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Sample records for bacterial elongation factor

  1. Loss of elongation factor P disrupts bacterial outer membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Hersch, Steven J; Roy, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is posttranslationally modified at a conserved lysyl residue by the coordinated action of two enzymes, PoxA and YjeK. We have previously established the importance of this modification in Salmonella stress resistance. Here we report that, like poxA and yjeK mutants, Sal...

  2. Bacterial elongation factors EF-Tu, their mutants, chimeric forms, and domains: isolation and purification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonák, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 849, 1-2 (2007), s. 141-153 ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052206; GA AV ČR KJB500520503; GA MŠk 2B06065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : bacterial elongation factors EF-Tu, , G-domain * recombinant EF-Tus * preparation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.935, year: 2007

  3. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    of the pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved......Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability...... changes in the translation machinery during stress adaptation, indicating that the role of these factors in physiology may be broadly conserved....

  4. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability...... of the pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved...

  5. (R)-β-lysine-modified elongation factor P functions in translation elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J; Zou, S Betty; Rajkovic, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of bacterial elongation factor P (EF-P) with (R)-β-lysine at a conserved lysine residue activates the protein in vivo and increases puromycin reactivity of the ribosome in vitro. The additional hydroxylation of EF-P at the same lysine residue by the YfcM protein has...... also recently been described. The roles of modified and unmodified EF-P during different steps in translation, and how this correlates to its physiological role in the cell, have recently been linked to the synthesis of polyproline stretches in proteins. Polysome analysis indicated that EF-P functions...... in translation elongation, rather than initiation as proposed previously. This was further supported by the inability of EF-P to enhance the rate of formation of fMet-Lys or fMet-Phe, indicating that the role of EF-P is not to specifically stimulate formation of the first peptide bond. Investigation of hydroxyl-(β)-lysyl-EF-P...

  6. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Jiang, Tianyi; Yu, Bo; Wang, Limin; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  7. The crystal structure of elongation factor G complexed with GDP, at 2.7 A resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Czworkowski, J; Wang, J; Steitz, T A; Moore, P B

    1994-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzes the translocation step of protein synthesis in bacteria, and like the other bacterial elongation factor, EF-Tu--whose structure is already known--it is a member of the GTPase superfamily. We have determined the crystal structure of EF-G--GDP from Thermus thermophilus. It is an elongated molecule whose large, N-terminal domain resembles the G domain of EF-Tu, except for a 90 residue insert, which covers a surface that is involved in nucleotide exchange in E...

  8. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase regulates the cold stress response by slowing translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John R P; Bastide, Amandine; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Jackson, Thomas J; Utami, Wahyu; Barrett, David A; Smales, C Mark; Willis, Anne E

    2015-01-15

    Cells respond to external stress conditions by controlling gene expression, a process which occurs rapidly via post-transcriptional regulation at the level of protein synthesis. Global control of translation is mediated by modification of translation factors to allow reprogramming of the translatome and synthesis of specific proteins that are required for stress protection or initiation of apoptosis. In the present study, we have investigated how global protein synthesis rates are regulated upon mild cooling. We demonstrate that although there are changes to the factors that control initiation, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) on the α-subunit, the reduction in the global translation rate is mediated by regulation of elongation via phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) by its specific kinase, eEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase). The AMP/ATP ratio increases following cooling, consistent with a reduction in metabolic rates, giving rise to activation of AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase), which is upstream of eEF2K. However, our data show that the major trigger for activation of eEF2K upon mild cooling is the release of Ca2+ ions from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and, importantly, that it is possible to restore protein synthesis rates in cooled cells by inhibition of this pathway at multiple points. As cooling has both therapeutic and industrial applications, our data provide important new insights into how the cellular responses to this stress are regulated, opening up new possibilities to modulate these responses for medical or industrial use at physiological or cooler temperatures.

  9. The life and death of translation elongation factor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene; Merrill, A.R.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) occupies an essential role in protein synthesis where it catalyses the translocation of the two tRNAs and the mRNA after peptidyl transfer on the 80S ribosome. Recent crystal structures of eEF2 and the cryo-EM reconstruction of its 80S complex now provide...

  10. One-step purification of E. coli elongation factor Tu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.; Degn, B

    1993-01-01

    The tuf A gene, encoding the E. coli elongation factor Tu, was cloned in the pGEX gene fusion system. Upon expression EF-Tu is fused to glutathione-S-transferase serving as a purification handle with affinity for glutathione immobilised on agarose. This allows purification of EF-Tu in a one...

  11. Studies of elongation factor Tu in Streptococcus faecium (ATCC 9790)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourbeau, P.P.

    1986-01-01

    It has been known for over twenty years that elongation factor Tu (Ef-Tu) is one of the proteins involved in protein synthesis in bacteria. Several years ago, it was proposed that Ef-Tu may, in addition, have other structural functions in bacterial. The author's research has examined the function of Ef-Tu in Streptococcus faecium. Using an antibiotic kirromycin, which specifically inhibits Ef-Tu function, the effects upon a number of cellular parameters were determined. Inhibition of both protein and RNA synthesis was found to be similar to the effect of chloramphenicol. Using the residual division technique for the determination of cell cycle events with both heterogeneous and sucrose gradient fractionated cell populations, a kirromycin sensitive event was detected between 8 min. (Td = 30 min.) and 19 min. (Td = 175 min.) later in the cell cycle than the chloramphenical sensitive event. This suggests that kirromycin is inhibiting a terminal cell cycle event which is in addition to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Purification of Ef-Tu was performed using two different methods: ion exchange and molecular exclusion chromatography; and GDP affinity chromatography. Various schemes were employed to try and obtain optimum cellular fractionation, allowing for both proper separation of ribosomes from the other cellular fractions and retention of enzymatic activity by Ef-Tu as determined by a /sup 3/H-GDP binding assay. Analysis of the cell cycle of S. faecium using the residual division technique was also performed. In addition, certain cell wall antibiotics were used to determine if other cell cycle events could be determined using the residual division technique.

  12. The life and death of translation elongation factor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene; Merrill, A.R.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) occupies an essential role in protein synthesis where it catalyses the translocation of the two tRNAs and the mRNA after peptidyl transfer on the 80S ribosome. Recent crystal structures of eEF2 and the cryo-EM reconstruction of its 80S complex now provide...... diphthamide residue, which is ADP-ribosylated by diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa....

  13. Doc toxin is a kinase that inactivates elongation factor Tu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W; Rothenbacher, Francesca P; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S; Dunham, Christine M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2014-03-14

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site.

  14. Doc Toxin Is a Kinase That Inactivates Elongation Factor Tu*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W.; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S.; Dunham, Christine M.; Woychik, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site. PMID:24448800

  15. A Novel, Extremely Elongated, and Endocellular Bacterial Symbiont Supports Cuticle Formation of a Grain Pest Beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Bin; Okude, Genta; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Futahashi, Ryo; Moriyama, Minoru; Meng, Xian-Ying; Nikoh, Naruo; Koga, Ryuichi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2017-09-26

    The saw-toothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Silvanidae), is a cosmopolitan stored-product pest. Early studies on O. surinamensis in the 1930s described the presence of peculiar bacteriomes harboring endosymbiotic bacteria in the abdomen. Since then, however, the microbiological nature of the symbiont has been elusive. Here we investigated the endosymbiotic system of O. surinamensis in detail. In the abdomen of adults, pupae, and larvae, four oval bacteriomes were consistently identified, whose cytoplasm was full of extremely elongated tubular bacterial cells several micrometers wide and several hundred micrometers long. Molecular phylogenetic analysis identified the symbiont as a member of the Bacteroidetes , in which the symbiont was the most closely related to the endosymbiont of a grain pest beetle, Rhyzopertha dominica (Bostrichidae). The symbiont was detected in developing embryos, corroborating vertical symbiont transmission through host generations. The symbiont gene showed AT-biased nucleotide composition and accelerated molecular evolution, plausibly reflecting degenerative evolution of the symbiont genome. When the symbiont infection was experimentally removed, the aposymbiotic insects grew and reproduced normally, but exhibited a slightly but significantly more reddish cuticle and lighter body mass. These results indicate that the symbiont of O. surinamensis is not essential for the host's growth and reproduction but contributes to the host's cuticle formation. Symbiont genome sequencing and detailed comparison of fitness parameters between symbiotic and aposymbiotic insects under various environmental conditions will provide further insights into the symbiont's biological roles for the stored-product pest. IMPORTANCE Some beetles notorious as stored-product pests possess well-developed symbiotic organs called bacteriomes for harboring specific symbiotic bacteria, although their biological roles have been poorly understood. Here we report

  16. Identification of elongation factor G as the conserved cellular target of argyrin B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Nyfeler

    Full Text Available Argyrins, produced by myxobacteria and actinomycetes, are cyclic octapeptides with antibacterial and antitumor activity. Here, we identify elongation factor G (EF-G as the cellular target of argyrin B in bacteria, via resistant mutant selection and whole genome sequencing, biophysical binding studies and crystallography. Argyrin B binds a novel allosteric pocket in EF-G, distinct from the known EF-G inhibitor antibiotic fusidic acid, revealing a new mode of protein synthesis inhibition. In eukaryotic cells, argyrin B was found to target mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EF-G1, the closest homologue of bacterial EF-G. By blocking mitochondrial translation, argyrin B depletes electron transport components and inhibits the growth of yeast and tumor cells. Further supporting direct inhibition of EF-G1, expression of an argyrin B-binding deficient EF-G1 L693Q variant partially rescued argyrin B-sensitivity in tumor cells. In summary, we show that argyrin B is an antibacterial and cytotoxic agent that inhibits the evolutionarily conserved target EF-G, blocking protein synthesis in bacteria and mitochondrial translation in yeast and mammalian cells.

  17. Contribution of Arg288 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu to translational functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattenborg, Thomas; Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1997-01-01

    The recently solved structure of the ternary complex formed between GTP-bound elongation factor Tu and aminoacylated tRNA reveals that the elements of aminoacyl-tRNA that interact with elongation factor Tu can be divided into three groups: the T stem; the 3'-end CCA-Phe; and the 5' end. The conse...

  18. Structural Basis for EarP-Mediated Arginine Glycosylation of Translation Elongation Factor EF-P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Krafczyk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is a universal strategy to posttranslationally modify proteins. The recently discovered arginine rhamnosylation activates the polyproline-specific bacterial translation elongation factor EF-P. EF-P is rhamnosylated on arginine 32 by the glycosyltransferase EarP. However, the enzymatic mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we solved the crystal structure of EarP from Pseudomonas putida. The enzyme is composed of two opposing domains with Rossmann folds, thus constituting a B pattern-type glycosyltransferase (GT-B. While dTDP-β-l-rhamnose is located within a highly conserved pocket of the C-domain, EarP recognizes the KOW-like N-domain of EF-P. Based on our data, we propose a structural model for arginine glycosylation by EarP. As EarP is essential for pathogenicity in P. aeruginosa, our study provides the basis for targeted inhibitor design.

  19. A Novel, Extremely Elongated, and Endocellular Bacterial Symbiont Supports Cuticle Formation of a Grain Pest Beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Hirota

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The saw-toothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Silvanidae, is a cosmopolitan stored-product pest. Early studies on O. surinamensis in the 1930s described the presence of peculiar bacteriomes harboring endosymbiotic bacteria in the abdomen. Since then, however, the microbiological nature of the symbiont has been elusive. Here we investigated the endosymbiotic system of O. surinamensis in detail. In the abdomen of adults, pupae, and larvae, four oval bacteriomes were consistently identified, whose cytoplasm was full of extremely elongated tubular bacterial cells several micrometers wide and several hundred micrometers long. Molecular phylogenetic analysis identified the symbiont as a member of the Bacteroidetes, in which the symbiont was the most closely related to the endosymbiont of a grain pest beetle, Rhyzopertha dominica (Bostrichidae. The symbiont was detected in developing embryos, corroborating vertical symbiont transmission through host generations. The symbiont gene showed AT-biased nucleotide composition and accelerated molecular evolution, plausibly reflecting degenerative evolution of the symbiont genome. When the symbiont infection was experimentally removed, the aposymbiotic insects grew and reproduced normally, but exhibited a slightly but significantly more reddish cuticle and lighter body mass. These results indicate that the symbiont of O. surinamensis is not essential for the host’s growth and reproduction but contributes to the host’s cuticle formation. Symbiont genome sequencing and detailed comparison of fitness parameters between symbiotic and aposymbiotic insects under various environmental conditions will provide further insights into the symbiont’s biological roles for the stored-product pest.

  20. The expression profile and prognostic significance of eukaryotic translation elongation factors in different cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Md. Khurshidul; Kumar, Dinesh; Naik, Monali

    2018-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation factors, especially initiation factors have garnered much attention with regards to their role in the onset and progression of different cancers. However, the expression levels and prognostic significance of translation elongation factors remain poorly explored in different cancers. In this study, we have investigated the mRNA transcript levels of seven translation elongation factors in different cancer types using Oncomine and TCGA databases. Furthermore, we have identified the prognostic significance of these factors using Kaplan-Meier Plotter and SurvExpress databases. We observed altered expression levels of all the elongation factors in different cancers. Higher expression of EEF1A2, EEF1B2, EEF1G, EEF1D, EEF1E1 and EEF2 was observed in most of the cancer types, whereas reverse trend was observed for EEF1A1. Overexpression of many factors predicted poor prognosis in breast (EEF1D, EEF1E1, EEF2) and lung cancer (EEF1A2, EEF1B2, EEF1G, EEF1E1). However, we didn’t see any common correlation of expression levels of elongation factors with survival outcomes across cancer types. Cancer subtype stratification showed association of survival outcomes and expression levels of elongation factors in specific sub-types of breast, lung and gastric cancer. Most interestingly, we observed a reciprocal relationship between the expression levels of the two EEF1A isoforms viz. EEF1A1 and EEF1A2, in most of the cancer types. Our results suggest that translation elongation factors can have a role in tumorigenesis and affect survival in cancer specific manner. Elongation factors have potential to serve as biomarkers and therapeutic drug targets, yet further study is required. Reciprocal relationship of differential expression between EEF1A isoforms observed in multiple cancer types indicates opposing roles in cancer and needs further investigation. PMID:29342219

  1. Elongation factor-P at the crossroads of the host-endosymbiont interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkovic, Andrei; Witzky, Anne; Navarre, William; Darwin, Andrew J; Ibba, Michael

    2015-09-23

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is an ancient bacterial translational factor that aids the ribosome in polymerizing oligo-prolines. EF-P structurally resembles tRNA and binds in-between the exit and peptidyl sites of the ribosome to accelerate the intrinsically slow reaction of peptidyl-prolyl bond formation. Recent studies have identified in separate organisms, two evolutionarily convergent EF-P post-translational modification systems (EPMS), split predominantly between gammaproteobacteria, and betaproteobacteria. In both cases EF-P receives a post-translational modification, critical for its function, on a highly conserved residue that protrudes into the peptidyl-transfer center of the ribosome. EPMSs are comprised of a gene(s) that synthesizes the precursor molecule used in modifying EF-P, and a gene(s) encoding an enzyme that reacts with the precursor molecule to catalyze covalent attachment to EF-P. However, not all organisms genetically encode a complete EPMS. For instance, some symbiotic bacteria harbor efp and the corresponding gene that enzymatically attaches the modification, but lack the ability to synthesize the substrate used in the modification reaction. Here we highlight the recent discoveries made regarding EPMSs, with a focus on how these incomplete modification pathways shape or have been shaped by the endosymbiont-host relationship.

  2. Structural Basis for EarP-Mediated Arginine Glycosylation of Translation Elongation Factor EF-P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafczyk, Ralph; Macošek, Jakub; Jagtap, Pravin Kumar Ankush; Gast, Daniel; Wunder, Swetlana; Mitra, Prithiba; Jha, Amit Kumar; Rohr, Jürgen; Hoffmann-Röder, Anja; Jung, Kirsten; Hennig, Janosch; Lassak, Jürgen

    2017-09-26

    Glycosylation is a universal strategy to posttranslationally modify proteins. The recently discovered arginine rhamnosylation activates the polyproline-specific bacterial translation elongation factor EF-P. EF-P is rhamnosylated on arginine 32 by the glycosyltransferase EarP. However, the enzymatic mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we solved the crystal structure of EarP from Pseudomonas putida The enzyme is composed of two opposing domains with Rossmann folds, thus constituting a B pattern-type glycosyltransferase (GT-B). While dTDP-β-l-rhamnose is located within a highly conserved pocket of the C-domain, EarP recognizes the KOW-like N-domain of EF-P. Based on our data, we propose a structural model for arginine glycosylation by EarP. As EarP is essential for pathogenicity in P. aeruginosa , our study provides the basis for targeted inhibitor design. IMPORTANCE The structural and biochemical characterization of the EF-P-specific rhamnosyltransferase EarP not only provides the first molecular insights into arginine glycosylation but also lays the basis for targeted-inhibitor design against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Copyright © 2017 Krafczyk et al.

  3. An Interbacterial NAD(P)+ Glycohydrolase Toxin Requires Elongation Factor Tu for Delivery to Target Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, John C.; Quentin, Dennis; Sawai, Shin; LeRoux, Michele; Harding, Brittany N.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Tran, Bao Q.; Robinson, Howard; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R.; Raunser, Stefan; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2015-10-08

    Type VI secretion (T6S) influences the composition of microbial communities by catalyzing the delivery of toxins between adjacent bacterial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T6S integral membrane toxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tse6, acts on target cells by degrading the universally essential dinucleotides NAD+ and NADP+. Structural analyses of Tse6 show that it resembles mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase proteins, such as diphtheria toxin, with the exception of a unique loop that both excludes proteinaceous ADP-ribose acceptors and contributes to hydrolysis. We find that entry of Tse6 into target cells requires its binding to an essential housekeeping protein, translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). These proteins participate in a larger assembly that additionally directs toxin export and provides chaperone activity. Visualization of this complex by electron microscopy defines the architecture of a toxin-loaded T6S apparatus and provides mechanistic insight into intercellular membrane protein delivery between bacteria.

  4. The diphthamide modification on elongation factor-2 renders mammalian cells resistant to ricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pradeep K; Liu, Shihui; Batavia, Mariska P; Leppla, Stephen H

    2008-08-01

    Diphthamide is a post-translational derivative of histidine in protein synthesis elongation factor-2 (eEF-2) that is present in all eukaryotes with no known normal physiological role. Five proteins Dph1-Dph5 are required for the biosynthesis of diphthamide. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells mutated in the biosynthetic genes lack diphthamide and are resistant to bacterial toxins such as diphtheria toxin. We found that diphthamide-deficient cultured cells were threefold more sensitive than their parental cells towards ricin, a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP). RIPs bind to ribosomes at the same site as eEF-2 and cleave the large ribosomal RNA, inhibiting translation and causing cell death. We hypothesized that one role of diphthamide may be to protect ribosomes, and therefore all eukaryotic life forms, from RIPs, which are widely distributed in nature. A protective role of diphthamide against ricin was further demonstrated by complementation where dph mutant CHO cells transfected with the corresponding DPH gene acquired increased resistance to ricin in comparison with the control-transfected cells, and resembled the parental CHO cells in their response to the toxin. These data show that the presence of diphthamide in eEF-2 provides protection against ricin and suggest the hypothesis that diphthamide may have evolved to provide protection against RIPs.

  5. Bacillus anthracis Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Interacts with and Modifies Elongation Factor Tu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnicker, Nicholas J. [Department; Razzaghi, Mortezaali [Department; Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta [Department; Chakravarthy, Srinivas [Biophysics; Dey, Mishtu [Department

    2017-10-17

    Prolyl hydroxylation is a very common post-translational modification and plays many roles in eukaryotes such as collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and controlling protein transcription and translation. There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that prokaryotes contain prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) homologous to the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes that act on elongation factor Tu (EFTu) and are likely involved in the regulation of bacterial translation. Recent biochemical and structural studies with a PHD from Pseudomonas putida (PPHD) determined that it forms a complex with EFTu and hydroxylates a prolyl residue of EFTu. Moreover, while animal, plant, and viral P4Hs act on peptidyl proline, most prokaryotic P4Hs have been known to target free l-proline; the exceptions include PPHD and a P4H from Bacillus anthracis (BaP4H) that modifies collagen-like proline-rich peptides. Here we use biophysical and mass spectrometric methods to demonstrate that BaP4H recognizes full-length BaEFTu and a BaEFTu 9-mer peptide for site-specific proline hydroxylation. Using size-exclusion chromatography coupled small-angle X-ray scattering (SEC–SAXS) and binding studies, we determined that BaP4H forms a 1:1 heterodimeric complex with BaEFTu. The SEC–SAXS studies reveal dissociation of BaP4H dimeric subunits upon interaction with BaEFTu. While BaP4H is unusual within bacteria in that it is structurally and functionally similar to the animal PHDs and collagen P4Hs, respectively, this work provides further evidence of its promiscuous substrate recognition. It is possible that the enzyme might have evolved to hydroxylate a universally conserved protein in prokaryotes, similar to the PHDs, and implies a functional role in B. anthracis.

  6. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly

  7. Mutational analysis of Glu272 in elongation factor 1A of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous work (Mansilla et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 927-934) we showed that Arg7 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu (EF1A) plays an essential role in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding. Substitution of Arg7 by Ala or Glu lost this activity. We proposed that Arg7 forms a salt bridge...

  8. Self-Elongation with Sequential Folding of a Filament of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryojiro; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Katori, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    Under hard-agar and nutrient-rich conditions, a cell of Bacillus subtilis grows as a single filament owing to the failure of cell separation after each growth and division cycle. The self-elongating filament of cells shows sequential folding processes, and multifold structures extend over an agar plate. We report that the growth process from the exponential phase to the stationary phase is well described by the time evolution of fractal dimensions of the filament configuration. We propose a method of characterizing filament configurations using a set of lengths of multifold parts of a filament. Systems of differential equations are introduced to describe the folding processes that create multifold structures in the early stage of the growth process. We show that the fitting of experimental data to the solutions of equations is excellent, and the parameters involved in our model systems are determined.

  9. Cyclic Rhamnosylated Elongation Factor P Establishes Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkovic, Andrei; Erickson, Sarah; Witzky, Anne; Branson, Owen E; Seo, Jin; Gafken, Philip R; Frietas, Michael A; Whitelegge, Julian P; Faull, Kym F; Navarre, William; Darwin, Andrew J; Ibba, Michael

    2015-06-09

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is a ubiquitous bacterial protein that is required for the synthesis of poly-proline motifs during translation. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, the posttranslational β-lysylation of Lys34 by the PoxA protein is critical for EF-P activity. PoxA is absent from many bacterial species such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, prompting a search for alternative EF-P posttranslation modification pathways. Structural analyses of P. aeruginosa EF-P revealed the attachment of a single cyclic rhamnose moiety to an Arg residue at a position equivalent to that at which β-Lys is attached to E. coli EF-P. Analysis of the genomes of organisms that both lack poxA and encode an Arg32-containing EF-P revealed a highly conserved glycosyltransferase (EarP) encoded at a position adjacent to efp. EF-P proteins isolated from P. aeruginosa ΔearP, or from a ΔrmlC::acc1 strain deficient in dTDP-L-rhamnose biosynthesis, were unmodified. In vitro assays confirmed the ability of EarP to use dTDP-L-rhamnose as a substrate for the posttranslational glycosylation of EF-P. The role of rhamnosylated EF-P in translational control was investigated in P. aeruginosa using a Pro4-green fluorescent protein (Pro4GFP) in vivo reporter assay, and the fluorescence was significantly reduced in Δefp, ΔearP, and ΔrmlC::acc1 strains. ΔrmlC::acc1, ΔearP, and Δefp strains also displayed significant increases in their sensitivities to a range of antibiotics, including ertapenem, polymyxin B, cefotaxim, and piperacillin. Taken together, our findings indicate that posttranslational rhamnosylation of EF-P plays a key role in P. aeruginosa gene expression and survival. Infections with pathogenic Salmonella, E. coli, and Pseudomonas isolates can all lead to infectious disease with potentially fatal sequelae. EF-P proteins contribute to the pathogenicity of the causative agents of these and other diseases by controlling the translation of proteins critical for modulating antibiotic

  10. The Neurospora crassa colonial temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) gene encodes protein elongation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propheta, O; Vierula, J; Toporowski, P; Gorovits, R; Yarden, O

    2001-02-01

    At elevated temperatures, the Neurospora crassa mutant colonial, temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) forms compact, highly branched colonies. Growth of the cot-3 strain under these conditions also results in the loss of the lower molecular weight (LMW) isoform of the Ser/Thr protein kinase encoded by the unlinked cot-1 gene, whose function is also involved in hyphal elongation. The unique cot-3 gene has been cloned by complementation and shown to encode translation elongation factor 2 (EF-2). As expected for a gene with a general role in protein synthesis, cot-3 mRNA is abundantly expressed throughout all asexual phases of the N. crassa life cycle. The molecular basis of the cot-3 mutation was determined to be an ATT to AAT transversion, which causes an Ile to Asn substitution at residue 278. Treatment with fusidic acid (a specific inhibitor of EF-2) inhibits hyphal elongation and induces hyperbranching in a manner which mimics the cot-3 phenotype, and also leads to a decrease in the abundance of the LMW isoform of COT1. This supports our conclusion that the mutation in cot-3 which results in abnormal hyphal elongation/branching impairs EF-2 function and confirms that the abundance of a LMW isoform of COT1 kinase is dependent on the function of this general translation factor.

  11. Mutation of the conserved Gly83 and Gly94 in Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu. Indication of structural pivots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgård, I V; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Wiborg, O

    1995-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli cycles between an active conformation where GTP is bound, and an inactive conformation where GDP is bound. Between the two conformations, elongation factor Tu undergoes major structural changes. The aim of this work has been to reveal the role of two very...

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c-Myc...

  13. A pea chloroplast translation elongation factor that is regulated by abiotic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Mishra, R.N.; Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Goswami, Mamta; Nair, Suresh; Sopory, S.K.; Reddy, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of both the cDNA (tufA) and genomic clones encoding for a chloroplast translation elongation factor (EF-Tu) from pea. The analysis of the deduced amino acids of the cDNA clone reveals the presence of putative transit peptide sequence and four GTP binding domains and two EF-Tu signature motifs in the mature polypeptide region. Using in vivo immunostaining followed by confocal microscopy pea EF-Tu was localized to chloroplast. The steady state transcript level of pea tufA was high in leaves and not detectable in roots. The expression of this gene is stimulated by light. The differential expression of this gene in response to various abiotic stresses showed that it is down-regulated in response to salinity and ABA and up-regulated in response to low temperature and salicylic acid treatment. These results indicate that regulation of pea tufA may have an important role in plant adaptation to environmental stresses

  14. Proteosynthetic elongation factor EF-Tu domains: Thermal stability, adaptation and functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonák, Jiří; Šanderová, Hana; Hůlková, Marta; Maloň, Petr; Krásný, Libor; Kepková, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, 1a (2009), b23-b24 ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of the Czechoslovak and Slovak Biologists /7./. 12.03.2009-14.03.2009, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06065; GA MZd NR9138 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : EF-Tu * proteosynthetic elongation factor * thermal stability Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. A Conserved Proline Triplet in Val-tRNA Synthetase and the Origin of Elongation Factor P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata L. Starosta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial ribosomes stall on polyproline stretches and require the elongation factor P (EF-P to relieve the arrest. Yet it remains unclear why evolution has favored the development of EF-P rather than selecting against the occurrence of polyproline stretches in proteins. We have discovered that only a single polyproline stretch is invariant across all domains of life, namely a proline triplet in ValS, the tRNA synthetase, that charges tRNAVal with valine. Here, we show that expression of ValS in vivo and in vitro requires EF-P and demonstrate that the proline triplet located in the active site of ValS is important for efficient charging of tRNAVal with valine and preventing formation of mischarged Thr-tRNAVal as well as efficient growth of E. coli in vivo. We suggest that the critical role of the proline triplet for ValS activity may explain why bacterial cells coevolved the EF-P rescue system.

  16. Dysregulation of Elongation Factor 1A Expression is Correlated with Synaptic Plasticity Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckelman, Brenna C; Day, Stephen; Zhou, Xueyan; Donohue, Maggie; Gouras, Gunnar K; Klann, Eric; Keene, C Dirk; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-06

    Synaptic dysfunction may represent an early and crucial pathophysiology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies implicate a connection between synaptic plasticity deficits and compromised capacity of de novo protein synthesis in AD. The mRNA translational factor eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is critically involved in several forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity. By examining postmortem human brain samples, a transgenic mouse model, and application of synthetic human Aβ42 on mouse hippocampal slices, we demonstrated that eEF1A protein levels were significantly decreased in AD, particularly in the hippocampus. In contrast, brain levels of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 were unaltered in AD. Further, upregulation of eEF1A expression by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, which induces long-lasting synaptic plasticity, was blunted in hippocampal slices derived from Tg2576 AD model mice. Finally, Aβ-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation defects were alleviated by upregulation of eEF1A signaling via brain-specific knockdown of the gene encoding tuberous sclerosis 2. In summary, our findings suggest a strong correlation between the dysregulation of eEF1A synthesis and AD-associated synaptic failure. These findings provide insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying AD etiology and may aid in identification of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  17. A Cellular Factor for Regulation of Transcriptional Elongation by HIV TAT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Qiang

    1998-01-01

    Control of transcriptional elongation has been recognized as an important step in gene regulation, but mechanisms regulating the efficiency of elongation by RNA polymerase II have not been extensively studied...

  18. Rapid fold and structure determination of the archaeal translation elongation factor 1β from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Ekiel, Irena; Beglova, Natalia; Yee, Adelinda; Dharamsi, Akil; Engel, Asaph; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Nong, Andrew; Gehring, Kalle

    2000-01-01

    The tertiary fold of the elongation factor, aEF-1β, from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was determined in a high-throughput fashion using a minimal set of NMR experiments. NMR secondary structure prediction, deuterium exchange experiments and the analysis of chemical shift perturbations were combined to identify the protein fold as an alpha-beta sandwich typical of many RNA binding proteins including EF-G. Following resolution of the tertiary fold, a high resolution structure of aEF-1β was determined using heteronuclear and homonuclear NMR experiments and a semi-automated NOESY assignment strategy. Analysis of the aEF-1β structure revealed close similarity to its human analogue, eEF-1β. In agreement with studies on EF-Ts and human EF-1β, a functional mechanism for nucleotide exchange is proposed wherein Phe46 on an exposed loop acts as a lever to eject GDP from the associated elongation factor G-protein, aEF-1α. aEF-1β was also found to bind calcium in the groove between helix α2 and strand β4. This novel feature was not observed previously and may serve a structural function related to protein stability or may play a functional role in archaeal protein translation

  19. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    Two residues of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA were identified and subjected to mutational analysis. Lys-89 and Asn-90 were each replaced by either Ala or Glu. The four single mutants were denoted K89A, K89E, N90A, and N90E, respectively. The mutants......-tRNA, which suggested an important role of Lys-89 and Asn-90 in tRNA binding. Furthermore, our results indicate helix B to be an important target site for nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. Also the mutants His-66 to Ala and His-118 to either Ala or Glu were characterized in an in vitro translation assay...

  20. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  1. Flow-induced elongation of von Willebrand factor precedes tension-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Darren; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Wong, Wesley P; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-08-23

    Von Willebrand factor, an ultralarge concatemeric blood protein, must bind to platelet GPIbα during bleeding to mediate hemostasis, but not in the normal circulation to avoid thrombosis. Von Willebrand factor is proposed to be mechanically activated by flow, but the mechanism remains unclear. Using microfluidics with single-molecule imaging, we simultaneously monitored reversible Von Willebrand factor extension and binding to GPIbα under flow. We show that Von Willebrand factor is activated through a two-step conformational transition: first, elongation from compact to linear form, and subsequently, a tension-dependent local transition to a state with high affinity for GPIbα. High-affinity sites develop only in upstream regions of VWF where tension exceeds ~21 pN and depend upon electrostatic interactions. Re-compaction of Von Willebrand factor is accelerated by intramolecular interactions and increases GPIbα dissociation rate. This mechanism enables VWF to be locally activated by hydrodynamic force in hemorrhage and rapidly deactivated downstream, providing a paradigm for hierarchical mechano-regulation of receptor-ligand binding.Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a blood protein involved in clotting and is proposed to be activated by flow, but the mechanism is unknown. Here the authors show that VWF is first converted from a compact to linear form by flow, and is subsequently activated to bind GPIbα in a tension-dependent manner.

  2. Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation through eukaryotic elongation factor eEF-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Stephen Z.; Castillo, Kathrina; Sachs, Matthew S.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock has a profound effect on gene regulation, controlling rhythmic transcript accumulation for up to half of expressed genes in eukaryotes. Evidence also exists for clock control of mRNA translation, but the extent and mechanisms for this regulation are not known. In Neurospora crassa, the circadian clock generates daily rhythms in the activation of conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways when cells are grown in constant conditions, including rhythmic activation of the well-characterized p38 osmosensing (OS) MAPK pathway. Rhythmic phosphorylation of the MAPK OS-2 (P-OS-2) leads to temporal control of downstream targets of OS-2. We show that osmotic stress in N. crassa induced the phosphorylation of a eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2) kinase, radiation sensitivity complementing kinase-2 (RCK-2), and that RCK-2 is necessary for high-level phosphorylation of eEF-2, a key regulator of translation elongation. The levels of phosphorylated RCK-2 and phosphorylated eEF-2 cycle in abundance in wild-type cells but not in cells deleted for OS-2 or the core clock component FREQUENCY (FRQ). Translation extracts from cells grown in constant conditions show decreased translational activity in the late subjective morning, coincident with the peak in eEF-2 phosphorylation, and rhythmic translation of glutathione S-transferase (GST-3) from constitutive mRNA levels in vivo is dependent on circadian regulation of eEF-2 activity. In contrast, rhythms in phosphorylated eEF-2 levels are not necessary for rhythms in accumulation of the clock protein FRQ, indicating that clock control of eEF-2 activity promotes rhythmic translation of specific mRNAs. PMID:27506798

  3. The surface-associated elongation factor Tu is concealed for antibody binding on viable pneumococci and meningococci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolberg, J.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Frank, R.; Jonák, Jiří; Šanderová, Hana; Aase, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2008), s. 222-230 ISSN 0928-8244 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500520503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Streptococcus pneumoniae * Neisseria meningitidis * elongation factor EF-Tu Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.972, year: 2008

  4. Immune Reactions Against Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: Specific Pathogenesis of Gastric Ulcer from Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Ayada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a definite causative factor for gastric ulcers (GUs. In the present study we detected a specific antigen of gastric epithelial cells (HGC-27 using cell ELISA, which was recognized by the sera of GU patients (n=20 but not in patients with chronic gastritis (CG; n=20 or in healthy volunteers (HC; n=10. This antigen was over-expressed by a stressful (heat-stressed environment, and was identified as elongation factor 2 kinase (EF-2K by western blotting. The GU patients' lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori specifically disrupted heat-stressed HGC-27 cells in a cytotoxic assay. In flow cytometry, the effector cells (lymphocytes from GU patients were significantly differentiated to T helper type 1 lymphocyte (Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL as opposed to those from CG patients. The target cells (HGC-27 expressed EF-2K and MHC-class I together with costimulatory molecules from heat stress. This antigen specific immune mechanism could have a prominent role in the pathogenesis of GU.

  5. [Factors of risk of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pedraza Avilés, A; Mota Vázquez, R; Ortiz Zaragoza, C; Ponce Rosas, R E

    2004-10-31

    To recognise factors in the host that might condition the appearance of the bacterial vaginosis (BV) syndrome, whether gynae-obstetrical factors, habits of sexual conduct, hygiene, or other factors. Cross-sectional, observational study. The study was conducted from January 2002 to June 2003 in the Primary Care Dr. Jose Castro Villagrana Community Health Centre at Tlalpan, Mexico City. 968 patients with an active sexual life who had not taken antibiotics for at least 15 days before the study and who were not menstruating at the moment of taking a swab, 859 of whom had a diagnosis of cervico-vaginitis and 109 had no symptoms. Confidential questionnaire and a cervical-vaginal culture. The Amsel criteria were used to make the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. There was 32.9% prevalence of BV. There was a statistically significant association with factors such as age, start of active sexual life, the number of sexual relations per week, the number of sexual partners, and pregnancy. Bacterial vaginosis is the main cause of infectious processes in the vagina. Its appearance appears to be linked to factors involving sexual transmission. Interventions to reduce its prevalence and complications are recommended.

  6. Factors affecting daughter cells' arrangement during the early bacterial divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Tzu Su

    Full Text Available On agar plates, daughter cells of Escherichia coli mutually slide and align side-by-side in parallel during the first round of binary fission. This phenomenon has been previously attributed to an elastic material that restricts apparently separated bacteria from being in string. We hypothesize that the interaction between bacteria and the underneath substratum may affect the arrangement of the daughter bacteria. To test this hypothesis, bacterial division on hyaluronic acid (HA gel, as an alternative substratum, was examined. Consistent with our proposition, the HA gel differs from agar by suppressing the typical side-by-side alignments to a rare population. Examination of bacterial surface molecules that may contribute to the daughter cells' arrangement yielded an observation that, with disrupted lpp, the E. coli daughter cells increasingly formed non-typical patterns, i.e. neither sliding side-by-side in parallel nor forming elongated strings. Therefore, our results suggest strongly that the early cell patterning is affected by multiple interaction factors. With oscillatory optical tweezers, we further demonstrated that the interaction force decreased in bacteria without Lpp, a result substantiating our notion that the side-by-side sliding phenomenon directly reflects the strength of in-situ interaction between bacteria and substratum.

  7. Elongation factor 1 β/δ of Echinococcus granulosus and allergic manifestations in human cystic echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortona, E; Margutti, P; Vaccari, S; Riganò, R; Profumo, E; Buttari, B; Chersi, A; Teggi, A; Siracusano, A

    2001-01-01

    Allergic reactions, such as urticaria, itching and anaphylactic shock, often complicate the course of cystic echinococcosis (CE). To investigate the role of the IgE-immunoreactive recombinant Echinococcus granulosus elongation factor-1 β/δ (EgEF-1 β/δ) in the allergic disorders during CE we determined humoral and cell-mediated responses to this antigen in patients with CE grouped according to the clinical presence or absence of allergic reactions. Immunoblotting analysis showed that serum IgE-binding reactivity to EgEF-1 β/δ differed significantly in patients with and without allergic reactions (38 of 42, 90% vs. 31 of 56, 56%; P < 10−4). EgEF-1 β/δ induced a proliferative response in 14 of 19 (74%) patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) irrespective of the allergic manifestations and skewed Th1/Th2 cytokine activation towards a preferentially Th2 polarization. Epitope mapping identified an immunodominant epitope of 18 residues with 78% identity and 89% similarity with an IgE-immunoreactive Strongyloides stercoralis antigen. Overall these findings suggest that EgEF-1 β/δ is an allergenic molecule that may be a general marker of the intensity of CE immune response and that could lead to a deeper understanding of the specific antigen-induced mechanisms underlying allergic reactions in the human host. PMID:11472433

  8. Elongation factor 1 beta/delta of Echinococcus granulosus and allergic manifestations in human cystic echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortona, E; Margutti, P; Vaccari, S; Riganò, R; Profumo, E; Buttari, B; Chersi, A; Teggi, A; Siracusano, A

    2001-07-01

    Allergic reactions, such as urticaria, itching and anaphylactic shock, often complicate the course of cystic echinococcosis (CE). To investigate the role of the IgE-immunoreactive recombinant Echinococcus granulosus elongation factor-1 beta/delta (EgEF-1 beta/delta) in the allergic disorders during CE we determined humoral and cell-mediated responses to this antigen in patients with CE grouped according to the clinical presence or absence of allergic reactions. Immunoblotting analysis showed that serum IgE-binding reactivity to EgEF-1 beta/delta differed significantly in patients with and without allergic reactions (38 of 42, 90% vs. 31 of 56, 56%; P < 10(-4)). EgEF-1 beta/delta induced a proliferative response in 14 of 19 (74%) patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) irrespective of the allergic manifestations and skewed Th1/Th2 cytokine activation towards a preferentially Th2 polarization. Epitope mapping identified an immunodominant epitope of 18 residues with 78% identity and 89% similarity with an IgE-immunoreactive Strongyloides stercoralis antigen. Overall these findings suggest that EgEF-1 beta/delta is an allergenic molecule that may be a general marker of the intensity of CE immune response and that could lead to a deeper understanding of the specific antigen-induced mechanisms underlying allergic reactions in the human host.

  9. Sequence-based identification of Japanese Armillaria species using the elongation factor-1 alpha gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Eri; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the sequences of three DNA regions-the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of ribosomal DNA-to compare their accuracy in identifying species of Japanese Armillaria. We studied 49 isolates of eight Armillaria species, A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. cepistipes, A. gallica, A. sinapina, A. tabescens and the biological species Nagasawa E (Nag. E). Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and IGS data helped in identifying A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. tabescens and Nag. E but could not be used to identify A. gallica, A. cepistipes and A. sinapina. Nevertheless our analysis showed that the EF-1 alpha gene was clearly different in the eight examined species. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of the IGS-1 region could be used to distinguish most species, but the RFLP profiles of some isolates of A. cepistipes and A. sinapina were the same even with four different restriction enzymes. In conclusion, among the techniques examined in this study, analyzing the EF-1 alpha sequence was found to be the most suitable method for identifying different species of Japanese Armillaria.

  10. Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A induces anoikis by triggering cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Keisuke; Naito, Toshihiko; Iwakiri, Ryota; Haga, Makoto; Miura, Shougo; Saito, Yohei; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Kamiya, Sadahiro; Iyoda, Takuya; Yajima, Hirofumi; Iwashita, Shintaro; Ejiri, Shin-ichiro; Fukai, Fumio

    2012-05-04

    Anoikis, apoptosis because of loss of cell anchorage, is crucial for tissue homeostasis. Fibronectin not only provides a scaffold for cell anchorage but also harbors a cryptic antiadhesive site capable of inducing β1-integrin inactivation. In this study, this cryptic antiadhesive site is implicated in spontaneous induction of anoikis. Nontransformed fibroblasts (NIH3T3) adhering to a fibronectin substratum underwent anoikis during serum starvation culture. This anoikis was caused by proteolytic exposure of the cryptic antiadhesive site in fibronectin by matrix metalloproteinase. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) was identified as a membrane receptor for the exposed antiadhesive site. Serum starvation raised the membrane residence of eEF1A, and siRNA-based disruption of this increase rendered cells anoikis-resistant. By contrast, cells became more susceptible to anoikis in parallel with increased membrane residence of eEF1A by enforced expression. These results demonstrate that eEF1A acts as a membrane receptor for the cryptic antiadhesive site of fibronectin, which contributes to cell regulation, including anoikis, through negative regulation of cell anchorage.

  11. Crosslinking of tRNA containing a long extra arm to elongation factor Tu by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nils-Jørgen; Wikman, Friedrik; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1990-01-01

    A tRNA containing a long extra arm, namely E. coli tRNA1Leu has been crosslinked to elongation factor Tu, with the crosslinking reagent trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). The nucleotide involved in the crosslinking was identified to be a guanosine in the variable region at position 47F or 47G....

  12. Advances toward DNA-based identification and phylogeny of North American Armillaria species using elongation factor-1 alpha gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Ross-Davis; John W. Hanna; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    The translation elongation factor-1 alpha gene was used to examine the phylogenetic relationships among 30 previously characterized isolates representing ten North American Armillaria species: A. solidipes (=A. ostoyae), A. gemina, A. calvescens, A. sinapina, A. mellea, A. gallica, A. nabsnona, North American biological species X, A. cepistipes, and A. tabescens. The...

  13. Th2-related immune responses by the Brucella abortus cellular antigens, malate dehydrogenase, elongation factor, and arginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Young Bin; Shim, Soojin; Park, Woo Bin; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2017-09-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Brucella species. The disease is difficult to control due to the intracellular survival of the bacterium and the lack of precise understanding of pathogenesis. Despite of continuous researches on the pathogenesis of Brucella spp. infection, there is still question on the pathogenesis, especially earlier immune response in the bacterial infection. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH), elongation factor (Tsf), and arginase (RocF), which showed serological reactivity, were purified after gene cloning, and their immune modulating activities were then analyzed in a murine model. Cytokine production profiles were investigated by stimulating RAW 264.7 cells and naïve splenocytes with the three recombinant proteins. Also, immune responses were analyzed by ELISA and an ELIspot assay after immunizing mice with the three proteins. Only TNF-α was produced in stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, whereas Th1-related cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-2, were induced in naïve splenocytes. In contrast, Th2-type immune response was more strongly induced in antigen-secreting cells in the splenocytes obtained 28 days after immunizing mice with the three proteins, as were IgM and IgG. The induction of Th2-related antibody, IgG1, was higher than the Th1-related antibody, IgG2a, in immunized mice. These results suggest that the three proteins strongly induce Th2-type immune response in vivo, even though Th1-related cytokines were produced in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bax Interacting Factor-1 Promotes Survival and Mitochondrial Elongation in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David B.; Uo, Takuma; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Sopher, Bryce L.; Lee, Rona J.; Murphy, Sean P.; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Garden, Gwenn A.; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, also known as endophilin B1) is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of apoptosis, mitochondrial morphology, and autophagy. Previous studies in non-neuronal cells have shown that Bif-1 is proapoptotic and promotes mitochondrial fragmentation. However, the role of Bif-1 in postmitotic neurons has not been investigated. In contrast to non-neuronal cells, we now report that in neurons Bif-1 promotes viability and mitochondrial elongation. In mouse primary cortical neurons, Bif-1 knockdown exacerbated apoptosis induced by the DNA-damaging agent camptothecin. Neurons from Bif-1-deficient mice contained fragmented mitochondria and Bif-1 knockdown in wild-type neurons also resulted in fragmented mitochondria which were more depolarized, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. During ischemic stroke, Bif-1 expression was downregulated in the penumbra of wild-type mice. Consistent with Bif-1 being required for neuronal viability, Bif-1-deficient mice developed larger infarcts and an exaggerated astrogliosis response following ischemic stroke. Together, these data suggest that, in contrast to non-neuronal cells, Bif-1 is essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function in neurons, and that loss of Bif-1 renders neurons more susceptible to apoptotic stress. These unique actions may relate to the presence of longer, neuron-specific Bif-1 isoforms, because only these forms of Bif-1 were able to rescue deficiencies caused by Bif-1 suppression. This finding not only demonstrates an unexpected role for Bif-1 in the nervous system but this work also establishes Bif-1 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of neurological diseases, especially degenerative disorders characterized by alterations in mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:24523556

  15. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 complex subunits are critical HIV-1 reverse transcription cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kylie; Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Qin, Fangyun; Warrilow, David; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Apolloni, Ann; Abbott, Catherine M; Jones, Alun; Anderson, Jenny L; Harrich, David

    2012-06-12

    Cellular proteins have been implicated as important for HIV-1 reverse transcription, but whether any are reverse transcription complex (RTC) cofactors or affect reverse transcription indirectly is unclear. Here we used protein fractionation combined with an endogenous reverse transcription assay to identify cellular proteins that stimulated late steps of reverse transcription in vitro. We identified 25 cellular proteins in an active protein fraction, and here we show that the eEF1A and eEF1G subunits of eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) are important components of the HIV-1 RTC. eEF1A and eEF1G were identified in fractionated human T-cell lysates as reverse transcription cofactors, as their removal ablated the ability of active protein fractions to stimulate late reverse transcription in vitro. We observed that the p51 subunit of reverse transcriptase and integrase, two subunits of the RTC, coimmunoprecipitated with eEF1A and eEF1G. Moreover eEF1A and eEF1G associated with purified RTCs and colocalized with reverse transcriptase following infection of cells. Reverse transcription in cells was sharply down-regulated when eEF1A or eEF1G levels were reduced by siRNA treatment as a result of reduced levels of RTCs in treated cells. The combined evidence indicates that these eEF1 subunits are critical RTC stability cofactors required for efficient completion of reverse transcription. The identification of eEF1 subunits as unique RTC components provides a basis for further investigations of reverse transcription and trafficking of the RTC to the nucleus.

  16. Thermostability of Multidomain Proteins: Elongation Factors EF-Tu from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus and Their Chimeric Forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šanderová, Hana; Hůlková, Marta; Maloň, Petr; Kepková, M.; Jonák, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2004), s. 89-99 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128; GA ČR GA204/98/0863; GA ČR GA303/02/0689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905; CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : elongation factor EF-Tu, thermostability, chimeric protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.116, year: 2004

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination...

  18. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan

    2010-01-01

    Multiple DNA-associated processes such as DNA repair, replication, and recombination are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show a novel interaction between the transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 and replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA......-binding protein with functions in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Bur1 interacted via its C-terminal domain with RPA, and bur1-¿C mutants showed a deregulated DNA damage response accompanied by increased sensitivity to DNA damage and replication stress as well as increased levels of persisting Rad52...... foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Three Cassava Elongation Factor 1 Alpha (MeEF1A) Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandono, Sony; Apriyanto, Ardha; Ihsani, Nisa

    2014-01-01

    In plant genetic engineering, the identification of gene promoters leading to particular expression patterns is crucial for the development of new genetically modified plant generations. This research was conducted in order to isolate and characterize several new promoters from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1A) gene family. Three promoters MeEF1A3, MeEF1A4 and MeEF1A5 were successfully isolated. Sequence analyses showed that all of the promoters contain three conserved putative cis-acting elements which are located upstream of the transcription start site. These elements are included a TEF1, a TELO and TATA boxes. In addition, all of the promoters also have the 5′UTR intron but with a different lengths. These promoters were constructed translationally with gusA reporter gene (promoter::gusA fusion) in pBI-121 binary vector to build a new binary vector using Overlap Extension PCR Cloning (OEPC) technique. Transient expression assay that was done by using agroinfiltration method was used to show functionality of these promoters. Qualitative and quantitative analysis from GUS assay showed that these promoters were functional and conferred a specific activity in tobacco seedlings (Nicotiana tabacum), tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum) and banana fruits (Musa acuminata). We hypothesized that MeEF1A6 could be categorized as a constitutive promoter because it was able to drive the gene expression in all transformed tissue described in here and also comparable to CaMV35S. On the other hand, MeEF1A3 drove specific expression in the aerial parts of seedlings such as hypocotyl and cotyledon thus MeEF1A5 drove specific expression in fruit tissue. The results obtained from transient analysis showed that these promoters had a distinct activity although they came from same gene family. The DNA sequences identified here are new promoters potentially use for genetic engineering in cassava or other plants. PMID:24404183

  20. Isolation and characterization of three cassava elongation factor 1 alpha (MeEF1A promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Suhandono

    Full Text Available In plant genetic engineering, the identification of gene promoters leading to particular expression patterns is crucial for the development of new genetically modified plant generations. This research was conducted in order to isolate and characterize several new promoters from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1A gene family.Three promoters MeEF1A3, MeEF1A5 and MeEF1A6 were successfully isolated [corrected]. Sequence analyses showed that all of the promoters contain three conserved putative cis-acting elements which are located upstream of the transcription start site. These elements are included a TEF1, a TELO and TATA boxes. In addition, all of the promoters also have the 5'UTR intron but with a different lengths. These promoters were constructed translationally with gusA reporter gene (promoter::gusA fusion in pBI-121 binary vector to build a new binary vector using Overlap Extension PCR Cloning (OEPC technique. Transient expression assay that was done by using agroinfiltration method was used to show functionality of these promoters. Qualitative and quantitative analysis from GUS assay showed that these promoters were functional and conferred a specific activity in tobacco seedlings (Nicotiana tabacum, tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum and banana fruits (Musa acuminata. We hypothesized that MeEF1A6 could be categorized as a constitutive promoter because it was able to drive the gene expression in all transformed tissue described in here and also comparable to CaMV35S. On the other hand, MeEF1A3 drove specific expression in the aerial parts of seedlings such as hypocotyl and cotyledon thus MeEF1A5 drove specific expression in fruit tissue. The results obtained from transient analysis showed that these promoters had a distinct activity although they came from same gene family. The DNA sequences identified here are new promoters potentially use for genetic engineering in cassava or other plants.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in the ruminant uterus: potential endometrial marker and regulator of conceptus elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rebecca M; Erikson, David W; Kim, Jinyoung; Burghardt, Robert C; Bazer, Fuller W; Johnson, Greg A; Spencer, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Establishment of pregnancy in ruminants requires conceptus elongation and production of interferon-tau (IFNT), the pregnancy recognition signal that maintains ovarian progesterone (P4) production. These studies determined temporal and spatial alterations in IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP3 in the ovine and bovine uterus; effects of P4 and IFNT on their expression in the ovine uterus; and effects of IGFBP1 on ovine trophectoderm cell proliferation, migration, and attachment. IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 were studied because they are the only IGFBPs specifically expressed by the endometrial luminal epithelia in sheep. In sheep, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 expression was coordinate with the period of conceptus elongation, whereas only IGFBP1 expression was coordinate with conceptus elongation in cattle. IGFBP1 mRNA in the ovine endometria was between 5- and 29-fold more abundant between d 12 and 16 of pregnancy compared with the estrous cycle and greater on d 16 of pregnancy than nonpregnancy in the bovine uterus. In sheep, P4 induced and IFNT stimulated expression of IGFBP1 but not IGFBP3; however, the effect of IFNT did not mimic the abundant increase observed in pregnant ewes. Therefore, IGFBP1 expression in the endometrium is regulated by another factor from the conceptus. IGFBP1 did not affect the proliferation of ovine trophectoderm cells in vitro but did stimulate their migration and mediate their attachment. These studies reveal that IGFBP1 is a common endometrial marker of conceptus elongation in sheep and cattle and most likely regulates conceptus elongation by stimulating migration and attachment of the trophectoderm.

  2. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, K. S.; Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infectious disease with high mortality and disability rates, despite availability of antibiotics and adjunctive therapy with dexamethasone. Several risk factors and predisposing conditions have been identified that increase susceptibility for bacterial

  3. Transcription factors TFIIF and TFIIS promote transcript elongation by RNA polymerase II by synergistic and independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Volker; Meng, Cong; Murakami, Kenji; Kaplan, Craig D; Kornberg, Roger D; Block, Steven M

    2014-05-06

    Recent evidence suggests that transcript elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is regulated by mechanical cues affecting the entry into, and exit from, transcriptionally inactive states, including pausing and arrest. We present a single-molecule optical-trapping study of the interactions of RNAPII with transcription elongation factors TFIIS and TFIIF, which affect these processes. By monitoring the response of elongation complexes containing RNAPII and combinations of TFIIF and TFIIS to controlled mechanical loads, we find that both transcription factors are independently capable of restoring arrested RNAPII to productive elongation. TFIIS, in addition to its established role in promoting transcript cleavage, is found to relieve arrest by a second, cleavage-independent mechanism. TFIIF synergistically enhances some, but not all, of the activities of TFIIS. These studies also uncovered unexpected insights into the mechanisms underlying transient pauses. The direct visualization of pauses at near-base-pair resolution, together with the load dependence of the pause-entry phase, suggests that two distinct mechanisms may be at play: backtracking under forces that hinder transcription and a backtrack-independent activity under assisting loads. The measured pause lifetime distributions are inconsistent with prevailing views of backtracking as a purely diffusive process, suggesting instead that the extent of backtracking may be modulated by mechanisms intrinsic to RNAPII. Pauses triggered by inosine triphosphate misincorporation led to backtracking, even under assisting loads, and their lifetimes were reduced by TFIIS, particularly when aided by TFIIF. Overall, these experiments provide additional insights into how obstacles to transcription may be overcome by the concerted actions of multiple accessory factors.

  4. Aminoacyl-tRNA-charged eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is a bona fide substrate for Legionelle pneumophila effector glucosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzivelekidis, Tina; Jank, Thomas; Pohl, Corinna

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, which is the causative organism of Legionnaires disease, translocates numerous effector proteins into the host cell cytosol by a type IV secretion system during infection. Among the most potent effector proteins of Legionella are glucosyltransferases (Lgt’s), which...... selectively modify eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF) 1A at Ser-53 in the GTP binding domain. Glucosylation results in inhibition of protein synthesis. Here we show that in vitro glucosylation of yeast and mouse eEF1A by Lgt3 in the presence of the factors Phe-tRNAPhe and GTP was enhanced 150 and 590-fold...

  5. Transcriptional Elongation Factor Elongin A Regulates Retinoic Acid-Induced Gene Expression during Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yasukawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Elongin A increases the rate of RNA polymerase II (pol II transcript elongation by suppressing transient pausing by the enzyme. Elongin A also acts as a component of a cullin-RING ligase that can target stalled pol II for ubiquitylation and proteasome-dependent degradation. It is not known whether these activities of Elongin A are functionally interdependent in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Elongin A-deficient (Elongin A−/− embryos exhibit abnormalities in the formation of both cranial and spinal nerves and that Elongin A−/− embryonic stem cells (ESCs show a markedly decreased capacity to differentiate into neurons. Moreover, we identify Elongin A mutations that selectively inactivate one or the other of the aforementioned activities and show that mutants that retain the elongation stimulatory, but not pol II ubiquitylation, activity of Elongin A rescue neuronal differentiation and support retinoic acid-induced upregulation of a subset of neurogenesis-related genes in Elongin A−/− ESCs.

  6. Preparation and some properties of polypeptide elongation factors from the pollen of Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, Shin-ichiro; Nunomiya, Masaaki; Katsumata, Teizo

    1976-01-01

    A cell-free protein synthesizing system was obtained for the first time from the pollen of Pinus densiflora. This system consisted of pollen ribosomes and partially purified pollen polypeptide elongation factors. Procedures were described for the complete resolution and partial purification of the two elongation factors (EF-1 and EF-2). One of the factors, EF-1, catalyzed a CTP-dependent binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to ribosomes. The second factor EF-2 catalyzed the polyphenylalanine synthesis in the presence of EF-1. Complete exchangeability was observed between pollen EF-1 and the silk gland EF-1, or between pollen EF-2 and the silk gland EF-2. Pollen EF-1 was heterogeneous in size; i.e. multiple forms. A larger form of EF-1 had a molecular weight of about 160,000 and the smaller one had molecular weight of about 60,000. The former was converted into the low molecular weight form in the process of germination and purification. (auth.)

  7. Ankyloglossia as a risk factor for maxillary hypoplasia and soft palate elongation: A functional - morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, A J; Zaghi, S; Ha, S; Law, C S; Guilleminault, C; Liu, S Y

    2017-11-01

    To characterize associations between restricted tongue mobility and maxillofacial development. Cross-sectional cohort study of 302 consecutive subjects from an orthodontic practice. Tongue mobility (measured with tongue range of motion ratio [TRMR] and Kotlow free tongue measurement) was correlated with measurements of the maxillofacial skeleton obtained from dental casts and cephalometric radiographs. Tongue range of motion ratio and Kotlow measures of restricted tongue mobility were associated with (i) ratio of maxillary intercanine width to canine arch length, (ii) ratio of maxillary intermolar width to canine arch length and (iii) soft palate length. Restricted tongue mobility was not associated with hyoid bone position or Angle's skeletal classification. Restricted tongue mobility was associated with narrowing of the maxillary arch and elongation of the soft palate in this study. These findings suggest that variations in tongue mobility may affect maxillofacial development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in search of a role for the N-terminal region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Laurberg, M

    1998-01-01

    We have mutated lysine 2 and arginine 7 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli separately either to alanine or glutamic acid. The aim of the work was to reveal the possible interactions between the conserved N-terminal part of the molecule, which is rich in basic residues and aminoacyl...... this activity. Furthermore, arginine 7 seems to play a role in regulating the binding of GTP. The three-dimensional structure of the ternary complex, EF-Tu:GTP:Phe-tRNAPhe, involving Thermus aquaticus EF-Tu and yeast Phe-tRNA(Phe), shows that Arg7 is in a position which permits salt bridge formation with Asp284...

  9. [Primary structure of the elongation factor G from Escherichia coli. V. Amino acid sequence of the C-terminal domain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakhov, Iu B; Vinokurov, L M; Dovgas, N V; Motuz, L P

    1983-03-01

    The amino acid sequence of the C-terminal domain of the elongation factor G (EF-G) has been studied. The polypeptide chain of the domain consists of 228 amino acid residues, and contains no tryptophan or cysteine residues. To determine its structure, the peptides obtained as a result of the fragment digestion by staphylococcal glutamic protease, cyanogen bromide cleavage, and tryptic hydrolysis of the fragment modified by maleic anhydride have been analyzed, as well as peptides obtained after hydrolyses of cyanogen bromide fragments with chymotrypsin, thermolysin and trypsin.

  10. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gender-related differences in the responses of oxidative enzymes and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) to exercise. METHODS: The influence of exercise (90 min, 60%VO(2peak)) on citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity and mRNA content...... expression and phosphorylation were unaffected by training status (NS). CONCLUSION: Basal transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational control of CS and HAD seems to be gender-dependent. Also, gender differences in translation and/or post-translational protein modification of CS occur during...

  11. The tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor-P with (R)-ß-lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Hervé; Zou, S Betty; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    The lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor P (EF-P) with a-lysine at low efficiency. Cell-free extracts containing non-a-lysine substrates of PoxA modified EF-P with a change in mass consistent with addition of ß-lysine, a substrate also predicted by genomic analyses. EF-P ......-P was efficiently functionally modified with (R)-ß-lysine but not (S)-ß-lysine or genetically encoded a-amino acids, indicating that PoxA has evolved an activity orthogonal to that of the canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.......The lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor P (EF-P) with a-lysine at low efficiency. Cell-free extracts containing non-a-lysine substrates of PoxA modified EF-P with a change in mass consistent with addition of ß-lysine, a substrate also predicted by genomic analyses. EF...

  12. Infantile Encephalopathy and Defective Mitochondrial DNA Translation in Patients with Mutations of Mitochondrial Elongation Factors EFG1 and EFTu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Lucia; Tiranti, Valeria; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Malfatti, Edoardo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Donnini, Claudia; Mereghetti, Paolo; De Gioia, Luca; Burlina, Alberto; Castellan, Claudio; Comi, Giacomo P.; Savasta, Salvatore; Ferrero, Iliana; Zeviani, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translation is a complex process performed within mitochondria by an apparatus composed of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)–encoded RNAs and nuclear DNA–encoded proteins. Although the latter by far outnumber the former, the vast majority of mitochondrial translation defects in humans have been associated with mutations in RNA-encoding mtDNA genes, whereas mutations in protein-encoding nuclear genes have been identified in a handful of cases. Genetic investigation involving patients with defective mitochondrial translation led us to the discovery of novel mutations in the mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EFG1) in one affected baby and, for the first time, in the mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EFTu) in another one. Both patients were affected by severe lactic acidosis and rapidly progressive, fatal encephalopathy. The EFG1-mutant patient had early-onset Leigh syndrome, whereas the EFTu-mutant patient had severe infantile macrocystic leukodystrophy with micropolygyria. Structural modeling enabled us to make predictions about the effects of the mutations at the molecular level. Yeast and mammalian cell systems proved the pathogenic role of the mutant alleles by functional complementation in vivo. Nuclear-gene abnormalities causing mitochondrial translation defects represent a new, potentially broad field of mitochondrial medicine. Investigation of these defects is important to expand the molecular characterization of mitochondrial disorders and also may contribute to the elucidation of the complex control mechanisms, which regulate this fundamental pathway of mtDNA homeostasis. PMID:17160893

  13. Elevated eukaryotic elongation factor 2 expression is involved in proliferation and invasion of lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Sun, Bing; Hao, LiHong; Hu, Jun; Du, Sha; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, LiYuan; Liu, Lu; Gong, LinLin; Chi, XinMing; Liu, Qiang; Shao, ShuJuan

    2016-09-06

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (EF2), is a critical enzyme solely responsible for catalyzing the translocation of the elongated peptidyl-tRNA from the A to P sites of the ribosome during the process of protein synthesis. EF2 is found to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumors and is correlated with cancer cell progression and recurrence. The present study was designed to uncover the function of EF2 on lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) cancer cell growth and progression. Our results from clinical tissue studies showed that EF2 protein was significantly overexpressed in LSCC tissues, compared with the adjacent normal lung tissues, which was confirmed by western blotting and tissue microarray. Forced expression of EF2 resulted in the enhancement of lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H520 cells growth through promotion of G2/M progression in cell cycle, activating Akt and Cdc2/Cyclin B1. In nude mice cancer xenograft model, overexpression of EF2 significantly facilitated cell proliferation in vivo. Furthermore, forced expression of EF2 in the cells increased the capabilities of migration and invasion by changing the expressions of EMT-related proteins and genes. These results provided novel insights into the role of EF2 in tumorigenesis and progression in LSCC. EF2-targeted therapy could become a good strategy for the clinical treatment of LSCC.

  14. Double overexpression of DREB and PIF transcription factors improves drought stress tolerance and cell elongation in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Madoka; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takuya; Mizoi, Junya; Todaka, Daisuke; Fernie, Alisdair R; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2017-04-01

    Although a variety of transgenic plants that are tolerant to drought stress have been generated, many of these plants show growth retardation. To improve drought tolerance and plant growth, we applied a gene-stacking approach using two transcription factor genes: DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING 1A (DREB1A) and rice PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR-LIKE 1 (OsPIL1). The overexpression of DREB1A has been reported to improve drought stress tolerance in various crops, although it also causes a severe dwarf phenotype. OsPIL1 is a rice homologue of Arabidopsis PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4), and it enhances cell elongation by activating cell wall-related gene expression. We found that the OsPIL1 protein was more stable than PIF4 under light conditions in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Transactivation analyses revealed that DREB1A and OsPIL1 did not negatively affect each other's transcriptional activities. The transgenic plants overexpressing both OsPIL1 and DREB1A showed the improved drought stress tolerance similar to that of DREB1A overexpressors. Furthermore, double overexpressors showed the enhanced hypocotyl elongation and floral induction compared with the DREB1A overexpressors. Metabolome analyses indicated that compatible solutes, such as sugars and amino acids, accumulated in the double overexpressors, which was similar to the observations of the DREB1A overexpressors. Transcriptome analyses showed an increased expression of abiotic stress-inducible DREB1A downstream genes and cell elongation-related OsPIL1 downstream genes in the double overexpressors, which suggests that these two transcription factors function independently in the transgenic plants despite the trade-offs required to balance plant growth and stress tolerance. Our study provides a basis for plant genetic engineering designed to overcome growth retardation in drought-tolerant transgenic plants. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology

  15. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt- phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS+ phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt- phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6. We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt- mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt- phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS within the ∂ element as the position of Spt- transcription in tested Spt- mutants.

  16. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-09

    The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt(-)) phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS(+) phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt(-) phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6 We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt(-) mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt(-) phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS) within the ∂ element as the position of Spt(-) transcription in tested Spt(-) mutants. Copyright © 2016 Cui et al.

  17. Strand transfer and elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcription is facilitated by cell factors in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Warrilow

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis.

  18. Strand transfer and elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcription is facilitated by cell factors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrilow, David; Warren, Kylie; Harrich, David

    2010-10-06

    Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s) did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s) enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT) system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s) suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s) may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis.

  19. Bacterial Keratitis: Risk Factors and Causative Agents | Bataineh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: to describe the clinical, microbiological characteristics and risk factors of. Bacterial Keratitis at Prince Zeid and Rashed Military Hospitals. Methods: A retrospective study of the hospital records of 35 patients who were diagnosed as Bacterial Keratitis and treated at the Ophthalmology in-patient department

  20. Factors contributing to bacterial bulb rots of onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of bacterial rots of onion bulbs is increasing and has become a serious problem for growers. This increase is likely due to a combination of factors, such as high bacterial populations in soils and irrigation water, heavy rains flooding production fields, higher temperatures, etc. It m...

  1. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  2. Vps Factors Are Required for Efficient Transcription Elongation in Budding Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaur, N. A.; Hašek, Jiří; Brickner, D. G.; Qiu, H.; Zhang, F.; Wong, Ch.; M.; Malcová, Ivana; Vašicová, Pavla; Brickner, J. H.; Hinnebusch, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 3 (2013), s. 829-851 ISSN 0016-6731 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/0480 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : RNA-POLYMERASE-II * SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE GENOME * ELL-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.389, year: 2012

  3. The Role of Protein Elongation Factor EEF1A2 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jonathan M

    2004-01-01

    ... overexpression can be used as a breast cancer prognostic factor. In addition, we proposed to test the idea that EEF1A2 expression modulates sensitivity to cisplatin and taxol and that EEF1A2-inactivation could be used as a treatment for breast cancer...

  4. 1 Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and associated factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an extremely common reproductive tract condition worldwide with reported high prevalence among African population. Factors associated with this condition include preterm labour, premature rupture of membranes, preterm delivery and possibly spontaneous abortion. Nevertheless ...

  5. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing enhances antiviral response in porcine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type I interferons (IFN) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the master regulator of IFN transcription. The role of 4EBPs in the negat...

  6. Exploratory factor analysis for differentiating sensory and mechanical variables related to muscle-tendon unit elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro H. Chagas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Stretching exercises are able to promote adaptations in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU, which can be tested through physiological and biomechanical variables. Identifying the key variables in MTU adaptations is crucial to improvements in training. Objective To perform an exploratory factor analysis (EFA involving the variables often used to evaluate the response of the MTU to stretching exercises. Method Maximum joint range of motion (ROMMAX, ROM at first sensation of stretching (FSTROM, peak torque (torqueMAX, passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy were investigated in 36 participants during passive knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer. Stiffness and energy values were normalized by the muscle cross-sectional area and their passive mode assured by monitoring the EMG activity. Results EFA revealed two major factors that explained 89.68% of the total variance: 53.13% was explained by the variables torqueMAX, passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy, whereas the remaining 36.55% was explained by the variables ROMMAX and FSTROM. Conclusion This result supports the literature wherein two main hypotheses (mechanical and sensory theories have been suggested to describe the adaptations of the MTU to stretching exercises. Contrary to some studies, in the present investigation torqueMAX was significantly correlated with the variables of the mechanical theory rather than those of the sensory theory. Therefore, a new approach was proposed to explain the behavior of the torqueMAX during stretching exercises.

  7. Synthesis of Elongated Microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the factors that influence the effectiveness of self-healing in functional materials is the amount of liquid healing agents that can be delivered to the damaged area. The use of hollow tubes or fibers and the more sophisticated micro-vascular networks has been proposed as a way to increase the amount of healing agents that can be released when damage is inflicted. Although these systems might be effective in some specific applications, they are not practical for coatings applications. One possible practical way to increase the healing efficiency is to use microcapsules with high-aspect-ratios, or elongated microcapsules. It is understood that elongated microcapsules will be more efficient because they can release more healing agent than a spherical microcapsule when a crack is initiated in the coating. Although the potential advantage of using elongated microcapsules for self healing applications is clear, it is very difficult to make elongated microcapsules from an emulsion system because spherical microcapsules are normally formed due to the interfacial tension between the dispersed phase and the continuous phase. This paper describes the two methods that have been developed by the authors to synthesize elongated microcapsules. The first method involves the use of an emulsion with intermediate stability and the second involves the application of mechanical shear conditions to the emulsion.

  8. A transcription elongation factor that links signals from the reproductive system to lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjumand Ghazi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the aging of the soma is influenced by the germline. When germline-stem cells are removed, aging slows and lifespan is increased. The mechanism by which somatic tissues respond to loss of the germline is not well-understood. Surprisingly, we have found that a predicted transcription elongation factor, TCER-1, plays a key role in this process. TCER-1 is required for loss of the germ cells to increase C. elegans' lifespan, and it acts as a regulatory switch in the pathway. When the germ cells are removed, the levels of TCER-1 rise in somatic tissues. This increase is sufficient to trigger key downstream events, as overexpression of tcer-1 extends the lifespan of normal animals that have an intact reproductive system. Our findings suggest that TCER-1 extends lifespan by promoting the expression of a set of genes regulated by the conserved, life-extending transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. Interestingly, TCER-1 is not required for DAF-16/FOXO to extend lifespan in animals with reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Thus, TCER-1 specifically links the activity of a broadly deployed transcription factor, DAF-16/FOXO, to longevity signals from reproductive tissues.

  9. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a significant burden of disease and mortality in all age groups worldwide despite the development of effective conjugated vaccines. The pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis is based on complex and incompletely understood host-pathogen interactions. Some of these are pathogen-specific, while some are shared between different bacteria. We searched the database PubMed to identify host risk factors for bacterial meningitis caused by the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b, because they are three most common causative bacteria beyond the neonatal period. We describe a number of risk factors; including socioeconomic factors, age, genetic variation of the host and underlying medical conditions associated with increased susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections in both children and adults. As conjugated vaccines are available for these infections, it is of utmost importance to identify high risk patients to be able to prevent invasive disease.

  10. The Arabidopsis Elongator complex is required for nonhost resistance against the bacterial pathogens Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chuanfu; Wang, Chenggang; Mou, Zhonglin

    2017-05-01

    Although in recent years nonhost resistance has attracted considerable attention for its broad spectrum and durability, the genetic and mechanistic components of nonhost resistance have not been fully understood. We used molecular and histochemical approaches including quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and aniline blue staining. The evolutionarily conserved histone acetyltransferase complex Elongator was identified as a major component of nonhost resistance against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp) NPS3121. Mutations in Elongator genes inhibit Xcc-, Psp NPS3121- and/or flg22-induced defense responses including defense gene expression, callose deposition, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. Mutations in Elongator also attenuate the ROS-SA amplification loop. We show that suppressed ROS and SA accumulation in Elongator mutants is correlated with reduced expression of the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homologue AtrbohD and the SA biosynthesis gene ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 (ICS1). Furthermore, we found that the Elongator subunit ELP2 is associated with the chromatin of AtrbohD and ICS1 and is required for maintaining basal histone H3 acetylation levels in these key defense genes. As both AtrbohD and ICS1 contribute to nonhost resistance against Xcc, our results reveal an epigenetic mechanism by which Elongator regulates nonhost resistance in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Microcystic, elongated, and fragmented pattern of invasion in relation to histopathologic and clinical prognostic factors in endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naki, M Murat; Oran, Gülbin; Tetikkurt, Seza Ümit; Sönmez, Cavide Fatma; Türkmen, İlknur; Köse, Faruk

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the association of microcystic, elongated, and fragmented (MELF) pattern of invasion with prognostic factors in endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma (EEA). Stained tissue sections from 83 cases of EEA operated by the same gynecologic oncologist were reviewed to identify cases showing MELF-type invasion in this retrospective study. The association of MELF pattern with age, tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion, and presence of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) was analyzed. FIGO grade 2 and grade 1 tumors were evident in 53.0% and 38.6% of patients, respectively. Depth of myometrial invasion was pattern was confirmed in 35 (42.2%) patients. Presence of MELF pattern was associated with significantly higher mean ± standard deviation age (62.9±6.9) years vs. 58.9±9.1 years, p=0.033), and found to be more likely in patients with high-grade tumor (FIGO grade III; 85.7% vs. 14.3%, ppattern. In conclusion, our findings revealed a high rate of MELF pattern among patients with EEA alongside the association of MELF pattern with poor prognostic factors such as high grade tumor, deep myometrial invasion, and LVSI.

  12. Decoding the biosynthesis and function of diphthamide, an enigmatic modification of translation elongation factor 2 (EF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffael Schaffrath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diphthamide is a highly conserved modification of archaeal and eukaryal translation elongation factor 2 (EF2 and yet why cells need EF2 to contain diphthamide is unclear. In yeast, the first steps of diphthamide synthesis and the genes (DPH1-DPH5 required to form the intermediate diphthine are well-documented. However, the last step, amidadation of diphthine to diphthamide, had largely been ill-defined. Remarkably, through mining genome-wide synthetic gene array (SGA and chemical genomics databases, recent studies by Uthman et al. [PLoS Genetics (2013 9, e1003334] and Su et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (2012 109, 19983-19987] have identified two more diphthamide players, DPH6 and DPH7. Consistent with roles in the amidation step, dph6 and dph7 deletion strains fail to complete diphthamide synthesis and accumulate diphthine-modified EF2. In contrast to Dph6, the catalytically relevant amidase, Dph7 appears to be regulatory. As shown by Uthman et al., it promotes dissociation of diphthine synthase (Dph5 from EF2, allowing diphthine amidation by Dph6 to occur and thereby coupling diphthine synthesis to the terminal step in the pathway. Remarkably, the study by Uthman et al. suggests that Dph5 has a novel role as an EF2 inhibitor that affects cell growth when diphthamide synthesis is blocked or incomplete and, importantly, shows that diphthamide promotes the accuracy of EF2 performance during translation.

  13. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A {sup 32}P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The {sup 32}P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The {sup 32}P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as ({sup 32}P)AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the {sup 32}P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and ({sup 32}P)NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When {sup 32}P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the {sup 32}P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min.

  14. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing [ 32 P]orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A 32 P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The 32 P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The 32 P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as [ 32 P]AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the 32 P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and [ 32 P]NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When 32 P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the 32 P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min

  15. Mutation of the conserved Gly94 and Gly126 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli. Elucidation of their structural and functional roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Kjaersgård, I V; Wiborg, O

    1995-01-01

    All guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins cycle between an inactive, GDP-bound and an active, GTP-bound conformation whereby they function as molecular switches. Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli is used as a model for defining residues important in the switch mechanism. Gly94 and Gly126...

  16. Mutation in elongation factor G confers resistance to the antibiotic argyrin in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Piotr; Lukat, Peer; Hüsecken, Kristina; Dötsch, Andreas; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Hartmann, Rolf W; Müller, Rolf; Häussler, Susanne

    2012-11-05

    The natural myxobacterial product argyrin is a cyclic peptide exhibiting immunosuppressive activity as well as antibacterial activity directed against the highly intrinsically resistant opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we used whole-genome sequencing technology as a powerful tool to determine the mode of action of argyrin. Sequencing of argyrin-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates selected in vitro uncovered six point mutations that distinguished the resistant mutants from their susceptible parental strain. All six mutations were localized within one gene: fusA1, which encodes for the elongation factor EF-G. After the reintroduction of selected mutations into the susceptible wild type, the strain became resistant to argyrin. Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the interaction of argyrin A with FusA1. Interestingly, EF-G has been previously shown to be the target of the anti-Staphylococcus antibiotic fusidic acid. Mapping of the mutations onto a structural model of EF-G revealed that the mutations conveying resistance against argyrin were clustered within domain III on the side opposite to that involved in fusidic acid binding, thus indicating that argyrin exhibits a new mode of protein synthesis inhibition. Although no mutations causing argyrin resistance have been found in other genes of P. aeruginosa, analysis of the sequence identity in EF-G and its correlation with argyrin resistance in different bacteria imply that additional factors such as uptake of argyrin play a role in the argyrin resistance of other organisms. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Rapid Identification of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-15

    anti-5. melitensis antibodies. In Brucella this protein shares homology with that of plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens wherein it is involved...Brucella suis homologue of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal virulence operon ChvE is essential for sugar utilization but not for survival in...Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Is an Acid-Induced, Chromosomally Encoded Virulence Factor in Agrobacterium tumefaciens . J. Bacteriol 187:6039-6045. Martin-Martin

  18. Functional Characterization of a Gene in Sedum alfredii Hance Resembling Rubber Elongation Factor Endowed with Functions Associated with Cadmium Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingying; Qiu, Wenming; He, Xuelian; Zheng, Liu; Song, Xixi; Han, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Jing; Qiao, Guirong; Sang, Jian; Liu, Mingqing; Zhuo, Renying

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a major toxic heavy-metal pollutant considering their bioaccumulation potential and persistence in the environment. The hyperaccumulating ecotype of Sedum alfredii Hance is a Zn/Cd co-hyperaccumulator inhabiting in a region of China with soils rich in Pb/Zn. Investigations into the underlying molecular regulatory mechanisms of Cd tolerance are of substantial interest. Here, library screening for genes related to cadmium tolerance identified a gene resembling the rubber elongation factor gene designated as SaREFl. The heterologous expression of SaREFl rescued the growth of a transformed Cd-sensitive strain (ycf1). Furthermore, SaREFl-expressing Arabidopsis plants were more tolerant to cadmium stress compared with wild type by measuring parameters of root length, fresh weight and physiological indexes. When under four different heavy metal treatments, we found that SaREFl responded most strongly to Cd and the root was the plant organ most sensitive to this heavy metal. Yeast two-hybrid screening of SaREFl as a bait led to the identification of five possible interacting targets in Sedum alfredii Hance. Among them, a gene annotated as prenylated Rab acceptor 1 (PRA1) domain protein was detected with a high frequency. Moreover, subcellular localization of SaREF1-GFP fusion protein revealed some patchy spots in cytosol suggesting potential association with organelles for its cellular functions. Our findings would further enrich the connotation of REF-like genes and provide theoretical assistance for the application in breeding heavy metal-tolerant plants.

  19. The nuclear elongation factor-1α gene: a promising marker for phylogenetic studies of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Molecular systematics is a remarkable approach for understanding the taxonomic traits and allows the exploration of the inter-population dynamics of several species in the Triatominae subfamily that are involved in Trypanosoma cruzi transmission. Compared to other relevant species that transmit vector-borne diseases, such as some species of the Diptera, there are relatively few nuclear genetic markers available for systematic studies in the Triatominae subfamily. Molecular systematic studies performed on Triatominae are based on mitochondrial gene fragments and, less frequently, on nuclear ribosomal genes or spacers. Due to the fact that these markers can occasionally present problems such as nuclear mitochondrial genes (NUMTs) or intra-genomic variation for high gene copy numbers, it is necessary to use additional nuclear markers to more reliably address the molecular evolution of Triatominae. In this study, we performed phylogenetic analysis using the nuclear elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) gene in individuals from 12 species belonging to the Triatomini and Rhodniini tribes. Genetic diversities and phylogenetic topologies were compared with those obtained for the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and Cytochrome b (cyt b) genes, as well as for the D2 variable region of the ribosomal 28S rRNA gene. These results indicate that the EF-1α marker exhibits an intermediate level of diversity compared to mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal genes, and that phylogenetic analysis based on EF-1α is highly informative for resolving deep phylogenetic relationships in Triatominae, such as tribe or genera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of a splice array experiment elucidates roles of chromatin elongation factor Spt4-5 in splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xiao

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Splicing is an important process for regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, and it has important functional links to other steps of gene expression. Two examples of these linkages include Ceg1, a component of the mRNA capping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4-5, both of which have recently been shown to play a role in the normal splicing of several genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a genomic approach to characterize the roles of Spt4-5 in splicing, we used splicing-sensitive DNA microarrays to identify specific sets of genes that are mis-spliced in ceg1, spt4, and spt5 mutants. In the context of a complex, nested, experimental design featuring 22 dye-swap array hybridizations, comprising both biological and technical replicates, we applied five appropriate statistical models for assessing differential expression between wild-type and the mutants. To refine selection of differential expression genes, we then used a robust model-synthesizing approach, Differential Expression via Distance Synthesis, to integrate all five models. The resultant list of differentially expressed genes was then further analyzed with regard to select attributes: we found that highly transcribed genes with long introns were most sensitive to spt mutations. QPCR confirmation of differential expression was established for the limited number of genes evaluated. In this paper, we showcase splicing array technology, as well as powerful, yet general, statistical methodology for assessing differential expression, in the context of a real, complex experimental design. Our results suggest that the Spt4-Spt5 complex may help coordinate splicing with transcription under conditions that present kinetic challenges to spliceosome assembly or function.

  1. Mitochondrial translation factors of Trypanosoma brucei: elongation factor-Tu has a unique subdomain that is essential for its function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cristodero, M.; Mani, J.; Oeljeklaus, S.; Aeberhard, L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Ramrath, D.J.F.; Lukeš, Julius; Warscheid, B.; Schneider, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial translation * Trypanosoma brucei * EF-Tu Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  2. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of these are pathogen-specific, while some are shared between different bacteria. METHODS: We searched the database PubMed to identify host risk factors for bacterial meningitis caused by the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b, because they are three most common...

  3. Risk Factors and Bacterial Profile of Suspected Neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal septicaemia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and a major health concern. The aim of this study is to evaluate the bacterial profile, antibiotics susceptibility pattern and associated risk factors of suspected septicaemia in neonates in this locality. Five hundred and forty seven ...

  4. Factors that influence the speed of bacterial wood degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.K.W.M.; Overeem, van B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial wood decay is a serious threat to the many wooden foundation piles in the Netherlands. In order to learn more about the factors that influence the process of decay, approx. 2000 wood samples taken from Amsterdam piles heads were analysed on type and degree of decay and for 59 extracted

  5. Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of potential factors limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the South Eastern Pacific Gyre. The effects of glucose, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate additions on heterotrophic bacterial production (using leucine technique were studied in parallel in unfiltered seawater samples incubated under natural daily irradiance. The enrichments realized on the subsurface showed three types of responses. From 141° W (Marquesas plateau to approx 125° W, bacteria were not bottom-up controlled, as confirmed by the huge potential of growth in non-enriched seawater (median of enhancement factor×39 in 24 h. Within the Gyre (125° W–95° W, nitrogen alone stimulated leucine incorporation rates (median×4.2, but rapidly labile carbon (glucose became a second limiting factor (median×37 when the two elements were added. Finally from the border of the gyre to the Chilean upwelling (95° W–73° W, labile carbon was the only factor stimulating heterotrophic bacterial production. Interaction between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial communities and the direct versus indirect effect of iron and macronutrients on bacterial production were also investigated in four selected sites: two sites on the vicinity of the Marquesas plateau, the centre of the gyre and the Eastern border of the gyre. Both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were limited by availability of nitrogen within the gyre, but not by iron. Iron limited phytoplankton at Marquesas plateau and at the eastern border of the gyre. However 48 h enrichment experiments were not sufficient to show any clear limitation of heterotrophic bacteria within Marquesas plateau and showed a limitation of these organisms by labile carbon in the eastern border of the Gyre.

  6. The phylogenetic position of an Armillaria species from Amami-Oshima, a subtropical island of Japan, based on elongation factor and ITS sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuko Ota; Mee-Sook Kim; Hitoshi Neda; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Eri Hasegawa

    2011-01-01

    An undetermined Armillaria species was collected on Amami-Oshima, a subtropical island of Japan. The phylogenetic position of the Armillaria sp. was determined using sequences of the elongation factor-1a (EF-1a) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The phylogenetic analyses based on EF-1a and ITS sequences...

  7. Data regarding the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates and recombinant production of elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ufuk Celebioglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the growth of the very well-known probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates. Furthermore, recombinant production of putative moonlighting proteins elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase from this bacterium is described. For further and detailed interpretation of the data presented here, please see the research article “Mucin- and carbohydrate-stimulated adhesion and subproteome changes of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM” (Celebioglu et al., 2017 [1].

  8. Data regarding the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates and recombinant production of elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Olesen, Sita Vaag; Prehn, Kennie

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the growth of the very well-known probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates. Furthermore, recombinant production of putative moonlighting proteins elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase from this bacterium is described. For further ...... and detailed interpretation of the data presented here, please see the research article “Mucin- and carbohydrate-stimulated adhesion and subproteome changes of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM” (Celebioglu et al., 2017) [1]....

  9. Investigation of functional aspects of the N-terminal region of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli using a protein engineering approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, M; Mansilla, Francisco; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    The function of the N-terminal region of elongation factor Tu is still unexplained. Until recently, it has not been visible in electron density maps from x-ray crystallography studies, but the presence of several well conserved basic residues suggest that this part of the molecule is of structural...... importance for the factor to function properly. In this study, two lysines at positions 4 and 9 were mutated separately to alanine or glutamate. The resulting four point mutants were expressed and purified using the pGEX system. The untagged products were characterized with regard to guanine...

  10. Effect of environmental factors on bacterial quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, E; Gothalwal, R

    2014-12-24

    Biodegradation of complex hydrocarbons usually requires the cooperation of more than a single species of microorganisms including bacteria. This is particularly true in pollutants that are made up of many different compounds such as crude oil or petroleum, and where complete mineralization to CO2 and H2O is desired. An effort has been made to form the consortium of bacterial isolates (Qs1, Qs2 and Qs5) which are isolated from oil contaminated soil, and the effects of different environmental factors on these consortium has been studied . The growth of the consortium was studied at 6.5 pH and 35°C like the individual bacterial isolates on the different hydrocarbons (xylene, toluene, hexane, diesel, benzene and petrol). These consortium of bacterial isolates, shared more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon as carbon source. This consortium shows confluent growth- at pH 6.0, 5.5, and 5.0 but survival rate decreases at pH above 6.5. Extremes in pH were shown to have a negative influence on the ability of microbial populations to degrade hydrocarbons. They also show the higher growth rate at the higher temperature range (up to 40°C) but their growth rate decreases at lower temperature range (below 25°C). It is suggested that the use of above bacterial consortium (at 35°C temperature and 6.5pH) will be an effective and eco-friendly technology for the remediation of hydrocarbons.

  11. Silencing of EEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase) reveals AMPK-ULK1-dependent autophagy in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Sham, Kathy W Y; Lai, Josie M Y; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2014-09-01

    EEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase), also known as Ca (2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III, functions in downregulating peptide chain elongation through inactivation of EEF2 (eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2). Currently, there is a limited amount of information on the promotion of autophagic survival by EEF2K in breast and glioblastoma cell lines. However, the precise role of EEF2K in carcinogenesis as well as the underlying mechanism involved is still poorly understood. In this study, contrary to the reported autophagy-promoting activity of EEF2K in certain cancer cells, EEF2K is shown to negatively regulate autophagy in human colon cancer cells as indicated by the increase of LC3-II levels, the accumulation of LC3 dots per cell, and the promotion of autophagic flux in EEF2K knockdown cells. EEF2K negatively regulates cell viability, clonogenicity, cell proliferation, and cell size in colon cancer cells. Autophagy induced by EEF2K silencing promotes cell survival and does not potentiate the anticancer efficacy of the AKT inhibitor MK-2206. In addition, autophagy induced by silencing of EEF2K is attributed to induction of protein synthesis and activation of the AMPK-ULK1 pathway, independent of the suppression of MTOR activity and ROS generation. Knockdown of AMPK or ULK1 significantly abrogates EEF2K silencing-induced increase of LC3-II levels, accumulation of LC3 dots per cell as well as cell proliferation in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, silencing of EEF2K promotes autophagic survival via activation of the AMPK-ULK1 pathway in colon cancer cells. This finding suggests that upregulation of EEF2K activity may constitute a novel approach for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  12. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Melanie C., E-mail: melanie.mann@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Strobel, Sarah, E-mail: sarah.strobel@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Fleckenstein, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.fleckenstein@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Kress, Andrea K., E-mail: andrea.kress@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-09-15

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. - Highlights: • ELL2, a transcription elongation factor, is upregulated in HTLV-1-positive T-cells. • Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 interact in vivo.

  13. Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates Latent HIV Reactivation through Maintaining the Function of Positive Transcriptional Elongation Factor b (p-TEFb) under Proteasome Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Lin, Jian; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Ren, Ru-Xia; Wang, Keng; Xun, Tian-Rong; Shai, Yechiel; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-12-09

    The persistence of HIV in resting memory CD4 + T cells at a latent state is considered as the major barrier on the path to achieve a cure for HIV. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) were previously reported as latency reversing agents (LRAs) but the mechanism underlying this function is yet unclear. Here we demonstrate that PIs reactivate latent HIV ex vivo without global T cell activation, and may facilitate host innate immune responses. Mechanistically, latent HIV reactivation induced by PIs is mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) via the recruitment of the heat shock protein (HSP) 90-positive transcriptional elongation factor b (p-TEFb) complex. Specifically, HSP90 downstream HSF1 gives positive feedback to the reactivation process through binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and preventing it from undergoing degradation by the proteasome. Overall, these findings suggest proteasome inhibitors as potential latency reversing agents. In addition, HSF1/HSP90 involved in HIV transcription elongation, may serve as therapeutic targets in HIV eradication. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates Latent HIV Reactivation through Maintaining the Function of Positive Transcriptional Elongation Factor b (p-TEFb) under Proteasome Inhibition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Lin, Jian; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Ren, Ru-Xia; Wang, Keng; Xun, Tian-Rong; Shai, Yechiel; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of HIV in resting memory CD4+ T cells at a latent state is considered as the major barrier on the path to achieve a cure for HIV. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) were previously reported as latency reversing agents (LRAs) but the mechanism underlying this function is yet unclear. Here we demonstrate that PIs reactivate latent HIV ex vivo without global T cell activation, and may facilitate host innate immune responses. Mechanistically, latent HIV reactivation induced by PIs is mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) via the recruitment of the heat shock protein (HSP) 90-positive transcriptional elongation factor b (p-TEFb) complex. Specifically, HSP90 downstream HSF1 gives positive feedback to the reactivation process through binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and preventing it from undergoing degradation by the proteasome. Overall, these findings suggest proteasome inhibitors as potential latency reversing agents. In addition, HSF1/HSP90 involved in HIV transcription elongation, may serve as therapeutic targets in HIV eradication. PMID:27799305

  15. Bacterial, behavioral and environmental factors associated with early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, Francisco J; Weintraub, Jane A; Gansky, Stuart A; Hoover, Charles I; Featherstone, John D B

    2002-01-01

    The goals of this cross-sectional study were to characterize and compare demographic, behavioral, and environmental factors potentially associated with early childhood caries (ECC) and to assess salivary levels of mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LB) in underserved, predominantly Hispanic children. One hundred forty-six children aged 3 to 55 months with a range of caries experience were identified and examined. ECC was primarily associated with the presence of MS and lack of access to dental care. Salivary MS levels among young children with ECC were higher than would be expected in a dentally healthy population, but lower than levels reported among older children at high risk for caries. After adjustment for age, children with log10 MS > or = 3.0 or log10 LB > or = 1.5 were about five times as likely (OR=4.9, 95% CI=2.0, 12.0) to have ECC than those with lower bacterial levels. This study demonstrated a significant association between relatively low cariogenic bacterial levels and dental caries in infants and toddlers. Antibiotic use, exposure to lead, and anemia were not significantly associated with the number of decayed and filled surfaces or decayed and filled teeth. ECC correlated significantly with child's age and lack of dental insurance of the children, as well as inversely with both family income and the educational level of the mother of the child.

  16. Risk factors for cervicitis among women with bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Murray, Pamela J; Busse, Barbara; Meyn, Leslie; Krohn, Marijane; Hillier, Sharon L

    2006-03-01

    Cervicitis commonly occurs in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV), often without concomitant chlamydial or gonococcal infection. The risk factors for cervicitis have not been described. We characterized the risk factors for cervicitis, which is defined as endocervical mucopurulent discharge or easily induced bleeding, among women with BV who were 14-45 years of age. Associations between cervicitis and the characteristics of the subjects, including the presence of specific vaginal bacteria and chlamydial or gonococcal infection detected by strand displacement assay, were analyzed. Of 424 women with BV, 63 (15%) had cervicitis. Of these 63 women, only 8 (13%) had chlamydia or gonorrhea. The risk factors for cervicitis, adjusted for variables, included older age (Pcervicitis was seen for current douching or smoking, race, time since or frequency of intercourse, or presence or quantity of vaginal bacteria other than H2O2-producing Lactobacillus species. Cervicitis is common among women with BV and is associated with some risk factors that are distinct from those associated with endocervical infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis. Absence of H2O2-producing lactobacilli may contribute to the development of cervicitis.

  17. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  18. What doesn't kill them makes them stronger: an association between elongation factor 1-α overdominance in the sea star Pisaster ochraceus and "sea star wasting disease".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, John P; Schiebelhut, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a massive mortality event has killed millions of sea stars, of many different species, along the Pacific coast of North America. This disease event, known as 'sea star wasting disease' (SSWD), is linked to viral infection. In one affected sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), previous work had identified that the elongation factor 1-α locus (EF1A) harbored an intronic insertion allele that is lethal when homozygous yet appears to be maintained at moderate frequency in populations through increased fitness for heterozygotes. The environmental conditions supporting this increased fitness are unknown, but overdominance is often associated with disease. Here, we evaluate populations of P. ochraceus to identify the relationship between SSWD and EF1A genotype. Our data suggest that there may be significantly decreased occurrence of SSWD in individuals that are heterozygous at this locus. These results suggest further studies are warranted to understand the functional relationship between diversity at EF1A and survival in P. ochraceus.

  19. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brain and still has a high mortality. Bacterial meningitis is described as early as the 5th century B.C. in Hippocratic writings. Organisms causing meningitis were identified in the late 19th century. ...

  20. Determinants of Antibacterial Spectrum and Resistance Potential of the Elongation Factor G Inhibitor Argyrin B in Key Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adriana K; Woods, Angela L; Takeoka, Kenneth T; Shen, Xiaoyu; Wei, Jun-Rong; Caughlan, Ruth E; Dean, Charles R

    2017-04-01

    Argyrins are natural products with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Burkholderia multivorans , and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia We previously showed that argyrin B targets elongation factor G (FusA). Here, we show that argyrin B activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1 (MIC = 8 μg/ml) was not affected by deletion of the MexAB-OprM, MexXY-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, or MexEF-OprN efflux pump. However, argyrin B induced expression of MexXY, causing slight but reproducible antagonism with the MexXY substrate antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Argyrin B activity against Escherichia coli increased in a strain with nine tolC efflux pump partner genes deleted. Complementation experiments showed that argyrin was effluxed by AcrAB, AcrEF, and MdtFX. Argyrin B was inactive against Acinetobacter baumannii Differences between A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa FusA proteins at key residues for argyrin B interaction implied that natural target sequence variation impacted antibacterial activity. Consistent with this, expression of the sensitive P. aeruginosa FusA1 protein in A. baumannii conferred argyrin susceptibility, whereas resistant variants did not. Argyrin B was active against S. maltophilia (MIC = 4 μg/ml). Spontaneous resistance occurred at high frequency in the bacterium (circa 10 -7 ), mediated by mutational inactivation of fusA1 rather than by amino acid substitutions in the target binding region. This strongly suggested that resistance occurred at high frequency through loss of the sensitive FusA1, leaving an alternate argyrin-insensitive elongation factor. Supporting this, an additional fusA -like gene ( fusA2 ) is present in S. maltophilia that was strongly upregulated in response to mutational loss of fusA1 . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the mRNA-binding domain of elongation factor SelB from Escherichia coli in complex with RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, Nicolas; Fourmy, Dominique; Yoshizawa, Satoko

    2007-01-01

    The mRNA-binding domain of E. coli selenocysteine-specific elongation factor SelB (residues 478–614; SelB-WH3/4) was overproduced in E. coli and its cognate mRNA ligand, 23 nucleotides of the SECIS RNA hairpin, was prepared by in vitro transcription. The purified SelB-WH3/4–SECIS RNA complex crystallized in space group C2 and diffracted to 2.3 Å. In bacteria, selenocysteine (the 21st amino acid) is incorporated into proteins via machinery that includes SelB, a specific translational elongation factor. SelB binds to an mRNA hairpin called the selenocysteine-insertion sequence (SECIS) and delivers selenocysteyl-tRNA Sec to the ribosomal A site. The minimum C-terminal fragment (residues 478–614) of Escherichia coli SelB (SelB-WH3/4) required for SECIS binding has been overexpressed and purified. This protein was crystallized in complex with 23 nucleotides of the SECIS hairpin at 294 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A data set was collected to 2.3 Å resolution from a single crystal at 100 K using ESRF beamline BM-30. The crystal belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.50, b = 56.51, c = 48.41 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one WH3/4-domain–RNA complex. The Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 3.37 Å 3 Da −1 and the solvent content was estimated to be 67.4%

  2. Stoichiometry and Change of the mRNA Closed-Loop Factors as Translating Ribosomes Transit from Initiation to Elongation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, X.; Xi, W.; Toomey, S.; Chiang, Y.-CH.; Hašek, Jiří; Laue, T.M.; Denis, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), e0150616 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : DEADENYLATION IN-VIVO * SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE * POLY(A)-BINDING PROTEIN Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  3. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the

  4. Site of ADP-ribosylation and the RNA-binding site are situated in different domains of the elongation factor EF-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    One of the proteins participating in the process of elongation of polypeptide chains - elongation factor 2 (EF-2) - can be ADP-ribosylated at a unique amino acid residue - diphthamide. Since the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 at dipthamide leads to a loss of affinity of the factor for RNA while the presence of RNA inhibits the ADP-ribosylation reaction, it seemed probable to the authors that diphthamide participated directly in the binding of EF-2 to DNA. The experiments presented in this article showed that this was not the case: diphthamide and the RNA-binding site are situated on different domains of EF-2. Thus, ADP-ribosylation of factor EF-2 in one domain leads to a loss of the ability to bind to RNA in the other. The authors investigated the mutual arrangement of diphthamide and the RNA-binding site on the EF-2 molecule by preparing a factor from rabbit reticulocytes and subjecting it to proteolytic digestion with elastase. The factor was incubated with elastase for 15 min at 37 0 C at an enzyme:substrate ratio of 1:100 in buffer solution containing 20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.6, 10 mM KCl, 1 mM MgCl 2 , and 2 mM dithiothreitol. The reaction was stopped by adding para-methylsulfonyl fluoride to 50 micro-M. The authors obtained a preparation as a result of proteolysis and applied it on a column with RNA-Sepharose and separated into two fractions: RNA-binding and without affinity for RNA. The initial preparation and its fractions were subjected to exhaustive ADP-ribosylation in the presence of diphtheria toxin and [U- 14 C] nicotinaide adenine dinucleotide ([ 14 C]NAD) (296 mCi/mmole). The samples were analyzed electrophoretically in a polyacrylamide gel gradient in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. For the detection of [ 14 C] ADP-ribosylated components, the gels were dried and exposed with RM-V x-ray film

  5. Heat Shock-Induced Accumulation of Translation Elongation and Termination Factors Precedes Assembly of Stress Granules in S. cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Groušl, Tomáš; Malcová, Ivana; Pompach, Petr; Frýdlová, Ivana; Slabá, Renata; Senohrábková, Lenka; Nováková, Lenka; Hašek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), e57083 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1924; GA ČR GAP305/12/0480; GA ČR GPP305/10/P253 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CYTOPLASMIC PROCESSING BODIES * GUANINE-NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE * EUKARYOTIC MESSENGER-RNAS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  6. Functional role of the C-terminal tail of the archaeal ribosomal stalk in recruitment of two elongation factors to the sarcin/ricin loop of 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hirotatsu; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Murakami, Ryo; Ito, Kosuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Two types of elongation factors alternate in their binding to the factor-binding center of the ribosome. Both binding events are accompanied by GTP hydrolysis and drive the translation elongation cycle. The multicopy ribosomal protein family, termed the stalk, contributes actively to the elongation process. Recent evidence indicates that the mobile C-terminal tail of archaeal stalk aP1 directly interacts with both the elongation factors aEF1A and aEF2. To investigate the functional significance of these interactions in recruitment of elongation factors to the factor-binding center of the ribosome, we substituted the archaeal stalk complex aL10•aP1 for the bL10•bL12 stalk complex in the Escherichia coli 50S subunit. The resultant hybrid ribosome accessed archaeal aEF1A and aEF2 in a manner dependent on the C-terminal tail containing the hydrophobic residues Leu103, Leu106 and Phe107. Bases G2659 and A2660 in the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 23S rRNA were protected against DMS modification by both factors as was A1067 by aEF2. Mutagenesis indicated that this protection was dependent on the intact C-terminal tail of aP1. The results suggest a crucial role for the interactions between the stalk C-terminal tail and elongation factors in their recruitment to the SRL of 23S rRNA within the ribosome. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Kinetics of the interactions between yeast elongation factors 1A and 1Balpha, guanine nucleotides, and aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromadski, Kirill B; Schümmer, Tobias; Strømgaard, Anne

    2007-01-01

    of guanine nucleotides. At the concentrations of nucleotides and factors prevailing in the cell, the overall exchange rate is expected to be in the range of 6 s(-1), which is compatible with the rate of protein synthesis in the cell. eEF1A.GTP binds Phe-tRNA(Phe) with a K(d) of 3 nm, whereas eEF1A.GDP shows...... no significant binding, indicating that eEF1A has similar tRNA binding properties as its prokaryotic homolog, EF-Tu. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-7...

  8. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wei

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N protein, phosphoprotein (P and matrix (M protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  9. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Marcial, Daneth; Khan, Moshin; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Snape, Natale; Ghildyal, Reena; Harrich, David; Spann, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N) protein, phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  10. Translation elongation factor-1A1 (eEF1A1 localizes to the spine by domain III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Jung Cho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, there are two variants of eukaryotic peptideelongation factor 1A (eEF1A; formerly eEF-1α, eEF1A1 andeEF1A2, which have three well-conserved domains (DI, DII,and DIII. In neurons, eEF1A1 is the embryonic type, which isexpressed during embryonic development as well as the firsttwo postnatal weeks. In the present study, EGFP-tagged eEF1A1truncates were expressed in cortical neurons isolated from ratembryo (E18-19. Live cell images of transfected neurons showedthat DIII-containing EGFP-fusion proteins (EGFP-DIII, -DII-III,-DI-III formed clusters that were confined within somatodendriticdomains, while DIII-missing ones (EGFP-DI, -DII, -DI-II andcontrol EGFP were homogeneously dispersed throughout theneuron including axons. In dendrites, EGFP-DIII was targeted tothe heads of spine- and filopodia-like protrusions, where it wascolocalized with SynGAPα, a postsynaptic marker. Our dataindicate that DIII of eEF1A1 mediates formation of clusters andlocalization to spines. [BMB reports 2012; 45(4: 227-232

  11. Mapping the human translation elongation factor eEF1H complex using the yeast two-hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Friis, Irene; Jadidi, Mandana

    2002-01-01

    of in vitro experiments have been proposed for the macromolecular organization of the eEF1H complex. However, these models differ in various aspects. This might be due to the difficulties of handling, particularly the eEF1B beta and eEF1B gamma subunits in vitro. Here, the human eEF1H complex is for the first...... time mapped using the yeast two-hybrid system, which is a powerful in vivo technique for analysing protein-protein interactions. The following complexes were observed: eEF1A1:eEF1B alpha, eEF1A1:eEF1B beta, eEF1B beta:eEF1B beta, eEF1B alpha:eEF1B gamma, eEF1B beta:eEF1B gamma and eEF1B alpha:eEF1B...... gamma:eEF1B beta, where the last was observed using a three-hybrid approach. Surprisingly, eEF1A2 showed no or only little affinity for the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors. Truncated versions of the subunits of eEF1B were used to orientate these subunits within the resulting model. The model unit...

  12. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 enhances the antiviral response in porcine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Carvajal, Lisbeth; Singh, Neetu; de los Santos, Teresa; Rodríguez, Luis L; Long, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7), the "master regulator" of IFN transcription. Previous studies have suggested that mouse cells depleted of 4E-BPs are more sensitive to IFNβ treatment and had lower viral loads as compared to wild type (WT) cells. However, such approach has not been tested as an antiviral strategy in livestock species. In this study, we tested the antiviral activity of porcine cells depleted of 4E-BP1 by a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering system. We found that 4E-BP1 knockout (KO) porcine cells had increased expression of IFNα and β, IFN stimulated genes, and significant reduction in vesicular stomatitis virus titer as compare to WT cells. No phenotypical changes associated with CRISPR/Cas9 manipulation were observed in 4E-BP1 KO cells. This work highlights the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to enhance the antiviral response in porcine cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of bacteriology and risk factor analysis of asymptomatic bacterial colonization in pacemaker replacement patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Ming Chu

    Full Text Available Recent researches revealed that asymptomatic bacterial colonization on PMs might be ubiquitous and increase the risk of clinical PM infection. Early diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic bacterial colonization could provide opportunity for targeted preventive measures.The present study explores the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in pacemaker replacement patients without signs of infection, and to analyze risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization.From June 2011 to December 2013, 118 patients underwent pacemaker replacement or upgrade. Identification of bacteria was carried out by bacterial culture and 16S rRNA sequencing. Clinical risk characteristics were analyzed.The total bacterial positive rate was 37.3% (44 cases, and the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus detection rate was the highest. Twenty two (18.6% patients had positive bacterial culture results, of which 50% had coagulase-negative staphylococcus. The bacterial DNA detection rate was 36.4 % (43 cases. Positive bacterial DNA results from pocket tissues and the surface of the devices were 22.0% and 29.7%, respectively. During follow-up (median, 27.0 months, three patients (6.8%, 3/44 became symptomatic with the same genus of microorganism, S. aureus (n=2 and S. epidermidis (n=1. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization.There was a high incidence of asymptomatic bacterial colonization in pacemaker patients with independent risk factors. Bacterial culture combined genetic testing could improve the detection rate.

  14. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Melanie C; Strobel, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Kress, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Translation elongation factor eEF1A2 is a potential oncoprotein that is overexpressed in two-thirds of breast tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller William R

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue-specific translation elongation factor eEF1A2 was recently shown to be a potential oncogene that is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Although there is no direct evidence for an involvement of eEF1A2 in breast cancer, the genomic region to which EEF1A2 maps, 20q13, is frequently amplified in breast tumours. We therefore sought to establish whether eEF1A2 expression might be upregulated in breast cancer. Methods eEF1A2 is highly similar (98% to the near-ubiquitously expressed eEF1A1 (formerly known as EF1-α making analysis with commercial antibodies difficult. We have developed specific anti-eEF1A2 antibodies and used them in immunohistochemical analyses of tumour samples. We report the novel finding that although eEF1A2 is barely detectable in normal breast it is moderately to strongly expressed in two-thirds of breast tumours. This overexpression is strongly associated with estrogen receptor positivity. Conclusion eEF1A2 should be considered as a putative oncogene in breast cancer that may be a useful diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for a high proportion of breast tumours. The oncogenicity of eEF1A2 may be related to its role in protein synthesis or to its potential non-canonical functions in cytoskeletal remodelling or apoptosis.

  16. Translation elongation factor eEF1A2 is a potential oncoprotein that is overexpressed in two-thirds of breast tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, Victoria AL; Newbery, Helen J; Wray, Naomi R; Jackson, Juliette; Larionov, Alexey; Miller, William R; Dixon, J Michael; Abbott, Catherine M

    2005-01-01

    The tissue-specific translation elongation factor eEF1A2 was recently shown to be a potential oncogene that is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Although there is no direct evidence for an involvement of eEF1A2 in breast cancer, the genomic region to which EEF1A2 maps, 20q13, is frequently amplified in breast tumours. We therefore sought to establish whether eEF1A2 expression might be upregulated in breast cancer. eEF1A2 is highly similar (98%) to the near-ubiquitously expressed eEF1A1 (formerly known as EF1-α) making analysis with commercial antibodies difficult. We have developed specific anti-eEF1A2 antibodies and used them in immunohistochemical analyses of tumour samples. We report the novel finding that although eEF1A2 is barely detectable in normal breast it is moderately to strongly expressed in two-thirds of breast tumours. This overexpression is strongly associated with estrogen receptor positivity. eEF1A2 should be considered as a putative oncogene in breast cancer that may be a useful diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for a high proportion of breast tumours. The oncogenicity of eEF1A2 may be related to its role in protein synthesis or to its potential non-canonical functions in cytoskeletal remodelling or apoptosis

  17. The C-terminal helix of ribosomal P stalk recognizes a hydrophobic groove of elongation factor 2 in a novel fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzawa, Takehito; Kato, Koji; Girodat, Dylan; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kumakura, Yuki; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Uchiumi, Toshio; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2018-04-06

    Archaea and eukaryotes have ribosomal P stalks composed of anchor protein P0 and aP1 homodimers (archaea) or P1•P2 heterodimers (eukaryotes). These P stalks recruit translational GTPases to the GTPase-associated center in ribosomes to provide energy during translation. The C-terminus of the P stalk is known to selectively recognize GTPases. Here we investigated the interaction between the P stalk and elongation factor 2 by determining the structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii EF-2 (PhoEF-2) in the Apo-form, GDP-form, GMPPCP-form (GTP-form), and GMPPCP-form bound with 11 C-terminal residues of P1 (P1C11). Helical structured P1C11 binds to a hydrophobic groove between domain G and subdomain G' of PhoEF-2, where is completely different from that of aEF-1α in terms of both position and sequence, implying that such interaction characteristic may be requested by how GTPases perform their functions on the ribosome. Combining PhoEF-2 P1-binding assays with a structural comparison of current PhoEF-2 structures and molecular dynamics model of a P1C11-bound GDP form, the conformational changes of the P1C11-binding groove in each form suggest that in response to the translation process, the groove has three states: closed, open, and release for recruiting and releasing GTPases.

  18. A Leader Intron of a Soybean Elongation Factor 1A (eEF1A) Gene Interacts with Proximal Promoter Elements to Regulate Gene Expression in Synthetic Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; McHale, Leah K; Finer, John J

    2016-01-01

    Introns, especially the first intron in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR), can significantly impact gene expression via intron-mediated enhancement (IME). In this study, we demonstrate the leader intron of a soybean elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) gene (GmScreamM8) was essential for the high activity of the native promoter. Furthermore, the interaction of the GmScreamM8 leader intron with regulatory element sequences from several soybean eEF1A promoters was studied using synthetic promoters, which consisted of element tetramers upstream of a core promoter used to regulate a green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter gene. Element tetramers, placed upstream of a GmScreamM8 core promoter, showed very high activity using both transient expression in lima bean cotyledons and stable expression in soybean hairy roots, only if the native leader intron was included, suggesting an interaction between intronic sequences and promoter elements. Partial deletions of the leader intron showed that a 222 bp intronic sequence significantly contributed to very high levels of GFP expression. Generation of synthetic intron variants with a monomeric or trimeric repeat of the 222 bp intronic sequence, yielded almost two-fold higher expression compared to the original intron, while partial deletion of the 222 bp intronic repeated sequence significantly decreased gene expression, indicating that this intronic sequence was essential for the intron-element interaction enhancement.

  19. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  20. Dissecting the role of the elongation factor 1A isoforms in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by liposome-mediated delivery of siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Rossella; Scaggiante, Bruna; Guerra, Chiara; Pozzato, Gabriele; Grassi, Mario; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Perrone, Francesca; Ferrari, Cinzia; Trotta, Francesco; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2017-06-20

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a protein involved in protein synthesis, has two major isoforms, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. Despite the evidences of their involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the quantitative contribution of each of the two isoforms to the disease is unknown. We depleted the two isoforms by means of siRNAs and studied the effects in three different HCC cell lines. Particular care was dedicated to select siRNAs able to target each of the two isoform without affecting the other one. This is not a trivial aspect due to the high sequence homology between eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. The selected siRNAs can specifically deplete either eEF1A1 or eEF1A2. This, in turn, results in an impairment of cell vitality, growth and arrest in the G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle. Notably, these effects are quantitatively superior following eEF1A1 than eEF1A2 depletion. Moreover, functional tests revealed that the G1/G0 block induced by eEF1A1 depletion depends on the down-regulation of the transcription factor E2F1, a known player in HCC. In conclusion, our data indicate that the independent targeting of the two eEF1A isoforms is effective in reducing HCC cell growth and that eEF1A1 depletion may result in a more evident effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  2. BACTERIOLOGY AND RISK FACTORS OF BACTERIAL KERATITIS IN JIMMA, SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremariam, Tewelde Tesfaye

    2015-10-01

    In East Africa, particularly in Ethiopia, bacterial keratitis is a major cause of blindness. The aims of this study were to identify risk factors of bacterial keratitis and the spectrum of bacterial etiologies, and to assess the in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of these bacterial isolates at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia. A prospective study was employed from January 2012 to June 2012 from which a total of 24 patients with bacterial keratitis were included in the study. Corneal scrapings were collected, transported and microbiologically processed using standard operating procedures. Four different predisposing factors for bacterial keratitis were identified: corneal trauma 9 (37.5%), blepharitis 7 (29.2%), herpetic keratitis, and use of contaminated medications 4. Bilateral corneal infection was found in 5 (20.8%) of the cases. A total of 24 corneal scrapings were collected for microbiological evaluation, of which 20 (83%) had bacterial growth. The isolated bacterial pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10 (41.7%), Staphyloccus aureus 5 (20.8%), Serratia marcescens 3 (12.5%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 (8.3%). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 85% of Gram-negative bacilli were susceptible to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin, while 86% of Gram-positive cocci were susceptible to vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin. Corneal trauma was the most common risk factor for bacterial keratitis followed by blepharitis. Bacteriological analysis of corneal scrapings also revealed that P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate followed by S. aureus; the antibiotic with the highest susceptibility was ciprofloxacin. As drug resistance among bacterial pathogens is an evolving process, routine surveillance and monitoring studies should be conducted to provide an update and most effective empirical treatment for bacterial keratitis.

  3. The Composition and Spatial Patterns of Bacterial Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in 19 Wastewater Treatment Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bing; Xia, Yu; Wen, Xianghua; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance are of concern for environmental safety and public health. Accumulating evidence suggests that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are as an important sink and source of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Virulence genes (encoding virulence factors) are good indicators for bacterial pathogenic potentials. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathogenic potentials and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs, bacterial vir...

  4. Succinate dehydrogenase assembly factor 2 is needed for assembly and activity of mitochondrial complex II and for normal root elongation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria complex II (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) plays a central role in respiratory metabolism as a component of both the electron transport chain and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We report the identification of an SDH assembly factor by analysis of T-DNA insertions in At5g51040, a protein with unknown function that was identified by mass spectrometry analysis as a low abundance mitochondrial protein. This gene is co-expressed with a number of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, including SDH1-1, and has low partial sequence similarity to human SDHAF2, a protein required for flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) insertion into SDH. In contrast to observations of other SDH deficient lines in Arabidopsis, the sdhaf2 line did not affect photosynthetic rate or stomatal conductance, but instead showed inhibition of primary root elongation with early lateral root emergence, presumably due to the low SDH activity caused by the reduced abundance of SDHAF2. Both roots and leaves showed succinate accumulation but different responses in the abundance of other organic acids and amino acids assayed. Isolated mitochondria showed lowered SDH1 protein abundance, lowered maximal SDH activity and less protein-bound flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at the molecular mass of SDH1 in the gel separation. The short root phenotype and SDH function of sdhaf2 was fully complemented by transformation with SDHAF2. Application of the SDH inhibitor, malonate, phenocopied the sdhaf2 root architecture in WT. Whole root respiratory assays showed no difference between WT and sdhaf2, but micro-respirometry of the tips of roots clearly showed low oxygen consumption in sdhaf2 which could explain a metabolic deficit responsible for root tip growth. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Protective immunity against acute toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice induced by a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii elongation factor 1-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, YuJian; Sun, XiaoNi; Zhang, ZhenChao; Liu, TingQi; Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Hassan, Ibrahim Adam; Xu, LiXin; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Li, XiangRui

    2015-10-24

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect almost all warm-blood animals including human beings. The high incidence and severe damage that can be caused by T. gondii infection clearly indicates the need for the development of a vaccine. T. gondii elongation factor 1-alpha (TgEF-1α) plays an important role in pathogenesis and host cell invasion for this parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding TgEF-1α gene against acute T. gondii infection in mice. A DNA vaccine (pVAX-EF-1α) encoding T. gondii EF-1a (TgEF-1α) gene was constructed and its immune response and protective efficacy against lethal challenge in BALB/c mice were evaluated. Mice inoculated with the pVAX-EF-1α vaccine had a high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies and produced high levels of IFN-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-17. The expression levels of MHC-I and MHC-II molecules as well as the percentages of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in mice vaccinated with pVAX-EF-1α were significantly increased (p control groups (blank control, PBS, and pVAXI). Immunization with pVAX-EF-1α significantly (p control groups which died within 8 days. DNA vaccination with pVAX-EF-1α triggered strong humoral and cellular responses and induced effective protection in mice against acute T. gondii infection, indicating that TgEF-1α is a promising vaccine candidate against acute toxoplasmosis.

  6. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  7. Isoforms of elongation factor eEF1A may be differently regulated at post-transcriptional level in breast cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vislovukh A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A exists as two 98 % homologous isoforms: eEF1A1 (A1 and eEF1A2 (A2 which are tissue and development specific. Despite high homology in an open reading frame (ORF region, mRNAs coding for eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 are different in their untranslated regions (UTR, suggesting a possibility of their dissimilar post-transcriptional regulation. Aim. To analyze the existence of cis-acting motifs in the UTRs of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs, to confirm the possibility of post-transcriptional control of eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 expression. Methods. An ensemble of bioinformatic methods was applied to predict regulatory motifs in the UTRs of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was employed to detect post-transcriptional regulation of eEF1A1/A2 expression. Results. Numerous regulatory motifs in the UTR of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs were found bioinformatically. The experimental evidence was obtained for the existence of negative regulation of EEF1A1 and positive regulation of EEF1A2 mRNA in the model of breast cancer development. Conclusions. EEF1A1 and EEF1A2 mRNAs contain distinct motifs in the UTRs and are differently regulated in cancer suggesting the possibility of their control by different cellular signals.

  8. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Jiang

    Full Text Available Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70 are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  9. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman MT (United States); Cassak, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown WV (United States); Priest, Eric R. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-20

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s{sup −1}. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  10. Elongator and SPT4/SPT5 complexes as proxy to study RNA polymerase II transcript elongation control of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Dürr, Julius; Woloszynska, Magdalena; Grasser, Klaus D

    2014-10-01

    The elongation phase of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription process is dynamic and regulated. Elongator and SUPPRESSOR OF Ty4 (SPT4)/SPT5 are transcript elongation factors that contribute to the regulation of mRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase II in the chromatin context. Recently, the Elongator complex consisting of six subunits and the SPT4/SPT5 heterodimer were isolated from Arabidopsis. Mutant plants affected in the expression of Elongator or SPT4/SPT5 share various auxin-signaling phenotypes. In line with that observation, auxin-related genes are prominent among the genes differentially expressed in these mutants. Exemplified by Elongator and SPT4/SPT5, we discuss here the role that transcript elongation factors may play in the control of plant growth and development. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Elongated Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan N. (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Perusich, Stephen A. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Elongated microcapsules, such as elongated hydrophobic-core and hydrophilic-core microcapsules, may be formed by pulse stirring an emulsion or shearing an emulsion between two surfaces moving at different velocities. The elongated microcapsules may be dispersed in a coating formulation, such as paint.

  12. The Level of Autoantibodies Targeting Eukaryote Translation Elongation Factor 1 α1 and Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme 2L3 in Nondiabetic Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunhee G. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence of novel type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM antibodies targeting eukaryote translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 autoantibody (EEF1A1-AAb and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 2L3 autoantibody (UBE2L3-AAb has been shown to be negatively correlated with age in T1DM subjects. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether age affects the levels of these two antibodies in nondiabetic subjects.MethodsEEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels in nondiabetic control subjects (n=150 and T1DM subjects (n=101 in various ranges of age (18 to 69 years were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cutoff point for the presence of each autoantibody was determined based on control subjects using the formula: [mean absorbance+3×standard deviation].ResultsIn nondiabetic subjects, there were no significant correlations between age and EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels. However, there was wide variation in EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels among control subjects <40 years old; the prevalence of both EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb in these subjects was 4.4%. When using cutoff points determined from the control subjects <40 years old, the prevalence of both autoantibodies in T1DM subjects was decreased (EEFA1-AAb, 15.8% to 8.9%; UBE2L3-AAb, 10.9% to 7.9% when compared to the prevalence using the cutoff derived from the totals for control subjects.ConclusionThere was no association between age and EEF1A1-AAb or UBE2L3-AAb levels in nondiabetic subjects. However, the wide variation in EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels apparent among the control subjects <40 years old should be taken into consideration when determining the cutoff reference range for the diagnosis of T1DM.

  13. Insights into the phylogeny of Northern Hemisphere Armillaria: Neighbor-net and Bayesian analyses of translation elongation factor 1-α gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfenstein, Ned B; Stewart, Jane E; Ota, Yuko; Hanna, John W; Richardson, Bryce A; Ross-Davis, Amy L; Elías-Román, Rubén D; Korhonen, Kari; Keča, Nenad; Iturritxa, Eugenia; Alvarado-Rosales, Dionicio; Solheim, Halvor; Brazee, Nicholas J; Łakomy, Piotr; Cleary, Michelle R; Hasegawa, Eri; Kikuchi, Taisei; Garza-Ocañas, Fortunato; Tsopelas, Panaghiotis; Rigling, Daniel; Prospero, Simone; Tsykun, Tetyana; Bérubé, Jean A; Stefani, Franck O P; Jafarpour, Saeideh; Antonín, Vladimír; Tomšovský, Michal; McDonald, Geral I; Woodward, Stephen; Kim, Mee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Armillaria possesses several intriguing characteristics that have inspired wide interest in understanding phylogenetic relationships within and among species of this genus. Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence-based analyses of Armillaria provide only limited information for phylogenetic studies among widely divergent taxa. More recent studies have shown that translation elongation factor 1-α (tef1) sequences are highly informative for phylogenetic analysis of Armillaria species within diverse global regions. This study used Neighbor-net and coalescence-based Bayesian analyses to examine phylogenetic relationships of newly determined and existing tef1 sequences derived from diverse Armillaria species from across the Northern Hemisphere, with Southern Hemisphere Armillaria species included for reference. Based on the Bayesian analysis of tef1 sequences, Armillaria species from the Northern Hemisphere are generally contained within the following four superclades, which are named according to the specific epithet of the most frequently cited species within the superclade: (i) Socialis/Tabescens (exannulate) superclade including Eurasian A. ectypa, North American A. socialis (A. tabescens), and Eurasian A. socialis (A. tabescens) clades; (ii) Mellea superclade including undescribed annulate North American Armillaria sp. (Mexico) and four separate clades of A. mellea (Europe and Iran, eastern Asia, and two groups from North America); (iii) Gallica superclade including Armillaria Nag E (Japan), multiple clades of A. gallica (Asia and Europe), A. calvescens (eastern North America), A. cepistipes (North America), A. altimontana (western USA), A. nabsnona (North America and Japan), and at least two A. gallica clades (North America); and (iv) Solidipes/Ostoyae superclade including two A. solidipes/ostoyae clades (North America), A. gemina (eastern USA), A. solidipes/ostoyae (Eurasia), A. cepistipes (Europe and Japan), A. sinapina (North America and Japan), and A. borealis

  14. Molecular characterization, expression analysis and RNAi knock-down of elongation factor 1α and 1γ from Nilaparvata lugens and its yeast-like symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W X; Zhu, T H; Li, K L; Chen, L F; Lai, F X; Fu, Q

    2017-06-01

    In the present paper, four cDNAs encoding the alpha and gamma subunits of elongation factor 1 (EF-1) were cloned and sequenced from Nilaparvata lugens, named NlEF-1α, NlEF-1γ, and its yeast-like symbiont (YLS), named YsEF-1α and YsEF-1γ, respectively. Comparisons with sequences from other species indicated a greater conservation for EF-1α than for EF-1γ. NlEF-1α has two identical copies. The deduced amino acid sequence homology of NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ is 96 and 64%, respectively, compared with Homalodisca vitripennis and Locusta migratoria. The deduced amino acid sequence homology of YsEF-1α and YsEF-1γ is 96 and 74%, respectively, compared with Metarhizium anisopliae and Ophiocordyceps sinensis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that the expression level of NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ mRNA in hemolymph, ovary, fat body and salivary glands were higher than the midgut and leg tissue. YsEF-1α and YsEF-1γ was highly expressed in fat body. The expression level of NlEF-1α was higher than that of NlEF-1γ. Through RNA interference (RNAi) of the two genes, the mortality of nymph reached 92.2% at the 11th day after treatment and the ovarian development was severely hindered. The RT-qPCR analysis verified the correlation between mortality, sterility and the down-regulation of the target genes. The expression and synthesis of vitellogenin (Vg) protein in insects injected with NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was significantly lower than control groups. Attempts to knockdown the YsEF-1 genes in the YLS was unsuccessful. However, the phenotype of N. lugens injected with YsEF-1α dsRNA was the same as that injected with NlEF-1α dsRNA, possibly due to the high similarity (up to 71.9%) in the nucleotide sequences between NlEF-1α and YsEF-1α. We demonstrated that partial silencing of NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ genes caused lethal and sterility effect on N. lugens. NlEF-1γ shares low identity with that of

  15. [Risk factors of bacterial nosocomial infection after pediatric liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Gao, W

    2017-08-02

    Objective: To analyze the risk factors of nosocomial infection after liver transplantation in children, so as to provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of nosocomial infection. Method: Clinical data of 223 pediatric patients undergoing liver transplantation between January 2014 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to investigate the risk factors of infection after transplantation. Result: Totally 51 children were infected among the 223 patients, the infection rate was 22.86%(51/223). Among the 74 cases with infection, 38 were infected with the blood (included peripherally inserted central catheters) accounting for 51.35 %; and surgical site infection accounted for 21.62%, the respiratory tract infections accounted for 18.92% and the other infections accounted for 8.11%. Totally 74 strains of infectious pathogens were found in 51 cases of infected patients, including Gram-negative bacteria accounting for 48.65%, Gram-positive bacteria accounting for 44.59% and the fungus accounting for 6.76%. According to a variety of survey factors, univariate analysis showed factors of hospitalization time, hospitalization time before surgery, surgical duration, and reoperation had statistically significant association with nosocomial infection( P nosocomial infection after pediatric liver transplantation. Conclusion: There are a variety of risk factors for the postoperative infections after liver transplantation in children. It is necessary to take into account the surgery factor, medical staff factor and hospital management factor. Management strengthening of these factors is necessary to reduce the infection rate.

  16. Procalcitonin as a potential predicting factor for prognosis in bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong Soo; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Si Hyung; Kim, Jinseung; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Byung In; Park, Kang Min

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis in patients with bacterial meningitis. This was a retrospective study of 80 patients with bacterial meningitis (13 patients died). In addition, 58 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed between the groups. We used the mortality rate during hospitalization as a marker of prognosis in patients with bacterial meningitis. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that high serum levels of procalcitonin (>0.12ng/mL) were an independently significant variable for differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis. The risk of having bacterial meningitis with high serum levels of procalcitonin was at least 6 times higher than the risk of having viral meningitis (OR=6.76, 95% CI: 1.84-24.90, p=0.004). In addition, we found that high levels of procalcitonin (>7.26ng/mL) in the blood were an independently significant predictor for death in patients with bacterial meningitis. The risk of death in patients with bacterial meningitis with high serum levels of procalcitonin may be at least 9 times higher than those without death (OR=9.09, 95% CI: 1.74-47.12, p=0.016). We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis, and it is also a potential predicting factor for prognosis in patients with bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acanthamoeba, fungal, and bacterial keratitis: a comparison of risk factors and clinical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Jeena; Lalitha, Prajna; Prajna, N. Venkatesh; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Das, Manoranjan; D’Silva, Sean S.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Borkar, Durga S.; Esterberg, Elizabeth J.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors and clinical signs that may differentiate between bacterial, fungal, and acanthamoeba keratitis among patients presenting with presumed infectious keratitis. Design Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Methods We examined the medical records of 115 patients with laboratory-proven bacterial keratitis, 115 patients with laboratory-proven fungal keratitis, and 115 patients with laboratory-proven acanthamoeba keratitis seen at Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, India, from 2006–2011. Risk factors and clinical features of the three organisms were compared using multinomial logistic regression. Results Of 95 patients with bacterial keratitis, 103 patients with fungal keratitis, and 93 patients with acanthamoeba keratitis who had medical records available for review, 287 (99%) did not wear contact lenses. Differentiating features were more common for acanthamoeba keratitis than for bacterial or fungal keratitis. Compared to patients with bacterial or fungal keratitis, patients with acanthamoeba keratitis were more likely to be younger and to have a longer duration of symptoms, and to have a ring infiltrate or disease confined to the epithelium. Conclusions Risk factors and clinical examination findings can be useful for differentiating acanthamoeba keratitis from bacterial and fungal keratitis. PMID:24200232

  18. Acanthamoeba, fungal, and bacterial keratitis: a comparison of risk factors and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Jeena; Lalitha, Prajna; Prajna, N Venkatesh; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Das, Manoranjan; D'Silva, Sean S; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Borkar, Durga S; Esterberg, Elizabeth J; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    To determine risk factors and clinical signs that may differentiate between bacterial, fungal, and acanthamoeba keratitis among patients presenting with presumed infectious keratitis. Hospital-based cross-sectional study. We examined the medical records of 115 patients with laboratory-proven bacterial keratitis, 115 patients with laboratory-proven fungal keratitis, and 115 patients with laboratory-proven acanthamoeba keratitis seen at Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, India, from 2006-2011. Risk factors and clinical features of the 3 organisms were compared using multinomial logistic regression. Of 95 patients with bacterial keratitis, 103 patients with fungal keratitis, and 93 patients with acanthamoeba keratitis who had medical records available for review, 287 (99%) did not wear contact lenses. Differentiating features were more common for acanthamoeba keratitis than for bacterial or fungal keratitis. Compared to patients with bacterial or fungal keratitis, patients with acanthamoeba keratitis were more likely to be younger and to have a longer duration of symptoms, and to have a ring infiltrate or disease confined to the epithelium. Risk factors and clinical examination findings can be useful for differentiating acanthamoeba keratitis from bacterial and fungal keratitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Host Plant Factors on the Bacterial Communities Associated with Two Whitefly Sibling Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Although discrepancy in the specific traits and ecological characteristics of Bemisia tabaci between species are partially attributed to the B. tabaci-associated bacteria, the factors that affect the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacteria are not well-understood. We used the metagenomic approach to characterize the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community because the approach is an effective tool to identify the bacteria.To investigate the effects of the host plant and a virus, tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, on the bacterial communities of B. tabaci sibling species B and Q, we analyzed the bacterial communities associated with whitefly B and Q collected from healthy cotton, healthy tomato, and TYLCV-infected tomato. The analysis used miseq-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene. For the bacteria associated with B. tabaci, we found that the influence of the host plant species was greater than that of the whitefly cryptic species. With further analysis of host plants infected with the TYLCV, the virus had no significant effects on the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community.The effects of different plant hosts and TYLCV-infection on the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacterial communities were successfully analyzed in this study. To explain why B. tabaci sibling species with different host ranges differ in performance, the analysis of the bacterial community may be essential to the explanation.

  20. Effects of Host Plant Factors on the Bacterial Communities Associated with Two Whitefly Sibling Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming-Ming; Guo, Lei; Tao, Yun-Li; Zhang, You-Jun; Wan, Fang-Hao; Chu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although discrepancy in the specific traits and ecological characteristics of Bemisia tabaci between species are partially attributed to the B. tabaci-associated bacteria, the factors that affect the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacteria are not well-understood. We used the metagenomic approach to characterize the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community because the approach is an effective tool to identify the bacteria. To investigate the effects of the host plant and a virus, tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), on the bacterial communities of B. tabaci sibling species B and Q, we analyzed the bacterial communities associated with whitefly B and Q collected from healthy cotton, healthy tomato, and TYLCV-infected tomato. The analysis used miseq-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene. For the bacteria associated with B. tabaci, we found that the influence of the host plant species was greater than that of the whitefly cryptic species. With further analysis of host plants infected with the TYLCV, the virus had no significant effects on the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community. The effects of different plant hosts and TYLCV-infection on the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacterial communities were successfully analyzed in this study. To explain why B. tabaci sibling species with different host ranges differ in performance, the analysis of the bacterial community may be essential to the explanation.

  1. Eye-banking risk factors for fungal endophthalmitis compared with bacterial endophthalmitis after corneal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sohela S; Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2005-04-01

    To track the relative frequency and explore possible risk factors of fungal compared with bacterial endophthalmitis after corneal transplantation. Case-comparison study nested in a surveillance registry. We examined, among recipients who underwent surgery from January 1991 through December 2003, demographic and eye-banking characteristics of postkeratoplasty endophthalmitis cases that were reported to the Eye Bank Association of America by US eye banks. Potential predictors of fungal compared with bacterial endophthalmitis were examined using multiple logistic regression. Of 234 reported cases of postkeratoplasty endophthalmitis reported by US eye bank, 46 cases (19.7%) were fungal, and 130 cases (55.6%) were bacterial. Concordant cultures of the residual donor corneoscleral rim or preservation medium occurred significantly more often with fungal than bacterial endophthalmitis (P = .009). After the introduction of Optisol-GS, the odds of bacterial relative to fungal endophthalmitis decreased by 77% (95% confidence interval, 44% - 91%). After adjustment for the preservation method and other eye-banking variables, the odds of fungal endophthalmitis was 3.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 - 7.4) times that of bacterial endophthalmitis, when donor corneal preservation was 4 days or longer. The frequency of postkeratoplasty bacterial endophthalmitis compared with fungal endophthalmitis fell after widespread use of a corneal preservation medium supplemented with gentamicin and streptomycin. Further improvements in corneal preservation procedures are needed.

  2. Intrinsic factors of Peltigera lichens influence the structure of the associated soil bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Diego; Clavero-León, Claudia; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2016-11-01

    Definition of lichens has evolved from bi(tri)partite associations to multi-species symbioses, where bacteria would play essential roles. Besides, although soil bacterial communities are known to be affected by edaphic factors, when lichens grow upon them these could become less preponderant. We hypothesized that the structure of both the lichen microbiota and the microbiota in the soil underneath lichens is shaped by lichen intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this work, intrinsic factors corresponded to mycobiont and cyanobiont identities of Peltigera lichens, metabolite diversity and phenoloxidase activity and extrinsic factors involved the site of the forest where lichens grow. Likewise, the genetic and metabolic structure of the lichen and soil bacterial communities were analyzed by fingerprinting. Among the results, metabolite diversity was inversely related to the genetic structure of bacterial communities of lichens and soils, highlighting the far-reaching effect of these substances; while phenoloxidase activity was inversely related to the metabolic structure only of the lichen bacterial microbiota, presuming a more limited effect of the products of these enzymes. Soil bacterial microbiota was different depending on the site and, strikingly, according to the cyanobiont present in the lichen over them, which could indicate an influence of the photobiont metabolism on the availability of soil nutrients. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Factors Associated With Conjunctival Bacterial Culture Positivity In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The associated risk factors with conjunctival culture positivity in patients scheduled for cataract surgery were: age 50 years and above (p value=0.004, risk ratio 1.4), male gender (p value=0.032, risk ratio 1.6) and low literacy level (p value=0.031, risk ratio 1.8). It was recommended that elderly, male and illiterate patients ...

  4. Large amplitude oscillatory elongation flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Laillé, Philippe; Yu, Kaijia

    2008-01-01

    A filament stretching rheometer (FSR) was used for measuring the elongation flow with a large amplitude oscillative elongation imposed upon the flow. The large amplitude oscillation imposed upon the elongational flow as a function of the time t was defined as epsilon(t) =(epsilon) over dot(0)t...... with a molecular weight of 145 kg/ mol was subjected to the oscillative flow. The onset of the steady periodic regime is reached at the same Hencky strain as the onset of the steady elongational viscosity ( Lambda = 0). The integral molecular stress function formulation within the 'interchain pressure' concept...

  5. Seeds' physicochemical traits and mucilage protection against aluminum effect during germination and root elongation as important factors in a biofuel seed crop (Ricinus communis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Giovanni Eustáquio Alves; Ramos, Flávia Toledo; de Faria, Ana Paula; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa

    2014-10-01

    We determined the length, volume, dry biomass, and density in seeds of five castor bean cultivars and verified notable physicochemical trait differences. Seeds were then subjected to different toxic aluminum (Al) concentrations to evaluate germination, relative root elongation, and the role of root apices' rhizosphere mucilage layer. Seeds' physicochemical traits were associated with Al toxicity responses, and the absence of Al in cotyledons near to the embryo was revealed by Al-hematoxylin staining, indicating that Al did not induce significant germination reduction rates between cultivars. However, in the more sensitive cultivar, Al was found around the embryo, contributing to subsequent growth inhibition. After this, to investigate the role of mucilage in Al tolerance, an assay was conducted using NH4Cl to remove root mucilage before or after exposure to different Al concentrations. Sequentially, the roots were stained with hematoxylin and a quantitative analysis of staining intensity was obtained. These results revealed the significant contribution of the mucilage layer to Al toxicity responses in castor bean seedlings. Root growth elongation under Al toxicity confirmed the role of the mucilage layer, which jointly indicated the differential Al tolerance between cultivars and an efficient Al-exclusion mechanism in the tolerant cultivar.

  6. Home life: factors structuring the bacterial diversity found within and between homes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R Dunn

    Full Text Available Most of our time is spent indoors where we are exposed to a wide array of different microorganisms living on surfaces and in the air of our homes. Despite their ubiquity and abundance, we have a limited understanding of the microbial diversity found within homes and how the composition and diversity of microbial communities change across different locations within the home. Here we examined the diversity of bacterial communities found in nine distinct locations within each of forty homes in the Raleigh-Durham area of North Carolina, USA, using high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that each of the sampled locations harbored bacterial communities that were distinct from one another with surfaces that are regularly cleaned typically harboring lower levels of diversity than surfaces that are cleaned infrequently. These location-specific differences in bacterial communities could be directly related to usage patterns and differences in the likely sources of bacteria dispersed onto these locations. Finally, we examined whether the variability across homes in bacterial diversity could be attributed to outdoor environmental factors, indoor habitat structure, or the occupants of the home. We found that the presence of dogs had a significant effect on bacterial community composition in multiple locations within homes as the homes occupied by dogs harbored more diverse communities and higher relative abundances of dog-associated bacterial taxa. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the types of bacteria deposited on surfaces outside the home and those found inside the home, highlighting that microbes from outside the home can have a direct effect on the microbial communities living on surfaces within our homes. Together this work provides the first comprehensive analysis of the microbial communities found in the home and the factors that shape the structure of these communities both within and between homes.

  7. Structure of a bacterial energy-coupling factor transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingliang; Fu, Guobin; Pan, Xiaojing; Wu, Jianping; Gong, Xinqi; Wang, Jiawei; Shi, Yigong

    2013-05-09

    The energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters constitute a novel family of conserved membrane transporters in prokaryotes that have a similar domain organization to the ATP-binding cassette transporters. Each ECF transporter comprises a pair of cytosolic ATPases (the A and A' components, or EcfA and EcfA'), a membrane-embedded substrate-binding protein (the S component, or EcfS) and a transmembrane energy-coupling component (the T component, or EcfT) that links the EcfA-EcfA' subcomplex to EcfS. The structure and transport mechanism of the quaternary ECF transporter remain largely unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of a nucleotide-free ECF transporter from Lactobacillus brevis at a resolution of 3.5 Å. The T component has a horseshoe-shaped open architecture, with five α-helices as transmembrane segments and two cytoplasmic α-helices as coupling modules connecting to the A and A' components. Strikingly, the S component, thought to be specific for hydroxymethyl pyrimidine, lies horizontally along the lipid membrane and is bound exclusively by the five transmembrane segments and the two cytoplasmic helices of the T component. These structural features suggest a plausible working model for the transport cycle of the ECF transporters.

  8. Divergent composition of algal-bacterial biofilms developing under various external factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barranguet, C.; Veuger, B.; van Beusekom, S.A.M.; Marvan, P.; Sinke, J.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of external factors other than nutrients on biofilm development and composition was studied with a combination of optical (Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, PAM fluorometry) and chemical methods (EPS extraction, HPLC, TOC determination). The development of algal-bacterial biofilms

  9. Use of radioisotopes in studying factors responsible for alfalfa resistance to bacterial wiltxng

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanker, I.; Kudelova, A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies are summarized dealing with possible causes of vascular dysfunction and resistance of alfalfa to bacterial wilting caused by Corynebacterium insidiosum (McCull.) H.L. Jens from the physiological and biochemical points of view. Using 32 P, 35 S, 54 Mn, 45 Ca, 65 Zn, and 86 Rb the uptake, distribution, translocation, and metabolism of these elements in plants with a different resistance against diseases were investigated. The possible use is discussed of 86 Rb as a tracer of potassium. The results suggest that the resistance of alfalfa to bacterial wilting is probably determined by several factors. (author)

  10. Synergism between the GTPase activities of EF-Tu.GTP and EF-G.GTP on empty ribosomes. Elongation factors as stimulators of the ribosomal oscillation between two conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, J R; Potapov, A P; de Graaf, J M; Kraal, B

    1994-10-07

    A remarkable positive cooperativity between the GTPase activities of EF-Tu and EF-G on empty ribosomes from Escherichia coli has been discovered. This cooperativity implies a decrease of the corresponding apparent KM values of the empty ribosome for either elongation factor: from more than 10 microM to 0.5 microM for EF-Tu.GTP by the addition of 0.25 microM EF-G and from 0.7 microM to 0.5 microM for EF-G.GTP by the addition of 3 microM EF-Tu. In a further analysis of this phenomenon, the effects of various specific antibiotics were studied: thiostrepton, fusidic acid, tetracycline, pulvomycin and kirromycin appeared to inhibit the synergistic effect, whereas streptomycin was found to stimulate it. Even in the present minimal system the ribosomes respond to the above-mentioned antibiotics in a way surprisingly similar to that in the coupled system with mRNA and tRNAs. The cooperativity seems not to be due to a simultaneous binding of the two elongation factors to the ribosome as revealed by studying the effects of fusidic acid and kirromycin, and by band-shift experiments by means of gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. Our experimental data and the kinetic analysis of alternative models provide evidence that EF-Tu.GTP and EF-G.GTP interact sequentially with empty ribosomes that oscillate between two different conformations, one for each elongation factor. Apparently, ribosomes have an intrinsic property for oscillation as normally observed during protein synthesis with a frequency paced by the events of tRNA binding and translocation.

  11. Bacterial infections after pediatric heart transplantation: Epidemiology, risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A; Wehrheim, Karla; Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Timothy M; L'Ecuyer, Thomas; Berkowitz, Katie; Mahle, William T; Scheel, Janet N

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial infections represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant recipients. However, data describing the epidemiology and outcomes of these infections in children are limited. We analyzed the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study database of patients transplanted between 1993 and 2014 to determine the etiologies, risk factors and outcomes of children with bacterial infections post-heart transplantation. Of 4,458 primary transplants in the database, there were 4,815 infections that required hospitalization or intravenous therapy, 2,047 (42.51%) of which were bacterial. The risk of bacterial infection was highest in the first month post-transplant, and the bloodstream was the most common site (24.82%). In the early post-transplant period (transplant), coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common pathogens (16.97%), followed by Enterobacter sp (11.99%) and Pseudomonas sp (11.62%). In the late post-transplant period, community-acquired pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.27%) and Haemophilus influenzae (2.82%) were also commonly identified. Patients' characteristics independently associated with acquisition of bacterial infection included younger age (p transplant. Overall mortality post-bacterial infection was 33.78%, and previous cardiac surgery (p heart transplant recipients and were associated with high mortality rates. The risk of acquiring a bacterial infection was highest in the first month post-transplant, and a large proportion of the infections were caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Lobato-Casado, Paula; Cámara-Marín, Belén; Pérez-Matos, Julio Alberto; Martínez-Maroto, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    To analyse and compare predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in the Emergency Departments (ED) due to an episode of acute meningitis (AM). A prospective, observational study was carried out in patients aged 15 years and older seen in ED due to AM between August 2009 and November 2015. Thirty-two variables for predicting bacterial meningitis were assessed. They covered epidemiological, comorbidity, clinical and analytical factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. The study included 154 patients. The diagnosis was bacterial meningitis in 53 (34.4%) patients. Four variables were significantly associated with bacterial aetiology: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentration ≥33mg/dl (odds ratio [OR] 50.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.63-119.47, P<.001), serum procalcitonin (PCT) ≥0.8ng/ml (OR 46.34; 95%CI: 19.71-108.89; P<.001), CSF glucose <60% of blood value (OR 20.82; 95%CI: 8.86-48.96; P=.001), CSF polymorphonuclears greater than 50% (OR 20.19; 95%CI: 8.31-49.09; P=.002]. The area under the curve for the model serum PCT≥0.8ng/ml plus CSF lactate ≥33mg/dl was 0.992 (95%CI: 0.979-1; P<.001), and achieved 99% sensitivity and 98% specificity for predicting bacterial meningitis. Serum PCT with CSF lactate, CSF glucose and CSF polymorphonuclears evaluated in an initial assessment in the ED for patients with AM, achieved an excellent diagnostic usefulness for predicting bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined influence of multiple climatic factors on the incidence of bacterial foodborne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Su; Park, Ki Hwan; Bahk, Gyung Jin

    2018-01-01

    Information regarding the relationship between the incidence of foodborne diseases (FBD) and climatic factors is useful in designing preventive strategies for FBD based on anticipated future climate change. To better predict the effect of climate change on foodborne pathogens, the present study investigated the combined influence of multiple climatic factors on bacterial FBD incidence in South Korea. During 2011-2015, the relationships between 8 climatic factors and the incidences of 13 bacterial FBD, were determined based on inpatient stays, on a monthly basis using the Pearson correlation analyses, multicollinearity tests, principal component analysis (PCA), and the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) modeling. Of the 8 climatic variables, the combination of temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, insolation, and cloudiness was significantly associated with salmonellosis (Pclimatic factors. These findings indicate that the relationships between multiple climatic factors and bacterial FBD incidence can be valuable for the development of prediction models for future patterns of diseases in response to changes in climate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  15. Auxin and Cellular Elongation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  16. Age-related risk factors for bacterial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahuquillo-Arce, José M; Menéndez, Rosario; Méndez, Raúl; Amara-Elori, Isabel; Zalacain, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Aspa, Javier; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; de Castro, Felipe Rodriguez; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Torres, Antoni

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of age and comorbidities, smoking and alcohol use on microorganisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective multicentre study was performed with 4304 patients. We compared microbiological results, bacterial aetiology, smoking, alcohol abuse and comorbidities in three age groups: young adults (65 years). Bacterial aetiology was identified in 1522 (35.4%) patients. In seniors, liver disease was independently associated with Gram-negative bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae and Enterobacteriaceae), COPD with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR = 2.69 (1.46-4.97)) and Staphylococcus aureus (OR = 2.8 (1.24-6.3)) and neurological diseases with S. aureus. In adults, diabetes mellitus (DM) was a risk factor for Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. aureus, and COPD for H. influenzae (OR = 3.39 (1.06-10.83)). In young adults, DM was associated with S. aureus. Smoking was a risk factor for Legionella pneumophila regardless of age. Alcohol intake was associated with mixed aetiology and Coxiella burnetii in seniors, and with S. pneumoniae in young adults. It should be considered that the bacterial aetiology may differ according to the patient's age, comorbidities, smoking and alcohol abuse. More extensive microbiological testing is warranted in those with risk factors for infrequent microorganisms. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. A 15-year retrospective analysis of prognostic factors in childhood bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Liang Yi Justin; Tanugroho, Raymond Reinaldo; Thoon, Koh Cheng; Chong, Chia Yin; Choong, Chew Thye; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Maiwald, Matthias; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Tan, Natalie Woon Hui

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review aimed to identify factors in childhood bacterial meningitis that predicted disease severity and long-term outcome. The study included 112 episodes of microbiologically confirmed bacterial meningitis in children aged three days to 15 years who were admitted to a Singapore hospital from 1998 to 2013. The mortality rate was 6%, and 44% required intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Predictive factors associated with ICU admission included pneumococcal meningitis, with an odds ratio (OR) of 5.2 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.5-18.2, leukopenia (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.7-17.9) and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF):serum glucose ratio 1000/mm(3) (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.086-0.76) was negatively associated with ICU admission. Five years after meningitis, 32% had residual sequelae, and the associated prognostic factors were Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis (OR 29.5, 95% CI 2-429), seizures during their inpatient stay (OR 10.6, 95% CI 1.9-60.2) and septic shock (OR 8.4, 95% CI 1.1-62.1). As mortality was low in this bacterial meningitis study, ICU admission was used as a marker of disease severity. These findings underscore the importance of the pneumococcal and Hib meningitis vaccines. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Factors shaping bacterial phylogenetic and functional diversity in coastal waters of the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boras, Julia A.; Vaqué, Dolors; Maynou, Francesc; Sà, Elisabet L.; Weinbauer, Markus G.; Sala, Maria Montserrat

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the main factors shaping bacterioplankton phylogenetic and functional diversity in marine coastal waters, we carried out a two-year study based on a monthly sampling in Blanes Bay (NW Mediterranean). We expected the key factors driving bacterial diversity to be (1) temperature and nutrient concentration, together with chlorophyll a concentration as an indicator of phytoplankton biomass and, hence, a carbon source for bacteria (here called bottom-up factors), and (2) top-down pressure (virus- and protist-mediated mortality of bacteria). Phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA. Functional diversity was assessed by using monomeric carbon sources in Biolog EcoPlates and by determining the activity of six extracellular enzymes. Our results indicate that the bacterial phylogenetic and functional diversity in this coastal system is shaped mainly by bottom-up factors. A dendrogram analysis of the DGGE banding patterns revealed three main sample clusters. Two clusters differed significantly in temperature, nitrate and chlorophyll a concentration, and the third was characterized by the highest losses of bacterial production due to viral lysis detected over the whole study period. Protistan grazing had no effect on bacterial functional diversity, since there were no correlations between protist-mediated mortality (PMM) and extracellular enzyme activities, and utilization of only two out of the 31 carbon sources (N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and α-cyclodextrin) was correlated with PMM. In contrast, virus-mediated mortality correlated with changes in the percentage of use of four carbon sources, and also with specific leu-aminopeptidase and β-glucosidase activity. This suggests that viral lysate provides a pool of labile carbon sources, presumably including amino acids and glucose, which may inhibit proteolytic and glucosidic activity. Our results indicate that bottom-up factors play a more important role than

  19. Culture-proven bacterial meningitis in elderly patients in southern Taiwan: clinical characteristics and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Lu, Chen-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Shu-Fang; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2006-06-01

    The epidemiologic landscape of causative pathogens and clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis varies with several clinical factors including preceding/pre-existent medical and/or surgical conditions, modes of contraction, geographic distributions, status of vaccinations, the study time periods and differences among age groups. In order to delineate the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in senior adults (ages > or =60 y/o) in southern Taiwan, we analyzed the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of 64 senior adults (42 men and 22 women, aged 60-80 years) with bacterial meningitis collected over a period of 13 years at our hospital. The prognostic factors between fatal and non-fatal groups of patients were compared. Twenty-seven of the 64 patients belonged to a nosocomial infection group, and the other 37 comprised a community-acquired infection group. Sixty percent (39/64) of the patients had a post-neurosurgical state as the most preceding event prior to infection. Liver disease (13) and diabetes mellitus (6) were the most common underlying conditions of the other 25 patients with spontaneous meningitis. Of these 64 patients, Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae (18), Acinetobacter baumannii (5), Escherichia coli (5), and Enterobacter species (5) were the most commonly implicated Gram-negative pathogens. Staphylococcus (S.) aureus infection was increasing during the study period. The therapeutic results of this group of patients showed a mortality rate of 38% (24/64). The presence of septic shock was the most significant prognostic factor. In conclusion, for this study group, a post-neurosurgical state was the single most important preceding event for senior adults developing bacterial meningitis. Of the implicated pathogens, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus were the most common gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens, respectively. The therapeutic result of this specific group of patients showed a high mortality rate; however, the small case number and

  20. Analysis on the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi JIANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Methods The clinical data of children with bacterial meningitis in our hospital were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors for subdural effusion.  Results A total of 128 cases were divided into control group (N = 64 and subdural effusion group (N = 64. There was no significant difference on serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and white blood cell (WBC between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF WBC (Z = 3.126, P = 0.003, CSF protein (Z = 4.928, P = 0.000 and serum procalcitonin (PCT; Z = 2.823, P = 0.007 in subdural effusion group were significantly higher, while CSF glucose (t = 2.166, P = 0.033 was significantly lower. After treatment, CSF WBC (Z = 2.467, P = 0.012 in subdural effusion group was still significantly higher than that of control group, and CSF glucose (t = 4.938, P = 0.000 was still significantly lower. Logistic regression analysis showed that WBC in CSF (P = 0.027, CSF protein (P = 0.002 and serum PCT (P = 0.014 were independent risk factors for bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Conclusions CSF examination of children with bacterial meningitis reveals significant increase of CSF WBC, CSF protein and serum PCT, suggesting concurrent subdural effusion is easily occurred. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.012

  1. Live Staphylococcus aureus and bacterial soluble factors induce different transcriptional responses in human airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreilhon, Chimène; Gras, Delphine; Hologne, Coralie; Bajolet, Odile; Cottrez, Françoise; Magnone, Virginie; Merten, Marc; Groux, Hervé; Puchelle, Edith; Barbry, Pascal

    2005-02-10

    To characterize the response of respiratory epithelium to infection by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), human airway cells were incubated for 1 to 24 h with a supernatant of a S. aureus culture (bacterial supernatant), then profiled with a pangenomic DNA microarray. Because an upregulation of many genes was noticed around 3 h, three independent approaches were then used to characterize the host response to a 3-h contact either with bacterial supernatant or with live bacteria: 1) a DNA microarray containing 4,200 sequence-verified probes, 2) a semiquantitative RT-PCR with a set of 537 pairs of validated primers, or 3) ELISA assay of IL-8, IL-6, TNFalpha, and PGE(2). Among others, Fos, Jun, and EGR-1 were upregulated by the bacterial supernatant and by live bacteria. Increased expression of bhlhb2 and Mig-6, promoter regions which harbor HIF responding elements, was explained by an increased expression of the HIF-1alpha protein. Activation of the inducible form of cyclooxygenase, COX-2, and of the interleukins IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8, as well as of the NF-kappaB pathway, was observed preferentially in cells in contact with bacterial supernatant. Early infection was characterized by an upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes and a downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes. This correlated with a necrotic, rather than apoptotic cell death. Overall, this first global description of an airway epithelial infection by S. aureus demonstrates a larger global response to bacterial supernatant (in term of altered genes and variation factors) than to exponentially growing live bacteria.

  2. Bronchoalveolar lavage amylase is associated with risk factors for aspiration and predicts bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Curtis H; Moazed, Farzad; DiBardino, David; Swaroop, Mamta; Wunderink, Richard G

    2013-03-01

    Aspiration of oropharyngeal or gastric contents into the respiratory tract leads to a spectrum of disorders with high morbidity. Aspiration is a diagnostic dilemma, because clinical characteristics and diagnostic tests are not effective predicting or confirming aspiration. We sought to determine whether α-amylase, a protein secreted by salivary glands and the pancreas, is elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens in patients with clinical risk factors for aspiration and whether bronchoalveolar lavage amylase predicts bacterial pneumonia. Retrospective analysis. Five adult ICUs at a tertiary care urban medical center. Mechanically ventilated patients who underwent either bronchoscopic or nonbronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage within 72 hrs of endotracheal intubation between August 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010. A total of 296 bronchoalveolar lavage amylase results from 280 patients were included in the analysis, and 155 bronchoalveolar lavage amylase specimens were obtained from patients with at least one predefined preintubation risk factor (altered consciousness, swallowing dysfunction, difficult intubation, peri-intubation vomiting, or cardiac arrest). Bronchoalveolar lavage amylase concentration increased as the number of preintubation risk factors increased (p bronchoalveolar lavage amylase was elevated in patients with bacterial pneumonia (cfu/mL ≥ 10) (p bronchoalveolar lavage amylase to differentiate between positive and negative bronchoalveolar lavage culture was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.75). The lower 95% confidence interval for bronchoalveolar lavage amylase in patients with at least one preintubation risk factor for aspiration was 125.9 units/L. In multivariate analysis, bronchoalveolar lavage amylase bronchoalveolar lavage amylase is associated with risk factors for aspiration and may predict bacterial pneumonia. Bronchoalveolar lavage amylase may be useful as an early screening tool to guide management of patients suspected of

  3. Correlation models between environmental factors and bacterial resistance to antimony and copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunji Shi

    Full Text Available Antimony (Sb and copper (Cu are toxic heavy metals that are associated with a wide variety of minerals. Sb(III-oxidizing bacteria that convert the toxic Sb(III to the less toxic Sb(V are potentially useful for environmental Sb bioremediation. A total of 125 culturable Sb(III/Cu(II-resistant bacteria from 11 different types of mining soils were isolated. Four strains identified as Arthrobacter, Acinetobacter and Janibacter exhibited notably high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs for Sb(III (>10 mM,making them the most highly Sb(III-resistant bacteria to date. Thirty-six strains were able to oxidize Sb(III, including Pseudomonas-, Comamonas-, Acinetobacter-, Sphingopyxis-, Paracoccus- Aminobacter-, Arthrobacter-, Bacillus-, Janibacter- and Variovorax-like isolates. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA revealed that the soil concentrations of Sb and Cu were the most obvious environmental factors affecting the culturable bacterial population structures. Stepwise linear regression was used to create two predictive models for the correlation between soil characteristics and the bacterial Sb(III or Cu(II resistance. The concentrations of Sb and Cu in the soil was the significant factors affecting the bacterial Sb(III resistance, whereas the concentrations of S and P in the soil greatly affected the bacterial Cu(II resistance. The two stepwise linear regression models that we derived are as follows: MIC(Sb(III=606.605+0.14533 x C(Sb+0.4128 x C(Cu and MIC((Cu(II=58.3844+0.02119 x C(S+0.00199 x CP [where the MIC(Sb(III and MIC(Cu(II represent the average bacterial MIC for the metal of each soil (μM, and the C(Sb, C(Cu, C(S and C(P represent concentrations for Sb, Cu, S and P (mg/kg in soil, respectively, p<0.01]. The stepwise linear regression models we developed suggest that metals as well as other soil physicochemical parameters can contribute to bacterial resistance to metals.

  4. Risk factors and features of recurrent bacterial complications of upper respiratory tract viral infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko A.V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine risk factors for recurrent bacterial complications of the upper respiratory tract viral infection (URTI in children, as well as the clinical and immunological features of the course of such complications. We enrolled 214 children aged 3-18 years with URTIs complicated with acute otitis media or acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Frequency of bacterial complications of URI in 128 children was low (group I and in 86 children it met the criteria of recurrent course (group II. In addition to the standard examination, lysozyme levels in the oropharyngeal secretion were determined three times during the disease. It was found that children of group II were characterized by an early debut of respiratory morbidity (at the age of 6.00 (4.00, 12.00 months against 13.00 (4.50, 16.00 months in children of group I (p<0,0001, as well as a longer duration of catarrhal and intoxication syndromes in similar forms of the disease. The most significant risk factors for the formation of the recurring complication pattern were maternal smoking (OR=2.73, 95% CI [1.34, 5.48], along with gastroenterological pathology and frequent URTI in the mother and a shortened period of breastfeeding. In children with recurrent bacterial complications of URTI, there was an impaired local resistance of the upper respiratory tract mucous membranes (as a decrease in the concentrations of lysozyme in all periods of the disease, which persisted after recovery.

  5. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew G.; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  6. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03 Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  7. Diphtheria toxin- and Pseudomonas A toxin-mediated apoptosis. ADP ribosylation of elongation factor-2 is required for DNA fragmentation and cell lysis and synergy with tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, H; Bonavida, B

    1992-09-15

    We have reported that diphtheria toxin (DTX) mediates target cell lysis and intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation (apoptosis) and also synergizes with TNF-alpha. In this paper, we examined which step in the pathway of DTX-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis was important for induction of cytolytic activity and for synergy. Using a DTX-sensitive tumor cell line, we first examined the activity of the mutant CRM 197, which does not catalyze the ADP ribosylation of elongation factor-2 (EF-2). CRM 197 was not cytolytic for target cells and did not mediate intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation of viable cells. The failure of CRM 197 to mediate target cell lysis suggested that the catalytic activity of DTX is prerequisite for target cell lysis. This was corroborated by demonstrating that MeSAdo, which blocks the biosynthesis of diphthamide, inhibited DTX-mediated protein synthesis inhibition and also blocked target cell lysis. Furthermore, the addition of nicotinamide, which competes with NAD+ on the DTX action site of EF-2, also blocked DTX-mediated lysis. These findings suggest that ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 may be a necessary step in the pathway leading to target cell lysis. In contrast to the sensitive line, the SKOV-3 tumor cell line is sensitive to protein synthesis inhibition by DTX but is not susceptible to cytolysis and apoptosis by DTX. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition by DTX is not sufficient to mediate target cell lysis. The synergy in cytotoxicity obtained with the combination of DTX and TNF-alpha was examined in order to determine the pathway mediated by DTX in synergy. Like the direct lysis by DTX, synergy was significantly reduced by MeSAdo and by nicotinamide. Furthermore, synergy was not observed with combination of CRM 197 and TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that, in synergy, DTX may utilize the same pathway required for its cytolytic activity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin shared most the properties shown for DTX. Altogether, these findings

  8. Cloning and characterization of the .I.str ./I.operon and elongation factor Tu expression in .I.Bacillus stearothermophilus./I..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásný, Libor; Vacík, Tomáš; Fučík, Vladimír; Jonák, Jiří

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 182, č. 21 (2000), s. 6114-6122 ISSN 0021-9193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/98/0863 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 75195-540305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.506, year: 2000

  9. Elongation Cutoff Technique: Parallel Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Korchowiec

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated that the elongation cutoff technique (ECT substantially speeds up thequantum-chemical calculation at Hartree-Fock (HF level of theory and is especially wellsuited for parallel performance. A comparison of ECT timings for water chains with thereference HF calculations is given. The analysis includes the overall CPU (central processingunit time and its most time consuming steps.

  10. Comparative Study of the Life Cycle Dependent Post-Translation Modifications of Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor Tu Present in the Membrane Proteome of Streptomycetes and Mycobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Martin; Bezoušková, Silvia; Petráčková, Denisa; Kalachová, Ladislava; Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich; Weiser, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2010), s. 203-210 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600200702; GA AV ČR IAA500200913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ESCHERICHIA-COLI * COELICOLOR A3(2) * OUTER-MEMBRANE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.977, year: 2010

  11. Environmental Factors Support the Formation of Specific Bacterial Assemblages on Microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Labrenz, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    While the global distribution of microplastics (MP) in the marine environment is currently being critically evaluated, the potential role of MP as a vector for distinct microbial assemblages or even pathogenic bacteria is hardly understood. To gain a deeper understanding, we investigated how different in situ conditions contribute to the composition and specificity of MP-associated bacterial communities in relation to communities on natural particles. Polystyrene (PS), polyethylene (PE), and wooden pellets were incubated for 2 weeks along an environmental gradient, ranging from marine (coastal Baltic Sea) to freshwater (waste water treatment plant, WWTP) conditions. The associated assemblages as well as the water communities were investigated applying high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Our setup allowed for the first time to determine MP-dependent and -independent assemblage factors as subject to different environmental conditions in one system. Most importantly, plastic-specific assemblages were found to develop solely under certain conditions, such as lower nutrient concentration and higher salinity, while the bacterial genus Erythrobacter, known for the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), was found specifically on MP across a broader section of the gradient. We discovered no enrichment of potential pathogens on PE or PS; however, the abundant colonization of MP in a WWTP by certain bacteria commonly associated with antibiotic resistance suggests MP as a possible hotspot for horizontal gene transfer. Taken together, our study clarifies that the surrounding environment prevailingly shapes the biofilm communities, but that MP-specific assemblage factors exist. These findings point to the ecological significance of specific MP-promoted bacterial populations in aquatic environments and particularly in plastic accumulation zones. PMID:29403454

  12. Environmental Factors Support the Formation of Specific Bacterial Assemblages on Microplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Oberbeckmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available While the global distribution of microplastics (MP in the marine environment is currently being critically evaluated, the potential role of MP as a vector for distinct microbial assemblages or even pathogenic bacteria is hardly understood. To gain a deeper understanding, we investigated how different in situ conditions contribute to the composition and specificity of MP-associated bacterial communities in relation to communities on natural particles. Polystyrene (PS, polyethylene (PE, and wooden pellets were incubated for 2 weeks along an environmental gradient, ranging from marine (coastal Baltic Sea to freshwater (waste water treatment plant, WWTP conditions. The associated assemblages as well as the water communities were investigated applying high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Our setup allowed for the first time to determine MP-dependent and -independent assemblage factors as subject to different environmental conditions in one system. Most importantly, plastic-specific assemblages were found to develop solely under certain conditions, such as lower nutrient concentration and higher salinity, while the bacterial genus Erythrobacter, known for the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, was found specifically on MP across a broader section of the gradient. We discovered no enrichment of potential pathogens on PE or PS; however, the abundant colonization of MP in a WWTP by certain bacteria commonly associated with antibiotic resistance suggests MP as a possible hotspot for horizontal gene transfer. Taken together, our study clarifies that the surrounding environment prevailingly shapes the biofilm communities, but that MP-specific assemblage factors exist. These findings point to the ecological significance of specific MP-promoted bacterial populations in aquatic environments and particularly in plastic accumulation zones.

  13. Application of Recombinant Factor C Reagent for the Detection of Bacterial Endotoxins in Pharmaceutical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Jay; Smith, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant Factor C (rFC) is non-animal-derived reagent used to detect bacterial endotoxins in pharmaceutical products. Despite the fact that the reagent was first commercially available nearly 15 years ago, the broad use of rFC in pharmaceutical industry has long been lagging, presumably due to historical single-source supplier concerns and the lack of inclusion in worldwide pharmacopeias. Commercial rFC reagents are now available from multiple manufacturers, thus single sourcing is no longer an issue. We report here the successful validation of several pharmaceutical products by an end-point florescence-based endotoxin method using the rFC reagent. The method is equivalent or superior to the compendia bacterial endotoxins test method. Based on the comparability data and extenuating circumstances, the incorporation of the end point fluorescence technique and rFC reagent in global compendia bacterial endotoxins test chapters is desired and warranted. LAY ABSTRACT: Public health has been protected for over 30 years with the use of a purified blood product of the horseshoe crab, limulus amebocyte lysate. More recently, this blood product can be produced in biotech manufacturing processes, which reduces potential impacts to the horseshoe crab and related species dependent upon the crab, for example, migrating shorebirds. The pharmaceutical industry has been slow to adopt the use of this reagent, Recombinant Factor C (rFC), for various reasons. We evaluated the use of rFC across many pharmaceutical products, and in other feasibility demonstration experiments, and found rFC to be a suitable alternative to the animal-derived limulus amebocyte lysate. Incorporation of rFC and its analytical method into national testing standards would provide an equivalent or better test while continuing to maintain patient safety for those who depend on medicines and while securing pharmaceutical supply chains. In addition, widespread use of this method would benefit existing animal

  14. The Composition and Spatial Patterns of Bacterial Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in 19 Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Xia, Yu; Wen, Xianghua; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance are of concern for environmental safety and public health. Accumulating evidence suggests that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are as an important sink and source of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Virulence genes (encoding virulence factors) are good indicators for bacterial pathogenic potentials. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathogenic potentials and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs, bacterial virulence genes and ARGs in 19 WWTPs covering a majority of latitudinal zones of China were surveyed by using GeoChip 4.2. A total of 1610 genes covering 13 virulence factors and 1903 genes belonging to 11 ARG families were detected respectively. The bacterial virulence genes exhibited significant spatial distribution patterns of a latitudinal biodiversity gradient and a distance-decay relationship across China. Moreover, virulence genes tended to coexist with ARGs as shown by their strongly positive associations. In addition, key environmental factors shaping the overall virulence gene structure were identified. This study profiles the occurrence, composition and distribution of virulence genes and ARGs in current WWTPs in China, and uncovers spatial patterns and important environmental variables shaping their structure, which may provide the basis for further studies of bacterial virulence factors and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs.

  15. The bacterial gut microbiota of wood- and humus-feeding termites: Diazotrophic populations and compartment-specific response of bacterial communities to environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wanyang; Brune, Andreas (Prof. Dr.)

    2018-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the influence of the microenvironment on the symbiosis between higher termites and their intestinal bacteria. The gut environmental factors pH, hydrogen partial pressure, redox potential and nitrogen pool size were measured. Bacterial gut community structure from each highly compartmentalized gut section was investigated. Furthermore, one specific function, nitrogen fixation, was comparatively analyzed in lower termites, higher termites and cockroaches. Hydrogen...

  16. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of five different elongation factor 1 alpha genes in the flatfish Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup: Differential gene expression and thyroid hormones dependence during metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchado Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A is one of the four subunits composing eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1. It catalyzes the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to the A-site of the ribosome in a GTP-dependent manner during protein synthesis, although it also seems to play a role in other non-translational processes. Currently, little information is still available about its expression profile and regulation during flatfish metamorphosis. With regard to this, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis is a commercially important flatfish in which eEF1A gene remains to be characterized. Results The development of large-scale genomics of Senegalese sole has facilitated the identification of five different eEF1A genes, referred to as SseEF1A1, SseEF1A2, SseEF1A3, SseEF1A4, and Sse42Sp50. Main characteristics and sequence identities with other fish and mammalian eEF1As are described. Phylogenetic and tissue expression analyses allowed for the identification of SseEF1A1 and SseEF1A2 as the Senegalese sole counterparts of mammalian eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, respectively, and of Sse42Sp50 as the ortholog of Xenopus laevis and teleost 42Sp50 gene. The other two elongation factors, SseEF1A3 and SseEF1A4, represent novel genes that are mainly expressed in gills and skin. The expression profile of the five genes was also studied during larval development, revealing different behaviours. To study the possible regulation of SseEF1A gene expressions by thyroid hormones (THs, larvae were exposed to the goitrogen thiourea (TU. TU-treated larvae exhibited lower SseEF1A4 mRNA levels than untreated controls at both 11 and 15 days after treatment, whereas transcripts of the other four genes remained relatively unchanged. Moreover, addition of exogenous T4 hormone to TU-treated larvae increased significantly the steady-state levels of SseEF1A4 with respect to untreated controls, demonstrating that its expression is up-regulated by THs. Conclusion We

  17. The Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1 Alpha (eEF1α from the Parasite Leishmania infantum Is Modified with the Immunomodulatory Substituent Phosphorylcholine (PC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Timm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and glycolipids have been found to be decorated with phosphorylcholine (PC both in protozoa and nematodes that parasitize humans and animals. PC epitopes can provoke various effects on immune cells leading to an immunomodulation of the host’s immune system that allows long-term persistence of the parasites. So far, only a limited number of PC-modified proteins, mainly from nematodes, have been identified. Infections caused by Leishmania spp. (e.g., L. infantum in southern Europe affect about 12 million people worldwide and are characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical forms in humans, ranging from cutaneous to fatal visceral leishmaniasis. To establish and maintain the infection, these protozoa are dependent on the secretion of effector molecules into the host for modulating their immune system. In this project, we analyzed the PC modification of L. infantum promastigotes by 2D-gel based proteomics. Western blot analysis with the PC-specific antibody TEPC-15 revealed one PC-substituted protein in this organism, identified as eEF1α. We could demonstrate that the binding of eEF1α to one of its downstream effectors is dependent on its PC-modification. In this study we provide evidence that in this parasite the modification of eEF1α with PC may be essential for its function as an important virulence factor.

  18. Bacterial genus is a risk factor for major amputation in patients with diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATÁLIA ANÍCIO CARDOSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate whether bacterial genus is a risk factor for major amputation in patients with diabetic foot and infected ulcer. Methods: we conducted a case-control, observational study of 189 patients with infected ulcers in diabetic feet admitted to the Vascular Surgery Service of the Risoleta Tolentino Neves Hospital, from January 2007 to December 2012. The bacteriological evaluation was performed in deep tissue cultures from the lesions and amputation was considered major when performed above the foot'smiddle tarsus. Results: the patients'mean age was 61.9±12.7 years; 122 (64.6% were men. The cultures were positive in 86.8%, being monomicrobial in 72% of the cases. In patients with major amputation, Acinetobacter spp. (24.4%, Morganella spp. (24.4%, Proteus spp. (23.1% and Enterococcus spp. (19.2% were the most frequent types of bacteria. The most commonly isolated species were Acinetobacter baumannii, Morganella morganii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. As predictors of major amputation, we identified the isolation of the generaAcinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp., serum creatinine ≥1.3mg/dl and hemoglobin <11g/dl. Conclusion: the bacterial genera Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. identified in infected ulcers of patients with diabetic foot were associated with a higher incidence of major amputation.

  19. Endogenous bacterial toxins are required for the injurious action of platelet-activating factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X M; MacKendrick, W; Tien, J; Huang, W; Caplan, M S; Hsueh, W

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), an endogenous mediator for experimental sepsis, has been shown to induce shock and intestinal necrosis in vivo. However, it is unclear whether PAF exerts its injurious effects on the intestinal tissue directly or via synergism with other endogenous products. The aim of this study was to examine the role of endogenous bacterial products, such as endotoxin, in PAF-induced intestinal injury. PAF (3 micrograms/kg) was injected intravenously into normally colonized rats, germfree rats, and normal rats pretreated with a combination of antibiotics, and the systemic response and intestinal injury were assessed. PAF did not cause prolonged shock, leukopenia, hemoconcentration, and bowel necrosis in germfree rats. When germfree rats were primed with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg) of endotoxin, the protection was lost. Combined treatment of the normally colonized rats with neomycin, polymyxin B, and metronidazole for 7 days largely protected the animal from PAF-induced shock and intestinal necrosis. PAF does not directly induce prolonged hypotension, hemoconcentration, persistent leukopenia, and gross intestinal necrosis but causes these changes via a synergism with endogenous bacterial toxins, presumably from the gut flora.

  20. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  1. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... concentrations in plasma changed during surgery. In vitro stimulation of blood samples with bacteria-derived antigens resulted in a significant increase in sVEGF (p Bacterial antigen-induced release of sVEGF correlated...... significantly with neutrophil cell counts (0.53 Bacterial antigen-induced sVEGFR1 release did not correlate with cell counts. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations did not change during surgery. In vitro bacterial stimulation led to increased release of sVEGF, which...

  2. Risk factors and bacterial spectrum for pneumonia after abdominal surgery in elderly Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; A, Yongjun; Hu, Zongqiang; Cun, Dongyun; Liu, Feng; Li, Wen; Hu, Mingdao

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pneumonia is a common complication of abdominal surgery in the elderly. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors and bacterial spectrum for pneumonia after abdominal surgery in elderly Chinese patients. We performed a case-control study in a total of 5431 patients aged 65 years and over who had undergone abdominal surgery at the 2nd affiliated hospital of Kunming medical college between June 2003 and June 2011. Postoperative pneumonia developed in 86 patients (1.58%). Gram-negative bacilli were the principal microorganisms (82.86%) isolated from patients. The most common organisms isolated were Klebsiella spp. (28.57%), Acinetobacter spp. (17.14%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17.14%). Multivariate analysis confirmed the following to be independent risk factors for postoperative pneumonia in the elderly after abdominal surgery: age ≥70 (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.16-3.22, p=0.01), upper abdominal surgery (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.18-3.64, p=0.01) and duration of operation >3 h (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.49-4.15, p=0.00). Identifying these risk factors may help achieve better prevention and treatment for postoperative pneumonia in elderly patients after abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. What doesn’t kill them makes them stronger: an association between elongation factor 1-α overdominance in the sea star Pisaster ochraceus and “sea star wasting disease”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Wares

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a massive mortality event has killed millions of sea stars, of many different species, along the Pacific coast of North America. This disease event, known as ‘sea star wasting disease’ (SSWD, is linked to viral infection. In one affected sea star (Pisaster ochraceus, previous work had identified that the elongation factor 1-α locus (EF1A harbored an intronic insertion allele that is lethal when homozygous yet appears to be maintained at moderate frequency in populations through increased fitness for heterozygotes. The environmental conditions supporting this increased fitness are unknown, but overdominance is often associated with disease. Here, we evaluate populations of P. ochraceus to identify the relationship between SSWD and EF1A genotype. Our data suggest that there may be significantly decreased occurrence of SSWD in individuals that are heterozygous at this locus. These results suggest further studies are warranted to understand the functional relationship between diversity at EF1A and survival in P. ochraceus.

  4. Elongational dynamics of multiarm polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2009-01-01

    The startup of uni-axial elongational flow followed by stress relaxation and reversed bi-axial flow has been measured for a branched polystyrene melt with narrow molar mass distribution using the filament stretching rheometer. The branched polystyrene melt was a multiarm A(q)-C-C-A(q) pom......-pom polystyrene with an estimated average number of arms of q=2.5. The molar mass of each arm is about 28 kg/mole with an overall molar mass of M-w=280 kg/mole. An integral molecular stress function constitutive formulation within the "interchain pressure" concept agrees reasonably well with the experiments....

  5. [Candidemia combined with bacterial bloodstream infection: analysis of clinical features and associated risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Sun, Yongchang; Zhuo, Jie; Liu, Xiaofang

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of and risk factors for candidemia combined with bacterial bloodstream infection(BSI) by retrospective analysis of cases. The clinical data of cases diagnosed as candidemia combined with BSI confirmed by blood culture were compared with those of cases with mono-candidemia in Beiing Tongren Hospital from January 2009 to December 2011. A logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the independent risk factors. Forty-two cases diagnosed as candidemia were analyzed including 14 cases of candidemia combined with BSI and 28 cases of mono-candidemia. Ten strains of gram-positive cocci and 4 strains of gram-negative bacilli were isolated from candidemia combined with BSI group.Six strains of C.albicans, 4 strains of C.glabrata, 3 strains of C.tropicalis and 1 strain of C.krosei were isolated. There was no C.parapsilosis isolated from candidemia combined with BSI group but 9 strains in the mono-candidemia group. The septic shock rate of the candidemia combined with BSI group was higher than that of the mono-candidemia group (12/14 vs 7/28, P = 0.000). The mortality rate of the candidemia combined with BSI group was higher than that of the mono-candidemia group (10/14 vs 15/28), but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.266).Four factors were found statistically different by univariate analysis, including hospitalization more than 4 weeks (P = 0.001), bacteremia before candidemia(P = 0.005), hematological tumor (P = 0.01) and abdominal infection (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that hospitalization more than 4 weeks was the independent risk factor. Gram-positive cocci were the predominant species and septic shock was more common in candidemia combined with BSI. Hospitalization more than 4 weeks was the independent risk factor for candidemia combined with BSI.

  6. Film dosimetry of small elongated electron beams for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, and 18 Mev electron beams for small elongated fields of dimensions L x W (where L=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 cm; and W=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 cm) have been studied. Film dosimetry and parallel-plate ion chamber measurements have been used to obtain various dose parameters. Selective results of a series of systematic measurements for central axis depth dose data, uniformity index, field flatness, and relative output factors of small elongated electron beams are reported. The square-root method is employed to predict the beam data of small elongated electron fields from corresponding small square electron fields using film dosimetry. The single parameter area/perimeter radio A/P is used to characterize the relative output factors of elongated electron beams. It is our conclusion that for clinical treatment planning square-root method may be applied with caution in determining the beam characteristics of small elongated electron fields from film dosimetry. The calculated and estimated relative output factors from square-root method and A/P ratio are in good agreement and show agreement to within 1% with the measured film values

  7. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. DESIGN...... presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value) of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann-Whitney tests with Benjamini-Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis.......01). Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles...

  8. Anaerobes and Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Virulence Factors Contributing to Vaginal Colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene W. J. Africa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aetiology and pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV is unclear but it appears to be associated with factors that disrupt the normal acidity of the vagina thus altering the equilibrium between the normal vaginal microbiota. BV has serious implications for female morbidity, including reports of pelvic inflammatory disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and infertility. This paper reviewed new available information regarding possible factors contributing to the establishment of the BV vaginal biofilm, examined the proposed role of anaerobic microbial species recently detected by new culture-independent methods and discusses developments related to the effects of BV on human pregnancy. The literature search included Pubmed (NLM, LISTA (EBSCO, and Web of Science. Because of the complexity and diversity of population groups, diagnosis and methodology used, no meta-analysis was performed. Several anaerobic microbial species previously missed in the laboratory diagnosis of BV have been revealed while taking cognisance of newly proposed theories of infection, thereby improving our understanding and knowledge of the complex aetiology and pathogenesis of BV and its perceived role in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  9. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. Design: Stimulated saliva samples from 292 participants with low levels of dental caries and periodontitis, enrolled in the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES, were analyzed for the presence of approximately 300 bacterial species by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM. Using presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann–Whitney tests with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis. Results: Targets for 131 different probes were identified in 292 samples, with Streptococcus and Veillonella being the most predominant genera identified. Two bacterial taxa (Streptococcus sobrinus and Eubacterium [11][G-3] brachy were more associated with smokers than non-smokers (adjusted p-value<0.01. Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI, and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles of saliva. Conclusions: The bacterial profile of saliva seems independent of diet intake, but influenced by smoking and maybe socioeconomic status.

  10. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  11. Ubiquitylation and degradation of elongating RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Harreman, Michelle; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    During its journey across a gene, RNA polymerase II has to contend with a number of obstacles to its progression, including nucleosomes, DNA-binding proteins, DNA damage, and sequences that are intrinsically difficult to transcribe. Not surprisingly, a large number of elongation factors have...... evolved to ensure that transcription stalling or arrest does not occur. If, however, the polymerase cannot be restarted, it becomes poly-ubiquitylated and degraded by the proteasome. This process is highly regulated, ensuring that only RNAPII molecules that cannot otherwise be salvaged are degraded....... In this review, we describe the mechanisms and factors responsible for the last resort mechanism of transcriptional elongation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation....

  12. Transcriptional control by NF-κB: elongation in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Gil; Dikstein, Rivka

    2013-09-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors governs the cellular reaction to a variety of extracellular signals. Following stimulation, NF-κB activates genes involved in inflammation, cell survival, cell cycle, immune cell homeostasis and more. This review focuses on studies of the past decade that uncover the transcription elongation process as a key regulatory stage in the activation pathway of NF-κB. Of interest are studies that point to the elongation phase as central to the selectivity of target gene activation by NF-κB. Particularly, the cascade leading to phosphorylation and acetylation of the NF-κB subunit p65 on serine 276 and lysine 310, respectively, was shown to mediate the recruitment of Brd4 and P-TEFb to many pro-inflammatory target genes, which in turn facilitate elongation and mRNA processing. On the other hand, some anti-inflammatory genes are refractory to this pathway and are dependent on the elongation factor DSIF for efficient elongation and mRNA processing. While these studies have advanced our knowledge of NF-κB transcriptional activity, they have also raised unresolved issues regarding the specific genomic and physiological contexts by which NF-κB utilizes different mechanisms for activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial blight (Pseudomonas pisi Sackett) of peas in South Africa, with special reference to frost as a predisposing factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelema, B.H.

    1972-01-01

    In the beginning of the nineteen fifties bacterial blight caused much damage to pea crops in South Africa, particularly to those grown for seed production. A study has been made of the causal organism and the conditioning factors of the disease, special attention being paid to frost as a

  14. Influence of abiotic factors on bacterial proliferation and anoxic survival of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babarro, J.M.F.; De Zwaan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of several abiotic factors (salinity, temperature and pH) on bacterial proliferation and survival time of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L. were studied under anoxic incubations. In addition, the presence in the incubation media of ammonium and the volatile fatty acids propionate and

  15. Spatial Distribution of Bacterial Communities Driven by Multiple Environmental Factors in a Beach Wetland of the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eDing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distributions of bacterial communities may be driven by multiple environmental factors. Thus, understanding the relationships between bacterial distribution and environmental factors is critical for understanding wetland stability and the functioning of freshwater lakes. However, little research on the bacterial communities in deep sediment layers exists. In this study, thirty clone libraries of 16S rRNA were constructed from a beach wetland of the Poyang Lake along both horizontal (distance to the water-land junction and vertical (sediment depth gradients to assess the effects of sediment properties on bacterial community structure and diversity. Our results showed that bacterial diversity increased along the horizontal gradient and decreased along the vertical gradient. The heterogeneous sediment properties along gradients substantially affected the dominant bacterial groups at the phylum and species levels. For example, the NH4+ concentration decreased with increasing depth, which was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. The changes in bacterial diversity and dominant bacterial groups showed that the top layer had a different bacterial community structure than the deeper layers. Principal component analysis revealed that both gradients, not each gradient independently, contributed to the shift in the bacterial community structure. A multiple linear regression model explained the changes in bacterial diversity and richness along the depth and distance gradients. Overall, our results suggest that spatial gradients associated with sediment properties shaped the bacterial communities in the Poyang Lake beach wetland.

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Dual-Function Green Fluorescent Protein–HSV1-Thymidine Kinase Reporter Gene Driven by the Human Elongation Factor 1α Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary D. Luker

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Toward the goal of monitoring activity of native mammalian promoters with molecular imaging techniques, we stably transfected DU145 prostate carcinoma cells with a fusion construct of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and wild-type herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK as a reporter gene driven by the promoter for human elongation factor 1α (EF-1α-EGFP-TK. Using this model system, expression of EGFP was quantified by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, while the HSV1-TK component of the reporter was quantified with 8-[3H]ganciclovir (8-[3H]GCV. As analyzed by flow cytometry, passage of EGFP-TK-DU145 transfected cells (ETK in vitro resulted in populations of cells with high and low expression of EGFP over time. High and low ETK cells retained 23-fold and 5-fold more GCV, respectively, than control. While differences in uptake and retention of GCV corresponded to relative expression of the reporter gene in each subpopulation of cells as determined by both flow cytometry (EGFP and quantitative RT-PCR, the correlation was not linear. Furthermore, in high ETK cells, net retention of various radiolabeled nucleoside analogues varied; the rank order was 8-[3H]GCV < 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutylguanine ([18F]FHBG ≈ 8-[3H]penciclovir (8-[3H]PCV < 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-5-iodouracil-beta-d-arabinofuranoside (2-[14C]FIAU. Xenograft tumors of ETK cells in vivo accumulated 2.5-fold more 8-[3H]GCV per gram of tissue and showed greater fluorescence from EGFP than control DU145 cells, demonstrating that the reporter gene functioned in vivo. These data extend previous reports by showing that a human promoter can be detected in vitro and in vivo with a dual-function reporter exploiting optical and radiotracer techniques.

  17. The photomorphogenic factors UV-B RECEPTOR 1, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5, and HY5 HOMOLOGUE are part of the UV-B signalling pathway in grapevine and mediate flavonol accumulation in response to the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Rodrigo; Herrera, Daniela; Mas, Abraham; Wong, Darren Chern Jan; Höll, Janine; Cavallini, Erika; Amato, Alessandra; Azuma, Akifumi; Ziegler, Tobias; Aquea, Felipe; Castellarin, Simone Diego; Bogs, Jochen; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Peña-Neira, Alvaro; Czemmel, Stefan; Alcalde, José Antonio; Matus, José Tomás; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is a species well known for its adaptation to radiation. However, photomorphogenic factors related to UV-B responses have not been molecularly characterized. We cloned and studied the role of UV-B RECEPTOR (UVR1), ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), and HY5 HOMOLOGUE (HYH) from V. vinifera. We performed gene functional characterizations, generated co-expression networks, and tested them in different environmental conditions. These genes complemented the Arabidopsis uvr8 and hy5 mutants in morphological and secondary metabolic responses to radiation. We combined microarray and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data with promoter inspections to identify HY5 and HYH putative target genes and their DNA binding preferences. Despite sharing a large set of common co-expressed genes, we found different hierarchies for HY5 and HYH depending on the organ and stress condition, reflecting both co-operative and partially redundant roles. New candidate UV-B gene markers were supported by the presence of HY5-binding sites. These included a set of flavonol-related genes that were up-regulated in a HY5 transient expression assay. We irradiated in vitro plantlets and fruits from old potted vines with high and low UV-B exposures and followed the accumulation of flavonols and changes in gene expression in comparison with non-irradiated conditions. UVR1, HY5, and HYH expression varied with organ, developmental stage, and type of radiation. Surprisingly, UVR1 expression was modulated by shading and temperature in berries, but not by UV-B radiation. We propose that the UV-B response machinery favours berry flavonol accumulation through the activation of HY5 and HYH at different developmental stages at both high and low UV-B exposures. PMID:27543604

  18. Frequency of dental caries in active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous patients: salivary and bacterial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola Rodriguez, J P; Galvan Torres, L J; Martinez Martinez, R E; Abud Mendoza, C; Medina Solis, C E; Ramos Coronel, S; Garcia Cortes, J O; Domínguez Pérez, R A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine dental caries frequency and to analyze salivary and bacterial factors associated with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) patients. Also, a proposal to identify dental caries by a surface, teeth, and the patient was developed. A cross-sectional, blinded study that included 60 SLE patients divided into two groups of 30 subjects each, according to the Activity Index for Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLEDAI). The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index and Integrative Dental Caries Index (IDCI) were used for analyzing dental caries. The saliva variables recorded were: flow, pH, and buffer capacity. The DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus were estimated by real-time PCR. The caries frequency was 85% for SLE subjects (73.3% for inactive systemic lupus erythematous (ISLE) and 100% for active systemic lupus erythematous (ASLE)); DMFT for the SLE group was 12.6 ± 5.7 and the IDCI was (9.8 ± 5.9). The ASLE group showed a salivary flow of 0.65 compared with 0.97 ml/1 min from the ISLE group; all variables mentioned above showed a statistical difference (p dental caries in epidemiological studies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Bacterial Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors SopE-Like and WxxxE Effectors▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgin, Richard; Raymond, Benoit; Garnett, James A.; Frankel, Gad; Crepin, Valerie F.; Berger, Cedric N.; Arbeloa, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Subversion of Rho family small GTPases, which control actin dynamics, is a common infection strategy used by bacterial pathogens. In particular, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) translocate type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins to modulate the Rho GTPases RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1, which trigger formation of stress fibers, filopodia, and lamellipodia/ruffles, respectively. The Salmonella effector SopE is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates Rac1 and Cdc42, which induce “the trigger mechanism of cell entry.” Based on a conserved Trp-xxx-Glu motif, the T3SS effector proteins IpgB1 and IpgB2 of Shigella, SifA and SifB of Salmonella, and Map of EPEC and EHEC were grouped together into a WxxxE family; recent studies identified the T3SS EPEC and EHEC effectors EspM and EspT as new family members. Recent structural and functional studies have shown that representatives of the WxxxE effectors share with SopE a 3-D fold and GEF activity. In this minireview, we summarize contemporary findings related to the SopE and WxxxE GEFs in the context of their role in subverting general host cell signaling pathways and infection. PMID:20123714

  20. Bacterial guanine nucleotide exchange factors SopE-like and WxxxE effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgin, Richard; Raymond, Benoit; Garnett, James A; Frankel, Gad; Crepin, Valerie F; Berger, Cedric N; Arbeloa, Ana

    2010-04-01

    Subversion of Rho family small GTPases, which control actin dynamics, is a common infection strategy used by bacterial pathogens. In particular, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) translocate type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins to modulate the Rho GTPases RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1, which trigger formation of stress fibers, filopodia, and lamellipodia/ruffles, respectively. The Salmonella effector SopE is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates Rac1 and Cdc42, which induce "the trigger mechanism of cell entry." Based on a conserved Trp-xxx-Glu motif, the T3SS effector proteins IpgB1 and IpgB2 of Shigella, SifA and SifB of Salmonella, and Map of EPEC and EHEC were grouped together into a WxxxE family; recent studies identified the T3SS EPEC and EHEC effectors EspM and EspT as new family members. Recent structural and functional studies have shown that representatives of the WxxxE effectors share with SopE a 3-D fold and GEF activity. In this minireview, we summarize contemporary findings related to the SopE and WxxxE GEFs in the context of their role in subverting general host cell signaling pathways and infection.

  1. Short term memory of Caenorhabditis elegans against bacterial pathogens involves CREB transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithika, Udayakumar; Vikneswari, Ramaraj; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2017-04-01

    One of the key issues pertaining to the control of memory is to respond to a consistently changing environment or microbial niche present in it. Human cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor which plays a crucial role in memory has a homolog in C. elegans, crh-1. crh-1 appears to influence memory processes to certain extent by habituation of the host to a particular environment. The discrimination between the pathogen and a non-pathogen is essential for C. elegans in a microbial niche which determines its survival. Training the nematodes in the presence of a virulent pathogen (S. aureus) and an opportunistic pathogen (P. mirabilis) separately exhibits a different behavioural paradigm. This appears to be dependent on the CREB transcription factor. Here we show that C. elegans homolog crh-1 helps in memory response for a short term against the interacting pathogens. Following conditioning of the nematodes to S. aureus and P. mirabilis, the wild type nematodes exhibited a positive response towards the respective pathogens which diminished slowly after 2h. By contrast, the crh-1 deficient nematodes had a defective memory post conditioning. The molecular data reinforces the importance of crh-1 gene in retaining the memory of nematode. Our results also suggest that involvement of neurotransmitters play a crucial role in modulating the memory of the nematode with the assistance of CREB. Therefore, we elucidate that CREB is responsible for the short term memory response in C. elegans against bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Heterotrophic bacterial production: Relationships to biological and abiological factors in estuarine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepfler, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Ecotoxicological effects of creosote contamination on benthic bacterial communities in the Elizabeth River, Virginia were investigated using both structural an functional microbial parameters. Results indicated that cell specific and total heterotrophic bacterial production parameters were depressed in a dose-dependent manner with increasing sediment PAH concentrations. Toxicity effects upon production were modified by temporal trends associated with temperature as well as spatial sediment characteristics. Of the parameters employed, the tritiated thymidine production assay was found to be the most sensitive for detection of ecotoxicological effects. Bacterial abundance and production were examined during a destratification event in the lower James River, Virginia. Bacterial abundance, although significantly different between stations, did not change over the study. Bacterial production ( 3 H-Tdr incorporation) in surface waters was significantly less during the mixed period 187 μg C·1-1· d -1 compared to the most stratified state (324μg C·1-1· d -1 ). Correlations between bacteria and chlorophyll were diminished during the mixed period. Total and flagellate specific grazing rates upon bacteria were reduced during the onset of destratification. Relationships between bacterial and nutrient parameters also indicated a strong influence of destratification. These results indicate that destratification changes trophic interactions within the microbial loop, which are not necessarily reflected in temporal patterns of bacterial abundance. Bacterioplankton production, and ammonium assimilation and remineralization were examined between April and August 1988 in the lower York River, Va

  3. Prevalence of and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis among women of reproductive age attending cervical screening in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Camila; Duarte, Marli T C; Silva, Daniela C; Silva, Márcia G

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis. A cross-sectional study of women aged 14-54 years attending 18 primary healthcare units in Botucatu, Brazil, for cervical screening was undertaken between September 1, 2012, and January 31, 2013. Data on sociodemographics, sexual behavior, and medical history were obtained by interview. Vaginal swabs were taken to classify the vaginal flora according to the Nugent scoring system. Candida sp. hyphae and infection by Trichomonas vaginalis were also evaluated by microscopy and culture, respectively. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors independently associated with bacterial vaginosis. Among 1519 women included in analyses, 457 (30.1%) had bacterial vaginosis. Variables independently associated with bacterial vaginosis were a single marital status (OR 1.4; 95%CI 1.1-1.8), partner infidelity (OR 1.5; 95%CI 1.2-1.9), abnormal discharge in the previous year (OR 1.5; 95%CI 1.2-2.0), and concurrent trichomoniasis (OR 4.1; 95%CI 1.5-11.5). Current use of hormonal contraception (OR 0.7; 95%CI 0.5-0.9), luteal phase of menstrual cycle (OR 0.8; 95%CI 0.6-0.9), higher income (OR 0.8; 95%CI 0.6-0.9), and vaginal candidiasis (OR 0.5; 95%CI 0.3-0.9) all had protective effects. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the study population is high. The epidemiological data provide evidence of the sexual transmissibility of bacterial vaginosis. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amphiregulin Antibody and Reduction of Axial Elongation in Experimental Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jun Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine the mechanism of ocular axial elongation in myopia, guinea pigs (age: 2–3 weeks which either underwent unilateral or bilateral lens-induced myopization (group 1 or which were primarily myopic at baseline (group 2 received unilateral intraocular injections of amphiregulin antibody (doses: 5, 10, or 15 μg three times in intervals of 9 days. A third group of emmetropic guinea pigs got intraocular unilateral injections of amphiregulin (doses: 0.25, 0.50 or 1.00 ng, respectively. In each group, the contralateral eyes received intraocular injections of Ringer's solution. In intra-animal inter-eye comparison and intra-eye follow-up comparison in groups 1 and 2, the study eyes as compared to the contralateral eyes showed a dose-dependent reduction in axial elongation. In group 3, study eyes and control eyes did not differ significantly in axial elongation. Immunohistochemistry revealed amphiregulin labelling at the retinal pigment epithelium in eyes with lens-induced myopization and Ringer's solution injection, but not in eyes with amphiregulin antibody injection. Intraocular injections of amphiregulin-antibody led to a reduction of lens-induced axial myopic elongation and of the physiological eye enlargement in young guinea pigs. In contrast, intraocularly injected amphiregulin in a dose of ≤1 ng did not show a significant effect. Amphiregulin may be one of several essential molecular factors for axial elongation.

  5. Visualization of elongation measurements using an SER universal testing platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivokonský, Radek; Filip, Petr; Zelenková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-8 ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/2342 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : elongational viscosity * Universal Testing Platform (SER) * polymer melts * LDPE Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2015

  6. Modelling elongational and shear rheology of two LDPE melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rolón-Garrido, V. H.; Pivokonský, Radek; Filip, Petr; Zatloukal, M.; Wagner, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2009), s. 691-697 ISSN 0035-4511 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Rheology * MSF model * Shear flow * Elongational flow * Strain hardening * Low-density polyethylene * Polymer melts Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.882, year: 2009

  7. Bacterial RNAs activate innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boyoung; Park, Yong-Soon; Lee, Soohyun; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The common molecular patterns of microbes play a critical role in the regulation of plant innate immunity. However, little is known about the role of nucleic acids in this process in plants. We pre-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaves with total RNAs from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) and subsequently inoculated these plants with the same bacterial cells. Total Pto DC3000 RNAs pre-infiltrated into Arabidopsis leaves elicited plant immune responses against Pto DC3000. However, sheared RNAs and RNase A application failed to induce immunity, suggesting that intact bacterial RNAs function in plant innate immunity. This notion was supported by the positive regulation of superoxide anion levels, callose deposition, two mitogen-activated protein kinases and defense-related genes observed in bacterial RNA-pre-treated leaves. Intriguingly, the Pto DC3000 population was not compromised in known pattern recognition receptor mutants for chitin, flagellin and elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Plant defense-related mutant analyses further revealed that bacterial RNA-elicited innate immunity was normally required for salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling. Notably, among total RNAs, the abundant bacterial RNA species 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs were the major determinants of this response. Our findings provide evidence that bacterial RNA serves as a microbe-associated molecular pattern in plants. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Bilateral elongated mandibular coronoid process in an Anatolian skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorumlu, Ufuk; Kopuz, Cem; Demir, Mehmet Tevfik; Pirzirenli, Mennan Ece

    2016-09-01

    Elongation or hyperplasia of coronoid process of mandible is rare condition characterized by abnormal bone development which cause malocclusion and the limited mouth opening. In this study, in an Anatolian skull, a case of bilateral elongation of mandibular coronoid process was presented. Levandoski panographic analysis was performed on the panoramic radiographie to determine the hyperplasia of the coronoid process. The right condylar process was exactly hyperplastic. The measurements of Kr-Go/Cd-Go were 95.10 mm/79.03 mm on right side and 97.53 mm/87.80 mm on left side. The ratio of Kr-Go/Cd-Go on the right side was 1.20. Elongated coronoid process is one of the factors cause mandibular hypomobility, it as reported here might lead to limited mouth opening. The knowledge of this variation or abnormality can be useful for the radiologist and surgeons and prevent misdiagnosis.

  9. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Brannan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5′ ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression.

  10. Yielding and Flow of Soft-Jammed Systems in Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Fadoul, O.; Lorenceau, E.; Coussot, P.

    2018-01-01

    So far, yielding and flow properties of soft-jammed systems have only been studied from simple shear and then extrapolated to other flow situations. In particular, simple flows such as elongations have barely been investigated experimentally or only in a nonconstant, partial volume of material. We show that using smooth tool surfaces makes it possible to obtain a prolonged elongational flow over a large range of aspect ratios in the whole volume of material. The normal force measured for various soft-jammed systems with different microstructures shows that the ratio of the elongation yield stress to the shear yield stress is larger (by a factor of around 1.5) than expected from the standard theory which assumes that the stress tensor is a function of the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. This suggests that the constitutive tensor of the materials cannot be determined solely from macroscopic shear measurements.

  11. Bacterial community composition and potential driving factors in different reef habitats of the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegler, Hauke F.; Lukman, Muhammad; Teichberg, Mirta

    2017-01-01

    Coastal eutrophication is a key driver of shifts in bacterial communities on coral reefs. With fringing and patch reefs at varying distances from the coast the Spermonde Archipelago in southern Sulawesi, Indonesia offers ideal conditions to study the effects of coastal eutrophication along...... a spatially defined gradient. The present study investigated bacterial community composition of three coral reef habitats: the water column, sediments, and mucus of the hard coral genus Fungia, along that cross shelf environmental and water quality gradient. The main research questions were: (1) How do water....../Shigella (Gammaproteobacteria) and Raistonia (Betaproteobacteria), respectively, both dominated the bacterial community composition of the both size fractions of the water column and coral mucus. The sampled reef sediments were more diverse, and no single OTUs was dominant. There was no gradual shift in bacterial classes...

  12. Local Environmental Factors Drive Divergent Grassland Soil Bacterial Communities in the Western Swiss Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashiro, Erika; Pinto-Figueroa, Eric; Buri, Aline; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Adatte, Thierry; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Guisan, Antoine; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-11-01

    Mountain ecosystems are characterized by a diverse range of climatic and topographic conditions over short distances and are known to shelter a high biodiversity. Despite important progress, still little is known on bacterial diversity in mountain areas. Here, we investigated soil bacterial biogeography at more than 100 sampling sites randomly stratified across a 700-km 2 area with 2,200-m elevation gradient in the western Swiss Alps. Bacterial grassland communities were highly diverse, with 12,741 total operational taxonomic units (OTUs) across 100 sites and an average of 2,918 OTUs per site. Bacterial community structure was correlated with local climatic, topographic, and soil physicochemical parameters with high statistical significance. We found pH (correlated with % CaO and % mineral carbon), hydrogen index (correlated with bulk gravimetric water content), and annual average number of frost days during the growing season to be among the groups of the most important environmental drivers of bacterial community structure. In contrast, bacterial community structure was only weakly stratified as a function of elevation. Contrasting patterns were discovered for individual bacterial taxa. Acidobacteria responded both positively and negatively to pH extremes. Various families within the Bacteroidetes responded to available phosphorus levels. Different verrucomicrobial groups responded to electrical conductivity, total organic carbon, water content, and mineral carbon contents. Alpine grassland bacterial communities are thus highly diverse, which is likely due to the large variety of different environmental conditions. These results shed new light on the biodiversity of mountain ecosystems, which were already identified as potentially fragile to anthropogenic influences and climate change. This article addresses the question of how microbial communities in alpine regions are dependent on local climatic and soil physicochemical variables. We benefit from a unique 700

  13. Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis and Associated Risk Factors among Women Complaining of Genital Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adane Bitew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial vaginosis is a global concern due to the increased risk of acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and bacteria causing aerobic vaginitis. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 210 patients between September 2015 and July 2016 at St. Paul’s Hospital. Gram-stained vaginal swabs were examined microscopically and graded as per Nugent’s procedure. Bacteria causing aerobic vaginitis were characterized, and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined. Results. The overall prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was 48.6%. Bacterial vaginosis was significantly associated with number of pants used per day (p=0.001 and frequency of vaginal bathing (p=0.045. Of 151 bacterial isolates, 69.5% were Gram-negative and 30.5% were Gram-positive bacteria. The overall drug resistance level of Gram-positive bacteria was high against penicillin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Cefoxitin and tobramycin were the most active drugs against Gram-positive bacteria. The overall drug resistance level of Gram-negative bacteria was high against tetracycline, ampicillin, and amoxicillin. Amikacin and tobramycin were the most active drugs against Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was high and was affected by individual hygiene. Routine culture of vaginal samples should be performed on patients with vaginitis and the drug susceptibility pattern of each isolate should be determined.

  14. Radiometric assay of bacterial growth: analysis of factors determining system performance and optimization of assay technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative technique for the measurement of 14 CO 2 released from a bacterial culture was evaluated. The technique uses liquid scintillation counting to record 14 CO 2 accumulation on a fluor-impregnated filter paper within a double-chambered scintillation vial that also houses the bacterial growth medium. We have successfully identified and corrected the major causes for a variably low detection efficiency, and also established the optimum mixture of reagents for the detection system. Incorporation of Triton X-100 into the scintillation fluid used for the detector reduced the variability between identical assays in a single batch from 50% to 5%, and, in conjunction with an increase in the scintillator concentration, raised the counting efficiency from 30% to 70-88%. The response of the improved detector is linear over a wide range of count-rates. Another significant modification was the interchange of growth and detector chambers. Overall, a 40-fold increase in count-rate during the exponential phase of bacterial growth was obtained by improving 14 CO 2 detection efficiency, increasing the rate of 14 CO 2 transfer from liquid to gas phases and enlarging the growth supporting capacity of the detector system. The minimum detection time for bacterial growth was shortened and the exponential phase of bacterial proliferation was lengthened by at least 2 hr. High counting efficiency, precision, and linearity make the improved detector a sensitive and reliable tool for radiometry of bacterial growth and metabolism

  15. Bacterial populations and environmental factors controlling cellulose degradation in an acidic Sphagnum peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, Timofey A; Ivanova, Anastasia O; Dedysh, Svetlana N; Liesack, Werner

    2011-07-01

    Northern peatlands represent a major global carbon store harbouring approximately one-third of the global reserves of soil organic carbon. A large proportion of these peatlands consists of acidic Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic bogs, which are characterized by extremely low rates of plant debris decomposition. The degradation of cellulose, the major component of Sphagnum-derived litter, was monitored in long-term incubation experiments with acidic (pH 4.0) peat extracts. This process was almost undetectable at 10°C and occurred at low rates at 20°C, while it was significantly accelerated at both temperature regimes by the addition of available nitrogen. Cellulose breakdown was only partially inhibited in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that bacteria participated in this process. We aimed to identify these bacteria by a combination of molecular and cultivation approaches and to determine the factors that limit their activity in situ. The indigenous bacterial community in peat was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The addition of cellulose induced a clear shift in the community structure towards an increase in the relative abundance of the Bacteroidetes. Increasing temperature and nitrogen availability resulted in a selective development of bacteria phylogenetically related to Cytophaga hutchinsonii (94-95% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), which densely colonized microfibrils of cellulose. Among isolates obtained from this community only some subdivision 1 Acidobacteria were capable of degrading cellulose, albeit at a very slow rate. These Acidobacteria represent indigenous cellulolytic members of the microbial community in acidic peat and are easily out-competed by Cytophaga-like bacteria under conditions of increased nitrogen availability. Members of the phylum Firmicutes, known to be key players in cellulose degradation in neutral habitats, were not detected in the cellulolytic community enriched at low pH. © 2011 Society for

  16. Potential Environmental Factors Affecting Oil-Degrading Bacterial Populations in Deep and Surface Waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiqing; Bacosa, Hernando P; Liu, Zhanfei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial community dynamics as a result of an oil spill is important for predicting the fate of oil released to the environment and developing bioremediation strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the roles of temperature, water chemistry (nutrients), and initial bacterial community in selecting oil degraders through a series of incubation experiments. Surface (2 m) and bottom (1537 m) waters, collected near the Deepwater Horizon site, were amended with 200 ppm light Louisiana sweet crude oil and bacterial inoculums from surface or bottom water, and incubated at 4 or 24°C for 50 days. Bacterial community and residual oil were analyzed by pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results showed that temperature played a key role in selecting oil-degrading bacteria. Incubation at 4°C favored the development of Cycloclasticus, Pseudoalteromonas , Sulfitobacter , and Reinekea , while 24°C incubations enhanced Oleibacter, Thalassobius, Phaeobacter, and Roseobacter. Water chemistry and the initial community also had potential roles in the development of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities. Pseudoalteromonas , Oleibacter , and Winogradskyella developed well in the nutrient-enriched bottom water, while Reinekea and Thalassobius were favored by low-nutrient surface water. We revealed that the combination of 4°C, crude oil and bottom inoculum was a key factor for the growth of Cycloclasticus , while the combination of surface inoculum and bottom water chemistry was important for the growth of Pseudoalteromonas . Moreover, regardless of the source of inoculum, bottom water at 24°C was a favorable condition for Oleibacter. Redundancy analysis further showed that temperature and initial community explained 57 and 19% of the variation observed, while oil and water chemistry contributed 14 and 10%, respectively. Overall, this study revealed the relative roles of temperature, water

  17. Structural rationale for the cross-resistance of tumor cells bearing the A399V variant of elongation factor eEF1A1 to the structurally unrelated didemnin B, ternatin, nannocystin A and ansatrienin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Murcia, Pedro A.; Cortés-Cabrera, Álvaro; Gago, Federico

    2017-10-01

    At least four classes of structurally distinct natural products with potent antiproliferative activities target the translation elongation factor eEF1A1, which is best known as the G-protein that delivers amino acyl transfer RNAs (aa-tRNAs) to ribosomes during mRNA translation. We present molecular models in atomic detail that provide a common structural basis for the high-affinity binding of didemnin B, ternatin, ansatrienin B and nannocystin A to eEF1A1, as well as a rationale based on molecular dynamics results that accounts for the deleterious effect of replacing alanine 399 with valine. The proposed binding site, at the interface between domains I and III, is eminently hydrophobic and exists only in the GTP-bound conformation. Drug binding at this site is expected to disrupt neither loading of aa-tRNAs nor GTP hydrolysis but would give rise to stabilization of this particular conformational state, in consonance with reported experimental findings. The experimental solution of the three-dimensional structure of mammalian eEF1A1 has proved elusive so far and the highly homologous eEF1A2 from rabbit muscle has been crystallized and solved only as a homodimer in a GDP-bound conformation. Interestingly, in this dimeric structure the large interdomain cavity where the drugs studied are proposed to bind is occupied by a mostly hydrophobic α-helix from domain I of the same monomer. Since binding of this α-helix and any of these drugs to domain III of eEF1A(1/2) is, therefore, mutually exclusive and involves two distinct protein conformations, one intriguing possibility that emerges from our study is that the potent antiproliferative effect of these natural products may arise not only from inhibition of protein synthesis, which is the current dogma, but also from interference with some other non-canonical functions. From this standpoint, this type of drugs could be considered antagonists of eEF1A1/2 oligomerization, a hypothesis that opens up novel areas of research.

  18. Th1 stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani: comparative cellular and protective responses of rTriose phosphate isomerase, rProtein disulfide isomerase and rElongation factor-2 in combination with rHSP70 against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  19. Fatores de risco para meningite bacteriana no recém-nascido Risk factors for bacterial meningitis in the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Jornada Krebs

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo é descrever os fatores de risco para meningite bacteriana em recém-nascidos e analisar a prevalência destes fatores, considerando-se a presença ou não de baixo peso ao nascimento. Foram analisados 50 recém-nascidos com meningite bacteriana, excluindo-se aqueles com meningomielocele ou infecção congênita. Na análise estatística utilizou-se o teste exato de Fisher, considerando-se significantes os valores de p The aim of this study is to describe the risk factors for bacterial meningitis in newborns, and to analyze the prevalence of these factors, considering or not the low birth weight presence. Fifty newborns with bacterial meningitis were analyzed, excluding the ones with meningomyelocele or congenital infection. In the statistical analysis, the Fisher's exact test was used, considering significant the p < 0.05 values. This study has shown that prematurity, low birth weight and presence of previous infectious diseases in the newborn or in the mother were important risk factors for meningitis. Among low birth weight newborns, invasive procedures, especially tracheal intubation, use of central venous catheter and previous use of antibiotics, were significantly associated to the meningitis occurrence. These results indicate that the improvement in the prenatal care and in the hospital infection control are measures of high importance in the decrease of the incidence of neonatal bacterial meningitis.

  20. Acute bacterial meningitis in the intensive care unit and risk factors for adverse clinical outcomes: retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, D; Gonçalves-Pereira, J; Janeiro, S; Silvestre, J; Bento, L; Póvoa, P

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis constitutes a medical emergency. Its burden has driven from childhood to the elderly and the immunocompromised population. However, the admission of patients with bacterial meningitis to the intensive care unit (ICU) has been sparsely approached, as have the prognostic factors associated with an adverse clinical outcome. We performed a retrospective analysis during a 7-year period of patients older than 18 years admitted to 2 polyvalent ICUs. Clinical, demographic, and outcome data were collected to evaluate its clinical impact on the outcome of patients with acute bacterial meningitis. We identified 65 patients with the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis (mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, 23; hospital mortality, 40%). Upon clinical presentation, their most frequent signs were fever (84%), seizures (21.5%), and a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score (GCSbacterial meningitis admitted to ICU had substantial morbidity and mortality. Those with low GCS or absence of fever have a particularly high risk of an adverse outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Is bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa a factor in post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, J. C.; Georgalas, C.; Kyi, M.; Ghufoor, K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify if there is a link between bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa and post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective non-interventional study of 105 patients who underwent tonsillectomy during a seven-month period. The study took place in a

  2. Impact of soil amendments and weather factors on bacterial wilt and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tomato bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, leads to tomato yield losses of up to 80% in southwestern Nigeria. Soil amendments and weather conditions are important in the management of the disease. Field experiments were conducted at the Research Farm of the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, ...

  3. Factors influencing efficacy of plastic shelters for control of bacterial blight of lilac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastic shelters are thought to manage bacterial blight by protecting plants from rain and/or frost. In February to April 2008 and 2009, we studied the contribution of frost protection to efficacy of this cultural control practice. Lilacs in 1-gallon pots were exposed to four treatments: 1) plants...

  4. Phonation threshold flow in elongated excised larynges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jack J; Regner, Michael F; Tao, Chao; Pauls, Steven

    2008-07-01

    This study proposes the use of a new parameter of vocal aerodynamics, phonation threshold flow (PTF). The sensitivities of the PTF and the phonation threshold pressure (PTP) were quantitatively compared to the percent of vocal fold elongation from physiologic length. Ten excised canine larynges were mounted on a bench apparatus capable of controlling vocal fold elongation. Subglottal airflow was gradually increased until the onset of phonation. Elongation of the vocal folds was varied from +0% (physiologic length) to +15%, and the PTF and PTP were measured. The mean PTFs at physiologic vocal fold length ranged from 101 to 217 mL/s. No statistically significant relationship was found to exist between the size of the larynx and the measured PTF values (p = .404). The average percent change of PTF compared to the magnitude of elongation was found to be statistically significant (p < .001). The data indicated that the PTF was proportional to the percent of vocal fold elongation. The PTF was positively correlated with vocal fold elongation and the PTP for small magnitudes of elongation. The results suggest that the PTF may be indicative of the biomechanical properties of the vocal folds, thus providing a possibly valuable tool in the clinical evaluation of laryngeal function.

  5. Differential effects of caffeine on hair shaft elongation, matrix and outer root sheath keratinocyte proliferation, and transforming growth factor-β2/insulin-like growth factor-1-mediated regulation of the hair cycle in male and female human hair follicles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T W; Herczeg-Lisztes, E; Funk, W; Zillikens, D; Bíró, T; Paus, R

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine reportedly counteracts the suppression of hair shaft production by testosterone in organ-cultured male human hair follicles (HFs). We aimed to investigate the impact of caffeine (i) on additional key hair growth parameters, (ii) on major hair growth regulatory factors and (iii) on male vs. female HFs in the presence of testosterone. Microdissected male and female human scalp HFs were treated in serum-free organ culture for 120 h with testosterone alone (0·5 μg mL(-1)) or in combination with caffeine (0·005-0·0005%). The following effects on hair shaft elongation were evaluated by quantitative (immuno)histomorphometry: HF cycling (anagen-catagen transition); hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation; expression of a key catagen inducer, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2; and expression of the anagen-prolonging insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1. Caffeine effects were further investigated in human outer root sheath keratinocytes (ORSKs). Caffeine enhanced hair shaft elongation, prolonged anagen duration and stimulated hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation. Female HFs showed higher sensitivity to caffeine than male HFs. Caffeine counteracted testosterone-enhanced TGF-β2 protein expression in male HFs. In female HFs, testosterone failed to induce TGF-β2 expression, while caffeine reduced it. In male and female HFs, caffeine enhanced IGF-1 protein expression. In ORSKs, caffeine stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis/necrosis, and upregulated IGF-1 gene expression and protein secretion, while TGF-β2 protein secretion was downregulated. This study reveals new growth-promoting effects of caffeine on human hair follicles in subjects of both sexes at different levels (molecular, cellular and organ). © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. GTP hydrolysis by IF2 guides progression of the ribosome into elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. Andrew; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent structural data have revealed two distinct conformations of the ribosome during initiation. We employed single-molecule fluorescence methods to probe the dynamic relation of these ribosomal conformations in real time. In the absence of initiation factors, the ribosome assembles in two distinct conformations. The initiation factors discriminate between these two conformations, guiding assembly of the conformation that can enter the elongation cycle. In particular, IF2 both accelerates the rate of subunit joining and actively promotes the transition to the elongation-competent conformation. Blocking GTP hydrolysis by IF2 results in 70S complexes formed in the conformation unable to enter elongation. We observe that rapid GTP hydrolysis by IF2 drives the transition to the elongation-competent conformation, thus committing the ribosome to enter the elongation cycle. PMID:19595714

  7. Multiple molecular dynamics simulation of the isoforms of human translation elongation factor 1A reveals reversible fluctuations between "open" and "closed" conformations and suggests specific for eEF1A1 affinity for Ca2+-calmodulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrutskii Boris S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A directs the correct aminoacyl-tRNA to ribosomal A-site. In addition, eEF1A is involved in carcinogenesis and apoptosis and can interact with large number of non-translational ligands. There are two isoforms of eEF1A, which are 98% similar. Despite the strong similarity, the isoforms differ in some properties. Importantly, the appearance of eEF1A2 in tissues in which the variant is not normally expressed can be coupled to cancer development. We reasoned that the background for the functional difference of eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 might lie in changes of dynamics of the isoforms. Results It has been determined by multiple MD simulation that eEF1A1 shows increased reciprocal flexibility of structural domains I and II and less average distance between the domains, while increased non-correlated diffusive atom motions within protein domains characterize eEF1A2. The divergence in the dynamic properties of eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 is caused by interactions of amino acid residues that differ between the two variants with neighboring residues and water environment. The main correlated motion of both protein isoforms is the change in proximity of domains I and II which can lead to disappearance of the gap between the domains and transition of the protein into a "closed" conformation. Such a transition is reversible and the protein can adopt an "open" conformation again. This finding is in line with our earlier experimental observation that the transition between "open" and "closed" conformations of eEF1A could be essential for binding of tRNA and/or other biological ligands. The putative calmodulin-binding region Asn311-Gly327 is less flexible in eEF1A1 implying its increased affinity for calmodulin. The ability of eEF1A1 rather than eEF1A2 to interact with Ca2+/calmodulin is shown experimentally in an ELISA-based test. Conclusion We have found that reversible transitions between "open" and "close

  8. Polyamines and Anaerobic Elongation of Rice Coleoptile

    OpenAIRE

    Remo, Reggiani; Alejandro, Hochkoeppler; Alcide, Bertani; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.

    1989-01-01

    The role of polyamines in the anaerobic elongation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) coleoptiles was studied. The reduced growth of rice coleoptiles under anoxic conditions was accompanied by a massive accumulation of free putrescine. Putrescine was synthesized from arginine in a reaction catalyzed by arginine decarboxylase (ADC). The anoxic titer of putrescine was closely correlated with elongation of coleoptiles. In experiments in which putrescine and inhibitors [a-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and...

  9. Tumor necrosis factor α level in cerebrospinal fluid for bacterial and aseptic meningitis: a diagnostic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, S; Zhao, J; Zhang, J; Kwon, S; Han, M; Bian, R; Fu, H; Zhang, Y; Pan, H

    2014-08-01

    In our previous study, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was identified as an effective target for sepsis patients (Int J Clin Pract, 68, 2014, 520). TNF-α in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was also investigated for its utility in the differential diagnosis of bacterial and aseptic meningitis. However, there has been neither definite nor convincing evidence so far. Here the overall diagnostic accuracy of TNF-α in differentiation between bacterial and aseptic meningitis was evaluated through the meta-analysis of diagnostic tests. The sensitivity, specificity and other measures of accuracy were pooled using random effect models. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess overall test performance. Publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots, and sensitivity analysis was also introduced. A total of 21 studies involving bacterial meningitis (678) and aseptic meningitis (694) involved a total of 1372 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for the TNF-α test were 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-0.86, I(2)  = 65.1] and 0.92 (95% CI 0.89-0.94, I(2)  = 61.8), respectively. The positive likelihood ratio was 12.05 (95% CI 7.41-19.60, I(2)  = 36.5), the negative likelihood ratio was 0.17 (95% CI 0.13-0.24, I(2)  = 59.4), and TNF-α was significantly associated with bacterial meningitis, with a diagnostic odds ratio of 49.84 (95% CI 28.53-87.06, I(2)  = 47.9). The overall accuracy of the TNF-α test was very high with the area under the curve 0.9317. Publication bias was absent, and sensitivity analysis suggested that our results were highly stable. Our meta-analysis suggested that TNF-α could be recommended as a useful marker for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and differential diagnosis between bacterial and aseptic meningitis with high sensitivity and specificity. Thus, hospitals should be encouraged to conduct TNF-α tests in CSF after lumbar puncture. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  10. [Evaluation of the concentration of cerebrospinal fluid ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in patients with purulent, bacterial meningitis--own observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Lucjan

    2012-01-01

    THE AIM of the study was evaluation of usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) concentration assessment in adults with purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis. The investigation was performed in 14 subjects hospitalized at the Department of Infectious Diseases of Medical University of Silesia in Bytom from 2007 - 2009 due to purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis. All patients were divided into to groups according to the severity of their clinical condition: I group - very severe course of the disease, II group - moderate and mild course of the disease. In all individuals CSF CNTF concentration was evaluated during the first 24 hours of hospitalization. Mean CSF CNTF concentration in patients in very severe clinical condition (group I) was 14,73 pg/ mL compared to 6,79 pg/mL in subjects of group II with moderate and mild course of disease. The difference between CSF mean concentration of this cytokine was statistically significant (p CNTF concentrations and other CSF inflammatory parameters. Control assays performed in 4 patients from group I revealed evident decrease of CSF CNTF level in fatal course of the disease. In survivals with recovery CSF concentration of this cytokine was only slightly decreased compared to initial level. CONCLUSIONS. The obtained results indicate the usefulness of CSF CNTF concentration assessment in estimation of severity of the patient's clinical condition. The level of this cytokine concentration also seems to be helpful as prognostic marker in purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis.

  11. Assessment of the bacterial diversity of human colostrum and screening of staphylococcal and enterococcal populations for potential virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Esther; Delgado, Susana; Fernández, Leonides; García, Natalia; Albújar, Mar; Gómez, Adolfo; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to breast milk, little is known about the bacterial composition of human colostrum. The objective of this work was to analyze the bacterial diversity of colostrum obtained from healthy women and to characterize the dominant bacterial species for the presence of possible virulence factors. Samples of colostrum obtained from 36 healthy women were inoculated into different culture media. Several isolates from each medium were selected and identified. Staphylococcal and enterococcal isolates were submitted to genetic profiling. One representative of each profile was included in a genetic and phenotypic characterization scheme, including detection of potential virulence traits/genes and sensitivity to antibiotics. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis were the dominant species, followed by Streptococcus mitis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Among the 48 S. epidermidis isolates selected on the basis of their genetic profiles, the biofilm-related icaD gene and the mecA gene were detected in only 11 and six isolates, respectively. In parallel, 10 enterococcal isolates were also characterized and none of them contained the cylA, vanA, vanB, vanD, vanE and vanG genes. All of them were sensitive to vancomycin. There were no indications that the colostrum samples contained harmful bacteria.

  12. CMV-beta-actin promoter directs higher expression from an adeno-associated viral vector in the liver than the cytomegalovirus or elongation factor 1 alpha promoter and results in therapeutic levels of human factor X in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Daly, T; Gao, C; Flotte, T R; Song, S; Byrne, B J; Sands, M S; Parker Ponder, K

    2001-03-20

    Although AAV vectors show promise for hepatic gene therapy, the optimal transcriptional regulatory elements have not yet been identified. In this study, we show that an AAV vector with the CMV enhancer/chicken beta-actin promoter results in 9.5-fold higher expression after portal vein injection than an AAV vector with the EF1 alpha promoter, and 137-fold higher expression than an AAV vector with the CMV promoter/enhancer. Although induction of the acute-phase response with the administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated the CMV promoter/enhancer from the context of an adenoviral vector in a previous study, LPS resulted in only a modest induction of this promoter from an AAV vector in vivo. An AAV vector with the CMV-beta-actin promoter upstream of the coagulation protein human factor X (hFX) was injected intravenously into neonatal mice. This resulted in expression of hFX at 548 ng/ml (6.8% of normal) for up to 1.2 years, and 0.6 copies of AAV vector per diploid genome in the liver at the time of sacrifice. Neonatal intramuscular injection resulted in expression of hFX at 248 ng/ml (3.1% of normal), which derived from both liver and muscle. We conclude that neonatal gene therapy with an AAV vector with the CMV-beta-actin promoter might correct hemophilia due to hFX deficiency.

  13. Von Willebrand factor indicates bacterial translocation, inflammation, and procoagulant imbalance and predicts complications independently of portal hypertension severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandorfer, M; Schwabl, P; Paternostro, R; Pomej, K; Bauer, D; Thaler, J; Ay, C; Quehenberger, P; Fritzer-Szekeres, M; Peck-Radosavljevic, M; Trauner, M; Reiberger, T; Ferlitsch, A

    2018-04-01

    Elevated plasma von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF) has been shown to indicate the presence of clinically significant portal hypertension, and thus, predicts the development of clinical events in patients with cirrhosis. To investigate the impact of bacterial translocation and inflammation on vWF, as well as the association between vWF and procoagulant imbalance. Moreover, we assessed whether vWF predicts complications of cirrhosis, independent of the severity of portal hypertension. Our study population comprised 225 patients with hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) ≥ 10 mm Hg without active bacterial infections or hepatocellular carcinoma. vWF correlated with markers of bacterial translocation (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein [LBP; ρ = 0.201; P = 0.021]), inflammation (interleukin 6 [IL-6; ρ = 0.426; P protein [CRP; ρ = 0.249; P protein C ratio; ρ = 0.507; P model for transplant-free mortality. Finally, the independent prognostic value of vWF/CRP groups for mortality was confirmed by competing risk analysis. Our results demonstrate that vWF is not only a marker of portal hypertension but also independently linked to bacterial translocation, inflammation and procoagulant imbalance, which might explain its HVPG-independent association with most clinical events. Prognostic groups based on vWF/CRP efficiently discriminate between patients with a poor 5-year survival and patients with a favourable prognosis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Factor H-IgG Chimeric Proteins as a Therapeutic Approach against the Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Anna M; Magda, Michal; Kohl, Lisa; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lambris, John D; Ram, Sanjay; Ermert, David

    2017-12-01

    Bacteria can cause life-threatening infections, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. Antibiotic therapy is a mainstay of treatment, although antimicrobial resistance has drastically increased over the years. Unfortunately, safe and effective vaccines against most pathogens have not yet been approved, and thus developing alternative treatments is important. We analyzed the efficiency of factor H (FH)6-7/Fc, a novel antibacterial immunotherapeutic protein against the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes This protein is composed of two domains of complement inhibitor human FH (FH complement control protein modules 6 and 7) that bind to S. pyogenes , linked to the Fc region of IgG (FH6-7/Fc). FH6-7/Fc has previously been shown to enhance complement-dependent killing of, and facilitate bacterial clearance in, animal models of the Gram-negative pathogens Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis We hypothesized that activation of complement by FH6-7/Fc on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria such as S. pyogenes will enable professional phagocytes to eliminate the pathogen. We found that FH6-7/Fc alleviated S. pyogenes- induced sepsis in a transgenic mouse model expressing human FH ( S. pyogenes binds FH in a human-specific manner). Furthermore, FH6-7/Fc, which binds to protein H and selected M proteins, displaced FH from the bacterial surface, enhanced alternative pathway activation, and reduced bacterial blood burden by opsonophagocytosis in a C3-dependent manner in an ex vivo human whole-blood model. In conclusion, FH-Fc chimeric proteins could serve as adjunctive treatments against multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly...

  16. Clinical and Microbiological Features and Factors Associated with Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Men with Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Gu; Cho, Min Chul; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and microbiological features in the patients with community-acquired acute bacterial prostatitis (CA-ABP), as well as factors that affect fluoroquinolone resistance. A retrospective analysis was performed of 209 patients hospitalized for antibiotic treatment of CA-ABP. We investigated patient age, body mass index, underlying diseases, recurrence, prostate-related factors and results of urine culture examination and antibiotic sensitivity tests. Seventeen patients (8.1%) had fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial colonies. When we divided the subjects into groups according to the fluoroquinolone resistance, the group with resistant bacteria was significantly older, had larger prostates and had greater residual urine volumes. Bacteria were identified in 127 of 209 patients (60.8%), and the most commonly cultured included Escherichia coli (43.5%). The sensitivity of the cultured bacteria to fluoroquinolones was high compared to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and gentamicin, but similar to cefotaxime. The bacteria were more sensitive to amikacin and imipenem than to fluoroquinolone. The multivariate analysis revealed that prostate volume ≥40 ml (p = 0.024) and residual urine volume >100 ml (p = 0.004) were independent predictive factors for fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy might be an effective treatment in CA-ABP. However, combination antibiotic therapy is recommended in cases with prostate volume ≥40 ml or residual urine volume >100 ml, because fluoroquinolone resistance can occur. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Root-associated bacterial diversities of Oryza rufipogon and Oryza sativa and their influencing environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Zhou, Xue; Ma, Lina; Xu, Shangqi; Nasir, Fahad; Tian, Chunjie

    2017-05-01

    Oryza rufipogon is the ancestor of human-cultivated Oryza sativa. However, little is known about the difference between the root-associated microorganisms of O. rufipogon and O. sativa. In this study, the root-associated bacteria of O. rufipogon, Leersia hexandra, and O. sativa from different latitudes in China were studied by DGGE analysis. Their bacterial community structures were compared by principal component analysis. The relationship between root-associated bacteria and soil properties was explored by canonical correspondence analysis. The relationships of glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content, soluble sugar content, proline content of the plant, and bacterial diversity indices of their root-associated microorganisms were also investigated. We found both broad-spectrum and host-specific bacteria, and the similarity, diversity and abundance indices of O. rufipogon and L. hexandra were higher than O. sativa root-associated bacteria. However, even living in the same habitat, O. rufipogon and L. hexandra selected different root-associated bacteria. Microbial composition was primarily correlated with available N, P, and K and the annual precipitation. We also found a positive correlation between the soluble sugar content of the plant and GRSP content of the root soil. The above results indicated that the community structure of root-associated bacteria differs between wild rice and cultivated rice. Human activity and the natural selection of the host plants shaped the differences, consistent with our hypothesis.

  18. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  19. RAV transcription factors are essential for disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight via activation of melatonin biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunxie; Chang, Yanli; Zeng, Hongqiu; Liu, Guoyin; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2018-01-01

    With 1 AP2 domain and 1 B3 domain, 7 MeRAVs in apetala2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) gene family have been identified in cassava. However, the in vivo roles of these remain unknown. Gene expression assays showed that the transcripts of MeRAVs were commonly regulated after Xanthomonas axonopodis pv manihotis (Xam) and MeRAVs were specifically located in plant cell nuclei. Through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in cassava, we found that MeRAV1 and MeRAV2 are essential for plant disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight, as shown by the bacterial propagation of Xam in plant leaves. Through VIGS in cassava leaves and overexpression in cassava leave protoplasts, we found that MeRAV1 and MeRAV2 positively regulated melatonin biosynthesis genes and the endogenous melatonin level. Further investigation showed that MeRAV1 and MeRAV2 are direct transcriptional activators of 3 melatonin biosynthesis genes in cassava, as evidenced by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR in cassava leaf protoplasts and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, cassava melatonin biosynthesis genes also positively regulated plant disease resistance. Taken together, this study identified MeRAV1 and MeRAV2 as common and upstream transcription factors of melatonin synthesis genes in cassava and revealed a model of MeRAV1 and MeRAV2-melatonin biosynthesis genes-melatonin level in plant disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Telomere elongation chooses TERRA ALTernatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rajika; Azzalin, Claus M

    2015-01-01

    Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) mechanisms allow telomerase-negative immortal cells to buffer replicative telomere shortening. ALT is naturally active in a number of human cancers and might be selected upon telomerase inactivation. ALT is thought to operate through homologous recombination (HR) occurring between telomeric repeats from independent chromosome ends. Indeed, suppression of a number of HR factors impairs ALT cell proliferation. Yet, how HR is initiated at ALT telomeres remains elusive. Mounting evidence suggests that the long noncoding telomeric RNA TERRA renders ALT telomeres recombinogenic by forming RNA:DNA hybrids with the telomeric C-rich strand. TERRA and telomeric hybrids act in concert with a number of other factors, including the RNA endoribonuclease RNaseH1 and the single stranded DNA binding protein RPA. The functional interaction network built upon these different players seems indispensable for ALT telomere maintenance, and digging into the molecular details of this previously unappreciated network might open the way to novel avenues for cancer treatments.

  1. Configuration of biological wastewater treatment line and influent composition as the main factors driving bacterial community structure of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaranowska, Paulina; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    The structure of microbial consortia in wastewater treatment facilities is a resultant of environmental conditions created by the operational parameters of the purification process. In the research, activated sludge from nine Polish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) was investigated at a molecular level to determine the impact of the complexity of biological treatment line and the influent composition on the species structure and the diversity of bacterial consortia. The community fingerprints and technological data were subjected to the canonical correspondence and correlation analyses. The number of separated biological processes realized in the treatment line and the presence of industrial wastewater in the influent were the key factors determining the species structure of total and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biomass. The N2O-reducers community composition depended significantly on the design of the facility; the highest species richness of denitrifiers was noted in the WWTPs with separated denitrification tanks. The contribution of industrial streams to the inflow affected the diversity of total and denitrifying bacterial consortia and diminished the diversity of ammonia oxidizers. The obtained data are valuable for engineers since they revealed the main factors, including the design of wastewater treatment plant, influencing the microbial groups critical for the stability of purification processes.

  2. Development of a multicomponent Staphylococcus aureus vaccine designed to counter multiple bacterial virulence factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Miller, Alita A.; Donald, Robert G.K.; Scully, Ingrid L.; Nanra, Jasdeep S.; Cooper, David; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of healthcare-associated infections and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease in hospitalized patients. Despite increasingly rigorous infection control guidelines, the prevalence and corresponding negative impact of S. aureus infections remain considerable. Difficulties in controlling S. aureus infections as well as the associated treatment costs are exacerbated by increasing rates of resistance to available antibiotics. Despite ongoing efforts over the past 20 years, no licensed S. aureus vaccine is currently available. However, learnings from past clinical failures of vaccine candidates and a better understanding of the immunopathology of S. aureus colonization and infection have aided in the design of new vaccine candidates based on multiple important bacterial pathogenesis mechanisms. This review outlines important considerations in designing a vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus disease in healthcare settings. PMID:22922765

  3. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong H Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  4. Various factors affecting the bacterial corneal ulcer healing: a 4-years study in referral tertiary eye hospital in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asroruddin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Corneal ulcer is one of the most common causes of visual acuity impairment and blindness all over the world. The aim of the study was to evaluate various factors affecting the bacterial corneal ulcers healing, including the predisposing factors, causative organisms, antibiotic sensitivity, as well as the treatment outcomes.Methods: All data were taken retrospectively from medical records of patients who underwent corneal scraping for Gram examination and/or culture over a-4-year period (2008-2011 at the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta. Treatment outcome were analyzed using Chi-square test, one-way ANOVA, and post-hoc analysis. Mean time required for complete epithelial healing was also investigated.Results: 220 cases of bacterial corneal ulcers in 216 patients were included. The most common risk factors were ocular trauma (45.8%. Gram-positive coccus were found in 65.7% cases other than other microbes. Pseudomonas sp. (25,0% and Staphylococcus epidermidis (18.4% were the most common isolates, sensitive to almost all kinds of antibiotics. About 83.0% (106 cases were improved with antibiotics only, the rest were not improved and worsened. Mean time for complete epithelial healing was 17.5 ± 8.9 days with mild ulcer had the most rapid recovery. Eyes treated with fluoroquinolone eyedrops were healed in 14 days, faster than other regiments.Conclusion: Ocular trauma was the most common risk factor for corneal ulcer, and the most commonly isolated organism was Pseudomonas sp. Most cases were improved with antibiotics, and fluoroquinolone showed faster healing. Complete epithelial healing occurred in about 17.5 days.

  5. Skin bacterial flora as a potential risk factor predisposing to late bacterial infection after cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netsvyetayeva, Irina; Marusza, Wojciech; Olszanski, Romuald; Szyller, Kamila; Krolak-Ulinska, Aneta; Swoboda-Kopec, Ewa; Sierdzinski, Janusz; Szymonski, Zachary; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna

    2018-01-01

    Cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) gel is widely used in esthetic medicine. Late bacterial infection (LBI) is a rare, but severe complication after HA augmentation. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients who underwent the HA injection procedure and developed LBI had qualitatively different bacterial flora on the skin compared to patients who underwent the procedure without any complications. The study group comprised 10 previously healthy women with recently diagnosed, untreated LBI after HA augmentation. The control group comprised 17 healthy women who had a similar amount of HA injected with no complications. To assess the difference between the two groups, their skin flora was cultured from nasal swabs, both before and after antibiotic treatment in the study group. A significant increase in the incidence of Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in the control group ( P =0.000) compared to the study group. The study group showed a significantly higher incidence of Staphylococcus aureus ( P =0.005), Klebsiella pneumoniae ( P =0.006), Klebsiella oxytoca ( P =0.048), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus ( P =0.048) compared to the control group. The bacterial flora on the skin differed in patients with LBI from the control group. The control group's bacterial skin flora was dominated by S. epidermidis . Patients with LBI had a bacterial skin flora dominated by potentially pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Elongation-based fiber optic tunable filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, G. G.; Mejia-Islas, J. A.; Andrade-González, E. A.; Pérez-Torres, J. R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper focuses on introducing the results of a model using a control system for an optical filter that can be tuned, using a solution that employs both, an elongation control system and a fiber Bragg grating. At the first stage, the optical characterization of the filter was made, then the stepper motors were chosen for the desired wavelength selection with a couple of pulleys which produce the grating elongation and, as a consequence, the wavelength shifting. The pulleys diameters were calculated to produce 0.8 nm shift for each filtering wavelength using a control program.

  7. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA, were identified in bacteria pertaining to family of Enterobacteriacae for the very first time. After that, they were discovered in almost every single observed strain. The structure of plasmids is made of circular double chain DNA molecules which are replicated autonomously in a host cell. Their length may vary from few up to several hundred kilobase (kb. Among the bacteria, plasmids are mostly transferred horizontally by conjugation process. Plasmid replication process can be divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The process involves DNA helicase I, DNA gyrase, DNA polymerase III, endonuclease, and ligase.Plasmids contain genes essential for plasmid function and their preservation in a host cell (the beginning and the control of replication. Some of them possess genes whichcontrol plasmid stability. There is a common opinion that plasmids are unnecessary fora growth of bacterial population and their vital functions; thus, in many cases they can be taken up or kicked out with no lethal effects to a plasmid host cell. However,there are numerous biological functions of bacteria related to plasmids. Plasmids identification and classification are based upon their genetic features which are presented permanently in all of them, and these are: abilities to preserve themselves in a host cell and to control a replication process. In this way, plasmids classification among incompatibility groups is performed. The method of replicon typing, which is based on genotype and not on phenotype characteristics, has the same results as in compatibility grouping.

  8. Effects of mechanical and bacterial stressors on cytokine and growth-factor expression in periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proff, P; Reicheneder, C; Faltermeier, A; Kubein-Meesenburg, D; Römer, P

    2014-05-01

    The goal of the study was to examine the effects of a mechanical (orthodontic force simulation by static compressive loading) and a bacterial (endotoxins from a heat-inactivated gram-negative periodontal pathogen) stressor on the expression patterns of factors that are key to regulating osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling. Three experimental groups were formed with fifth-passage periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts treated by the static application of compressive force (2 g/cm(2)), heat-inactivated aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (1 × 10(7) cells), or both of these stressors combined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to study gene expression of IL-6, IL-8, COX-2, IGF-1, VEGF, and MMP-13 in the 3 groups. Protein levels of COX-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)), and IL-8 production were quantified using immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mechanical stressor upregulated the genes of COX-2, IL-8, IGF-1, and MMP-13 in PDL fibroblasts and the bacterial stressor upregulated IL-6, IL-8, COX-2 and MMP-13. Both stressors in combination upregulated VEGF and caused COX-2 gene expression to increase further; the latter effect was also detected at the protein level and indirectly via the enhanced production of PGE(2). We noted that the posttranscriptional regulation of IL-8 was induced by the mechanical stressor and influenced by PGE(2). While mechanical-stressor application increased the gene expression of COX-2, IL-8, and VEGF in the presence of the bacterial stressor, IL-8 production was posttranscriptionally regulated by the mechanical stressor, whereas COX-2 expression correlated with enhanced production of the inflammatory tissue hormone PGE(2), which exerted a suppressive effect on endotoxin-induced IL-8 production.

  9. Bacterial Profile, Antibacterial Resistance Pattern, and Associated Factors from Women Attending Postnatal Health Service at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebaw Bitew Kifilie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical site infection is a vital cause of maternal mortality and morbidity, especially in resource-limited countries. The rise of antibiotic resistance bacterial infection poses a big threat to this vulnerable population. However, there is lack of studies around the study area. Objective. The purpose of this study was to identify bacterial profile, antibacterial resistance pattern, and associated factors among mothers attending postnatal care health service. Methods. Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted on 107 study participants at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from 1 January 2016 to 30 May 2016. Wound swab, aspirate, and biopsy were collected and performed for culture and drug resistance testing. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to determine the associated factors for bacterial infection. Odds ratio (95% CI was calculated to determine the strength of statistically significant associated factors. Result. Bacterial growth was confirmed in 90 (84.1% of 107 study participants suspected to have surgical site infection. The predominant bacterial isolates were S. aureus (41.6%, E. coli (19.8%, K. pneumoniae (13.9%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus (12.9%, and Enterobacter spp. (4%. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, and tetracycline but susceptible to ceftriaxone and amikacin. Multidrug-resistant bacteria species were isolated. Using a procedure such as cesarean section and episiotomy for delivery and premature rapture of membrane had strong association with bacterial infection. Conclusion. The high prevalence of bacterial profile and isolation of multidrug-resistant bacteria pose a big threat to postnatal mothers and their children. Factors such as cesarean section, episiotomy for delivery, and premature rapture of membrane were predictors for bacterial infection. Therefore, there

  10. Extravaginal reservoirs of vaginal bacteria as risk factors for incident bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fiedler, Tina L; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Thomas, Katherine K; Liu, Congzhou; Ko, Daisy; Xie, Hu; Saracino, Misty; Fredricks, David N

    2012-05-15

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) represents shifts in microbiota from Lactobacillus spp. to diverse anaerobes. Although antibiotics relieve symptoms and temporarily eradicate BV-associated bacteria (BVAB), BV usually recurs. We investigated the role of extravaginal BVAB reservoirs in recurrence. Risks for BV acquisition over the course of 1 year were defined. DNA in vaginal, anal, and oral swab samples from enrollment was subjected to quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Gardnerella vaginalis, Lactobacillus crispatus, BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3, Megasphaera spp., Lactobacillus jensenii, and Leptotrichia/Sneathia spp. A case-control approach analyzed BVAB detection at enrollment for case patients (BV acquisition) versus controls (none). Of 239 women enrolled without BV, 199 were seen in follow-up, and 40 experienced BV; 15 had all samples for analysis. Detection of G. vaginalis in oral cavity or anal samples and Leptotrichia/Sneathia spp. in anal samples was more common at enrollment among case patients, who also had higher concentrations of these bacteria and Megasphaera relative to 30 controls at each site. In contrast, L. crispatus was detected more frequently in anal samples among controls. Women who acquire BV are more likely have previous colonization of extravaginal reservoirs with some BVAB, and less likely to have L. crispatus, suggesting that BVAB may be acquired vaginally from extravaginal reservoirs.

  11. EVALUATION OF BIOTIC AND TREATMENT FACTORS RELATING TO BACTERIAL CONTROL OF ZEBRA MUSSELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Testing over the last quarter has indicated the following regarding control of zebra mussels with bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A: (1) the concentration of bacteria suspended in water is directly correlated with mussel kill; (2) the ratio of bacterial mass per mussel, if too low, could limit mussel kill; a treatment must be done at a high enough ratio so that mussels do not deplete all the suspended bacteria before the end of the desired exposure period; (3) bacteria appear to lose almost all their toxicity after suspension for 24 hr in highly oxygenated water; (4) in a recirculating pipe system, the same percentage mussel kill will be achieved irrespective of whether all the bacteria are applied at once or divided up and applied intermittently in smaller quantities over a 10-hr period. Since this is the fourth quarterly report, a summation of all test results over the last twelve months is provided as a table in this report. The table includes the above-mentioned fourth-quarter results

  12. EVALUATION OF BIOTIC AND TREATMENT FACTORS RELATING TO BACTERIAL CONTROL OF ZEBRA MUSSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-04-30

    Testing over the last quarter has indicated the following regarding control of zebra mussels with bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A: (1) the concentration of bacteria suspended in water is directly correlated with mussel kill; (2) the ratio of bacterial mass per mussel, if too low, could limit mussel kill; a treatment must be done at a high enough ratio so that mussels do not deplete all the suspended bacteria before the end of the desired exposure period; (3) bacteria appear to lose almost all their toxicity after suspension for 24 hr in highly oxygenated water; (4) in a recirculating pipe system, the same percentage mussel kill will be achieved irrespective of whether all the bacteria are applied at once or divided up and applied intermittently in smaller quantities over a 10-hr period. Since this is the fourth quarterly report, a summation of all test results over the last twelve months is provided as a table in this report. The table includes the above-mentioned fourth-quarter results.

  13. Three tRNAs on the ribosome slow translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junhong; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2017-12-26

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome simultaneously binds up to three different transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. Among the three tRNA binding sites, the regulatory role of the exit (E) site, where deacylated tRNA spontaneously dissociates from the translational complex, has remained elusive. Here we use two donor-quencher pairs to observe and correlate both the conformation of ribosomes and tRNAs as well as tRNA occupancy. Our results reveal a partially rotated state of the ribosome wherein all three tRNA sites are occupied during translation elongation. The appearance and lifetime of this state depend on the E-site tRNA dissociation kinetics, which may vary among tRNA species and depends on temperature and ionic strength. The 3-tRNA partially rotated state is not a proper substrate for elongation factor G (EF-G), thus inhibiting translocation until the E-site tRNA dissociates. Our result presents two parallel kinetic pathways during translation elongation, underscoring the ability of E-site codons to modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis.

  14. The Sweetness of Embryonic Elongation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganathan, Sundar R; Oates, Andrew C

    2017-02-27

    Metabolic pathways play a vital yet poorly understood role in embryogenesis. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Bulusu et al. (2017) and Oginuma et al. (2017) provide insights into the intricate relationship between metabolism and morphogenesis, showing that glycolysis facilitates body elongation and balances neural and mesodermal differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Static Elongation of a Suspended Slinky™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Mikolaj ``Mik''

    2002-05-01

    Elongation of a vertically suspended Slinky under its own weight and a weight hung from it is discussed using elementary considerations. Displacement of the center of mass of Slinky is also found. The results are verified experimentally using a 1 apparatus.

  16. Rhizome elongation and seagrass clonal growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marbà, N.; Duarte, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    A compilation of published and original data on rhizome morphometry, horizontal and vertical elongation rates and branching patterns for 27 seagrass species developing in 192 seagrass stands allowed an examination of the variability of seagrass rhizome and clonal growth programmes across and within

  17. Transcriptomic and hormone analyses reveal mechanisms underlying petal elongation in Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Jinba'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Haibin; Ding, Lian; Song, Aiping; Shen, Feng; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2017-04-01

    Auxin regulates chrysanthemum petal elongation by promoting cell elongation. Transcriptomic analysis shows that auxin signal transduction may connect with other transcription factors by TCPs to regulate chrysanthemum petal elongation. As an ornamental species, Chrysanthemum morifolium has high ornamental and economic value. Petal size is the primary factor that influences the ornamental value of chrysanthemum, but the mechanism underlying the development of C. morifolium petals remains unclear. In our study, we tracked the growth of petals and found that the basal region of 'Jinba' petals showed a higher elongation rate, exhibiting rapid cell elongation during petal growth. During petal elongation growth, auxin was demonstrated to promote cell elongation and an increase in cell numbers in the petal basal region. To further study the molecular mechanisms underlying petal growth, the RNA-seq (high-throughput cDNA sequencing) technique was employed. Four cDNA libraries were assembled from petals in the budding, bud breaking, early blooming and full blooming stages of 'Jinba' flower development. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed that auxin was the most important regulator in controlling petal growth. The TEOSINTEBRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA and PCF transcription factor genes (TCPs), basic helix-loop-helix-encoding gene (bHLH), glutaredoxin-C (GRXC) and other zinc finger protein genes exhibited obvious up-regulation and might have significant effects on the growth of 'Jinba' petals. Given the interaction between these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we speculated that auxin signal transduction might exhibit a close relationship with transcription factors through TCPs. In summary, we present the first comprehensive transcriptomic and hormone analyses of C. morifolium petals. The results offer direction in identifying the mechanism underlying the development of chrysanthemum petals in the elongated phase and have great significance in improving the

  18. A systematic approach for the assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors linked to biological stability of drinking water in distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, E. I.

    2016-01-06

    A systematic approach is presented for the assessment of (i) bacterial growth-controlling factors in drinking water and (ii) the impact of distribution conditions on the extent of bacterial growth in full-scale distribution systems. The approach combines (i) quantification of changes in autochthonous bacterial cell concentrations in full-scale distribution systems with (ii) laboratoryscale batch bacterial growth potential tests of drinking water samples under defined conditions. The growth potential tests were done by direct incubation of water samples, without modification of the original bacterial flora, and with flow cytometric quantification of bacterial growth. This method was shown to be reproducible (ca. 4% relative standard deviation) and sensitive (detection of bacterial growth down to 5 μg L-1 of added assimilable organic carbon). The principle of step-wise assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors was demonstrated on bottled water, shown to be primarily carbon limited at 133 (±18) × 103 cells mL-1 and secondarily limited by inorganic nutrients at 5,500 (±1,700) × 103 cells mL-1. Analysis of the effluent of a Dutch full-scale drinking water treatment plant showed (1) bacterial growth inhibition as a result of end-point chlorination, (2) organic carbon limitation at 192 (±72) × 103 cells mL-1 and (3) inorganic nutrient limitation at 375 (±31) × 103 cells mL-1. Significantly lower net bacterial growth was measured in the corresponding full-scale distribution system (176 (±25) × 103 cells mL-1) than in the laboratory-scale growth potential test of the same water (294 (±35) × 103 cells mL-1), highlighting the influence of distribution on bacterial growth. The systematic approach described herein provides quantitative information on the effect of drinking water properties and distribution system conditions on biological stability, which can assist water utilities in decision-making on treatment or distribution system improvements to

  19. Issues in determining factors influencing bacterial attachment: a review using the attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulter, R M; Gentle, I R; Dykes, G A

    2009-07-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms which facilitate the attachment of Escherichia coli and other bacterial species to abiotic surfaces is desired by numerous industries including the food and medical industries. Numerous studies have attempted to explain bacterial attachment as a function of bacterial properties such as cellular surface charge, hydrophobicity and outer membrane proteins amongst others. Conflicting evidence in the literature both for and against a positive relationship may arise from the nature of the test methods used to measure them. A handful of recent studies utilizing technologies such as atomic force microscopy have begun to look at bacterial attachment at a single cell and molecular level. These studies may provide the information required to fully understand the underlying factors which influence bacterial cell attachment to abiotic surfaces. A number of issues in determining the influential factors of bacterial attachment have been identified from the literature: a lack of standardization and sensitivity of methods, as well as the value of measuring bulk properties of a number of cells rather than the behaviour of single cells which may overlook key interactions at a molecular level. These issues will need to be addressed in future studies in this area.

  20. Environmental factors affecting methane distribution and bacterial methane oxidation in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osudar, R.; Matoušů, Anna; Alawi, M.; Wagner, D.; Bussmann, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 160, July (2015), s. 10-21 ISSN 0272-7714 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : methanotrophy * estuary * Elbe River Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2015

  1. GATA Transcription Factor Required for Immunity to Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Nathan C.; Aballay, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to dissect several genetic pathways involved in immunity; however, little is known about transcription factors that regulate the expression of immune effectors. C. elegans does not appear to have a functional homolog of the key immune transcription factor NF-κB. Here we show that that the intestinal GATA transcription factor ELT-2 is required for both immunity to Salmonella enterica and expression of a C-type lectin gene, clec-67, which is expressed in the intestinal cells and is a good marker of S. enterica infection. We also found that ELT-2 is required for immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. Lack of immune inhibition by DAF-2, which negatively regulates the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, rescues the hypersusceptibility to pathogens phenotype of elt-2(RNAi) animals. Our results indicate that ELT-2 is part of a multi-pathogen defense pathway that regulates innate immunity independently of the DAF-2/DAF-16 signaling pathway. PMID:17183709

  2. Predisposing factors for bacterial vaginosis, treatment efficacy and pregnancy outcome among term deliveries; results from a preterm delivery study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsson Tell

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery but little is known about factors that could predict BV. We have analyzed if it is possible to identify a category of pregnant women that should be screened for BV, and if BV would alter the pregnancy outcome at term; we have also studied the treatment efficacy of clindamycin. Methods Prospective BV screening and treatment study of 9025 women in a geographically defined region in southeast Sweden. BV was defined as a modified Nugent score of 6 and above. Data was collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Women allocated to treatment were supplied with vaginal clindamycin cream. The main outcome goals were to identify factors that could predict BV. Results Vaginal smears were consistent with BV criteria in 9.3%. Logistic regression indicates a significant correlation between smoking and BV (p Conclusion BV is more than twice as common among smokers, and there is a higher prevalence in the younger age group. However these two markers for BV do not suffice as a tool for screening, and considering the lack of other risk factors associated with BV, screening of all pregnant women might be a strategy to follow in a program intended to reduce the number of preterm births.

  3. Environmental Factors Correlated with Size of Bacterial Populations in a Polluted Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasfeild, Helen

    1972-01-01

    Samples of water were taken from a polluted zone of the Gallinas River and analyzed as to numbers of total bacteria, coliforms, and fecal streptococci. Environmental factors measured were temperature, pH and concentrations of detergent, nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen, sulfate, chloride, bicarbonate, and phosphate. Thirty-two observations were made from 12 March through 22 July 1971. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses of the data were carried out by computer to determine which of the environmental factors were significantly correlated with numbers of bacteria present. A multiple linear regression equation was constructed for each bacteriological parameter as a function of significant variables only. Log total bacteria was correlated positively with bicarbonate, phosphate, and detergent concentrations. Log coliforms was correlated positively with phosphate and sulfate concentrations and negatively with chloride concentration. Log fecal streptococci was correlated positively with bicarbonate and chloride concentrations. PMID:4627965

  4. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  5. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA, peptidoglycan (PGN, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, staphylococcal protein A (SPA, α-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1. Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 μg/eye to 1.0 μg/eye increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1β. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold and HKSA (7.3-fold, in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and α-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis.

  6. Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Communities Along an Altitudinal Gradient in Alpine Forest Soils: What Are the Driving Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, José A; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    Shifts in soil microbial communities over altitudinal gradients and the driving factors are poorly studied. Their elucidation is indispensable to gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of ecosystems to global climate change. Here, we investigated soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities at four Alpine forest sites representing a climosequence, over an altitudinal gradient from 545 to 2000 m above sea level (asl), regarding abundance and diversity by using qPCR and Illumina sequencing, respectively. Archaeal community was dominated by Thaumarchaeota, and no significant shifts were detected in abundance or community composition with altitude. The relative bacterial abundance increased at higher altitudes, which was related to increasing levels of soil organic matter and nutrients with altitude. Shifts in bacterial richness and diversity as well as community structure (comprised basically of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) significantly correlated with several environmental and soil chemical factors, especially soil pH. The site at the lowest altitude harbored the highest bacterial richness and diversity, although richness/diversity community properties did not show a monotonic decrease along the gradient. The relative size of fungal community also increased with altitude and its composition comprised Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Changes in fungal richness/diversity and community structure were mainly governed by pH and C/N, respectively. The variation of the predominant bacterial and fungal classes over the altitudinal gradient was the result of the environmental and soil chemical factors prevailing at each site.

  7. Planar elongation of soft polymeric networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Krog; Hassager, Ole; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2010-01-01

    A new test fixture for the filament stretch rheometer (FSR) has been developed to measure planar elongation of soft polymeric networks with application towards pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). The concept of this new geometry is to elongate a tube-like sample by keeping the perimeter constant....... To validate this new technique, soft polymeric networks of poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) were investigated during deformation. Particle tracking and video recording were used to detect to what extent the imposed strain rate and the sample perimeter remained constant. It was observed that, by using...... an appropriate choice of initial sample height, perimeter, and thickness, the planar stretch ratio will follow lambda(t) = h(t)/h(0) = exp((epsilon)overdot t), with h(t) being the height at time t and (epsilon)overdot the imposed constant strain rate. The perimeter would decrease by a few percent only, which...

  8. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57-6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76-7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64-3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13-2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61-5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02-1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15-3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15-3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03-3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64-0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42-3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28-0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01-2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05-2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55-0.63). Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season, frequency of diarrhea, frequency of vomiting, and eating shrimp or crab.

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum L9 but not Lactobacillus acidophilus LA reduces tumour necrosis factor induced bacterial translocation in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Chen, J; Wang, S; Zhao, X; Lu, G; Tang, X

    2017-05-30

    Translocation of bacteria across the intestinal barrier is important in the pathogenesis of systemic sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Inflammatory cytokines increase paracellular permeability that allows increased luminal bacteria to translocate across mucosal epithelium and further deteriorate the gut barrier. In order to reduce this risk, the prophylactic use of probiotics has been recently addressed. In this paper, we investigate the protective role toward tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced non-pathogenic Escherichia coli translocation across Caco-2 monolayers of Lactobacillus strains. According to our experimental data, Lactobacillus plantarum L9 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA have good capacities to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Addition of L. plantarum L9 and L. acidophilus LA to the enterocyte monolayer surface result in significant inhibition of E. coli adhesion and cell internalisation. However, L. plantarum L9 and L. acidophilus LA did not inhibit the growth of the non-pathogenic E. coli B5 after 24 h incubation. Exposure to TNF-α for 6 h caused a dramatic increase in E. coli B5 translocation across Caco-2 cells, which was uncoupled from increases in paracellular permeability. Pretreatment with L. plantarum L9 prevent TNF-α induced transcellular bacterial translocation and IL-8 production in Caco-2 cells. L. plantarum L9 also did not affect the integrity of the monolayers, as indicated by lactate dehydrogenase release, horseradish peroxidase permeability, and transepithelial electrical resistance. L. plantarum L9 showed the potential to protect enterocytes from an acute inflammatory response and therefore could be good potential prophylactic agents in counteracting bacterial translocation.

  10. Fibronectin in the ascitic fluid of cirrhotic patients: correlation with biochemical risk factors for the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.A. Mesquita

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhotic patients (23 with alcoholic cirrhosis, 5 with posthepatitic cirrhosis and 2 with cryptogenic cirrhosis with ascites and portal hypertension were studied and divided into two groups corresponding to high or low risk to develop spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP related to the concentration of total protein in the ascitic fluid (A-TP: group I (high risk: A-TP£1.5 g/dl and group II (low risk: A-TP>1.5 g/dl. Fibronectin (FN, C3 and C4 concentrations were measured by radial immunodiffusion while total protein was measured by the biuret method. The mean values (group I vs group II of C3 (12.59 ± 4.72 vs 24.53 ± 15.58 mg/dl, C4 (4.26 ± 3.87 vs 7.26 ± 4.14 mg/dl and FN (50.47 ± 12.49 vs 75.89 ± 24.70 mg/dl in the ascitic fluid were significantly lower (P<0.05 in the group considered to be at high risk for SBP. No significant difference was observed in the plasma/ascites fibronectin ratio (3.91 ± 1.21 vs 3.80 ± 1.26 or gradient (131.46 ± 64.01 vs 196.96 ± 57.38 between groups. Fibronectin in ascites was significantly correlated to C3 (r = 0.76, C4 (r = 0.58, total protein (r = 0.73 and plasma FN (r = 0.58 (P<0.05. The data suggest that the FN concentration in ascites is related to the opsonic capacity of this fluid, and that its concentration in the ascitic fluid may be a biochemical risk factor indicator for the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

  11. Arabidopsis RSS1 Mediates Cross-Talk Between Glucose and Light Signaling During Hypocotyl Elongation Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Singh, Dhriti; Khurana, Jitendra P; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2017-11-23

    Plants possess exuberant plasticity that facilitates its ability to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions. The developmental plasticity largely depends upon cellular elongation which is governed by a complex network of environmental and phytohormonal signals. Here, we report role of glucose (Glc) and Glc-regulated factors in controlling elongation growth and shade response in Arabidopsis. Glc controls shade induced hypocotyl elongation in a dose dependent manner. We have identified a Glc repressed factor REGULATED BY SUGAR AND SHADE1 (RSS1) encoding for an atypical basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein of unknown biological function that is required for normal Glc actions. Phenotype analysis of mutant and overexpression lines suggested RSS1 to be a negative regulator of elongation growth. RSS1 affects overall auxin homeostasis. RSS1 interacts with the elongation growth-promoting proteins HOMOLOG OF BEE2 INTERACTING WITH IBH 1 (HBI1) and BR ENHANCED EXPRESSION2 (BEE2) and negatively affects the transcription of their downstream targets such as YUCs, INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE (IAAs), LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1), HOMEOBOX PROTEIN 2 (ATHB2), XYLOGLUCAN ENDOTRANSGLUCOSYLASE/HYDROLASES (XTHs) and EXPANSINS. We propose, Glc signals might maintain optimal hypocotyl elongation under multiple signals such as light, shade and phytohormones through the central growth regulatory bHLH/HLH module.

  12. How do roots elongate in a structured soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kemo; Shen, Jianbo; Ashton, Rhys W; Dodd, Ian C; Parry, Martin A J; Whalley, William R

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we examine how roots penetrate a structured soil. We first examine the relationship between soil water status and its mechanical strength, as well as the ability of the soil to supply water to the root. We identify these as critical soil factors, because it is primarily in drying soil that mechanical constraints limit root elongation. Water supply to the root is important because root water status affects growth pressures and root stiffness. To simplify the bewildering complexity of soil-root interactions, the discussion is focused around the special cases of root elongation in soil with pores much smaller than the root diameter and the penetration of roots at interfaces within the soil. While it is often assumed that the former case is well understood, many unanswered questions remain. While low soil-root friction is often viewed as a trait conferring better penetration of strong soils, it may also increase the axial pressure on the root tip and in so doing reduce the rate of cell division and/or expansion. The precise trade-off between various root traits involved in root elongation in homogeneous soil remains to be determined. There is consensus that the most important factors determining root penetration at an interface are the angle at which the root attempts to penetrate the soil, root stiffness, and the strength of the soil to be penetrated. The effect of growth angle on root penetration implicates gravitropic responses in improved root penetration ability. Although there is no work that has explored the effect of the strength of the gravitropic responses on penetration of hard layers, we attempt to outline possible interactions. Impacts of soil drying and strength on phytohormone concentrations in roots, and consequent root-to-shoot signalling, are also considered.

  13. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  14. Structure of a bacterial quorum-sensing transcription factor complexed with pheromone and DNA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Pappas, T.; Brace, J.; Miller, P.; Oulmassov, T.; Molyneaux, J.; Anderson, J.; Bashkin, J.; Winans, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Cornell Univ.; Monsanto Co.

    2002-06-27

    Many proteobacteria are able to monitor their population densities through the release of pheromones known as N-acylhomoserine lactones. At high population densities, these pheromones elicit diverse responses that include bioluminescence, biofilm formation, production of antimicrobials, DNA exchange, pathogenesis and symbiosis1. Many of these regulatory systems require a pheromone-dependent transcription factor similar to the LuxR protein of Vibrio fischeri. Here we present the structure of a LuxR-type protein. TraR of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was solved at 1.66 A as a complex with the pheromone N-3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OOHL) and its TraR DNA-binding site. The amino-terminal domain of TraR is an {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich that binds OOHL, whereas the carboxy-terminal domain contains a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. The TraR dimer displays a two-fold symmetry axis in each domain; however, these two axes of symmetry are at an approximately 90 degree angle, resulting in a pronounced overall asymmetry of the complex. The pheromone lies fully embedded within the protein with virtually no solvent contact, and makes numerous hydrophobic contacts with the protein as well as four hydrogen bonds: three direct and one water-mediated.

  15. A Salmonella small non-coding RNA facilitates bacterial invasion and intracellular replication by modulating the expression of virulence factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs that act as regulators of gene expression have been identified in all kingdoms of life, including microRNA (miRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA in eukaryotic cells. Numerous sRNAs identified in Salmonella are encoded by genes located at Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs that are commonly found in pathogenic strains. Whether these sRNAs are important for Salmonella pathogenesis and virulence in animals has not been reported. In this study, we provide the first direct evidence that a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA, IsrM, is important for Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells, intracellular replication inside macrophages, and virulence and colonization in mice. IsrM RNA is expressed in vitro under conditions resembling those during infection in the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, IsrM is found to be differentially expressed in vivo, with higher expression in the ileum than in the spleen. IsrM targets the mRNAs coding for SopA, a SPI-1 effector, and HilE, a global regulator of the expression of SPI-1 proteins, which are major virulence factors essential for bacterial invasion. Mutations in IsrM result in disregulation of expression of HilE and SopA, as well as other SPI-1 genes whose expression is regulated by HilE. Salmonella with deletion of isrM is defective in bacteria invasion of epithelial cells and intracellular replication/survival in macrophages. Moreover, Salmonella with mutations in isrM is attenuated in killing animals and defective in growth in the ileum and spleen in mice. Our study has shown that IsrM sRNA functions as a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA directly involved in Salmonella pathogenesis in animals. Our results also suggest that sRNAs may represent a distinct class of virulence factors that are important for bacterial infection in vivo.

  16. THE ROLE OF BACTERIAL FACTOR AND IMMUNOLOGICAL СHANGES IN NONINFECTIOUS DISEASES OF MICROBIAL ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korniychuk O.P.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today during the study of the development mechanisms of any somatic disease possible participation of the microorganism as trigger factor or its influence on the course of the disease or development of complications is considered. Microflora participation in the etiopathogenesis of noninfectious diseases allows to divide the latest into the following groups: Naturally, the first aspects of the study of the role of microorganisms in the development of noninfectious diseases are pathological processes developing in the organs and systems of the body, which are natural biotope, particularly gastrointestinal tract. The imbalance in the functioning of the macroorganism (stress, poor diet causes changes in the composition of endogenous microcenosis and therefore dysbiosis. Thus changes in the hormonal homeostasis, immunoreactivity, in the hypothalamic-adrenal system, speed of peristalsis of the intestines are observed, the overgrowth syndrome in the small intestine developes. A classic disease of a group of diseases that are accompanied by the development of erosive conditions are Helicobacter pylori - associated ulcerous disease of 12 duodenal ulcer. Diseases of the colon digestive canal can be divided into 2 groups - ulcerative colitis and tumors. Escherichia are the main representatives of facultative anaerobic microflora of the colon and are involved in the pathogenesis of both ulcerative colitis and cancer. Material and methods. A study in order to compare the inducing impact of Escherichia lipopolysaccharide isolated from patients with nonspecific ulcerative colitis (NUC, N =38, Crohn's disease (CD, N =30 and colon cancer (CC, N =38, on the humoral and cellular (cytokine links of immunity in ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. From the patients in both study groups and individuals from the control group E. coli were isolated from fecal for obtainining LPS. Synthesis induction of TNFα, IL.-8 and IL.-10 was conducted by

  17. Risk factors for otitis media in children with special emphasis on the role of colonization with bacterial airway pathogens: The Generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Labout (Joost); L. Duijts (Liesbeth); A. Lebon (Ankie); R. de Groot (Ronald); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAcute otitis media is the most frequent diagnosis in children visiting physicians' offices. Risk factors for otitis media have been widely studied. Yet, the correlation between bacterial carriage and the development of otitis media is not entirely clear. Our aim was to study in a

  18. Risk factors for otitis media in children with special emphasis on the role of colonization with bacterial airway pathogens: the Generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labout, J.A.; Duijts, L.; Lebon, A.; Groot, R. de; Hofman, A.; Jaddoe, V.V.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Moll, H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Acute otitis media is the most frequent diagnosis in children visiting physicians' offices. Risk factors for otitis media have been widely studied. Yet, the correlation between bacterial carriage and the development of otitis media is not entirely clear. Our aim was to study in a population-based

  19. Bacterial Factors Associated with Lethal Outcome of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection: Genomic Case-Control Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Donnenberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Typical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (tEPEC strains were associated with mortality in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS. Genetic differences in tEPEC strains could underlie some of the variability in clinical outcome.We produced draft genome sequences of all available tEPEC strains from GEMS lethal infections (LIs and of closely matched EPEC strains from GEMS subjects with non-lethal symptomatic infections (NSIs and asymptomatic infections (AIs to identify gene clusters (potential protein encoding sequences sharing ≥90% nucleotide sequence identity associated with lethality.Among 14,412 gene clusters identified, the presence or absence of 392 was associated with clinical outcome. As expected, more gene clusters were associated with LI versus AI than LI versus NSI. The gene clusters more prevalent in strains from LI than those from NSI and AI included those encoding proteins involved in O-antigen biogenesis, while clusters encoding type 3 secretion effectors EspJ and OspB were among those more prevalent in strains from non-lethal infections. One gene cluster encoding a variant of an NleG ubiquitin ligase was associated with LI versus AI, while two other nleG clusters had the opposite association. Similar associations were found for two nleG gene clusters in an additional, larger sample of NSI and AI GEMS strains.Particular genes are associated with lethal tEPEC infections. Further study of these factors holds potential to unravel the mechanisms underlying severe disease and to prevent adverse outcomes.

  20. Aetiology and factors associated with bacterial diarrhoeal diseases amongst urban refugee children in Eastleigh, Kenya: A case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuvi, Gideon; Omollo, Jared; Abade, Ahmed; Amwayi, Samuel; Ampofo, William; Luman, Elizabeth T.; Oundo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Kenya is home to over 400 000 refugees from neighbouring countries. There is scanty information about diarrhoea amongst urban refugees in Kenya. Objectives We investigated the enteric bacteria causing diarrhoea amongst urban refugee children and described the associated factors. Method During the period of August–December 2010, urban refugee children between the ages of two and five who attended Eastleigh County Council Health Centre were enrolled into the study. Diarrhoeal cases were compared with age-matched children with no diarrhoea (controls). Stool specimens were collected and enteric bacteria isolated. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors. Results A total of 41 cases and 41 controls were enrolled in the study. The age and country of origin were similar for cases and controls. The bacterial isolation rates amongst the cases were: non-pathogenic Escherichia coli 71%, Shigella dysenteriae 2.4%, Shigella flexneri 2.4%, Salmonella paratyphi 5%. For the controls, non-pathogenic E. coli 90% and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) 2.4% were amongst the organisms isolated. All isolates were resistant to amoxicillin; resistance to other antibiotics varied by isolate type. Factors associated independently with diarrhoea included children not washing their hands with soap (aOR 5.9, p < 0.05), neighbour(s) having diarrhoea (aOR 39.8, p < 0.05), children not exclusively breastfed for their first 6 months (aOR 7.6, p < 0.05) and children eating food cooked the previous day (aOR 23.8, p = 0.002). Conclusions Shigella species, Salmonella species and ETEC were found to be responsible for diarrhoea amongst the urban refugee children. Measures to control and guide the use of antibiotics are critical for the prevention of antibiotic resistance. Efforts to improve personal and domestic hygiene, including educational campaigns to promote appropriate handwashing, should be encouraged. PMID:29043163

  1. Women's Views and Experiences of the Triggers for Onset of Bacterial Vaginosis and Exacerbating Factors Associated with Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; McNair, Ruth; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection affecting women of childbearing age. While the aetiology and transmissibility of BV remain unclear, there is strong evidence to suggest an association between BV and sexual activity. This study explored women's views and experiences of the triggers for BV onset and factors associated with recurrence. A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past five years took part in semi-structured interviews. The majority of women predominantly reported sexual contact triggered the onset of BV and sexual and non-sexual factors precipitated recurrence. Recurrence was most commonly referred to in terms of a 'flare-up' of symptoms. The majority of women did not think BV was a sexually transmitted infection however many reported being informed this by their clinician. Single women who attributed BV onset to sex with casual partners were most likely to display self-blame tendencies and to consider changing their future sexual behaviour. Women who have sex with women (WSW) were more inclined to believe their partner was responsible for the transmission of or reinfection with BV and seek partner treatment or change their sexual practices. Findings from this study strongly suggest women believe that BV onset is associated with sexual activity, concurring with epidemiological data which increasingly suggest BV may be sexually transmitted. Exacerbating factors associated with recurrence were largely heterogeneous and may reflect the fact it is difficult to determine whether recurrence is due to persistent BV or a new infection in women. There was however evidence to suggest possible transmission and reinfection among WSW, reinforcing the need for new approaches to treatment and management strategies including male and female partner treatment trials.

  2. Aetiology and factors associated with bacterial diarrhoeal diseases amongst urban refugee children in Eastleigh, Kenya: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqo G. Boru

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kenya is home to over 400 000 refugees from neighbouring countries. There is scanty information about diarrhoea amongst urban refugees in Kenya. Objectives: We investigated the enteric bacteria causing diarrhoea amongst urban refugee children and described the associated factors. Method: During the period of August–December 2010, urban refugee children between the ages of two and five who attended Eastleigh County Council Health Centre were enrolled into the study. Diarrhoeal cases were compared with age-matched children with no diarrhoea (controls. Stool specimens were collected and enteric bacteria isolated. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors. Results: A total of 41 cases and 41 controls were enrolled in the study. The age and country of origin were similar for cases and controls. The bacterial isolation rates amongst the cases were: non-pathogenic Escherichia coli 71%, Shigella dysenteriae 2.4%, Shigella flexneri 2.4%, Salmonella paratyphi 5%. For the controls, non-pathogenic E. coli 90% and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC2.4% were amongst the organisms isolated. All isolates were resistant to amoxicillin; resistance to other antibiotics varied by isolate type. Factors associated independently with diarrhoea included children not washing their hands with soap (aOR 5.9, p < 0.05, neighbour(s having diarrhoea (aOR 39.8, p < 0.05, children not exclusively breastfed for their first 6 months (aOR 7.6, p < 0.05 and children eating food cooked the previous day (aOR 23.8, p = 0.002. Conclusions: Shigella species, Salmonella species and ETEC were found to be responsible for diarrhoea amongst the urban refugee children. Measures to control and guide the use of antibiotics are critical for the prevention of antibiotic resistance. Efforts to improve personal and domestic hygiene, including educational campaigns to promote appropriate handwashing, should be encouraged.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of genome-wide transcription elongation speeds and rates of RNA polymerase II transition into active elongation with 4sUDRB-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Gilad; Voichek, Yoav; Rabani, Michal; Benjamin, Sima; Gilad, Shlomit; Amit, Ido; Oren, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    4sUDRB-seq separately measures, on a genomic scale, the distinct contributions of transcription elongation speed and rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transition into active elongation (TAE) to the overall mRNA production rate. It uses reversible inhibition of transcription elongation with 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), combined with a pulse of 4-thiouridine (4sU), to tag newly transcribed RNA. After DRB removal, cells are collected at several time points, and tagged RNA is biotinylated, captured on streptavidin beads and sequenced. 4sUDRB-seq enables the comparison of elongation speeds between different developmental stages or different cell types, and it allows the impact of specific transcription factors on transcription elongation speed versus TAE to be studied. RNA preparation takes ∼4 d to complete, with deep sequencing requiring an additional ∼4-11 d plus 1-3 d for bioinformatics analysis. The experimental protocol requires basic molecular biology skills, whereas data analysis requires knowledge in bioinformatics, particularly MATLAB and the Linux environment.

  4. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Gen

    2001-01-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  5. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Gen

    2001-06-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  6. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  7. CDK9 inhibitors define elongation checkpoints at both ends of RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitem, Clélia; Zaborowska, Justyna; Isa, Nur F; Kufs, Johann; Dienstbier, Martin; Murphy, Shona

    2015-05-01

    Transcription through early-elongation checkpoints requires phosphorylation of negative transcription elongation factors (NTEFs) by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 9. Using CDK9 inhibitors and global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), we have mapped CDK9 inhibitor-sensitive checkpoints genome wide in human cells. Our data indicate that early-elongation checkpoints are a general feature of RNA polymerase (pol) II-transcribed human genes and occur independently of polymerase stalling. Pol II that has negotiated the early-elongation checkpoint can elongate in the presence of inhibitors but, remarkably, terminates transcription prematurely close to the terminal polyadenylation (poly(A)) site. Our analysis has revealed an unexpected poly(A)-associated elongation checkpoint, which has major implications for the regulation of gene expression. Interestingly, the pattern of modification of the C-terminal domain of pol II terminated at this new checkpoint largely mirrors the pattern normally found downstream of the poly(A) site, thus suggesting common mechanisms of termination.

  8. Fruiting branch K+ level affects cotton fibre elongation through osmoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiashuo eYang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K deficiency in cotton plants results in reduced fibre length. As one of the primary osmotica, K+ contributes to an increase in cell turgor pressure during fibre elongation. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fibre length is affected by K deficiency through an osmotic pathway, so in 2012 and 2013, an experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis by imposing three potassium supply regimes (0, 125, 250 kg K ha-1 on a low-K-sensitive cultivar, Siza 3, and a low-K-tolerant cultivar, Simian 3. We found that fibres were longer in the later season bolls than in the earlier ones in cotton plants grown under normal growth conditions, but later season bolls showed a greater sensitivity to low-K stress, especially the low-K sensitive genotype. We also found that the maximum velocity of fibre elongation (Vmax is the parameter that best reflects the change in fibre elongation under K deficiency. This parameter mostly depends on cell turgor, so the content of the osmotically active solutes was analysed accordingly. Statistical analysis showed that K+ was the major osmotic factor affecting fibre length, and malate was likely facilitating K+ accumulation into fibres, which enabled the low-K-tolerant genotype to cope with low-K stress. Moreover, the low-K-tolerant genotype tended to have greater K+ absorptive capacities in the upper fruiting branches. Based on our findings, we suggest a fertilization scheme for Gossypium hirsutum that adds extra potash fertilizer or distributes it during the development of late season bolls to mitigate K deficiency in the second half of the growth season and to enhance fibre length in late season bolls.

  9. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Vece, Marcel Di; Rath, Jatindra K; Dijk, Lourens van; Schropp, Ruud E I

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented.

  10. The role of host and microbial factors in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal bacteraemia arising from a single bacterial cell bottleneck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlini, Alice; Colomba, Leonarda; Furi, Leonardo; Braccini, Tiziana; Manso, Ana Sousa; Pammolli, Andrea; Wang, Bo; Vivi, Antonio; Tassini, Maria; van Rooijen, Nico; Pozzi, Gianni; Ricci, Susanna; Andrew, Peter W; Koedel, Uwe; Moxon, E Richard; Oggioni, Marco R

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenesis of bacteraemia after challenge with one million pneumococci of three isogenic variants was investigated. Sequential analyses of blood samples indicated that most episodes of bacteraemia were monoclonal events providing compelling evidence for a single bacterial cell bottleneck at the origin of invasive disease. With respect to host determinants, results identified novel properties of splenic macrophages and a role for neutrophils in early clearance of pneumococci. Concerning microbial factors, whole genome sequencing provided genetic evidence for the clonal origin of the bacteraemia and identified SNPs in distinct sub-units of F0/F1 ATPase in the majority of the ex vivo isolates. When compared to parental organisms of the inoculum, ex-vivo pneumococci with mutant alleles of the F0/F1 ATPase had acquired the capacity to grow at low pH at the cost of the capacity to grow at high pH. Although founded by a single cell, the genotypes of pneumococci in septicaemic mice indicate strong selective pressure for fitness, emphasising the within-host complexity of the pathogenesis of invasive disease.

  11. The role of host and microbial factors in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal bacteraemia arising from a single bacterial cell bottleneck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Gerlini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of bacteraemia after challenge with one million pneumococci of three isogenic variants was investigated. Sequential analyses of blood samples indicated that most episodes of bacteraemia were monoclonal events providing compelling evidence for a single bacterial cell bottleneck at the origin of invasive disease. With respect to host determinants, results identified novel properties of splenic macrophages and a role for neutrophils in early clearance of pneumococci. Concerning microbial factors, whole genome sequencing provided genetic evidence for the clonal origin of the bacteraemia and identified SNPs in distinct sub-units of F0/F1 ATPase in the majority of the ex vivo isolates. When compared to parental organisms of the inoculum, ex-vivo pneumococci with mutant alleles of the F0/F1 ATPase had acquired the capacity to grow at low pH at the cost of the capacity to grow at high pH. Although founded by a single cell, the genotypes of pneumococci in septicaemic mice indicate strong selective pressure for fitness, emphasising the within-host complexity of the pathogenesis of invasive disease.

  12. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic piglet and genome-wide identification of bacterial factors required for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan P W; Linn, Aileen; Macleod, Kareen; MacCallum, Amanda; Hardy, Simon P; Douce, Gill; Watson, Eleanor; Dagleish, Mark P; Thompson, Hal; Stevenson, Andy; Kennedy, David; Baig, Abiyad; Coward, Chris; Maskell, Duncan J; Smith, David G E; Grant, Andrew J; Everest, Paul

    2017-03-10

    To investigate how Campylobacter jejuni causes the clinical symptoms of diarrhoeal disease in humans, use of a relevant animal model is essential. Such a model should mimic the human disease closely in terms of host physiology, incubation period before onset of disease, clinical signs and a comparable outcome of disease. In this study, we used a gnotobiotic piglet model to study determinants of pathogenicity of C. jejuni. In this model, C. jejuni successfully established infection and piglets developed an increased temperature with watery diarrhoea, which was caused by a leaky epithelium and reduced bile re-absorption in the intestines. Further, we assessed the C. jejuni genes required for infection of the porcine gastrointestinal tract utilising a transposon (Tn) mutant library screen. A total of 123 genes of which Tn mutants showed attenuated piglet infection were identified. Our screen highlighted a crucial role for motility and chemotaxis, as well as central metabolism. In addition, Tn mutants of 14 genes displayed enhanced piglet infection. This study gives a unique insight into the mechanisms of C. jejuni disease in terms of host physiology and contributing bacterial factors.

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  14. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  15. Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis and Its Association with Risk Factors among Nonpregnant Women: A Hospital Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Ranjit

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is an ecological imbalance of the vaginal microbiota affecting mostly women of reproductive age group. This study was carried out among 160 nonpregnant women registered at the Outpatient Department of Gynaecology/Obstetrics of KIST Medical College Teaching Hospital, Imadol, Lalitpur, Nepal, from November 2014 to May 2015. The aim of the study was to assess the association of the risk factors with BV and analyze the type of bacteria associated with BV. Nugent’s scoring method was used for diagnosis of BV in this study. The overall prevalence of BV was 24.4% among symptomatic patients. Douching was statistically related to BV (P=0.015. Also, BV was significantly associated with consistency (P=0.0001, odor (P=0.02, and amount of abnormal vaginal discharge (P=0.09. Contraceptives users on anatomical sites were found more prone to BV than those who did not use contraceptives on anatomical sites. Pseudomonas spp., Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp., Proteus spp., Klebsiella spp., Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci (CoNS, and Streptococcus agalactiae were associated with BV and out of those Lactobacillus spp. was the predominant organism. The higher prevalence of BV among symptomatic patients indicates interventions should be applied to reduce the incidence of stillbirth, abortion, and sterility.

  16. Role of environmental factors for the vertical distribution (0–1000 m of marine bacterial communities in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Ghiglione

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterioplankton plays a central role in energy and matter fluxes in the sea, yet the factors that constrain its variation in marine systems are still poorly understood. Here we use the explanatory power of direct multivariate gradient analysis to evaluate the driving forces exerted by environmental parameters on bacterial community distribution in the water column. We gathered and analysed data from a one month sampling period from the surface to 1000 m depth at the JGOFS-DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea. This station is characterized by very poor horizontal advection currents which makes it an ideal model to test hypotheses on the causes of vertical stratification of bacterial communities. Capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP fingerprinting profiles analyzed using multivariate statistical methods demonstrated a vertical zonation of bacterial assemblages in three layers, above, in or just below the chlorophyll maximum and deeper, that remained stable during the entire sampling period. Through the use of direct gradient multivariate ordination analyses we demonstrate that a complex array of biogeochemical parameters is the driving force behind bacterial community structure shifts in the water column. Physico-chemical parameters such as phosphate, nitrate, salinity and to a lesser extent temperature, oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and photosynthetically active radiation acted in synergy to explain bacterial assemblages changes with depth. Analysis of lipid biomarkers of organic matter sources and fates suggested that bacterial community structure in the surface layers was in part explained by lipids of chloroplast origin. Further detailed analysis of pigment-based phytoplankton diversity gave evidence of a compartmentalized influence of several phytoplankton groups on bacterial community structure in the first 150 m depth.

  17. Methylation of bacterial release factors RF1 and RF2 is required for normal translation termination in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Liliana; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; de Zamaroczy, Miklos; Kervestin, Stephanie; Buckingham, Richard H

    2007-12-07

    Bacterial release factors RF1 and RF2 are methylated on the Gln residue of a universally conserved tripeptide motif GGQ, which interacts with the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit, triggering hydrolysis of the ester bond in peptidyl-tRNA and releasing the newly synthesized polypeptide from the ribosome. In vitro experiments have shown that the activity of RF2 is stimulated by Gln methylation. The viability of Escherichia coli K12 strains depends on the integrity of the release factor methyltransferase PrmC, because K12 strains are partially deficient in RF2 activity due to the presence of a Thr residue at position 246 instead of Ala. Here, we study in vivo RF1 and RF2 activity at termination codons in competition with programmed frameshifting and the effect of the Ala-246 --> Thr mutation. PrmC inactivation reduces the specific termination activity of RF1 and RF2(Ala-246) by approximately 3- to 4-fold. The mutation Ala-246 --> Thr in RF2 reduces the termination activity in cells approximately 5-fold. After correction for the decrease in level of RF2 due to the autocontrol of RF2 synthesis, the mutation Ala-246 --> Thr reduced RF2 termination activity by approximately 10-fold at UGA codons and UAA codons. PrmC inactivation had no effect on cell growth in rich media but reduced growth considerably on poor carbon sources. This suggests that the expression of some genes needed for optimal growth under such conditions can become growth limiting as a result of inefficient translation termination.

  18. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom-Pom molecule...... it corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum...... in the viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  19. Trade studies of plasma elongation for next-step tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.; Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of elongation on minimum-cost devices is investigated for elongations ranging from 2 to 3. The analysis, carried out with the TETRA tokamak systems code, includes the effects of elongation on both physics (plasma beta limit) and engineering (poloidal field coil currents) issues. When ignition is required, the minimum cost occurs for elongations from 2.3 to 2.9, depending on the plasma energy confinement scaling used. Scalings that include favorable plasma current dependence and/or degradation with fusion power tend to have minimum cost at higher elongation (2.5-2.9); scalings that depend primarily on size result in lower elongation (/approximately/2.3) for minimum cost. For design concepts that include steady-state current-driven operation, minimum cost occurs at an elongation of 2.3. 12 refs., 13 figs

  20. Risk factors for possible serious bacterial infection in a rural cohort of young infants in central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie E. Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Possible serious bacterial infection (PBSI is a major cause of neonatal mortality worldwide. We studied risk factors for PSBI in a large rural population in central India where facility deliveries have increased as a result of a government financial assistance program. Methods We studied 37,379 pregnant women and their singleton live born infants with birth weight ≥ 1.5 kg from 20 rural primary health centers around Nagpur, India, using data from the 2010–13 population-based Maternal and Newborn Health Registry supported by NICHD’s Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research. Factors associated with PSBI were identified using multivariable Poisson regression. Results Two thousand one hundred twenty-three infants (6 % had PSBI. Risk factors for PSBI included nulliparity (RR 1.13, 95 % CI 1.03–1.23, parity > 2 (RR 1.30, 95 % CI 1.07–1.57 compared to parity 1–2, first antenatal care visit in the 2nd/3rd trimester (RR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.08–1.98 compared to 1st trimester, administration of antenatal corticosteroids (RR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.60–2.61, low birth weight (RR 3.10, 95 % CI 2.17–4.42, male sex (RR 1.20, 95 % CI 1.10–1.31 and lack of early initiation of breastfeeding (RR 3.87, 95 % CI 2.69–5.58. Conclusion Infants who are low birth weight, born to mothers who present late to antenatal care or receive antenatal corticosteroids, or born to nulliparous women or those with a parity > 2, could be targeted for interventions before and after delivery to improve early recognition of signs and symptoms of PSBI and prompt referral. There also appears to be a need for a renewed focus on promoting early initiation of breastfeeding following delivery in facilities. Trial registration This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01073475 .

  1. Dexamethasone treatment and prognostic factors in community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a Danish retrospective population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Dalager-Pedersen, Michael; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik

    2014-06-01

    The morbidity and mortality in community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) remain substantial and treatment outcomes and predictors of a poor prognosis must be assessed regularly. We aimed to describe the outcome of patients with CABM treated with dexamethasone and to assess the performance of the Dutch Meningitis Risk Score (DMRS). We retrospectively evaluated all adults with CABM in North Denmark Region, 1998-2012. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score. A GOS score of 5 was categorized as a favourable outcome and scores of 1-4 as unfavourable. We used logistic analysis to compute relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for an unfavourable outcome adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidity. We identified a total of 172 cases of CABM. In-hospital mortality was unaffected by the implementation of dexamethasone in 2003 (19% vs 20%). Dexamethasone treatment was associated with a prompt diagnosis of meningitis and a statistically insignificant decrease in the risk of an unfavourable outcome (33% vs 53%; adjusted RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41-1.01) and in-hospital mortality (15% vs 24%; adjusted RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.35-1.48). Of the risk factors included in the DMRS, we found age and tachycardia to be significantly associated with an unfavourable outcome in the multivariate analyses. Patients treated with dexamethasone were more likely to have a favourable outcome, although statistical significance was not reached. Several parameters included in the Dutch risk score were also negative predictors in our cohort, although the entire risk score could not be validated due to a lack of data.

  2. The significance of oral streptococci in patients with pneumonia with risk factors for aspiration: the bacterial floral analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akata, Kentaro; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Naito, Keisuke; Noguchi, Shingo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-05-11

    Aspiration pneumonia has been a growing interest in an aging population. Anaerobes are important pathogens, however, the etiology of aspiration pneumonia is not fully understood. In addition, the relationship between the patient clinical characteristics and the causative pathogens in pneumonia patients with aspiration risk factors are unclear. To evaluate the relationship between the patient clinical characteristics with risk factors for aspiration and bacterial flora in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in pneumonia patients, the bacterial floral analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene was applied in addition to cultivation methods in BALF samples. From April 2010 to February 2014, BALF samples were obtained from the affected lesions of pneumonia via bronchoscopy, and were evaluated by the bacterial floral analysis of 16S rRNA gene in addition to cultivation methods in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Factors associated with aspiration risks in these patients were analyzed. A total of 177 (CAP 83, HCAP 94) patients were enrolled. According to the results of the bacterial floral analysis, detection rate of oral streptococci as the most detected bacterial phylotypes in BALF was significantly higher in patients with aspiration risks (31.0 %) than in patients without aspiration risks (14.7 %) (P = 0.009). In addition, the percentages of oral streptococci in each BALF sample were significantly higher in patients with aspiration risks (26.6 ± 32.0 %) than in patients without aspiration risks (13.8 ± 25.3 %) (P = 0.002). A multiple linear regression analysis showed that an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of ≥3, the presence of comorbidities, and a history of pneumonia within a previous year were significantly associated with a detection of oral streptococci in BALF. The bacterial floral analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that oral streptococci were mostly

  3. Immiscible blend morphology after shear and elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch, Gibson L.; Trifkovic, Milana; Hedegaard, Aaron; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2015-05-01

    This work examines the role of shear and extensional strain on immiscible blend morphology, namely domain size, orientation, and co-continuity. The domain size reduces with surface tension similar to what is observed with isolated droplets. The domain size is shown to increase with shear strain due to coalescence. Hence the best mixing is found with low shear strains, i.e. low rates of shear and short durations of time. Extensional strain (extrusion draw ratio DR) reduces phase width and thickness with a DR-0.5 dependence, suggesting the transformation to a fibrilar morphology. The critical draw ratio for morphology transformation is approximately 7, in agreement with observations by Grace for droplet breakup in elongation. Fibrilar morphology is also consistent with a large increase in strain-to-break in the drawn film and with observed creep and optical scattering behavior.

  4. Events during eucaryotic rRNA transcription initiation and elongation: Conversion from the closed to the open promoter complex requires nucleotide substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-05-01

    Chemical footprinting and topological analysis were carried out on the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA transcription initiation factor (TIF) and RNA polymerase I complexes with DNA during transcription initiation and elongation. The results show that the binding of TIF and polymerase to the promoter does not alter the supercoiling of the DNA template and the template does not become sensitive to modification by diethylpyro-carbonate, which can identify melted DNA regions. Thus, in contrast to bacterial RNA polymerase, the eucaryotic RNA polymerase I-promoter complex is in a closed configuration preceding addition of nucleotides in vitro. Initiation and 3'-O-methyl CTP-limited translocation by RNA polymerase I results in separation of the polymerase-TIF footprints, leaving the TIF footprint unaltered. In contrast, initiation and translocation result in a significant change in the conformation of the polymerase-DNA complex, culminating in an unwound DNA region of at least 10 base pairs.

  5. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  6. Plant cell wall polysaccharide analysis during cell elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoyuan

    Plant cell walls are complex structures whose composition and architecture are important to various cellular activities. Plant cell elongation requires a high level of rearrangement of the cell wall polymers to enable cell expansion. However, the cell wall polysaccharides dynamics during plant cell...... elongation is poorly understood. This PhD project aims to elucidate the cell wall compositional and structural change during cell elongation by using Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP), microscopic techniques and molecular modifications of cell wall polysaccharide. Developing cotton fibre......, pea and Arabidopsis thaliana were selected as research models to investigate different types of cell elongation, developmental elongation and tropism elongation. A set of comprehensive analysis covering 4 cotton species and 11 time points suggests that non-cellulosic polysaccharides contribute...

  7. Rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae produces multiple DSF-family signals in regulation of virulence factor production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha Jae-Soon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo is the causal agent of rice bacterial blight disease. Xoo produces a range of virulence factors, including EPS, extracellular enzyme, iron-chelating siderophores, and type III-secretion dependent effectors, which are collectively essential for virulence. Genetic and genomics evidence suggest that Xoo might use the diffusible signal factor (DSF type quorum sensing (QS system to regulate the virulence factor production. However, little is known about the chemical structure of the DSF-like signal(s produced by Xoo and the factors influencing the signal production. Results Xoo genome harbours an rpf cluster comprising rpfB, rpfF, rpfC and rpfG. The proteins encoded by these genes are highly homologous to their counterparts in X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, suggesting that Xcc and Xoo might use similar mechanisms for DSF biosynthesis and autoregulation. Consistent with in silico analysis, the rpfF mutant was DSF-deficient and the rpfC mutant produced about 25 times higher DSF-like activity than the wild type Xoo strain KACC10331. From the supernatants of rpfC mutant, we purified three compounds showing strong DSF-like activity. Mass spectrometry and NMR analysis revealed that two of them were the previously characterized DSF and BDSF; the third one was a novel unsaturated fatty acid with 2 double bonds and was designated as CDSF in this study. Further analysis showed that all the three DSF-family signals were synthesized via the enzyme RpfF encoded by Xoo2868. DSF and BDSF at a final concentration of 3 μM to the rpfF mutant could fully restore its extracellular xylanase activity and EPS production to the wild type level, but CDSF was less active than DSF and BDSF in induction of EPS and xylanase. DSF and CDSF shared a similar cell density-dependent production time course with the maximum production being detected at 42 h after inoculation, whereas the maximum production of BDSF was observed

  8. Using dynamic input allocation for elongation control at FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncagni, L.; Galeani, S.; Granucci, G.; Varano, G.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we exploit the dynamic allocation scheme for input redundant control systems proposed in to achieve elongation control on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). The scheme first serves as a means for regulating the current in the F coils. Then, due to the quasi-static relationship between the plasma elongation and the F coils current, elongation control is achieved by suitably generalizing the allocation scheme. Both simulation and experimental results are reported.

  9. Contactless Measurement Of Rectilinearity Of An Elongated Object Based On The Example A Crane Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćmielewski Kazimierz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The common aim of engineering surveys is to determine deviations from rectilinearity for elongated objects. We have developed a number of methods for measuring points that represent an elongated object. These are the constant straight (optical, laser, mechanical-string method, the trigonometric method, geometric levelling method, photogrammetric methods and terrestrial laser scanning. When taking these measurements, it is crucial to have a direct access to the survey points of the measured object. Factors impeding the measurements include: adverse lighting conditions, vibration, dust, refractory effects, lack of direct access to the survey points, etc.

  10. Role of lipids on elongation of the preimplantation conceptus in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo S; Santos, José E P; Thatcher, William W

    2016-10-01

    Elongation of the preimplantation conceptus is a prerequisite for successful pregnancy in ruminants and depends on histotroph secretion by the endometrium. Lipids are an essential component of the histotroph, and recent studies indicate that lipids have important roles in the elongation phase of conceptus development. The onset of elongation is marked by dynamic changes in the transcriptome of trophectoderm cells, which are associated with lipid metabolism. During elongation, the trophectoderm increases transcript expression of genes related to uptake, metabolism and de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids and prostaglandins. Expression of the gene PPARG increases substantially, and activation of the transcription factor PPARG by binding of lipid ligands appears to be crucial for the coordination of cell biology during elongation. Lipids accumulated in the epithelial cells of the endometrium during diestrus are likely the most important source of fatty acids for utilization by the conceptus and become available in the uterine lumen through exporting of exosomes, microvesicles, carrier proteins and lipoproteins. Targeting of uterine lipid metabolism and PPARG activity during preimplantation conceptus development through nutraceutical diets may be a good strategy to improve pregnancy survival and reproductive efficiency in ruminants. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. The Caenorhabditis elegans Elongator complex regulates neuronal alpha-tubulin acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jachen A Solinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although acetylated alpha-tubulin is known to be a marker of stable microtubules in neurons, precise factors that regulate alpha-tubulin acetylation are, to date, largely unknown. Therefore, a genetic screen was employed in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that identified the Elongator complex as a possible regulator of alpha-tubulin acetylation. Detailed characterization of mutant animals revealed that the acetyltransferase activity of the Elongator is indeed required for correct acetylation of microtubules and for neuronal development. Moreover, the velocity of vesicles on microtubules was affected by mutations in Elongator. Elongator mutants also displayed defects in neurotransmitter levels. Furthermore, acetylation of alpha-tubulin was shown to act as a novel signal for the fine-tuning of microtubules dynamics by modulating alpha-tubulin turnover, which in turn affected neuronal shape. Given that mutations in the acetyltransferase subunit of the Elongator (Elp3 and in a scaffold subunit (Elp1 have previously been linked to human neurodegenerative diseases, namely Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Familial Dysautonomia respectively highlights the importance of this work and offers new insights to understand their etiology.

  12. The contractility of elongated microvilli in early sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Evelyn; Howard, Louisa; Spiegel, Melvin

    1990-04-01

    Elongated microvilli attach the early sea urchin embryo to the fertilization envelope and support it in a concentric position within the perivitelline space. The contractility of the elongated microvilli was demonstrated in several ways. (1) During normal cleavage, these microvilli change their length to adapt to the change in shape and numbers of blastomeres. (2) When treated with calcium-free sea water, embryos become eccentrically located and the microvilli extend further than normal on one side; when returned to normal sea water, the embryos become centered again. (3) Several agents cause the fertilization envelope to become higher and thinner than normal and the elongated microvilli to extend correspondingly if treated within ten min after fertilization. In some cases, both elongated microvilli and fertilization envelope return to normal size when returned to normal sea water. (4) Fertilization in a papain solution causes the elongated microvilli and the fertilization envelope to contract to the surface of the embryo. (5) Refertilization after the papain-induced contraction can bring about the elongation of these microvilli and the elevation of the fertilization envelope a second time. It was also shown that elongated microvilli are extended immediately upon fertilization, at the same time as the short microvilli. The firm adherence of the tips of elongated microvilli to the fertilization envelope by means of extracellular matrix fibers is shown in a high voltage electron microscope stereoimage. This allows us to understand why it is that when the elongated microvilli extend or contract, the fertilization envelope also extends and contracts accordingly.

  13. Stress relaxation of entangled polystyrene solution after constant-rate, uniaxial elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumiya, Yumi; Masubuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    For an entangled solution of linear polystyrene (PS 545k; M = 545k) in dibutyl phthalate (DBP), the stress relaxation after constant-rate uniaxial elongation was examined with an extensional viscosity fixture mounted on ARES (TA Instruments). The PS concentration, c = 52 wt%, was chosen in a way...... that the entanglement density M/Me of the solution coincided with that of PS 290k melt (M = 290k). After the elongation at the Rouse-based Weissenberg number Wi(R) ~ 3 up to the Hencky strain of 3, the short time stress relaxation of the solution was accelerated by a factor of ~4, which was less significant compared...... but this reduction weakens on an increase of the concentration of un-stretchable solvent molecules. This change of the stretch/orientation reduction of the friction with the solvent concentration appears to be consistent with the monotonic thinning of the steady-state elongational viscosity seen for melts...

  14. A constitutive analysis of transient and steady-state elongational viscosities of bidisperse polystyrene blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Manfred H.; Rolon-Garrido, Victor H.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2008-01-01

    The transient and steady-state elongational viscosity data of three bidisperse polystyrene blends were investigated recently by Nielsen et al. [J. Rheol. 50, 453-476 (2006)]. The blends contain a monodisperse high molar mass component (M-L= 390 kg/ mol) in a matrix of a monodisperse small molar...... stretching potential of the long-chain component and an increasing steady-state elongational viscosity with increasing strain rate. In addition, in the dilution regime, a transition from affine chain stretch to nonaffine tube squeeze with decreasing strain rate is identified. The dilution regime ends......, and allowing (albeit by use of empirical linear-viscoelastic shift factors to correct the linear-viscoelastic predictions) for a quantitative description of the transient and steady-state elongational viscosities of the bidisperse polystyrene blends....

  15. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  16. Photoautotrophic symbiont and geography are major factors affecting highly structured and diverse bacterial communities in the lichen microbiome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodkinson, Brendan P [ORNL; Gottel, Neil R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Lutzoni, Francois [Duke University

    2011-01-01

    Although common knowledge dictates that the lichen thallus is formed solely by a fungus (mycobiont) that develops a symbiotic relationship with an alga and/or cyanobacterium (photobiont), the non-photoautotrophic bacteria found in lichen microbiomes are increasingly regarded as integral components of lichen thalli. For this study, comparative analyses were conducted on lichen-associated bacterial communities to test for effects of photobiont-types (i.e. green algal vs. cyanobacterial), mycobiont-types and large-scale spatial distances (from tropical to arctic latitudes). Amplicons of the 16S (SSU) rRNA gene were examined using both Sanger sequencing of cloned fragments and barcoded pyrosequencing. Rhizobiales is typically the most abundant and taxonomically diverse order in lichen microbiomes; however, overall bacterial diversity in lichens is shown to be much higher than previously reported. Members of Acidobacteriaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Brucellaceae and sequence group LAR1 are the most commonly found groups across the phylogenetically and geographically broad array of lichens examined here. Major bacterial community trends are significantly correlated with differences in large-scale geography, photobiont-type and mycobiont-type. The lichen as a microcosm represents a structured, unique microbial habitat with greater ecological complexity and bacterial diversity than previously appreciated and can serve as a model system for studying larger ecological and evolutionary principles.

  17. Mass composition analysis using elongation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochilo, Livingstone; Risse, Markus; Yushkov, Alexey [University of Siegen, Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum has been observed to flatten at around 5.2 x 10{sup 18} eV where the spectral index changes from γ = 3.2 to γ = 2.6, a feature called the ''ankle'' of the spectrum. Cosmic rays with energy around the ankle and beyond, known as ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR), have a very low flux and reconstruction of their properties from extensive air shower measurements is subject to uncertainties for instance from hadronic interaction models. Since the year 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has recorded a considerable number of UHECR events beyond the ankle. With the greatly improved statistics, the mass composition of the extreme end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum is now being investigated with improved accuracy. The measured composition of UHECR is an important parameter in validating the models used to explain their sources and acceleration mechanisms. In this study, we perform a mass composition analysis using elongation rate (the rate of change of the depth of shower maximum with energy), measured by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The advantage of this approach is a weak dependence of the results on the choice of the hadronic interaction models.

  18. Radiometric detection of bacterial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.; Wagner Junior, H.N.

    1979-01-01

    The measurement of 14 CO 2 produced by the bacterial oxidation of labelled compounds is discussed as a means of evaluating the bacterial metabolism. The following items are discussed:automated radiometric detection, types of graphs, clinical applications of the radiometric system and influential factors. Complementary studies on bacterial assimilation of substances are presented. (M.A.) [pt

  19. Identification of genes involved in the ACC-mediated control of root cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markakis Marios

    2012-11-01

    signaling cascade, these are converged to a ’common pathway’. Furthermore, several potential keyplayers, such as transcription factors and auxin-responsive genes, were identified by the microarray analysis. They await further analysis to reveal their exact role in the control of cell elongation.

  20. Characterization of Elongation Factor Tu of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhang, Yue-feng Chu, Ping Zhao, Peng-cheng Gao, Ying He, Nu Wang and Zhong-xin Lu*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is considered as an important pathogen of small ruminants, but its antigenic proteins are not well known so far. In this study, we cloned the EF-Tu gene of M. ovipneumoniae and analyzed the molecular features of the gene and its coding protein for the first time. The gene was then expressed in E.coli and the antigenicity of the coding protein was evaluated as well. The EF-Tu gene of M. ovipneumoniae is 1209 bp in length, encodes 402 amino acids, and shares the highest DNA sequence identity of 87.5% and deduced amino acid sequence identity of 97.8% with those of M. hyopneumoniae, respectively. The recombinant EF-Tu protein can react with the polyclonal antiserum of M. ovipneumoniae and can induce humoral immune responses in mice, which indicated that the EF-Tu may be used as a candidate protein in developing the technologies to control the disease.

  1. BACTERIAL PREVALENCE, ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY PATTERN AND PREDISPOSING FACTORS IN PATIENTS OF NOSOCOMIAL URINARY TRACT INFECTION (UTI VISITED THE TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN JAMNAGAR REGION, WESTERN GUJARAT, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Somabhai Modi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nosocomial UTI is the most common bacterial infection ranging from asymptomatic bacterial to septicaemia. Gram-negative bacteria contribute 80-85% of UTI and 15-20% by gram positive with major contribution by E. coli. The aim of the study is to assess the bacterial prevalence, drug sensitivity pattern and predisposing factors in nosocomial UTI. MATERIALS AND METHODS 778 midstream urine samples were tested by conventional methods of which 282 (36.25% samples were identified as positive for bacteria. All the isolates were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test. RESULTS Bacterial prevalence was 36.25%. 87.95% UTI were caused by gram negative while 12.05% cases were due to gram-positive bacteria. Most prevalent bacterium was E. coli (48.23%. Piperacillin+tazobactam were identified as most sensitive drug for all gram-negative isolates. Among the gram-positive isolates, coagulase-positive bacteria like Staph aureus were sensitive to all tested drugs while coagulase-negative bacteria were less sensitive to all exposed drugs and Enterococcus produced 75% sensitivity rate to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. UTI was common between 40-60 years (37.23% with mean age 44.23±20.05 and P value was >0.05. High frequency observed in men (55.32% than women (44.68%, (P >0.05. 53.19% cases had history of catheterisation (P <0.001. CONCLUSION Variable sensitivity pattern and increasing drug resistance observed in uropathogen, so study emphasise over antibiotic sensitivity testing before prescribing empirical therapy, understanding the risk factors helps to contain the UTI.

  2. Halogenated auxins affect microtubules and root elongation in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, and 5,6-dichloro-indole-3-acetic acid (DCIAA) on growth and microtubule (MT) organization in roots of Lactuca sativa L. DCIAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) inhibited root elongation and depolymerized MTs in the cortex of the elongation zone, inhibited the elongation of stele cells, and promoted xylem maturation. Both auxins caused the plane of cell division to shift from anticlinal to periclinal. In contrast, TFIBA (100 micromolar) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% and stimulated the elongation of lateral roots, even in the presence of IBA, the microtubular inhibitors oryzalin and taxol, or the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. However, TFIBA inhibited the formation of lateral root primordia. Immunostaining showed that TFIBA stabilized MTs orientation perpendicular to the root axis, doubled the cortical cell length, but delayed xylem maturation. The data indicate that the auxin-induced inhibition of elongation and swelling of roots results from reoriented phragmoplasts, the destabilization of MTs in elongating cells, and promotion of vessel formation. In contrast, TFIBA induced promotion of root elongation by enhancing cell length, prolonging transverse MT orientation, delaying cell and xylem maturation.

  3. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Invasion-Resistant Cells Identifies Laminin α2 as a Host Factor for Bacterial Invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wijk, Xander M.; Döhrmann, Simon; Hallstrom, Bjorn

    2017-01-01

    To understand the role of glycosaminoglycans in bacterial cellular invasion, xylosyltransferase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were created using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-cas9) gene targeting. When...... these mutants were compared to the pgsA745 cell line, a CHO xylosyltransferase mutant generated previously using chemical mutagenesis, an unexpected result was obtained. Bacterial invasion of pgsA745 cells by group B Streptococcus (GBS), group A Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus was markedly reduced...... compared to the invasion of wild-type cells, but newly generated CRISPR-cas9 mutants were only resistant to GBS. Invasion of pgsA745 cells was not restored by transfection with xylosyltransferase, suggesting that an additional mutation conferring panresistance to multiple bacteria was present in pgsA745...

  4. Configuration of biological wastewater treatment line and influent composition as the main factors driving bacterial community structure of activated sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Jaranowska, Paulina; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zieli?ska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The structure of microbial consortia in wastewater treatment facilities is a resultant of environmental conditions created by the operational parameters of the purification process. In the research, activated sludge from nine Polish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) was investigated at a molecular level to determine the impact of the complexity of biological treatment line and the influent composition on the species structure and the diversity of bacterial consortia. The community fingerpri...

  5. Caries-related factors and bacterial composition of supragingival plaques in caries free and caries active Algerian adults

    OpenAIRE

    Amina Hoceini; Nihel Klouche Khelil; Ilhem Ben-Yelles; Amine Mesli; Sara Ziouani; Lotfi Ghellai; Nadia Aissaoui; Fatima Nas; Mounia Arab

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare oral hygiene practices, education and social background, food intake and oral malodor of Algerian adults suffering from dental caries with normal controls, and to determine and compare the bacterial composition of the supragingival plaques from the above-mentioned groups. Methods: Participants completed a questionnaire and were clinically examined for dental caries using decayed, missing and filled teeth index according to the criteria laid down by the World Health Or...

  6. High n ballooning modes in highly elongated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, C.H.; Bateman, G.

    1980-02-01

    An analytic study of stability against high n ballooning modes in highly elongated axisymmetric plasmas is presented and compared with computational results. From the equation for the marginal pressure gradient, it is found that the local shear plays an important role on the stability of elongated and shifted plasma, and that high elongation deteriorates the stability by decreasing the stabilizing effects of field line bending and local shear. The net contribution of the local shear to stability decreases with elongation and shift for strongly ballooning modes (eigenfunctions strongly localized near the outer edge of the toroidal flux surfaces) but increases for interchange modes (eigenfunctions more uniform along the flux surfaces). The computational study of high n ballooning modes in a highly elongated plasma reveals that lowering the aspect ratio and broadening the pressure profile enhance the marginal beta for β/sub p/ less than unity but severely reduce the marginal beta for β/sub p/ larger than unity

  7. Sequence-Dependent Elongation Dynamics on Macrolide-Bound Ribosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Johansson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough.

  8. TALE-induced bHLH transcription factors that activate a pectate lyase contribute to water soaking in bacterial spot of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Allison R; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2017-01-31

    AvrHah1 [avirulence (avr) gene homologous to avrBs3 and hax2, no. 1] is a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector (TALE) in Xanthomonas gardneri that induces water-soaked disease lesions on fruits and leaves during bacterial spot of tomato. We observe that water from outside the leaf is drawn into the apoplast in X. gardneri-infected, but not X. gardneriΔavrHah1 (XgΔavrHah1)-infected, plants, conferring a dark, water-soaked appearance. The pull of water can facilitate entry of additional bacterial cells into the apoplast. Comparing the transcriptomes of tomato infected with X. gardneri vs. XgΔavrHah1 revealed the differential up-regulation of two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with predicted effector binding elements (EBEs) for AvrHah1. We mined our RNA-sequencing data for differentially up-regulated genes that could be direct targets of the bHLH transcription factors and therefore indirect targets of AvrHah1. We show that two pectin modification genes, a pectate lyase and pectinesterase, are targets of both bHLH transcription factors. Designer TALEs (dTALEs) for the bHLH transcription factors and the pectate lyase, but not for the pectinesterase, complement water soaking when delivered by XgΔavrHah1 By perturbing transcriptional networks and/or modifying the plant cell wall, AvrHah1 may promote water uptake to enhance tissue damage and eventual bacterial egression from the apoplast to the leaf surface. Understanding how disease symptoms develop may be a useful tool for improving the tolerance of crops from damaging disease lesions.

  9. Soil factors involved in the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, B B; Montes-Borrego, M; Aranda, S; Soriano, M A; Gómez, J A; Navas-Cortés, J A

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a tendency in olive production systems to reduce tillage or keep a vegetative cover to reduce soil erosion and degradation. However, there is scarce information on the effects of different soil management systems (SMS) in soil bacterial community composition of olive groves. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of soil type and different SMS implemented to control weeds in the structure and diversity of bacterial communities of 58 soils in the two geographic areas that best represent the organic olive production systems in Spain. Bacterial community composition assessed by frequency and intensity of occurrence of terminal restriction profiles (TRFs) derived from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of amplified 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid were strongly correlated with soil type/field site (Eutric/Calcaric) that differed mainly in soil particle size distribution and soil pH, followed by a strong effect of SMS, in that order. Canonical discriminant (CD) analysis of TRFs properly classified all of the olive orchard soils as belonging to their respective soil type or SMS. Furthermore, only a small set of TRFs were enough to clearly and significantly differentiate soil samples according to soil type or SMS. Those specific TRFs could be used as bioindicators to assess the effect of changes in SMS aimed to enhance soil quality in olive production systems. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cotton fiber elongation network revealed by expression profiling of longer fiber lines introgressed with different Gossypium barbadense chromosome segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lei; Tian, Ruiping; Li, Xinghe; Chen, Jiedan; Wang, Sen; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2014-10-02

    Cotton fiber, a highly elongated, thickened single cell of the seed epidermis, is a powerful cell wall research model. Fiber length, largely determined during the elongation stage, is a key property of fiber quality. Several studies using expressed sequence tags and microarray analysis have identified transcripts that accumulate preferentially during fiber elongation. To further show the mechanism of fiber elongation, we used Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling to compare transcriptome data from longer fiber chromosome introgressed lines (CSILs) containing segments of various Gossypium barbadense chromosomes with data from its recurrent parent TM-1 during fiber elongation (from 5 DPA to 20 DPA). A large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in carbohydrate, fatty acid and secondary metabolism, particularly cell wall biosynthesis, were highly upregulated during the fiber elongation stage, as determined by functional enrichment and pathway analysis. Furthermore, DEGs related to hormone responses and transcription factors showed upregulated expression levels in the CSILs. Moreover, metabolic and regulatory network analysis indicated that the same pathways were differentially altered, and distinct pathways exhibited altered gene expression, in the CSILs. Interestingly, mining of upregulated DEGs in the introgressed segments of these CSILs based on D-genome sequence data showed that these lines were enriched in glucuronosyltransferase, inositol-1, 4, 5-trisphosphate 3-kinase and desulfoglucosinolate sulfotransferase activity. These results were similar to the results of transcriptome analysis. This report provides an integrative network about the molecular mechanisms controlling fiber length, which are mainly tied to carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biosynthesis, fatty acid metabolism, secondary metabolism, hormone responses and Transcription factors. The results of this study provide new insights into the critical factors associated with cell

  11. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  12. DksA guards elongating RNA polymerase against ribosome-stalling-induced arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Mooney, Rachel A; Grass, Jeffrey A; Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Herman, Christophe; Landick, Robert; Wang, Jue D

    2014-03-06

    In bacteria, translation-transcription coupling inhibits RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalling. We present evidence suggesting that, upon amino acid starvation, inactive ribosomes promote rather than inhibit RNAP stalling. We developed an algorithm to evaluate genome-wide polymerase progression independently of local noise and used it to reveal that the transcription factor DksA inhibits promoter-proximal pausing and increases RNAP elongation when uncoupled from translation by depletion of charged tRNAs. DksA has minimal effect on RNAP elongation in vitro and on untranslated RNAs in vivo. In these cases, transcripts can form RNA structures that prevent backtracking. Thus, the effect of DksA on transcript elongation may occur primarily upon ribosome slowing/stalling or at promoter-proximal locations that limit the potential for RNA structure. We propose that inactive ribosomes prevent formation of backtrack-blocking mRNA structures and that, in this circumstance, DksA acts as a transcription elongation factor in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial Proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology.

  14. Resin Elongation Phenomenon of Polystyrene Nanopillars in Nanoimprint Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Kosuke; Miyauchi, Akihiro; Sugimura, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the elongation of polystyrene nanopillars formed by thermal nanoimprint lithography. Silicone and perfluoropolyether were used as mold release agents to obtain molds with different adhesion forces against polystyrene to be imprinted. The adhesion force between the resin and release layers was evaluated as a force curve by atomic force microscope with a polystyrene colloid probe. Elongation depended on the aspect ratio of the corresponding microholes on the mold and the adhesion force against the release layer. The conditions under which the elongation occurred exhibited a clear threshold on the stress loaded on the foot area of the nanopillars.

  15. Scattering phaseshift formulas for mesons and baryons in elongated boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank X.; Alexandru, Andrei

    2018-03-01

    We derive Lüscher phaseshift formulas for two-particle states in boxes elongated in one of the dimensions. Such boxes offer a cost-effective way of varying the relative momentum of the particles. Boosted states in the elongated direction, which allow wider access to energies, are also considered. The formulas for the various scenarios (moving and zero-momentum states in cubic and elongated boxes) are compared and relations between them are clarified. The results are applicable to a wide set of meson-meson and meson-baryon elastic scattering processes, with the two-particle system having equal or unequal masses.

  16. The Survival and Recovery of Irradiated Bacterial Spores as Affected by Population Density and Some External Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Kiss, I.; Andrássy, E.

    1967-01-01

    The radiation resistance of Bacillus cereus spores as affected by the pH-value and cell density of the irradiated spore suspensions was investigated. The portions of the survival curves of suspensions of 10 8 , 4 x 10 3 and 5 x 10 1 per millilitre viable cell counts, respectively, were compared for a three-orders-of-magnitude decrease in viable cell count. It was established that the initial cell density did not affect radiation resistance of spores. Radiation resistance as affected by pH-value in the range of 3 to 8 was investigated. In the range of pH 5 to 8, the radiation resistance of B. cereus spores was not affected. By lowering the pH-value to below 5, the radiation resistance decreased below that observed in the neutral region. The colony-forming capacity of B. cereus, B. coagulans and B. pumilus as a function of the pH-value in the nutrient medium, and the pH-sensitivity of bacterial spores as affected by radiation, were also investigated. It was established that irradiation increased the pH-sensitivity of surviving bacterial spores in all three strains. The initial phase of spore germination (the phase accompanied by decrease of refractivity of the spores) and the division stage of vegetative cells proved to be the most sensitive to the value of the hydrogen ion concentration. (author)

  17. Bacterial clearance is improved in septic mice by platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-da-Cunha, Mariana G A; Gomes, Rachel N; Roehrs, Nathassia; Bozza, Fernando A; Prescott, Stephen M; Stafforini, Diana; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Patricia T; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that dysregulation of the host inflammatory response to infectious agents is central to the mortality of patients with sepsis. Strategies to block inflammatory mediators such as PAF have been investigated as adjuvant therapies for sepsis. PAF-AH, the enzyme responsible for PAF degradation, showed positive results in pre-clinical studies and phase II clinical trials, but the results of a phase III study were disappointing. In this study, we investigated the potential protective mechanism of PAF-AH in sepsis using the murine model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Treatment with rPAF-AH increased peritoneal fluid levels of the anti-inflammatory mediators MCP-1/CCL2 after CLP. The numbers of bacteria (CFU) in the peritoneal cavity were decreased in the rPAF-AH-treated group, indicating more efficient bacterial clearance after rPAF-AH treatment. Interestingly, we observed increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) after PAF-AH administration, and rPAF-AH treatment did not decrease CFU numbers either in iNOS-deficient mice or in CCR2-deficient mice. We concluded that administration of exogenous rPAF-AH reduced inflammatory injury, altered cytokine levels and favored bacterial clearance with a clear impact on mortality through modulation of MCP-1/CCL2 and NO levels in a clinically relevant sepsis model.

  18. Streptococcus pyogenes CAMP factor promotes bacterial adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial cells without serum via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Mie; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Isono, Toshihito; Nakamura, Yuki; Saitoh, Issei; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a bacterium that causes systemic diseases, such as pharyngitis and toxic shock syndrome, via oral- or nasal-cavity infection. S. pyogenes produces various molecules known to function with serum components that lead to bacterial adhesion and invasion in human tissues. In this study, we identified a novel S. pyogenes adhesin/invasin. Our results revealed that CAMP factor promoted streptococcal adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial Detroit562 cells without serum. Recombinant CAMP factor initially localized on the membranes of cells and then became internalized in the cytosol following S. pyogenes infection. Additionally, CAMP factor phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and serine-threonine kinase in the cells. ELISA results demonstrate that CAMP factor affected the amount of phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and serine-threonine kinase in Detroit562 cells. Furthermore, CAMP factor did not reverse the effect of phosphoinositide 3-kinase knockdown by small interfering RNA in reducing the level of adhesion and invasion of S. pyogenes isogenic cfa-deficient mutant. These results suggested that S. pyogenes CAMP factor activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/serine-threonine kinase signaling pathway, promoting S. pyogenes invasion of Detroit562 cells without serum. Our findings suggested that CAMP factor played an important role on adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Lip Nam; Gao, Geli; Tuomanen, Elaine I

    2017-01-03

    The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen infecting the respiratory tract and brain. It is an established model organism for understanding how infection injures the host. During infection or bacterial growth, bacteria shed their cell wall (CW) into the host environment and trigger inflammation. A previous study has shown that CW enters and crosses cell barriers by interacting with a receptor on the surfaces of host cells, termed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr). In the present study, by using cells that are depleted of PAFr, we identified a second pathway with features of macropinocytosis, which is a receptor-independent fluid uptake mechanism by cells. Each pathway contributes approximately the same amount of cell wall trafficking, but the PAFr pathway is silent, while the new pathway appears to contribute to the host inflammatory response to CW insult. Copyright © 2017

  20. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium: biological role of interferon tau in endometrial function and conceptus elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorniak, P; Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E

    2013-04-01

    This review integrates established and new information on the biological role of ovarian progesterone (P4) and interferon tau as well as conceptus- and endometrial-derived factors, PG and cortisol, in endometrial function and conceptus elongation during the periimplantation period of pregnancy in ruminants. Interferon tau is the maternal recognition of pregnancy signal that inhibits production of luteolytic pulses of PGF2α by the endometrium to maintain corpora lutea and their production of P4, the unequivocal hormone of pregnancy. Conceptus-endometrial interactions in ruminants are complex and involve carefully orchestrated temporal and spatial alterations in endometrial gene expression during pregnancy. Available results from studies in sheep support the idea that the individual, interactive, and coordinated actions of P4, interferon tau, PG, and cortisol regulate expression of elongation- and implantation-related genes in the endometrial epithelia and that P4 and PG are essential regulators of conceptus elongation. The outcome of these gene expression changes is alterations in endometrial secretions that govern conceptus elongation via effects on trophectoderm proliferation, migration, attachment, and adhesion. An increased knowledge of conceptus-endometrial interactions during early pregnancy in ruminants is necessary to understand and elucidate the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss and to provide a basis for new strategies to improve pregnancy outcome and reproductive efficiency.

  1. Mechanical modelling quantifies the functional importance of outer tissue layers during root elongation and bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rosemary J; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Band, Leah R; Fernandes, Anwesha N; French, Andrew P; Fozard, John A; Hodgman, T Charlie; Kenobi, Kim; Pridmore, Tony P; Stout, Michael; Wells, Darren M; Wilson, Michael H; Bennett, Malcolm J; Jensen, Oliver E

    2014-01-01

    Root elongation and bending require the coordinated expansion of multiple cells of different types. These processes are regulated by the action of hormones that can target distinct cell layers. We use a mathematical model to characterise the influence of the biomechanical properties of individual cell walls on the properties of the whole tissue. Taking a simple constitutive model at the cell scale which characterises cell walls via yield and extensibility parameters, we derive the analogous tissue-level model to describe elongation and bending. To accurately parameterise the model, we take detailed measurements of cell turgor, cell geometries and wall thicknesses. The model demonstrates how cell properties and shapes contribute to tissue-level extensibility and yield. Exploiting the highly organised structure of the elongation zone (EZ) of the Arabidopsis root, we quantify the contributions of different cell layers, using the measured parameters. We show how distributions of material and geometric properties across the root cross-section contribute to the generation of curvature, and relate the angle of a gravitropic bend to the magnitude and duration of asymmetric wall softening. We quantify the geometric factors which lead to the predominant contribution of the outer cell files in driving root elongation and bending. PMID:24641449

  2. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  3. Venus Elongation Measurements for the Transit of Venus, using the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 11. Venus Elongation Measurements for the Transit of Venus, using the Historical Jantar Mantar Observatory. N Rathnasree. Classroom Volume 9 Issue 11 November 2004 pp 46-55 ...

  4. Bacteriophage Resistance Mechanisms in the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: Linking Genomic Mutations to Changes in Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2015-01-01

    requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage-resistant...... resistance and the genetic modifications were supported by direct measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, biofilm formation, and secretion of extracellular enzymes, which were all impaired in the resistant strains, probably due to superficial structural changes. The clustered regularly interspaced...... were associated with a number of derived effects on the physiological properties of the pathogen, including reduced virulence under in vitro conditions. Consequently, phage-driven physiological changes associated with resistance may have implications for the impact of the pathogen in aquaculture...

  5. Spondylolisthesis caused by extreme pedicle elongation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo, Roland; Fuerderer, Sebastian; Eysel, Peer

    2007-01-01

    Although osteogenesis imperfecta is a well-known skeletal disorder, reports of spondylolisthesis in osteogenesis imperfecta are rare. Only very few cases of spondylolisthesis caused by elongation of lumbar pedicles have been described in the literature. Here we report three patients suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta showing a severe form of hyperlordosis caused by lumbar pedicle elongation and consecutive spondylolisthesis. Radiographs in the course of childhood and adolescence show a ra...

  6. Amplification of pico-scale DNA mediated by bacterial carrier DNA for small-cell-number transcription factor ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus S; Bagger, Frederik O; Hasemann, Marie S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is used to map transcription factor occupancy and generate epigenetic profiles genome-wide. The requirement of nano-scale ChIP DNA for generation of sequencing libraries has impeded ChIP-seq on in vivo tissues of low...... cell numbers. RESULTS: We describe a robust, simple and scalable methodology for ChIP-seq of low-abundant cell populations, verified down to 10,000 cells. By employing non-mammalian genome mapping bacterial carrier DNA during amplification, we reliably amplify down to 50 pg of ChIP DNA from...... transcription factor (CEBPA) and histone mark (H3K4me3) ChIP. We further demonstrate that genomic profiles are highly resilient to changes in carrier DNA to ChIP DNA ratios. CONCLUSIONS: This represents a significant advance compared to existing technologies, which involve either complex steps of pre...

  7. Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide and X-irradiation on the production of colony-stimulating factor and the maintenance of granulopoiesis in bone marrow culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, H.; Miyanomae, T.; Tsurusawa, M.; Fujita, J.; Mori, K.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and X-irradiation on CSF production and granulopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures were studied. Levels of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) increased soon after the refeeding of the culture, but the activity was undetectable at day 7. Addition of LPS induced a significant increase in CSF levels in the culture, followed by an elevated granulopoiesis. The increase in CSF levels was suppressed when culture medium that had been harvested at refeeding on day 7 was added. Although irradiation did not increase CSF production, granulopoiesis was markedly stimulated shortly after irradiation. Thus granulopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture may also be regulated by humoral factors such as CSF, and the culture system may represent the in vivo response to haemopoietic stimuli. (author)

  8. APOBEC3G inhibits elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate N Bishop

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a host cytidine deaminase that, in the absence of Vif, restricts HIV-1 replication and reduces the amount of viral DNA that accumulates in cells. Initial studies determined that A3G induces extensive mutation of nascent HIV-1 cDNA during reverse transcription. It has been proposed that this triggers the degradation of the viral DNA, but there is now mounting evidence that this mechanism may not be correct. Here, we use a natural endogenous reverse transcriptase assay to show that, in cell-free virus particles, A3G is able to inhibit HIV-1 cDNA accumulation not only in the absence of hypermutation but also without the apparent need for any target cell factors. We find that although reverse transcription initiates in the presence of A3G, elongation of the cDNA product is impeded. These data support the model that A3G reduces HIV-1 cDNA levels by inhibiting synthesis rather than by inducing degradation.

  9. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair migration and aortic elongation differentiated using dual reference point analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Takayama, Toshio; Panthofer, Annalise; Cambria, Richard P; Farber, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Matsumura, Jon S

    2018-02-01

    mm vs -3.5 ± 5.4 mm, respectively; P consequence of age. Employing two landmarks can account for these changes and proves to be an important factor, among others, in the differentiation of aortic elongation from true stent graft migration. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of elongational viscosity of polymer melts using SER Universal Testing Platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Petr; Švrčinová, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2012), s. 14776 ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307; GA ČR GA103/09/2066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : elongational viscosity * SER Universal Testing Platform * polymer melts * LDPE Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2012 http://www.ar.ethz.ch/TMPPDF/23074299892.48/ApplRheol_22_14776.pdf

  11. Role of 30 kDa antigen of enteric bacterial pathogens as a possible arthritogenic factor in post-dysenteric reactive arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive arthritis (ReA/Reiter′s syndrome (RS may be caused as a sequel of infections caused by enteric bacterial pathogens, although the mechanisms through, which different pathogens cause similar disease are not clear. Aim: This study was done to look for the presence and role of any common bacterial antigen among the pathogens isolated from such patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 51 patients of ReA and 75 controls (three groups of 25 subjects each: Group 1: Patients who did not develop arthritic complications within 3 months after bacillary dysentery/diarrhea; Group 2: Patients with other arthritic diseases and Group 3: Normal healthy subjects were included. The isolated enteric pathogens were tested to detect the immunodominant antigens. Results and Conclusions: A common 30 kDa antigen was found to be specifically present among seven arthritogenic enteric bacterial strains belonging to three genera, Salmonella, Shigella and Hafnia. Post-dysenteric ReA patients′ sera show higher levels of immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A antibodies against this antigen as compared to the controls. Lymphocytes of ReA patients recognize this antigen, proliferate and produce interleukin-2 in response to this antigen more than the lymphocytes of controls. 30 kDa antigen may be a common arthritogenic factor associated with post-dysenteric ReA/RS. The association of Hafnia alvei with post-dysenteric ReA is described for the first time. Four cases of mycobacterial ReA had an association with this antigen, suggesting that the arthritogenic antigen of mycobacteria and enteric bacteria may be of a similar nature.

  12. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors for Poor Outcome in Infants Less Than 90 Days of Age with Bacterial Meningitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okike, Ifeanyichukwu O; Ladhani, Shamez N; Johnson, Alan P; Henderson, Katherine L; Blackburn, Ruth M; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Cafferkey, Mary; Anthony, Mark; Ninis, Nelly; Heath, Paul T

    2018-01-29

    To describe the clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with poor outcome in infants <90 days of age with bacterial meningitis. Prospective, enhanced, national population-based active surveillance for infants aged <90 days with bacterial meningitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland between July 2010 and July 2011. Infants were identified through the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit, laboratory surveillance and meningitis charities. Clinical details was available for 263 out of 298 (88%) infants where a bacterium was identified, 184 (70%) were born at term. Fever was reported in 143 (54%), seizures in 73 (28%), bulging fontanelle in 58 (22%), coma in 15 (6%) and neck stiffness in 7 (3%). 23 (9%) died and 56/240 (23%) of the survivors had serious central nervous system (CNS) complications at discharge. Temperature instability (odds ratio [OR] 2.99; 95% CI: 1.21-7.41), seizures (OR 7.06; 95% CI: 2.80-17.81), CSF protein greater than the median concentration (2275mg/dl; OR 2.62; 95% CI: 1.13-6.10) and pneumococcal meningitis (OR 4.83; 95% CI: 1.33-17.58) were independently associated with serious CNS complications, while prematurity (OR 5.84; 95% CI: 2.02-16.85), low birthweight (OR 8.48; 95% CI: 2.60-27.69), coma at presentation (OR 31.85; 95% CI: 8.46-119.81) and pneumococcal meningitis (OR 4.62; 95% CI: 1.19-17.91) were independently associated with death. The classic features of meningitis were uncommon. The presentation in young infants is often non-specific and only half of cases presented with fever. A number of clinical and laboratory factors were associated with poor outcomes; further research is required to determine how knowledge of these risk factors might improve clinical management and outcomes.

  13. Two Cassava Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP Transcription Factors (MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 Confer Disease Resistance against Cassava Bacterial Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Basic domain-leucine zipper (bZIP transcription factor, one type of conserved gene family, plays an important role in plant development and stress responses. Although 77 MebZIPs have been genome-wide identified in cassava, their in vivo roles remain unknown. In this study, we analyzed the expression pattern and the function of two MebZIPs (MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 in response to pathogen infection. Gene expression analysis indicated that MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 were commonly regulated by flg22, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam, salicylic acid (SA, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Subcellular localization analysis showed that MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 are specifically located in cell nucleus. Through overexpression in tobacco, we found that MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 conferred improved disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight, with more callose depositions. On the contrary, MebZIP3- and MebZIP5-silenced plants by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS showed disease sensitive phenotype, lower transcript levels of defense-related genes and less callose depositions. Taken together, this study highlights the positive role of MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 in disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight for further utilization in genetic improvement of cassava disease resistance.

  14. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lip Nam Loh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling.

  15. A bacterial cytotoxin identifies the RhoA exchange factor Net1 as a key effector in the response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Guerra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure of adherent cells to DNA damaging agents, such as the bacterial cytolethal distending toxin (CDT or ionizing radiations (IR, activates the small GTPase RhoA, which promotes the formation of actin stress fibers and delays cell death. The signalling intermediates that regulate RhoA activation and promote cell survival are unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that the nuclear RhoA-specific Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF Net1 becomes dephosphorylated at a critical inhibitory site in cells exposed to CDT or IR. Expression of a dominant negative Net1 or Net1 knock down by iRNA prevented RhoA activation, inhibited the formation of stress fibers, and enhanced cell death, indicating that Net1 activation is required for this RhoA-mediated responses to genotoxic stress. The Net1 and RhoA-dependent signals involved activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38 and its downstream target MAPK-activated protein kinase 2. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data highlight the importance of Net1 in controlling RhoA and p38 MAPK mediated cell survival in cells exposed to DNA damaging agents and illustrate a molecular pathway whereby chronic exposure to a bacterial toxin may promote genomic instability.

  16. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Lea-Jessica; Tauber, Simone C; Merres, Julika; Kress, Eugenia; Stope, Matthias B; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6(-/-), TNFR1(-/-), and TNFR1-IL-6(-/-) KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1(-/-), IL-6(-/-), and TNFR1-IL-6(-/-) mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1(-/-) and TNFR1-IL-6(-/-) mice in contrast to IL-6(-/-) and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1(-/-) and TNFR1-IL-6(-/-) mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6(-/-) or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone.

  17. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  18. The PAF complex and Prf1/Rtf1 delineate distinct Cdk9-dependent pathways regulating transcription elongation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbogning, Jean; Nagy, Stephen; Pagé, Viviane; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart; Fisher, Robert P; Tanny, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9) promotes elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), mRNA processing, and co-transcriptional histone modification. Cdk9 phosphorylates multiple targets, including the conserved RNAPII elongation factor Spt5 and RNAPII itself, but how these different modifications mediate Cdk9 functions is not known. Here we describe two Cdk9-dependent pathways in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that involve distinct targets and elicit distinct biological outcomes. Phosphorylation of Spt5 by Cdk9 creates a direct binding site for Prf1/Rtf1, a transcription regulator with functional and physical links to the Polymerase Associated Factor (PAF) complex. PAF association with chromatin is also dependent on Cdk9 but involves alternate phosphoacceptor targets. Prf1 and PAF are biochemically separate in cell extracts, and genetic analyses show that Prf1 and PAF are functionally distinct and exert opposing effects on the RNAPII elongation complex. We propose that this opposition constitutes a Cdk9 auto-regulatory mechanism, such that a positive effect on elongation, driven by the PAF pathway, is kept in check by a negative effect of Prf1/Rtf1 and downstream mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B. Thus, optimal RNAPII elongation may require balanced action of functionally distinct Cdk9 pathways.

  19. The PAF complex and Prf1/Rtf1 delineate distinct Cdk9-dependent pathways regulating transcription elongation in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Mbogning

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9 promotes elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII, mRNA processing, and co-transcriptional histone modification. Cdk9 phosphorylates multiple targets, including the conserved RNAPII elongation factor Spt5 and RNAPII itself, but how these different modifications mediate Cdk9 functions is not known. Here we describe two Cdk9-dependent pathways in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that involve distinct targets and elicit distinct biological outcomes. Phosphorylation of Spt5 by Cdk9 creates a direct binding site for Prf1/Rtf1, a transcription regulator with functional and physical links to the Polymerase Associated Factor (PAF complex. PAF association with chromatin is also dependent on Cdk9 but involves alternate phosphoacceptor targets. Prf1 and PAF are biochemically separate in cell extracts, and genetic analyses show that Prf1 and PAF are functionally distinct and exert opposing effects on the RNAPII elongation complex. We propose that this opposition constitutes a Cdk9 auto-regulatory mechanism, such that a positive effect on elongation, driven by the PAF pathway, is kept in check by a negative effect of Prf1/Rtf1 and downstream mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B. Thus, optimal RNAPII elongation may require balanced action of functionally distinct Cdk9 pathways.

  20. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  1. Effect of several ribosomal mutations on speed of elongation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, D.J.; Branscomb, E.W.

    1976-09-28

    Consideration of simple kinetic schemes for the discrimination of charged tRNA at the ribosome has led us to expect changes in the elongation speed to be caused by some ribosomal mutations. We have examined this hypothesis by investigating the effect of several well-studied mutations of E. coli ribosomes on the chain elongation time in the translation of the Z gene of the lactose operon. The lag time (at 37/sup 0/C) in the appearance of the first active, newly-synthesized ..beta..-galactosidase molecule after induction of the operon was measured, and the average elongation time estimated. We found that mutations to resistance to high levels of streptomycin (at the str A locus) fall into two classes; one class exhibits a slow-down in elongation of about 30 percent, the other exhibits little, if any, detectable change. Mutation to paramomycin resistance also causes a significant decrease in speed. On the other hand, mutation to spectinomycin resistance appears not to affect the speed. A common characteristic of streptomycin and paramomycin is that they both are known to cause misreading during translation (and resistance causes a decrease in errors) whereas spectinomycin is known to have no such effect. This evidence, together with kinetic considerations, seems to indicate that mutations which affect the accuracy of translation may also affect elongation speed.

  2. Sequence-dependent elongation dynamics on macrolide-bound ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Magnus; Chen, Jin; Tsai, Albert; Kornberg, Guy; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2014-06-12

    The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET) has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter

    2004-01-01

    A model of pneumococcal meningitis in young adult rats receiving antibiotics once the infection was established was developed. The intent was to mimic clinical and histopathological features of pneumococcal meningitis in humans. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate whether medical...... boosting of the peripheral neutrophil count affected the outcome of the meningitis. The risk of terminal illness over the first 7 days after infection was significantly reduced for rats who had elevated peripheral white blood cell counts after receiving granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prior...... to the infection compared to that for untreated rats (P = 0.039 by the log rank test). The improved outcome was associated with reduced signs of cerebral cortical damage (P = 0.008). Furthermore, the beneficial effects of G-CSF were associated with reduced bacterial loads in the cerebrospinal fluid (median, 1.1 x...

  4. Spondylolisthesis caused by extreme pedicle elongation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerderer, Sebastian; Eysel, Peer

    2007-01-01

    Although osteogenesis imperfecta is a well-known skeletal disorder, reports of spondylolisthesis in osteogenesis imperfecta are rare. Only very few cases of spondylolisthesis caused by elongation of lumbar pedicles have been described in the literature. Here we report three patients suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta showing a severe form of hyperlordosis caused by lumbar pedicle elongation and consecutive spondylolisthesis. Radiographs in the course of childhood and adolescence show a rapid progression of pedicle elongation and hyperlordosis with increased mechanical loads. The treatment strategy consists of physiotherapy, medical treatment with bisphosphonates, and orthopedic surgery and is preferably conservative. In the three patients reported here, one patient was treated with laminectomy and postero-lateral fusion, whereas in the other two patients surgery is currently not considered as necessary. PMID:17242874

  5. Preparation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals of bacterial flagellar sigma factor σ28 in complex with the σ28-binding region of its antisigma factor, FlgM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kengo; Ichihara, Hisako; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ishihama, Akira; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    A complex of E. coli flagellar and chemotaxis-specific sigma factor σ 28 bound to the σ 28 -binding region of its antisigma factor FlgM was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The sigma 28 kDa (σ 28 ) factor is a transcription factor specific for the expression of bacterial flagellar and chemotaxis genes. Its antisigma factor, FlgM, binds σ 28 factor and inhibits its activity as a transcription factor. In this study, crystals of the complex between Escherichia coli σ 28 and the C-terminal σ 28 -binding region of FlgM were obtained. The crystals belong to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.7 (2), c = 51.74 (3) Å, containing one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An X-ray intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å

  6. Elongation of fibers from highly viscous dextran solutions enables fabrication of rapidly dissolving drug carrying fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, John P; Lai, David; Lounds, Maxwell; Chung, Kyeongwoon; Kim, Jinsang; Mansfield, John F; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-28

    A simple method is presented for forming thread-like fibers from highly viscous dextran solutions. Based on the cohesive and adhesive forces between a dextran solution and the substrate to which it is applied, multiple fibers of approximately 10 μm in diameter can be elongated simultaneously. These fibers can be woven into multiple layers to produce fabrics of varying fiber orientations and mechanical properties. Various bioactive agents can be incorporated into the dextran solution prior to fiber formation, including hemostatic and antibiotic agents. Fabrics containing thrombin are capable of coagulating human platelet poor plasma in vitro. Fabrics containing antibiotics are capable of suppressing bacterial growth in a disk diffusion assay. These data suggest that this new material composed entirely of dextran has promise as a drug delivery component in wound dressings. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  8. BacPP: bacterial promoter prediction--a tool for accurate sigma-factor specific assignment in enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila E Silva, Scheila; Echeverrigaray, Sergio; Gerhardt, Günther J L

    2011-10-21

    Promoter sequences are well known to play a central role in gene expression. Their recognition and assignment in silico has not consolidated into a general bioinformatics method yet. Most previously available algorithms employ and are limited to σ70-dependent promoter sequences. This paper presents a new tool named BacPP, designed to recognize and predict Escherichia coli promoter sequences from background with specific accuracy for each σ factor (respectively, σ24, 86.9%; σ28, 92.8%; σ32, 91.5%; σ38, 89.3%, σ54, 97.0%; and σ70, 83.6%). BacPP is hence outstanding in recognition and assignment of sequences according to σ factor and provide circumstantial information about upstream gene sequences. This bioinformatic tool was developed by weighing rules extracted from neural networks trained with promoter sequences known to respond to a specific σ factor. Furthermore, when challenged with promoter sequences belonging to other enterobacteria BacPP maintained 76% accuracy overall. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  10. Viscosity overshoot in the start-up of uniaxial elongation of low density polyethylene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Bach, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The transient uniaxial elongational viscosity of BASF Lupolen 1840D and 3020D melts has been measured on a filament stretch rheometer up to Hencky strains of 6-7. The elongational viscosity of both melts was measured at 130 degrees C within a broad range of elongational rates. At high elongation ...

  11. Bacterial etiologies, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and risk factors among patients with ear discharge at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seble Worku

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the etiologic agent, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and possible risk factors among patients who had ear infection. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2014 and June 2014 at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia among patients with ear discharge. Data were collected by using a semi-structured questionnaire. Ear discharge was inoculated on blood agar, chocolate agar and MacConkey agar plates. Standard procedures were used for identification of etiologic agents. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on MuellerHinton agar. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20 and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 167 patients, 97 (58.1% were males. The mean age of the study participants was 23.3 years with the age ranging form 4 months to 78 years. Among the 167 study participants with ear discharge, 154 (92.2% were showed bacterial growth. Gram-negative bacteria were commonly isolated from 100 (58.5% participants. Of the 167 ear infection cases, 68.9% and 31.1% were from patients with chronic and acute otitis media, respectively. A total of 125 (73.1% and 46 (24.9% bacterial isolates were recovered from patients with chronic otitis media and acute otits media, respectively. The most commonly isolated Grampositive bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus [43 (25.1%]. Among the Gram-negative isolates, Proteus species [43 (25.1%] were the most common isolate. Age and sex had statically significant association with ear infection (P = 0.013. Multidrug resistances were observed in 100% and 88.4% Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial isolates, respectively. Conclusions: The prevalence of Gram-negative bacteria was high. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and Pseudomonas species were the most predominant. Alarmingly high rates of multiple drug resistance to majority of the commonly used antimicrobial agents were found. Therefore, treatment of ear

  12. Identification of two proteins that interact with the Erp virulence factor from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using the bacterial two-hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cataldi Angel A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exported repetitive protein (erp gene encodes a secreted 36-kDa protein with a central domain containing several proline-glycine-leucine-threonine-serine (PGLTS repeats. It has been demonstrated that erp is a virulence-associated factor since the disruption of this gene impairs the growth of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice. Results In order to elucidate the function of Erp we searched for Erp-binding proteins from M. tuberculosis by using a bacterial two-hybrid system. Our results indicate that Erp interacts specifically with two putative membrane proteins, Rv1417 and Rv2617c. Further analysis revealed that the latter two interact with each other, indicating that Rv1417, Rv2617c and Erp are connected through multiple interactions. While Rv1417 is disseminated in several Actinomycetales genera, orthologues of Rv2617c are exclusively present in members of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC. The central and amino-terminal regions of Erp were determined to be involved in the interaction with Rv1417 and Rv2627c. Erp forms from Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium leprae were not able to interact with Rv2617c in two-hybrid assays. Immunolocalization experiments showed that Rv1417 and Rv2617c are found on the cell membrane and Erp on the bacterial cell wall. Finally, comparative genomics and expression studies revealed a possible role of Rv1417 in riboflavin metabolism. Conclusion We identified interactive partners of Erp, an M. tuberculosis protein involved in virulence, which will be the focus of future investigation to decipher the function of the Erp family protein.

  13. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone.

  14. Fatty Acid Elongation in Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja M. Kessler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH represents a risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and is characterized by quantitative and qualitative changes in hepatic lipids. Since elongation of fatty acids from C16 to C18 has recently been reported to promote both hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammation we aimed to investigate whether a frequently used mouse NASH model reflects this clinically relevant feature and whether C16 to C18 elongation can be observed in HCC development. Feeding mice a methionine and choline deficient diet to model NASH not only increased total hepatic fatty acids and cholesterol, but also distinctly elevated the C18/C16 ratio, which was not changed in a model of simple steatosis (ob/ob mice. Depletion of Kupffer cells abrogated both quantitative and qualitative methionine-and-choline deficient (MCD-induced alterations in hepatic lipids. Interestingly, mimicking inflammatory events in early hepatocarcinogenesis by diethylnitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis (48 h increased hepatic lipids and the C18/C16 ratio. Analyses of human liver samples from patients with NASH or NASH-related HCC showed an elevated expression of the elongase ELOVL6, which is responsible for the elongation of C16 fatty acids. Taken together, our findings suggest a detrimental role of an altered fatty acid pattern in the progression of NASH-related liver disease.

  15. BRD4 assists elongation of both coding and enhancer RNAs guided by histone acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Tomohiko; Kanno, Yuka; LeRoy, Gary; Campos, Eric; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Vahedi, Golnaz; Heightman, Tom D; Garcia, Benjamin A; Reinberg, Danny; Siebenlist, Ulrich; O’Shea, John J; Ozato, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule BET inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic interactions between acetylated histones and the bromodomains of the BET family proteins, including BRD4, and they potently inhibit growth of malignant cells by targeting cancer-promoting genes. BRD4 interacts with the pause-release factor P-TEFb, and has been proposed to release Pol II from promoter-proximal pausing. We show that BRD4 occupied widespread genomic regions in mouse cells, and directly stimulated elongation of both protein-coding transcripts and non-coding enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), dependent on the function of bromodomains. BRD4 interacted physically with elongating Pol II complexes, and assisted Pol II progression through hyper-acetylated nucleosomes by interacting with acetylated histones via bromodomains. On active enhancers, the BET inhibitor JQ1 antagonized BRD4-associated eRNA synthesis. Thus, BRD4 is involved in multiple steps of the transcription hierarchy, primarily by assisting transcript elongation both at enhancers and on gene bodies. PMID:25383670

  16. BRD4 assists elongation of both coding and enhancer RNAs by interacting with acetylated histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Tomohiko; Kanno, Yuka; LeRoy, Gary; Campos, Eric; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Vahedi, Golnaz; Heightman, Tom D; Garcia, Benjamin A; Reinberg, Danny; Siebenlist, Ulrich; O'Shea, John J; Ozato, Keiko

    2014-12-01

    Small-molecule BET inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic interactions between acetylated histones and the bromodomains of the BET family proteins, including BRD4, and they potently inhibit growth of malignant cells by targeting cancer-promoting genes. BRD4 interacts with the pause-release factor P-TEFb and has been proposed to release RNA polymerase II (Pol II) from promoter-proximal pausing. We show that BRD4 occupies widespread genomic regions in mouse cells and directly stimulates elongation of both protein-coding transcripts and noncoding enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), in a manner dependent on bromodomain function. BRD4 interacts with elongating Pol II complexes and assists Pol II in progression through hyperacetylated nucleosomes by interacting with acetylated histones via bromodomains. On active enhancers, the BET inhibitor JQ1 antagonizes BRD4-associated eRNA synthesis. Thus, BRD4 is involved in multiple steps of the transcription hierarchy, primarily by facilitating transcript elongation both at enhancers and on gene bodies independently of P-TEFb.

  17. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  18. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  19. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  20. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    , the production and oxidation of methane, nitrate reduction and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen are exclusively carried out by different groups of bacteria. Some bacterial species – ‘extremophiles’ – thrive in extreme environments in which no eukaryotic organisms can survive with respect to temperature, salinity...

  1. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that coats the walls of the vagina Vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or fishlike odor Vaginal pain or itching Burning during urination Doctors are unsure of the incubation period for bacterial vaginosis. How Is the Diagnosis Made? Your child’s pediatrician can make the diagnosis ...

  2. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  3. CLOSED FORM OF THE STEERED ELONGATED HERMITE-GAUSS WAVELETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papari, Giuseppe; Campisi, Patrizio; Petkov, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    We provide a closed form, both in the spatial and in the frequency domain, of a family of wavelets which arise from steering elongated Hermite-Gauss filters. These wavelets have interesting mathematical properties, as they form new dyadic families of eigenfunctions of the 2D Fourier transform, and

  4. Longitudinal domain wall formation in elongated assemblies of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varón, Miriam; Beleggia, Marco; Jordanovic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Through evaporation of dense colloids of ferromagnetic ~13 nm ε-Co particles onto carbon substrates, anisotropic magnetic dipolar interactions can support formation of elongated particle structures with aggregate thicknesses of 100-400 nm and lengths of up to some hundred microns. Lorenz microsco...

  5. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  6. On the measurement of elongational viscosity of polyethylene materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švrčinová, Petra; Kharlamov, Alexander; Filip, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-57 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Elongational viscosity * SER Universal * Testing Platform * LDPE Escorene Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. High recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis over the course of 12 months after oral metronidazole therapy and factors associated with recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catriona S; Morton, Anna N; Hocking, Jane; Garland, Suzanne M; Morris, Margaret B; Moss, Lorna M; Horvath, Leonie B; Kuzevska, Irene; Fairley, Christopher K

    2006-06-01

    We wished to determine recurrences of bacterial vaginosis (BV) after treatment over the course of 12 months and to establish factors associated with recurrence. Women with symptomatic BV (a Nugent score [NS] of 7-10 or of 4-6 with >or=3 Amsel criteria) were enrolled. BV was treated with 400 mg of oral metronidazole twice a day for 7 days. Participants completed a questionnaire and vaginal swabs were collected at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months; the study end point was an NS of 7-10. A total of 121 (87%) women with an NS of 7-10 and 18 (13%) with an NS of 4-6 and >or=3 Amsel criteria were enrolled; 130 (94%) returned >or=1 vaginal samples. Sixty-eight women (58% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 49%-66%]) had a recurrence of BV (NS 7-10), and 84 (69% [95% CI, 61%-77%]) had a recurrence of abnormal vaginal flora (NS 4-10) by 12 months. A past history of BV, a regular sex partner throughout the study, and female sex partners were significantly associated with recurrence of BV and abnormal vaginal flora by multivariate analysis; the use of hormonal contraception had a negative association with recurrence. Current recommended treatment is not preventing the recurrence of BV or abnormal vaginal flora in the majority of women; factors associated with recurrence support a possible role for sexual transmission in the pathogenesis of recurrent BV.

  8. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  9. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  10. Cycle inhibiting factors (CIFs are a growing family of functional cyclomodulins present in invertebrate and mammal bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Jubelin

    Full Text Available The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli was the first cyclomodulin to be identified that is injected into host cells via the type III secretion machinery. Cif provokes cytopathic effects characterized by G(1 and G(2 cell cycle arrests, accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs p21(waf1/cip1 and p27(kip1 and formation of actin stress fibres. The X-ray crystal structure of Cif revealed it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a conserved catalytic triad. Here we report the discovery and characterization of four Cif homologs encoded by different pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria isolated from vertebrates or invertebrates. Cif homologs from the enterobacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and the beta-proteobacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei all induce cytopathic effects identical to those observed with Cif from pathogenic E. coli. Although these Cif homologs are remarkably divergent in primary sequence, the catalytic triad is strictly conserved and was shown to be crucial for cell cycle arrest, cytoskeleton reorganization and CKIs accumulation. These results reveal that Cif proteins form a growing family of cyclomodulins in bacteria that interact with very distinct hosts including insects, nematodes and humans.

  11. Association of maternal-child characteristics as a factor in early childhood caries and salivary bacterial counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersin, Nazan Kocatas; Eronat, Nesrin; Cogulu, Dilsah; Uzel, Atac; Aksit, Sadik

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the caries-related microorganisms in saliva and the prevalence of Early childhood caries (ECC) in 15- to 35-month-old Turkish children and their associations with the characteristics of the mothers, socioeconomic criteria, and feeding habits of the children. Saliva samples of 101 children were studied to determine the numbers of Streptococcus mutans, lactobacilli, and Candida albicans. A questionnaire regarding the characteristics of the mothers, socioeconomic criteria, and feeding habits of the children was carried out before the dental examinations of the mother-child pairs. The regression analyses revealed DMFS scores of the mothers as an impact factor for the children's caries experience. The prolonged usage of feeding bottle with sweetened milk, pacifier use, and maternal sharing were strongly associated with the colonization of S. mutans, lactobacilli, and C. albicans, respectively. A significant correlation was also found between maternal education and S. mutans. Data indicated that the mother's DMFS scores, education, and feeding habits were strong risk indicators for the colonization of caries-related micro-organisms and ECC.

  12. Ecological factors characterizing the prevalence of bacterial tick-borne pathogens in Ixodes ricinus ticks in pastures and woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halos, Lénaïg; Bord, Séverine; Cotté, Violaine; Gasqui, Patrick; Abrial, David; Barnouin, Jacques; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2010-07-01

    Ecological changes are recognized as an important driver behind the emergence of infectious diseases. The prevalence of infection in ticks depends upon ecological factors that are rarely taken into account simultaneously. Our objective was to investigate the influences of forest fragmentation, vegetation, adult tick hosts, and habitat on the infection prevalence of three tick-borne bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Rickettsia sp. of the spotted fever group, in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks, taking into account tick characteristics. Samples of questing nymphs and adults were taken from 61 pastures and neighboring woodlands in central France. The ticks were tested by PCR of pools of nymphs and individual adults. The individual infection prevalence was modeled using multivariate regression. The highest infection prevalences were found in adult females collected in woodland sites for B. burgdorferi sensu lato and A. phagocytophilum (16.1% and 10.7%, respectively) and in pasture sites for Rickettsia sp. (8.7%). The infection prevalence in nymphs was lower than 6%. B. burgdorferi sensu lato was more prevalent in woodlands than in pastures. Forest fragmentation favored B. burgdorferi sensu lato and A. phagocytophilum prevalence in woodlands, and in pastures, the B. burgdorferi sensu lato prevalence was favored by shrubby vegetation. Both results are probably because large amounts of edges or shrubs increase the abundance of small vertebrates as reservoir hosts. The Rickettsia sp. prevalence was maximal on pasture with medium forest fragmentation. Female ticks were more infected by B. burgdorferi sensu lato than males and nymphs in woodland sites, which suggests an interaction between the ticks and the bacteria. This study confirms the complexity of the tick-borne pathogen ecology. The findings support the importance of small vertebrates as reservoir hosts and make a case for further studies in Europe on the link between the

  13. Sample Dilution and Bacterial Community Composition Influence Empirical Leucine-to-Carbon Conversion Factors in Surface Waters of the World's Oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Teira, Eva

    2015-09-25

    The transformation of leucine incorporation rates to prokaryotic carbon production rates requires the use of either theoretical or empirically determined conversion factors. Empirical leucine-to-carbon conversion factors (eCFs) vary widely across environments, and little is known about their potential controlling factors. We conducted 10 surface seawater manipulation experiments across the world\\'s oceans, where the growth of the natural prokaryotic assemblages was promoted by filtration (i.e., removal of grazers [F treatment]) or filtration combined with dilution (i.e., also relieving resource competition [FD treatment]). The impact of sunlight exposure was also evaluated in the FD treatments, and we did not find a significant effect on the eCFs. The eCFs varied from 0.09 to 1.47 kg C mol Leu−1 and were significantly lower in the FD than in the F samples. Also, changes in bacterial community composition during the incubations, as assessed by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), were more pronounced in the FD than in the F treatments, compared to unmanipulated controls. Thus, we discourage the common procedure of diluting samples (in addition to filtration) for eCF determination. The eCFs in the filtered treatment were negatively correlated with the initial chlorophyll a concentration, picocyanobacterial abundance (mostly Prochlorococcus), and the percentage of heterotrophic prokaryotes with high nucleic acid content (%HNA). The latter two variables explained 80% of the eCF variability in the F treatment, supporting the view that both Prochlorococcus and HNA prokaryotes incorporate leucine in substantial amounts, although this results in relatively low carbon production rates in the oligotrophic ocean.

  14. Bacterial reproductive pathogens of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth M; Taylor, David J

    2012-05-01

    With the notable exception of Brucella canis, exogenous bacterial pathogens are uncommon causes of reproductive disease in cats and dogs. Most bacterial reproductive infections are endogenous, and predisposing factors for infection are important. This article reviews the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and public health significance of bacterial reproductive pathogens in cats and dogs.

  15. Bacterial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to the enzyme an interfacial area. As a consequence, the kinetics of a lipase rea...

  16. Transition zone cells reach G2 phase before initiating elongation in maize root apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Victoria Alarcón

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root elongation requires cell divisions in the meristematic zone and cell elongation in the elongation zone. The boundary between dividing and elongating cells is called the transition zone. In the meristem zone, initial cells are continuously dividing, but on the basal side of the meristem cells exit the meristem through the transition zone and enter in the elongation zone, where they stop division and rapidly elongate. Throughout this journey cells are accompanied by changes in cell cycle progression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that meristematic cells are in cycle, but exit when they enter the elongation zone. In addition, the percentage of cells in G2 phase (4C strongly increased from the meristem to the elongation zone. However, we did not observe remarkable changes in the percentage of cells in cell cycle phases along the entire elongation zone. These results suggest that meristematic cells in maize root apex stop the cell cycle in G2 phase after leaving the meristem.

  17. A transcript cleavage factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis important for its survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab China

    Full Text Available After initiation of transcription, a number of proteins participate during elongation and termination modifying the properties of the RNA polymerase (RNAP. Gre factors are one such group conserved across bacteria. They regulate transcription by projecting their N-terminal coiled-coil domain into the active center of RNAP through the secondary channel and stimulating hydrolysis of the newly synthesized RNA in backtracked elongation complexes. Rv1080c is a putative gre factor (MtbGre in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protein enhanced the efficiency of promoter clearance by lowering abortive transcription and also rescued arrested and paused elongation complexes on the GC rich mycobacterial template. Although MtbGre is similar in domain organization and shares key residues for catalysis and RNAP interaction with the Gre factors of Escherichia coli, it could not complement an E. coli gre deficient strain. Moreover, MtbGre failed to rescue E. coli RNAP stalled elongation complexes, indicating the importance of specific protein-protein interactions for transcript cleavage. Decrease in the level of MtbGre reduced the bacterial survival by several fold indicating its essential role in mycobacteria. Another Gre homolog, Rv3788 was not functional in transcript cleavage activity indicating that a single Gre is sufficient for efficient transcription of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  18. Functional role of pyruvate kinase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus in acid tolerance and identification of its transcription factor by bacterial one-hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhengyuan; An, Haoran; Wang, Guohong; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2015-11-19

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus develops acid tolerance response when subjected to acid stress conditions, such as the induction of enzymes associated with carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, pyk gene encoding pyruvate kinase was over-expressed in heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the successful expression of this gene in NZ9000. The survival rate of Pyk-overproducing strain was 45-fold higher than the control under acid stress condition (pH 4.0). In order to determine the transcription factor (TF) which regulates the expression of pyk by bacterial one-hybrid, we constructed a TF library including 65 TFs of L. bulgaricus. Western blotting indicated that TFs in this library could be successfully expressed in host strains. Subsequently, the promoter of pfk-pyk operon in L. bulgaricus was identified by 5'-RACE PCR. The bait plasmid pH3U3-p01 carrying the deletion fragment of pfk-pyk promoter captured catabolite control protein A (CcpA) which could regulate the expression of pyk by binding to a putative catabolite-responsive element (5'-TGTAAGCCCTAACA-3') upstream the -35 region. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed the transcription of pyk was positively regulated by CcpA. This is the first report about identifying the TF of pyk in L. bulgaricus, which will provide new insight into the regulatory network.

  19. Functions of fasciculation and elongation protein zeta-1 (FEZ1) in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés D; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2010-08-17

    Fasciculation and elongation protein zeta-1 (FEZ1) is a mammalian ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-76 protein that possesses four coiled-coil domains and a nuclear localization signal. It is mainly expressed in the brain. Suppression of FEZ1 expression in cultured embryonic neurons causes deficiency of neuronal differentiation. Recently, proteomic techniques revealed that FEZ1 interacts with various intracellular partners, such as signaling, motor, and structural proteins. FEZ1 was shown to act as an antiviral factor. The findings reported so far indicate that FEZ1 is associated with neuronal development, neuropathologies, and viral infection. Based on these accumulating evidences, we herein review the biological functions of FEZ1.

  20. Research on the processing technology of elongated holes based on rotary ultrasonic drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yi; Chen, Jianhua; Sun, Lipeng; Yu, Xin; Wang, Xin

    2014-08-01

    The optical glass is hard, brittle and difficult to process. Based on the method of rotating ultrasonic drilling, the study of single factor on drilling elongated holes was made in optical glass. The processing equipment was DAMA ultrasonic machine, and the machining tools were electroplated with diamond. Through the detection and analysis on the processing quality and surface roughness, the process parameters (the spindle speed, amplitude, feed rate) of rotary ultrasonic drilling were researched, and the influence of processing parameters on surface roughness was obtained, which will provide reference and basis for the actual processing.

  1. Cladding axial elongation models for FRAP-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.; Berna, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the cladding axial elongation models developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for use by the FRAP-T6 computer code in analyzing the response of fuel rods during reactor transients in light water reactors (LWR). The FRAP-T6 code contains models (FRACAS-II subcode) that analyze the structural response of a fuel rod including pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). Recently, four models were incorporated into FRACAS-II to calculate cladding axial deformation: (a) axial PCMI, (b) trapped fuel stack, (c) fuel relocation, and (d) effective fuel thermal expansion. Comparisons of cladding axial elongation measurements from two experiments with the corresponding FRAP-T6 calculations are presented

  2. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Reyes, M.; Lopez-Sandoval, R.; Arenas-Alatorre, J.; Garibay-Alonso, R.; Carroll, D.L.; Lastras-Martinez, A.

    2007-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam

  3. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)], E-mail: reyesm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garibay-Alonso, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 (United States); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-11-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam.

  4. The Many Faces of Elongator in Neurodevelopment and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kojic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system requires a variety of cellular activities, such as proliferation, migration, axonal outgrowth and guidance and synapse formation during the differentiation of neural precursors into mature neurons. Malfunction of these highly regulated and coordinated events results in various neurological diseases. The Elongator complex is a multi-subunit complex highly conserved in eukaryotes whose function has been implicated in the majority of cellular activities underlying neurodevelopment. These activities include cell motility, actin cytoskeleton organization, exocytosis, polarized secretion, intracellular trafficking, and the maintenance of neural function. Several studies have associated mutations in Elongator subunits with the neurological disorders familial dysautonomia, intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and rolandic epilepsy. Here, we review the various cellular activities assigned to this complex and discuss the implications for neural development and disease. Further research in this area has the potential to generate new diagnostic tools, better prevention strategies and more effective treatment options for a wide variety of neurological disorders.

  5. TERRA promotes telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Martin; Wischnewski, Harry; Bah, Amadou; Hu, Yan; Liu, Na; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; King, Megan C; Azzalin, Claus M

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase-mediated telomere elongation provides cell populations with the ability to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase is capable of recognizing and extending the shortest telomeres in cells; nevertheless, how this mechanism is executed remains unclear. Here, we show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, shortened telomeres are highly transcribed into the evolutionarily conserved long noncoding RNA TERRA A fraction of TERRA produced upon telomere shortening is polyadenylated and largely devoid of telomeric repeats, and furthermore, telomerase physically interacts with this polyadenylated TERRA in vivo We also show that experimentally enhanced transcription of a manipulated telomere promotes its association with telomerase and concomitant elongation. Our data represent the first direct evidence that TERRA stimulates telomerase recruitment and activity at chromosome ends in an organism with human-like telomeres. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. Risk factors for surgical site infection following laparotomy: Effect of season and perioperative variables and reporting of bacterial isolates in 287 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgren, C M; Salem, S E; Archer, D C; Worsman, F C F; Townsend, N B

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important cause of post operative morbidity following laparotomy. To investigate risk factors for SSI, including effect of season and surgery performed outside normal working hours, and to report bacterial isolates and antimicrobial resistance patterns. Retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from horses that had undergone exploratory laparotomy over a 3-year period (2010-2013) in a UK hospital population. SSI was defined as any purulent or serous discharge from the laparotomy incision of >24 h duration that developed during hospitalisation. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify associations between pre-, intra- and post operative variables and altered likelihood of SSI. Surgical site infection developed in 73/287 (25.4%) horses during hospitalisation. Horses of greater bodyweight (odds ratio [OR] 1.002, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0002-1.005, P = 0.03), increased packed cell volume (≥48%) on admission (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.32-6.94, P = 0.01), small intestinal resection (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.15-4.46, P = 0.02) and post operative colic (OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.41-5.79, P = 0.003) were significantly associated with increased likelihood of SSI in a multivariable model. SSI was also significantly more likely to occur during winter (OR 3.84, 95% CI 1.38-10.70, P = 0.01) and summer (OR 5.63, 95% CI 2.07-15.3, P = 0.001) months in the model. Three-layer closure of the incision was protective (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.16-0.58, P<0.001) compared to 2-layer closure. There was no effect of surgery being performed outside normal working hours (P = 0.5). The most common bacterial isolates were Escherichia coli (59.5%), Enterococcus spp. (42.4%) and Staphylococcus spp. (25.4%). Penicillin resistant isolates accounted for 92% (96/104) of isolates while 18% (21/119) of isolates were gentamicin resistant. Laparotomy during winter and summer months was associated with increased likelihood of SSI but there was no effect of surgery

  7. Neuroprotective copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato complexes promote neurite elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bica

    Full Text Available Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato-copper complex, Cu(II(gtsm on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that Cu(II(gtsm induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato complex, Cu(II(atsm, but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by Cu(II(gtsm was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75-99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM Cu(II(gtsm treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that Cu(II(gtsm inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM Cu(II(gtsm, suggesting a potential link between Cu(II(gtsm-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes.

  8. IAA-glucopyranoside stimulation of corn coleoptiles elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Szmidt-Jaworska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously suggested that 1-O-IAGIuc growth stimulation occurs as the effect of its hydrolysis into a free IAA. In present experiments castanospermine, a known β-glucosidase inhibitor, was included. 1-O-IAGluc in the presence of castanospermine stimulated growth of corn coleoptiles segments even stronger then free IAA. So, it seems that 1-O-IAGluc itself, is responsible for the observed stimulation of corn coleoptile segments elongation.

  9. Polymer film strain gauges for measuring large elongations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratov, A. P.; Zueva, A. M.; Varakin, R. S.; Taranec, I. P.; Savenkova, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    The paper shows the possibility to print polymer strain gages, microstrip lines, coplanar waveguides, and other prints for avionics using printing technology and equipment. The methods of screen and inkjet printing have been complemented by three new operations of preparing print films for application of an electrically conductive ink layer. Such additional operations make it possible to enhance the conductive ink layer adhesion to the film and to manufacture strain gages for measuring large elongations.

  10. Significant enhancement by biochar of caproate production via chain elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming; Zhang, Hua; Lü, Fan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, biochar was introduced into a chain elongation system to enhance the bioproduction of caproate and caprylate. The concentration of caproate increased to 21.1 g/L upon the addition of biochar, which is the highest level of caproate reported for such a system to date when ethanol was used as electron donor. The addition of biochar created a tougher system with more stable microorganism community structure for chain elongation, in which no obvious inhibition by products or substrates was observed, moreover, the lag phase was reduced 2.3-fold compared to the system without biochar. These reinforcement effect of biochar are attributed to the enhanced conductivity due to the significant enrichment of functional microorganisms via the microbial network surrounding smaller biochar particles, and via the adsorption on the rough surfaces or pores of larger particles, which facilitated electron transfer. Higher amounts of extracellular polymer substances and higher conductivity induced by biochar could contribute to the reinforcement effect in chain elongation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of cracking potential and micro-elongation of linerboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supattra Panthai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Folding cracks of linerboards in relation to their micro-elongation and the forming conditions were studied using an industrial linerboard machine with a top former. The experiments consisted of the study of various forming conditions by manipulating the jet/wire speed ratio to produce linerboard with differences in fiber structures that were related to the cracked and uncracked products. The results showed that changes to the jet/wire speed ratio of about 0.01–0.02 to improve the tested folding endurance in the machine direction potentially produced folding cracks in the linerboard, which indicated an ambiguous interpretation of the foldability tests. The delaminated cracked layers were found to have a high folding endurance and tensile strength, while the decrease in the micro-elongation formulated in this study was found to be related to cracking. A lower micro-elongation of about 350–500 μm/N·g was found in a range of products with folding cracks.

  12. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Vvlcc3, a Novel and Functional Laccase Gene Possibly Involved in Stipe Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanping Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volvariella volvacea, usually harvested in its egg stage, is one of the most popular mushrooms in Asia. The rapid transition from the egg stage to elongation stage, during which the stipe stretches to almost full length leads to the opening of the cap and rupture of the universal veil, and is considered to be one of the main factors that negatively impacts the yield and value of V. volvacea. Stipe elongation is a common phenomenon in mushrooms; however, the mechanisms, genes and regulation involved in stipe elongation are still poorly understood. In order to study the genes related to the stipe elongation, we analyzed the transcription of laccase genes in stipe tissue of V. volvacea, as some laccases have been suggested to be involved in stipe elongation in Flammulina velutipes. Based on transcription patterns, the expression of Vvlcc3 was found to be the highest among the 11 laccase genes. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 has a high degree of identity with other basidiomycete laccases. Therefore, we selected and cloned a laccase gene, named Vvlcc3, a cDNA from V. volvacea, and expressed the cDNA in Pichia pastoris. The presence of the laccase signature L1-L4 on the deduced protein sequence indicates that the gene encodes a laccase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 clusters with Coprinopsis cinerea laccases. The ability to catalyze ABTS (2,2’-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid oxidation proved that the product of the Vvlcc3 gene was a functional laccase. We also found that the expression of the Vvlcc3 gene in V. volvacea increased during button stage to the elongation stage; it reached its peak in the elongation stage, and then decreased in the maturation stage, which was similar to the trend in the expression of Fv-lac3 and Fv-lac5 in F. velutipes stipe tissue. The similar trend in expression level of these laccase genes of F. velutipes suggested that this gene could be involved in stipe elongation in V

  13. The enteropathogenic E. coli effector EspH promotes actin pedestal formation and elongation via WASP-interacting protein (WIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexander R C; Raymond, Benoit; Collins, James W; Crepin, Valerie F; Frankel, Gad

    2012-07-01

    Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) are diarrheagenic pathogens that colonize the gut mucosa via attaching-and-effacing lesion formation. EPEC and EHEC utilize a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins that subvert host cell signalling to sustain colonization and multiplication. EspH, a T3SS effector that modulates actin dynamics, was implicated in the elongation of the EHEC actin pedestals. In this study we found that EspH is necessary for both efficient pedestal formation and pedestal elongation during EPEC infection. We report that EspH induces actin polymerization at the bacterial attachment sites independently of the Tir tyrosine residues Y474 and Y454, which are implicated in binding Nck and IRSp53/ITRKS respectively. Moreover, EspH promotes recruitment of neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the Arp2/3 complex to the bacterial attachment site, in a mechanism involving the C-terminus of Tir and the WH1 domain of N-WASP. Dominant negative of WASP-interacting protein (WIP), which binds the N-WASP WH1 domain, diminished EspH-mediated actin polymerization. This study implicates WIP in EPEC-mediated actin polymerization and pedestal elongation and represents the first instance whereby N-WASP is efficiently recruited to the EPEC attachment sites independently of the Tir:Nck and Tir:IRTKS/IRSp53 pathways. Our study reveals the intricacies of Tir and EspH-mediated actin signalling pathways that comprise of distinct, convergent and synergistic signalling cascades. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...... movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating...

  15. Bacterial meningitis in Nottingham.

    OpenAIRE

    Ispahani, P.

    1983-01-01

    Records of 171 cases of bacterial meningitis admitted to Nottingham hospitals from January 1974 to June 1980 were reviewed. The distribution of organisms producing meningitis and the factors influencing mortality in different age groups were assessed. Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 69% of all proven cases. The overall mortality was 26% being lowest in patients with meningococcal meningitis (0%) and highest in those with pneumococcal m...

  16. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Relative Mesothelioma Potencies for Unregulated Respirable Elongated Mineral and Synthetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    For decades uncertainties and contradictions have surrounded the issue of whether exposures to respirable elongated mineral and synthetic particles (REMPs and RESPs) present health risks such as those recognized for exposures to elongated asbestiform mineral particles from the fi...

  18. Characteristics of elongated and ruptured anterior cruciate ligament grafts: An analysis of 21 consecutive revision cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Iio

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The location of the original femoral tunnel was more proximal in patients with elongated grafts than in those with ruptured grafts. Different bone tunnel position from native ACL might lead to graft elongation.

  19. Higher atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (a-EPEC) bacterial loads in children with diarrhea are associated with PCR detection of the EHEC factor for adherence 1/lymphocyte inhibitory factor A (efa1/lifa) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinger, Robert; Lau, Kimberley; Slinger, Michael; Moldovan, Ioana; Chan, Francis

    2017-03-23

    Typical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (t-EPEC) are known to cause diarrhea in children but it is uncertain whether atypical EPEC (a-EPEC) do, since a-EPEC lack the bundle-forming pilus (bfp) gene that encodes a key adherence factor in t-EPEC. In culture-based studies of a-EPEC, the presence of another adherence factor, called EHEC factor for adherence/lymphocyte activation inhibitor (efa1/lifA), was strongly associated with diarrhea. Since a-EPEC culture is not feasible in clinical laboratories, we designed an efa1/lifA quantitative PCR assay and examined whether the presence of efa1/lifA was associated with higher a-EPEC bacterial loads in pediatric diarrheal stool samples. Fecal samples from children with diarrhea were tested by qPCR for EPEC (presence of eae gene) and for shiga toxin genes to exclude enterohemorrhagic E. coli, which also contain the eae gene. EPEC containing samples were then tested for the bundle-forming pilus gene found in t-EPEC and efa1/lifA. The eae gene quantity in efa1/lifA-positive and negative samples was compared. Thirty-nine of 320 (12%) fecal samples tested positive for EPEC and 38/39 (97%) contained a-EPEC. The efa1/lifA gene was detected in 16/38 (42%) a-EPEC samples. The median eae concentration for efa1/lifA positive samples was significantly higher than for efa1/lifA negative samples (median 16,745 vs. 1183 copies/µL, respectively, p = 0.006). Atypical enteropathogenic E. coli-positive diarrheal stool samples containing the efa1/lifA gene had significantly higher bacterial loads than samples lacking this gene. This supports the idea that efa1/lifA contributes to diarrheal pathogenesis and suggests that, in EPEC-positive samples, efa/lifA may be a useful additional molecular biomarker.

  20. Effect of hip and knee position on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching: An ultrasonic shear wave elastography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Ikezoe, Tome; Nishishita, Satoru; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-12-01

    Decreased flexibility of the tensor fasciae latae is one factor that causes iliotibial band syndrome. Stretching has been used to improve flexibility or tightness of the muscle. However, no studies have investigated the effective stretching position for the tensor fasciae latae using an index to quantify muscle elongation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hip rotation and knee angle on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty healthy men participated in this study. The shear elastic modulus of the tensor fasciae latae was calculated using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Stretching was performed at maximal hip adduction and maximal hip extension in 12 different positions with three hip rotation conditions (neutral, internal, and external rotations) and four knee angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°). Two-way analysis of variance showed a significant main effect for knee angle, but not for hip rotation. The post-hoc test for knee angle indicated that the shear elastic modulus at 90° and 135° were significantly greater than those at 0° and 45°. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation to the stretching position with hip adduction and extension may have less effect on tensor fasciae latae elongation, and that stretching at >90° of knee flexion may effectively elongate the tensor fasciae latae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Jasmonate inhibits COP1 activity to suppress hypocotyl elongation and promote cotyledon opening in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuyu; Cui, Xuefei; Su, Liang; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Gong, Qingqiu; Yang, Jianping; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2017-06-01

    A germinating seedling undergoes skotomorphogenesis to emerge from the soil and reach for light. During this phase, the cotyledons are closed, and the hypocotyl elongates. Upon exposure to light, the seedling rapidly switches to photomorphogenesis by opening its cotyledons and suppressing hypocotyl elongation. The E3 ubiquitin ligase CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) is critical for maintaining skotomorphogenesis. Here, we report that jasmonate (JA) suppresses hypocotyl elongation and stimulates cotyledon opening in etiolated seedlings, partially phenocopying cop1 mutants in the dark. We also find that JA stabilizes several COP1-targeted transcription factors in a COP1-dependent manner. RNA-seq analysis further defines a JA-light co-modulated and cop1-dependent transcriptome, which is enriched for auxin-responsive genes and genes participating in cell wall modification. JA suppresses COP1 activity through at least two distinct mechanisms: decreasing COP1 protein accumulation in the nucleus; and reducing the physical interaction between COP1 and its activator, SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A-105 1 (SPA1). Our work reveals that JA suppresses COP1 activity to stabilize COP1 targets, thereby inhibiting hypocotyl elongation and stimulating cotyledon unfolding in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Is the glass half full or half empty? How to reverse the effect of glass elongation on the volume poured.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R Caljouw

    Full Text Available To reduce the volume of drinks and the risk of overconsumption, health professionals recommend the use of tall skinny instead of short wide glasses. Yet the results of the present study contradict this health advice. Participants who generously filled up a glass with lemonade served 9% more in tall narrow compared with short wide glasses (p<0.05. In addition, when pouring a small amount (i.e., a shot, participants poured 3% more in a short wide than in a tall narrow glass (p<0.05. Elongation may bias the perceived volume that is poured but also the perceived volume of the free space in the glass. We hypothesised that shifting attention from the bottom to the brim of the glass when filling it close to capacity might reverse the glass elongation effect on the quantity poured. This hypothesis was tested, by investigating two pouring tasks that differed in the required focus of attention. When the instruction was to match a reference volume, participants poured more liquid in the short wide compared with the tall narrow glass (p<0.05. The effect of glass elongation on poured volume was the opposite when the instruction was to leave space in the glasses for the reference volume. It seems likely that task and individual factors affect the pourer's viewing strategy and thus may determine the direction of the glass elongation effect on the volume poured.

  3. Function of an anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) isoform isolated from the hemocytes of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii in protecting against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Chung, Chien-Pang; Lin, Chang-Yi; Sung, Hung-Hung

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a 780-bp full-length cDNA encoding Macrobrachium rosenbergii anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (MrALF) from hemocytes was cloned and identified. The ALF isoform exhibited immune activities, and its concentration in hemolymph was determined. An in vivo expression study showed that the ALF mRNA level of hemocytes could be induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in an exposure time-dependent manner. Purified recombinant MrALF (rMrALF) expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris SMD1168 eukaryotic protein expression system demonstrated antibacterial activity against the Gram-negative prawn pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)=0.806μM, minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)=1.606μM) but not the Gram-positive pathogen Lactococcus garvieae exposed to 25.696μM of rALF. However, rMrALF can bind to Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. An in vivo expression study demonstrated that the ALF concentrations in prawn hemocytes and plasma were 0.176μM and 0.168μM, respectively; following LPS treatment for 6h, the corresponding concentrations were 0.133μM in hemocytes and 0.272μM in plasma. Furthermore, the percentage of hemocytes phagocytosing bacteria cells was higher in hemoyctes previously treated with MrALF than those treated with sterile medium. These results suggest that in the innate immune response of M. rosenbergii, the MrALF from hemocytes may play an opsonin during a bacterial invasion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Arabidopsis ATAF1, a NAC transcription factor, is a negative regulator of defense responses against necrotrophic fungal and bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao'e; Basnayake, B M Vindhya S; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Virk, Nasar; Mengiste, Tesfaye; Song, Fengming

    2009-10-01

    Transcription factors of the NAC family are known to be involved in various growth or developmental processes and in regulation of response to environmental stresses. In the present study, we report that Arabidopsis ATAF1 is a negative regulator of defense responses against both necrotrophic fungal and bacterial pathogens. Expression of ATAF1 was downregulated after infection with Botrytis cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato or after treatment with salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid, and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (the precursor of ethylene biosynthesis). Transgenic plants that overexpress the ATAF1 gene (ATAF1-OE) showed increased susceptibility while expression of an ATAF1 chimeric repressor construct (ATAF1-SRDX) exhibited enhanced resistance to P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, B. cinerea, and Alternaria brassicicola. The ataf1 mutant plants showed no significant resistance against the pathogens tested. After inoculation with B. cinerea or P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, expressions of defense-related genes PR-1, PR-5. and PDF1.2 were upregulated in the ATAF1-SRDX plants but attenuated or unchanged in the ATAF1-OE plants. In ATAF1-OE plants, SA-induced expression of pathogenesis-related genes and disease resistance against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 was partially suppressed. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (i.e., H(2)O(2) and superoxide anion) accumulated only in the ATAF1-OE but not in the ATAF1-SRDX plants after Botrytis spp. infection. Our studies provide direct genetic evidence for the role of ATAF1 as a negative regulator of defense response against different type of pathogens.

  5. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehara Tadamichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. Results We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2–12 h, P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24–36 h the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. Conclusion The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  6. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnowey, Sonya; Ansai, Toshihiro; Bitko, Vira; Nakayama, Koji; Takehara, Tadamichi; Barik, Sailen

    2006-03-08

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2-12 h), P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24-36 h) the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp) suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  7. Gibberellin-Regulation and Genetic Variations in Leaf Elongation for Tall Fescue in Association with Differential Gene Expression Controlling Cell Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Krishnan, Sanalkumar; Merewitz, Emily; Xu, Jichen; Huang, Bingru

    2016-07-26

    Leaf elongation rate (LER) is an important factor controlling plant growth and productivity. The objective of this study was to determine whether genetic variation in LER for a fast-growing ('K-31'), and a dwarf cultivar ('Bonsai') of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and gibberellic acid (GA) regulation of LER were associated with differential expression of cell-expansion genes. Plants were treated with GA3, trinexapac-ethyl (TE) (GA inhibitor), or water (untreated control) in a hydroponic system. LER of 'K-31' was 63% greater than that of 'Bonsai', which corresponded with 32% higher endogenous GA4 content in leaf and greater cell elongation and production rates under the untreated control condition. Exogenous application of GA3 significantly enhanced LER while TE treatment inhibited leaf elongation due to GA3-stimulation or TE-inhibition of cell elongation and production rate in leaves for both cultivars. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that three α-expansins, one β-expansin, and three xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) genes were associated with GA-stimulation of leaf elongation, of which, the differential expression of EXPA4 and EXPA7 was related to the genotypic variation in LER of two cultivars. Those differentially-expressed expansin and XET genes could play major roles in genetic variation and GA-regulated leaf elongation in tall fescue.

  8. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates. PMID:26627254

  9. Targeting Transcription Elongation Machinery for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    determined in vitro and in vivo. Cell lines used: MCF10A progression model ( MCF10A , M-II and M-IV cells), all in hand. Mouse strain used: 5-week old...breast cancer cells. 6-30 H. Lu (Zhou) 7 Cell lines used: MCF10A , M-II and M-IV. Subtask 2: Determine the molecular basis underlying high sensitivity...of EMT and metastasis-related genes to control at the transcription elongation stage. Cell lines used: MCF10A , M-II and M-IV. 12-36 H. Lu (Zhou

  10. Time Dependent and Steady Uni-axial Elongational Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens K.; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Here we present measurements of transient and steady uni-axial elongational viscosity, using the Filament Stretching Rheometer1 or FSR1 (see Fig. 1) of the following melts: Four narrow MMD polystyrene (PS) samples with weight-average molar mass Mw in the range of 50k to 390k. Three different bi......-disperse samples, mixed from the narrow MMD PS. Two low-density polyethylene (LDPE) melts (Lupolen 1840D and 3020D). A steady-state viscosity was kept for 1-2.5 Hencky strain units in all measurements....

  11. Controlled laser production of elongated articles from particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Lewis, Gary K.; Milewski, John O.

    2002-01-01

    It has been discovered that wires and small diameter rods can be produced using laser deposition technology in a novel way. An elongated article such as a wire or rod is constructed by melting and depositing particulate material into a deposition zone which has been designed to yield the desired article shape and dimensions. The article is withdrawn from the deposition zone as it is formed, thus enabling formation of the article in a continuous process. Alternatively, the deposition zone is moved along any of numerous deposition paths away from the article being formed.

  12. Urinary pathogenic bacterial profile, antibiogram of isolates and associated risk factors among pregnant women in Ambo town, Central Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonas Alem Gessese

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is a well-known bacterial infection posing serious health problem in pregnant women. A study was conducted in pregnant women with the objectives of estimating prevalence of UTI, determining antibiogram of the bacterial isolates and assessment of the potential risk factors associated with UTI. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used to collect 300 mid-stream urine samples from pregnant women from March 2016 to December, 2016. Samples were inoculated into Cysteine Lactose Electrolyte Deficient medium (CLED. Colonies from CLED were subcultured onto MacConkey and Blood agar plates. A standard agar disc diffusion method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Chi-square (X 2 test & logistic regression were used to show associations between UTI and explanatory variables & identify the predictors of UTI, respectively. Results The age of pregnant women enrolled in this study ranges from 16 to 46 years (mean ± standard deviation = 25 ± 4.7 years.The overall prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 18.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.4–23.54%.The prevalence of symptomatic and asymptomatic UTI was 20.4% (95% CI: 13.09–29.46% and 17.8% (95% CI: 12.70–23.83% respectively. The predominant bacteria identified were E. coli (46.4%, S. aureus (14.3%, coagulase negative Staphylococci [CoNS] (14.3% and Proteus species (10.6%. Majority of Gram-negative bacteria isolates were resistant to ampicillin (70%, ceftriaxon (66%, gentamicin (68% and nitrofurantoin (64% while 75–100% of the Gram positive isolates were resistance to ampicillin. Multiple drug resistance was observed in all of the isolates. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that the odds of acquiring UTI was 4.78 times higher in pregnant women earning monthly income of ≤500 Ethiopian Birr (21.18 USD as compared to those earning monthly income >2001 Ethiopian Birr [84.79 USD] (P = 0.046. Similarly, the

  13. Cryptochrome 1 interacts with PIF4 to regulate high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation in response to blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dingbang; Li, Xu; Guo, Yongxia; Chu, Jingfang; Fang, Shuang; Yan, Cunyu; Noel, Joseph P; Liu, Hongtao

    2016-01-05

    Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) is a blue light receptor that mediates primarily blue-light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Very little is known of the mechanisms by which CRY1 affects growth. Blue light and temperature are two key environmental signals that profoundly affect plant growth and development, but how these two abiotic factors integrate remains largely unknown. Here, we show that blue light represses high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation via CRY1. Furthermore, CRY1 interacts directly with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) in a blue light-dependent manner to repress the transcription activity of PIF4. CRY1 represses auxin biosynthesis in response to elevated temperature through PIF4. Our results indicate that CRY1 signal by modulating PIF4 activity, and that multiple plant photoreceptors [CRY1 and PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB)] and ambient temperature can mediate morphological responses through the same signaling component-PIF4.

  14. Cryptochrome 1 interacts with PIF4 to regulate high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation in response to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dingbang; Li, Xu; Guo, Yongxia; Chu, Jingfang; Fang, Shuang; Yan, Cunyu; Noel, Joseph P.; Liu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) is a blue light receptor that mediates primarily blue-light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Very little is known of the mechanisms by which CRY1 affects growth. Blue light and temperature are two key environmental signals that profoundly affect plant growth and development, but how these two abiotic factors integrate remains largely unknown. Here, we show that blue light represses high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation via CRY1. Furthermore, CRY1 interacts directly with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) in a blue light-dependent manner to repress the transcription activity of PIF4. CRY1 represses auxin biosynthesis in response to elevated temperature through PIF4. Our results indicate that CRY1 signal by modulating PIF4 activity, and that multiple plant photoreceptors [CRY1 and PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB)] and ambient temperature can mediate morphological responses through the same signaling component—PIF4. PMID:26699514

  15. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, Shahid B.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-01-01

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for 103 Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r,θ), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r 103 Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r,θ) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r,θ) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the linear interpolation technique. The results of these investigations indicate that the TG-43U1 formalism can be extended for elongated brachytherapy sources, if the two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy function is tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 cm, L/2, and L/2±0.2 cm. Moreover, with the addition of recommended radial distances for 2D anisotropy functions, the linear interpolation technique more closely replicates

  16. Modeling cell elongation during germ band retraction: cell autonomy versus applied anisotropic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Holley E; Shane Hutson, M; Veldhuis, Jim; Wayne Brodland, G

    2014-01-01

    The morphogenetic process of germ band retraction in Drosophila embryos involves coordinated movements of two epithelial tissues—germ band and amnioserosa. The germ band shortens along its rostral–caudal or head-to-tail axis, widens along its perpendicular dorsal-ventral axis, and uncurls from an initial ‘U’ shape. The amnioserosa mechanically assists this process by pulling on the crook of the U-shaped germ band. The amnioserosa may also provide biochemical signals that drive germ band cells to change shape in a mechanically autonomous fashion. Here, we use a finite-element model to investigate how these two contributions reshape the germ band. We do so by modeling the response to laser-induced wounds in each of the germ band’s spatially distinct segments (T1–T3, A1–A9) during the middle of retraction when segments T1–A3 form the ventral arm of the ‘U’, A4–A7 form its crook, and A8–A9 complete the dorsal arm. We explore these responses under a range of externally applied stresses and internal anisotropy of cell edge tensions—akin to a planar cell polarity that can drive elongation of cells in a direction parallel to the minimum edge tension—and identify regions of parameter space (edge-tension anisotropy versus stress anisotropy) that best match previous experiments for each germ band segment. All but three germ band segments are best fit when the applied stress anisotropy and the edge-tension anisotropy work against one another—i.e., when the isolated effects would elongate cells in perpendicular directions. Segments in the crook of the germ band (A4–A7) have cells that elongate in the direction of maximum external stress, i.e., external stress anisotropy is dominant. In most other segments, the dominant factor is internal edge-tension anisotropy. These results are consistent with models in which the amnioserosa pulls on the crook of the germ band to mechanically assist retraction. In addition, they suggest a mechanical cue for

  17. Application of an Elongated Kelvin Model to Space Shuttle Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle foams are rigid closed-cell polyurethane foams. The two foams used most-extensively oil space shuttle external tank are BX-265 and NCFL4-124. Because of the foaming and rising process, the foam microstructures are elongated in the rise direction. As a result, these two foams exhibit a nonisotropic mechanical behavior. A detailed microstructural characterization of the two foams is presented. Key features of the foam cells are described and the average cell dimensions in the two foams are summarized. Experimental studies are also conducted to measure the room temperature mechanical response of the two foams in the two principal material directions (parallel to the rise and perpendicular to the rise). The measured elastic modulus, proportional limit stress, ultimate tensile strength, and Poisson's ratios are reported. The generalized elongated Kelvin foam model previously developed by the authors is reviewed and the equations which result from this model are summarized. Using the measured microstructural dimensions and the measured stiffness ratio, the foam tensile strength ratio and Poisson's ratios are predicted for both foams and are compared with the experimental data. The predicted tensile strength ratio is in close agreement with the measured strength ratio for both BX-265 and NCFI24-124. The comparison between the predicted Poisson's ratios and the measured values is not as favorable.

  18. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole (PS52K) and 103 kg/mole (PS103K), and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The bidisperse melts consist of PS103K or PS52K and a monodisperse...... (closed loop proportional regulator) using the laser in such a way that the stretch rate at the neck is kept constant. The rheometer has been described in more detail in (A. Bach, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Journal of Rheology, 47 (2003) 429). PS390K show a decrease in the steady viscosity as a power......-law function of the elongational rate (A. Bach, K. Almdal, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Macromolecules 36 (2003) 5174). PS52K and PS103K show that the steady viscosity has a maximum that is respectively 100% and 50% above 3 times the zero-shear-rate viscosity. The bidisperse melts show a significant...

  19. Initiation and elongation of lateral roots in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Lactuca sativa cv. Baijianye seedlings do not normally produce lateral roots, but removal of the root tip or application of auxin, especially indole-butyric acid, triggered the formation of lateral roots. Primordia initiated within 9 h and were fully developed after 24 h by activating the pericycle cells opposite the xylem pole. The pericycle cells divided asymmetrically into short and long cells. The short cells divided further to form primordia. The effect of root tip removal and auxin application was reversed by 6-benzylaminopurine at concentrations >10(-8) M. The cytokinin oxidase inhibitor N1-(2chloro4pyridyl)-N2-phenylurea also suppressed auxin-induced lateral rooting. The elongation of primary roots was promoted by L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl) glycine and silver ions, but only the latter enhanced elongation of lateral roots. The data indicate that the induction of lateral roots is controlled by basipetally moving cytokinin and acropetally moving auxin. Lateral roots appear to not produce ethylene.

  20. Axial elongation following prolonged near work in myopes and emmetropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Emily C; Read, Scott A; Collins, Michael J; Hegarty, Katherine J; Priddle, Scott B; Smith, Josephine M; Perro, Judd V

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the influence of a period of sustained near work upon axial length in groups of emmetropes (EMM) and myopes. Forty young adult subjects (20 myopes and 20 emmetropes) were recruited for the study. Myopes were further classified as early onset (EOM), late onset (LOM), stable (SM) or progressing (PM) subgroups. Axial length was measured with the IOLMaster instrument before, immediately after and then again 10 min after a continuous 30 min near task of 5 D accommodation demand. Measures of distance objective refraction were also collected. Significant changes in axial length were observed immediately following the near task. EOM axial length elongated on average by 0.027±0.021 mm, LOM by 0.014±0.020 mm, EMM by 0.010±0.015 mm, PM by 0.031±0.022 mm and SM by 0.014±0.018 mm. At the conclusion of the 10 min regression period, axial length measures were not significantly different from baseline values. Axial elongation was observed following a prolonged near task. Both EOM and PM groups showed increases in axial length that were significantly greater than emmetropes.

  1. Granular packings of elongated faceted particles deposited under gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Raúl Cruz; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical results of the effect that particle shape has on the packing properties of granular materials. We have systematically measured the particle angular distribution, the cluster size distribution and the stress profiles of ensembles of faceted elongated particles deposited in a bidimensional box. Stress transmission through this granular system has been numerically simulated using a two-dimensional model of irregular particles. For grains of maximum symmetry (squares), the stress propagation localizes and forms chain-like forces analogous to those observed for granular materials composed of spheres. For thick layers of grains, a pressure saturation is observed for deposit depths beyond a characteristic length. This scenario correlates with packing morphology and can be understood in terms of stochastic models of aggregation and random multiplicative processes. As grains elongate and lose their symmetry, stress propagation is strongly affected. Lateral force transmission becomes less favored than vertical transfer, and hence, an increase in the pressure develops with depth, hindering force saturation

  2. Swimming of a Sea Butterfly with an Elongated Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ferhat; Maas, Amy E.; Murphy, David W.

    2017-11-01

    Sea butterflies (pteropods) are small, zooplanktonic marine snails which swim by flapping highly flexible parapodia. Previous studies show that the swimming hydrodynamics of Limacina helicina, a polar pteropod with a spiraled shell, is similar to tiny insect flight aerodynamics and that forward-backward pitching is key for lift generation. However, swimming by diverse pteropod species with different shell shapes has not been examined. We present measurements of the swimming of Cuvierina columnella, a warm water species with an elongated non-spiraled shell collected off the coast of Bermuda. With a body length of 9 mm, wing beat frequency of 4-6 Hz and swimming speed of 35 mm/s, these organisms swim at a Reynolds number of approximately 300, larger than that of L. helicina. High speed 3D kinematics acquired via two orthogonal cameras reveals that the elongated shell correlates with reduced body pitching and that the wings bend approximately 180 degrees in each direction, overlapping at the end of each half-stroke. Time resolved 2D flow measurements collected with a micro-PIV system reveal leading edge vortices present in both power and recovery strokes. Interactions between the overlapping wings and the shell also likely play a role in lift generation.

  3. Measurements of rope elongation or deflection in impact destructive testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of energy dissipation in mechanical protective systems and the corresponding determination of their safe use in mine shafts, requires a precise description of their bending and elongation, for instance, in conditions of dynamic, transverse loading induced by the falling of mass. The task aimed to apply a fast parallactic rangefinder and then to mount it on a test stand, which is an original development of the Central Mining Institute's Laboratory of Rope Testing in Katowice. In the solution presented in this paper, the measuring method and equipment in which the parallactic laser rangefinder, provided with a fast converter and recording system, ensures non-contact measurement of elongation, deflection or deformation of the sample (construction during impact loading. The structure of the unit, and metrological parameters are also presented. Additionally, the method of calibration and examples of the application in the impact tests of steel wire ropes are presented. The measurement data obtained will provide a basis for analysis, the prediction of the energy of events and for applying the necessary means to maintain explosion-proofness in the case of destructive damage to mechanical elements in the mine atmosphere. What makes these measurements novel is the application of a fast and accurate laser rangefinder to the non-contact measurement of crucial impact parameters of dynamic events that result in the destruction of the sample. In addition, the method introduces a laser scanning vibrometer with the aim of evaluating the parameters of the samples before and after destruction.

  4. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  5. Dynamic basis of fidelity and speed in translation: Coordinated multistep mechanisms of elongation and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Arjun; Choi, Junhong; Wang, Jinfan; Petrov, Alexey; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2017-07-01

    As the universal machine that transfers genetic information from RNA to protein, the ribosome synthesizes proteins with remarkably high fidelity and speed. This is a result of the accurate and efficient decoding of mRNA codons via multistep mechanisms during elongation and termination stages of translation. These mechanisms control how the correct sense codon is recognized by a tRNA for peptide elongation, how the next codon is presented to the decoding center without change of frame during translocation, and how the stop codon is discriminated for timely release of the nascent peptide. These processes occur efficiently through coupling of chemical energy expenditure, ligand interactions, and conformational changes. Understanding this coupling in detail required integration of many techniques that were developed in the past two decades. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed the dynamic nature of translational control and uncovered how external cellular factors such as tRNA abundance and mRNA modifications affect the synthesis of the protein product. Insights from these studies will aid synthetic biology and therapeutic approaches to translation. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  6. 2'-O-methylation in mRNA disrupts tRNA decoding during translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junhong; Indrisiunaite, Gabriele; DeMirci, Hasan; Ieong, Ka-Weng; Wang, Jinfan; Petrov, Alexey; Prabhakar, Arjun; Rechavi, Gideon; Dominissini, Dan; He, Chuan; Ehrenberg, Måns; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2018-03-01

    Chemical modifications of mRNA may regulate many aspects of mRNA processing and protein synthesis. Recently, 2'-O-methylation of nucleotides was identified as a frequent modification in translated regions of human mRNA, showing enrichment in codons for certain amino acids. Here, using single-molecule, bulk kinetics and structural methods, we show that 2'-O-methylation within coding regions of mRNA disrupts key steps in codon reading during cognate tRNA selection. Our results suggest that 2'-O-methylation sterically perturbs interactions of ribosomal-monitoring bases (G530, A1492 and A1493) with cognate codon-anticodon helices, thereby inhibiting downstream GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and A-site tRNA accommodation, leading to excessive rejection of cognate aminoacylated tRNAs in initial selection and proofreading. Our current and prior findings highlight how chemical modifications of mRNA tune the dynamics of protein synthesis at different steps of translation elongation.

  7. Crystal structure of the three tandem FF domains of the transcription elongation regulator CA150.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Yang, Jun; Ren, Zhiyong; Sabui, Subir; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T; Jacobson, Raymond H; Jeruzalmi, David; McMurray, John S; Chen, Xiaomin

    2009-10-23

    FF domains are small protein-protein interaction modules that have two flanking conserved phenylalanine residues. They are present in proteins involved in transcription, RNA splicing, and signal transduction, and often exist in tandem arrays. Although several individual FF domain structures have been determined by NMR, the tandem nature of most FF domains has not been revealed. Here we report the 2.7-A-resolution crystal structure of the first three FF domains of the human transcription elongation factor CA150. Each FF domain is composed of three alpha-helices and a 3(10) helix between alpha-helix 2 and alpha-helix 3. The most striking feature of the structure is that an FF domain is connected to the next by an alpha-helix that continues from helix 3 to helix 1 of the next. The consequent elongated arrangement allows exposure of many charged residues within the region that can be engaged in interaction with other molecules. Binding studies using a peptide ligand suggest that a specific conformation of the FF domains might be required to achieve higher-affinity binding. Additionally, we explore potential DNA binding of the FF construct used in this study. Overall, we provide the first crystal structure of an FF domain and insights into the tandem nature of the FF domains and suggest that, in addition to protein binding, FF domains might be involved in DNA binding.

  8. BRCA2 Regulates Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase II to Prevent R-Loop Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud K.K. Shivji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The controlled release of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII from promoter-proximal pausing (PPP sites is critical for transcription elongation in metazoans. We show that the human tumor suppressor BRCA2 interacts with RNAPII to regulate PPP release, thereby preventing unscheduled RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops implicated in genomic instability and carcinogenesis. BRCA2 inactivation by depletion or cancer-causing mutations instigates RNAPII accumulation and R-loop accrual at PPP sites in actively transcribed genes, accompanied by γH2AX formation marking DNA breakage, which is reduced by ERCC4 endonuclease depletion. BRCA2 inactivation decreases RNAPII-associated factor 1 (PAF1 recruitment (which normally promotes RNAPII release and diminishes H2B Lys120 ubiquitination, impeding nascent RNA synthesis. PAF1 depletion phenocopies, while its overexpression ameliorates, R-loop accumulation after BRCA2 inactivation. Thus, an unrecognized role for BRCA2 in the transition from promoter-proximal pausing to productive elongation via augmented PAF1 recruitment to RNAPII is subverted by disease-causing mutations, provoking R-loop-mediated DNA breakage in BRCA2-deficient cells.

  9. Bacterial flora of sturgeon fingerling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arani, A.S.; Mosahab, R.

    2008-01-01

    The study on microbial populations is a suitable tool to understand and apply control methods to improve the sanitary level of production in fish breeding and rearing centers, ensure health of sturgeon fingerlings at the time of their release into the rivers and also in the conversation and restoration of these valuable stocks in the Caspian Sea, Iran. A laboratory research based on Austin methods (Austin, B., Austin, D.A. 1993) was conducted for bacterial study on 3 sturgeon species naming A. persicus, A. stellatus and A. nudiventris during different growth stages. Bacterial flora of Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Edwardsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas were determined. The factors which may induce changes in bacterial populations during different stages of fife are the followings: quality of water in rearing ponds, different conditions for growth stages, suitable time for colonization of bacterial flora in rearing pond, water temperature increase in fingerlings size and feeding condition. (author)

  10. Tide as steering factor in structuring archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing communities in mangrove forest soils dominated by Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcos, Magali S.; Barboza, A.D.H.; Keijzer, R.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2018-01-01

    Mangrove species are adapted to grow at specific zones in a tidal gradient. Here we tested the hypothesis that the archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities differ in soils dominated by the mangrove species Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle. Two of the sampling locations

  11. Tide as steering factor in structuring archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing communities in mangrove forest soils dominated by Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcos, Magali S.; Barboza, A.D.H.; Keijzer, R.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove species are adapted to grow at specific zones in a tidal gradient. Here we tested the hypothesis that the archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities differ in soils dominated by the mangrove species Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle. Two of the sampling locations

  12. Effect of two culture media on Pinus taeda shoots elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paula Imbrogno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pinus taeda L. is a forest species of great international importance and in Argentina. Biotechnological techniques can provide an alternative to propagate this species, as well as for obtaining mother plants. The aim of this study was to achieve adequate elongation of in vitro shoots before transfer to the rooting stage. The shoots were obtained from acclimatized mother plants. It was disinfected for in vitro establishment. Two types of basal culture media: WV5 and DCR were studied. The best results were achieved with the combination of the WV5 salts supplement with 0.5% activated carbon, 0.01 mg l-1 ANA to obtain vigorous and longer than 40.0 mm in length shoots. Key words: forest, micropropagation, pine

  13. Iwr1 facilitates RNA polymerase II dynamics during transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Estruch, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Iwr1 is an RNA polymerase II (RNPII) interacting protein that directs nuclear import of the enzyme which has been previously assembled in the cytoplasm. Here we present genetic and molecular evidence that links Iwr1 with transcription. Our results indicate that Iwr1 interacts with RNPII during elongation and is involved in the disassembly of the enzyme from chromatin. This function is especially important in resolving problems posed by damage-arrested RNPII, as shown by the sensitivity of iwr1 mutants to genotoxic drugs and the Iwr1's genetic interactions with RNPII degradation pathway mutants. Moreover, absence of Iwr1 causes genome instability that is enhanced by defects in the DNA repair machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sigmoid Colon Elongation Evaluation by Volume Rendering Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla SENAYLI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigmoid colons have various measurements, shapes, and configurations for individuals. In this subject there are rare clinical trials to answer the question of sigmoidal colon maldevelopment predicting a risk for volvulus. Therefore, sigmoid colon measurement may be beneficial to decide for volvulus. In a study, sigmoid colon diameters were evaluated during abdominal surgeries and it was found that median length was 47 cm and median vertical mesocolon length was 13 cm. We report a 14-year-old female patient who has a sigmoidal colon measured as nearly 54 cm. We used tomographic equipments for this evaluation. We know that MRI technique was used for this purpose but, there has not been data for MRI predicting the sigmoidal volvulus. We hope that our findings by this evaluation can contribute to insufficient literature of sigmoidal elongation. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 71-73

  15. Direct Damage to a Vertebral Artery Better Predicts a Vertebral Artery Injury than Elongation in Cervical Spine Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kosei; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Inokuchi, Koichi; Ishii, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Atsuki; Kanai, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota

    2017-10-01

    Cervical spine dislocation and fracture of a transverse process are isolated risk factors for vertebral artery injuries (VAIs), which can cause a life-threatening ischemic stroke. Since in vivo experiments are not possible, it has not been unclear whether damage to or extension of vertebral arteries is more predictive of a VAI. To identify the imaging characteristics associated with VAI, we analyzed 36 vertebral arteries from 22 cervical spine dislocation patients who underwent computed tomography angiography (Aug. 2008-Dec. 2014). We evaluated (1) the posttraumatic elongation of the vertebral artery and (2) the presence of fracture involving the transverse foramen. VAI was found in 20 (56%) of the 36 vertebral arteries. The rate of residual shift (vertebral artery elongation) was not markedly different between the VAI and no-VAI groups. However, the rate of >1 mm displacement into the foramen and that of fracture with gross displacement (≥2 mm) differed significantly between the groups. We found that greater displacement of fractured transverse processes with cervical spine dislocation was a risk factor for VAI. These results suggest that direct damage to the vertebral arteries by transverse process fragments is more likely to predict a VAI compared to elongation, even in cervical spine dislocation.

  16. Elongational rheology and cohesive fracture of photo-oxidated LDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.; Wagner, Manfred H.

    2014-01-01

    It was found recently that low-density polyethylene (LDPE) samples with different degrees of photo-oxidation represent an interesting system to study the transition from ductile to cohesive fracture and the aspects of the cohesive rupture in elongational flow. Sheets of LDPE were subjected to photo-oxidation in the presence of air using a xenon lamp to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Characterisation methods included Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solvent extraction method, and rheology in shear and uniaxial extensional flows. Linear viscoelasticity was increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by the carbonyl index, acid and aldehydes groups, and gel fraction. The molecular stress function model was used to quantify the experimental data, and the nonlinear model parameter β was found to be correlated with the gel content. The uniaxial data showed that the transition from ductile to cohesive fracture was shifted to lower elongational rates, the higher the gel content was. From 2 weeks photo-oxidation onwards, cohesive rupture occurred at every strain rate investigated. The true strain and true stress at cohesive fracture as well as the energy density applied to the sample up to fracture were analyzed. At low gel content, rupture was mainly determined by the melt fraction while at high gel content, rupture occurred predominantly in the gel structure. The strain at break was found to be independent of strain rate, contrary to the stress at break and the energy density. Thus, the true strain and not the stress at break or the energy density was found to be the relevant physical quantity to describe cohesive fracture behavior of photo-oxidated LDPE. The equilibrium modulus of the gel structures was correlated with the true strain at rupture. The stiffer the gel structure, the lower was the deformation tolerated before the sample breaks

  17. Measurement of Behavioral Evolution in Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A curious aspect of bacterial behavior under stress is the induction of filamentation: the anomalous growth of certain bacteria in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide into progeny. We show that E.coli under the influence of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin have robust filamentous growth, which provides individual bacteria a mesoscopic niche for evolution until resistant progeny can bud off and propagate. Hence, filamentation is a form of genomic amplification where even a single, isolated bacteria can have access to multiple genomes. We propose a model that predicts that the first arrival time of the normal sized progeny should follow a Gompertz distribution with the mean first arrival time proportional to the elongation rate of filament. These predictions agree with our experimental measurements. Finally, we suggest bacterial filament growth and budding has many similarities to tumor growth and metastasis and can serve as a simpler model to study those complicated processes. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  18. Vertical stratification of bacterial communities driven by multiple environmental factors in the waters (0-5000 m) off the Galician coast (NW Iberian margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobal-Amador, Vladimir; Nieto-Cid, Mar; Guerrero-Feijoo, Elisa; Hernando-Morales, Victor; Teira, Eva; Varela-Rozados, Marta M.

    2016-08-01

    The processes mediated by microbial planktonic communities occur along the entire water column, yet the microbial activity and composition have been studied mainly in surface waters. This research examined the vertical variation in bacterial abundance, activity and community composition and structure from surface down to 5000 m depth following a longitudinal transect off the Galician coast (NW Iberian margin, from 43°N, 9°W to 43°N, 15°W). Community activity and composition changed with depth. The leucine incorporation rates decreased from the euphotic layer to the bathypelagic waters by three orders of magnitude, whereas prokaryotic abundance decreased only by one order of magnitude. The relative abundance of SAR11 and Alteromonas, determined by catalyzed reported deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH), decreased with depth. Meanwhile, the contribution of SAR 202 and SAR324 was significantly higher in the deeper layers (i.e. NEADW, North East Atlantic Deep Water and LDW, Lower Deep Water) than in the euphotic zone. Bacterial community structure, assessed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), was depth-specific. A distance based linear model (DistLM) revealed that the variability found in bacterial community structure was mainly explained by temperature nitrate, phosphate, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence, prokaryotic abundance, leucine incorporation and to a lesser extent salinity, oxygen, CDOM absorbance and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Our results displayed a bacterial community structure shaped not only by depth-related physicochemical features but also by DOM quality, indicating that different prokaryotic taxa have the potential to metabolize particular DOM sources.

  19. Current knowledge of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis, earlier termed nonspecific vaginitis (anaerobic vaginosis because of the absence of recognized pathogens, is most common vaginal syndrome of women of childbearing age affecting 15-30%. This syndrome, whose aetiology and pathogenesis remains unknown, is characterized by significant changes in the vaginal ecosystem. These changes consist of a decrease in the number of lactobacilli and a large increase in the number of anaerobic organisms. The bacteria adhere to desquamated epithelial cells with a distinctive appearance of clue cells The main complaints of women with symptomatic bacterial vaginosis include vaginal discharge and odour. However, a significant number of all women who have bacterial vaginosis deny symptoms. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with a number of gynaecologic and obstetric complications including cervicitis, cervical neoplasia, pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infections, and preterm labour. The diagnosis is most frequently made based on vaginal smear stained according to Gram (Nugent scoring method. Metronidazole and clindamycin are the drugs of choice for treatment of women with bacterial vaginosis. Which women should undergo treatment? According to the prevailing attitude, it should include women with symptoms. Symptomatic women with frequent relapses of bacterial vaginosisas, as a rule, have poor response to the applied therapy. To achieve better efficiency in the treatment of such women, it is necessary to have more extensive understanding of all factors in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

  20. Bacterial Prostatitis: Bacterial Virulence, Clinical Outcomes, and New Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, John N; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-02-01

    Four prostatitis syndromes are recognized clinically: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic prostatitis. Because Escherichia coli represents the most common cause of bacterial prostatitis, we investigated the importance of bacterial virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in E. coli strains causing prostatitis and the potential association of these characteristics with clinical outcomes. A structured literature review revealed that we have limited understanding of the virulence-associated characteristics of E. coli causing acute prostatitis. Therefore, we completed a comprehensive microbiological and molecular investigation of a unique strain collection isolated from healthy young men. We also considered new data from an animal model system suggesting certain E. coli might prove important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Our human data suggest that E. coli needs multiple pathogenicity-associated traits to overcome anatomic and immune responses in healthy young men without urological risk factors. The phylogenetic background and accumulation of an exceptional repertoire of extraintestinal pathogenic virulence-associated genes indicate that these E. coli strains belong to a highly virulent subset of uropathogenic variants. In contrast, antibiotic resistance confers little added advantage to E. coli strains in these healthy outpatients. Our animal model data also suggest that certain pathogenic E. coli may be important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome through mechanisms that are dependent on the host genetic background and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

  1. Inelastic spectra to predict period elongation of structures under earthquake loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanos, Evangelos; Sextos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    (expressed by the force reduction factor, Ry), post-yield stiffness (ay) and hysteretic laws are examined for a large number of strong motions. Constant-strength, inelastic spectra in terms of Tin/Tel are calculated to assess the extent of period elongation for various levels of structural inelasticity......Period lengthening, exhibited by structures when subjected to strong ground motions, constitutes an implicit proxy of structural inelasticity and associated damage. However, the reliable prediction of the inelastic period is tedious and a multi-parametric task, which is related to both epistemic....... Moreover, the influence that structural characteristics (Ry, ay and degrading level) and strong-motion parameters (epicentral distance, frequency content and duration) exert on period lengthening are studied. Determined by regression analyses of the data obtained, simplified equations are proposed...

  2. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functions of Fasciculation and Elongation Protein Zeta-1 (FEZ1 in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés D. Maturana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasciculation and elongation protein zeta-1 (FEZ1 is a mammalian ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-76 protein that possesses four coiled-coil domains and a nuclear localization signal. It is mainly expressed in the brain. Suppression of FEZ1 expression in cultured embryonic neurons causes deficiency of neuronal differentiation. Recently, proteomic techniques revealed that FEZ1 interacts with various intracellular partners, such as signaling, motor, and structural proteins. FEZ1 was shown to act as an antiviral factor. The findings reported so far indicate that FEZ1 is associated with neuronal development, neuropathologies, and viral infection. Based on these accumulating evidences, we herein review the biological functions of FEZ1.

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Elongation Behavior of Polyphenylene Sulfide using Melt Spinning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Changbin; Yang, Yan; Gao, Jun; Li, Shenghu; Qing, Long

    2017-12-01

    The elongational properties of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) melt were measured using a melt spinning technique. The relationship between extrusion temperature and melt strength (MS) as well as between elongational viscosity and drawability were investigated with respect to the effects of extrusion temperature and extensional strain rate on the melt extensional stress and elongational viscosity. The results showed that the stretching force for the PPS melt decreased with a rise of extrusion temperature while increased roughly with an increase of extensional rate. The MS decreased with an increase of temperature, and the ln MS was a linear function of 1/T when the extrusion velocity was constant. Both the melt extensional stress and elongational viscosity decreased with the increase of the extrusion temperature. With increase of the extensional strain rate, the extensional stress increased while the melt elongational viscosity first decreases and then increases gradually. A low melt elongational viscosity might be beneficial to improve the melt drawability.

  5. The Acid Growth Theory of auxin-induced cell elongation is alive and well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cells elongate irreversibly only when load-bearing bonds in the walls are cleaved. Auxin causes the elongation of stem and coleoptile cells by promoting wall loosening via cleavage of these bonds. This process may be coupled with the intercalation of new cell wall polymers. Because the primary site of auxin action appears to be the plasma membrane or some intracellular site, and wall loosening is extracellular, there must be communication between the protoplast and the wall. Some "wall-loosening factor" must be exported from auxin-impacted cells, which sets into motion the wall loosening events. About 20 years ago, it was suggested that the wall-loosening factor is hydrogen ions. This idea and subsequent supporting data gave rise to the Acid Growth Theory, which states that when exposed to auxin, susceptible cells excrete protons into the wall (apoplast) at an enhanced rate, resulting in a decrease in apoplastic pH. The lowered wall pH then activates wall-loosening processes, the precise nature of which is unknown. Because exogenous acid causes a transient (1-4 h) increase in growth rate, auxin must also mediate events in addition to wall acidification for growth to continue for an extended period of time. These events may include osmoregulation, cell wall synthesis, and maintenance of the capacity of walls to undergo acid-induced wall loosening. At present, we do not know if these phenomena are tightly coupled to wall acidification or if they are the products of multiple independent signal transduction pathways.

  6. Elongation Kinetics of Polyglutamine Peptide Fibrils: A Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Robert H.; Jacobson, Kurt H.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Murphy, Regina M.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally expanded polyglutamine domains in proteins are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) domain facilitates aggregation of the affected protein, and several studies directly link aggregation to neurotoxicity. Studies of synthetic polyQ peptides have contributed substantially to our understanding of the mechanism of aggregation. In this report, polyQ fibrils were immobilized onto a sensor, and their elongation by polyQ peptides of various length and conformation was examined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The rate of elongation increased as the peptide length increased from 8 to 24 glutamines (Q8, Q20, and Q24). Monomer conformation affected elongation rates: insertion of a β-turn template d-Pro-Gly in the center of the peptide increased elongation rates several-fold, while insertion of Pro-Pro dramatically slowed elongation. Dissipation measurements of the QCM-D provided qualitative information about mechanical properties of the elongating fibrils. These data showed clear differences in the characteristics of the elongating aggregates, depending on the specific identity of the associating polyQ peptide. Elongation rates were sensitive to the pH and ionic strength of the buffer. Comparison of QCM-D data with those obtained by optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy revealed that very little water was associated with the elongation of fibrils by the peptide containing d-Pro-Gly, but a significant amount of water was associated when the fibrils were elongated by Q20. Together, the data indicate that elongation of polyQ fibrils can occur without full consolidation to the fibril structure, resulting in variations to the aggregate structure during elongation. PMID:22459263

  7. Engineering of methionine chain elongation part of glucoraphanin pathway in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Crocoll, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2016-01-01

    in Escherichia coli cytosol. Introduction of two plasmids encoding the methionine chain elongation pathway into E. coli resulted in production of 25mgL(-1) of dihomo-methionine. In addition to chain-elongated methionine products, side-products from chain elongation of leucine were produced. Methionine...... supplementation enhanced dihomo-methionine production to 57mgL(-1), while keeping a steady level of the chain-elongated leucine products. Engineering of the de-compartmentalized pathway of dihomo-methionine in E. coli cytosol provides an important first step for microbial production of the health...

  8. A Bipolar Spindle of Antiparallel ParM Filaments Drives Bacterial Plasmid Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gayathri, P; Fujii, T; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    To ensure their stable inheritance by daughter cells during cell division, bacterial low copy-number plasmids make simple DNA segregating machines that use an elongating protein filament between sister plasmids. In the ParMRC system of Escherichia coli R1 plasmid, ParM, an actin-like protein, forms...

  9. SMADs and YAP compete to control elongation of β-catenin:LEF-1-recruited RNAPII during hESC differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estarás, Conchi; Benner, Chris; Jones, Katherine A

    2015-06-04

    The Wnt3a/β-catenin and Activin/SMAD2,3 signaling pathways synergize to induce endodermal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Using ChIP-seq and GRO-seq analyses, we show here that Wnt3a-induced β-catenin:LEF-1 enhancers recruit cohesin to direct enhancer-promoter looping and activate mesendodermal (ME) lineage genes. Moreover, we find that LEF-1 and other hESC enhancers recruit RNAPII complexes (eRNAPII) that are highly phosphorylated at Ser5, but not Ser7. Wnt3a signaling further increases Ser5P-RNAPII at LEF-1 sites and ME gene promoters, indicating that elongation remains limiting. However, subsequent Activin/SMAD2,3 signaling selectively increases transcription elongation, P-TEFb occupancy, and Ser7P-RNAPII levels at these genes. Finally, we show that the Hippo regulator, YAP, functions with TEAD to regulate binding of the NELF negative elongation factor and block SMAD2,3 induction of ME genes. Thus, the Wnt3a/β-catenin and Activin/SMAD2,3 pathways act in concert to counteract YAP repression and upregulate ME genes during early hESC differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Zonisamide Enhances Neurite Elongation of Primary Motor Neurons and Facilitates Peripheral Nerve Regeneration In Vitro and in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Yagi

    Full Text Available No clinically applicable drug is currently available to enhance neurite elongation after nerve injury. To identify a clinically applicable drug, we screened pre-approved drugs for neurite elongation in the motor neuron-like NSC34 cells. We found that zonisamide, an anti-epileptic and anti-Parkinson's disease drug, promoted neurite elongation in cultured primary motor neurons and NSC34 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The neurite-scratch assay revealed that zonisamide enhanced neurite regeneration. Zonisamide was also protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death of primary motor neurons. Zonisamide induced mRNA expression of nerve growth factors (BDNF, NGF, and neurotrophin-4/5, and their receptors (tropomyosin receptor kinase A and B. In a mouse model of sciatic nerve autograft, intragastric administration of zonisamide for 1 week increased the size of axons distal to the transected site 3.9-fold. Zonisamide also improved the sciatic function index, a marker for motor function of hindlimbs after sciatic nerve autograft, from 6 weeks after surgery. At 8 weeks after surgery, zonisamide was protective against denervation-induced muscle degeneration in tibialis anterior, and increased gene expression of Chrne, Colq, and Rapsn, which are specifically expressed at the neuromuscular junction. We propose that zonisamide is a potential therapeutic agent for peripheral nerve injuries as well as for neuropathies due to other etiologies.

  11. Telomere Elongation and Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Achieved from Telomerase Haplo-Insufficient Cells by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ying Sung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Haplo-insufficiency of telomerase genes in humans leads to telomere syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenital and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from telomerase haplo-insufficient donor cells would provide unique opportunities toward the realization of patient-specific stem cell therapies. Recently, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (ntESCs have been efficiently achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. We tested the hypothesis that SCNT could effectively elongate shortening telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells in the ntESCs with relevant mouse models. Indeed, telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient (Terc+/− mouse cells are elongated in ntESCs. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc+/− cells exhibit naive pluripotency as evidenced by generation of Terc+/− ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation, the most stringent test of naive pluripotency. These data suggest that SCNT could offer a powerful tool to reprogram telomeres and to discover the factors for robust restoration of telomeres and pluripotency of telomerase haplo-insufficient somatic cells. : Sung et al. demonstrate in a mouse model that telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells can be elongated by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc+/− cells exhibit pluripotency evidenced by generation of Terc+/−ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation, the most stringent test of naive pluripotency.

  12. Effect of benzyladenine (BA on auxin-induced stem elongation and thickening in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that stem elongation in tulip is induced by the auxin produced in the leaves and gynoecium. Excision of the flower bud and all the leaves in an early stage of tulip growth resulted in almost total inhibition of stem growth, but the inhibition was completely recovered by the exogenous application of auxin to the place from which the flower bud had been removed. Hormonal control of stem thickening in tulip is much less known. Additional application of benzyladenine (BA to the tulip stem by soaking a cotton wick wrapped around all the internodes only slightly inhibited stem growth induced by IAA at a concentration of 0.1 and 2.0%, but substantially stimulated the thickening of all the internodes. The treatment of the tulip stem with benzyladenine enabled direct contact of the cytokinin with the epidermis, which is an important factor in stem elongation. The experiment conducted in field conditions also showed that BA only slightly inhibited the elongation of the fourth internode induced by IAA, but stimulated the thickening of that internode. IAA applied at a concentration of 2.0% stimulated ethylene production to a much higher extent than IAA at a concentration of 0.1%, and BA affected the auxin-induced ethylene production only to a small extent. Metabolic significance of these findings is discussed.

  13. Venus 2004: east and west elongations and solar transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, R. J.; Blaxall, K.; Heath, A.

    2007-04-01

    The year 2004 was exceptional in producing the first solar transit of Venus since the late Victorian era. The bright aureole and atmospheric ring were re-observed, and the entire phenomenon was witnessed for the first time ever in hydrogen alpha light. Although routine observations throughout 2004 were unexceptional, patterns of visibility of bright and dark markings, cusp extensions and cusp-caps were recorded. No correlation was found between the latitude of the sub-Earth point and the visibility of either cusp-cap, with the S. cap predominating for most of the year. It was possible to accurately follow individual ultraviolet dark markings over many consecutive rotations, extending from the E. to W. elongations, and thereby to make a current measurement of the synodic atmospheric rotation period for the near-equatorial features: 3.996 ± 0.001 days. The true Ashen Light was reported visually on only a few occasions, but these correspond closely to times when infrared emission from the surface of the dark side was recorded in 1-micron waveband images. Some of the stable dark side albedo features were also visible upon the 1-micron images, and have been tentatively identified with known surface features. Infrared imaging at the same waveband showed little detail on the sunlit disk, but a few bright spots were sufficiently well observed to suggest a synodic rotation period close to 5.0 days, not atypical for the lower cloud decks.

  14. The undulatory swimming gait of elongated swimmers revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosilevskii, Gil

    2017-03-31

    An undulatory swimming gait is characterized by short lateral displacement waves that propagate backwards along the body of the swimmer faster than it swims. Hydrodynamic theory of elongated bodies predicts that if the amplitude of the displacement waves does not increase toward the caudal end, the part of the swimmer posteriad of the dorso-ventrally widest point takes no part in propulsion. It also predicts that if the amplitude does increase, then the hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency suffers. Cusk eels have their widest point located in the anterior half of the body with the bulk of their locomotive muscles located posteriad of it; indeed, they swim so that the amplitude of the propulsion wave increases toward the caudal end. Anguillid eels have their widest point posteriad of the mid-body, and their locomotive muscles are distributed along their entire length-but they swim as cusk eels, using the posterior half only. Apparently, both use hydrodynamically inefficient gaits. The paper questions the definition of propulsion efficiency and shows that biomechanical considerations are more important than hydrodynamic, and that most probably fish adjust their gait to maximize the ratio between the energy made good (the product of thrust and distance) and the chemical energy consumed by the muscles. The role of body shape is discussed.

  15. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  16. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment.

  17. Combining orthogonal polarization for elongated target detection with GPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lualdi, Maurizio; Lombardi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    For an accurate imaging of ground penetrating radar data the polarization characteristics of the propagating electromagnetic (EM) wavefield and wave amplitude variations with antenna pattern orientation must be taken into account. For objects that show some directionality feature and cylindrical shape any misalignment between transmitter and target can strongly modify the polarization state of the backscattered wavefield, thus conditioning the detection capability of the system. Hints on the depolarization can be used to design the optimal GPR antenna survey to avoid omissions and pitfalls during data processing. This research addresses the issue of elongated target detection through a multi azimuth (or multi polarization) approach based on the combination of mutually orthogonal GPR data. Results from the analysis of the formal scattering problem demonstrate how this strategy can reach a scalar formulation of the scattering matrix and achieve a rotational invariant quantity. The effectiveness of the algorithm is then evaluated with a detailed field example showing results closely proximal to those obtained under the optimal alignment condition: detection is significantly improved and the risk of target missing is reduced. (paper)

  18. Aquatic bacteria elongate and wobble their bodies for flagellar performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Valenzuela, Joanna; Chopra, Pooja

    2017-11-01

    Bacteria are endowed with well-regulated sizes and shapes. A bacillus has a rod-like cell body, achieving swimming motility by rotating a single flagellum or multiple flagella. Along with other shapes, this elongated cell is often viewed as a payload, and its movements are regarded as passive responses to its flagellar propulsion. Here, we simultaneously measured the morphology and movement of individual free-swimming bacteria using an automated tracking microscope and 3D reconstruction techniques. These cells were found to consistently precess, based on reconstructions of the apparent wobbling movements viewed from a microscope. Through a hydrodynamic model that incorporates such precessing cell bodies and rod-like geometries, we found that there is a critical cell size below which wobbling movement is beneficial for flagellar performance. This critical cell size is consistent with the cellular morphologies of Caulobacter crescentus and Escherichia coli, as examples of single- and multi-flagellated species that are known for wobbling movements in aquatic environments. We also showed that the moderate cell sizes of these species could be attributed to a compromise between dispersal speed and power consumption. The authors thank the support of NSF-CREST: Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Machines at UC Merced (NSF-HRD-1547848).

  19. X chromosome dosage compensation via enhanced transcriptional elongation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larschan, Erica; Bishop, Eric P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2011-03-03

    The evolution of sex chromosomes has resulted in numerous species in which females inherit two X chromosomes but males have a single X, thus requiring dosage compensation. MSL (Male-specific lethal) complex increases transcription on the single X chromosome of Drosophila males to equalize expression of X-linked genes between the sexes. The biochemical mechanisms used for dosage compensation must function over a wide dynamic range of transcription levels and differential expression patterns. It has been proposed that the MSL complex regulates transcriptional elongation to control dosage compensation, a model subsequently supported by mapping of the MSL complex and MSL-dependent histone 4 lysine 16 acetylation to the bodies of X-linked genes in males, with a bias towards 3' ends. However, experimental analysis of MSL function at the mechanistic level has been challenging owing to the small magnitude of the chromosome-wide effect and the lack of an in vitro system for biochemical analysis. Here we use global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to examine the specific effect of the MSL complex on RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) on a genome-wide level. Results indicate that the MSL complex enhances transcription by facilitating the progression of RNAP II across the bodies of active X-linked genes. Improving transcriptional output downstream of typical gene-specific controls may explain how dosage compensation can be imposed on the diverse set of genes along an entire chromosome.

  20. The Impact of Aminoglycosides on the Dynamics of Translation Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tsai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging, as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-transfer RNA site (A site in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead, it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition.