were constructed. The two variants with a mutation at residue 182, located adjacent to the Ca-I site and the active site cleft, possessed an enhanced thermostability characteristic. The activity half-life of variant S182G at 60 °C was increased to 94 min, while the parent CGTase was only 22 min. This improvement may be attributed to the formation of a shorter α-helix and the alleviation of unfavorable steric strains by glycine at the corresponding region. For the variant S182E, an extra ionic interaction at the A/B domain interface increased the half-life to 31 min, yet it reduced CGTase activity. The introduction of an ionic interaction at the Ca-I site via the mutation N132R disrupted CGTase catalytic activity. Conversely, the variant N28R, which has an additional ionic interaction at the Ca-II site, displayed increased cyclization activity. However, thermostability was not affected.

  7. Rational mutagenesis of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase at the calcium binding regions for enhancement of thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Poh Hong; Illias, Rosli Md; Goh, Kian Mau

    2012-01-01

    Studies related to the engineering of calcium binding sites of CGTase are limited. The calcium binding regions that are known for thermostability function were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in this study. The starting gene-protein is a variant of CGTase Bacillus sp. G1, reported earlier and denoted as "parent CGTase" herein. Four CGTase variants (S182G, S182E, N132R and N28R) were constructed. The two variants with a mutation at residue 182, located adjacent to the Ca-I site and the active site cleft, possessed an enhanced thermostability characteristic. The activity half-life of variant S182G at 60 °C was increased to 94 min, while the parent CGTase was only 22 min. This improvement may be attributed to the formation of a shorter α-helix and the alleviation of unfavorable steric strains by glycine at the corresponding region. For the variant S182E, an extra ionic interaction at the A/B domain interface increased the half-life to 31 min, yet it reduced CGTase activity. The introduction of an ionic interaction at the Ca-I site via the mutation N132R disrupted CGTase catalytic activity. Conversely, the variant N28R, which has an additional ionic interaction at the Ca-II site, displayed increased cyclization activity. However, thermostability was not affected.

  8. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  9. Quorum-sensing blockade as a strategy for enhancing host defences against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    -mediated killing or growth inhibition would be to attenuate the bacteria with respect to pathogenicity. The realization that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a number of other pathogens, controls much of their virulence arsenal by means of extracellular signal molecules in a process denoted quorum sensing (QS) gave...... is likely to increase the susceptibility of the infecting organism to host defences and its clearance from the host. The use of QS signal blockers to attenuate bacterial pathogenicity, rather than bacterial growth, is therefore highly attractive, particularly with respect to the emergence of multi...

  10. RNA- and single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins expressed during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis: a homolog of bacterial and eukaryotic mitochondrial SSBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroumbakis, N D; Li, Z; Tolias, P P

    1994-06-10

    Little is known about the identity and involvement of single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding (SSB) and RNA-binding proteins in developmental processes that occur during oogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). Here, we describe a molecular approach designed to identify such proteins by virtue of their ssDNA-binding activity. We have constructed a directional ovarian cDNA library and conducted expression cloning screens which identified five unique cDNAs that encode proteins capable of binding ssDNA. All five represent previously unreported sequences. The remainder of this paper focuses on one of these cDNAs which encodes a Dm protein displaying significant sequence homology to Escherichia coli ssDNA-binding protein (SSB, involved in DNA replication, repair and recombination), as well as eukaryotic SSBs isolated from the mitochondria (mt) of rats, frogs, humans and yeast. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of this 15.6-kDa protein, which we will refer to as Dm mtSSB, displays average identities of 38.3% with eukaryotic mtSSBs and 23.4% with bacterial SSBs. Gel retardation analysis with an affinity-purified GST fusion protein confirms that Dm mtSSB specifically binds ss, but not double stranded DNA. Dm mtSSB is encoded by a nuclear gene whose expression appears to be developmentally regulated. It is expressed as a single 600-nucleotide (nt) transcript during oogenesis and embryogenesis. A larger transcript of 1500 nt is prevalent in some later stages of Dm development.

  11. Handheld Chem/Biosensor Using Extreme Conformational Changes in Designed Binding Proteins to Enhance Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFCEC-CX-TY-TR-2016-0007 HANDHELD CHEM/ BIOSENSOR USING EXTREME CONFORMATIONAL CHANGES IN DESIGNED BINDING PROTEINS TO ENHANCE SURFACE PLASMON...Include area code) 03/24/2016 Abstract 08/14/2015--03/31/2016 Handheld chem/ biosensor using extreme conformational changes in designed binding...Baltimore, Maryland on 17-21 April 2016. We propose the development of a highly sensitive handheld chem/ biosensor device using a novel class of engineered

  12. Investigation of spore forming bacterial flooding for enhanced oil recovery in a North Sea chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    saturation state, was able to produce additionally 1.0-2.3% original oil in place (OOIP) in homogeneous cores and 6.9-8.8% OOIP in heterogeneous cores. In addition, the pressure gradient was much higher in the heterogeneous cores, which confirms that bacterial selective plugging plays an important role...

  13. Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase Enhances Middle Ear Mucosal Proliferation during Bacterial Otitis Media▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Pak, Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but paralleled mucosal hyperplasia in this in vivo rat model. Nuclear JNK phosphorylation was observed in many cells of both the mucosal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry. In an in vitro model of primary rat middle ear mucosal explants, bacterially induced mucosal growth was blocked by the Rac/Cdc42 inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B, the mixed-lineage kinase inhibitor CEP11004, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Finally, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited mucosal hyperplasia during in vivo bacterial otitis media in guinea pigs. Inhibition of JNK in vivo resulted in a diminished proliferative response, as shown by a local decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that activation of JNK is a critical pathway for bacterially induced mucosal hyperplasia during otitis media, influencing tissue proliferation. PMID:17325051

  14. Bacterial Community Analysis, New Exoelectrogen Isolation and Enhanced Performance of Microbial Electrochemical Systems Using Nano-Decorated Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoutao

    Microbial electrochemical systems (MESs) have attracted much research attention in recent years due to their promising applications in renewable energy generation, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. In a MES, microorganisms interact with electrodes via electrons, catalyzing oxidation and reduction reactions at the anode and the cathode. The bacterial community of a high power mixed consortium MESs (maximum power density is 6.5W/m2) was analyzed by using denature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S DNA clone library methods. The bacterial DGGE profiles were relatively complex (more than 10 bands) but only three brightly dominant bands in DGGE results. These results indicated there are three dominant bacterial species in mixed consortium MFCs. The 16S DNA clone library method results revealed that the predominant bacterial species in mixed culture is Geobacter sp (66%), Arcobacter sp and Citrobacter sp. These three bacterial species reached to 88% of total bacterial species. This result is consistent with the DGGE result which showed that three bright bands represented three dominant bacterial species. Exoelectrogenic bacterial strain SX-1 was isolated from a mediator-less microbial fuel cell by conventional plating techniques with ferric citrate as electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed that it was related to the members of Citrobacter genus with Citrobacter sp. sdy-48 being the most closely related species. The bacterial strain SX-1 produced electricity from citrate, acetate, glucose, sucrose, glycerol, and lactose in MFCs with the highest current density of 205 mA/m2 generated from citrate. Cyclic voltammetry analysis indicated that membrane associated proteins may play an important role in facilitating electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrode. This is the first study that demonstrates that Citrobacter species can transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors

  15. Fluorescence Enhancement of Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Protein A Caused by Affinity Binding with Immunoglobulin G in Bovine Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Sakai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence enhancement of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled protein A (FITC-protein A caused by the binding with immunoglobulin G (IgG in bovine plasma was studied. FITC-protein A was immobilized onto a glass surface by covalent bonds. An increase in fluorescence intensity was dependent on IgG concentration ranging from 20 to 78 μg/mL in both phosphate buffer saline and bovine plasma. This method requires no separation procedure, and the reaction time is less than 15 min. A fluorescence enhancement assay by the affinity binding of fluorescence-labeled reagent is thus available for the rapid determination of biomolecules in plasma.

  16. Molecular sensing of bacteria in plants. The highly conserved RNA-binding motif RNP-1 of bacterial cold shock proteins is recognized as an elicitor signal in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Georg; Boller, Thomas

    2003-02-21

    To detect microbial infection multicellular organisms have evolved sensing systems for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Here, we identify bacterial cold shock protein (CSP) as a new such PAMP that acts as a highly active elicitor of defense responses in tobacco. Tobacco cells perceive a conserved domain of CSP and synthetic peptides representing 15 amino acids of this domain-induced responses at subnanomolar concentrations. Central to the elicitor-active domain is the RNP-1 motif KGFGFITP, a motif conserved also in many RNA- and DNA-binding proteins of eukaryotes. Csp15-Nsyl, a peptide representing the domain with highest homology to csp15 in a protein of Nicotiana sylvestris exhibited only weak activity in tobacco cells. Crystallographic and genetic data from the literature show that the RNP-1 domain of bacterial CSPs resides on a protruding loop and exposes a series of aromatic and basic side chains to the surface that are essential for the nucleotide-binding activity of CSPs. Similarly, these side chains were also essential for elicitor activity and replacement of single residues in csp15 with Ala strongly reduced or abolished activity. Most strikingly, csp15-Ala10, a peptide with the RNP-1 motif modified to KGAGFITP, lacked elicitor activity but acted as a competitive antagonist for CSP-related elicitors. Bacteria commonly have a small family of CSP-like proteins including both cold-inducible and noninducible members, and Csp-related elicitor activity was detected in extracts from all bacteria tested. Thus, the CSP domain containing the RNP-1 motif provides a structure characteristic for bacteria in general, and tobacco plants have evolved a highly sensitive chemoperception system to detect this bacterial PAMP.

  17. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against DNA-binding tips of DNABII proteins disrupt biofilms in vitro and induce bacterial clearance in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Novotny

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of chronic and recurrent bacterial diseases are attributed to the presence of a recalcitrant biofilm that contributes significantly to pathogenesis. As such, these diseases will require an innovative therapeutic approach. We targeted DNABII proteins, an integral component of extracellular DNA (eDNA which is universally found as part of the pathogenic biofilm matrix to develop a biofilm disrupting therapeutic. We show that a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies directed against specific epitopes of a DNABII protein is highly effective to disrupt diverse biofilms in vitro as well as resolve experimental infection in vivo, in both a chinchilla and murine model. Combining this monoclonal antibody cocktail with a traditional antibiotic to kill bacteria newly released from the biofilm due to the action of the antibody cocktail was highly effective. Our results strongly support these monoclonal antibodies as attractive candidates for lead optimization as a therapeutic for resolution of bacterial biofilm diseases.

  19. Structure-Based Rational Design to Enhance the Solubility and Thermostability of a Bacterial Laccase Lac15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zemin; Zhou, Peng; Chang, Fei; Yin, Qiang; Fang, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Xuecheng; Xiao, Yazhong

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial laccases are ideal alternatives of fungal laccases for specific industrial applications due to specific characteristics such as alkalescence dependence and high chloride tolerance. However, some bacterial laccases presented as inclusion bodies when expressing in Escherichia coli and showed thermal instability. In this study, rational design was employed to enhance the solubility and the thermostablity of the bacterial laccase Lac15-His6 based on the crystal structure obtained previously. After deletion of His-tag and residues323–332, the obtained Lac15D was completely expressed in soluble form even at a higher temperature of 28°C, compared to only 50% of Lac15-His6 expressed solubly at 16°C. It showed a two-time higher activity at temperatures lower than 35°C and a half-life increasing from 72 min to 150 min at 45°C. When used in chromogenic reactions, Lac15D showed constant activity toward dye precursors and their combinations under alkaline conditions, demonstrating its application potential in hair coloring biotechnology. PMID:25036001

  20. Structure-based rational design to enhance the solubility and thermostability of a bacterial laccase Lac15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemin Fang

    Full Text Available Bacterial laccases are ideal alternatives of fungal laccases for specific industrial applications due to specific characteristics such as alkalescence dependence and high chloride tolerance. However, some bacterial laccases presented as inclusion bodies when expressing in Escherichia coli and showed thermal instability. In this study, rational design was employed to enhance the solubility and the thermostablity of the bacterial laccase Lac15-His6 based on the crystal structure obtained previously. After deletion of His-tag and residues323-332, the obtained Lac15D was completely expressed in soluble form even at a higher temperature of 28°C, compared to only 50% of Lac15-His6 expressed solubly at 16°C. It showed a two-time higher activity at temperatures lower than 35°C and a half-life increasing from 72 min to 150 min at 45°C. When used in chromogenic reactions, Lac15D showed constant activity toward dye precursors and their combinations under alkaline conditions, demonstrating its application potential in hair coloring biotechnology.

  1. Sialoadhesin expressed on IFN-induced monocytes binds HIV-1 and enhances infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14(+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1, a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14(+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14(+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells.

  2. ATP binding and aspartate protonation enhance photoinduced electron transfer in plant cryptochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailliez, Fabien; Müller, Pavel; Gallois, Michaël; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2014-09-17

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins encountered in most vegetal and animal species. They play a role of blue-light receptors in plants and in invertebrates. The putative resting state of the FAD cofactor in these proteins is its fully oxidized form, FADox. Upon blue-light excitation, the isoalloxazine ring (ISO) may undergo an ultrafast reduction by a nearby tryptophan residue W400. This primary reduction triggers a cascade of electron and proton transfers, ultimately leading to the formation of the FADH° radical. A recent experimental study has shown that the yield of FADH° formation in Arabidopsis cryptochrome can be strongly modulated by ATP binding and by pH, affecting the protonation state of D396 (proton donor to FAD°(-)). Here we provide a detailed molecular analysis of these effects by means of combined classical molecular dynamics simulations and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. When ATP is present and D396 protonated, FAD remains in close contact with W400, thereby enhancing electron transfer (ET) from W400 to ISO*. In contrast, deprotonation of D396 and absence of ATP introduce flexibility to the photoactive site prior to FAD excitation, with the consequence of increased ISO-W400 distance and diminished tunneling rate by almost two orders of magnitude. We show that under these conditions, ET from the adenine moiety of FAD becomes a competitive relaxation pathway. Overall, our data suggest that the observed effects of ATP and pH on the FAD photoreduction find their roots in the earliest stage of the photoreduction process; i.e., ATP binding and the protonation state of D396 determine the preferred pathway of ISO* relaxation.

  3. Development of porcine ficolin-alpha monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for determining the binding capacity of multiple GlcNAc-binding proteins to bacterial danger components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, M Abu; Ross, Steven J; Umiker, Benjamin R; Li, Huapeng; Sugii, Sunji; Bari, Latiful

    2016-02-01

    Ficolins are a group of oligomeric defense proteins assembled from collagen-like stalks and fibrinogen-like domains that have common biochemical specificity for N-acetyl-d-glucose amine (GlcNAc) and can function as opsonins. In this report, GlcNAc-binding protein (GBP) purified from porcine nonimmune serum was biochemically characterized as ficolin-α. Ficolin-α was used as an immunogen to generate both rabbit polyclonal and murine monoclonal anti-ficolin-α antibodies, which are not yet commercially available. GBPs have been shown to be present in many animals, including humans; however, their functions are largely unknown. GBPs from chicken, dog, horse, bovine, and human sera were isolated using various chromatography methods. Interestingly, anti-ficolin-α antibody showed cross-reaction with those animal sera GBPs. Furthermore, anti-ficolin-α antibody was reactive with the GlcNAc eluate of Escherichia coli O26-bound and Salmonella-bound porcine serum proteins. Functionally, GBPs and bacteria-reactive pig serum proteins were able to bind with pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids. Our studies demonstrate that ficolin-α specific antibody was reactive with GBPs from many species as well as bacteria-reactive serum proteins. These proteins may play important roles in innate immunity by sensing danger components that can lead to antibacterial activity.

  4. Selection and breeding of corn to enhance associative bacterial nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ela, S.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Brill, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    We have increased, through screening and breeding, the ability of corn (maize, Zea mays L.) to support bacterial nitrogen fixation in or on corn roots. Isotopic N fixed from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was found on the roots. Even though the nitrogen-fixing association depends on germ plasm from tropical corn, the activity can be bred into corn currently used in midwestern United States agriculture.

  5. Enhanced delignification of steam-pretreated poplar by a bacterial laccase

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rahul; Hu, Jinguang; Matthew R. Regner; Round, James W.; Ralph, John; Saddler, John N.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2017-01-01

    The recalcitrance of woody biomass, particularly its lignin component, hinders its sustainable transformation to fuels and biomaterials. Although the recent discovery of several bacterial ligninases promises the development of novel biocatalysts, these enzymes have largely been characterized using model substrates: direct evidence for their action on biomass is lacking. Herein, we report the delignification of woody biomass by a small laccase (sLac) from Amycolatopsis sp. 75iv3. Incubation of...

  6. Ischemic stroke induces gut permeability and enhances bacterial translocation leading to sepsis in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajkumar; Venna, Venugopal R.; Liu, Fudong; Chauhan, Anjali; Koellhoffer, Edward; Patel, Anita; Ricker, Austin; Maas, Kendra; Graf, Joerg; McCullough, Louise D.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an important risk factor for post-stroke infection, which accounts for a large proportion of stroke-associated mortality. Despite this, studies evaluating post-stroke infection rates in aged animal models are limited. In addition, few studies have assessed gut microbes as a potential source of infection following stroke. Therefore we investigated the effects of age and the role of bacterial translocation from the gut in post-stroke infection in young (8-12 weeks) and aged (18-20 months) C57Bl/6 male mice following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham surgery. Gut permeability was examined and peripheral organs were assessed for the presence of gut-derived bacteria following stroke. Furthermore, sickness parameters and components of innate and adaptive immunity were examined. We found that while stroke induced gut permeability and bacterial translocation in both young and aged mice, only young mice were able to resolve infection. Bacterial species seeding peripheral organs also differed between young (Escherichia) and aged (Enterobacter) mice. Consequently, aged mice developed a septic response marked by persistent and exacerbated hypothermia, weight loss, and immune dysfunction compared to young mice following stroke. PMID:27115295

  7. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB enhances bacterial virulence by inhibiting autophagy in a zebrafish infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ting; Gao, Song; Xu, Guang-Mei; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shu-Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause gastroenteritis and systemic infection in a wide range of hosts. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB is closely related to bacterial virulence in different cells and animal models, and the encoded protein acts as an intracellular toxin required for ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. However, until now there is no report about the pathogenecity of spvB gene on zebrafish. Due to the outstanding advantages of zebrafish in analyzing bacteria-host interactions, a S. typhimurium infected zebrafish model was set up here to study the effect of spvB on autophagy and intestinal pathogenesis in vivo. We found that spvB gene could decrease the LD50 of S. typhimurium, and the strain carrying spvB promoted bacterial proliferation and aggravated the intestinal damage manifested by the narrowed intestines, fallen microvilli, blurred epithelium cell structure and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Results demonstrated the enhanced virulence induced by spvB in zebrafish. In spvB-mutant strain infected zebrafish, the levels of Lc3 turnover and Beclin1 expression increased, and the double-membraned autophagosome structures were observed, suggesting that spvB can inhibit autophagy activity. In summary, our results indicate that S. typhimurium strain containing spvB displays more virulence, triggering an increase in bacterial survival and intestine injuries by suppressing autophagy for the first time. This model provides novel insights into the role of Salmonella plasmid virulence gene in bacterial pathogenesis, and can help to further elucidate the relationship between bacteria and host immune response.

  8. Bacterial cellulose-polyaniline nano-biocomposite: A porous media hydrogel bioanode enhancing the performance of microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkour, Mehrdad; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Mashkour, Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are one of the possible renewable energy supplies which microorganisms play an active role in bio-oxidize reactions of a substrate such as glucose. Electrode materials and surface modifications are highly effective tools in enhancing MFCs' Performance. In this study, new composite anodes are fabricated. Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used as continuous phase and polyaniline (PANI) as dispersed one which is synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization on BC's fibers. With hydrogel nature of BC as a novel feature and polyaniline conductivity there meet the favorable conditions to obtain an active microbial biofilm on anode surface. Maximum power density of 117.76 mW/m2 in current density of 617 mA/m2 is achieved for BC/PANI anode. The amounts demonstrate a considerable enhancement compared with graphite plate (1 mW/m2 and 10 mA/m2).

  9. Enhanced remediation of chlorpyrifos by ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and a chlorpyrifos degrading bacterial endophyte Mezorhizobium sp. HN3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Hina; Iqbal, Samina; Ahmad, Fiaz; Afzal, Muhammad; Firdous, Sadiqa

    2016-01-01

    For effective remediation of contaminants, plant-endophyte partnership is a promising field to be explored. Generally endophytic bacteria assist their host plant by withstanding the stress induced by the contaminants. The objective of this study was to explore the suitability of plant-bacterial partnership for chlorpyrifos (CP) remediation using ryegrass and a CP degrading endophyte, Mesorhizobium sp. HN3 which belongs to plant growth promoting rhizobia. The inoculated yfp-tagged Mesorhizobium sp. HN3 efficiently colonized in the rhizosphere, enhanced plant growth and degradation of CP and its metabolite 3,5,6 trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP). Significantly lower CP residues were observed in the roots and shoots of plants vegetated in inoculated soil which might be attributed to the efficient root colonization of HN3yfp. These results suggest the involvement of Mesorhizobium sp. HN3yfp in CP degradation inside the roots and rhizosphere of plants and further emphasize on the effectiveness of endophytic bacteria in stimulating the remediation of pesticide contaminants. This is the first report which demonstrates the efficacy of bacterial endophyte for degradation of CP residues taken up by the plant and enhanced remediation of chlorpyrifos contaminated soil.

  10. Site-directed antibody immobilization using a protein A-gold binding domain fusion protein for enhanced SPR immunosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Franco, Elena; Caruz, Antonio; Pedrajas, J R; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-04-07

    We have implemented a novel strategy for the oriented immobilization of antibodies onto a gold surface based on the use of a fusion protein, the protein A-gold binding domain (PAG). PAG consists of a gold binding peptide (GBP) coupled to the immunoglobulin-binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. This fusion protein provides an easy and fast oriented immobilization of antibodies preserving its native structure, while leaving the antigen binding sites (Fab) freely exposed. Using this immobilization strategy, we have demonstrated the performance of the immunosensing of the human Growth Hormone by SPR. A limit of detection of 90 ng mL(-1) was obtained with an inter-chip variability lower than 7%. The comparison of this method with other strategies for the direct immobilization of antibodies over gold surfaces has showed the enhanced sensitivity provided by the PAG approach.

  11. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Emily E; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Shi, Zi; Bailey, Bryan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Maximova, Siela N; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The internalization of some oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors' cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants to secrete PI3P-binding proteins. In this study, we tested this strategy using the chocolate tree Theobroma cacao. Transient expression and secretion of four different PI3P-binding proteins in detached leaves of T. cacao greatly reduced infection by two oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora tropicalis and Phytophthora palmivora, which cause black pod disease. Lesion size and pathogen growth were reduced by up to 85%. Resistance was not conferred by proteins lacking a secretory leader, by proteins with mutations in their PI3P-binding site, or by a secreted PI4P-binding protein. Stably transformed, transgenic T. cacao plants expressing two different PI3P-binding proteins showed substantially enhanced resistance to both P. tropicalis and P. palmivora, as well as to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum theobromicola. These results demonstrate that secretion of PI3P-binding proteins is an effective way to increase disease resistance in T. cacao, and potentially in other plants, against a broad spectrum of pathogens.

  12. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  13. Mechanism of neuroinflammation: enhanced cytotoxicity and IL-17 production via CD46 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Karen; Graham, Jhanelle; Akahata, Yoshimi; Oh, Unsong; Jacobson, Steven

    2010-09-01

    The membrane co-factor protein CD46 is the cellular receptor for a number of pathogens including the human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). In addition to its function as an inhibitory complement receptor, engagement of CD46 in the context of T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences T-cell activation. Simultaneous cross-linking of the CD3/CD46 molecules led to differentiation of a unique population of CD4+ T-cell subset characterized by enhanced expressions of IFN-gamma, IL-10, granzyme B, adhesion molecule MAdCAM-1 (alpha-4-beta-7), surface-bound cytokine LIGHT, and chemokine receptor CCR9. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with unknown etiology. The HHV-6 is a candidate pathogen in MS and uses the CD46 molecule as its receptor. We hypothesize that binding of the HHV-6 glycoprotein to CD46 may trigger a pro-inflammatory response that could contribute to CNS tissue damage. To address this question, we examined immunological parameters such as proliferation, cytokine production and cytotoxic functions in CD4+ T cells of healthy individuals and MS patients following CD3/CD46 co-engagement by using anti-CD3 and anti-CD46 monoclonal antibodies as surrogates to mimic T-cell receptor and CD46 signaling. Our results demonstrated that CD3/CD46 cross-linking induced expression of IL-1beta and IL-17A in multiple sclerosis patient T cells. Additionally, increase in transient surface expression of lysosomal associated protein CD107a suggested enhanced CD4+ T-cell cytotoxic functions following CD3/CD46 co-stimulation. Collectively, this study demonstrated evidence to suggest a potential mechanism of virus-induced neuroinflammation that may be involved in MS disease pathogenesis.

  14. Retinol binding protein 4 concentrations relate to enhanced atherosclerosis in obese patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick H Dessein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP enhances metabolic risk and atherogenesis. Whether RBP4 contributes to cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is unknown. METHODS: We assessed RBP4 concentrations and those of endothelial activation molecules including E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 by ELISA, and the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT and carotid artery plaque by ultrasound in 217 (112 black and 105 white patients with RA. Relationships were identified in potential confounder and mediator adjusted mixed regression models. RESULTS: RBP4 concentrations were associated with systolic and mean blood pressure, and those of glucose and E-selectin (partial R = -0.207 (p = 0.003, -0.195 (p = 0.006, -0.155 (p = 0.03 and -0.191 (p = 0.007, respectively in all patients; these RBP4-cardiovascular risk relations were mostly reproduced in patients with but not without adverse traditional or non-traditional cardiovascular risk profiles. RBP4 concentrations were not associated with atherosclerosis in all patients, but related independently to cIMT (partial R = 0.297, p = 0.03 and plaque (OR (95%CI = 2.95 (1.31-6.68, p = 0.008 in those with generalized obesity, as well as with plaque in those with abdominal obesity (OR (95%CI  = 1.95 (1.12-3.42, p = 0.01. CONCLUSION: In the present study, RBP4 concentrations were inversely associated with metabolic risk and endothelial activation in RA. This requires further investigation. RBP4 concentrations were related to enhanced atherosclerosis in patients with generalized or/and abdominal obesity.

  15. Nutrient pulses driven by internal solitary waves enhance heterotrophic bacterial growth in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Tai, Jen-Hua; Ko, Chia-Ying; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chung-Chi; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hong-Bin; Shiah, Fuh-Kwo

    2016-12-01

    This study demonstrated the potential effects of internal waves (IWs) on heterotrophic bacterial activities for the first time. Nine anchored studies were conducted from 2009-2012 in the South China Sea areas with different physical conditions, i.e. areas subjected to elevation IWs, to depression IWs, and to weak/no IWs. The latter two areas were treated as the Control sites. Field survey results indicated that within the euphotic zone, the minima of the depth-averaged bacterial production (IBP; ∼1.0 mgC m(-3) d(-1) ) and growth rate (IBμ; ∼0.1 d(-1) ) at all sites were similar. Except for one case, the maxima of IBP (6-12 mgC m(-3) d(-1) ) and IBμ (0.55-1.13 d(-1) ) of the elevation IWs areas were ∼fivefolds higher than those of the Control sites (IBP 1.7-2.1 mgC m(-3) d(-1) ; IBμ 0.13-0.24 d(-1) ). Replicate surveys conducted at the north-western area of the Dongsha atoll during spring-to-neap (NW1 survey) and neap-to-spring (NW2 survey) tide periods showed a great contrast to each other. Low variation and averages of IBμ in NW1 survey were similar to those of the Control sites, while those in NW2 were similar to the other elevation IWs sites with larger variation and higher averages of IBμ. This finding suggests that bacterial activities may be a function of the lunar fortnightly (14-day) cycle. Enrichment experiments suggested more directly that the limiting inorganic nutrients introduced by the elevation waves (EIWs) may contribute a higher IBμ within the euphotic zone.

  16. Robust hydrocarbon degradation and dynamics of bacterial communities during nutrient-enhanced oil spill bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röling, Wilfred F M; Milner, Michael G; Jones, D Martin; Lee, Kenneth; Daniel, Fabien; Swannell, Richard J P; Head, Ian M

    2002-11-01

    Degradation of oil on beaches is, in general, limited by the supply of inorganic nutrients. In order to obtain a more systematic understanding of the effects of nutrient addition on oil spill bioremediation, beach sediment microcosms contaminated with oil were treated with different levels of inorganic nutrients. Oil biodegradation was assessed respirometrically and on the basis of changes in oil composition. Bacterial communities were compared by numerical analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes and cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. Nutrient amendment over a wide range of concentrations significantly improved oil degradation, confirming that N and P limited degradation over the concentration range tested. However, the extent and rate of oil degradation were similar for all microcosms, indicating that, in this experiment, it was the addition of inorganic nutrients rather than the precise amount that was most important operationally. Very different microbial communities were selected in all of the microcosms. Similarities between DGGE profiles of replicate samples from a single microcosm were high (95% +/- 5%), but similarities between DGGE profiles from replicate microcosms receiving the same level of inorganic nutrients (68% +/- 5%) were not significantly higher than those between microcosms subjected to different nutrient amendments (63% +/- 7%). Therefore, it is apparent that the different communities selected cannot be attributed to the level of inorganic nutrients present in different microcosms. Bioremediation treatments dramatically reduced the diversity of the bacterial community. The decrease in diversity could be accounted for by a strong selection for bacteria belonging to the alkane-degrading Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group. On the basis of Shannon-Weaver indices, rapid recovery of the bacterial community diversity to preoiling levels of diversity occurred. However, although

  17. Expression and Critical Role of Interleukin Enhancer Binding Factor 2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobing Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2, a transcription factor, regulates cell growth by inhibiting the stabilization of mRNA. Currently, its role has gained recognition as a factor in the tumorigenic process. However, until now, little has been known about the detailed role ILF2 plays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of ILF2 in HCC tissue with Western blot and immunohistochemical assays. To examine the effect of ILF2 on liver cancer cell growth and apoptosis, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting ILF2 were recombined to create lentiviral overexpression vectors. Our results showed higher expression levels of ILF2 mRNA and ILF2 protein in HCC tissue compared with matched peritumoral tissue. Expression of ILF2 may regulate cell growth and apoptosis in liver cancer cells via regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, Bcl-2 related ovarian killer (Bok, Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX, and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1. Moreover, we inoculated nude mice with liver cancer cells to investigate the effect of ILF2 on tumorigenesis in vivo. As expected, a rapid growth was observed in cancer cells inoculated with a lentiviral vector coding Flag-ILF2 (Lenti-ILF2 compared with the control cells. Hence, these results promote a better understanding of ILF2’s potential role as a therapeutic target in HCC.

  18. Genome-wide screens for in vivo Tinman binding sites identify cardiac enhancers with diverse functional architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong; Stojnic, Robert; Adryan, Boris; Ozdemir, Anil; Stathopoulos, Angelike; Frasch, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The NK homeodomain factor Tinman is a crucial regulator of early mesoderm patterning and, together with the GATA factor Pannier and the Dorsocross T-box factors, serves as one of the key cardiogenic factors during specification and differentiation of heart cells. Although the basic framework of regulatory interactions driving heart development has been worked out, only about a dozen genes involved in heart development have been designated as direct Tinman target genes to date, and detailed information about the functional architectures of their cardiac enhancers is lacking. We have used immunoprecipitation of chromatin (ChIP) from embryos at two different stages of early cardiogenesis to obtain a global overview of the sequences bound by Tinman in vivo and their linked genes. Our data from the analysis of ~50 sequences with high Tinman occupancy show that the majority of such sequences act as enhancers in various mesodermal tissues in which Tinman is active. All of the dorsal mesodermal and cardiac enhancers, but not some of the others, require tinman function. The cardiac enhancers feature diverse arrangements of binding motifs for Tinman, Pannier, and Dorsocross. By employing these cardiac and non-cardiac enhancers in machine learning approaches, we identify a novel motif, termed CEE, as a classifier for cardiac enhancers. In vivo assays for the requirement of the binding motifs of Tinman, Pannier, and Dorsocross, as well as the CEE motifs in a set of cardiac enhancers, show that the Tinman sites are essential in all but one of the tested enhancers; although on occasion they can be functionally redundant with Dorsocross sites. The enhancers differ widely with respect to their requirement for Pannier, Dorsocross, and CEE sites, which we ascribe to their different position in the regulatory circuitry, their distinct temporal and spatial activities during cardiogenesis, and functional redundancies among different factor binding sites.

  19. Skim Milk Enhances the Preservation of Thawed -80°C Bacterial Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, William L.; Wilson, James W.; Hendrixson, David R.; McIver, Kevin S.; Hagman, Kayla E.; Ott, C.M.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The results from bacterial strain recovery efforts following hurricanes Katrina and Rita are reported. Over 90% of strains frozen in 10% skim milk were recovered whereas various recovery rates were observed for glycerol-stored stocks (56% and 94% of E. coli, depending upon the laboratory). These observations led to a viability comparison of Streptococcus pyogenes, Campylobacter jejuni, Borrelia burgdorferi, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli strains stored in glycerol or skim milk. In all bacteria examined, 10% skim milk resulted in significantly longer viability after thawing than 15% glycerol solutions currently used in most laboratories. PMID:18573555

  20. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein transcription factors in cultured human sebocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, WenChieh; Yang, Chao-Chun; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2003-09-01

    Lipid synthesis and accumulation represent a major step in sebocyte differentiation and it may be of importance for sebocytes to express two families of transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (c/EBPs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which were found to play a crucial role in the differentiation of adipocytes. Using the immortalized human sebaceous gland cell line SZ95 we examined the expression of the molecules before and after treatment with testosterone, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dexamethasone, 17beta-estradiol and genistein, at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors -alpha, -delta, -gamma1, -gamma2 and CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha, -beta, -gamma-delta in native SZ95 sebocytes. In western blot studies, high levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma were expressed at 6, 24, and 12 h, respectively. Immunostaining of the cultured sebocytes showed the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta mainly localized within nuclei, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma in the cytoplasm. Strong staining of sebocytes was immunohistochemically revealed in the basal layer of sebaceous glands in human scalp and sebaceous nevus. Genistein down-regulated the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma on the protein level. Treatment with linoleic acid for 48 h induced further differentiation of sebocytes leading to abundant lipid synthesis.

  1. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  2. A fluorescent microplate assay quantifies bacterial efflux and demonstrates two distinct compound binding sites in AcrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-04-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux.

  3. SIGffRid: A tool to search for sigma factor binding sites in bacterial genomes using comparative approach and biologically driven statistics

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    Kucherov Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many programs have been developed to identify transcription factor binding sites. However, most of them are not able to infer two-word motifs with variable spacer lengths. This case is encountered for RNA polymerase Sigma (σ Factor Binding Sites (SFBSs usually composed of two boxes, called -35 and -10 in reference to the transcription initiation point. Our goal is to design an algorithm detecting SFBS by using combinational and statistical constraints deduced from biological observations. Results We describe a new approach to identify SFBSs by comparing two related bacterial genomes. The method, named SIGffRid (SIGma Factor binding sites Finder using R'MES to select Input Data, performs a simultaneous analysis of pairs of promoter regions of orthologous genes. SIGffRid uses a prior identification of over-represented patterns in whole genomes as selection criteria for potential -35 and -10 boxes. These patterns are then grouped using pairs of short seeds (of which one is possibly gapped, allowing a variable-length spacer between them. Next, the motifs are extended guided by statistical considerations, a feature that ensures a selection of motifs with statistically relevant properties. We applied our method to the pair of related bacterial genomes of Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis. Cross-check with the well-defined SFBSs of the SigR regulon in S. coelicolor is detailed, validating the algorithm. SFBSs for HrdB and BldN were also found; and the results suggested some new targets for these σ factors. In addition, consensus motifs for BldD and new SFBSs binding sites were defined, overlapping previously proposed consensuses. Relevant tests were carried out also on bacteria with moderate GC content (i.e. Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis/Bacillus licheniformis pairs. Motifs of house-keeping σ factors were found as well as other SFBSs such as that of SigW in Bacillus strains

  4. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Asit; Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Patra, Ashok K; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30mgL(-1) metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10mgL(-1)), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72-78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP-bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil.

  5. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K Christopher; McSorley, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity.

  6. Exposure of juvenile Leghorn chickens to lead acetate enhances antibiotic resistance in enteric bacterial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisanian, M; Holladay, S D; Karpuzoglu, E; Kerr, R P; Williams, S M; Stabler, L; McArthur, J Vaun; Tuckfield, R Cary; Gogal, R M

    2014-04-01

    Heavy metals have been implicated for their ability to increase antibiotic resistance in bacteria collected from polluted waters, independent of antibiotic exposure. Specific-pathogen-free Leghorn chickens were therefore given Pb acetate in the drinking water to expose the enteric bacteria to Pb and to determine if antibiotic resistance changed in these bacteria. Concentrations of Pb used were 0.0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, or 10.0 mM; birds given the highest 2 concentrations showed signs of moribundity and dehydration and were removed from the study. Vent culture samples were collected for bacterial cultures on d 0 before Pb exposure, d 7 and 14, and then birds were euthanized by CO2 gas for necropsy on d 14, at which time intestinal contents were also collected for bacterial cultures. Fecal swabs but not intestinal samples from Pb-exposed birds contained isolates that had significantly elevated antibiotic resistance. Some of the isolates contained bacteria that were resistant to up to 20 antibiotics. These results suggest the need for repeated studies in chickens infected with zoonotic pathogens.

  7. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity. PMID:27456828

  8. Troxerutin, a natural flavonoid binds to DNA minor groove and enhances cancer cell killing in response to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panat, Niranjan A; Singh, Beena G; Maurya, Dharmendra K; Sandur, Santosh K; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2016-05-05

    Troxerutin, a flavonoid best known for its radioprotective and antioxidant properties is of considerable interest of study due to its broad pharmacological activities. The present study on troxerutin highlights its abilities to bind DNA and enhance cancer cell killing in response to radiation. Troxerutin showed strong binding with calf thymus DNA in vitro. Troxerutin-DNA interaction was confirmed by CD spectropolarimetry. The mode of binding of troxerutin to DNA was assessed by competing troxerutin with EtBr or DAPI, known DNA intercalator and a minor groove binder, respectively. DAPI fluorescence was drastically reduced with linear increase in troxerutin concentration suggesting possible binding of troxerutin to DNA minor groove. Further, computational studies of docking of troxerutin molecule on mammalian DNA also indicated possible troxerutin-DNA interaction at minor groove of DNA. Troxerutin was found to mainly localize in the nucleus of prostate cancer cells. It induced cytotoxicity in radioresistant (DU145) and sensitive (PC3) prostate cancer cells. When troxerutin pre-treated DU145 and PC3 cells were exposed to γ-radiation, cytotoxicity as estimated by MTT assay, was found to be further enhanced. In addition, the % subG1 population detected by propidium iodide staining also showed similar response when combined with radiation. A similar trend was observed in terms of ROS generation and DNA damage in DU145 cells when troxerutin and radiation were combined. DNA binding at minor groove by troxerutin may have contributed to strand breaks leading to increased radiation induced cell death.

  9. GABPα Binding to Overlapping ETS and CRE DNA Motifs Is Enhanced by CREB1: Custom DNA Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ximiao; Syed, Khund Sayeed; Tillo, Desiree; Mann, Ishminder; Weirauch, Matthew T; Vinson, Charles

    2015-07-16

    To achieve proper spatiotemporal control of gene expression, transcription factors cooperatively assemble onto specific DNA sequences. The ETS domain protein monomer of GABPα and the B-ZIP domain protein dimer of CREB1 cooperatively bind DNA only when the ETS ((C)/GCGGAA GT: ) and CRE ( GT: GACGTCAC) motifs overlap precisely, producing the ETS↔CRE motif ((C)/GCGGAA GT: GACGTCAC). We designed a Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) with 60-bp DNAs containing four identical sectors, each with 177,440 features that explore the cooperative interactions between GABPα and CREB1 upon binding the ETS↔CRE motif. The DNA sequences include all 15-mers of the form (C)/GCGGA--CG-, the ETS↔CRE motif, and all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and occurrences in the human and mouse genomes. CREB1 enhanced GABPα binding to the canonical ETS↔CRE motif CCGGAAGT two-fold, and up to 23-fold for several SNPs at the beginning and end of the ETS motif, which is suggestive of two separate and distinct allosteric mechanisms of cooperative binding. We show that the ETS-CRE array data can be used to identify regions likely cooperatively bound by GABPα and CREB1 in vivo, and demonstrate their ability to identify human genetic variants that might inhibit cooperative binding.

  10. Complex Binding of the FabR Repressor of Bacterial Unsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis to its Cognate Promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Two transcriptional regulators, the FadR activator and the FabR repressor control biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Escherichia coli. FabR represses expression of the two genes, fabA and fabB, required for unsaturated fatty acid synthesis and has been reported to require the presence of an unsaturated thioester (of either acyl carrier protein or CoA) in order to bind the fabA and fabB promoters in vitro. We report in vivo experiments in which unsaturated fatty acid synthesis was bloc...

  11. Airborne bacterial spore counts by terbium-enhanced luminescence detection: pitfalls and real values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyang; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Temkins, Henry K

    2008-04-15

    Bacterial spore determination by terbium(III)-dipicolinate luminescence has been reported by several investigators. We collected spore samples with a cyclone and extracted dipicolinic acid (DPA) in-line with hot aqueous dodecylamine, added Tb(III) in a continuous-flow system and detected the Tb(III)-DPA with a gated liquid core waveguide fluorescence detector with a flashlamp excitation source. The absolute limit of detection (LOD) for the system was equivalent to 540 B. subtilis spores (for a 1.8 m3 sample volume (t = 2 h, Q = 15 L/min), concentration LOD is 0.3 spores/L air). Extant literature suggests that, from office to home settings, viable spore concentrations range from 0.1 to 10 spores/L; however, these data have never been validated. Previously reported semiautomated instrumentation had an LOD of 50 spores/L. The present system was tested at five different location settings in Lubbock, Texas. The apparent bacterial spore concentrations ranged from 9 to 700 spores/L and only occasionally exhibited the same trend as the simultaneously monitored total optical particle counts in the > or = 0.5 microm size fraction. However, because the apparent spore counts sometimes were very large relative to the 0.5+ microm size particle counts, we investigated potential positive interferences. We show that aromatic acids are very likely large interferents. This interference typically constitutes approximately 70% of the signal and can be as high as 95%. It can be completely removed by prewashing the particles.

  12. Deficiency of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein family DNA binding prevents malignant conversion of adenoma to carcinoma in NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Shioko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs play important roles in carcinogenesis of many tumors including the lung. Since multiple C/EBPs are expressed in lung, the combinatorial expression of these C/EBPs on lung carcinogenesis is not known. Methods A transgenic mouse line expressing a dominant negative A-C/EBP under the promoter of lung epithelial Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP gene in doxycycline dependent fashion was subjected to 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis bioassay in the presence and absence of doxycycline, and the effect of abolition of DNA binding activities of C/EBPs on lung carcinogenesis was examined. Results A-C/EBP expression was found not to interfere with tumor development; however, it suppressed the malignant conversion of adenoma to carcinoma during NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis. The results suggested that Ki67 may be used as a marker for lung carcinomas in mouse. Conclusions The DNA binding of C/EBP family members can be used as a potential molecular target for lung cancer therapy.

  13. Human neuromodulator SLURP-1: bacterial expression, binding to muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, secondary structure, and conformational heterogeneity in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepko, M A; Lyukmanova, E N; Paramonov, A S; Lobas, A A; Shenkarev, Z O; Kasheverov, I E; Dolgikh, D A; Tsetlin, V I; Arseniev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2013-02-01

    Human protein SLURP-1 is an endogenous neuromodulator belonging to the Ly-6/uPAR family and acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In the present work, the gene of SLURP-1 was expressed in E. coli. The bacterial systems engineered for SLURP-1 expression as fused with thioredoxin and secretion with leader peptide STII failed in the production of milligram quantities of the protein. The SLURP-1 was produced with high-yield in the form of inclusion bodies, and different methods of the protein refolding were tested. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-1 and its (15)N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant SLURP-1 competed with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to muscle-type Torpedo californica nAChR at micromolar concentrations, indicating a partial overlap in the binding sites for SLURP-1 and α-neurotoxins on the receptor surface. NMR study revealed conformational heterogeneity of SLURP-1 in aqueous solution, which was associated with cis-trans isomerization of the Tyr39-Pro40 peptide bond. The two structural forms of the protein have almost equal population in aqueous solution, and exchange process between them takes place with characteristic time of about 4 ms. Almost complete (1)H and (15)N resonance assignment was obtained for both structural forms of SLURP-1. The secondary structure of SLURP-1 involves two antiparallel β-sheets formed from five β-strands and closely resembles those of three-finger snake neurotoxins.

  14. ATP-binding cassette transporter enhances tolerance to DDT in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, YingZhi; Dang, Huai; Liu, GuangLong; Xiong, Jie; Yuan, DongXia; Feng, LiFang; Miao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The reuse of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) as an indoor residual spray was permitted by the World Health Organization in 2007, and approximately 14 countries still use DDT to control disease vectors. The extensive exposure of insects to DDT has resulted in the emergence of DDT resistance, especially in mosquitoes, and the mechanism for this resistance in mosquitoes has been widely reported. Spraying can also introduce DDT directly into surface water, and DDT can subsequently accumulate in microorganisms, but the mechanism for the resistance to DDT degradation in microorganisms is unclear. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we detected an abcb15 gene that was up-regulated in a specific manner by DDT treatment in T. thermophile. The deduced ABCB15 peptide sequence had two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to form the structure TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD, and each NBD contained three conserved motifs: Walker-A, C-loop, and Walker-B, which indicated the T. thermophila abcb15 was a typical ABC transporter gene. The expression of ABCB15 fused with a C-terminal green fluorescent protein was found to be on the periphery of the cell, suggesting that ABCB15 was a membrane pump protein. In addition, cells with abcb15 partially knocked down (abcb15-KD) grew slower than wild-type cells in the presence of 256 mg L(-1) DDT, indicating the tolerance of abcb15-KD strain to DDT exposure was decreased. Thus, we suggest that in Tetrahymena, the membrane pump protein encoded by ABCT gene abcb15 can enhance the tolerance to DDT and protect cells from this exogenous toxin by efficiently pumping it to the extracellular space.

  15. Cyclin C regulates adipogenesis by stimulating transcriptional activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ziyi; Xiaoli, Alus M; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Sven; Chang, Rui; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yang, Gongshe; Strich, Randy; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2017-03-28

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for maintaining energy homeostasis and adaptive thermogenesis in rodents and humans. As disorders arising from dysregulated energy metabolism, such as obesity and metabolic diseases, have increased, so has interest in the molecular mechanisms in adipocyte biology. Using a functional screen, we identified cyclin C (CycC), a conserved subunit of the Mediator complex, as a novel regulator for brown adipocyte formation. siRNA-mediated CycC knockdown (KD) in brown preadipocytes impaired the early transcriptional program of differentiation, and genetic knockout (KO) of CycC completely blocked the differentiation process. RNA-seq analyses of CycC-KD revealed a critical role of CycC in activating genes co-regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). Overexpression of PPARγ2 or addition of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone rescued the defects in CycC-KO brown preadipocytes, and efficiently activated the PPARγ-responsive promoters in both wild-type (WT) and CycC-KO cells, suggesting that CycC is not essential for PPARγ transcriptional activity. In contrast, CycC-KO significantly reduced C/EBPα-dependent gene expression. Unlike for PPARγ, overexpression of C/EBPα could not induce C/EBPα target gene expression in CycC-KO cells or rescue the CycC-KO defects in brown adipogenesis, suggesting that CycC is essential for C/EBPα-mediated gene activation. CycC physically interacted with C/EBPα and this interaction was required for C/EBPα transactivation domain activity. Consistent with the role of C/EBPα in white adipogenesis, CycC-KD also inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into white adipocytes. Together, these data indicate that CycC activates adipogenesis by stimulating the transcriptional activity of C/EBPα.

  16. Bacterial spore components which enhance the bacteriostatic effectiveness of S-nitrosothiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S L; Hansen, J N

    1981-12-01

    Spore components exuded into the medium during outgrowth of Bacillus cereus T enhanced the bacteriostatic effectiveness of S-nitrosomercaptoethanol, an inhibitor which prevents outgrowth at low concentrations and germination at higher concentrations. The enhancement effect was slight with respect to outgrowth, but dramatic with respect to germination, in that the inhibitory effectiveness of nitrosothiols toward germination inhibition was enhanced by as much as 33-fold when nitrosothiols was in the presence of the exuded spore component. Exudate activity was freely dialyzable and was not measurably affected by a broad-spectrum protease (proteinase K), by autoclaving at 121 degrees C, or by freezing and thawing. Sephadex G-25 chromatography of the exudate indicated that two active species were present, a major component with a molecular weight of less than 1,000 and a minor component with a molecular weight of more than 5,000.

  17. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  18. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  19. Identification and characterization of GIP1, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that enhances the DNA binding affinity and reduces the oligomeric state of G-box binding factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul C. SEHNKE; Beth J. LAUGHNER; Carla R. LYERLY LINEBARGER; William B. GURLEY; Robert J.FERL

    2005-01-01

    Environmental control of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and other stress response genes in plants is in part brought about by transcriptional regulation involving the G-box cis-acting DNA element and bZIP G-box Binding Factors (GBFs).The mechanisms of GBF regulation and requirements for additional factors in this control process are not well understood.In an effort to identify potential GBF binding and control partners, maize GBF1 was used as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an A. thaliana cDNA library. GBF Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) arose from the screen as a 496 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 53,748 kDa that strongly interacts with GBFs. Northern analysis of A.thaliana tissue suggests a 1.8-1.9 kb GIP1 transcript, predominantly in roots. Immunolocalization studies indicate that GIP1 protein is mainly localized to the nucleus. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays using an Adh G-box DNA probe and recombinant A. thaliana GBF3 or maize GBF1, showed that the presence of GIP1 resulted in a tenfold increase in GBF DNA binding activity without altering the migration, suggesting a transient association between GIP1 and GBF. Addition of GIP1 to intentionally aggregated GBF converted GBF to lower molecular weight macromolecular complexes and GIP1 also refolded denatured rhodanese in the absence of ATP. These data suggest GIP1 functions to enhance GBF DNA binding activity by acting as a potent nuclear chaperone or crowbar, and potentially regulates the multimeric state of GBFs, thereby contributing to bZIP-mediated gene regulation.

  20. Structure of the Legionella Virulence Factor, SidC Reveals a Unique PI(4P-Specific Binding Domain Essential for Its Targeting to the Bacterial Phagosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Luo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila delivers nearly 300 effector proteins into host cells for the establishment of a replication-permissive compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV. SidC and its paralog SdcA are two effectors that have been shown to anchor on the LCV via binding to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4P] to facilitate the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. We recently reported that the N-terminal SNL (SidC N-terminal E3 Ligase domain of SidC is a ubiquitin E3 ligase, and its activity is required for the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. Here we report the crystal structure of SidC (1-871. The structure reveals that SidC contains four domains that are packed into an arch-like shape. The P4C domain (PI(4P binding of SidC comprises a four α-helix bundle and covers the ubiquitin ligase catalytic site of the SNL domain. Strikingly, a pocket with characteristic positive electrostatic potentials is formed at one end of this bundle. Liposome binding assays of the P4C domain further identified the determinants of phosphoinositide recognition and membrane interaction. Interestingly, we also found that binding with PI(4P stimulates the E3 ligase activity, presumably due to a conformational switch induced by PI(4P from a closed form to an open active form. Mutations of key residues involved in PI(4P binding significantly reduced the association of SidC with the LCV and abolished its activity in the recruitment of ER proteins and ubiquitin signals, highlighting that PI(4P-mediated targeting of SidC is critical to its function in the remodeling of the bacterial phagosome membrane. Finally, a GFP-fusion with the P4C domain was demonstrated to be specifically localized to PI(4P-enriched compartments in mammalian cells. This domain shows the potential to be developed into a sensitive and accurate PI(4P probe in living cells.

  1. Enhancement of bacterial iron and sulfate respiration for in situ bioremediation of acid mine drainage sites: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgin, A.A.; Harrington, J.M.; Silverstein, J. [ARCADIS G& amp; M, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The prevention of acid mine drainage (AMD) in situ is more attractive than down-gradient treatment alternatives that do not involve source control. AMD source control can be achieved by shifting the microbial activity in the sulfidic rock from pyrite oxidation to anaerobic heterotrophic activity. This is achieved by adding biodegradable organic carbon amendments to the sulfidic rock. This technique was applied to an abandoned coal mine pool in Pennsylvania. The pool had a pH of 3.0 to 3.5. Following treatment, near-neutral pH and decreased effluent heavy metal concentrations were achieved. In situ bioremediation by the enhancement of bacterial iron and sulfate reduction is a promising technology for AMD prevention.

  2. Potential Bacillus probiotics enhance bacterial numbers, water quality and growth during early development of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrat, Subuntith; Suksawat, Sunisa; Boonthai, Traimat; Vuthiphandchai, Verapong

    2012-10-12

    Epidemics of epizootics and occurrence of multiresistant antibiotics of pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture have put forward a development of effective probiotics for the sustainable culture. This study examined the effectiveness of forms of mixed Bacillus probiotics (probiotic A and probiotic B) and mode of probiotic administration on growth, bacterial numbers and water quality during rearing of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in two separated experiments: (1) larval stages and (2) postlarval (PL) stages. Forms of Bacillus probiotics and modes of probiotic administration did not affect growth and survival of larval to PL shrimp. The compositions of Bacillus species in probiotic A and probiotic B did not affect growth and survival of larvae. However, postlarvae treated with probiotic B exhibited higher (Pvannamei. This investigation showed that administration of mixed Bacillus probiotics significantly improved growth and survival of PL shrimp, increased beneficial bacteria in shrimp and culture water and enhanced water quality for the levels of pH, ammonia and nitrite of culture water.

  3. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  4. Quantum dots as enhancers of the efficacy of bacterial lethal photosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narband, N.; Mubarak, M.; Ready, D.; Parkin, I. P.; Nair, S. P.; Green, M. A.; Beeby, A.; Wilson, M.

    2008-11-01

    Because of the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics there is considerable interest in light-activated antimicrobial agents (LAAAs) as alternatives to antibiotics for treating localized infections. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) could enhance the antibacterial activity of the LAAA, toluidine blue O (TBO). Suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes were exposed to white light (3600 lux) and TBO (absorbance maximum = 630 nm) in the presence and absence of 25 nm diameter QD (emission maximum = 627 nm). When the TBO:QD ratio was 2667:1, killing of Staph. aureus was enhanced by 1.72log10 units. In the case of Strep. pyogenes, an enhanced kill of 1.55log10 units was achieved using TBO and QD in the ratio 267:1. Singlet oxygen and fluorescence measurements showed that QD suppress the formation of singlet oxygen from TBO and that QD fluorescence is significantly quenched in the presence of TBO (70-90%). Enhanced killing appears to be attributable to a non-Förster resonance energy transfer mechanism, whereby the QD converts part of the incident light to the absorption maximum for TBO; hence more light energy is harvested, resulting in increased concentrations of bactericidal radicals. QD may, therefore, be useful in improving the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy.

  5. Enhancement of Methacholine-Evoked Tracheal Contraction Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides Depends on Epithelium and Tumor Necrosis Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Secher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs induce an acute tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α- dependent inflammatory response in the murine airways mediated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 via the myeloid differentiation MyD88 adaptor protein pathway. However, the contractile response of the bronchial smooth muscle and the role of endogenous TNFα in this process have been elusive. We determined the in vivo respiratory pattern of C57BL/6 mice after intranasal LPS administration with or without the presence of increasing doses of methacholine (MCh. We found that LPS administration altered the basal and MCh-evoked respiratory pattern that peaked at 90 min and decreased thereafter in the next 48 h, reaching basal levels 7 days later. We investigated in controlled ex vivo condition the isometric contraction of isolated tracheal rings in response to MCh cholinergic stimulation. We observed that preincubation of the tracheal rings with LPS for 90 min enhanced the subsequent MCh-induced contractile response (hyperreactivity, which was prevented by prior neutralization of TNFα with a specific antibody. Furthermore, hyperreactivity induced by LPS depended on an intact epithelium, whereas hyperreactivity induced by TNFα was well maintained in the absence of epithelium. Finally, the enhanced contractile response to MCh induced by LPS when compared with control mice was not observed in tracheal rings from TLR4- or TNF- or TNF-receptor-deficient mice. We conclude that bacterial endotoxin-mediated hyperreactivity of isolated tracheal rings to MCh depends upon TLR4 integrity that signals the activation of epithelium, which release endogenous TNFα.

  6. Yeast One-hybrid System Used to Identify the Binding Proteins for Rat Glutathione S-transferase P Enhancer I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To detect the trans-factors specifically binding to the strong enhancer element (GPEI) in the upstream of rat glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P) gene. Methods Yeast one-hybrid system was used to screen rat lung MATCHMAKER cDNA library to identify potential trans-factors that can interact with core sequence of GPEI(cGPEI).Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to analyze the binding of transfactors to cGPEI. Results cDNA fragments coding for the C-terminal part of the transcription factor c-Jun and rat adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) were isolated, The binding of c-Jun and ANT to GPEI core sequence were confirmed. Conclusions Rat c-jun transcriptional factor and ANT may interact with cGPEI. They could play an important role in the induced expression of GST-P gene.

  7. ZipA binds to FtsZ with high affinity and enhances the stability of FtsZ protofilaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Kuchibhatla

    Full Text Available A bacterial membrane protein ZipA that tethers FtsZ to the membrane is known to promote FtsZ assembly. In this study, the binding of ZipA to FtsZ was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. ZipA was found to bind to FtsZ with high affinities at three different (6.0, 6.8 and 8.0 pHs, albeit the binding affinity decreased with increasing pH. Further, thick bundles of FtsZ protofilaments were observed in the presence of ZipA under the pH conditions used in this study indicating that ZipA can promote FtsZ assembly and stabilize FtsZ polymers under unfavorable conditions. Bis-ANS, a hydrophobic probe, decreased the interaction of FtsZ and ZipA indicating that the interaction between FtsZ and ZipA is hydrophobic in nature. ZipA prevented the dilution induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers suggesting that it stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled ZipA was found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the FtsZ protofilaments indicating that ZipA stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments by cross-linking them.

  8. Hypertonic saline enhances host response to bacterial challenge by augmenting receptor-independent neutrophil intracellular superoxide formation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to determine whether hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion modulates the host response to bacterial challenge. METHODS: Sepsis was induced in 30 Balb-C mice by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli (5 x 107 organisms per animal). In 10 mice, resuscitation was performed at 0 and 24 hours with a 4 mL\\/kg bolus of HTS (7.5% NaCl), 10 animals received 4 mL\\/kg of normal saline (0.9% NaCl), and the remaining animals received 30 mL\\/kg of normal saline. Samples of blood, spleen, and lung were cultured at 8 and 36 hours. Polymorphonucleocytes were incubated in isotonic or hypertonic medium before culture with E. coli. Phagocytosis was assessed by flow cytometry, whereas intracellular bacterial killing was measured after inhibition of phagocytosis with cytochalasin B. Intracellular formation of free radicals was assessed by the molecular probe CM-H(2)DCFDA. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase p38 and ERK-1 phosphorylation, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation were determined. Data are represented as means (SEM), and an analysis of variance test was performed to gauge statistical significance. RESULTS: Significantly reduced bacterial culture was observed in the animals resuscitated with HTS when compared with their NS counterparts, in blood (51.8 +\\/- 4.3 vs. 82.0 +\\/- 3.3 and 78.4 +\\/- 4.8, P = 0.005), lung (40.0 +\\/- 4.1 vs. 93.2 +\\/- 2.1 and 80.9 +\\/- 4.7, P = 0.002), and spleen (56.4 +\\/- 3.8 vs. 85.4 +\\/- 4.2 and 90.1 +\\/- 5.9, P = 0.05). Intracellular killing of bacteria increased markedly (P = 0.026) and superoxide generation was enhanced upon exposure to HTS (775.78 +\\/- 23.6 vs. 696.57 +\\/- 42.2, P = 0.017) despite inhibition of MAP kinase and NFkappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: HTS significantly enhances intracellular killing of bacteria while attenuating receptor-mediated activation of proinflammatory cascades.

  9. Bacterial fatty acids enhance recovery from the dauer larva in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Tiffany K; Reis Rodrigues, Pedro; Ogungbe, Ifedayo V; Kapahi, Pankaj; Gill, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    The dauer larva is a specialized dispersal stage in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that allows the animal to survive starvation for an extended period of time. The dauer does not feed, but uses chemosensation to identify new food sources and to determine whether to resume reproductive growth. Bacteria produce food signals that promote recovery of the dauer larva, but the chemical identities of these signals remain poorly defined. We find that bacterial fatty acids in the environment augment recovery from the dauer stage under permissive conditions. The effect of increased fatty acids on different dauer constitutive mutants indicates a role for insulin peptide secretion in coordinating recovery from the dauer stage in response to fatty acids. These data suggest that worms can sense the presence of fatty acids in the environment and that elevated levels can promote recovery from dauer arrest. This may be important in the natural environment where the dauer larva needs to determine whether the environment is appropriate to support reproductive growth following dauer exit.

  10. CHEMICALLY FABRICATED SILVER NANOPARTICLES ENHANCES THE ACTIVITY OF ANTIBIOTICS AGAINST SELECTED HUMAN BACTERIAL PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thangapandiyan and P. Prema*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the outbreak of infectious diseases caused by different pathogenic bacteria and the development of antibiotic resistance, the pharmaceutical companies and the researchers are now searching for new unconventional antibacterial agents. Nanotechnology represents a modern and innovative approach to develop new formulations based on metallic nanoparticles with antimicrobial properties. The potential bioactivity of chemically fabricated silver nanoparticles has been extensively studied. However, the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles individually or in combination with different antibiotics has not been demonstrated. In the present investigations, the effect of silver nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of different antibiotics was evaluated against selected human bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus epidermis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus by disc diffusion method. In the presence of sub - inhibitory concentration of silver nanoparticles (100µL/disc, the antibacterial activities of all antibiotics are increased from 1 mm to 10 mm. The maximum fold increase was noticed for vancomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (66.67%, Escherichia coli (62.50%, and Staphylococcus aureus (46% followed by rifampicin against Bacillus cereus (66.67% and kanamycin against Streptococcus epidermis (25%. These results signify that the silver nanoparticles showed potential antibacterial action of ß-lactams, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, sulphonamides suggesting a possible utilization of silver nanocompounds in combination therapy against selected pathogens used in the experiment.

  11. A Radio Frequency Electric Current Enhances Antibiotic Efficacy against Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caubet, R.; Pedarros-Caubet, F.; Chu, M.; Freye, E.; de Belém Rodrigues, M.; Moreau, J. M.; Ellison, W. J.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are notably resistant to antibiotic prophylaxis. The concentration of antibiotic necessary to significantly reduce the number of bacteria in the biofilm matrix can be several hundred times the MIC for the same bacteria in a planktonic phase. It has been observed that the addition of a weak continuous direct electric current to the liquid surrounding the biofilm can dramatically increase the efficacy of the antibiotic. This phenomenon, known as the bioelectric effect, has only been partially elucidated, and it is not certain that the electrical parameters are optimal. We confirm here the bioelectric effect for Escherichia coli biofilms treated with gentamicin and with oxytetracycline, and we report a new bioelectric effect with a radio frequency alternating electric current (10 MHz) instead of the usual direct current. None of the proposed explanations (transport of ions within the biofilm, production of additional biocides by electrolysis, etc.) of the direct current bioelectric effect are applicable to the radio frequency bioelectric effect. We suggest that this new phenomenon may be due to a specific action of the radio frequency electromagnetic field upon the polar parts of the molecules forming the biofilm matrix. PMID:15561841

  12. Combining prebiotics with probiotic bacteria can enhance bacterial growth and secretion of bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranckutė, Raminta; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kuisienė, Nomeda; Čitavičius, Donaldas J

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing interest in supporting human health by using prebiotics, such as oligosaccharides, and beneficial bacteria, also called probiotics. Combining these two components we can develop synbiotics. In order to create successful combination of synbiotic it is very important to evaluate the influence of prebiotic oligosaccharides to probiotic bacteria and their behavior, such as growth and secretion of health related biomolecules, including bacteriocins. In this study seven type strains of probiotic bacteria (five Lactobacillus sp. and two Lactococcus sp.) and two Lactobacillus sp. strains, isolated from probiotic yoghurt, were cultivated with various commercially available and extracted oligosaccharides (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of these OS on type and isolated bacterial strains growth and antibacterial activity. Obtained results suggest that combination of certain OS with probiotic strains may considerably improve their growth and/or antibacterial activity. We also determined the antibacterial activity spectrum of investigated strains with combination of OS against common food borne pathogens. Results of this work show that prebiotic OS can be useful for modulating probiotic bacteria growth, antibacterial activity and even specificity of this activity.

  13. Superior hybrid hydrogels of polyacrylamide enhanced by bacterial cellulose nanofiber clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ningxiao; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Lu; Ye, Haowen; Zhao, Jianhao; Liu, Zhong; Rong, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid polyacrylamide/bacterial cellulose nanofiber clusters (PAM/BC) hydrogels with high strength, toughness and recoverability were synthesized by in situ polymerization of acrylamide monomer in BC nanofiber clusters suspension. The hybrid gels exhibited an extremely large elongation at break of 2200%, and a high fracture stress of 1.35MPa. Additionally, the original length of hydrogels could be recovered after releasing the tensile force. Compressive results showed that the PAM/BC hybrid gels could reach a strain of about 99% without break, and was able to completely recover its original shape immediately after releasing the compression force. The compressive stress at 99% reached as high as 30MPa. Nearly no hysteresis in cyclic compressive tests was observed with these hybrid gels. The FT-IR, XRD and TGA analysis showed that hydrogen bonds between the PAM chains and BC nanofiber clusters mainly contributed to the superior mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels. The cell viability results suggested that PAM/BC hybrid hydrogel was benign for biomedical application. These PAM/BC hydrogels offer a great promise as biomaterials such as bone and cartilage repair materials.

  14. Selectivity Enhancement in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Binding of Bisphenol A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noof A. Alenazi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is an estrogen-mimicking chemical that can be selectively detected in water using a chemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs. However, the utility of BPA-MIPs in sensor applications is limited by the presence of non-specific binding sites. This study explored a dual approach to eliminating these sites: optimizing the molar ratio of the template (bisphenol A to functional monomer (methacrylic acid to cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and esterifying the carboxylic acid residues outside of specific binding sites by treatment with diazomethane. The binding selectivity of treated MIPs and non-treated MIPs for BPA and several potential interferents was compared by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection. Baclofen, diclofenac and metformin were demonstrated to be good model interferents to test all MIPs for selective binding of BPA. Treated MIPs demonstrated a significant decrease in binding of the interferents while offering high selectivity toward BPA. These results demonstrate that conventional optimization of the molar ratio, together with advanced esterification of non-specific binding sites, effectively minimizes the residual binding of interferents with MIPs to facilitate BPA sensing.

  15. Selectivity Enhancement in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Binding of Bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Noof A; Manthorpe, Jeffrey M; Lai, Edward P C

    2016-10-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogen-mimicking chemical that can be selectively detected in water using a chemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). However, the utility of BPA-MIPs in sensor applications is limited by the presence of non-specific binding sites. This study explored a dual approach to eliminating these sites: optimizing the molar ratio of the template (bisphenol A) to functional monomer (methacrylic acid) to cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate), and esterifying the carboxylic acid residues outside of specific binding sites by treatment with diazomethane. The binding selectivity of treated MIPs and non-treated MIPs for BPA and several potential interferents was compared by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection. Baclofen, diclofenac and metformin were demonstrated to be good model interferents to test all MIPs for selective binding of BPA. Treated MIPs demonstrated a significant decrease in binding of the interferents while offering high selectivity toward BPA. These results demonstrate that conventional optimization of the molar ratio, together with advanced esterification of non-specific binding sites, effectively minimizes the residual binding of interferents with MIPs to facilitate BPA sensing.

  16. Selectivity Enhancement in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Binding of Bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Noof A.; Manthorpe, Jeffrey M.; Lai, Edward P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogen-mimicking chemical that can be selectively detected in water using a chemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). However, the utility of BPA-MIPs in sensor applications is limited by the presence of non-specific binding sites. This study explored a dual approach to eliminating these sites: optimizing the molar ratio of the template (bisphenol A) to functional monomer (methacrylic acid) to cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate), and esterifying the carboxylic acid residues outside of specific binding sites by treatment with diazomethane. The binding selectivity of treated MIPs and non-treated MIPs for BPA and several potential interferents was compared by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection. Baclofen, diclofenac and metformin were demonstrated to be good model interferents to test all MIPs for selective binding of BPA. Treated MIPs demonstrated a significant decrease in binding of the interferents while offering high selectivity toward BPA. These results demonstrate that conventional optimization of the molar ratio, together with advanced esterification of non-specific binding sites, effectively minimizes the residual binding of interferents with MIPs to facilitate BPA sensing. PMID:27754429

  17. Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain enhances the processivity and fidelity of Taq DNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain (TBD) into the distantly related thermostable Taq DNA polymerase at an analogous position in the thumb domain, converts the Taq DNA polymerase from a low processive to a highly processive enzyme. Processivity is dependent on the presence of thioredoxin. The enhancement in processivity is 20–50-fold when compared with the wild-type Taq DNA polymerase or to the recombinant polymerase in the absence of thioredoxin. The recombinant Taq...

  18. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    were assessed with 2D sections and 3D reconstruction images and fusion was defined as intertransverse bridging. Results: Spinal fusion was found in 72 % of levels receiving silk fibre enhanced ABM/P15 graft material. In levels with silk fibre enhanced AMB fusion rate was 41 %. These findings...... on the surface of bone forming cells. The binding initiates natural intra- and extracellular signalling pathways, inducing production of growth factors, bone morphogenic proteins and cytokines. P15 peptide has previously shown to improve osteoinductive properties when coated on graft materials. Purpose...

  19. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  20. Enhancement of binding activity of soluble human CD40 to CD40 ligand through incorporation of an isoleucine zipper motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui HE; Li-hui XU; Yi LIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of incorporation of all isoleucine zipper(IZ)motif into CD40 on binding activity of CD40 for the CD40 ligand (CD40L).Methods:Prokaryotic expression vectors for 2 soluble CD40 derivatives,shCD40His and shCD40IZ containing an IZ dowain,were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli.The recombinant proteins were purified to homogeneity after refolding from inclusion bodies.Their molecular weights in solution of shCD40His and shCD40IZ were compared by size-exclusion chromatography,and their binding activity for CD40L on Jurkat T cells was determined by flow cytometry.Results:shCD40His and shCD40IZ were generated.Both of them possessed significant binding activity for the cognate ligand CD40L expressed on the cell surface.shCD40IZ had much higher binding activity to its ligand(CD40L)than did shCD40His.Furthermore,size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that shCD40IZ existed in high molecular mass forms that were most likely to be trimers in solution.Conclusion:Incorporation of an IZ motif into CD40 enhances its binding activity for CD40L through trimerization of the CD40 derivative.

  1. Predicting the Structure-Activity Relationship of Hydroxyapatite-Binding Peptides by Enhanced-Sampling Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weilong; Xu, Zhijun; Cui, Qiang; Sahai, Nita

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular structural and energetic basis of the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces is critical to their applications in tissue engineering and biomimetic material synthesis. Despite recent experimental progresses in the identification and functionalization of hydroxyapatite (HAP)-binding peptides, the molecular mechanisms of their interactions with HAP surfaces are yet to be explored. In particular, the traditional method of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suffers from insufficient sampling at the peptide-inorganic interface that renders the molecular-level observation dubious. Here we demonstrate that an integrated approach combining bioinformatics, MD, and metadynamics provides a powerful tool for investigating the structure-activity relationship of HAP-binding peptides. Four low charge density peptides, previously identified by phage display, have been considered. As revealed by bioinformatics and MD, the binding conformation of the peptides is controlled by both the sequence and the amino acid composition. It was found that formation of hydrogen bonds between lysine residue and phosphate ions on the surface dictates the binding of positively charged peptide to HAP. The binding affinities of the peptides to the surface are estimated by free energy calculation using parallel-tempering metadynamics, and the results compare favorably to measurements reported in previous experimental studies. The calculation suggests that the charge density of the peptide primarily controls the binding affinity to the surface, while the backbone secondary structure that may restrain side chain orientation toward the surface plays a minor role. We also report that the application of enhanced-sampling metadynamics effects a major advantage over the steered MD method by significantly improving the reliability of binding free energy calculation. In general, our novel integration of diverse sampling techniques should contribute to the rational

  2. Mining the phytomicrobiome to understand how bacterial coinoculations enhance plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskit eMaymon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous work, we showed that coinoculating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 128C53 and Bacillus simplex 30N-5 onto Pisum sativum L. roots resulted in better nodulation and increased plant growth. We now expand this research to include another alpha-rhizobial species as well as a beta-rhizobium, Burkholderia tuberum STM678. We first determined whether the rhizobia were compatible with B. simplex 30N-5 by cross-streaking experiments, and then Medicago truncatula and Melilotus alba were coinoculated with B. simplex 30N-5 and Sinorhizobium (Ensifer meliloti to determine the effects on plant growth. Similarly, B. simplex 30N-5 and Bu. tuberum STM678 were coinoculated onto Macroptilium atropurpureum. The exact mechanisms whereby coinoculation results in increased plant growth are incompletely understood, but the synthesis of phytohormones and siderophores, the improved solubilization of inorganic nutrients, and the production of antimicrobial compounds are likely possibilities. Because B. simplex 30N-5 is not widely recognized as a Plant Growth Promoting Bacterial (PGPB species, after sequencing its genome, we searched for genes proposed to promote plant growth, and then compared these sequences with those from several well studied PGPB species. In addition to genes involved in phytohormone synthesis, we detected genes important for the production of volatiles, polyamines, and antimicrobial peptides as well as genes for such plant growth-promoting traits as phosphate solubilization and siderophore production. Experimental evidence is presented to show that some of these traits, such as polyamine synthesis, are functional in B. simplex 30N-5, whereas others, e.g., auxin production, are not.

  3. Bacterial Compatibility in Combined Inoculations Enhances the Growth of Potato Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Santiago, Christine; Yagi, Shogo; Ijima, Motoaki; Nashimoto, Tomoya; Sawada, Maki; Ikeda, Seishi; Asano, Kenji; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Ohwada, Takuji

    2017-02-04

    The compatibility of strains is crucial for formulating bioinoculants that promote plant growth. We herein assessed the compatibility of four potential bioinoculants isolated from potato roots and tubers (Sphingomonas sp. T168, Streptomyces sp. R170, Streptomyces sp. R181, and Methylibium sp. R182) that were co-inoculated in order to improve plant growth. We screened these strains using biochemical tests, and the results obtained showed that R170 had the highest potential as a bioinoculant, as indicated by its significant ability to produce plant growth-promoting substances, its higher tolerance against NaCl (2%) and AlCl3 (0.01%), and growth in a wider range of pH values (5.0-10.0) than the other three strains. Therefore, the compatibility of R170 with other strains was tested in combined inoculations, and the results showed that the co-inoculation of R170 with T168 or R182 synergistically increased plant weight over uninoculated controls, indicating the compatibility of strains based on the increased production of plant growth promoters such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and siderophores as well as co-localization on roots. However, a parallel test using strain R181, which is the same Streptomyces genus as R170, showed incompatibility with T168 and R182, as revealed by weaker plant growth promotion and a lack of co-localization. Collectively, our results suggest that compatibility among bacterial inoculants is important for efficient plant growth promotion, and that R170 has potential as a useful bioinoculant, particularly in combined inoculations that contain compatible bacteria.

  4. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (PS. mutans strains isolated from infected root canal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases.

  5. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurier Jean-Fabien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC, a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. Methods We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. Results TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to

  6. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  7. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  8. Bacterial inoculants of forage grasses that enhance degradation of 2-chlorobenzoic acid in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, S.D.; Germida, J.J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    Biological remediation of contaminated soil is an effective method of reducing risk to human and ecosystem health. Bacteria and plants might be used to enhance remediation of soil pollutants in situ. This study assessed the potential of bacteria, plants, and plant-bacteria associations to remediate 2-chlorobenzoic acid (2CBA) contaminated soil. Initially, grass viability was assessed in 2CBA-contaminated soil. Soil was contaminated with 2CBA, forage grasses were grown under growth chamber conditions for 42 or 60 d, and the 2CBA concentration in soil was determined by gas chromatography. Only five of 16 forage grasses grew in 2CBA-treated soil. Growth of Bromus inermis had no effect on 2CBA concentration, whereas Agropyron intermedium, B. biebersteinii, A. riparum, and Elymus dauricus decreased 2CBA relative to nonplanted control soil by 32 to 42%. The 12 bacteria isolates were screened for their ability to promote the germination of the five grasses in 2CBA-contaminated soil. Inoculation of A. riparum with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain R75, a proven plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, increased seed germination by 80% and disappearance of 2CBA by 20% relative to noninoculated plants. Inoculation of E. dauricus with a mixture of P. savastanoi strain CB35, a 2CBA-degrading bacterium, and P. aeruginosa strain R75 increased disappearance of 2CBA by 112% relative to noninoculated plants. No clear relationship between enhanced 2CBA disappearance and increased plant biomass was found. These results suggest that specific plant-microbial systems can be developed to enhance remediation of pollutants in soil.

  9. Characterization of smart auto-degradative hydrogel matrix containing alginate lyase to enhance levofloxacin delivery against bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islan, German A; Dini, Cecilia; Bartel, Laura C; Bolzán, Alejandro D; Castro, Guillermo R

    2015-12-30

    The aim of the present work is the characterization of smart auto-degradable microspheres composed of calcium alginate/high methoxylated pectin containing an alginate lyase (AL) from Sphingobacterium multivorum and levofloxacin. Microspheres were prepared by ionotropic gelation containing AL in its inactive form at pH 4.0. Incubation of microspheres in Tris-HCl and PBS buffers at pH 7.40 allowed to establish the effect of ion-chelating phosphate on matrix erodability and suggested an intrinsically activation of AL by turning the pH close to neutrality. Scanning electron and optical microscopies revealed the presence of holes and surface changes in AL containing microspheres. Furthermore, texturometric parameters, DSC profiles and swelling properties were showing strong changes in microspheres properties. Encapsulation of levofloxacin into microspheres containing AL showed 70% efficiency and 35% enhancement of antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Levofloxacin release from microspheres was not changed at acidic pH, but was modified at neutral pH in presence of AL. Advantageously, only gel matrix debris were detectable after overnight incubation, indicating an autodegradative gel process activated by the pH. Absence of matrix cytotoxicity and a reduction of the levofloxacin toxicity after encapsulation were observed in mammalian CHO-K1 cell cultures. These properties make the system a potent and versatile tool for antibiotic oral delivery targeted to intestine, enhancing the drug bioavailability to eradicate bacterial biofilm and avoiding possible intestinal obstructions.

  10. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections by killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth, but resistance to antibiotics can develop readily. The discovery that bacterial quorum-sensing regulates bacterial virulence as well as the formation of biofilms opens up new ways...

  11. A thermonuclease of Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances bacterial escape from killing by neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Richard A; Stevens, Jacqueline S; Apicella, Michael A; Criss, Alison K

    2015-07-15

    Acute gonorrhea is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation that is insufficient to clear Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Activated neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs), which are composed of chromatin and decorated with antimicrobial proteins. The N. gonorrhoeae NG0969 open reading frame contains a gene (nuc) that encodes a putatively secreted thermonuclease (Nuc) that contributes to biofilm remodeling. Here, we report that Nuc degrades NETs to help N. gonorrhoeae resist killing by neutrophils. Primary human neutrophils released NETs after exposure to N. gonorrhoeae, but NET integrity declined over time with Nuc-containing bacteria. Recombinant Nuc and conditioned medium from Nuc-containing N. gonorrhoeae degraded human neutrophil DNA and NETs. NETs were found to have antimicrobial activity against N. gonorrhoeae, and Nuc expression enhanced N. gonorrhoeae survival in the presence of neutrophils that released NETs. We propose that Nuc enables N. gonorrhoeae to escape trapping and killing by NETs during symptomatic infection, highlighting Nuc as a multifunctional virulence factor for N. gonorrhoeae.

  12. Sfp-type PPTase inactivation promotes bacterial biofilm formation and ability to enhance wheat drought tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salme eTimmusk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus polymyxa is a common soil bacterium with broad range of practical applications. An important group of secondary metabolites in P. polymyxa are nonribosomal peptide and polyketide derived metabolites (NRP/PK. Modular nonribosomal peptide synthetases catalyse main steps in the biosynthesis of the complex secondary metabolites. Here we report on the inactivation of an A26 sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase. The inactivation of the gene resulted in loss of NRP/PK production. In contrast to the former Bacillus spp. model the mutant strain compared to wild type showed greatly enhanced biofilm formation ability. Its biofilm promotion is directly mediated by NRP/PK, as exogenous addition of the wild type metabolite extracts restores its biofilm formation level. Wheat inoculation with bacteria that had lost their sfp-type PPTase gene resulted in two times higher plant survival and about three times increased biomass under severe drought stress compared to wild type.

  13. Mannose binding lectin plays a crucial role in innate immunity against yeast by enhanced complement activation and enhanced uptake of polymorphonuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herpers Bjorn L

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose binding lectin (MBL is an important host defence protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens. This carbohydrate-binding protein, an opsonin and lectin pathway activator, binds through multiple lectin domains to the repeating sugar arrays displayed on the surface of a wide range of clinically relevant microbial species. We investigated the contribution of MBL to antifungal innate immunity towards C. parapsilosis in vitro. Results High avidity binding was observed between MBL and C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. Addition of MBL to MBL deficient serum increased the deposition of C4 and C3b and enhanced the uptake of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and acapsular C. neoformans by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs. Compared to other microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Cryptococcus neoformans, C. parapsilosis and Candida albicans were potent activators of the lectin pathway. Conclusion Our results suggest that MBL plays a crucial role in the innate immunity against infections caused by yeast by increasing uptake by PMN.

  14. Southern leaf blight disease severity is correlated with decreased maize leaf epiphytic bacterial species richness and the phyllosphere bacterial diversity decline is enhanced by nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather eManching

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant leaves are inhabited by a diverse group of microorganisms that are important contributors to optimal growth. Biotic and abiotic effects on plant growth are usually studied in controlled settings examining response to variation in single factors and in field settings with large numbers of variables. Multi-factor experiments with combinations of stresses bridge this gap, increasing our understanding of the genotype-environment-phenotype functional map for the host plant and the affiliated epiphytic community. The maize inbred B73 was exposed to single and combination abiotic and the biotic stress treatments: low nitrogen fertilizer and high levels of infection with southern leaf blight (causal agent Cochliobolus heterostrophus. Microbial epiphyte samples were collected at the vegetative early-season phase and species composition was determined using 16S ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Plant traits and level of southern leaf blight disease were measured late-season. Bacterial diversity was different among stress treatment groups (P< 0.001. Lower species richness—alpha diversity--was correlated with increased severity of southern leaf blight disease when disease pressure was high. Nitrogen fertilization intensified the decline in bacterial alpha diversity. While no single bacterial ribotype was consistently associated with disease severity, small sets of ribotypes were good predictors of disease levels. Difference in leaf bacterial-epiphyte diversity early in the season were correlated with plant disease severity, supporting further tests of microbial epiphyte-disease correlations for use in predicting disease progression.

  15. Membrane steroid-binding protein 1 (MSBP1) negatively regulates brassinosteroid signaling by enhancing the endocytosis of BAK1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Song; Qiu-Ming Shi; Xiao-Hua Yang; Zhi-Hong Xu; Hong-Wei Xue

    2009-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are perceived by transmembrane receptors and play vital roles in plant growth and devel-opment, as well as cell in responses to environmental stimuli. The transmembrane receptor BRI1 can directly bind to brassinolide (BL), and BAK1 interacts with BRI1 to enhance the BRll-mediated BR signaling. Our previous studies indicated that a membrane steroid-binding protein 1 (MSBP1) could bind to BL in vitro and is negatively involved in BR signaling. To further elucidate the underlying mechanism, we here show that MSBP1 specifically interacts with the extracellular domain of BAKI in vivo in a BL-independent manner. Suppressed cell expansion and BR responses by increased expression of MSBPI can be recovered by overexpressing BAKI or its intracellular kinase domain, sug-gesting that MSBPI may suppress BR signaling through interacting with BAK1. Subcellular localization studies re-vealed that both MSBPI and BAKI are localized to plasma membrane and endocytic vesicles and MSBPI accelerates BAKI endocytosis, which results in suppressed BR signaling by shifting the equilibrium of BAKI toward endosomes. Indeed, enhanced MSBPI expression reduces the interaction between BRI1 and BAK1 in vivo, demonstrating that MSBPI acts as a negative factor at an early step of the BR signaling pathway.

  16. Construction of an S-layer protein exhibiting modified self-assembling properties and enhanced metal binding capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Katrin; Matys, Sabine

    2007-07-01

    The functional S-layer protein gene slfB of the uranium mining waste pile isolate Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 was cloned as a polymerase chain reaction product into the expression vector pET Lic/Ek 30 and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli Bl21(DE3). The addition of His tags to the N and C termini enabled the purification of the recombinant protein by Ni-chelating chromatography. The Ni binding capacity of the His-tagged recombinant S-layer protein was compared with that of the wild-type S layer. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate a significantly enhanced Ni binding capability of the recombinant protein. In addition, the self-assembling properties of the purified modified S-layer proteins were studied by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Whereas the wild-type S-layer proteins re-assembled into regular cylindric structures, the recombinant S-layer proteins reassembled into regular sheets that formed globular agglomerating structures. The nanoporous structure of the protein meshwork, together with its enhanced Ni binding capacity, makes the recombinant S-layer attractive as a novel self-assembling biological template for the fabrication of metal nanoclusters and construction of nanomaterials that are of technical interest.

  17. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  18. CP2 binding to the promoter is essential for the enhanced transcription of globin genes in erythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ji Hyung; Kim, Chul Geun

    2003-02-28

    We have previously reported that the reduced level of CP2 suppresses the mouse alpha- and beta-globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis during terminal differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells in vitro [Chae et al. (1999)]. As an extension of this study, we demonstrated that human alpha-, epsilon-, and gamma- globin genes were also suppressed by the reduced expression of CP2 in K562 cells. To address how much CP2 contributes in the regulation of globin gene expression, we measured transcriptional activities of the wild type alpha-globin promoter and its various factor-binding sites mutants in erythroid and nonerythroid cells. Interestingly, CP2 site dependent transcriptional activation occurred in an erythroid-cell specific manner, even though CP2 is ubiquitously expressed. In addition, CP2 site mutation within the alpha-promoter severely suppressed promoter activity in differentiated, but not in undifferentiated MEL cells, suggesting that the CP2 binding site is needed for the enhanced transcription of globin genes during erythroid differentiation. When the human beta-globin locus control region was linked to the alpha-promoter, suppression was more severe in the CP2 site mutant in differentiated MEL cells. Overall data indicate that CP2 is a major factor in the regulation of globin expression in human and mouse erythroid cells, and CP2 binding to the globin gene promoter is essential for the enhanced transcription of globin genes in erythroid differentiation.

  19. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity.

  20. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  1. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia. PMID:27242974

  2. F. NOVICIDA-INFECTED A. CASTELLANII DOES NOT ENHANCE BACTERIAL VIRULENCE IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja eOzanic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia.

  3. Enhanced Expression of Aquaporin-9 in Rat Brain Edema Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaili WANG; Runming JIN; Peichao TIAN; Zhihong ZHUO

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the role of AQP9 in brain edema,the expression of AQP9 in an infectious rat brain edema model induced by the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was examined.Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the expressions of AQP9 mRNA and protein at all observed intervals were significantly increased in LPS-treated animals in comparison with the control animals.Time-course analysis showed that the first signs of blood-brain barrier disruption and the increase of brain water content in LPS-treated animals were evident 6 h after LPS injection,with maximum value appearing at 12 h,which coincided with the expression profiles of AQP9 mRNA and protein in LPS-treated animals.The further correlation analysis revealed strong positive correlations among the brain water content,the disruption of the blood-brain barrier and the enhanced expressions of AQP9 mRNA and protein in LPS-treated animals.These results suggested that the regulation of AQP9 expression may play important roles in water movement and in brain metabolic homeostasis associated with the pathophysiology of brain edema induced by LPS injection.

  4. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia.

  5. Biorefinery of bacterial cellulose from rice straw: enhanced enzymatic saccharification by ionic liquid pretreatment%Biorefinery of bacterial cellulose from rice straw: enhanced enzymatic saccharification by ionic liquid pretreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Feng; Han Shifen

    2011-01-01

    The pretreatment of rice straw is often used to enhance the hydrolysis. 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ( [ AMIM ] C1) is a kind of low viscous, nontoxic and recyclable ionic liquid. It was used to treat rice straw and improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw in this study. The factors influencing the pretreatment were as follows: the dosage of rice straw in [ AMIM ] Cl, crush mesh of rice straw, pretreatment temperature and time. After the pretreatment with a 3 % (the weight ratio of rice straw to ionic liquid) rice straw dosage in [AMIM]Cl at 110 ℃ for 1 h, the yield of reducing sugar of regenerated rice straw by 33 U/mL cellulase hydrolysis was 53.3 %, which was two times higher than that of un-treated rice straw (23.7 % ). More researches regarding straw biorefinery to bacterial cellulose are being performed in the lab and prospective results will be published in near future.

  6. Histone acetylation characterizes chromatin presetting by NF1 and Oct1 and enhances glucocorticoid receptor binding to the MMTV promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrand, Carolina, E-mail: ca340@cam.ac.uk [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Belikov, Sergey, E-mail: Sergey.Belikov@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Wrange, Orjan, E-mail: Orjan.Wrange@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-10

    Transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). This switch was reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. Previously, we showed that Nuclear Factor 1 (NF1) and Octamer Transcription Factor 1 (Oct1) bind constitutively to the MMTV promoter and thereby induce translational nucleosome positioning representing an intermediary, i.e. preset, state of nucleosome organization. Here we further characterize this NF1 and Oct1 induced preset chromatin in relation to the inactive and the hormone-activated state. The preset chromatin exhibits increased histone acetylation but does not cause dissociation of histone H1 as oppose to the hormone-activated state. Furthermore, upon hormone induction the preset MMTV chromatin displays an enhanced and prolonged GR binding capacity and transcription during an intrinsic and time-dependent silencing of the injected template. The silencing process correlates with a reduced histone acetylation. However, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), does not counteract silencing in spite of its distinct stimulation of GR-DNA binding. The latter indicates the importance of histone acetylation to maintain DNA access for inducible factor binding. We discuss how constitutively bound factors such as NF1 and Oct1 may participate in the maintenance of tissue specificity of hormone responsive genes.

  7. Stat3 enhances vimentin gene expression by binding to the antisilencer element and interacting with the repressor protein, ZBP-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongzhong; Diab, Iman; Zhang, Xueping; Izmailova, Elena S; Zehner, Zendra E

    2004-01-08

    Vimentin exhibits a complex pattern of developmental- and tissue-specific expression and is aberrantly expressed in most metastatic tumors. The human vimentin promoter contains multiple DNA elements, some of which enhance gene expression and one that inhibits. A silencer element (at -319) binds the repressor ZBP-89. Further upstream (at -757) is an element, which acts positively in the presence of the silencer element and, thus, is referred to as an antisilencer (ASE). Previously, we showed that Stat1alpha binds to this element upon induction by IFN-gamma. However, substantial binding and reporter gene activity was still present in nontreated cells. Here, we have found that Stat3 binds to the ASE element in vitro. Transfection experiments in COS-1 cells with various vimentin promoter--reporter constructs show that gene activity is dependent upon the cotransfection and activation of Stat3. Moreover, activated Stat3 can overcome ZBP-89 repression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that Stat3 and ZBP-89 can interact and confocal microscopy detects these factors to be colocalized in the nucleus. Moreover, a correlation exists between the presence of activated Stat3 and vimentin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, which is lacking in MCF7 cells where vimentin is not expressed. In the light of these results, we propose that the interaction of Stat3 and ZBP-89 may be crucial for overcoming the effects of the repressor ZBP-89, which suggests a novel mode for Stat3 gene activation.

  8. Plasma-treated polystyrene film that enhances binding efficiency for sensitive and label-free protein biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bihong; Li, Shaopeng; Song, Lusheng; Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Tyagi, Deependra; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-08-01

    A plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene (PS) film surface was explored as a simple, robust, and low-cost surface chemistry solution for protein biosensing applications. This surface could dramatically improve the binding efficiency of the protein-protein interactions, which is defined as the binding signal per immobilized ligand. The PS-modified protein biosensor was readily fabricated by spin coating and plasma treatment. Various parameters for fabrication, including the concentration of the PS solution, rate of spin coating, and duration of plasma treatment, were systematically optimized based on the improvement of fluorescence signal yielded by the microfluidic network-aided fluorescence immunoassay. The performance of the label-free protein detection on the optimized surfaces was further evaluated by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). PS surfaces with optimal fabrication parameters exhibited up to an 620% enhancement of the protein binding response and approximately 210% of the protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA). The relationship between the fabrication parameters used and changes to the surface chemistry and the morphological properties were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was revealed that the morphological changes observed in the plasma-treated PS film were the dominant factor for the improvement of the protein bioassay performance, rather than the chemical changes.

  9. Inhibition of bacterial DD-peptidases (penicillin-binding proteins) in membranes and in vivo by peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Kumar, Ish; Pratt, R F

    2012-04-03

    The DD-peptidases or penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) catalyze the final steps of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis and are inhibited by the β-lactam antibiotics. There is at present a question of whether the active site structure and activity of these enzymes is the same in the solubilized (truncated) DD-peptidase constructs employed in crystallographic and kinetics studies as in membrane-bound holoenzymes. Recent experiments with peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids have suggested that these transition state analogue-generating inhibitors may be able to induce reactive conformations of these enzymes and thus inhibit strongly. We have now, therefore, measured the dissociation constants of peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids from Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis PBPs in membrane preparations and, in the former case, in vivo, by means of competition experiments with the fluorescent penicillin Bocillin Fl. The experiments showed that the boronic acids bound measurably (K(i) DD-peptidase inhibitors are more or less effective in vivo than in homogeneous solution.

  10. Isolation of prawn ( Exopalaemon carinicauda) lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein gene and its expression in responding to bacterial and viral infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qianqian; Li, Jian; Duan, Yafei; Li, Jitao; Sun, Ming; Zhao, Fazhen

    2016-04-01

    The pattern recognition proteins (PRPs) play a major role in immune response of crustacean to resist pathogens. In the present study, as one of PRPs, lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) gene in the ridge tail white prawn ( Exopalaemon carinicauda) ( EcLGBP) was isolated. The full-length cDNA of EcLGBP was 1338 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 366 amino acid residules. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcLGBP shared high similarities with LGBP and BGBP from other crustaceans. Some conservative domains were predicted in EcLGBP sequence. EcLGBP constitutively expressed in most tissues at different levels, and the highest expression was observed in hepatopancreas. With infection time, the cumulative mortality increased gradually followed by the proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The expression of EcLGBP in response to V. parahaemolyticus infection was up-regulated in hemocytes and hepatopancreas, and the up-regulation in hepatopancreas was earlier than that in hemocytes. EcLGBP expression after WSSV infection increased at 3 h, then significantly decreased in both hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The results indicated that EcLGBP was involved in the immune defense against bacterial and viral infections.

  11. Enhanced biodegradation of alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil by mixed strains and bacterial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Li, Chen; Zhou, Zhengxi; Wen, Jianping; You, Xueyi; Mao, Youzhi; Lu, Chunzhe; Huo, Guangxin; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two strains, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 and Pseudomonas sp. XM-01, were isolated from soil samples polluted by crude oil at Bohai offshore. The former one could degrade alkane hydrocarbons (crude oil and diesel, 1:4 (v/v)) and crude oil efficiently; the latter one failed to grow on alkane hydrocarbons but could produce rhamnolipid (a biosurfactant) with glycerol as sole carbon source. Compared with pure culture, mixed culture of the two strains showed higher capability in degrading alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil of which degradation rate were increased from 89.35 and 74.32 ± 4.09 to 97.41 and 87.29 ± 2.41 %, respectively. In the mixed culture, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 grew fast with sufficient carbon source and produced intermediates which were subsequently utilized for the growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01 and then, rhamnolipid was produced by Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. Till the end of the process, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 was inhibited by the rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. In addition, alkane hydrocarbon degradation rate of the mixed culture increased by 8.06 to 97.41 % compared with 87.29 % of the pure culture. The surface tension of medium dropping from 73.2 × 10(-3) to 28.6 × 10(-3) N/m. Based on newly found cooperation between the degrader and the coworking strain, rational investigations and optimal strategies to alkane hydrocarbons biodegradation were utilized for enhancing crude oil biodegradation.

  12. Overexpressing CYP71Z2 enhances resistance to bacterial blight by suppressing auxin biosynthesis in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Li

    Full Text Available The hormone auxin plays an important role not only in the growth and development of rice, but also in its defense responses. We've previously shown that the P450 gene CYP71Z2 enhances disease resistance to pathogens through regulation of phytoalexin biosynthesis in rice, though it remains unclear if auxin is involved in this process or not.The expression of CYP71Z2 was induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo inoculation was analyzed by qRT-PCR, with GUS histochemical staining showing that CYP71Z2 expression was limited to roots, blades and nodes. Overexpression of CYP71Z2 in rice durably and stably increased resistance to Xoo, though no significant difference in disease resistance was detected between CYP71Z2-RNA interference (RNAi rice and wild-type. Moreover, IAA concentration was determined using the HPLC/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry system. The accumulation of IAA was significantly reduced in CYP71Z2-overexpressing rice regardless of whether plants were inoculated or not, whereas it was unaffected in CYP71Z2-RNAi rice. Furthermore, the expression of genes related to IAA, expansin and SA/JA signaling pathways was suppressed in CYP71Z2-overexpressing rice with or without inoculation.These results suggest that CYP71Z2-mediated resistance to Xoo may be via suppression of IAA signaling in rice. Our studies also provide comprehensive insight into molecular mechanism of resistance to Xoo mediated by IAA in rice. Moreover, an available approach for understanding the P450 gene functions in interaction between rice and pathogens has been provided.

  13. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    upon azide complexation. Application of this method allows for rapid analysis of ligand binding in metalloproteins in dilute aqueous solution and could in the future, when combined with theoretical studies, increase the obtainable structural resolution of proteins beyond that of X-ray analysis....

  14. Transferring the C-terminus of the chemokine CCL21 to CCL19 confers enhanced heparin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmore, Austin J; Castex, Sally M; Gouletas, Brittany A; Griffith, Alex J; Metz, Slater W; Muelder, Nicolas G; Populin, Michael J; Sackett, David M; Schuster, Abigail M; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-09-02

    Chemokines direct the migration of cells during various immune processes and are involved in many disease states. For example, CCL19 and CCL21, through activation of the CCR7 receptor, recruit dendritic cells and naïve T-cells to the secondary lymphoid organs aiding in balancing immune response and tolerance. However, CCL19 and CCL21 can also direct the metastasis of CCR7 expressing cancers. Chemokine binding to glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin, is as important to chemokine function as receptor activation. CCL21 is unique in that it contains an extended C-terminus not found in other chemokines like CCL19. Deletion of this extended C-terminus reduces CCL21's affinity for heparin and transferring the CCL21 C-terminus to CCL19 enhances heparin binding mainly through non-specific, electrostatic interactions.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates S100A8 expression by activating protein kinase A and CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lin; Grebhardt, Sina; Shi, Jiandang; Peipe, Isabelle; Zhang, Ju; Mayer, Doris

    2012-11-01

    S100A8 and S100A9 are strongly expressed in epithelial cells of human prostate cancer. However, the regulation of their expression is unclear. Here we show that S100A8 and to a lesser extent S100A9 mRNA expression is induced by prostaglandin E2 in a dose and time-dependent manner in PC-3 prostate cancer cells as well as in BPH-1 benign prostatic epithelial cells. Prostanoid receptor EP2 antagonist AH6809 and EP4 antagonist AH23848, as well as protein kinase A inhibitor H89, inhibited prostaglandin E2 mediated increase in S100A8 mRNA expression as well as promoter activity. Sequence analysis detected a potential binding site of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta within the proximal S100A8 promoter. CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta overexpression increased S100A8 mRNA and protein expression as well as its promoter activity. The latter was prevented by mutation of the potential CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta binding site within the S100A8 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed increased binding of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta to the S100A8 promoter in prostaglandin E2 treated cells. Knockdown of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta by siRNA blocked prostaglandin E2 mediated induction of S100A8 promoter activity and mRNA expression. Our results indicate that in prostate cancer cells, S100A8 expression is stimulated by prostaglandin E2 via EP2 and EP4 receptors through activation of the protein kinase A signaling pathway and subsequent stimulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta binding to the S100A8 promoter.

  16. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors.

  17. Rhizospheric bacterial strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a colonizes plant tissues and enhances Cd, Zn, Cu phytoextraction by white mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz ePłociniczak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants.The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%, Zn (86% and Cu (39% in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  18. Surface modification of bacterial cellulose nanofibers for property enhancement of optically transparent composites: dependence on acetyl-group DS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Nogi, Masaya; Abe, Kentaro; Handa, Keishin; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers were acetylated to enhance the properties of optically transparent composites of acrylic resin reinforced with the nanofibers. A series of BC nanofibers acetylated from degree-of-substitution (DS) 0 to 1.76 were obtained. X-ray diffraction profiles indicated that acetylation proceeded from the surface to the core of BC nanofibers, and scanning electron microscopy images showed that the volume of nanofibers increases by the bulky acetyl group. Since acetylation decreased the refractive index of cellulose, regular transmittance of composites comprised of 63% BC nanofiber was improved, and deterioration at 580 nm because of fiber reinforcement was suppressed to only 3.4%. Acetylation of nanofibers changed their surface properties and reduced the moisture content of the composite to about one-third that of untreated composite, although excessive acetylation increased hygroscopicity. Furthermore, acetylation was found to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion of a BC sheet from 3 x 10(-6) to below 1 x 10(-6) 1/K.

  19. Classification of bacterial samples as negative or positive for a UTI and antibiogram using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Pitris, Costas

    2011-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis requires an overnight culture to identify a sample as positive or negative for a UTI. Additional cultures are required to identify the pathogen responsible for the infection and to test its sensitivity to antibiotics. A rise in ineffective treatments, chronic infections, rising health care costs and antibiotic resistance are some of the consequences of this prolonged waiting period of UTI diagnosis. In this work, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is used for classifying bacterial samples as positive or negative for UTI. SERS spectra of serial dilutions of E.coli bacteria, isolated from a urine culture, were classified as positive (105-108 cells/ml) or negative (103-104 cells/ml) for UTI after mixing samples with gold nanoparticles. A leave-one-out cross validation was performed using the first two principal components resulting in the correct classification of 82% of all samples. Sensitivity of classification was 88% and specificity was 67%. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was also done using SERS spectra of various species of gram negative bacteria collected 4 hours after exposure to antibiotics. Spectral analysis revealed clear separation between the spectra of samples exposed to ciprofloxacin (sensitive) and amoxicillin (resistant). This study can become the basis for identifying urine samples as positive or negative for a UTI and determining their antibiogram without requiring an overnight culture.

  20. Self-Assembled Functional Nanostructure of Plasmid DNA with Ionic Liquid [Bmim][PF₆]: Enhanced Efficiency in Bacterial Gene Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sarvesh K; Sarkar, Sampa; Mirzadeh, Nedaossadat; Selvakannan, P R; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged phosphate groups of plasmid DNA and the cationic part of hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]), initiates spontaneous self-assembly to form the functional nanostructures made up of DNA and ionic liquid (IL). These functional nanostructures were demonstrated as promising synthetic nonviral vectors for the efficient bacterial pGFP gene transformation in cells. In particular, the functional nanostructures that were made up of 1 μL of IL ([Bmim][PF6]) and 1 μg of plasmid DNA can increase the transformation efficiency by 300-400% in microbial systems, without showing any toxicity for E. coli DH5α cells. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopic analysis revealed that the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged phosphate oxygen and cationic Bmim(+) tends to initiate the self-assembly process. Thermogravimetric analysis of the DNA-IL functional nanostructures showed that these nanostructures consist of ∼16 wt % ionic liquid, which is considered to provide the stability to the plasmid DNA that eventually enhanced the transformation efficiency.

  1. Enhanced killing of penicillin-treated gram-positive cocci by human granulocytes: role of bacterial autolysins, catalase, and granulocyte oxidative pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isturiz, R; Metcalf, J A; Root, R K

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococci pretreated with subminimal inhibitory concentrations (subMIC) of cell-wall active antibiotics exhibit increased susceptibility to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), even when phagosome information is impaired by the mold metabolite, cytochalasin B. To investigate the role of specific bacterial factors in the process, studies were carried out with organisms lacking catalase (streptococci) or cell-wall autolytic enzymes and compared to findings with Staphylococcus aureus 502A. Neutrophil factors were studied using inhibitors, oxygen radical scavengers, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-deficient PMNs, or PMNs from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Documentation of the enhanced susceptibility of the streptococcal strains to killing by PMNs following subMIC penicillin pretreatment required the use of cytochalasin B. Enhancement of killing occurred independent of the presence or absence of bacterial autolysins or catalase. SubMIC penicillin pretreatment of S. pneumoniae R36A specifically promoted the susceptibility of these organisms to killing by myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated mechanisms (enhancement lost using MPO-deficient or azide-treated cells). Factors other than MPO or toxic oxygen products generated by the PMN respiratory burst are responsible for enhanced killing of penicillin-pretreated S. aureus 502A (enhancement preserved using MPO-deficient, azide-treated, or chronic granulomatous disease patient cells). These studies define methods to study the interaction of antimicrobial agents and PMNs in the killing of microorganisms. They also demonstrate that penicillin treatment can change the susceptibility of gram-positive cocci to the action of specific PMN microbicidal mechanisms. The mechanism of the enhancement appears to be bacterial strain-dependent and not predictable by bacterial autolysin or catalase activity.

  2. A Manganese(V)-Oxo Complex: Synthesis by Dioxygen Activation and Enhancement of Its Oxidizing Power by Binding Scandium Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seungwoo; Lee, Yong-Min; Sankaralingam, Muniyandi; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Park, Young Jun; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Ogura, Takashi; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-07-13

    A mononuclear non-heme manganese(V)-oxo complex, [Mn(V)(O)(TAML)](-) (1), was synthesized by activating dioxygen in the presence of olefins with weak allylic C-H bonds and characterized structurally and spectroscopically. In mechanistic studies, the formation rate of 1 was found to depend on the allylic C-H bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of olefins, and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 16 was obtained in the reactions of cyclohexene and cyclohexene-d10. These results suggest that a hydrogen atom abstraction from the allylic C-H bonds of olefins by a putative Mn(IV)-superoxo species, which is formed by binding O2 by a high-spin (S = 2) [Mn(III)(TAML)](-) complex, is the rate-determining step. A Mn(V)-oxo complex binding Sc(3+) ion, [Mn(V)(O)(TAML)](-)-(Sc(3+)) (2), was also synthesized in the reaction of 1 with Sc(3+) ion and then characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The binding site of the Sc(3+) ion was proposed to be the TAML ligand, not the Mn-O moiety, probably due to the low basicity of the oxo group compared to the basicity of the amide carbonyl group in the TAML ligand. Reactivity studies of the Mn(V)-oxo intermediates, 1 and 2, in oxygen atom transfer and electron-transfer reactions revealed that the binding of Sc(3+) ion at the TAML ligand of Mn(V)-oxo enhanced its oxidizing power with a positively shifted one-electron reduction potential (ΔEred = 0.70 V). This study reports the first example of tuning the second coordination sphere of high-valent metal-oxo species by binding a redox-inactive metal ion at the supporting ligand site, thereby modulating their electron-transfer properties as well as their reactivities in oxidation reactions.

  3. Plasma-treated polystyrene film that enhances binding efficiency for sensitive and label-free protein biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Bihong [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Shaopeng [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Lusheng [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Tyagi, Deependra [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquan Rd., 19(A), Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Jinsong, E-mail: jizhu88@gmail.com [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • A simple and robust plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene film surface was developed for protein biosensing. • The surface was optimized by evaluating up to 120 types of fabrication parameters with high-throughput analytical methods. • The optimized surface showed a 620% improvement of the protein detection signal and 210% protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer surface. - Abstract: A plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene (PS) film surface was explored as a simple, robust, and low-cost surface chemistry solution for protein biosensing applications. This surface could dramatically improve the binding efficiency of the protein–protein interactions, which is defined as the binding signal per immobilized ligand. The PS-modified protein biosensor was readily fabricated by spin coating and plasma treatment. Various parameters for fabrication, including the concentration of the PS solution, rate of spin coating, and duration of plasma treatment, were systematically optimized based on the improvement of fluorescence signal yielded by the microfluidic network-aided fluorescence immunoassay. The performance of the label-free protein detection on the optimized surfaces was further evaluated by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). PS surfaces with optimal fabrication parameters exhibited up to an 620% enhancement of the protein binding response and approximately 210% of the protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA). The relationship between the fabrication parameters used and changes to the surface chemistry and the morphological properties were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was revealed that the morphological changes observed in the plasma-treated PS film were the dominant factor for the

  4. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  5. Virus-binding proteins recovered from bacterial culture derived from activated sludge by affinity chromatography assay using a viral capsid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Daisuke; Matsuo, Takahiro; Omura, Tatsuo

    2004-06-01

    The contamination of water environments by pathogenic viruses has raised concerns about outbreaks of viral infectious diseases in our society. Because conventional water and wastewater treatment systems are not effective enough to inactivate or remove pathogenic viruses, a new technology for virus removal needs to be developed. In this study, the virus-binding proteins (VBPs) in a bacterial culture derived from activated sludge were successfully recovered. The recovery of VBPs was achieved by applying extracted crude proteins from a bacterial culture to an affinity column in which a custom-made peptide of capsid protein from the poliovirus type 1 (PV1) Mahoney strain (H(2)N-DNPASTTNKDKL-COOH) was immobilized as a ligand. VBPs exhibited the ability to adsorb infectious particles of PV1 Sabin 1 as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The evaluation of surface charges of VBPs with ion-exchange chromatography found that a majority of VBP molecules had a net negative charge under the conditions of affinity chromatography. On the other hand, a calculated isoelectric point implied that the viral peptide in the affinity column was also charged negatively. As a result, the adsorption of the VBPs to the viral peptide in the affinity column occurred with a strong attractive force that was able to overcome the electrostatic repulsive force. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that the isolated VBPs include a number of proteins, and their molecular masses were widely distributed but smaller than 100 kDa. Amino acid sequences of N termini of five VBPs were determined. Homology searches for the N termini against all protein sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database showed that the isolated VBPs in this study were newly discovered proteins. These VBPs that originated with bacteria in activated sludge might be stable, because they are existing in the environment of wastewater treatments. Therefore, a virus removal technology

  6. Drosophila TDP-43 RNA-Binding Protein Facilitates Association of Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins with Genes, Enhancers and Polycomb Response Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Swain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The cohesin protein complex mediates sister chromatid cohesion and participates in transcriptional control of genes that regulate growth and development. Substantial reduction of cohesin activity alters transcription of many genes without disrupting chromosome segregation. Drosophila Nipped-B protein loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and together Nipped-B and cohesin occupy essentially all active transcriptional enhancers and a large fraction of active genes. It is unknown why some active genes bind high levels of cohesin and some do not. Here we show that the TBPH and Lark RNA-binding proteins influence association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and gene regulatory sequences. In vitro, TBPH and Lark proteins specifically bind RNAs produced by genes occupied by Nipped-B and cohesin. By genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation these RNA-binding proteins also bind to chromosomes at cohesin-binding genes, enhancers, and Polycomb response elements (PREs. RNAi depletion reveals that TBPH facilitates association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and regulatory sequences. Lark reduces binding of Nipped-B and cohesin at many promoters and aids their association with several large enhancers. Conversely, Nipped-B facilitates TBPH and Lark association with genes and regulatory sequences, and interacts with TBPH and Lark in affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments. Blocking transcription does not ablate binding of Nipped-B and the RNA-binding proteins to chromosomes, indicating transcription is not required to maintain binding once established. These findings demonstrate that RNA-binding proteins help govern association of sister chromatid cohesion proteins with genes and enhancers.

  7. Conjugation of benzylvanillin and benzimidazole structure improves DNA binding with enhanced antileukemic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mudaris, Zena A; Majid, Aman S A; Ji, Dan; Al-Mudarris, Ban A; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang; Osman, Hasnah; Jamal Din, Shah Kamal Khan; Abdul Majid, Amin M S

    2013-01-01

    Benzyl-o-vanillin and benzimidazole nucleus serve as important pharmacophore in drug discovery. The benzyl vanillin (2-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) compound shows anti-proliferative activity in HL60 leukemia cancer cells and can effect cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Its apoptosis activity was due to disruption of mitochondrial functioning. In this study, we have studied a series of compounds consisting of benzyl vanillin and benzimidazole structures. We hypothesize that by fusing these two structures we can produce compounds that have better anticancer activity with improved specificity particularly towards the leukemia cell line. Here we explored the anticancer activity of three compounds namely 2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 2MP, N-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 2XP, and (R) and (S)-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl benzenesulfonate, 3BS and compared their activity to 2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, (Bn1), the parent compound. 2XP and 3BS induces cell death of U937 leukemic cell line through DNA fragmentation that lead to the intrinsic caspase 9 activation. DNA binding study primarily by the equilibrium binding titration assay followed by the Viscosity study reveal the DNA binding through groove region with intrinsic binding constant 7.39 µM/bp and 6.86 µM/bp for 3BS and 2XP respectively. 2XP and 3BS showed strong DNA binding activity by the UV titration method with the computational drug modeling showed that both 2XP and 3BS failed to form any electrostatic linkages except via hydrophobic interaction through the minor groove region of the nucleic acid. The benzylvanillin alone (Bn1) has weak anticancer activity even after it was combined with the benzimidazole (2MP), but after addition of another benzylvanillin structure (2XP), stronger activity was observed. Also, the combination of benzylvanillin with benzenesulfonate (3BS) significantly improved the

  8. Conjugation of benzylvanillin and benzimidazole structure improves DNA binding with enhanced antileukemic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena A Al-Mudaris

    Full Text Available Benzyl-o-vanillin and benzimidazole nucleus serve as important pharmacophore in drug discovery. The benzyl vanillin (2-(benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound shows anti-proliferative activity in HL60 leukemia cancer cells and can effect cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Its apoptosis activity was due to disruption of mitochondrial functioning. In this study, we have studied a series of compounds consisting of benzyl vanillin and benzimidazole structures. We hypothesize that by fusing these two structures we can produce compounds that have better anticancer activity with improved specificity particularly towards the leukemia cell line. Here we explored the anticancer activity of three compounds namely 2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazole, 2MP, N-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzyl-2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazole, 2XP, and (R and (S-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl benzenesulfonate, 3BS and compared their activity to 2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, (Bn1, the parent compound. 2XP and 3BS induces cell death of U937 leukemic cell line through DNA fragmentation that lead to the intrinsic caspase 9 activation. DNA binding study primarily by the equilibrium binding titration assay followed by the Viscosity study reveal the DNA binding through groove region with intrinsic binding constant 7.39 µM/bp and 6.86 µM/bp for 3BS and 2XP respectively. 2XP and 3BS showed strong DNA binding activity by the UV titration method with the computational drug modeling showed that both 2XP and 3BS failed to form any electrostatic linkages except via hydrophobic interaction through the minor groove region of the nucleic acid. The benzylvanillin alone (Bn1 has weak anticancer activity even after it was combined with the benzimidazole (2MP, but after addition of another benzylvanillin structure (2XP, stronger activity was observed. Also, the combination of benzylvanillin with benzenesulfonate (3BS significantly improved

  9. HCV NS3 protease enhances liver fibrosis via binding to and activating TGF-β type I receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kotaro; Hara, Mitsuko; Terada, Takaho; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Takaya, Daisuke; Yaguchi, So-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Tokio; Miyazawa, Keiji; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Imoto, Masaya; Kojima, Soichi

    2013-11-01

    Viruses sometimes mimic host proteins and hijack the host cell machinery. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver fibrosis, a process largely mediated by the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen, although the precise underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we report that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3) protease affects the antigenicity and bioactivity of TGF-β2 in (CAGA)9-Luc CCL64 cells and in human hepatic cell lines via binding to TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α facilitates this mechanism by increasing the colocalization of TβRI with NS3 protease on the surface of HCV-infected cells. An anti-NS3 antibody against computationally predicted binding sites for TβRI blocked the TGF-β mimetic activities of NS3 in vitro and attenuated liver fibrosis in HCV-infected chimeric mice. These data suggest that HCV NS3 protease mimics TGF-β2 and functions, at least in part, via directly binding to and activating TβRI, thereby enhancing liver fibrosis.

  10. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram enhances hippocampal synaptic efficacy via glycine-binding site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-10-01

    Sunifiram is a novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug structurally related to piracetam, which was developed for neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease. Sunifiram is known to enhance cognitive function in some behavioral experiments such as Morris water maze task. To address question whether sunifiram affects N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic function in the hippocampal CA1 region, we assessed the effects of sunifiram on NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) by electrophysiology and on phosphorylation of synaptic proteins by immunoblotting analysis. In mouse hippocampal slices, sunifiram at 10-100 nM significantly enhanced LTP in a bell-shaped dose-response relationship which peaked at 10 nM. The enhancement of LTP by sunifiram treatment was inhibited by 7-chloro-kynurenic acid (7-ClKN), an antagonist for glycine-binding site of NMDAR, but not by ifenprodil, an inhibitor for polyamine site of NMDAR. The enhancement of LTP by sunifilam was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisozazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) through activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and an increase in phosphorylation of NMDAR through activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Sunifiram treatments at 1-1000 nM increased the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a dose-dependent manner. The enhancement was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of AMPAR receptor through activation of CaMKII. Interestingly, under the basal condition, sunifiram treatments increased PKCα (Ser-657) and Src family (Tyr-416) activities with the same bell-shaped dose-response curve as that of LTP peaking at 10 nM. The increase in phosphorylation of PKCα (Ser-657) and Src (Tyr-416) induced by sunifiram was inhibited by 7-ClKN treatment. The LTP enhancement by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by PP2, a Src family inhibitor. Finally, when pretreated with a high

  11. The DUF582 Proteins of Chlamydia trachomatis Bind to Components of the ESCRT Machinery, Which Is Dispensable for Bacterial Growth In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromman, François; Perrinet, Stéphanie; Gehre, Lena; Subtil, Agathe

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram negative bacteria that develop exclusively inside eukaryotic host cells, within a membrane-bounded compartment. Members of the family Chlamydiaceae, such as Chlamydia trachomatis, are pathogenic species infecting vertebrates. They have a very reduced genome and exploit the capacities of their host for their own development, mainly through the secretion of proteins tailored to interfere with eukaryotic processes, called effector proteins. All Chlamydiaceae possess genes coding for four to five effectors that share a domain of unknown function (DUF582). Here we show that four of these effectors, which represent the conserved set in all Chlamydiaceae, accumulate in the infectious form of C. trachomatis, and are therefore likely involved in an early step of the developmental cycle. The fifth member of the family, CT621, is specific to C. trachomatis, and is secreted during the growth phase. Using a two-hybrid screen in yeast we identified an interaction between the host protein Hrs and the DUF582, which we confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations in co-transfected mammalian cells. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that a second domain of one of the DUF582 proteins, CT619, binds the host protein Tsg101. Hrs and Tsg101 are both implicated in a well conserved machinery of the eukaryotic cell called the ESCRT machinery, which is involved in several cellular processes requiring membrane constriction. Using RNA interference targeting proteins implicated at different stages of ESCRT-driven processes, or inhibition by expression of a dominant negative mutant of VPS4, we demonstrated that this machinery was dispensable for bacterial entry, multiplication and differentiation into infectious progeny, and for uptake of glycogen into the parasitophorous vacuole. In light of these observations we discuss how the DUF582 proteins might target the ESCRT machinery during infection. PMID:27774439

  12. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Zartman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA, more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100 retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944. Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy treated with choline (Kd = 13,800 and carnitine (Kd = 3960 adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944. A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100 adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340 or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293. Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity.

  13. SNBRFinder: A Sequence-Based Hybrid Algorithm for Enhanced Prediction of Nucleic Acid-Binding Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to various fundamental biological processes. Automated methods capable of reliably identifying DNA- and RNA-binding residues in protein sequence are assuming ever-increasing importance. The majority of current algorithms rely on feature-based prediction, but their accuracy remains to be further improved. Here we propose a sequence-based hybrid algorithm SNBRFinder (Sequence-based Nucleic acid-Binding Residue Finder by merging a feature predictor SNBRFinderF and a template predictor SNBRFinderT. SNBRFinderF was established using the support vector machine whose inputs include sequence profile and other complementary sequence descriptors, while SNBRFinderT was implemented with the sequence alignment algorithm based on profile hidden Markov models to capture the weakly homologous template of query sequence. Experimental results show that SNBRFinderF was clearly superior to the commonly used sequence profile-based predictor and SNBRFinderT can achieve comparable performance to the structure-based template methods. Leveraging the complementary relationship between these two predictors, SNBRFinder reasonably improved the performance of both DNA- and RNA-binding residue predictions. More importantly, the sequence-based hybrid prediction reached competitive performance relative to our previous structure-based counterpart. Our extensive and stringent comparisons show that SNBRFinder has obvious advantages over the existing sequence-based prediction algorithms. The value of our algorithm is highlighted by establishing an easy-to-use web server that is freely accessible at http://ibi.hzau.edu.cn/SNBRFinder.

  14. Autogenous control of PspF, a constitutively active enhancer-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic, G; Dworkin, J; Model, P

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli sigma54-dependent phage shock protein operon (pspA to -E) transcription is under the control of PspF, a constitutively active activator. Sigma70-dependent transcription of pspF is under autogenous control by wild-type PspF but not by a DNA-binding mutant, PspF deltaHTH. Negative autoregulation of PspF is continual and not affected by stimuli, like f1 pIV, that induce the pspA to -E operon. PspF production is independent of PspA (the negative regulator of the pspA to -E operon...

  15. Enhanced bilirubin binding to different mammalian erythrocytes in the presence of magnesium ions

    OpenAIRE

    M. K. Ali; Siddiqui, M. U.; Tayyab, S.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of magnesium ions on the binding of bilirubin to erythrocytes of different mammalian species, namely, human, buffalo, goat and sheep was studied. Increase in the concentration of magnesium ions led to a gradual increase in the erythrocyte-bound bilirubin in both human and buffalo erythrocytes whereas in sheep and goat erythrocytes, the pronounced increase was found beyond 2.0 and 2.7 mM MgCl2 concentrations respectively. Percentage increase in erythrocyte-bound bilirubin was found high...

  16. Argonaute-1 binds transcriptional enhancers and controls constitutive and alternative splicing in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alló, Mariano; Agirre, Eneritz; Bessonov, Sergey; Bertucci, Paola; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Buggiano, Valeria; Bellora, Nicolás; Singh, Babita; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Blaustein, Matías; Miñana, Belén; Dujardin, Gwendal; Pozzi, Berta; Pelisch, Federico; Bechara, Elías; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Srebrow, Anabella; Lührmann, Reinhard; Valcárcel, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Argonaute proteins in cytoplasmic microRNA and RNAi pathways are well established. However, their implication in small RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in the mammalian cell nucleus is less understood. We have recently shown that intronic siRNAs cause chromatin modifications that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation and modulate alternative splicing in an Argonaute-1 (AGO1)-dependent manner. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide distribution of AGO1 nuclear targets. Unexpectedly, we found that about 80% of AGO1 clusters are associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional enhancers, most of them (73%) overlapping active enhancers. This association seems to be mediated by long, rather than short, enhancer RNAs and to be more prominent in intragenic, rather than intergenic, enhancers. Paradoxically, crossing ChIP-seq with RNA-seq data upon AGO1 depletion revealed that enhancer-bound AGO1 is not linked to the global regulation of gene transcription but to the control of constitutive and alternative splicing, which was confirmed by an individual gene analysis explaining how AGO1 controls inclusion levels of the cassette exon 107 in the SYNE2 gene. PMID:25313066

  17. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-08-27

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach.

  18. Creation of a putative third metal binding site in type II dihydroorotases significantly enhances enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroorotase (DHOase) is the third enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides. DHOase is divided into two types (I and II). Type II DHOase generally contains a binuclear metal center in its active site. Recently, the crystal structure of DHOase domain in human CAD protein (huDHOase) has revealed three metal ions in the protein's active site. However, whether type II DHOase can have the critical third metal ion, as observed in huDHOase, remains unknown. In the present study, the putative third metal binding site in type II enzymes, such as the prokaryotic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 DHOase (StDHOase) and the eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae DHOase (ScDHOase), was created and identified. StDHOase T198E and ScDHOase T208E mutants had higher activities compared with their wild-type enzymes. The need for a higher DHOase stability and activity may drive creation of the third metal ion binding site in huDHOase, which can be achieved by mutating a highly conserved position T in type II dihydroorotases to E, similar to that in huDHOase.

  19. ``Black Holes" and Bacterial Pathogenicity: A Large Genomic Deletion that Enhances the Virulence of Shigella spp. and Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurelli, Anthony T.; Fernandez, Reinaldo E.; Bloch, Craig A.; Rode, Christopher K.; Fasano, Alessio

    1998-03-01

    Plasmids, bacteriophages, and pathogenicity islands are genomic additions that contribute to the evolution of bacterial pathogens. For example, Shigella spp., the causative agents of bacillary dysentery, differ from the closely related commensal Escherichia coli in the presence of a plasmid in Shigella that encodes virulence functions. However, pathogenic bacteria also may lack properties that are characteristic of nonpathogens. Lysine decarboxylate (LDC) activity is present in ≈ 90% of E. coli strains but is uniformly absent in Shigella strains. When the gene for LDC, cadA, was introduced into Shigella flexneri 2a, virulence became attenuated, and enterotoxin activity was inhibited greatly. The enterotoxin inhibitor was identified as cadaverine, a product of the reaction catalyzed by LDC. Comparison of the S. flexneri 2a and laboratory E. coli K-12 genomes in the region of cadA revealed a large deletion in Shigella. Representative strains of Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive E. coli displayed similar deletions of cadA. Our results suggest that, as Shigella spp. evolved from E. coli to become pathogens, they not only acquired virulence genes on a plasmid but also shed genes via deletions. The formation of these ``black holes,'' deletions of genes that are detrimental to a pathogenic lifestyle, provides an evolutionary pathway that enables a pathogen to enhance virulence. Furthermore, the demonstration that cadaverine can inhibit enterotoxin activity may lead to more general models about toxin activity or entry into cells and suggests an avenue for antitoxin therapy. Thus, understanding the role of black holes in pathogen evolution may yield clues to new treatments of infectious diseases.

  20. Directed evolution of a bacterial alpha-amylase: toward enhanced pH-performance and higher specific activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Cornelius; Schmitt, Jutta; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schmid, Rolf D

    2003-10-01

    alpha-Amylases, in particular, microbial alpha-amylases, are widely used in industrial processes such as starch liquefaction and pulp processes, and more recently in detergency. Due to the need for alpha-amylases with high specific activity and activity at alkaline pH, which are critical parameters, for example, for the use in detergents, we have enhanced the alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA). The genes coding for the wild-type BAA and the mutants BAA S201N and BAA N297D were subjected to error-prone PCR and gene shuffling. For the screening of mutants we developed a novel, reliable assay suitable for high throughput screening based on the Phadebas assay. One mutant (BAA 42) has an optimal activity at pH 7, corresponding to a shift of one pH unit compared to the wild type. BAA 42 is active over a broader pH range than the wild type, resulting in a 5-fold higher activity at pH 10. In addition, the activity in periplasmic extracts and the specific activity increased 4- and 1.5-fold, respectively. Another mutant (BAA 29) possesses a wild-type-like pH profile but possesses a 40-fold higher activity in periplasmic extracts and a 9-fold higher specific activity. The comparison of the amino acid sequences of these two mutants with other homologous microbial alpha-amylases revealed the mutation of the highly conserved residues W194R, S197P, and A230V. In addition, three further mutations were found K406R, N414S, and E356D, the latter being present in other bacterial alpha-amylases.

  1. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu;

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Ara...

  2. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  3. Human Intersectin 2 (ITSN2 binds to Eps8 protein and enhances its degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ding

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Participates in actin remodeling through Rac and receptor endocytosisvia Rab5. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid systemwith Eps8 as bait to screen a human brain cDNA library.ITSN2 was identified as the novel binding factor of Eps8. Theinteraction between ITSN2 and Eps8 was demonstrated by thein vivo co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization assays andthe in vitro GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, we mappedthe interaction domains to the region between amino acids260-306 of Eps8 and the coiled-coil domain of ITSN2. In addition,protein stability assays and immunofluorescence analysisshowed ITSN2 overexpression induced the degradation ofEps8 proteins, which was markedly alleviated with the lysosomeinhibitor NH4Cl treatment. Taken together, our resultssuggested ITSN2 interacts with Eps8 and stimulates the degradationof Eps8 proteins. [BMB reports 2012; 45(3: 183-188

  4. Debranching of soluble wheat arabinoxylan dramatically enhances recalcitrant binding to cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selig, Michael J.; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.; Felby, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    The presence of xylan is a detriment to the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose in lignocelluloses. The inhibition of the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A by soluble wheat arabinoxylan is shown here to increase by 50 % following enzymatic treatment with a commercially-purified α-l-arabinofu......The presence of xylan is a detriment to the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose in lignocelluloses. The inhibition of the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A by soluble wheat arabinoxylan is shown here to increase by 50 % following enzymatic treatment with a commercially-purified α...... considerably increased the rate and rigidity of arabinoxylan mass association with cellulose. These data also suggest significant xylan–xylan adlayer formation occurs following initial binding of debranched arabinoxylan. From this, we speculate the inhibitory effects of xylan to cellulases may result from...... reduced enzymatic access via the dense association of xylan with cellulose....

  5. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Schmidt, John W; Harhay, Dayna M

    2013-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their planktonic counterparts, so these foodborne pathogens in biofilms pose a serious food safety concern. We investigated how the coexistence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium strains would affect bacterial planktonic growth competition and mixed biofilm composition. Furthermore, we also investigated how mixed biofilm formation would affect bacterial resistance to common sanitizers. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were able to outcompete E. coli strains in the planktonic growth phase; however, mixed biofilm development was highly dependent upon companion strain properties in terms of the expression of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), including curli fimbriae and exopolysaccharide cellulose. The EPS-producing strains with higher biofilm-forming abilities were able to establish themselves in mixed biofilms more efficiently. In comparison to single-strain biofilms, Salmonella or E. coli strains with negative EPS expression obtained significantly enhanced resistance to sanitization by forming mixed biofilms with an EPS-producing companion strain of the other species. These observations indicate that the bacterial EPS components not only enhance the sanitizer resistance of the EPS-producing strains but also render protections to their companion strains, regardless of species, in mixed biofilms. Our study highlights the potential risk of cross-contamination by multispecies biofilms in food safety and the need for increased attention to proper sanitization practices in food processing facilities.

  6. Enhanced Biofilm Formation and Increased Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents and Bacterial Invasion Are Caused by Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Webb, J.S.; Rao, D.

    2006-01-01

    Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated...... specific interactions. In summary, our data strongly indicate that synergistic effects promote biofilm biomass and resistance of the biofilm to antimicrobial agents and bacterial invasion in multispecies biofilms....

  7. Binding of complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein to a highly virulent Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain is mediated by protein H and enhances adhesion to and invasion of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Weckel, Antonin; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Blom, Anna M

    2013-11-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes AP1, a strain of the highly virulent M1 serotype, uses exclusively protein H to bind the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We found a strong correlation between the ability of AP1 and its isogenic mutants lacking protein H to inhibit opsonization with complement C3b and binding of C4BP. C4BP bound to immobilized protein H or AP1 bacteria retained its cofactor activity for degradation of (125)I-C4b. Furthermore, C4b deposited from serum onto AP1 bacterial surfaces was processed into C4c/C4d fragments, which did not occur on strains unable to bind C4BP. Recombinant C4BP mutants, which (i) lack certain CCP domains or (ii) have mutations in single aa as well as (iii) mutants with additional aa between different CCP domains were used to determine that the binding is mainly mediated by a patch of positively charged amino acid residues at the interface of domains CCP1 and CCP2. Using recombinant protein H fragments, we narrowed down the binding site to the N-terminal domain A. With a peptide microarray, we identified one single 18-amino acid-long peptide comprising residues 92-109, which specifically bound C4BP. Biacore was used to determine KD = 6 × 10(-7) M between protein H and a single subunit of C4BP. C4BP binding also correlated with elevated levels of adhesion and invasion to endothelial cells. Taken together, we identified the molecular basis of C4BP-protein H interaction and found that it is not only important for decreased opsonization but also for invasion of endothelial cells by S. pyogenes.

  8. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E. (Vanderbilt); (Scripps); (CDC)

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  9. The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta-2 isoform (CEBPβ-2 upregulates galectin-7 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole G Campion

    Full Text Available Galectin-7 is considered a gene under the control of p53. However, elevated expression of galectin-7 has been reported in several forms of cancer harboring an inactive p53 pathway. This is especially true for breast cancer where galectin-7 expression is readily expressed in a high proportion in basal-like breast cancer tissues, conferring cancer cells with increased resistance to cell death and metastatic properties. These observations suggest that other transcription factors are capable of inducing galectin-7 expression. In the present work, we have examined the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ in inducing expression of galectin-7. C/EBP proteins have been shown to contribute to breast cancer by upregulating pro-metastatic genes. We paid particular attention to C/EBPβ-2 (also known as LAP2, the most transcriptionally active of the C/EBPβ isoforms. Our results showed that ectopic expression of C/EBPβ-2 in human breast cancer cells was sufficient to induce expression of galectin-7 at both the mRNA and protein levels. In silico analysis further revealed the presence of an established CEBP element in the galectin-7 promoter. Mutation of this binding site abolished the transcriptional activity of the galectin-7 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that C/EBPβ-2 binds to the endogenous galectin-7 promoter. Analysis of galectin-7 protein expression in normal epithelia and in breast carcinoma by immunohistochemistry further showed the expression pattern of C/EBPβ closely micmicked that of galectin-7, most notably in mammary myoepithelial cells and basal-like breast cancer where galectin-7 is preferentially expressed. Taken together, our findings suggest that C/EBPβ is an important mediator of galectin-7 gene activation in breast cancer cells and highlight the different transcriptional mechanisms controlling galectin-7 in cancer cells.

  10. Deficiency of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-Epsilon Reduces Atherosclerotic Lesions in LDLR−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryoko; Gery, Sigal; Gombart, Adrian F.; Wang, Xuping; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Akagi, Tadayuki; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Ho, Quoc; Lusis, Aldons J.; Li, Quanlin; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2014-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) are transcription factors involved in hematopoietic cell development and induction of several inflammatory mediators. C/EBPε is expressed only in myeloid cells including monocytes/macrophages. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder of the vascular wall and circulating immune cells such as monocytes/macrophages. Mice deficient in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (Ldlr−/−) fed on a high cholesterol diet (HCD) show elevated blood cholesterol levels and are widely used as models to study human atherosclerosis. In this study, we generated Ldlr and Cebpe double-knockout (llee) mice and compared their atherogenic phenotypes to Ldlr single deficient (llEE) mice after HCD. Macrophages from llee mice have reduced lipid uptake by foam cells and impaired phagokinetic motility in vitro compared to macrophages from llEE mice. Also, compared to llEE mice, llee mice have alterations of lipid metabolism, and reduced atheroma and obesity, particularly the males. Peritoneal macrophages of llee male mice have reduced mRNA expression of FABP4, a fatty acid binding protein implicated in atherosclerosis. Overall, our study suggests that the myeloid specific factor C/EBPε is involved in systemic lipid metabolism and that silencing of C/EBPε could decrease the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:24489659

  11. Optimized gamma synchronization enhances functional binding of fronto-parietal cortices in mathematically gifted adolescents during deductive reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As enhanced fronto-parietal network has been suggested to support reasoning ability of math-gifted adolescents, the main goal of this EEG source analysis is to investigate the temporal binding of the gamma-band (30-60Hz synchronization between frontal and parietal cortices in adolescents with exceptional mathematical ability, including the functional connectivity of gamma neurocognitive network, the temporal dynamics of fronto-parietal network (phase-locking durations and network lability in time domain, and the self-organized criticality of synchronizing oscillation. Compared with the average-ability subjects, the math-gifted adolescents show a highly integrated fronto-parietal network due to distant gamma phase-locking oscillations, which is indicated by lower modularity of the global network topology, more connector bridges between the frontal and parietal cortices and less connector hubs in the sensorimotor cortex. The time-domain analysis finds that, while maintaining more stable phase dynamics of the fronto-parietal coupling, the math-gifted adolescents are characterized by more extensive fronto-parietal connection reconfiguration. The results from sample fitting in the power-law model further find that the phase-locking durations in the math-gifted brain abides by a wider interval of the power-law distribution. This phase-lock distribution mechanism could represent a relatively optimized pattern for the functional binding of frontal-parietal network, which underlies stable fronto-parietal connectivity and increases flexibility of timely network reconfiguration.

  12. Loss of sialic acid binding domain redirects protein σ1 to enhance M cell-directed vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Zlotkowska

    Full Text Available Ovalbumin (OVA genetically fused to protein sigma 1 (pσ1 results in tolerance to both OVA and pσ1. Pσ1 binds in a multi-step fashion, involving both protein- and carbohydrate-based receptors. To assess the relative pσ1 components responsible for inducing tolerance and the importance of its sialic binding domain (SABD for immunization, modified OVA-pσ1, termed OVA-pσ1(short, was deleted of its SABD, but with its M cell targeting moiety intact, and was found to be immunostimulatory and enhanced CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell proliferation. When used to nasally immunize mice given with and without cholera toxin (CT adjuvant, elevated SIgA and serum IgG responses were induced, and OVA-pσ1(s was more efficient for immunization than native OVA+CT. The immune antibodies (Abs were derived from elevated Ab-forming cells in the upper respiratory tissues and submaxillary glands and were supported by mixed Th cell responses. Thus, these studies show that pσ1(s can be fused to vaccines to effectively elicit improved SIgA responses.

  13. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magno, Aaron L. [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ingley, Evan [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Brown, Suzanne J. [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Conigrave, Arthur D. [School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2000 (Australia); Ratajczak, Thomas [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ward, Bryan K., E-mail: bryanw@cyllene.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  14. Virtual screening of mandelate racemase mutants with enhanced activity based on binding energy in the transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiali; Liu, Min; Guo, Fei; Xie, Wenping; Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Chen, Zhirong; Yuan, Shenfeng; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-02-05

    Mandelate racemase (MR) is a promising candidate for the dynamic kinetic resolution of racemates. However, the poor activity of MR towards most of its non-natural substrates limits its widespread application. In this work, a virtual screening method based on the binding energy in the transition state was established to assist in the screening of MR mutants with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Using R-3-chloromandelic acid as a model substrate, a total of 53 mutants were constructed based on rational design in the two rounds of screening. The number of mutants for experimental validation was brought down to 17 by the virtual screening method, among which 14 variants turned out to possess improved catalytic efficiency. The variant V26I/Y54V showed 5.2-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) towards R-3-chloromandelic acid than that observed for the wild-type enzyme. Using this strategy, mutants were successfully obtained for two other substrates, R-mandelamide and R-2-naphthylglycolate (V26I and V29L, respectively), both with a 2-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency. These results demonstrated that this method could effectively predict the trend of mutational effects on catalysis. Analysis from the energetic and structural assays indicated that the enhanced interactions between the active sites and the substrate in the transition state led to improved catalytic efficiency. It was concluded that this virtual screening method based on the binding energy in the transition state was beneficial in enzyme rational redesign and helped to better understand the catalytic properties of the enzyme.

  15. A sequence upstream of canonical PDZ-binding motif within CFTR COOH-terminus enhances NHERF1 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neeraj; LaRusch, Jessica; Sosnay, Patrick R; Gottschalk, Laura B; Lopez, Andrea P; Pellicore, Matthew J; Evans, Taylor; Davis, Emily; Atalar, Melis; Na, Chan-Hyun; Rosson, Gedge D; Belchis, Deborah; Milewski, Michal; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-12-01

    The development of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) targeted therapy for cystic fibrosis has generated interest in maximizing membrane residence of mutant forms of CFTR by manipulating interactions with scaffold proteins, such as sodium/hydrogen exchange regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1). In this study, we explored whether COOH-terminal sequences in CFTR beyond the PDZ-binding motif influence its interaction with NHERF1. NHERF1 displayed minimal self-association in blot overlays (NHERF1, Kd = 1,382 ± 61.1 nM) at concentrations well above physiological levels, estimated at 240 nM from RNA-sequencing and 260 nM by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in sweat gland, a key site of CFTR function in vivo. However, NHERF1 oligomerized at considerably lower concentrations (10 nM) in the presence of the last 111 amino acids of CFTR (20 nM) in blot overlays and cross-linking assays and in coimmunoprecipitations using differently tagged versions of NHERF1. Deletion and alanine mutagenesis revealed that a six-amino acid sequence (1417)EENKVR(1422) and the terminal (1478)TRL(1480) (PDZ-binding motif) in the COOH-terminus were essential for the enhanced oligomerization of NHERF1. Full-length CFTR stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells fostered NHERF1 oligomerization that was substantially reduced (∼5-fold) on alanine substitution of EEN, KVR, or EENKVR residues or deletion of the TRL motif. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that the EENKVR and TRL sequences contribute to preferential localization of CFTR to the apical membrane. Together, these results indicate that COOH-terminal sequences mediate enhanced NHERF1 interaction and facilitate the localization of CFTR, a property that could be manipulated to stabilize mutant forms of CFTR at the apical surface to maximize the effect of CFTR-targeted therapeutics.

  16. Enhanced Binding Affinity for an i-Motif DNA Substrate Exhibited by a Protein Containing Nucleobase Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaoguang; Talukder, Poulami; Daskalova, Sasha M; Roy, Basab; Chen, Shengxi; Li, Zhongxian; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-17

    Several variants of a nucleic acid binding motif (RRM1) of putative transcription factor hnRNP LL containing nucleobase amino acids at specific positions have been prepared and used to study binding affinity for the BCL2 i-motif DNA. Molecular modeling suggested a number of amino acids in RRM1 likely to be involved in interaction with the i-motif DNA, and His24 and Arg26 were chosen for modification based on their potential ability to interact with G14 of the i-motif DNA. Four nucleobase amino acids were introduced into RRM1 at one or both of positions 24 and 26. The introduction of cytosine nucleobase 2 into position 24 of RRM1 increased the affinity of the modified protein for the i-motif DNA, consistent with the possible Watson-Crick interaction of 2 and G14. In comparison, the introduction of uracil nucleobase 3 had a minimal effect on DNA affinity. Two structurally simplified nucleobase analogues (1 and 4) lacking both the N-1 and the 2-oxo substituents were also introduced in lieu of His24. Again, the RRM1 analogue containing 1 exhibited enhanced affinity for the i-motif DNA, while the protein analogue containing 4 bound less tightly to the DNA substrate. Finally, the modified protein containing 1 in lieu of Arg26 also bound to the i-motif DNA more strongly than the wild-type protein, but a protein containing 1 both at positions 24 and 26 bound to the DNA less strongly than wild type. The results support the idea of using nucleobase amino acids as protein constituents for controlling and enhancing DNA-protein interaction. Finally, modification of the i-motif DNA at G14 diminished RRM1-DNA interaction, as well as the ability of nucleobase amino acid 1 to stabilize RRM1-DNA interaction.

  17. Enhanced Degradation of Diesel in the Rhizosphere of after Inoculation with Diesel-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterial Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kidd, Petra S; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Monterroso, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The association of plants and rhizospheric bacteria provides a successful strategy to clean up contaminated soils. The purpose of this work was to enhance diesel degradation in rhizosphere by inoculation with selected bacterial strains: a diesel degrader (D), plant growth-promoting (PGP) strains, or a combination (D+PGP). Plants were set up in pots with the A or B horizon of an umbric Cambisol (A and B) spiked with diesel (1.25%, w/w). After 1 mo, the dissipation of diesel range organics (DRO) with respect to = 0 (i.e., 1 wk after preparing the pots with the seedlings) concentration was significantly higher in inoculated than in noninoculated (NI) pots: The highest DRO losses were found in A D+PGP pots (close to 15-20% higher than NI) and in B D pots (close to 10% higher). The water-extractable DRO fraction was significantly higher at = 30 d (15-25%) compared with = 0 (<5%), probably due to the effects of plant root exudates and biosurfactants produced by the degrader strain. The results of this experiment reflect the importance of the partnerships between plants and bacterial inoculants and demonstrate the relevance of the effect of bacterial biosurfactants and plant root exudates on contaminant bioavailability, a key factor for enhancing diesel rhizodegradation. The association of lupine with D and PGP strains resulted in a promising combination for application in the rhizoremediation of soils with moderate diesel contamination.

  18. Complexes containing activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein (CREB) interact with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-ATF composite site to regulate Gadd153 expression during the stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, T W; Martindale, J L; Guyton, K Z; Hai, T; Holbrook, N J

    1999-01-01

    Gadd153, also known as chop, encodes a member of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factor family and is transcriptionally activated by cellular stress signals. We recently demonstrated that arsenite treatment of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells results in the biphasic induction of Gadd153 mRNA expression, controlled in part through binding of C/EBPbeta and two uncharacterized protein complexes to the C/EBP-ATF (activating transcription factor) composite site in the Gadd153 promoter. In this report, we identified components of these additional complexes as two ATF/CREB (cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein) transcription factors having differential binding activities dependent upon the time of arsenite exposure. During arsenite treatment of PC12 cells, we observed enhanced binding of ATF4 to the C/EBP-ATF site at 2 h as Gadd153 mRNA levels increased, and enhanced binding of ATF3 complexes at 6 h as Gadd153 expression declined. We further demonstrated that ATF4 activates, while ATF3 represses, Gadd153 promoter activity through the C/EBP-ATF site. ATF3 also repressed ATF4-mediated transactivation and arsenite-induced activation of the Gadd153 promoter. Our results suggest that numerous members of the ATF/CREB family are involved in the cellular stress response, and that regulation of stress-induced biphasic Gadd153 expression in PC12 cells involves the ordered, sequential binding of multiple transcription factor complexes to the C/EBP-ATF composite site. PMID:10085237

  19. Harvesting microalgae using activated sludge can decrease polymer dosing and enhance methane production via co-digestion in a bacterial-microalgal process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Radovici, Maria; Smets, Barth F.

    2016-01-01

    Third generation biofuels, e.g. biofuels production from algal biomass, have gained attention due to increased interest on global renewable energy. However, crop-based biofuels compete with food production and should be avoided. Microalgal cultivation for biofuel production offers an alternative...... to crops and can become economically viable when combined with the use of used water resources. Besides nutrients and water, harvesting microalgal biomass represents one of the major costs related to biofuel production and thus efficient and cheap solutions are needed. In bacterial-algal systems......, there is the potential to produce energy by co-digesting the two types of biomass. We present an innovative approach to recover microalgal biomass via a two-step flocculation using bacterial biomass after the destabilisation of microalgae with conventional cationic polymer. A short solids retention time (SRT) enhanced...

  20. EDTA addition enhances bacterial respiration activities and hydrocarbon degradation in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kharusi, Samiha; Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The low number and activity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and the low solubility and availability of hydrocarbons hamper bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils in arid deserts, thus bioremediation treatments that circumvent these limitations are required. We tested the effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition, at different concentrations (i.e. 0.1, 1 and 10 mM), on bacterial respiration and biodegradation of Arabian light oil in bioaugmented (i.e. with the addition of exogenous alkane-degrading consortium) and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils. Post-treatment shifts in the soils' bacterial community structure were monitored using MiSeq sequencing. Bacterial respiration, indicated by the amount of evolved CO2, was highest at 10 mM EDTA in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented soils, reaching an amount of 2.2 ± 0.08 and 1.6 ± 0.02 mg-CO2 g(-1) after 14 days of incubation, respectively. GC-MS revealed that 91.5% of the C14-C30 alkanes were degraded after 42 days when 10 mM EDTA and the bacterial consortium were added together. MiSeq sequencing showed that 78-91% of retrieved sequences in the original soil belonged to Deinococci, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteia and Bacilli. The same bacterial classes were detected in the 10 mM EDTA-treated soils, however with slight differences in their relative abundances. In the bioaugmented soils, only Alcanivorax sp. MH3 and Parvibaculum sp. MH21 from the exogenous bacterial consortium could survive until the end of the experiment. We conclude that the addition of EDTA at appropriate concentrations could facilitate biodegradation processes by increasing hydrocarbon availability to microbes. The addition of exogenous oil-degrading bacteria along with EDTA could serve as an ideal solution for the decontamination of oil-contaminated desert soils.

  1. Synthetic Cationic Peptide IDR-1002 Provides Protection against Bacterial Infections through Chemokine Induction and Enhanced Leukocyte Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua;

    2010-01-01

    activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study...... aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor...

  2. Deficiency of thioredoxin binding protein-2 (TBP-2 enhances TGF-β signaling and promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Masaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β has critical roles in regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of various cancer cells. TGF-β-induced EMT is an important step during carcinoma progression to invasion state. Thioredoxin binding protein-2 (TBP-2, also called Txnip or VDUP1 is downregulated in various types of human cancer, and its deficiency results in the earlier onset of cancer. However, it remains unclear how TBP-2 suppresses the invasion and metastasis of cancer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we demonstrated that TBP-2 deficiency increases the transcriptional activity in response to TGF-β and also enhances TGF-β-induced Smad2 phosphorylation levels. Knockdown of TBP-2 augmented the TGF-β-responsive expression of Snail and Slug, transcriptional factors related to TGF-β-mediated induction of EMT, and promoted TGF-β-induced spindle-like morphology consistent with the depletion of E-Cadherin in A549 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that TBP-2 deficiency enhances TGF-β signaling and promotes TGF-β-induced EMT. The control of TGF-β-induced EMT is critical for the inhibition of the invasion and metastasis. Thus TBP-2, as a novel regulatory molecule of TGF-β signaling, is likely to be a prognostic indicator or a potential therapeutic target for preventing tumor progression.

  3. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  4. First analysis of a bacterial collagen-binding protein with collagen Toolkits: promiscuous binding of YadA to collagens may explain how YadA interferes with host processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jack C; Elovaara, Heli; Bihan, Dominique; Pugh, Nicholas; Kilpinen, Sami K; Raynal, Nicolas; Skurnik, Mikael; Farndale, Richard W; Goldman, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    The Yersinia adhesin YadA mediates the adhesion of the human enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica to collagens and other components of the extracellular matrix. Though YadA has been proposed to bind to a specific site in collagens, the exact binding determinants for YadA in native collagen have not previously been elucidated. We investigated the binding of YadA to collagen Toolkits, which are libraries of triple-helical peptides spanning the sequences of type II and III human collagens. YadA bound to many of them, in particular to peptides rich in hydroxyproline but with few charged residues. We were able to block the binding of YadA to collagen type IV with the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10), suggesting that the same site in YadA binds to triple-helical regions in network-forming collagens as well. We showed that a single Gly-Pro-Hyp triplet in a triple-helical peptide was sufficient to support YadA binding, but more than six triplets were required to form a tight YadA binding site. This is significantly longer than the case for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins. YadA-expressing bacteria bound promiscuously to Toolkit peptides. Promiscuous binding could be advantageous for pathogenicity in Y. enterocolitica and, indeed, for other pathogenic bacteria. Many of the tightly binding peptides are also targets for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins, and YadA was able to inhibit the interaction between selected Toolkit peptides and platelets. This leads to the intriguing possibility that YadA may interfere in vivo with host processes mediated by endogenous collagen-binding proteins.

  5. Enhanced plasmid loss in bacterial populations exposed to the antimicrobial compound irgasan delivered from interpenetrating polymer network silicone hydrogels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Leise; Burmølle, Mette; Alm, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    into liquid growth medium from irgasan-impregnated Interpenetrating Polymer Network (IPN) silicone hydrogel objects, a novel technology developed as drug-delivery platform. IPN-mediated irgasan-release was indirectly monitored as the extent of plasmid loss from bacterial cells during a 24-hour period...

  6. Novel PCR-based methods enhance characterization of vaginal microbiota in a bacterial vaginosis patient before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Janet A; Kalra, Apoorv; Dodge, Cristina T; John, Susan; Sobel, Jack D; Akins, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Deep characterization, even by next-generation sequencing, of the vaginal microbiota in healthy women or posttreatment bacterial vaginosis patients is limited by the dominance of lactobacilli. To improve detection, we offer two approaches: quantitative PCR (qPCR) using phylogenetic branch-inclusive primers and sequencing of broad-spectrum amplicons generated with oligomers that block amplification of lactobacilli.

  7. Influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocytic bacterial clearance and enhances susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keer; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a leading contributor to mortality during recent influenza pandemics. The mechanism for this influenza-induced susceptibility to secondary S. aureus infection is poorly understood. Here we show that innate antibacterial immunity was significantly suppressed during the recovery stage of influenza infection, despite the fact that MRSA super-infection had no significant effect on viral burdens. Compared to mice infected with bacteria alone, post-influenza MRSA infected mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance, which was not due to defective phagocyte recruitment, but rather coincided with reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. NADPH oxidase is responsible for ROS production during phagocytic bacterial killing, a process also known as oxidative burst. We found that gp91phox-containing NADPH oxidase activity in macrophages and neutrophils was essential for optimal bacterial clearance during respiratory MRSA infections. In contrast to WT animals, gp91phox−/− mice exhibited similar defects in MRSA clearance before and after influenza infection. Using gp91phox+/− mosaic mice, we further demonstrate that influenza infection inhibits a cell-intrinsic contribution of NADPH oxidase to phagocyte bactericidal activity. Together, our results establish that influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial clearance and leads to susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection. PMID:24563256

  8. Bacterial reaction centers purified with styrene maleic acid copolymer retain native membrane functional properties and display enhanced stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Van Grondelle, Rienk; Killian, J. Antoinette; Jones, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins often present daunting challenges for biophysical characterization, a fundamental issue being how to select a surfactant that will optimally preserve the individual structure and functional properties of a given membrane protein. Bacterial reaction centers offer a rare opp

  9. Impact on bacterial community in midguts of the Asian corn borer larvae by transgenic Trichoderma strain overexpressing a heterologous chit42 gene with chitin-binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Li

    Full Text Available This paper is the first report of the impact on the bacterial community in the midgut of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis by the chitinase from the transgenic Trichoderma strain. In this study, we detected a change of the bacterial community in the midgut of the fourth instar larvae by using a culture-independent method. Results suggested that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the most highly represented phyla, being present in all the midgut bacterial communities. The observed species richness was simple, ranging from four to five of all the 16S rRNA clone libraries. When using Trichoderma fermentation liquids as additives, the percentages of the dominant flora in the total bacterial community in larval midgut changed significantly. The community of the genus Ochrobactrum in the midgut decreased significantly when the larvae were fed with the fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4. However, the Enterococcus community increased and then occupied the vacated niche of the Ochrobactrum members. Furthermore, the Shannon-Wiener (H and the Simpson (1-D indexes of the larval midgut bacterial library treated by feeding fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4 was the lowest compared with the culture medium, fermentation liquids of the wild type strain T30, and the sterile artificial diet. The Enterococcus sp. strain was isolated and characterized from the healthy larvae midgut of the Asian corn borer. An infection study of the Asian corn borer larvae using Enterococcus sp. ACB-1 revealed that a correlation existed between the increased Enterococcus community in the larval midgut and larval mortality. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain could affect the composition of the midgut bacterial community. The change of the midgut bacterial community might be viewed as one of the factors resulting in the increased mortality of the Asian corn borer larvae.

  10. Impact on bacterial community in midguts of the Asian corn borer larvae by transgenic Trichoderma strain overexpressing a heterologous chit42 gene with chitin-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingying; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wu, Qiong; Fan, Lili; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report of the impact on the bacterial community in the midgut of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) by the chitinase from the transgenic Trichoderma strain. In this study, we detected a change of the bacterial community in the midgut of the fourth instar larvae by using a culture-independent method. Results suggested that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the most highly represented phyla, being present in all the midgut bacterial communities. The observed species richness was simple, ranging from four to five of all the 16S rRNA clone libraries. When using Trichoderma fermentation liquids as additives, the percentages of the dominant flora in the total bacterial community in larval midgut changed significantly. The community of the genus Ochrobactrum in the midgut decreased significantly when the larvae were fed with the fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4. However, the Enterococcus community increased and then occupied the vacated niche of the Ochrobactrum members. Furthermore, the Shannon-Wiener (H) and the Simpson (1-D) indexes of the larval midgut bacterial library treated by feeding fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4 was the lowest compared with the culture medium, fermentation liquids of the wild type strain T30, and the sterile artificial diet. The Enterococcus sp. strain was isolated and characterized from the healthy larvae midgut of the Asian corn borer. An infection study of the Asian corn borer larvae using Enterococcus sp. ACB-1 revealed that a correlation existed between the increased Enterococcus community in the larval midgut and larval mortality. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain could affect the composition of the midgut bacterial community. The change of the midgut bacterial community might be viewed as one of the factors resulting in the increased mortality of the Asian corn borer larvae.

  11. Brassica RNA binding protein ERD4 is involved in conferring salt, drought tolerance and enhancing plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Archana N; Tamirisa, Srinath; Rao, K V; Kumar, Vinay; Suprasanna, P

    2016-03-01

    'Early responsive to dehydration' (ERD) genes are a group of plant genes having functional roles in plant stress tolerance and development. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a Brassica juncea 'ERD' gene (BjERD4) which encodes a novel RNA binding protein. The expression pattern of ERD4 analyzed under different stress conditions showed that transcript levels were increased with dehydration, sodium chloride, low temperature, heat, abscisic acid and salicylic acid treatments. The BjERD4 was found to be localized in the chloroplasts as revealed by Confocal microscopy studies. To study the function, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated and analyzed for various morphological and physiological parameters. The overexpressing transgenic lines showed significant increase in number of leaves with more leaf area and larger siliques as compared to wild type plants, whereas RNAi:ERD4 transgenic lines showed reduced leaf number, leaf area, dwarf phenotype and delayed seed germination. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BjERD4 gene also exhibited enhanced tolerance to dehydration and salt stresses, while the knockdown lines were susceptible as compared to wild type plants under similar stress conditions. It was observed that BjERD4 protein could bind RNA as evidenced by the gel-shift assay. The overall results of transcript analysis, RNA gel-shift assay, and transgenic expression, for the first time, show that the BjERD4 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance besides offering new clues about the possible roles of BjERD4 in plant growth and development.

  12. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {beta} deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Shaikh M., E-mail: rmizanoor@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Choudhury, Mahua; Janssen, Rachel C.; Baquero, Karalee C. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Miyazaki, Makoto [Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Friedman, Jacob E. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP{beta}) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBP{beta} expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBP{beta} deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBP{beta} in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBP{beta} might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR

  13. Multiple Metal Binding Domains Enhance the Zn(II) Selectivity of the Divalent Metal Ion Transporter AztA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.; Reyes-Caballero, H.; Li, C.; Scott, R.A.; Giedroc, D.P.

    2009-06-03

    Transition metal-transporting P{sub 1B}-type CPx ATPases play crucial roles in mediating metal homeostasis and resistance in all cells. The degree to which N-terminal metal binding domains (MBDs) confer metal specificity to the transporter is unclear. We show that the two MBDs of the Zn/Cd/Pb effluxing pump Anabaena AztA are functionally nonequivalent, but only with respect to zinc resistance. Inactivation of the a-MBD largely abrogates resistance to high intracellular Zn(II) levels, whereas inactivation of the b-MBD is not as deleterious. In contrast, inactivation of either the a- or b-MBD has little measurable impact on Cd(II) and Pb(II) resistance. The membrane proximal b-MBD binds Zn(II) with a higher affinity than the distal N-terminal a-MBD. Facile Zn(II)-specific intermolecular transfer from the a-MBD to the higher-affinity b-MBD is readily observed by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectroscopy. Unlike Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) form saturated 1:1 S{sub 4} or S{sub 3}(O/N) complexes with AztA{sup aHbH}, where a single metal ion bridges the two MBDs. We propose that the tandem MBDs enhance Zn(II)-specific transport, while stabilizing a non-native inter-MBD Cd/Pb cross-linked structure that is a poor substrate and/or regulator for the transporter.

  14. Structure-based stabilization of HIV-1 gp120 enhances humoral immune responses to the induced co-receptor binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Dey

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, possesses conserved binding sites for interaction with the primary virus receptor, CD4, and also for the co-receptor, generally CCR5. Although gp120 is a major target for virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, the gp120 variable elements and its malleable nature contribute to evasion of effective host-neutralizing antibodies. To understand the conformational character and immunogenicity of the gp120 receptor binding sites as potential vaccine targets, we introduced structure-based modifications to stabilize gp120 core proteins (deleted of the gp120 major variable regions into the conformation recognized by both receptors. Thermodynamic analysis of the re-engineered core with selected ligands revealed significant stabilization of the receptor-binding regions. Stabilization of the co-receptor-binding region was associated with a marked increase in on-rate of ligand binding to this site as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Rabbit immunization studies showed that the conformational stabilization of core proteins, along with increased ligand affinity, was associated with strikingly enhanced humoral immune responses against the co-receptor-binding site. These results demonstrate that structure-based approaches can be exploited to stabilize a conformational site in a large functional protein to enhance immunogenic responses specific for that region.

  15. Ectopic expression of Hrf1 enhances bacterial resistance via regulation of diterpene phytoalexins, silicon and reactive oxygen species burst in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Li

    Full Text Available Harpin proteins as elicitor derived from plant gram negative bacteria such as Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, Erwinia amylovora induce disease resistance in plants by activating multiple defense responses. However, it is unclear whether phytoalexin production and ROS burst are involved in the disease resistance conferred by the expression of the harpin(Xoo protein in rice. In this article, ectopic expression of hrf1 in rice enhanced resistance to bacterial blight. Accompanying with the activation of genes related to the phytoalexin biosynthesis pathway in hrf1-transformed rice, phytoalexins quickly and consistently accumulated concurrent with the limitation of bacterial growth rate. Moreover, the hrf1-transformed rice showed an increased ability for ROS scavenging and decreased hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 concentration. Furthermore, the localization and relative quantification of silicon deposition in rice leaves was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS. Finally, the transcript levels of defense response genes increased in transformed rice. These results show a correlation between Xoo resistance and phytoalexin production, H(2O(2, silicon deposition and defense gene expression in hrf1-transformed rice. These data are significant because they provide evidence for a better understanding the role of defense responses in the incompatible interaction between bacterial disease and hrf1-transformed plants. These data also supply an opportunity for generating nonspecific resistance to pathogens.

  16. Ectopic Expression of Hrf1 Enhances Bacterial Resistance via Regulation of Diterpene Phytoalexins, Silicon and Reactive Oxygen Species Burst in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weigong; Yang, Jie; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Guang; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Shanshan; Chang, Shanshan; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2012-01-01

    Harpin proteins as elicitor derived from plant gram negative bacteria such as Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), Erwinia amylovora induce disease resistance in plants by activating multiple defense responses. However, it is unclear whether phytoalexin production and ROS burst are involved in the disease resistance conferred by the expression of the harpinXoo protein in rice. In this article, ectopic expression of hrf1 in rice enhanced resistance to bacterial blight. Accompanying with the activation of genes related to the phytoalexin biosynthesis pathway in hrf1-transformed rice, phytoalexins quickly and consistently accumulated concurrent with the limitation of bacterial growth rate. Moreover, the hrf1-transformed rice showed an increased ability for ROS scavenging and decreased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration. Furthermore, the localization and relative quantification of silicon deposition in rice leaves was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Finally, the transcript levels of defense response genes increased in transformed rice. These results show a correlation between Xoo resistance and phytoalexin production, H2O2, silicon deposition and defense gene expression in hrf1-transformed rice. These data are significant because they provide evidence for a better understanding the role of defense responses in the incompatible interaction between bacterial disease and hrf1-transformed plants. These data also supply an opportunity for generating nonspecific resistance to pathogens. PMID:22970151

  17. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)CCAAT/enhancer binding protein genes and their responses to induction by GH in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are transcription factors consisting of six isoforms and play diverse physiological roles in vertebrates. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), in addition to the reported C/EBPbeta1,we have isolated cDNA of four other isoforms, C/EBPalpha, C/EBPbeta2, C/E...

  18. Muscleblind-like 1 activates insulin receptor exon 11 inclusion by enhancing U2AF65 binding and splicing of the upstream intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Gloria V; Cooper, Thomas A

    2014-02-01

    Alternative splicing regulates developmentally and tissue-specific gene expression programs, disruption of which have been implicated in numerous diseases. Muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) regulates splicing transitions, which are disrupted on loss of MBNL1 function in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). One such event is MBNL1-mediated activation of insulin receptor exon 11 inclusion, which requires an intronic enhancer element downstream of exon 11. The mechanism of MBNL1-mediated activation of exon inclusion is unknown. We developed an in vitro splicing assay, which robustly recapitulates MBNL1-mediated splicing activation of insulin receptor exon 11 and found that MBNL1 activates removal of the intron upstream of exon 11 upon binding its functional response element in the downstream intron. MBNL1 enhances early spliceosome assembly as evidenced by enhanced complex A formation and binding of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein auxiliary factor 65 kDa subunit (U2AF65) on the upstream intron. We demonstrated that neither the 5' splice site nor exon 11 sequences are required for MBNL1-activated U2AF65 binding. Interestingly, the 5' splice site is required for MBNL1-mediated activation of upstream intron removal, although MBNL1 has no effect on U1 snRNA recruitment. These results suggest that MBNL1 directly activates binding of U2AF65 to enhance upstream intron removal to ultimately activate alternative exon inclusion.

  19. TRANSLATION START SITE MULTIPLICITY OF THE CCAAT ENHANCER-BINDING PROTEIN-ALPHA MESSENGER-RNA IS DICTATED BY A SMALL 5' OPEN READING FRAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CALKHOVEN, CF; BOUWMAN, PRJ; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP) alpha and beta of the bZIP family of transcription factors each occur as multiple forms due to translation initiation at different in-frame AUG codons from the same messenger RNA. The C/EBP alpha mRNAs of chicken, rat and Xenopus all contain a small 5' ope

  20. Differential stimulation by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha isoforms of the estrogen-activated promoter of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1997-01-01

    The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins alpha and beta (C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta) are highly expressed in liver and are believed to function in maintaining the differentiated state of the hepatocytes, C/EBP alpha appears to be a critical regulator of genes involved in metabolic p

  1. The role of silicon in enhancing resistance to bacterial blight of hydroponic- and soil-cultured rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Alin; Xue, Gaofeng; Cui, Peiyuan; Fan, Fenliang; Liu, Hongfang; Yin, Chang; Sun, Wanchun; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-04-19

    Here we report for the first time that bacterial blight of rice can be alleviated by silicon (Si) added. In both inoculated and uninoculated plants, shoot dry weight was significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. A soil-cultured trial showed that disease severity was 24.3% lower in the Si-amended plants than in the non-Si-amended plants. Plants that were switched from -Si to +Si nutrient solution and simultaneously inoculated with Xoo also exhibited the same high resistance to bacterial blight as the plants that were treated continuously with Si, with control efficiencies of 52.8 and 62.9%, respectively. Moreover, total concentrations of soluble phenolics and lignin in rice leaves were significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities in rice leaves were observed to be higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. The expression levels of Os03g0109600, Prla, Rcht2 and Lox2osPil, were also higher in +Si plants than in -Si plants post-inoculation during the experimental time. Addition of Si resulted in increased Pal transcription, and inhibited CatA and Os03g0126000 expression in the earlier and later stages of bacterial inoculation, respectively.

  2. Bacterial photodynamic inactivation mediated by methylene blue and red light is enhanced by synergistic effect of potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Daniela; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Liyi; Landi, Giacomo; Avci, Pinar; Rodas, Andrea; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    The inexorable increase of antibiotic resistance occurring in different bacterial species is increasing the interest in developing new antimicrobial treatments that will be equally effective against multidrug-resistant strains and will not themselves induce resistance. One of these alternatives may be photodynamic inactivation (PDI), which uses a combination of nontoxic dyes, called photosensitizers (PS), excited by harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) by type 1 (radical) and type 2 (singlet oxygen) pathways. In this study, we asked whether it was possible to improve the efficacy of PDI in vitro and in vivo by addition of the inert salt potassium iodide (KI) to a commonly investigated PS, the phenothiazinium dye methylene blue (MB). By adding KI, we observed a consistent increase of red light-mediated bacterial killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative species in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, we also observed less bacterial recurrence in wounds in the days posttreatment. The mechanism of action is probably due to formation of reactive iodine species that are produced quickly with a short lifetime. This finding may have a relevant clinical impact by reducing the risk of amputation and, in some cases, the risk of death, leading to improvement in the care of patients affected by localized infections.

  3. The role of silicon in enhancing resistance to bacterial blight of hydroponic- and soil-cultured rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Alin; Xue, Gaofeng; Cui, Peiyuan; Fan, Fenliang; Liu, Hongfang; Yin, Chang; Sun, Wanchun; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    Here we report for the first time that bacterial blight of rice can be alleviated by silicon (Si) added. In both inoculated and uninoculated plants, shoot dry weight was significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the −Si plants. A soil-cultured trial showed that disease severity was 24.3% lower in the Si-amended plants than in the non-Si-amended plants. Plants that were switched from −Si to +Si nutrient solution and simultaneously inoculated with Xoo also exhibited the same high resistance to bacterial blight as the plants that were treated continuously with Si, with control efficiencies of 52.8 and 62.9%, respectively. Moreover, total concentrations of soluble phenolics and lignin in rice leaves were significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the −Si plants. Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities in rice leaves were observed to be higher in the +Si plants than in the −Si plants. The expression levels of Os03g0109600, Prla, Rcht2 and Lox2osPil, were also higher in +Si plants than in −Si plants post-inoculation during the experimental time. Addition of Si resulted in increased Pal transcription, and inhibited CatA and Os03g0126000 expression in the earlier and later stages of bacterial inoculation, respectively. PMID:27091552

  4. JC virus promoter/enhancers contain TATA box-associated Spi-B-binding sites that support early viral gene expression in primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leslie J; Moore, Lisa D; Mirsky, Matthew M; Major, Eugene O

    2012-03-01

    JC virus (JCV) is the aetiological agent of the demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, an AIDS defining illness and serious complication of mAb therapies. Initial infection probably occurs in childhood. In the working model of dissemination, virus persists in the kidney and lymphoid tissues until immune suppression/modulation causes reactivation and trafficking to the brain where JCV replicates in oligodendrocytes. JCV infection is regulated through binding of host factors such as Spi-B to, and sequence variation in the non-coding control region (NCCR). Although NCCR sequences differ between sites of persistence and pathogenesis, evidence suggests that the virus that initiates infection in the brain disseminates via B-cells derived from latently infected haematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow. Spi-B binds adjacent to TATA boxes in the promoter/enhancer of the PML-associated JCV Mad-1 and Mad-4 viruses but not the non-pathogenic, kidney-associated archetype. The Spi-B-binding site of Mad-1/Mad-4 differs from that of archetype by a single nucleotide, AAAAGGGAAGGGA to AAAAGGGAAGGTA. Point mutation of the Mad-1 Spi-B site reduced early viral protein large T-antigen expression by up to fourfold. Strikingly, the reverse mutation in the archetype NCCR increased large T-antigen expression by 10-fold. Interestingly, Spi-B protein binds the NCCR sequence flanking the viral promoter/enhancer, but these sites are not essential for early viral gene expression. The effect of mutating Spi-B-binding sites within the JCV promoter/enhancer on early viral gene expression strongly suggests a role for Spi-B binding to the viral promoter/enhancer in the activation of early viral gene expression.

  5. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

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    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  6. Stromal adipocyte enhancer-binding protein (AEBP1) promotes mammary epithelial cell hyperplasia via proinflammatory and hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ryan W; Bogachev, Oleg; Bharadwaj, Alamelu G; McCluskey, Greg D; Majdalawieh, Amin F; Zhang, Lei; Ro, Hyo-Sung

    2012-11-09

    Disruption of mammary stromal-epithelial communication leads to aberrant mammary gland development and induces mammary tumorigenesis. Macrophages have been implicated in carcinogenesis primarily by creating an inflammatory microenvironment, which promotes growth of the adjacent epithelial cells. Adipocyte enhancer-binding protein 1 (AEBP1), a novel proinflammatory mediator, promotes macrophage inflammatory responsiveness by inducing NF-κB activity, which has been implicated in tumor cell growth and survival by aberrant sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression. Here, we show that stromal macrophage AEBP1 overexpression results in precocious alveologenesis in the virgin AEBP1 transgenic (AEBP1(TG)) mice, and the onset of ductal hyperplasia was accelerated in AEBP1(TG) mice fed a high fat diet, which induces endogenous AEBP1 expression. Transplantation of AEBP1(TG) bone marrow cells into non-transgenic (AEBP1(NT)) mice resulted in alveolar hyperplasia with up-regulation of NF-κB activity and TNFα expression as displayed in the AEBP1(TG) mammary macrophages and epithelium. Shh expression was induced in AEBP1(TG) macrophages and RAW264.7 macrophages overexpressing AEBP1. The Shh target genes Gli1 and Bmi1 expression was induced in the AEBP1(TG) mammary epithelium and HC11 mammary epithelial cells co-cultured with AEBP1(TG) peritoneal macrophages. The conditioned AEBP1(TG) macrophage culture media promoted NF-κB activity and survival signal, Akt activation, in HC11 cells, whereas such effects were abolished by TNFα neutralizing antibody treatment. Furthermore, HC11 cells displayed enhanced proliferation in response to AEBP1(TG) macrophages and their conditioned media. Our findings highlight the role of AEBP1 in the signaling pathways regulating the cross-talk between mammary epithelium and stroma that could predispose the mammary tissue to tumorigenesis.

  7. CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-β expression and elevation in Alzheimer's disease and microglial cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Strohmeyer

    Full Text Available CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins are transcription factors that help to regulate a wide range of inflammatory mediators, as well as several key elements of energy metabolism. Because C/EBPs are expressed by rodent astrocytes and microglia, and because they are induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines that are chronically upregulated in the Alzheimer's disease (AD cortex, we have investigated whether C/EBPs are expressed and upregulated in the AD cortex. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that C/EBPβ can be detected by Western blots in AD and nondemented elderly (ND cortex, and that it is significantly increased in AD cortical samples. In situ, C/EBPβ localizes immunohistochemically to microglia. In microglia cultured from rapid autopsies of elderly patient's brains and in the BV-2 murine microglia cell line, we have shown that C/EBPβ can be upregulated by C/EBP-inducing cytokines or lipopolysaccharide and exhibits nuclear translocation possibly indicating functional activity. Given the known co-regulatory role of C/EBPs in pivotal inflammatory mechanisms, many of which are present in AD, we propose that upregulation of C/EBPs in the AD brain could be an important orchestrator of pathogenic changes.

  8. CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-β expression and elevation in Alzheimer's disease and microglial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeyer, Ron; Shelton, Jadd; Lougheed, Christopher; Breitkopf, Trisia

    2014-01-01

    CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins are transcription factors that help to regulate a wide range of inflammatory mediators, as well as several key elements of energy metabolism. Because C/EBPs are expressed by rodent astrocytes and microglia, and because they are induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines that are chronically upregulated in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cortex, we have investigated whether C/EBPs are expressed and upregulated in the AD cortex. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that C/EBPβ can be detected by Western blots in AD and nondemented elderly (ND) cortex, and that it is significantly increased in AD cortical samples. In situ, C/EBPβ localizes immunohistochemically to microglia. In microglia cultured from rapid autopsies of elderly patient's brains and in the BV-2 murine microglia cell line, we have shown that C/EBPβ can be upregulated by C/EBP-inducing cytokines or lipopolysaccharide and exhibits nuclear translocation possibly indicating functional activity. Given the known co-regulatory role of C/EBPs in pivotal inflammatory mechanisms, many of which are present in AD, we propose that upregulation of C/EBPs in the AD brain could be an important orchestrator of pathogenic changes.

  9. CCAAT-Enhancer Binding Protein-β Expression and Elevation in Alzheimer’s Disease and Microglial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeyer, Ron; Shelton, Jadd; Lougheed, Christopher; Breitkopf, Trisia

    2014-01-01

    CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins are transcription factors that help to regulate a wide range of inflammatory mediators, as well as several key elements of energy metabolism. Because C/EBPs are expressed by rodent astrocytes and microglia, and because they are induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines that are chronically upregulated in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cortex, we have investigated whether C/EBPs are expressed and upregulated in the AD cortex. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that C/EBPβ can be detected by Western blots in AD and nondemented elderly (ND) cortex, and that it is significantly increased in AD cortical samples. In situ, C/EBPβ localizes immunohistochemically to microglia. In microglia cultured from rapid autopsies of elderly patient’s brains and in the BV-2 murine microglia cell line, we have shown that C/EBPβ can be upregulated by C/EBP-inducing cytokines or lipopolysaccharide and exhibits nuclear translocation possibly indicating functional activity. Given the known co-regulatory role of C/EBPs in pivotal inflammatory mechanisms, many of which are present in AD, we propose that upregulation of C/EBPs in the AD brain could be an important orchestrator of pathogenic changes. PMID:24466171

  10. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein CEBP-2 controls fat consumption and fatty acid desaturation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Jian-Ping; Wu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Li-Shun; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    Mammalian CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are generally known as regulators in adipocyte differentiation. However, more understanding of the role of C/EBPs in lipid and glucose metabolism remains to be discovered. In this study, we verified the effect of CEBP-2, the homolog of CEBPs, on fat storage in Caenorhabditis elegans. Expressions of 85 genes that encode the major enzymes in energy metabolic pathways were then screened in cebp-2-deficient worms using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR). Our data implied that loss of function of CEBP-2 displayed a low-fat phenotype in C. elegans owing to increased expression of ech-1.1 and decreased expression of fat-5. Our findings indicated that cebp-2 controls total body fat content by governing fatty acid mitochondrial β-oxidation and desaturation in C. elegans. These data provide insights into how C/EBPs may affect lipid metabolism in mammals in addition to regulating adipocyte differentiation.

  11. Expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein Beta in Muscle Satellite Cells Inhibits Myogenesis in Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchildon, François; Lamarche, Émilie; Lala-Tabbert, Neena; St-Louis, Catherine; Wiper-Bergeron, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a paraneoplastic syndrome that causes profound weight loss and muscle mass atrophy and is estimated to be the cause of up to 30% of cancer deaths. Though the exact cause is unknown, patients with cancer cachexia have increased muscle protein catabolism. In healthy muscle, injury activates skeletal muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, to differentiate and promote regeneration. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanism is inhibited in cancer cachexia due to persistent expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein beta (C/EBPβ) in muscle myoblasts. C/EBPβ is a bzip transcription factor that is expressed in muscle satellite cells and is normally downregulated upon differentiation. However, in myoblasts exposed to a cachectic milieu, C/EBPβ expression remains elevated, despite activation to differentiate, resulting in the inhibition of myogenin expression and myogenesis. In vivo, cancer cachexia results in increased number of Pax7+ cells that also express C/EBPβ and the inhibition of normal repair mechanisms. Loss of C/EBPβ expression in primary myoblasts rescues differentiation under cachectic conditions without restoring myotube size, indicating that C/EBPβ is an important inhibitor of myogenesis in cancer cachexia.

  12. Enhancement of Urinary Bladder Carcinogenesis by the Role of Chronic Bacterial Infection-induced Inflammation (Imunnohistochemical and Biochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabri MS*, Ashmawy AM**, Ibrahim MA*, Hosny RM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial infections traditionally have not been considered major causes of cancer. Recently, however, bacteria have been linked to cancer by two mechanisms: induction of chronic inflammation and production of carcinogenic bacterial metabolites. The most specific example of the inflammatory mechanism of carcinogenesis is Escherichia coli infection. E. coli has been epidemiologically linked to urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder by its propensity to cause lifelong inflammation. This inflammation is in turn thought to cause cancer by inducing cell proliferation and production of mutagenic free radicals and N-nitroso compounds.Material and methods: After each 3, 6 and 9 months of daily oral administration of dibutyl amine (DBA plus sodium nitrate (nitrosamine precursors in drinking water, curcuma in grinding diet and bladder injection with E. coli, rats were sacrificed. The excited bladder were dissected, processed and stained with H&E and anti-Ki67 immunohistochemical stains. This was followed by Elisa for caspse-3 and statistical analysis.Results: The current results indicated that E. coli infection in the bladder tissues increases the carcinogenic ability of nitrosamine precursors through caused marked alteration in the form hyperplastic, dysplastic and metaplastic urothelium. Also, there was a statistically significant increase in ki67 immunoreactivity in urothelium. However, a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of caspase-3 in bladder tissue consequently caused the process of carcinogenesis. All these changes were less marked after curcuma treatment when compared with the group that not treated with curcuma. Conclusion: Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder may play a major additive and possible role in bladder carcinogenesis. Rhizome of curcuma may have a protective action during induction of urinary bladder tumors.

  13. Phytoestrogens genistein and daidzin enhance the acetylcholinesterase activity of the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by binding to the estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Hiroko; Talorete, Terence P N; Kimura, Momoko; Maekawa, Takaaki; Inamori, Yuhei; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Seki, Humitake

    2002-11-01

    Some compounds derived from plants have been known to possess estrogenic properties and can thus alter the physiology of higher organisms. Genistein and daidzin are examples of these phytoestrogens, which have recently been the subject of extensive research. In this study, genistein and daidzin were found to enhance the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the rat neuronal cell line PC12 at concentrations as low as 0.08 muM by binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). Results have shown that this enhancement was effectively blocked by the known estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen, indicating the involvement of the ER in AChE induction. That genistein and daidzin are estrogenic were confirmed in a cell proliferation assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF7. This proliferation was also blocked by tamoxifen, again indicating the involvement of the ER. On the other hand, incubating the PC12 cells in increasing concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol (E2) did not lead to enhanced AChE activity, even in the presence of genistein or daidzin. This suggests that mere binding of an estrogenic compound to the ER does not necessarily lead to enhanced AChE activity. Moreover, the effect of the phytoestrogens on AChE activity cannot be expressed in the presence of E2 since they either could not compete with the natural ligand in binding to the ER or that E2 down-regulates its own receptor. This study clearly suggests that genistein and daidzin enhance AChE activityin PC12 cells by binding to the ER; however, the actual mechanism of enhancement is not known.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of cooperative binding of transcription factors Runx1–CBFβ–Ets1 on the TCRα gene enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Shiina, Masaaki; Fukuda, Ikuo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-01-01

    Ets1 is an essential transcription factor (TF) for several important physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. Its recognition of the enhancer region of the TCRα gene is enhanced by the cooperative binding of the Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer, with the cancelation of phosphorylation-dependent autoinhibition. The detailed mechanism of this interesting cooperativity between Ets1 and the Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer is still largely unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this cooperativity, by using molecular dynamics simulations. Consequently, we detected high flexibility of the loop region between the HI2 and H1 helices of Ets1. Upon Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer binding, this loop transiently adopts various sub-stable conformations in its interactions with the DNA. In addition, a network analysis suggested an allosteric pathway in the molecular assembly and identified some key residues that coincide with previous experimental studies. Our simulations suggest that the cooperative binding of Ets1 and the Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer alters the DNA conformation and induces sub-stable conformations of the HI2–H1 loop of Ets1. This phenomenon increases the flexibility of the regulatory module, including the HI2 helix, and destabilizes the inhibitory form of this module. Thus, we hypothesize that this effect facilitates Ets1–DNA binding and prevents the phosphorylation-dependent DNA binding autoinhibition. PMID:28231333

  15. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  16. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  17. Liposomal co-entrapment of CD40mAb induces enhanced IgG responses against bacterial polysaccharide and protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Hatzifoti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibody against CD40 is effective in enhancing immune responses to vaccines when chemically conjugated to the vaccine antigen. Unfortunately the requirement for chemical conjugation presents some difficulties in vaccine production and quality control which are compounded when multivalent vaccines are required. We explore here an alternative to chemical conjugation, involving the co-encapsulation of CD40 antibody and antigens in liposomal vehicles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anti-mouse CD40 mAb or isotype control mAb were co-entrapped individually in cationic liposomal vehicles with pneumococcal polysaccharides or diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. Retention of CD40 binding activity upon liposomal entrapment was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. After subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c female mice, anti-polysaccharide and DT/TT responses were measured by ELISA. Simple co-encapsulation of CD40 antibody allowed for the retention of CD40 binding on the liposome surface, and also produced vaccines with enhanced imunogenicity. Antibody responses against both co-entrapped protein in the form of tetanus toxoid, and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide, were enhanced by co-encapsulation with CD40 antibody. Surprisingly, liposomal encapsulation also appeared to decrease the toxicity of high doses of CD40 antibody as assessed by the degree of splenomegaly induced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Liposomal co-encapsulation with CD40 antibody may represent a practical means of producing more immunogenic multivalent vaccines and inducing IgG responses against polysaccharides without the need for conjugation.

  18. Binding of a candidate splice regulator to a calcitonin-specific splice enhancer regulates calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Timothy P; Tran, Quincy; Roesser, James R

    2003-01-27

    The calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pre-mRNA is alternatively processed in a tissue-specific manner leading to the production of calcitonin mRNA in thyroid C cells and CGRP mRNA in neurons. A candidate calcitonin/CGRP splice regulator (CSR) isolated from rat brain was shown to inhibit calcitonin-specific splicing in vitro. CSR specifically binds to two regions in the calcitonin-specific exon 4 RNA previously demonstrated to function as a bipartate exonic splice enhancer (ESE). The two regions, A and B element, are necessary for inclusion of exon 4 into calcitonin mRNA. A novel RNA footprinting method based on the UV cross-linking assay was used to define the site of interaction between CSR and B element RNA. Base changes at the CSR binding site prevented CSR binding to B element RNA and CSR was unable to inhibit in vitro splicing of pre-mRNAs containing the mutated CSR binding site. When expressed in cells that normally produce predominantly CGRP mRNA, a calcitonin/CGRP gene containing the mutated CSR binding site expressed predominantly calcitonin mRNA. These observations demonstrate that CSR binding to the calcitonin-specific ESE regulates calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA splicing.

  19. Conformational changes of the bacterial type I ATP-binding cassette importer HisQMP2 at distinct steps of the catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuveling, Johanna; Frochaux, Violette; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Wawrzinek, Robert; Wessig, Pablo; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotic solute binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette import systems are divided into type I and type II and mechanistic differences in the transport process going along with this classification are under intensive investigation. Little is known about the conformational dynamics during the catalytic cycle especially concerning the transmembrane domains. The type I transporter for positively charged amino acids from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (LAO-HisQMP2) was studied by limited proteolysis in detergent solution in the absence and presence of co-factors including ATP, ADP, LAO/arginine, and Mg(2+) ions. Stable peptide fragments could be obtained and differentially susceptible cleavage sites were determined by mass spectrometry as Lys-258 in the nucleotide-binding subunit, HisP, and Arg-217/Arg-218 in the transmembrane subunit, HisQ. In contrast, transmembrane subunit HisM was gradually degraded but no stable fragment could be detected. HisP and HisQ were equally resistant under pre- and post-hydrolysis conditions in the presence of arginine-loaded solute-binding protein LAO and ATP/ADP. Some protection was also observed with LAO/arginine alone, thus reflecting binding to the transporter in the apo-state and transmembrane signaling. Comparable digestion patterns were obtained with the transporter reconstituted into proteoliposomes and nanodiscs. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy confirmed the change of HisQ(R218) to a more apolar microenvironment upon ATP binding and hydrolysis. Limited proteolysis was subsequently used as a tool to study the consequences of mutations on the transport cycle. Together, our data suggest similar conformational changes during the transport cycle as described for the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli, despite distinct structural differences between both systems.

  20. Dual effects and mechanism of TiO2 nanotube arrays in reducing bacterial colonization and enhancing C3H10T1/2 cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Z

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhaoxiang Peng,1,2,* Jiahua Ni,3,* Kang Zheng,2 Yandong Shen,2 Xiaoqing Wang,1 Guo He,3 Sungho Jin,4 Tingting Tang1 1Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopaedic Implants, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ningbo Medical Treatment Center Lihuili Hospital, Ningbo, People's Republic of China; 3State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Competition occurs between the osteoblasts in regional microenvironments and pathogens introduced during surgery, on the surface of bone implants, such as joint prostheses. The aim of this study was to modulate bacterial and osteoblast adhesion on implant surfaces by using a nanotube array. Titanium oxide (TiO2 nanotube arrays, 30 nm or 80 nm in diameter, were prepared by a two-step anodization on titanium substrates. Mechanically polished and acid-etched titanium samples were also prepared to serve as control groups. The standard strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, American Type Culture Collection [ATCC]35984 and mouse C3H10T1/2 cell lines with osteogenic potential were used to evaluate the different responses to the nanotube arrays, in bacteria and eukaryotic cells. We found that the initial adhesion and colonization of S. epidermidis on the surface of the TiO2 nanotube arrays were significantly reduced and that the adhesion of C3H10T1/2 cells on the surface of the TiO2 nanotube arrays was significantly enhanced when compared with the control samples. Based on a surface analysis of all four groups, we observed increased surface roughness, decreased water contact angles, and an enhanced

  1. Isolation, identification and characterization of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BZ-6, a bacterial isolate for enhancing oil recovery from oily sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Xiaobing; Wu, Longhua; Chen, Mengfang; Tu, Chen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Over 100 biosurfactant-producing microorganisms were isolated from oily sludge and petroleum-contaminated soil from Shengli oil field in north China. Sixteen of the bacterial isolates produced biosurfactants and reduced the surface tension of the growth medium from 71 to BZ-6 was found to be the most efficient strain and the three phases (oil, water and sediment) were separated automatically after the sludge was treated with the culture medium of BZ-6. Based on morphological, physiological characteristics and molecular identification, isolate BZ-6 was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The biosurfactant produced by isolate BZ-6 was purified and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. There were four ion peaks representing four different fengycin A homologues.

  2. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  3. Enhanced Binding of a Non-hydrogen Bond Ligand to DNA by Introducing an Apurine/Apyrimidine Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Yong; NIU Zhenjiang; CHEN Jianrong; ZHANG Liangke

    2009-01-01

    Intercalators are well known for their DNA binding specificity by inserting between base pairs, whereas the binding event occurring to apurine/apyrimidine site (AP site)-containing DNA for this type of noncovalent interac-tion is still not highlighted although AP site is frequently in vivo produced in living cells. Here proflavine (PF) as an example is used to investigate the binding specificity of the AP site in DNA for a non-hydrogen bond iigand. Ex-perimental results indicate that the AP site should be the preferential binding site for PE The intrinsic binding con-stant of PF for the AP site is one order of magnitude greater than that occurring for PF intercalation. Additionally, the thermostability of the AP site-containing DNA is significantly increased after PF binding. The PF bound to the AP site should adopt a specific binding orientation distinguishable from that by which PF intercalated into base pairs. The results obtained here should be very useful for judging biochemical and biophysical effectiveness of small molecules based on their different binding behavior to DNA.

  4. Wheat and barley allergens associated with baker's asthma. Glycosylated subunits of the alpha-amylase-inhibitor family have enhanced IgE-binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Monge, R; Gomez, L; Barber, D; Lopez-Otin, C; Armentia, A; Salcedo, G

    1992-01-15

    A 16 kDa protein, designated CM16*, which strongly binds IgE from baker's-asthma patients has been identified as a glycosylated form of the previously reported WTAI-CM16, which is a subunit of the wheat tetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor. A glycosylated form (CMb*) of BTAI-CMb, the equivalent inhibitor subunit from barley, has been also found to have significantly enhanced IgE-binding capacity. In all, 14 purified members of the alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitor family showed very different IgE-binding capacities when tested by a dot-blot assay. The glycosylated components CM16*, CMb* and the previously described non-glycosylated 14.5 kDa allergen from barley (renamed BMAI-1) were found to be the strongest allergens.

  5. Pili play an important role in enhancing the bacterial clearance from the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media with Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Toshiaki; Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Mitsui, Marcelo Takahiro; Ahmed, Kamruddin; Nishizono, Akira; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative aerobic diplococcus that is currently the third most frequent cause of bacterial acute otitis media (AOM) in children. In this study, we developed an experimental murine AOM model by inoculating M. catarrhalis in the middle ear bulla and studied the local response to this inoculation, and modulation of its course by the pili of M. catarrhalis. The pili-positive and pili-negative M. catarrhalis showed differences in bacterial clearance and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the middle ear. Pili-negative M. catarrhalis induced a more delayed and prolonged immune response in the middle ear than that of pili-positive M. catarrhalis. TLR2, -4, -5 and -9 mRNA expression was upregulated in neutrophils that infiltrated the middle ear cavity during AOM caused by both pili-positive and pili-negative bacteria. TLR5 mRNA expression and TLR5 protein in the neutrophils were induced more robustly by pili-positive M. catarrhalis. This immune response is likely to be related to neutrophil function such as toll-like 5-dependent phagocytosis. Our results show that mice may provide a useful AOM model for studying the role of M. catarrhalis. Furthermore, we show that pili play an important role in enhancing M. catarrhalis clearance from the middle ear that is probably mediated through neutrophil-dependent TLR5 signaling.

  6. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  7. Comparison of mammalian and bacterial expression library screening to detect recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants with enhanced thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierczak, Richard F; Bhakta, Varsha; Xie, Michael; Sheffield, William P

    2015-08-20

    Serpins are a widely distributed family of serine proteases. A key determinant of their specificity is the reactive centre loop (RCL), a surface motif of ∼20 amino acids in length. Expression libraries of variant serpins could be rapidly probed with proteases to develop novel inhibitors if optimal systems were available. The serpin variant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R (API M358R) inhibits the coagulation protease thrombin, but at sub-maximal rates compared to other serpins. Here we compared two approaches to isolate functional API variants from serpin expression libraries, using the same small library of API randomized at residue 358 (M358X): flow cytometry of transfected HEK 293 cells expressing membrane-displayed API; and a thrombin capture assay (TCA) performed on pools of bacterial lysates expressing soluble API. No enrichment for specific P1 residues was observed when the RCL codons of the 1% of sorted transfected 293 cells with the highest fluorescent thrombin-binding signals were subcloned and sequenced. In contrast, screening of 16 pools of bacterial API-expressing transformants led to the facile identification of API M358R and M358K as functional variants. Kinetic characterization showed that API M358R inhibited thrombin 17-fold more rapidly than API M358K. Reducing the incubation time with immobilized thrombin improved the sensitivity of TCA to detect supra-active API M358R variants and was used to screen a hypervariable library of API variants expressing 16 different amino acids at residues 352-357. The most active variant isolated, with TLSATP substituted for FLEAI, inhibited thrombin 2.9-fold more rapidly than API M358R. Our results indicate that flow cytometric approaches used in protein engineering of antibodies are not appropriate for serpins, and highlight the utility of the optimized TCA for serpin protein engineering.

  8. Cooperative Model of Bacterial Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Y; Shi, Yu; Duke, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is controlled by the signalling of a cluster of receptors. A cooperative model is presented, in which coupling between neighbouring receptor dimers enhances the sensitivity with which stimuli can be detected, without diminishing the range of chemoeffector concentration over which chemotaxis can operate. Individual receptor dimers have two stable conformational states: one active, one inactive. Noise gives rise to a distribution between these states, with the probability influenced by ligand binding, and also by the conformational states of adjacent receptor dimers. The two-state model is solved, based on an equivalence with the Ising model in a randomly distributed magnetic field. The model has only two effective parameters, and unifies a number of experimental findings. According to the value of the parameter comparing coupling and noise, the signal can be arbitrarily sensitive to changes in the fraction of receptor dimers to which ligand is bound. The counteracting effect of a change of...

  9. Listeria monocytogenes survival of UV-C radiation is enhanced by presence of sodium chloride, organic food material and by bacterial biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    a biofilm for 7days before exposure. It is not known if this enhanced survival is due to physiological changes in the attached bacterial cells, a physical protection of the cells in the food matrix or a combination. In conclusion, we demonstrate that UV-C light is a useful extra bacteriocidal step......The bactericidal effect on food processing surfaces of ceiling-mounted UV-C light (wavelength 254nm) was determined in a fish smoke house after the routine cleaning and disinfection procedure. The total aerobic counts were reduced during UV-C light exposure (48h) and the number of Listeria...... monocytogenes positive samples went from 30 (of 68) before exposure to 8 (of 68). We therefore in a laboratory model determined the L. monocytogenes reduction kinetics by UV-C light with the purpose of evaluating the influence of food production environmental variables, such as presence of NaCl, organic...

  10. Molecular Organization of Cytochrome c 2 near the Binding Domain of Cytochrome bc 1 Studied by Electron Spin–Lattice Relaxation Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Pietras, Rafał; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of specific interactions between proteins are challenging. In redox systems, interactions involve surfaces near the attachment sites of cofactors engaged in interprotein electron transfer (ET). Here we analyzed binding of cytochrome c 2 to cytochrome bc 1 by measuring paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) of spin label (SL) attached to cytochrome c 2. PRE was exclusively induced by the iron atom of heme c 1 of cytochrome bc 1, which guaranteed that only the configurations wit...

  11. cAMP-independent role of PKA in tonicity-induced transactivation of tonicity-responsive enhancer/ osmotic response element-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Hypertonicity-induced increase in activity of the transcription factor tonicity-responsive enhancer/osmotic response element-binding protein (TonEBP/OREBP) protects renal cells by increasing transcription of genes, including those involved in increased accumulation of organic osmolytes. We previously showed that hypertonicity increases transactivating activity of TonEBP/OREBP. Assay with a binary GAL4 transactivation system showed that the 984 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP (amino aci...

  12. Influence of calcium in extracellular DNA mediated bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerthankar Das

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca(2+ has an important structural role in guaranteeing the integrity of the outer lipopolysaccharide layer and cell walls of bacterial cells. Extracellular DNA (eDNA being part of the slimy matrix produced by bacteria promotes biofilm formation through enhanced structural integrity of the matrix. Here, the concurrent role of Ca(2+ and eDNA in mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation was studied for the first time using a variety of bacterial strains and the thermodynamics of DNA to Ca(2+ binding. It was found that the eDNA concentrations under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions were different among bacterial strains. Whilst Ca(2+ had no influence on eDNA release, presence of eDNA by itself favours bacterial aggregation via attractive acid-base interactions in addition, its binding with Ca(2+ at biologically relevant concentrations was shown further increase in bacterial aggregation via cationic bridging. Negative Gibbs free energy (ΔG values in iTC data confirmed that the interaction between DNA and Ca(2+ is thermodynamically favourable and that the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic owing to its highly negative enthalpy. Removal of eDNA through DNase I treatment revealed that Ca(2+ alone did not enhance cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This discovery signifies the importance of eDNA and concludes that existence of eDNA on bacterial cell surfaces is a key facilitator in binding of Ca(2+ to eDNA thereby mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

  13. Characterization of two novel bacterial type A exo-chitobiose hydrolases having C-terminal 5/12-type carbohydrate-binding modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binti Jamek, Shariza; Nyffenegger, Christian; Muschiol, Jan

    2017-01-01

    /α barrel domain of each of the new enzymes showed individual differences, but ~69% identity of each to that of SmaChiA and highly conserved active site residues. Superposition of a model substrate on 3D structural models of the catalytic domain of the enzymes corroborated exo-chitobiose hydrolase type...... A activity for FbalChi18A and MvarChi18A, i.e., substrate attack from the reducing end. A main feature of both of the new enzymes was the presence of C-terminal 5/12 type carbohydrate-binding modules (SmaChiA has no C-terminal carbohydrate binding module). These new enzymes may be useful tools...

  14. Cloning of a DNA-binding protein that interacts with the ethylene-responsive enhancer element of the carnation GST1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, J M; Woodson, W R

    1996-07-01

    Ethylene transcriptionally activates a glutathione S-transferase gene (GST1) at the onset of the senescence program in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals. A 126 bp region of the GST1 promoter sequence has been identified as an ethylene-responsive enhancer element (ERE). In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of nuclear proteins from senescing petals to recognize a 22 bp sequence within the ERE (ERE oligonucleotide). Mutation of the ERE oligonucleotide sequence significantly alters the strength of this nuclear protein-DNA association. The wild-type ERE oligonucleotide sequence was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. Nucleotide sequencing and deduced amino acid sequence analysis of this cDNA predicted a 32 kDa protein which we have designated carnation ethylene-responsive element-binding protein-1 (CEBP-1). The mRNA expression pattern of CEBP-1 suggests that it is not transcriptionally regulated by ethylene. The amino acid sequence homology of CEBP-1 with other plant nucleic acid binding proteins indicates a conserved nucleic acid binding domain. Within this domain are two highly conserved RNA-binding motifs, RNP-1 and RNP-2. An acidic region and a putative nuclear localization signal are also identified.

  15. A tandem sequence motif acts as a distance-dependent enhancer in a set of genes involved in translation by binding the proteins NonO and SFPQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roepcke Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic analyses of expression control sequences in promoters of co-expressed or functionally related genes enable the discovery of common regulatory sequence motifs that might be involved in co-ordinated gene expression. By studying promoter sequences of the human ribosomal protein genes we recently identified a novel highly specific Localized Tandem Sequence Motif (LTSM. In this work we sought to identify additional genes and LTSM-binding proteins to elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms. Results Genome-wide analyses allowed finding a considerable number of additional LTSM-positive genes, the products of which are involved in translation, among them, translation initiation and elongation factors, and 5S rRNA. Electromobility shift assays then showed specific signals demonstrating the binding of protein complexes to LTSM in ribosomal protein gene promoters. Pull-down assays with LTSM-containing oligonucleotides and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified the related multifunctional nucleotide binding proteins NonO and SFPQ in the binding complex. Functional characterization then revealed that LTSM enhances the transcriptional activity of the promoters in dependency of the distance from the transcription start site. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the power of bioinformatic analyses for the identification of biologically relevant sequence motifs. LTSM and the here found LTSM-binding proteins NonO and SFPQ were discovered through a synergistic combination of bioinformatic and biochemical methods and are regulators of the expression of a set of genes of the translational apparatus in a distance-dependent manner.

  16. Kinetics of H+ ion binding by the P+QA-state of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: rate limitation within the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Wraight, C A

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of flash-induced H+ ion binding by isolated reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, strain R-26, were measured, using pH indicators and conductimetry, in the presence of terbutryn to block electron transfer between the primary and secondary quinones (QA and QB), and in the absence of exogenous electron donors to the oxidized primary donor, P+, i.e., the P+QA-state. Under these conditions, proton binding by RCs is to the protein rather than to any of the cofactors. After light activation to form P+QA-, the kinetics of proton binding were monoexponential at all pH values studied. At neutral pH, the apparent bimolecular rate constant was close to the diffusional limit for proton transfer in aqueous solution (approximately 10(11) M-1 s-1), but increased significantly in the alkaline pH range (e.g., 2 x 10(13) M-1 s-1 at pH 10). The average slope of the pH dependence was -0.4 instead of -1.0, as might be expected for a H+ diffusion-controlled process. High activation energy (0.54 eV at pH 8.0) and weak viscosity dependence showed that H+ ion uptake by RCs is not limited by diffusion. The salt dependence of the H+ ion binding rate and the pK values of the protonatable amino acid residues of the reaction center implicated surface charge influences, and Gouy-Chapman theory provided a workable description of the ionic effects as arising from modulation of the pH at the surface of the RC. Incubation in D2O caused small increases in the pKs of the protonatable groups and a small, pH (pD)-dependent slowing of the binding rate. The salt, pH, temperature, viscosity, and D2O dependences of the proton uptake by RCs in the P+QA- state were accounted for by three considerations: 1) parallel pathways of H+ delivery to the RC, contributing to the observed (net) H+ disappearance; 2) rate limitation of the protonation of target groups within the protein by conformational dynamics; and 3) electrostatic influences of charged groups in the protein, via the surface p

  17. Kinetics of H+ ion binding by the P+QA-state of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: rate limitation within the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Wraight, C A

    1997-07-01

    The kinetics of flash-induced H+ ion binding by isolated reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, strain R-26, were measured, using pH indicators and conductimetry, in the presence of terbutryn to block electron transfer between the primary and secondary quinones (QA and QB), and in the absence of exogenous electron donors to the oxidized primary donor, P+, i.e., the P+QA-state. Under these conditions, proton binding by RCs is to the protein rather than to any of the cofactors. After light activation to form P+QA-, the kinetics of proton binding were monoexponential at all pH values studied. At neutral pH, the apparent bimolecular rate constant was close to the diffusional limit for proton transfer in aqueous solution (approximately 10(11) M-1 s-1), but increased significantly in the alkaline pH range (e.g., 2 x 10(13) M-1 s-1 at pH 10). The average slope of the pH dependence was -0.4 instead of -1.0, as might be expected for a H+ diffusion-controlled process. High activation energy (0.54 eV at pH 8.0) and weak viscosity dependence showed that H+ ion uptake by RCs is not limited by diffusion. The salt dependence of the H+ ion binding rate and the pK values of the protonatable amino acid residues of the reaction center implicated surface charge influences, and Gouy-Chapman theory provided a workable description of the ionic effects as arising from modulation of the pH at the surface of the RC. Incubation in D2O caused small increases in the pKs of the protonatable groups and a small, pH (pD)-dependent slowing of the binding rate. The salt, pH, temperature, viscosity, and D2O dependences of the proton uptake by RCs in the P+QA- state were accounted for by three considerations: 1) parallel pathways of H+ delivery to the RC, contributing to the observed (net) H+ disappearance; 2) rate limitation of the protonation of target groups within the protein by conformational dynamics; and 3) electrostatic influences of charged groups in the protein, via the surface pH.

  18. Allosteric enhancers, allosteric agonists and ago-allosteric modulators: where do they bind and how do they act?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    2007-01-01

    Many small-molecule agonists also display allosteric properties. Such ago-allosteric modulators act as co-agonists, providing additive efficacy--instead of partial antagonism--and they can affect--and often improve--the potency of the endogenous agonist. Surprisingly, the apparent binding sites...... different binding modes. In another, dimeric, receptor scenario, the endogenous agonist binds to one protomer while the ago-allosteric modulator binds to the other, 'allosteric' protomer. It is suggested that testing for ago-allosteric properties should be an integral part of the agonist drug discovery...... process because a compound that acts with--rather than against--the endogenous agonist could be an optimal agonist drug....

  19. Dietary Fiber and Bacterial SCFA Enhance Oral Tolerance and Protect against Food Allergy through Diverse Cellular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs, which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103+ DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103+ DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens.

  20. Enhanced expression of a recombinant bacterial laccase at low temperature and microaerobic conditions: purification and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mahdi; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Mollania, Nasrin; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Khajeh, Khosro

    2010-08-01

    Laccases (benzenediol oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2) have many biotechnological applications because of their oxidation ability towards a wide range of phenolic compounds. Within recent years, researchers have been highly interested in the identification and characterization of laccases from bacterial sources. In this study, we have isolated and cloned a gene encoding laccase (CotA) from Bacillus sp. HR03 and then expressed it under microaerobic conditions and decreased temperature in order to obtain high amounts of soluble protein. The laccase was purified and its biochemical properties were investigated using three common laccase substrates, 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), syringaldazine (SGZ) and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP). K(M) and k(cat) were calculated 535 microM and 127 s(-1) for ABTS, 53 microM and 3 s(-1) for 2, 6-DMP and 5 microM and 20 s(-1) for SGZ when the whole reactions were carried out at room temperature. Laccase activity was also studied when the enzyme was preincubated at 70 and 80 degrees C. With SGZ as the substrate, the activity was increased three-fold after 50 min preincubation at 70 degrees C and 2.4-fold after 10 min preincubation at 80 degrees C. Preincubation of the enzyme in 70 degrees C for 30 min raised the activity four-fold with ABTS as the substrate. Also, L-dopa was used as a substrate. The enzyme was able to oxidize L-dopa with the K(M) and k(cat) of 1,493 microM and 194 s(-1), respectively.

  1. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  2. Bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate binds pro-inflammatory bacterial compounds and prevents immune activation in an intestinal co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detzel, Christopher J; Horgan, Alan; Henderson, Abigail L; Petschow, Bryon W; Warner, Christopher D; Maas, Kenneth J; Weaver, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is associated with chronic gastrointestinal tract inflammation and diseases such as IBD and IBS. Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) is a specially formulated protein preparation (>90%) for oral administration. The composition of SBI is greater than 60% immunoglobulin including contributions from IgG, IgA, and IgM. Immunoglobulin within the lumen of the gut has been recognized to have anti-inflammatory properties and is involved in maintaining gut homeostasis. The binding of common intestinal antigens (LPS and Lipid A) and the ligand Pam3CSK4, by IgG, IgA, and IgM in SBI was shown using a modified ELISA technique. Each of these antigens stimulated IL-8 and TNF-α cytokine production by THP-1 monocytes. Immune exclusion occurred as SBI (≤50 mg/mL) bound free antigen in a dose dependent manner that inhibited cytokine production by THP-1 monocytes in response to 10 ng/mL LPS or 200 ng/mL Lipid A. Conversely, Pam3CSK4 stimulation of THP-1 monocytes was unaffected by SBI/antigen binding. A co-culture model of the intestinal epithelium consisted of a C2BBe1 monolayer separating an apical compartment from a basal compartment containing THP-1 monocytes. The C2BBe1 monolayer was permeabilized with dimethyl palmitoyl ammonio propanesulfonate (PPS) to simulate a damaged epithelial barrier. Results indicate that Pam3CSK4 was able to translocate across the PPS-damaged C2BBe1 monolayer. However, binding of Pam3CSK4 by immunoglobulins in SBI prevented Pam3CSK4 translocation across the damaged C2BBe1 barrier. These results demonstrated steric exclusion of antigen by SBI which prevented apical to basal translocation of antigen due to changes in the physical properties of Pam3CSK4, most likely as a result of immunoglobulin binding. This study demonstrates that immunoglobulins in SBI can reduce antigen-associated inflammation through immune and steric exclusion mechanisms and furthers the mechanistic understanding of how SBI

  3. APE1/Ref-1 enhances DNA binding activity of mutant p53 in a redox-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cun, Yanping; Dai, Nan; Li, Mengxia; Xiong, Chengjie; Zhang, Qinhong; Sui, Jiangdong; Qian, Chengyuan; Wang, Dong

    2014-02-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a dual function protein; in addition to its DNA repair activity, it can stimulate DNA binding activity of numerous transcription factors as a reduction-oxidation (redox) factor. APE1/Ref-1 has been found to be a potent activator of wild-type p53 (wtp53) DNA binding in vitro and in vivo. Although p53 is mutated in most types of human cancer including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), little is known about whether APE1/Ref-1 can regulate mutant p53 (mutp53). Herein, we reported the increased APE1/Ref-1 protein and accumulation of mutp53 in HCC by immunohistochemistry. Of note, it was observed that APE1/Ref-1 high-expression and mutp53 expression were associated with carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. To determine whether APE1/Ref-1 regulates DNA binding of mutp53, we performed electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HCC cell lines. In contrast to sequence-specific and DNA structure-dependent binding of wtp53, reduced mutp53 efficiently bound to nonlinear DNA, but not to linear DNA. Notably, overexpression of APE1/Ref-1 resulted in increased DNA binding activity of mutp53, while downregulation of APE1/Ref-1 caused a marked decrease of mutp53 DNA binding. In addition, APE1/Ref-1 could not potentiate the accumulation of p21 mRNA and protein in mutp53 cells. These data indicate that APE1/Ref-1 can stimulate mutp53 DNA binding in a redox-dependent manner.

  4. Enhanced sunlight photocatalytic activity of Ag3PO4 decorated novel combustion synthesis derived TiO2 nanobelts for dye and bacterial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswar, Neerugatti KrishnaRao; Ramamurthy, Praveen Chandrashekarapura; Madras, Giridhar

    2015-07-01

    This study demonstrates the synthesis of TiO2 nanobelts using solution combustion derived TiO2 with enhanced photocatalytic activity for dye degradation and bacterial inactivation. Hydrothermal treatment of combustion synthesized TiO2 resulted in unique partially etched TiO2 nanobelts and Ag3PO4 was decorated using the co-precipitation method. The catalyst particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction analysis, BET surface area analysis, diffuse reflectance and electron microscopy. The photocatalytic properties of the composites of Ag3PO4 with pristine combustion synthesized TiO2 and commercial TiO2 under sunlight were compared. Therefore the studies conducted proved that the novel Ag3PO4/unique combustion synthesis derived TiO2 nanobelt composites exhibited extended light absorption, better charge transfer mechanism and higher generation of hydroxyl and hole radicals. These properties resulted in enhanced photodegradation of dyes and bacteria when compared to the commercial TiO2 nanocomposite. These findings have important implications in designing new photocatalysts for water purification.

  5. Electromagnetic irradiation of Enterococcus hirae at low-intensity 51.8- and 53.0-GHz frequencies: changes in bacterial cell membrane properties and enhanced antibiotics effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Ohanyan, Vahe; Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Kalantaryan, Vitaly; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 51.8 and 53.0 GHz and low intensity (flux capacity of 0.06 mW cm(-2) ) for 1 h markedly decreased the energy-dependent H(+) and K(+) transport across membranes of Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790. After EMI, there was also a significant decrease of overall and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD)-sensitive ATPase activity of the membrane vesicles. These measures were considerably lower at 53.0 GHz. EMI in combination with different antibiotics, such as ceftriaxone and kanamycin at their minimal inhibitory concentrations (100 and 200 μM, respectively), enhanced bacterial cell growth and altered their membrane transport properties. Total H(+) efflux was most sensitive to ceftriaxone but DCCD-inhibited H(+) efflux and total K(+) influx were sensitive to kanamycin. The results indicate that cell membrane proteins could be a target in the action of EMI and enhanced antibacterial effects in combination with antibiotics. The DCCD-sensitive F(0) F(1) -ATPase or this ATPase in combination with K(+) uptake protein probably plays a key role in these effects.

  6. Cutting edge: the nucleotide receptor P2X7 contains multiple protein- and lipid-interaction motifs including a potential binding site for bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, L C; Fisette, P L; Sommer, J A; Watters, J J; Prabhu, U; Dubyak, G R; Proctor, R A; Bertics, P J

    2001-08-15

    The nucleotide receptor P2X7 has been shown to modulate LPS-induced macrophage production of numerous inflammatory mediators. Although the C-terminal portion of P2X7 is thought to be essential for multiple receptor functions, little is known regarding the structural motifs that lie within this region. We show here that the P2X7 C-terminal domain contains several apparent protein-protein and protein-lipid interaction motifs with potential importance to macrophage signaling and LPS action. Surprisingly, P2X7 also contains a conserved LPS-binding domain. In this report, we demonstrate that peptides derived from this P2X7 sequence bind LPS in vitro. Moreover, these peptides neutralize the ability of LPS to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1, ERK2) and to promote the degradation of the inhibitor of kappaB-alpha isoform (IkappaB-alpha) in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Collectively, these data suggest that the C-terminal domain of P2X7 may directly coordinate several signal transduction events related to macrophage function and LPS action.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against accumulation-associated protein affect EPS biosynthesis and enhance bacterial accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hu

    Full Text Available Because there is no effective antibiotic to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm infections that lead to the failure of medical device implantations, the development of anti-biofilm vaccines is necessary. Biofilm formation by S. epidermidis requires accumulation-associated protein (Aap that contains sequence repeats known as G5 domains, which are responsible for the Zn(2+-dependent dimerization of Aap to mediate intercellular adhesion. Antibodies against Aap have been reported to inhibit biofilm accumulation. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against the Aap C-terminal single B-repeat construct followed by the 79-aa half repeat (AapBrpt1.5 were generated. MAb(18B6 inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis RP62A to 60% of the maximum, while MAb(25C11 and MAb(20B9 enhanced biofilm accumulation. All three MAbs aggregated the planktonic bacteria to form visible cell clusters. Epitope mapping revealed that the epitope of MAb(18B6, which recognizes an identical area within AapBrpt constructs from S. epidermidis RP62A, was not shared by MAb(25C11 and MAb(20B9. Furthermore, all three MAbs were found to affect both Aap expression and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, including extracellular DNA and PIA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis and enhance the cell accumulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and will help to develop epitope-peptide vaccines against staphylococcal infections.

  8. Enhancing filterability of activated sludge from landfill leachate treatment plant by applying electrical field ineffective on bacterial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Gulizar Kurtoglu; Sekman, Elif; Top, Selin; Sagir, Ece; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan; Guvenc, Senem Yazici

    2017-03-09

    The aim of this study is to investigate filterability enhancement of activated sludge supplied form a full-scale leachate treatment plant by applying DC electric field while keeping the biological operational conditions in desirable range. The activated sludge samples were received from the nitrification tank in the leachate treatment plant of Istanbul's Odayeri Sanitary Landfill Site. Experimental sets were conducted as laboratory-scale batch studies and were duplicated for 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, and 5A of electrical currents and 2, 5, 10, 15, and 30 min of exposure times under continuous aeration. Physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, and oxidation reduction potential in the mixture right after each experimental set and biochemical parameters such as chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, and ammonia nitrogen in supernatant were analyzed to define the sets that remain in the range of ideal biological operational conditions. Later on, sludge filterability properties such as capillary suction time, specific resistance to filtration, zeta potential, and particle size were measured for remaining harmless sets. Additionally, cost analyses were conducted in respect to energy and electrode consumptions. Application of 2A DC electric field and 15-min exposure time was found to be the most favorable conditions to enhance filterability of the landfill leachate-activated sludge.

  9. Moderately thermophilic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial communities in Kuwaiti desert soil: enhanced activity via Ca(2+) and dipicolinic acid amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mailem, D M; Kansour, M K; Radwan, S S

    2015-05-01

    Pristine and oil-contaminated desert soil samples from Kuwait harbored between 10 and 100 cells g(-1) of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria capable of growth at 50 °C. Enrichment by incubation of moistened soils for 6 months at 50 °C raised those numbers to the magnitude of 10(3) cells g(-1). Most of these organisms were moderately thermophilic and belonged to the genus Bacillus; they grew at 40-50 °C better than at 30 °C. Species belonging to the genera Amycolatopsis, Chelativorans, Isoptericola, Nocardia, Aeribacillus, Aneurinibacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Kocuria, Marinobacter and Paenibacillus were also found. This microbial diversity indicates a good potential for hydrocarbon removal in soil at high temperature. Analysis of the same desert soil samples by a culture-independent method (combined, DGGE and 16S rDNA sequencing) revealed dramatically different lists of microorganisms, many of which had been recorded as hydrocarbonoclastic. Many species were more frequent in the oil contaminated than in the pristine soil samples, which may reflect their hydrocarbonoclastic activity in situ. The growth and hydrocarbon consumption potential of all tested isolates were dramatically enhanced by amendment of the cultures with Ca(2+) (up to 2.5 M CaSO4). This enhanced effect was even amplified when in addition 8 % w/v dipicolinic acid was amended. These novel findings are useful in suggesting biotechnologies for waste hydrocarbon remediation at moderately high temperature.

  10. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  11. Cyclosporin A suppresses the expression of the interleukin 2 gene by inhibiting the binding of lymphocyte-specific factors to the IL-2 enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randak, C; Brabletz, T; Hergenröther, M; Sobotta, I; Serfling, E

    1990-08-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), a powerful immunosuppressive drug, inhibits the synthesis of lymphokines in T lymphocytes at the level of gene transcription. Using protein extracts from El4 lymphoma cells we show that the binding of lymphocyte-specific factors interacting with the two so-called purine boxes (Pu-boxes) of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) enhancer are missing in CsA-treated cells. The CsA-sensitive factors are newly synthesized upon induction. The most prominent factor consists of 45 kd polypeptides and contacts both Pu-boxes at the two central G residues within the identical core sequence AAGAGGAAAA. The CsA-mediated suppression of factor binding to the Pu-boxes correlates well with functional studies in which the inducible, T cell-restricted proto-enhancer activity of Pu-boxes was selectively repressed by CsA. These observations support the conclusion that the suppression of factor binding to the Pu-boxes by CsA impairs the activity of IL-2 and of further lymphokine genes, thereby inhibiting the synthesis of lymphokines in T lymphocytes.

  12. CLOCKWORK ORANGE Enhances PERIOD Mediated Rhythms in Transcriptional Repression by Antagonizing E-box Binding by CLOCK-CYCLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Wangjie; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-11-01

    The Drosophila circadian oscillator controls daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate feedback loop function by binding E-box elements to activate per and tim transcription. PER-TIM heterodimers then accumulate, bind CLK-CYC to inhibit transcription, and are ultimately degraded to enable the next round of transcription. The timing of transcriptional events in this feedback loop coincide with, and are controlled by, rhythms in CLK-CYC binding to E-boxes. PER rhythmically binds CLK-CYC to initiate transcriptional repression, and subsequently promotes the removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes. However, little is known about the mechanism by which CLK-CYC is removed from DNA. Previous studies demonstrated that the transcription repressor CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO) contributes to core feedback loop function by repressing per and tim transcription in cultured S2 cells and in flies. Here we show that CWO rhythmically binds E-boxes upstream of core clock genes in a reciprocal manner to CLK, thereby promoting PER-dependent removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes, and maintaining repression until PER is degraded and CLK-CYC displaces CWO from E-boxes to initiate transcription. These results suggest a model in which CWO co-represses CLK-CYC transcriptional activity in conjunction with PER by competing for E-box binding once CLK-CYC-PER complexes have formed. Given that CWO orthologs DEC1 and DEC2 also target E-boxes bound by CLOCK-BMAL1, a similar mechanism may operate in the mammalian clock.

  13. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  14. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  15. Molecular organization of cytochrome c2 near the binding domain of cytochrome bc1 studied by electron spin-lattice relaxation enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Rafał; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-06-19

    Measurements of specific interactions between proteins are challenging. In redox systems, interactions involve surfaces near the attachment sites of cofactors engaged in interprotein electron transfer (ET). Here we analyzed binding of cytochrome c2 to cytochrome bc1 by measuring paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) of spin label (SL) attached to cytochrome c2. PRE was exclusively induced by the iron atom of heme c1 of cytochrome bc1, which guaranteed that only the configurations with SL to heme c1 distances up to ∼30 Å were detected. Changes in PRE were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the binding. Our data suggest that at low ionic strength and under an excess of cytochrome c2 over cytochrome bc1, several cytochrome c2 molecules gather near the binding domain forming a "cloud" of molecules. When the cytochrome bc1 concentration increases, the cloud disperses to populate additional available binding domains. An increase in ionic strength weakens the attractive forces and the average distance between cytochrome c2 and cytochrome bc1 increases. The spatial arrangement of the protein complex at various ionic strengths is different. Above 150 mM NaCl the lifetime of the complexes becomes so short that they are undetectable. All together the results indicate that cytochrome c2 molecules, over the range of salt concentration encompassing physiological ionic strength, do not form stable, long-lived complexes but rather constantly collide with the surface of cytochrome bc1 and ET takes place coincidentally with one of these collisions.

  16. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis.

  17. Cooperative binding of estrogen receptor to imperfect estrogen-responsive DNA elements correlates with their synergistic hormone-dependent enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, E; Wahli, W

    1989-12-01

    The Xenopus vitellogenin (vit) gene B1 estrogen-inducible enhancer is formed by two closely adjacent 13 bp imperfect palindromic estrogen-responsive elements (EREs), i.e. ERE-2 and ERE-1, having one and two base substitutions respectively, when compared to the perfect palindromic consensus ERE (GGTCANNNTGACC). Gene transfer experiments indicate that these degenerated elements, on their own, have a low or no regulatory capacity at all, but in vivo act together synergistically to confer high receptor- and hormone-dependent transcription activation to the heterologous HSV thymidine kinase promoter. Thus, the DNA region upstream of the vitB1 gene comprising these two imperfect EREs separated by 7 bp, was called the vitB1 estrogen-responsive unit (vitB1 ERU). Using in vitro protein-DNA interaction techniques, we demonstrate that estrogen receptor dimers bind cooperatively to the imperfect EREs of the vitB1 ERU. Binding of a first receptor dimer to the more conserved ERE-2 increases approximately 4- to 8-fold the binding affinity of the receptor to the adjacent less conserved ERE-1. Thus, we suggest that the observed synergistic estrogen-dependent transcription activation conferred by the pair of hormone-responsive DNA elements of the vit B1 ERU is the result of cooperative binding of two estrogen receptor dimers to these two adjacent imperfect EREs.

  18. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  19. An inverted repeat motif stabilizes binding of E2F and enhances transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, M; Blake, M C; Jambou, R C;

    1995-01-01

    and viral genes. This element, 5'-TTTCGCGCCAAA-3', is comprised of two overlapping, oppositely oriented sites which match the consensus E2F site (5'-TTT(C/G)(C/G)CGC-3'). Recent work has shown that E2F binding activity is composed of at least six related cellular polypeptides which are capable of forming...

  20. Microbial desalination cell for enhanced biodegradation of waste engine oil using a novel bacterial strain Bacillus subtilis moh3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabina, K; Fayidh, Mohammed A; Archana, G; Sivarajan, M; Babuskin, S; Babu, P Azhagu Saravana; Radha, K Krishnan; Sukumar, M

    2014-01-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a bioelectrochemical system developed recently from microbial fuel cells (MFCs), for producing green energy from organic wastes along with desalination of saltwater. MDC is proved to be a better performer than MFC in terms of power output and chemical oxygen demand removal, with desalination as an additional feature. This study investigates the application potential of MDC for integrated biodegradation of waste engine oil. This study showed, for the first time, that waste engine oil could be used as an organic substrate in MDC, achieving biodegradation of engine oil along with considerable desalination and power production. Utilization of these wastes in MDC can protect the environment from waste engine oil contamination. Indigenous oil-degrading bacteria were isolated and identified from engine oil contaminated sludge. Degradation of waste engine oil by these novel isolates was studied in batch cultures and optimized the growth conditions. The same cultures when used in MDC, gave enhanced biodegradation (70.1 +/- 0.5%) along with desalination (68.3 +/- 0.6%) and power production (3.1 +/- 0.3 mW/m2). Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were performed to characterize the degradation metabolites in the anolyte of MDC which clearly indicated the biodegradation of long chain, branched and cyclic hydrocarbons present in waste engine oil.

  1. Transformation of tomato with a bacterial codA gene enhances tolerance to salt and water stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Deepa; Singh, Ajay K; Yadav, Vichita; Babbar, Shashi B; Murata, Norio; Bansal, Kailash C

    2011-07-15

    Genetically engineered tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with the ability to synthesize glycinebetaine was generated by introducing the codA gene encoding choline oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis. Integration of the codA gene in transgenic tomato plants was verified by PCR analysis and DNA blot hybridization. Transgenic expression of gene was verified by RT-PCR analysis and RNA blot hybridization. The codA-transgenic plants showed higher tolerance to salt stress during seed germination, and subsequent growth of young seedlings than wild-type plants. The codA transgene enhanced the salt tolerance of whole plants and leaves. Mature leaves of codA-transgenic plants revealed higher levels of relative water content, chlorophyll content, and proline content than those of wild-type plants under salt and water stresses. Results from the current study suggest that the expression of the codA gene in transgenic tomato plants induces the synthesis of glycinebetaine and improves the tolerance of plants to salt and water stresses.

  2. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation by enhancers: the roles of synergistic activation, cooperative binding and short-range repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    Full Text Available Quantitative models of cis-regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled, or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence, as a function of transcription factor concentrations and their DNA-binding specificities. It uses statistical thermodynamics theory to model not only protein-DNA interaction, but also the effect of DNA-bound activators and repressors on gene expression. In addition, the model incorporates mechanistic features such as synergistic effect of multiple activators, short range repression, and cooperativity in transcription factor-DNA binding, allowing us to systematically evaluate the significance of these features in the context of available expression data. Using this model on segmentation-related enhancers in Drosophila, we find that transcriptional synergy due to simultaneous action of multiple activators helps explain the data beyond what can be explained by cooperative DNA-binding alone. We find clear support for the phenomenon of short-range repression, where repressors do not directly interact with the basal transcriptional machinery. We also find that the binding sites contributing to an enhancer's function may not be conserved during evolution, and a noticeable fraction of these undergo lineage-specific changes. Our implementation of the model, called GEMSTAT, is the first publicly available program for simultaneously modeling the regulatory activities of a given set of sequences.

  3. A select combination of clinically relevant phytoestrogens enhances estrogen receptor beta-binding selectivity and neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2009-02-01

    We have previously shown that a number of naturally occurring phytoestrogens and derivatives were effective to induce some measures of neuroprotective responses but at a much lower magnitude than those induced by the female gonadal estrogen 17beta-estradiol. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether a combination of select phytoestrogens could enhance neural responses without affecting the reproductive system. We performed a range of comparative analyses of the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha/beta binding profile, and in vitro to in vivo estrogenic activities in neural and uterine tissues induced by clinically relevant phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, equol, and IBSO03569, when used alone or in combination. Our analyses revealed that both the ERalpha/beta binding profile and neural activities associated with individual phytoestrogens are modifiable when used in combination. Specifically, the combination of genistein plus daidzein plus equol resulted in the greatest binding selectivity for ERbeta and an overall improved efficacy/safety profile when compared with single or other combined formulations, including: 1) an approximate 30% increase in ERbeta-binding selectivity (83-fold over ERalpha); 2) a greater effect on neuronal survival against toxic insults in primary neurons; 3) an enhanced activity in promoting neural proactive defense mechanisms against neurodegeneration, including mitochondrial function and beta-amyloid degradation; and 4) no effect on uterine growth. These observations suggest that select phytoestrogens in combination have the therapeutic potential of an alternative approach to conventional estrogen therapy for long-term safe use to reduce the increased risk of cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disease associated with menopause in women.

  4. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy Cooper

    Full Text Available The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid

  5. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation.

  6. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  7. Ribosome binding to a 5' translational enhancer is altered in the presence of the 3' untranslated region in cap-independent translation of turnip crinkle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, Vera A; Yuan, Xuefeng; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Simon, Anne E

    2011-05-01

    Plus-strand RNA viruses without 5' caps require noncanonical mechanisms for ribosome recruitment. A translational enhancer in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) contains an internal T-shaped structure (TSS) that binds to 60S ribosomal subunits. We now report that the 63-nucleotide (nt) 5' UTR of TCV contains a 19-nt pyrimidine-rich element near the initiation codon that supports translation of an internal open reading frame (ORF) independent of upstream 5' UTR sequences. Addition of 80S ribosomes to the 5' UTR reduced the flexibility of the polypyrimidine residues and generated a toeprint consistent with binding to this region. Binding of salt-washed 40S ribosomal subunits was reduced 6-fold when the pyrimidine-rich sequence was mutated. 40S subunit binding generated the same toeprint as 80S ribosomes but also additional ones near the 5' end. Generation of out-of-frame AUGs upstream of the polypyrimidine region reduced translation, which suggests that 5'-terminal entry of 40S subunits is followed by scanning and that the polypyrimidine region is needed for an alternative function that requires ribosome binding. No evidence for RNA-RNA interactions between 5' and 3' sequences was found, suggesting that TCV utilizes an alternative means for circularizing its genome. Combining 5' and 3' UTR fragments in vitro had no discernible effect on the structures of the RNAs. In contrast, when 80S ribosomes were added to both fragments, structural changes were found in the 5' UTR polypyrimidine tract that were not evident when ribosomes interacted with the individual fragments. This suggests that ribosomes can promote an interaction between the 5' and 3' UTRs of TCV.

  8. Enhanced binding affinity, remarkable selectivity, and high capacity of CO 2 by dual functionalization of a rht-type metal-organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2011-12-23

    Open and friendly: The smallest member of the rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, see picture) constructed by a hexacarboxylate ligand with a nitrogen-rich imino triazine backbone shows a significantly enhanced gas binding affinity relative to all other isoreticular rht-type MOFs. The high adsorption capacity and remarkable selectivity of CO 2 are attributed to the high density of open metal and Lewis basic sites in the framework. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Cyclosporin A suppresses the expression of the interleukin 2 gene by inhibiting the binding of lymphocyte-specific factors to the IL-2 enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Randak, C; Brabletz, T; Hergenröther, M; Sobotta, I; Serfling, E

    1990-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), a powerful immunosuppressive drug, inhibits the synthesis of lymphokines in T lymphocytes at the level of gene transcription. Using protein extracts from El4 lymphoma cells we show that the binding of lymphocyte-specific factors interacting with the two so-called purine boxes (Pu-boxes) of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) enhancer are missing in CsA-treated cells. The CsA-sensitive factors are newly synthesized upon induction. The most prominent factor consists of 45 kd polypepti...

  10. A TRAF2 binding independent region of TNFR2 is responsibl for TRAF2 depletion and enhancement of cytotoxicity driven b TNFR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal-Hierro, Lucía; Noelia, Artime; Iglesias, Julián; Miguel A., Prado; Ugarte-Gil, Lore; Pedro, Casado; Fernández-García, Belén; Darnay, Bryant G.; Lazo, Pedro S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) interacts with two receptors known as TNFR1 and TNFR2. TNFR1 activation may result in either cell proliferation or cell death. TNFR2 activates Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) which lead to transcriptional activation of genes related to cell proliferation and survival. This depends on the binding of TNF Receptor Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to the receptor. TNFR2 also induces TRAF2 degradation. In this work we have investigated the structural features of TNFR2 responsible for inducing TRAF2 degradation and have studied the biological consequences of this activity. We show that when TNFR1 and TNFR2 are co-expressed, TRAF2 depletion leads to an enhanced TNFR1 cytotoxicity which correlates with the inhibition of NF-kB. NF-kB activation and TRAF2 degradation depend of different regions of the receptor since TNFR2 mutants at amino acids 343-349 fail to induce TRAF2 degradation and have lost their ability to enhance TNFR1-mediated cell death but are still able to activate NF-kB. Moreover, whereas NF-kB activation requires TRAF2 binding to the receptor, TRAF2 degradation appears independent of TRAF2 binding. Thus, TNFR2 mutants unable to bind TRAF2 are still able to induce its degradation and to enhance TNFR1-mediated cytotoxicity. To test further this receptor crosstalk we have developed a system stably expressing in cells carrying only endogenous TNFR1 the chimeric receptor RANK-TNFR2, formed by the extracellular region of RANK (Receptor activator of NF-kB) and the intracellular region of TNFR2.This has made possible to study independently the signals triggered by TNFR1 and TNFR2. In these cells TNFR1 is selectively activated by soluble TNF (sTNF) while RANK-TNFR2 is selectively activated by RANKL. Treatment of these cells with sTNF and RANKL leads to an enhanced cytotoxicity. PMID:24318359

  11. Phytoestrogens genistein and daidzin enhance the acetylcholinesterase activity of the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by binding to the estrogen receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Isoda, Hiroko; Talorete, Terence P. N.; Kimura, Momoko; Maekawa, Takaaki; Inamori, Yuhei; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Seki, Humitake

    2002-01-01

    Some compounds derived from plants have been known to possess estrogenic properties and can thus alter the physiology of higher organisms. Genistein and daidzin are examples of these phytoestrogens, which have recently been the subject of extensive research. In this study, genistein and daidzin were found to enhance the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the rat neuronal cell line PC12 at concentrations as low as 0.08 μM by binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). Results have shown that t...

  12. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  13. Structure prediction of LDLR-HNP1 complex based on docking enhanced by LDLR binding 3D motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaielbeiki, Reyhaneh; Naughton, Declan P; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including defensins, have come under intense scrutiny owing to their key multiple roles as antimicrobial agents. Not only do they display direct action on microbes, but also recently they have been shown to interact with the immune system to increase antimicrobial activity. Unfortunately, since mechanisms involved in the binding of AMPs to mammalian cells are largely unknown, their potential as novel anti-infective agents cannot be exploited yet. Following the reported interaction of Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 dimer (HNP1) with a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), a computational study was conducted to discover their putative mode of interaction. State-of-the-art docking software produced a set of LDLR-HNP1 complex 3D models. Creation of a 3D motif capturing atomic interactions of the LDLR binding interface allowed selection of the most plausible configurations. Eventually, only two models were in agreement with the literature. Binding energy estimations revealed that only one of them is particularly stable, but also interaction with LDLR weakens significantly bonds within the HNP1 dimer. This may be significant since it suggests a mechanism for internalisation of HNP1 in mammalian cells. In addition to a novel approach for complex structure prediction, this study proposes a 3D model of the LDLR-HNP1 complex which highlights the key residues which are involved in the interactions. The putative identification of the receptor binding mechanism should inform the future design of synthetic HNPs to afford maximum internalisation, which could lead to novel anti-infective drugs.

  14. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  15. Backbone dynamics of a bacterially expressed peptide from the receptor binding domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin strain PAK from heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A. Patricia [University of Washington, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy (United States); Spyracopoulos, Leo [Department of Biochemistry (Canada); Irvin, Randall T. [University of Alberta, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology (Canada); Sykes, Brian D. [Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2000-07-15

    The backbone dynamics of a {sup 15}N-labeled recombinant PAK pilin peptide spanning residues 128-144 in the C-terminal receptor binding domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin protein strain PAK (Lys{sup 128}-Cys-Thr-Ser-Asp-Gln-Asp-Glu-Gln-Phe-Ile-Pro-Lys-Gly-Cys-Ser-Lys{sup 144}) were probed by measurements of {sup 15}N NMR relaxation. This PAK(128-144) sequence is a target for the design of a synthetic peptide vaccine effective against multiple strains of P. aeruginosa infection. The {sup 15}N longitudinal (T{sub 1}) and transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates and the steady-state heteronuclear {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}-{sup 15}N NOE were measured at three fields (7.04, 11.74 and 14.1 Tesla), five temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 deg. C ) and at pH 4.5 and 7.2. Relaxation data was analyzed using both the 'model-free' formalism [Lipari, G. and Szabo, A. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 104, 4546-4559 and 4559-4570] and the reduced spectral density mapping approach [Farrow, N.A., Szabo, A., Torchia, D.A. and Kay, L.E. (1995) J. Biomol. NMR, 6, 153-162]. The relaxation data, spectral densities and order parameters suggest that the type I and type II {beta}-turns spanning residues Asp{sup 134}-Glu-Gln-Phe{sup 137} and Pro{sup 139}-Lys-Gly-Cys{sup 142}, respectively, are the most ordered and structured regions of the peptide. The biological implications of these results will be discussed in relation to the role that backbone motions play in PAK pilin peptide immunogenicity, and within the framework of developing a pilin peptide vaccine capable of conferring broad immunity across P. aeruginosa strains.

  16. Enhancing the Decolorizing and Degradation Ability of Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Textile Effluent Affected Area and Its Application on Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial consortium BMP1/SDSC/01 consisting of six isolates was isolated from textile effected soil, sludge, and textile effluent from Hudiara drain near Nishat Mills Limited, Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan. It was selected because of being capable of degrading and detoxifying red, green, black, and yellow textile dyes. The pH and supplements were optimized to enhance the decolorization ability of the selected consortium. The results indicated that decolorizing ability of consortium for the red, green, black, and yellow dyes was higher as compared to individual strains. The consortium was able to decolorize 84%, 84%, 85%, 85%, and 82% of 200 ppm of red, green, black, yellow, and mixed dyes within 24 h while individual strain required 72 h. On supplementing urea, the consortium decolorized 87, 86, 89, 86, and 83%, respectively, while on supplementing sodium chloride the consortium decolorized 93, 94, 93, 94, and 89% of red, green, black, yellow, and mixed dyes, respectively, which was maximum while in the presence of ascorbic acid and ammonium chloride it showed intermediate results. The effect of untreated and treated dyes was investigated on Zea mays L. (maize and Sorghum vulgare Pers. (sorghum. This study will help to promote an efficient biotreatment of textile effluents.

  17. Direct Host Plasminogen Binding to Bacterial Surface M-protein in Pattern D Strains of Streptococcus pyogenes Is Required for Activation by Its Natural Coinherited SK2b Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrahas, Vishwanatha; Glinton, Kristofor; Liang, Zhong; Donahue, Deborah L; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2015-07-24

    Streptokinase (SK), secreted by Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a single-chain ∼47-kDa protein containing three consecutive primary sequence regions that comprise its α, β, and γ modules. Phylogenetic analyses of the variable β-domain sequences from different GAS strains suggest that SKs can be arranged into two clusters, SK1 and SK2, with a subdivision of SK2 into SK2a and SK2b. SK2b is secreted by skin-tropic Pattern D M-protein strains that also express plasminogen (human Pg (hPg)) binding Group A streptococcal M-protein (PAM) as its major cell surface M-protein. SK2a-expressing strains are associated with nasopharynx tropicity, and many of these strains express human fibrinogen (hFg) binding Pattern A-C M-proteins, e.g. M1. PAM interacts with hPg directly, whereas M1 binds to hPg indirectly via M1-bound hFg. Subsequently, SK is secreted by GAS and activates hPg to plasmin (hPm), thus generating a proteolytic surface on GAS that enhances its dissemination. Due to these different modes of hPg/hPm recognition by GAS, full characterizations of the mechanisms of activation of hPg by SK2a and SK2b and their roles in GAS virulence are important topics. To more fully examine these subjects, isogenic chimeric SK- and M-protein-containing GAS strains were generated, and the virulence of these chimeric strains were analyzed in mice. We show that SK and M-protein alterations influenced the virulence of GAS and were associated with the different natures of hPg activation and hPm binding. These studies demonstrate that GAS virulence can be explained by disparate hPg activation by SK2a and SK2b coupled with the coinherited M-proteins of these strains.

  18. Drosophila Enhancer of Rudimentary Homolog, ERH, Is a Binding Partner of RPS3, RPL19, and DDIT4, Suggesting a Mechanism for the Nuclear Localization of ERH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart I. Tsubota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The protein enhancer of rudimentary homolog, ERH, is a small, highly conserved protein that has been found in animals, plants, and protists. Genetic and biochemical interactions have implicated ERH in the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis, DNA replication, transcription, mRNA splicing, cellular proliferation, tumorigenesis, and the Notch signaling pathway. In vertebrates and insects, ERH is nuclearly localized; however, an examination of the ERH amino-acid sequence does not reveal any nuclear localization signals. In this paper we show that the first 24 amino acids contain sequences necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization. Through yeast two-hybrid screens, three new binding partners of ERH, RPS3, RPL19, and DDIT4, were identified. RPS3 was isolated from both human and Drosophila screens. These interactions suggest functions of ERH in cell growth, cancer, and DNA repair. The ERH sequences necessary for the interactions between ERH and RPS3 and RPL19 are mapped onto the same 24-amino-acid region in ERH which are necessary for nuclear localization, suggesting that ERH is localizing to the nucleus through binding to one of its DNA-binding partners, such as RPS3 or RPL19.

  19. The methylated-DNA binding protein MBD2 enhances NGFI-A (egr-1)-mediated transcriptional activation of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ian C G; Hellstrom, Ian C; Brown, Shelley E; Andrews, Stephen D; Dymov, Sergiy; Diorio, Josie; Zhang, Tie-Yuan; Szyf, Moshe; Meaney, Michael J

    2014-09-26

    Variations in maternal care in the rat influence the epigenetic state and transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in the hippocampus. The mechanisms underlying this maternal effect remained to be defined, including the nature of the relevant maternally regulated intracellular signalling pathways. We show here that increased maternal licking/grooming (LG), which stably enhances hippocampal GR expression, paradoxically increases hippocampal expression of the methyl-CpG binding domain protein-2 (MBD2) and MBD2 binding to the exon 17 GR promoter. Knockdown experiments of MBD2 in hippocampal primary cell culture show that MBD2 is required for activation of exon 17 GR promoter. Ectopic co-expression of nerve growth factor-inducible protein A (NGFI-A) with MBD2 in HEK 293 cells with site-directed mutagenesis of the NGFI-A response element within the methylated exon 17 GR promoter supports the hypothesis that MBD2 collaborates with NGFI-A in binding and activation of this promoter. These data suggest a possible mechanism linking signalling pathways, which are activated by behavioural stimuli and activation of target genes.

  20. NF-κB and enhancer-binding CREB protein scaffolded by CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 proteins regulate CD59 protein expression to protect cells from complement attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiqun; Teng, Xiaoyan; Wang, Na; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Jianfeng; Ding, Peipei; Qiao, Qian; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Yang, Chaoqun; Yang, Zhangmin; Chu, Yiwei; Du, Xiang; Zhou, Xuhui; Hu, Weiguo

    2014-01-31

    The complement system can be activated spontaneously for immune surveillance or induced to clear invading pathogens, in which the membrane attack complex (MAC, C5b-9) plays a critical role. CD59 is the sole membrane complement regulatory protein (mCRP) that restricts MAC assembly. CD59, therefore, protects innocent host cells from attacks by the complement system, and host cells require the constitutive and inducible expression of CD59 to protect themselves from deleterious destruction by complement. However, the mechanisms that underlie CD59 regulation remain largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that the widely expressed transcription factor Sp1 may regulate the constitutive expression of CD59, whereas CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 bridge NF-κB and CREB, which surprisingly functions as an enhancer-binding protein to induce the up-regulation of CD59 during in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-triggered complement activation, thus conferring host defense against further MAC-mediated destruction. Moreover, individual treatment with LPS, TNF-α, and the complement activation products (sublytic MAC (SC5b-9) and C5a) could increase the expression of CD59 mainly by activating NF-κB and CREB signaling pathways. Together, our findings identify a novel gene regulation mechanism involving CBP/p300, NF-κB, and CREB; this mechanism suggests potential drug targets for controlling various complement-related human diseases.

  1. Fluorescence enhancement of fluorescent unnatural streptavidin by binding of a biotin analogue with spacer tail and its application to biotin sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xianwei; Shinohara, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    We designed a novel molecular biosensing system for the detection of biotin, an important vitamin by the combination of fluorescent unnatural streptavidin with a commercialized biotin-(AC5)2-hydrazide. A fluorescent unnatural amino acid, BODIPY-FL-aminophenylalanine (BFLAF), was position-specifically incorporated into Trp120 of streptavidin by four-base codon method. Fluorescence of the Trp120BFLAF mutant streptavidin was enhanced by the addition of biotin-(AC5)2-hydrazide with the concentration dependent, whereas fluorescence enhancement was not observed at all by the addition of natural biotin. It was considered that the spacer tail of biotin-(AC5)2-hydrazide may disturb the fluorescence quenching of the Trp120BFLAF by Trp79 and Trp108 of the neighbor subunit. Therefore, biotin sensing was carried out by the competitive binding reaction of biotin-(AC5)2-hydrazide and natural biotin to the fluorescent mutant streptavidin. The fluorescence intensity decreased by increasing free biotin concentration. The result suggested that molecular biosensor for small ligand could be successfully designed by the pair of fluorescent mutant binding protein and ligand analogue.

  2. Estrogen modulates NFκB signaling by enhancing IκBα levels and blocking p65 binding at the promoters of inflammatory genes via estrogen receptor-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Xing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NFκB signaling is critical for expression of genes involved in the vascular injury response. We have shown that estrogen (17β-estradiol, E2 inhibits expression of these genes in an estrogen receptor (ER-dependent manner in injured rat carotid arteries and in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs. This study tested whether E2 inhibits NFκB signaling in RASMCs and defined the mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TNF-α treated RASMCs demonstrated rapid degradation of IκBα (10-30 min, followed by dramatic increases in IκBα mRNA and protein synthesis (40-60 min. E2 enhanced TNF-α induced IκBα synthesis without affecting IκBα degradation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed that E2 pretreatment both enhanced TNF-α induced binding of NFκB p65 to the IκBα promoter and suppressed TNF-α induced binding of NFκB p65 to and reduced the levels of acetylated histone 3 at promoters of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-2β genes. ChIP analyses also demonstrated that ERβ can be recruited to the promoters of MCP-1 and CINC-2β during co-treatment with TNF-α and E2. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that E2 inhibits inflammation in RASMCs by two distinct mechanisms: promoting new synthesis of IκBα, thus accelerating a negative feedback loop in NFκB signaling, and directly inhibiting binding of NFκB to the promoters of inflammatory genes. This first demonstration of multifaceted modulation of NFκB signaling by E2 may represent a novel mechanism by which E2 protects the vasculature against inflammatory injury.

  3. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 enhances viral LMP2A expression.

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    Henrik Gross

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively. EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2 Type 1. The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3 which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K. Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  4. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Henrik; Hennard, Christine; Masouris, Ilias; Cassel, Christian; Barth, Stephanie; Stober-Grässer, Ute; Mamiani, Alfredo; Moritz, Bodo; Ostareck, Dirk; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Neuenkirchen, Nils; Fischer, Utz; Deng, Wen; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Noessner, Elfriede; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Grässer, Friedrich A

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG) repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively). EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN) and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2) Type 1). The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3) which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  5. Research progress of penicillin-binding proteins and Gram-negative bacterial resistance%青霉素结合蛋白与革兰阴性细菌耐药性的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣慧; 蒋燕群

    2012-01-01

    青霉素结合蛋白(PBPs)的改变与β-内酰胺类抗生素的亲和力降低是革兰阳性球菌获得抗生素耐药性的重要机制之一,而在革兰阴性细菌中因PBPs的改变导致耐药的出现却十分少见,这一观点忽视了革兰阴性细菌中PBPs在β-内酰胺类抗生素耐药机制中的作用.文章对PBPs的结构、功能、检测方法及与革兰阴性细菌耐药性的关系等方面的研究进展作一综述.%It has been identified that the modification of penicillin-binding proteins ( PBPs) and the reduction of affinity for β-lactams are important mechanisms by which Gram-positive cocci acquire antibiotic resistance. However, among Gram-negative bacteria, the resistance caused by the modification of PBPs has been considered unusual, which neglects the role of PBPs in β-lactams resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. In this paper, the structure, function and research method of PBPs, and the relationship between PBPs and Gram-negative bacterial resistance are reviewed.

  6. Potential of goat probiotic to bind mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apás, Ana Lidia; González, Silvia Nelina; Arena, Mario Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    The mutagen binding ability of the goat probiotics (Lactobacillus reuteri DDL 19, Lactobacillus alimentarius DDL 48, Enterococcus faecium DDE 39, and Bifidobacterium bifidum DDBA) was evaluated. The oral administration of these probiotics reduced fecal mutagens and intestinal cancer markers in goats. Secondly, the effects of probiotics against the mutagenesis induced by sodium azide (SA), and Benzopyrene (B[α]P) by performing the modified Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 was investigated. The capacity to bind benzopyrene and the stability of the bacterial-mutagen complex was analyzed by HPLC. The dismutagenic potential against both mutagens was proportional to probiotic concentration. Results showed that probiotic antimutagenic capacity against SA was ranging from 13 to 78%. The mixture of four goat probiotics (MGP) displayed higher antimutagenic activity against SA than any individual strains at the same cell concentration. This study shows that the highest diminution of mutagenicity in presence of B[α]P (74%) was observed in presence of MGP. The antimutagenic activity of nearly all the individual probiotic and the MGP were in concordance with the B[α]P binding determined by HPLC. According to our results, the B[α]P binding to probiotic was irreversible still after being washed with DMSO solution. The stability of the toxic compounds-bacterial cell binding is a key consideration when probiotic antimutagenic property is evaluated. MGP exhibits the ability to bind and detoxify potent mutagens, and this property can be useful in supplemented foods for goats since it can lead to the removal of potent mutagens and protect and enhance ruminal health and hence food safety of consumers.

  7. Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances the affinity for PDZ-RhoGEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Heath G; Gutowski, Stephen; Chen, Hua; Brautigam, Chad A; Chen, Zhe; Sternweis, Paul C; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-12-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules and typically recognize a short motif at the C terminus of their ligands, with a few residues in the motif endowing the binding specificity. The sequence-based rules, however, cannot fully account for the specificity between the vast number of PDZ domains and ligands in the cell. Plexins are transmembrane receptors that regulate processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. Two related guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), PDZ-RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG), use their PDZ domains to bind class B plexins and play critical roles in signaling. Here, we present the crystal structure of the full-length cytoplasmic region of PlexinB2 in complex with the PDZ domain of PDZ-RhoGEF. The structure reveals that, in addition to the canonical C-terminal motif/PDZ interaction, the 3D domain of PlexinB2 forms a secondary interface with the PDZ domain. Our biophysical and cell-based assays show that the secondary interface contributes to the specific interaction between plexin and PDZ-RhoGEF and to signaling by plexin in the cell. Formation of secondary interfaces may be a general mechanism for increasing affinity and specificity of modular domain-mediated interactions.

  8. Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances the affinity for PDZ–RhoGEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Heath G.; Gutowski, Stephen; Chen, Hua; Brautigam, Chad A.; Chen, Zhe; Sternweis, Paul C.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules and typically recognize a short motif at the C terminus of their ligands, with a few residues in the motif endowing the binding specificity. The sequence-based rules, however, cannot fully account for the specificity between the vast number of PDZ domains and ligands in the cell. Plexins are transmembrane receptors that regulate processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. Two related guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), PDZ–RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG), use their PDZ domains to bind class B plexins and play critical roles in signaling. Here, we present the crystal structure of the full-length cytoplasmic region of PlexinB2 in complex with the PDZ domain of PDZ–RhoGEF. The structure reveals that, in addition to the canonical C-terminal motif/PDZ interaction, the 3D domain of PlexinB2 forms a secondary interface with the PDZ domain. Our biophysical and cell-based assays show that the secondary interface contributes to the specific interaction between plexin and PDZ–RhoGEF and to signaling by plexin in the cell. Formation of secondary interfaces may be a general mechanism for increasing affinity and specificity of modular domain-mediated interactions. PMID:26627240

  9. Substrate binding process and mechanistic functioning of type 1 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from enhanced sampling methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo D Favia

    Full Text Available In humans, type 1 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD-1 plays a key role in the regulation of the glucocorticoids balance by converting the inactive hormone cortisone into cortisol. Numerous functional aspects of 11β-HSD-1 have been understood thanks to the availability at the Worldwide Protein Data Bank of a number of X-ray structures of the enzyme either alone or in complex with inhibitors, and to several experimental data. However at present, a complete description of the dynamic behaviour of 11β-HSD-1 upon substrate binding is missing. To this aim we firstly docked cortisone into the catalytic site of 11β-HSD-1 (both wild type and Y177A mutant, and then we used steered molecular dynamics and metadynamics to simulate its undocking. This methodology helped shedding light at molecular level on the complex relationship between the enzyme and its natural substrate. In particular, the work highlights a the reason behind the functional dimerisation of 11β-HSD-1, b the key role of Y177 in the cortisone binding event, c the fine tuning of the active site degree of solvation, and d the role of the S228-P237 loop in ligand recognition.

  10. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Gul; M. Bogels; S. Grewal; A.J. van der Meer; L.B. Rojas; D.M. Fluitsma; M.P. van den Tol; K.A. Hoeben; J. van Marle; H.E. de Vries; R.H.J. Beelen; M. van Egmond

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) ar

  11. Functional dissection of the Oct6 schwann cell enhancer reveals an essential role for dimeric sox10 binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.B. Jagalur (Noorjahan ); M. Ghazvini (Mehrnaz); W. Mandemakers (Wim); S. Driegen (Siska); A. Maas (Alex); E.A. Jones (Erin); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); M. Jaegle (Martine); J. Svaren (John); D.N. Meijer (Dies)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe POU domain transcription factor Pou3f1 (Oct6/Scip/Tst1) initiates the transition from ensheathing, promyelinating Schwann cells to myelinating cells. Axonal and other extracellular signals regulate Oct6 expression through the Oct6 Schwann cell enhancer (SCE), which is both required a

  12. Disruption of an AP-2 alpha binding site in an IRF6 enhancer is associated with cleft lip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimov, Fedik; Marazita, Mary L.; Visel, Axel; Cooper, Margaret E.; Hitchler, Michael J.; Rubini, Michele; Domann, Frederick E.; Govil, Manika; Christensen, Kaare; Bille, Camille; Melbye, Mads; Jugessur, Astanand; Lie, Rolv T.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Green, Eric D.; Mossey, Peter A.; Little, Julian; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Schutte, Brian C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    Previously we have shown that nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P)(1) is strongly associated with SNPs in IRF6 (interferon regulatory factor 6)(2). Here, we use multispecies sequence comparisons to identify a common SNP (rs642961, G>A) in a newly identified IRF6 enhancer. The

  13. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  14. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Duren

    Full Text Available Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells.

  15. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, Ryan P; Boudreaux, Seth P; Conneely, Orla M

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells.

  16. Impairment of the bacterial biofilm stability by triclosan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen V Lubarsky

    Full Text Available The accumulation of the widely-used antibacterial and antifungal compound triclosan (TCS in freshwaters raises concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style of microorganisms in aquatic systems. However, investigations to-date rarely go beyond effects at the cellular, physiological or morphological level. The present paper focuses on bacterial biofilms addressing the possible chemical impairment of their functionality, while also examining their substratum stabilization potential as one example of an important ecosystem service. The development of a bacterial assemblage of natural composition--isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK--on non-cohesive glass beads (<63 µm and exposed to a range of triclosan concentrations (control, 2-100 µg L(-1 was monitored over time by Magnetic Particle Induction (MagPI. In parallel, bacterial cell numbers, division rate, community composition (DGGE and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances: carbohydrates and proteins secretion were determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development was increasingly inhibited by increasing TCS levels. The surface binding capacity (MagPI of the assemblages was positively correlated to the microbial secreted EPS matrix. The EPS concentrations and composition (quantity and quality were closely linked to bacterial growth, which was affected by enhanced TCS exposure. Furthermore, TCS induced significant changes in bacterial community composition as well as a significant decrease in bacterial diversity. The impairment of the stabilization potential of bacterial biofilm under even low, environmentally relevant TCS levels is of concern since the resistance of sediments to erosive forces has large implications for the dynamics of sediments and associated pollutant dispersal. In addition, the surface adhesive capacity of the biofilm acts as a sensitive measure of

  17. Protein-x of hepatitis B virus in interaction with CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα - an in silico analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadkhani Ashraf

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though many functions of protein-x from the Hepatitis B virus (HBV have been revealed, the nature of protein-x is yet unknown. This protein is well-known for its transactivation activity through interaction with several cellular transcription factors, it is also known as an oncogene. In this work, we have presented computational approaches to design a model to show the structure of protein-x and its respective binding sites associated with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα. C/EBPα belongs to the bZip family of transcription factors, which activates transcription of several genes through its binding sites in liver and fat cells. The C/EBPα has been shown to bind and modulate enhancer I and the enhancer II/core promoter of HBV. In this study using the bioinformatics tools we tried to present a reliable model for the protein-x interaction with C/EBPα. Results The amino acid sequence of protein-x was extracted from UniProt [UniProt:Q80IU5] and the x-ray crystal structure of the partial CCAAT-enhancer α [PDB:1NWQ] was retrieved from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Similarity search for protein-x was carried out by psi-blast and bl2seq using NCBI [GenBank: BAC65106.1] and Local Meta-Threading-Server (LOMETS was used as a threading server for determining the maximum tertiary structure similarities. Advanced MODELLER was implemented to design a comparative model, however, due to the lack of a suitable template, Quark was used for ab initio tertiary structure prediction. The PDB-blast search indicated a maximum of 23% sequence identity and 33% similarity with crystal structure of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader protease Nsp1α [PDB:3IFU]. This meant that protein-x does not have a suitable template to predict its tertiary structure using comparative modeling tools, therefore we used QUARK as an ab initio 3D prediction approach. Docking results from the ab initio tertiary structure of

  18. Listeria monocytogenes survival of UV-C radiation is enhanced by presence of sodium chloride, organic food material and by bacterial biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernbom, N; Vogel, B F; Gram, L

    2011-05-14

    The bactericidal effect on food processing surfaces of ceiling-mounted UV-C light (wavelength 254 nm) was determined in a fish smoke house after the routine cleaning and disinfection procedure. The total aerobic counts were reduced during UV-C light exposure (48 h) and the number of Listeria monocytogenes positive samples went from 30 (of 68) before exposure to 8 (of 68). We therefore in a laboratory model determined the L. monocytogenes reduction kinetics by UV-C light with the purpose of evaluating the influence of food production environmental variables, such as presence of NaCl, organic material and the time L. monocytogenes was allowed to adhere to steel before exposure. L. monocytogenes grown and attached in tryptone soy broth (TSB) with glucose were rapidly killed (after 2 min) by UV-C light. However, bacteria grown and adhered in TSB with glucose and 5% NaCl were more resistant and numbers declined with 4-5 log units during exposure of 8-10 min. Bacteria grown in juice prepared from cold-smoked salmon were protected and numbers were reduced with 2-3 log when UV-C light was used immediately after attachment whereas numbers did not change at all if bacteria had been allowed to form a biofilm for 7 days before exposure. It is not known if this enhanced survival is due to physiological changes in the attached bacterial cells, a physical protection of the cells in the food matrix or a combination. In conclusion, we demonstrate that UV-C light is a useful extra bacteriocidal step and that it, as all disinfecting procedures, is hampered by the presence of organic material.

  19. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  20. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial gastroenteritis is present when bacteria cause an infection of the stomach and intestines ... has not been treated Many different types of bacteria can cause ... Campylobacter jejuni E coli Salmonella Shigella Staphylococcus ...

  1. Curdlan sulphate modulates protein synthesis and enhances NF-κB and C/EBP binding activity in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guzdek

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In human hepatoma HepG2 cell line curdlan sulphate enhances basal and interleukin-6-stimulated fibrinogen and antichymotrypsin (ACT synthesis, slightly increases basal ceruloplasmin production and exerts only minor effects on alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor and transferrin. Curdlan sulphate may, at least in part, affect protein synthesis at a pretranslational level, as the expression of ACT mRNA was found to be increased, whereas intracellular enzyme, manganese superoxide dismutase mRNA level was decreased in the cell culture treated with curdlan sulphate. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that curdlan sulphate increases the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and C/EBP, suggesting that these transcription factors may participate in the regulatory effects of curdlan sulphate in HepG2 cells.

  2. The single nucleotide variant rs12722489 determines differential estrogen receptor binding and enhancer properties of an IL2RA intronic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putlyaeva, Lidia V.; Demin, Denis E.; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Fridman, Marina V.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Schwartz, Anton M.

    2017-01-01

    We studied functional effect of rs12722489 single nucleotide polymorphism located in the first intron of human IL2RA gene on transcriptional regulation. This polymorphism is associated with multiple autoimmune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis). Analysis in silico suggested significant difference in the affinity of estrogen receptor (ER) binding site between alternative allelic variants, with stronger predicted affinity for the risk (G) allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that purified human ERα bound only G variant of a 32-bp genomic sequence containing rs12722489. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that endogenous human ERα interacted with rs12722489 genomic region in vivo and DNA pull-down assay confirmed differential allelic binding of amplified 189-bp genomic fragments containing rs12722489 with endogenous human ERα. In a luciferase reporter assay, a kilobase-long genomic segment containing G but not A allele of rs12722489 demonstrated enhancer properties in MT-2 cell line, an HTLV-1 transformed human cell line with a regulatory T cell phenotype. PMID:28234966

  3. Acute stress enhances contact dermatitis by promoting nuclear factor-kappaB DNA-binding activity and interleukin-18 expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Lingjiang; Lu, Qianjin; Xiao, Rong; Wen, Haiquan; Yan, Kailin; Li, Yan; Zhou, Ying; Su, Yuwen; Zhang, Guiying; Li, Weihui; Zhou, Jiansong

    2010-06-01

    Psychological stress adversely affects the immune system, and aggravates various skin diseases, such as psoriasis, alopecia areata and atopic dermatitis. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The goal of this study was to use a murine restraint stress model to determine the mechanisms by which psychological stress modulates immune response in contact dermatitis. In the present study, mice were sensitized and challenged on the skin with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. Acute restraint stress was administrated to healthy or sensitized mice before challenge, and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB DNA-binding activation of nuclear protein and expression of interleukin (IL)-18 mRNA in murine spleen lymphocytes was detected. Chemical sympathectomy was performed using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxy-dopamine to determine the effect of the sympathetic nervous system. The experiment showed that restraint stress induced a series of changes which include increasing of NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity and IL-18 mRNA expression in spleen lymphocytes and enhancement of contact hypersensitivity response, and these changes may be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. These findings provide new insights into the roles of the nervous system in the aggravation of skin diseases.

  4. Effects of glutathione depletion by 2-cyclohexen-1-one on excitatory amino acids-induced enhancement of activator protein-1 DNA binding in murine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, K; Kitayama, T; Okuda, H; Yoneda, Y

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the role of glutathione in mechanisms associated with excitatory amino acid signaling to the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP1) in the brain using mice depleted of endogenous glutathione by prior treatment with 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX). In the hippocampus of animals treated with CHX 2 h before, a significant increase was seen in enhancement of AP1 DNA binding when determined 2 h after the injection of kainic acid (KA) at low doses. The sensitization to KA was not seen in animals injected with CHX 24 h before, in coincidence with the recovery of glutathione contents to the normal levels. By contrast, CHX did not significantly affect the potentiation by NMDA of AP1 binding under any experimental conditions. Prior treatment with CHX resulted in facilitation of behavioral changes induced by KA without affecting those induced by NMDA. These results suggest that endogenous glutathione may be at least in part involved in molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control by KA, but not by NMDA, signals of cellular functions.

  5. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  6. CCAAT-enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ) and Downstream Human Placental Growth Hormone Genes Are Targets for Dysregulation in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in “normal” pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this “resistance,” suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2) versus lean (BMI 20–25 kg/m2) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development. PMID:23782703

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides with Differential Bacterial Binding Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Moderate CA-MA [22] KWKLFKKIGIGKFLHLAKKF Strong Strong HP-ME [23] AKKVFKRLGIGAVLKVLTTG Strong Strong Strong activity: MIC ≤ 10 µM; Moderate...activity: MIC = 10-100 µM; Weak activity: MIC ≥ 100 µM; n.d. = no data available; qual. = qualitative assessment of activity only. 4...Andersson, M., Jornvall, H., Mutt, V., & Boman, H. G. (1989). Antimicrobial peptides from pig intestine: Isolation of a mammalian cecropin

  8. Disruption of an AP-2alpha binding site in an IRF6 enhancer is associated with cleft lip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimov, Fedik; Marazita, Mary L; Visel, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Previously we have shown that nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is strongly associated with SNPs in IRF6 (interferon regulatory factor 6). Here, we use multispecies sequence comparisons to identify a common SNP (rs642961, G>A) in a newly identified IRF6 enhancer....... The A allele is significantly overtransmitted (P = 1 x 10(-11)) in families with NSCL/P, in particular those with cleft lip but not cleft palate. Further, there is a dosage effect of the A allele, with a relative risk for cleft lip of 1.68 for the AG genotype and 2.40 for the AA genotype. EMSA and ChIP assays...

  9. The transition from noncoded to coded protein synthesis: did coding mRNAs arise from stability-enhancing binding partners to tRNA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate Warren

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the origin of protein synthesis has been notoriously difficult. We have taken as a starting premise Wolf and Koonin's view that "evolution of the translation system is envisaged to occur in a compartmentalized ensemble of replicating, co-selected RNA segments, i.e., in an RNA world containing ribozymes with versatile activities". Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that coded protein synthesis arose from a noncoded process in an RNA world as a natural consequence of the accumulation of a range of early tRNAs and their serendipitous RNA binding partners. We propose that, initially, RNA molecules with 3' CCA termini that could be aminoacylated by ribozymes, together with an ancestral peptidyl transferase ribozyme, produced small peptides with random or repetitive sequences. Our concept is that the first tRNA arose in this context from the ligation of two RNA hairpins and could be similarly aminoacylated at its 3' end to become a substrate for peptidyl transfer catalyzed by the ancestral ribozyme. Within this RNA world we hypothesize that proto-mRNAs appeared first simply as serendipitous binding partners, forming complementary base pair interactions with the anticodon loops of tRNA pairs. Initially this may have enhanced stability of the paired tRNA molecules so they were held together in close proximity, better positioning the 3' CCA termini for peptidyl transfer and enhancing the rate of peptide synthesis. If there were a selective advantage for the ensemble through the peptide products synthesized, it would provide a natural pathway for the evolution of a coding system with the expansion of a cohort of different tRNAs and their binding partners. The whole process could have occurred quite unremarkably for such a profound acquisition. Testing the hypothesis It should be possible to test the different parts of our model using the isolated contemporary 50S ribosomal subunit initially, and then with RNAs

  10. The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP δ is differently regulated by fibrillar and oligomeric forms of the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lars NG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP α, β and δ have been shown to be expressed in brain and to be involved in regulation of inflammatory genes in concert with nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. In general, C/EBPα is down-regulated, whereas both C/EBPβ and δ are up-regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. In Alzheimer's disease (AD one of the hallmarks is chronic neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes and microglial cells, most likely induced by the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ deposits. The inflammatory response in AD has been ascribed both beneficial and detrimental roles. It is therefore important to delineate the inflammatory mediators and signaling pathways affected by Aβ deposits with the aim of defining new therapeutic targets. Methods Here we have investigated the effects of Aβ on expression of C/EBP family members with a focus on C/EBPδ in rat primary astro-microglial cultures and in a transgenic mouse model with high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits (tg-ArcSwe by western blot analysis. Effects on DNA binding activity were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cross-talk between C/EBPδ and NF-κB was investigated by analyzing binding to a κB site using a biotin streptavidin-agarose pull-down assay. Results We show that exposure to fibril-enriched, but not oligomer-enriched, preparations of Aβ inhibit up-regulation of C/EBPδ expression in interleukin-1β-activated glial cultures. Furthermore, we observed that, in aged transgenic mice, C/EBPα was significantly down-regulated and C/EBPβ was significantly up-regulated. C/EBPδ, on the other hand, was selectively down-regulated in the forebrain, a part of the brain showing high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits. In contrast, no difference in expression levels of C/EBPδ between wild type and transgenic mice was detected in the relatively spared hindbrain. Finally, we show that interleukin-1β-induced C/EBPδ DNA

  11. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  12. TNF receptor-associated factor-2 binding site is involved in TNFR75-dependent enhancement of TNFR55-induced cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    TNF recepter-55 is the main mediator of TNF-induced apoptosis. TNF receptor-75-dependent induction or enhancement of cytotoxicity has been explained by intracellular signaling, “ligand passing”, or induction of endogenous TNF. To study the function of human TNF receptor-75 (hTR75) and the interaction between human TNF receptor-55 (hTR55) and hTR75 in hTNFc-induced cytotoxicity, Hep-2 cells were transfected with bicistronic expression vector of hTR75 and its deletion mutants genes. hTNFα-induced cytotoxicity was determined by crystal violet colorimetric method. The expression of hTR75 and its deletion mutants in Hep-2 cells was demonstrated by RT-PCR and indirect ELISA. We found that the overexpressed hTR75 could significantly increase the susceptibility of Hep-2 cells to hTNFα which especiαlly required TRAF2 binding site. hTR75 could not only mediate partial hTNFα-induced cytotoxicity independently but also fulfill an accessory role in enhancing or synergizing hTR55-mediated cytotoxicity.

  13. A Polymorphic Enhancer near GREM1 Influences Bowel Cancer Risk through Differential CDX2 and TCF7L2 Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Lewis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A rare germline duplication upstream of the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist GREM1 causes a Mendelian-dominant predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC. The underlying disease mechanism is strong, ectopic GREM1 overexpression in the intestinal epithelium. Here, we confirm that a common GREM1 polymorphism, rs16969681, is also associated with CRC susceptibility, conferring ∼20% differential risk in the general population. We hypothesized the underlying cause to be moderate differences in GREM1 expression. We showed that rs16969681 lies in a region of active chromatin with allele- and tissue-specific enhancer activity. The CRC high-risk allele was associated with stronger gene expression, and higher Grem1 mRNA levels increased the intestinal tumor burden in ApcMin mice. The intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and Wnt effector TCF7L2 bound near rs16969681, with significantly higher affinity for the risk allele, and CDX2 overexpression in CDX2/GREM1-negative cells caused re-expression of GREM1. rs16969681 influences CRC risk through effects on Wnt-driven GREM1 expression in colorectal tumors.

  14. Enhancement of avermectin and ivermectin production by overexpression of the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Xuan; Song, Yuan; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the function of maltose ABC transporter system encoded by malEFG-a and the effect of its overexpression on antibiotic production in Streptomyces avermitilis. A malEFG-a deletion mutant was unable to grow in a minimal medium with maltose as sole carbon source and produce avermectin. Maltose utilization and avermectin production were restored by introduction of a single copy of malEFG-a. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of malE-a was induced by maltose, and was strongly repressed by glucose. When multi-copy, integrative malEFG-a gene expression vectors were introduced into wild-type strain ATCC31267 and ivermectin-producer OI-31, antibiotic production increased by 2.6- to 3.3-fold and the time required for fermentation decreased by about 10%. The overexpression of malEFG-a improved the utilization rate of starch, and thereby enhanced avermectin production. Such an approach would be useful for the improvement of commercial antibiotic production using starch as the main carbon source in the fermentation process.

  15. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  16. Further biochemical characterization of Mycobacterium leprae laminin-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Marques

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the alpha2 chain of laminin-2 present on the surface of Schwann cells is involved in the process of attachment of Mycobacterium leprae to these cells. Searching for M. leprae laminin-binding molecules, in a previous study we isolated and characterized the cationic proteins histone-like protein (Hlp and ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 as potential adhesins involved in M. leprae-Schwann cell interaction. Hlp was shown to bind alpha2-laminins and to greatly enhance the attachment of mycobacteria to ST88-14 Schwann cells. In the present study, we investigated the laminin-binding capacity of the ribosomal proteins S4 and S5. The genes coding for these proteins were PCR amplified and their recombinant products were shown to bind alpha2-laminins in overlay assays. However, when tested in ELISA-based assays and in adhesion assays with ST88-14 cells, in contrast to Hlp, S4 and S5 failed to bind laminin and act as adhesins. The laminin-binding property and adhesin capacity of two basic host-derived proteins were also tested, and only histones, but not cytochrome c, were able to increase bacterial attachment to ST88-14 cells. Our data suggest that the alanine/lysine-rich sequences shared by Hlp and eukaryotic H1 histones might be involved in the binding of these cationic proteins to laminin.

  17. Synergistic toxicity of zno nanoparticles and dimethoate in mice: Enhancing their biodistribution by synergistic binding of serum albumin and dimethoate to zno nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xincheng; Xu, Xiaolong; Guo, Mingchun; Wang, Shasha; Gao, Shang; Zhu, Shanshan; Rong, Rui

    2017-04-01

    The extensive applications of ZnO nanoparticles (nano ZnO) and dimethoate (DM) have increased the risk of humans' co-exposure to nano ZnO and DM. Here, we report the synergistic effect of nano ZnO and DM on their biodistribution and subacute toxicity in mice. Nano ZnO and DM had a synergistic toxicity in mice. In contrast, bulk ZnO and DM did not cause an obvious synergistic toxicity in mice. Although nano ZnO was low toxic to mice, coexposure to nano ZnO and DM significantly enhanced DM-induced oxidative damage in the liver. Coadministration of nano ZnO with DM significantly increased Zn accumulation by 30.9 ± 1.9% and DM accumulation by 45.6 ± 2.2% in the liver, respectively. The increased accumulations of DM and Zn in the liver reduced its cholinesterase activity from 5.65 ± 0.32 to 4.37 ± 0.49 U/mg protein and induced hepatic oxidative stress. Nano ZnO had 3-fold or 2.4-fold higher binding capability for serum albumin or DM, respectively, than bulk ZnO. In addition, serum albumin significantly increased the binding capability of nano ZnO for DM by approximately four times via the interaction of serum albumin and DM. The uptake of serum albumin- and DM-bound nano ZnO by the macrophages significantly increased DM accumulation in mice. Serum albumins play an important role in the synergistic toxicity of nano ZnO and DM. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1202-1212, 2017.

  18. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their pla...

  19. Gram-negative bacterial isolates from fresh-cut processing plants enhance the presence of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in dual-species biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilms formed by resident microflora may provide a microenvironment for foodborne bacterial pathogens to survive and cause cross-contamination in fresh-cut processing and handling facilities. The objective of this study is to determine the impact of individual bacteria strains isolated from two l...