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Sample records for bacterial community structure

  1. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

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    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  2. Experimental sulfate amendment alters peatland bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickman, R J S; Fulthorpe, R R; Coleman Wasik, J K; Engstrom, D R; Mitchell, C P J

    2016-10-01

    As part of a long-term, peatland-scale sulfate addition experiment, the impact of varying sulfate deposition on bacterial community responses was assessed using 16S tag encoded pyrosequencing. In three separate areas of the peatland, sulfate manipulations included an eight year quadrupling of atmospheric sulfate deposition (experimental), a 3-year recovery to background deposition following 5years of elevated deposition (recovery), and a control area. Peat concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, were measured, the production of which is attributable to a growing list of microorganisms, including many sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. The total bacterial and Deltaproteobacterial community structures in the experimental treatment differed significantly from those in the control and recovery treatments that were either indistinguishable or very similar to one another. Notably, the relatively rapid return (within three years) of bacterial community structure in the recovery treatment to a state similar to the control, demonstrates significant resilience of the peatland bacterial community to changes in atmospheric sulfate deposition. Changes in MeHg accumulation between sulfate treatments correlated with changes in the Deltaproteobacterial community, suggesting that sulfate may affect MeHg production through changes in the community structure of this group. PMID:27267720

  3. Bacterial community structure in aquifers corresponds to stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andrea; Möller, Silke; Neumann, Stefan; Burow, Katja; Gutmann, Falko; Lindner, Julia; Müsse, Steffen; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    So far, groundwater microbiology with respect to different host rocks has not been well described in the literature. However, factors influencing the communities would be of interest to provide a tool for mapping groundwater paths. The Thuringian Basin (Germany) studied here, contains formations of the Permian (Zechstein) and also Triassic period of Buntsandstein, Muschelkalk and Keuper, all of which can be found to crop out at the surface in different regions. We analyzed the bacterial community of nine natural springs and sixteen groundwater wells of the respective rock formations as well as core material from the Zechstein salts. For that we sampled in a mine 3 differnet salt rock samples (carnallitite, halite and sylvinitite). To validate the different approaches, similar rock formations were compared and a consistent microbial community for Buntsandstein could be verified. Similary, for Zechstein, the presence of halophiles was seen with cultivation, isolation directly from the rock material and also in groundwater with DNA-dependent approaches. A higher overlap between sandstone- and limestone-derived communities was visible as if compared to the salt formations. Principal component analysis confirmed formation specific patterns for Muschelkalk, Buntsandstein and Zechstein for the bacterial taxa present, with some overlaps. Bacilli and Gammaproteobacteria were the major groups, with the genera Pseudomonas, Marinomonas, Bacillus, Marinobacter and Pseudoalteromonas representing the communities. The bacteria are well adapted to their respective environment with survival strategies including a wide range of salinity which makes them suitable as tracers for fluid movement below the ground. The results indicate the usefulness and robustness of the approach taken here to investigate aquifer community structures in dependence of the stratigraphy of the groundwater reservoir.

  4. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie Stauffert

    Full Text Available Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In this study, an experimental laboratory device maintaining pristine collected mudflat sediments in microcosms closer to true environmental conditions--with tidal cycles and natural seawater--was used to simulate an oil spill under bioturbation conditions. Different conditions were applied to the microcosms including an addition of: standardized oil (Blend Arabian Light crude oil, 25.6 mg.g⁻¹ wet sediment, the common burrowing organism Hediste (Nereis diversicolor and both the oil and H. diversicolor. The addition of H. diversicolor and its associated bioturbation did not affect the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons. After 270 days, 60% of hydrocarbons had been removed in all microcosms irrespective of the H. diversicolor addition. However, 16S-rRNA gene and 16S-cDNA T-RFLP and RT-PCR-amplicon libraries analysis showed an effect of the condition on the bacterial community structure, composition, and dynamics, supported by PerMANOVA analysis. The 16S-cDNA libraries from microcosms where H. diversicolor was added (oiled and un-oiled showed a marked dominance of sequences related to Gammaproteobacteria. However, in the oiled-library sequences associated to Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also highly represented. The 16S-cDNA libraries from oiled-microcosms (with and without H. diversicolor addition revealed two distinct microbial communities characterized by different phylotypes associated to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and dominated by

  5. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jézéquel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In this study, an experimental laboratory device maintaining pristine collected mudflat sediments in microcosms closer to true environmental conditions--with tidal cycles and natural seawater--was used to simulate an oil spill under bioturbation conditions. Different conditions were applied to the microcosms including an addition of: standardized oil (Blend Arabian Light crude oil, 25.6 mg.g⁻¹ wet sediment), the common burrowing organism Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor and both the oil and H. diversicolor. The addition of H. diversicolor and its associated bioturbation did not affect the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons. After 270 days, 60% of hydrocarbons had been removed in all microcosms irrespective of the H. diversicolor addition. However, 16S-rRNA gene and 16S-cDNA T-RFLP and RT-PCR-amplicon libraries analysis showed an effect of the condition on the bacterial community structure, composition, and dynamics, supported by PerMANOVA analysis. The 16S-cDNA libraries from microcosms where H. diversicolor was added (oiled and un-oiled) showed a marked dominance of sequences related to Gammaproteobacteria. However, in the oiled-library sequences associated to Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also highly represented. The 16S-cDNA libraries from oiled-microcosms (with and without H. diversicolor addition) revealed two distinct microbial communities characterized by different phylotypes associated to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and dominated by Gammaproteobacteria

  6. Bioturbating shrimp alter the structure and diversity of bacterial communities in coastal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverock, Bonnie; Smith, Cindy J; Tait, Karen; Osborn, A Mark; Widdicombe, Steve; Gilbert, Jack A

    2010-12-01

    Bioturbation is a key process in coastal sediments, influencing microbially driven cycling of nutrients as well as the physical characteristics of the sediment. However, little is known about the distribution, diversity and function of the microbial communities that inhabit the burrows of infaunal macroorganisms. In this study, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to investigate variation in the structure of bacterial communities in sediment bioturbated by the burrowing shrimp Upogebia deltaura or Callianassa subterranea. Analyses of 229 sediment samples revealed significant differences between bacterial communities inhabiting shrimp burrows and those inhabiting ambient surface and subsurface sediments. Bacterial communities in burrows from both shrimp species were more similar to those in surface-ambient than subsurface-ambient sediment (R=0.258, P<0.001). The presence of shrimp was also associated with changes in bacterial community structure in surrounding surface sediment, when compared with sediments uninhabited by shrimp. Bacterial community structure varied with burrow depth, and also between individual burrows, suggesting that the shrimp's burrow construction, irrigation and maintenance behaviour affect the distribution of bacteria within shrimp burrows. Subsequent sequence analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from surface sediments revealed differences in the relative abundance of bacterial taxa between shrimp-inhabited and uninhabited sediments; shrimp-inhabited sediment contained a higher proportion of proteobacterial sequences, including in particular a twofold increase in Gammaproteobacteria. Chao1 and ACE diversity estimates showed that taxon richness within surface bacterial communities in shrimp-inhabited sediment was at least threefold higher than that in uninhabited sediment. This study shows that bioturbation can result in significant structural and compositional changes in sediment bacterial communities, increasing

  7. The structure and functions of bacterial communities in an agrocenosis

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    Dobrovol'skaya, T. G.; Khusnetdinova, K. A.; Manucharova, N. A.; Balabko, P. N.

    2016-01-01

    The most significant factor responsible for the specific taxonomic composition of the bacterial communities in the agrocenosis studied was found to be a part or organ of plants (leaves, flowers, roots, fruits). A stage of plant ontogeny also determines changes of taxa. In the course of the plant growth, eccrisotrophic bacteria are replaced by hydrolytic ones that belong to the group of cellulose-decomposing bacteria. Representatives of the proteobacteria genera that are difficult to identify by phenotypic methods were determined using molecular-biological methods. They were revealed only on oat leaves in the moist period. As the vetch-oat mixture was fertilized with BIOUD-1 (foliar application) in the phyllosphere of both oats and vetch, on all the plant organs, representatives of the Rhodococcus genus as dominants were isolated. This fact was related to the capability of bacteria to decompose the complex aromatic compounds that are ingredients of the fertilizers applied. Another positive effect for plants of the bacterial communities forming in agrocenoses is the presence of bacteria that are antagonists of phytopathogenic bacteria. Thus, in agrocenoses, some interrelationships promoting the growth and reproduction of plants are formed in crop plants and bacteria.

  8. Gut bacterial community structure of two Australian tropical fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Narit Thaochan; Richard A.I. Drew; Anuchit Chinajariyawong; Anurag Sunpapao; Chaninun Pornsuriya

    2015-01-01

    The community structure of the alimentary tract bacteria of two Australian fruit fly species, Bactrocera cacuminata (Hering) and Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), was studied using a molecular cloning method based on the 16S rRNA gene. Differences in the bacterial community structure were shown between the crops and midguts of the two species and sexes of each species. Proteobacteria was the dominant bacterial phylum in the flies, especially bacteria in the order Gammaproteobacteria w...

  9. Bacterial community structure and diversity in a black soil as affected by long-term fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Dan; YANG Qian; ZHANG Jun-Zheng; WANG Shuang; CHEN Xue-Li; ZHANG Xi-Lin; LI Wei-Qun

    2008-01-01

    Black soil (Mollisol) is one of the main soil types in northeastern China.Biolog and polymerase chain reactiondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) methods were used to examine the influence of various fertilizer combinations on the structure and function of the bacterial community in a black soil collected from Harbin,Heilongjiang Province.Biolog results showed that substrate richness and catabolic diversity of the soil bacterial community were the greatest in the chemical fertilizer and chemical fertilizer+manure treatments.The metabolic ability of the bacterial community in the manure treatment was similar to the control.DGGE fingerprinting indicated similarity in the distribution of most 16S rDNA bands among all treatments,suggesting that microorganisms with those bands were stable and not influenced by fertilization.However,chemical fertilizer increased the diversity of soil bacterial community.Principal component analysis of Biolog and DGGE data revealed that the structure and function of the bacterial community were similar in the control and manure treatments,suggesting that the application of manure increased the soil microbial population,but had no effect on the bacterial community structure.Catabolic function was similar in the chemical fertilizer and chemical fertilizer+manure treatments,but the composition structure of the soil microbes differed between them.The use of chemical fertilizers could result in a decline in the catabolic activity of fast-growing or eutrophic bacteria.

  10. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  11. Characterisation of the bacterial community structures in the intestine of Lampetra morii.

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    Li, Yingying; Xie, Wenfang; Li, Qingwei

    2016-07-01

    The metagenomic analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing method were used to investigate the bacterial community in the intestines of Lampetra morii. The bacterial community structure in L. morii intestine was relatively simple. Eight different operational taxonomic units were observed. Chitinophagaceae_unclassified (26.5 %) and Aeromonas spp. (69.6 %) were detected as dominant members at the genus level. The non-dominant genera were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (1.4 %), Candidatus Bacilloplasma (2.5 %), Enterobacteria spp. (1.5 %), Shewanella spp. (0.04 %), Vibrio spp. (0.09 %), and Yersinia spp. (1.8 %). The Shannon-Wiener (H) and Simpson (1-D) indexes were 0.782339 and 0.5546, respectively. The rarefaction curve representing the bacterial community richness and Shannon-Wiener curve representing the bacterial community diversity reached asymptote, which indicated that the sequence depth were sufficient to represent the majority of species richness and bacterial community diversity. The number of Aeromonas in lamprey intestine was two times higher after stimulation by lipopolysaccharide than PBS. This study provides data for understanding the bacterial community harboured in lamprey intestines and exploring potential key intestinal symbiotic bacteria essential for the L. morii immune response. PMID:27180095

  12. Deterministic assembly processes govern bacterial community structure in the Fynbos, South Africa.

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    Moroenyane, I; Chimphango, S B M; Wang, J; Kim, H-K; Adams, Jonathan Miles

    2016-08-01

    The Mediterranean Fynbos vegetation of South Africa is well known for its high levels of diversity, endemism, and the existence of very distinct plant communities on different soil types. Studies have documented the broad taxonomic classification and diversity patterns of soil microbial diversity, but none has focused on the community assembly processes. We hypothesised that bacterial phylogenetic community structure in the Fynbos is highly governed by deterministic processes. We sampled soils in four Fynbos vegetation types and examined bacterial communities using Illumina HiSeq platform with the 16S rRNA gene marker. UniFrac analysis showed that the community clustered strongly by vegetation type, suggesting a history of evolutionary specialisation in relation to habitats or plant communities. The standardised beta mean nearest taxon distance (ses. β NTD) index showed no association with vegetation type. However, the overall phylogenetic signal indicates that distantly related OTUs do tend to co-occur. Both NTI (nearest taxon index) and ses. β NTD deviated significantly from null models, indicating that deterministic processes were important in the assembly of bacterial communities. Furthermore, ses. β NTD was significantly higher than that of null expectations, indicating that co-occurrence of related bacterial lineages (over-dispersion in phylogenetic beta diversity) is determined by the differences in environmental conditions among the sites, even though the co-occurrence pattern did not correlate with any measured environmental parameter, except for a weak correlation with soil texture. We suggest that in the Fynbos, there are frequent shifts of niches by bacterial lineages, which then become constrained and evolutionary conserved in their new environments. Overall, this study sheds light on the relative roles of both deterministic and neutral processes in governing bacterial communities in the Fynbos. It seems that deterministic processes play a major

  13. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats. PMID:26790863

  14. Variations of Bacterial Community Structure and Composition in Mangrove Sediment at Different Depths in Southeastern Brazil

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    Lucas William Mendes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical mangroves are considered one of the most productive ecosystems of the world, being characterized as nurseries and food sources for fish and other animals. Microorganisms play important roles in these environments, and the study of bacterial communities is of paramount importance for a better comprehension of mangrove dynamics. This study focused on the structure and composition of bacterial communities in mangrove sediments at different depths and points, located in Southeastern Brazil. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP was used to determine the community structure, and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to characterize the community composition. Redundancy analysis of T-RFLP patterns revealed differences in bacterial community structure according to soil attributes and depth. The parameters K and depth presented significant correlation with general community structure. Most sequences were classified into the phylum Proteobacteria (88%, which presented differences according to the depth, where the classes Betaproteobacteria (21% and Deltaproteobacteria (16% were abundant at 10 cm and Epsilonproteobacteria (35% was abundant at 40 cm depth. Clear differences were observed in community composition as shown by the differential distribution of the phyla Firmicutes (1.13% and 3.8%, for 10 cm and 40 cm respectively, Chloroflexi (2.8% and 0.75%, and Acidobacteria (2.75% and 0.57% according to the depth. Bacterial diversity measurements indicated higher diversity in shallow samples. Taken together, our findings indicate that mangrove holds a diverse bacterial community, which is shaped by the variations found in the ecosystem, such as sediment properties and depth.

  15. Microbial activity and bacterial community structure during degradation of microcystins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; Lyck, Susanne; Winding, A.

    2002-01-01

    Degradation of realistic microcystin concentrations in lake water with indigenous bacteria was studied in laboratory and field experiments following inoculation with lysed toxic algal material containing microcystin primarily from Microcystis sp. or purified commercial microcystin-LR to microcosms...... experiment, using toxic natural algal material from 3 lakes and purified microcystin-LR, and between 2 and 54 mug 1(-1) in the field experiment, using toxic natural algal material and material from a highly toxic culture. Lysed material from a non-toxic algal culture (Scenedesmus sp.) was included in the...... slow initial degradation rates occurred in 2 out of 7 cases, Microcystin was almost eliminated from the water after around 8 d. Results from concomitant measurements of bacterial abundance and net production showed an elevated bacterial activity within 1 to 2 d after the inoculation with algal lysates...

  16. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Stauffert, Magali; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jezequel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In t...

  17. Bacterial community structure of a full-scale biofilter treating pig house exhaust air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Anja; Pedersen, Kristina Hadulla; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Schramm, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Biological air filters represent a promising tool for treating emissions of ammonia and odor from pig facilities. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing were used to investigate the bacterial community structure and diversity in a full-scale biofilter...

  18. Changes in bacterial community structure in a full-scale membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kurumi; Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Takada, Kazuki; Hamada, Hiroshi; Sakai, Kousuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Yamashita, Kyoko; Tsuji, Koji; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; Ike, Michihiko

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated changes in the structure and metabolic capabilities of the bacterial community in a full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal wastewater. Microbial monitoring was also conducted for a parallel-running conventional activated sludge (CAS) process treating the same influent. The mixed-liquor suspended solid concentration in the MBR reached a steady-state on day 73 after the start-up. Then the MBR maintained higher rates of removal of organic compounds and nitrogen than the CAS process did. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the bacterial community structure in the MBR was similar to that in the CAS process at the start-up, but it became very different from that in the CAS process in the steady state. The bacterial community structure of the MBR continued to change dynamically even after 20 months of the steady-state operation, while that of the CAS process was maintained in a stable condition. By contrast, Biolog assay revealed that the carbon source utilization potential of the MBR resembled that of the CAS process as a whole, although it declined transiently. Overall, the results indicate that the bacterial community of the MBR has flexibility in terms of its phylogenetic structure and metabolic activity to maintain the high wastewater treatment capability. PMID:26811223

  19. Community structure of actively growing bacterial populations in plant pathogen suppressive soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, K.; Lembke, A.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Smalla, K.; Jansson, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community in soil was screened by using various molecular approaches for bacterial populations that were activated upon addition of different supplements. Plasmodiophora brassicae spores, chitin, sodium acetate, and cabbage plants were added to activate specific bacterial populations a

  20. Exploring bacterial community structure and function associated with atrazine biodegradation in repeatedly treated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hua; Lian, Jianjun; Wang, Huifang; Cai, Lin; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-04-01

    Substantial application of the herbicide atrazine in agriculture leads to persistent contamination, which may damage the succeeding crops and pose potential threats to soil ecology and environmental health. Here, the degradation characteristics of atrazine and dynamic change of soil bacterial community structure and function as well as their relations were studied during three repeated treatments at the recommended, double, and five-fold doses. The results showed that the degradation half-life of atrazine obviously decreased with increased treatment frequency. Soil microbial functional diversity displayed a variation trend of suppression-recovery-stimulation, which was associated with increased degradation rate of atrazine. 16S amplicon sequencing was conducted to explore bacterial community structure and correlate the genus to potential atrazine degradation. A total of seven potentially atrazine-degrading bacterial genera were found including Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Bradyrhizobium, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium, Mycobacterium, and Clostridium. These bacterial genera showed almost complete atrazine degradation pathways including dechlorination, dealkylation, hydroxylation, and ring cleavage. Furthermore, the relative abundance of four of them (i.e., Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Methylobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium) increased with treatment frequency and atrazine concentration, suggesting that they may participate in atrazine degradation during repeated treatments. Our findings reveal the potential relationship between atrazine degradation and soil bacterial community structure in repeatedly treated soils. PMID:25603295

  1. Microbial communities of urban stormwater sediments: the phylogenetic structure of bacterial communities varies with porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Anne-Laure; Mustafa, Tarfa; Bertrand, Cédric; Monier, Armelle; Delolme, Cécile; Geremia, Roberto A; Bedell, Jean-Philippe

    2012-08-01

    This study focuses on the distribution of bacterial and fungal communities within the microstructure of a multi-contaminated sedimentary layer resulting from urban stormwater infiltration. Fractionation was performed on the basis of differential porosity and aggregate grain size, resulting in five fractions: leachable fitting macroporosity, 1000 μm. Amounts of both bacterial and fungal biomasses are greater in the < 10 μm and leachable fractions. The aggregates contain numerous bacteria but very low amounts of fungal biomass. Single-strand conformational polymorphism molecular profiles highlighted the differences between bacterial and fungal communities of the leachable fraction and those of the aggregates. Random Sanger sequencing of ssu clones revealed that these differences were mainly because of the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria and Firmicutes in the leachable fractions, while the aggregates contained more Cyanobacteria. The Cyanobacteria phylotypes in the aggregates were dominated by the sequences related to Microcoleus vaginatus while the leachable fractions presented the sequences of chloroplastic origin. Therefore, more than 50% of the phylotypes observed were related to Proteobacteria while 40% were related to Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Preferential distribution of clades in almost all the phyla or classes detected was observed. This study provides insight into the identities of dominant members of the bacterial communities of urban sediments. Microcoleus vaginatus appeared to predominate in pioneer soils. PMID:22404135

  2. Gut bacterial community structure of two Australian tropical fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narit Thaochan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The community structure of the alimentary tract bacteria of two Australian fruit fly species, Bactrocera cacuminata (Hering and Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt, was studied using a molecular cloning method based on the 16S rRNA gene. Differences in the bacterial community structure were shown between the crops and midguts of the two species and sexes of each species. Proteobacteria was the dominant bacterial phylum in the flies, especially bacteria in the order Gammaproteobacteria which was prominent in all clones. The total bacterial community consisted of Proteobacteria (more than 75% of clones, except in the crop of B. cacuminata where more than 50% of clones belonged to Firmicutes. Firmicutes gave the number of the secondary community structure in the fly’s gut. Four orders, Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria and the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were found in both fruit fly species, while the order Epsilonproteobacteria and the phylum Bacteroidetes were found only in B. tryoni. Two phyla, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were rare and less frequent in the flies. There was a greater diversity of bacteria in the crop of the two fruit fly species than in the midgut. The midgut of B. tryoni females and the midgut of B. cacuminata males had the lowest bacterial diversity.

  3. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties. PMID:25560266

  4. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial community structure in mine soils affected by mining subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuanyuan a; Chen Longqian a; ⇑; Wen Hongyu b; Zhou Tianjian a; Zhang Ting a

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 454 pyrosequencing approach, this research evaluated the influence of coal mining subsi-dence on soil bacterial diversity and community structure in Chinese mining area. In order to characterize the bacterial community comparatively, this study selected a field experiment site with coal-excavated subsidence soils and an adjacent site with non-disturbed agricultural soils, respectively. The dataset com-prises 24512 sequences that are affiliated to the 7 phylogenetic groups: proteobacteria, actinobacteria, bacteroidetes, gemmatimonadetes, chloroflexi, nitrospirae and unclassified phylum. Proteobacteria is the largest bacterial phylum in all samples, with a marked shift of the proportions of alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. The results show that undisturbed soils are relatively more diverse and rich than subsided soils, and differences in abundances of dominant taxonomic groups between the two soil groups are visible. Compared with the control, soil nutrient contents decline achieves significant level in subsided soils. Correlational analysis showed bacterial diversity indices have significantly positive corre-lation with soil organic matter, total N, total P, and available K, but in negative relation with soil salinity. Ground subsidence noticeably affects the diversity and composition of soil microbial community. Degen-eration of soil fertility and soil salinization inhibits the sole-carbon-source metabolic ability of microbial community, leading to the simplification of advantage species and uneven distribution of microbial spe-cies. This work demonstrates the great potential of pyrosequencing technique in revealing microbial diversity and presents background information of microbial communities of mine subsidence land.

  5. Impacts of methamidophos, copper, and their combinations on bacterial community structure and function in black soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Huiwen; ZHOU Qixing; ZHANG Qianru; ZHANG Chenggang

    2005-01-01

    The potential ecotoxicologial risks of methamidophos, copper, and their combinations on microbial community of black soil ecosystem in the Northeast China were assessed in species richness and structures by using 16S rDNA-PCR-DGGE analysis approach, and functional characteristics at community levels by using BIOLOGGN system analysis method as well as two conventional methods(DHA and SIR). All results of DGGE banding fingerprint patterns(amplified by bacterial specific 16S rDNA V3 high variable region universal primer) indicated that the species richness of bacterial community in tested soil was significantly decreased to different extents by using different concentrations of single methamidophos, copper, especially some of their combinations had worse effects than their corresponding single factors. In addition,the structures of soil bacterial community had been disturbed under all stresses applied in this study because of the enrichment of some species and the disappearance of other species from the bacterial community. The effects of the single factors with lower concentrations on the communiy structure were weaker than those with higher concentrations. Moreover, the bacterial community structures under the combined stresses of methamidophos and copper were significantly different from those of control and their corresponding single factors. The change of DHA and carbon source substrate utilizing fingerprint patterns based on BIOLOGGNsystem were two relatively sensitive directors corresponding to the stress presented in this study. Between methamodophos and copper, there happened the significant joint-toxic actions when they were used in combination on DHA and carbon source substrate utilizing fingerprint patterns of soil bacterial communities. The DHA of soil under the combined stresses was lower than that of the control and that under the single factors, and the BIOLOGGN substrate utilizing patterns of soil treated by combinations were distinctively

  6. Bacterial community structure in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, Kevin P.; Neilson, Julia W.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Quade, Jay; Henderson, David A.; Pryor, Barry M.; Maier, Raina M.

    2006-01-01

    Soils from the hyperarid Atacama Desert of northern Chile were sampled along an east-west elevational transect (23.75 to 24.70 degrees S) through the driest sector to compare the relative structure of bacterial communities. Analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles from each of the samples revealed that microbial communities from the extreme hyperarid core of the desert clustered separately from all of the remaining communities. Bands sequenced from DGGE profiles of two samples taken at a 22-month interval from this core region revealed the presence of similar populations dominated by bacteria from the Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes phyla.

  7. Changes of Bacterial Community Structure in Copper Mine Tailings After Colonization of Reed (Phragmites communis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Qing; REN Guan-Ju; AN Shu-Qing; SUN Qing-Ye; LIU Chang-Hong; SHUANG Jing-Lei

    2008-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from both bare and vegetated mine tailings to study the changes in bacterial communities and soil chemical properties of copper mine tailings due to reed (Phragmites communis) colonization. The structures of bacterial communities were investigated using culture-independent 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. The bacterial diversity in the bare mine tailing was lower than that of the vegetated mine tailing. The former was dominated by sulfur metabolizing bacteria, whereas the latter was by nitrogen fixing bacteria. The bare mine tailing was acidic (pH = 3.78), whereas the vegetated mine tailing was near neutral (pH = 7.28). The contents of organic matter, total nitrogen, and ammonium acetate-extractable otassium in vegetated mine tailings were significantly higher than those in the bare mine tailings (P < 0.01), whereas available phosphorus and electrical conductivity were significantly lower than those in the bare mine tailings (P < 0.01). The results demonstrated that 16S rRNA gene sequencing could be successfully used to study the bacterial diversity in mine tailings. The colonization of the mine tailings by reed significantly changed the bacterial community and the chemical properties of tailings. The complex interactions between bacteria and plants deserve further investigation.

  8. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  9. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic–inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of

  10. Effect of streptomycin treatment on bacterial community structure in the apple phyllosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Yashiro

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of many years of streptomycin use in apple orchards on the proportion of phyllosphere bacteria resistant to streptomycin and bacterial community structure. Leaf samples were collected during early July through early September from four orchards that had been sprayed with streptomycin during spring of most years for at least 10 years and four orchards that had not been sprayed. The percentage of cultured phyllosphere bacteria resistant to streptomycin at non-sprayed orchards (mean of 65% was greater than at sprayed orchards (mean of 50% (P = 0.0271. For each orchard, a 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed from leaf samples. Proteobacteria dominated the bacterial communities at all orchards, accounting for 71 of 104 OTUs (determined at 97% sequence similarity and 93% of all sequences. The genera Massilia, Methylobacterium, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas were shared across all sites. Shannon and Simpson's diversity indices and Pielou's evenness index were similar among orchards regardless of streptomycin use. Analysis of Similarity (ANOSIM indicated that long-term streptomycin treatment did not account for the observed variability in community structure among orchards (R = -0.104, P = 0.655. Other variables, including time of summer, temperature and time at sampling, and relative distance of the orchards from each other, also had no significant effect on bacterial community structure. We conclude that factors other than streptomycin exposure drive both the proportion of streptomycin-resistant bacteria and phylogenetic makeup of bacterial communities in the apple phyllosphere in middle to late summer.

  11. Petroleum-influenced beach sediments of the campeche bank, Mexico: Diversity and bacterial community structure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Mexican, either spilled or seeped out petroleum impacts nearly 300 km of the beach between Dos Bocas (Tabasco State) to Champoton town (Campeche State), where between 9 to exceptionally 9 to exceptionally 300 tonnes of oil as tar balls have been measured. This study was focused to explore, for the first time, the bacterial diversity and community structure (α-diversity)- in a kilometric scale on petroleum influenced sediments of 100 km of sandy beach. (Author)

  12. Petroleum-influenced beach sediments of the campeche bank, Mexico: Diversity and bacterial community structure assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosano-Hernandez, M. C.; Ramirez-Saad, H.; Fernandez-Linares, L.; Xoconostle, B.

    2009-07-01

    In Mexican, either spilled or seeped out petroleum impacts nearly 300 km of the beach between Dos Bocas (Tabasco State) to Champoton town (Campeche State), where between 9 to exceptionally 9 to exceptionally 300 tonnes of oil as tar balls have been measured. This study was focused to explore, for the first time, the bacterial diversity and community structure ({alpha}-diversity)- in a kilometric scale on petroleum influenced sediments of 100 km of sandy beach. (Author)

  13. Structural and functional diversity of bacterial communities of bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterial phycosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Louati, Imen

    2015-01-01

    Potentially toxic cyanobacteria blooms often occur in eutrophic aquatic ecosystems. While many studies have been published on their ecology and toxicity, few have investigated the interactions between cyanobacteria and their associated chimiotrophic bacteria within the phycosphere. This latter is the subject of this thesis. Using both natural ecosystems and laboratory approaches, we show that the structure and composition of bacterial communities (BC) associated with cyanobacteria are differe...

  14. Temporal and spatial influences incur reconfiguration of Arctic heathland soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard; Saetnan, Eli R; Scullion, John; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Ostle, Nick; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-06-01

    Microbial responses to Arctic climate change could radically alter the stability of major stores of soil carbon. However, the sensitivity of plot-scale experiments simulating climate change effects on Arctic heathland soils to potential confounding effects of spatial and temporal changes in soil microbial communities is unknown. Here, the variation in heathland soil bacterial communities at two survey sites in Sweden between spring and summer 2013 and at scales between 0-1 m and, 1-100 m and between sites (> 100 m) were investigated in parallel using 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP and amplicon sequencing. T-RFLP did not reveal spatial structuring of communities at scales changes were striking. Amplicon sequencing corroborated shifts from r- to K-selected taxon-dominated communities, influencing in silico predictions of functional potential. Network analyses reveal temporal keystone taxa, with a spring betaproteobacterial sub-network centred upon a Burkholderia operational taxonomic unit (OTU) and a reconfiguration to a summer sub-network centred upon an alphaproteobacterial OTU. Although spatial structuring effects may not confound comparison between plot-scale treatments, temporal change is a significant influence. Moreover, the prominence of two temporally exclusive keystone taxa suggests that the stability of Arctic heathland soil bacterial communities could be disproportionally influenced by seasonal perturbations affecting individual taxa. PMID:26259508

  15. Shifts in Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure During Tallgrass Prairie Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutthanandan, J.; Bailey, V. L.; Bolton, H.; Brockman, F. J.

    2002-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through the microbial community of soils results in both the storage of freshly added carbon in the soil and the release of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. It is hypothesized that fungi and bacteria cycle carbon differently, and result in different proportions of carbon stored and evolved. The intensive management of a soil will affect these proportions and thus, may also affect the terrestrial carbon cycle. The soil microbial community was monitored in four soils that form a tallgrass prairie restoration chronosequence. The chronosequence was composed of: 1) native tallgrass prairie, 2) farmland restored to tallgrass prairie in 1979, 3) farmland restored to prairie in 1993, and 4) farmland still in production with row crops. The structure of the microbial community was determined by terminal restriction fragment length analysis (T-RFLP) and we focus here on comparing bacterial and fungal domains from agriculture to native conditions. Shifts in the fungal and bacterial communities were detected that indicate that the bacteria recovered faster from changing the land use from farmland back to prairie, while the fungi are more sensitive to the perturbations of invasive agriculture and appear to be taking longer to revert to their original prairie composition. However, it must also be considered that assays of the activities of these two communities indicate that as the restoration progresses, the fungi dominate the degradation of freshly added carbon (the ratio of fungal-to-bacterial activity was 13.5:1 in the 1979 restoration, but only 0.85:1 in the farmland). Identification of this shift in community structure offers insights into monitoring ecosystem restoration and may also suggest opportunities for enhancing carbon storage by allowing marginal lands to revert to a natural condition.

  16. Temporal distribution of bacterial community structure in the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia area and the adjacent East China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial community structure and the effects of environmental factors on the microbial community distribution were investigated in the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia area and its adjacent area in the East China Sea (ECS) in June, August and October, 2006. Profiles of bacterial communities were generated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes followed by DNA sequence analysis. The dominant bacterial groups were affiliated to Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophaga–Flavobacteria–Bacteroides (CFB), Deltaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes, which were mostly from the marine seawater ecosystem. Effects of environmental factors on the bacterial community distribution were analyzed by the ordination technique of canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The environmental factors significantly influencing bacterial community structure were different in the three months; dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and temperature in June and nitrite in August. No environmental variables displayed significant influence on the bacterial community at the 5% level in October. The seasonal environmental heterogeneity in the Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent ECS, such as seasonal hydrodynamic conditions and riverine input of nutrients, might be the reason for the difference in the key environmental factors determining the bacterial community in the three months. (letter)

  17. Denitrification in agriculturally impacted streams: seasonal changes in structure and function of the bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Manis

    Full Text Available Denitrifiers remove fixed nitrogen from aquatic environments and hydrologic conditions are one potential driver of denitrification rate and denitrifier community composition. In this study, two agriculturally impacted streams in the Sugar Creek watershed in Indiana, USA with different hydrologic regimes were examined; one stream is seasonally ephemeral because of its source (tile drainage, whereas the other stream has permanent flow. Additionally, a simulated flooding experiment was performed on the riparian benches of the ephemeral stream during a dry period. Denitrification activity was assayed using the chloramphenicol amended acetylene block method and bacterial communities were examined based on quantitative PCR and terminal restriction length polymorphisms of the nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ and 16S rRNA genes. In the stream channel, hydrology had a substantial impact on denitrification rates, likely by significantly lowering water potential in sediments. Clear patterns in denitrification rates were observed among pre-drying, dry, and post-drying dates; however, a less clear scenario was apparent when analyzing bacterial community structure suggesting that denitrifier community structure and denitrification rate were not strongly coupled. This implies that the nature of the response to short-term hydrologic changes was physiological rather than increases in abundance of denitrifiers or changes in composition of the denitrifier community. Flooding of riparian bench soils had a short-term, transient effect on denitrification rate. Our results imply that brief flooding of riparian zones is unlikely to contribute substantially to removal of nitrate (NO3- and that seasonal drying of stream channels has a negative impact on NO3- removal, particularly because of the time lag required for denitrification to rebound. This time lag is presumably attributable to the time required for the denitrifiers to respond physiologically rather than a change

  18. Streptomycin application has no detectable effect on bacterial community structure in apple orchard soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Ashley; Klimowicz, Amy K; Spear, Russell N; Linske, Matthew; Donato, Justin J; Hogan, Clifford S; McManus, Patricia S; Handelsman, Jo

    2013-11-01

    Streptomycin is commonly used to control fire blight disease on apple trees. Although the practice has incited controversy, little is known about its nontarget effects in the environment. We investigated the impact of aerial application of streptomycin on nontarget bacterial communities in soil beneath streptomycin-treated and untreated trees in a commercial apple orchard. Soil samples were collected in two consecutive years at 4 or 10 days before spraying streptomycin and 8 or 9 days after the final spray. Three sources of microbial DNA were profiled using tag-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes: uncultured bacteria from the soil (culture independent) and bacteria cultured on unamended or streptomycin-amended (15 μg/ml) media. Multivariate tests for differences in community structure, Shannon diversity, and Pielou's evenness test results showed no evidence of community response to streptomycin. The results indicate that use of streptomycin for disease management has minimal, if any, immediate effect on apple orchard soil bacterial communities. This study contributes to the profile of an agroecosystem in which antibiotic use for disease prevention appears to have minimal consequences for nontarget bacteria. PMID:23974143

  19. Effect of cow slurry amendment on atrazine dissipation and bacterial community structure in an agricultural Andisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, G; Jorquera, M A; Demanet, R; Mora, M L; Durán, N; Palma, G

    2010-06-15

    Atrazine is a commonly used herbicide for maize production in Chile, but it has recently been shown to be ineffective in soils that receive applications of cow slurries generated from the dairy industry. This effect may be caused either by the sorption of the pesticide to organic matter or more rapid degradation in slurry-amended soils. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of cow slurry on atrazine dissipation, the formation of atrazine metabolites and the modification of bacterial community in Andisol. The cow slurry was applied at doses of 100,000-300,000 Lha(-1). After 4 weeks, atrazine was applied to the slurry-amended soils at concentrations of 1-3 mg kg(-1). The amounts of atrazine and its metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The soil microbial community was monitored by measurement of CO(2) evolution and changes in bacterial community using PCR-DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. The results show that cow slurry applications had no effect on atrazine dissipation, which had a half-life of 15-19 days. The atrazine metabolites were detected after 20 days and were significantly higher in soils amended with the slurry at both 20 and 40 days after application of the herbicide. Respiration rates were elevated after 10 days in all soils with atrazine addition. Both the atrazine and slurry amendments altered the bacterial community structures, indicated by the appearance of specific bands in the DGGE gels after 10 days. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes from the DGGE gels showed that the bands represented various genera of beta-proteobacteria that appeared in response to atrazine. According to our results, further field studies are required to explain the lower effectiveness of atrazine in weed control. These studies may include the effect of dissolved organic carbon on the atrazine mobility. PMID:20388570

  20. Influence of bioturbation by the polychaete Nereis diversicolor on the structure of bacterial communities in oil contaminated coastal sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Cuny, Philippe; Miralles, Gilles; Cornet-Barthaux, Véronique; Acquaviva, Monique; Stora, Georges; Grossi, Vincent; Gilbert, Franck

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of change in the structure of bacterial communities monitored by ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) in oil contaminated sediments inhabited or not by the marine polychaete Nereis diversicolor were studied during 45 days under laboratory conditions. Results supported by principal component analysis showed a marked response of the bacterial communities to the oil contamination and to the presence of N. diversicolor. Phylogenetic affiliation of specific RISA bands showed that, ...

  1. Effects of heavy metals and soil physicochemical properties on wetland soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang; Nie, Shuang; Liang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Haipeng; Hua, Shanshan; Liu, Jiayu; Yuan, Yujie; Xiao, Haibing; Deng, Linjing; Xiang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metals (HMs) contamination is a serious environmental issue in wetland soil. Understanding the micro ecological characteristic of HMs polluted wetland soil has become a public concern. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of HMs and soil physicochemical properties on soil microorganisms and prioritize some parameters that contributed significantly to soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure. Bacterial community structure was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Relationships between soil environment and microorganisms were analyzed by correlation analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). The result indicated relationship between SMB and HMs was weaker than SMB and physicochemical properties. The RDA showed all eight parameters explained 74.9% of the variation in the bacterial DGGE profiles. 43.4% (contain the variation shared by Cr, Cd, Pb and Cu) of the variation for bacteria was explained by the four kinds of HMs, demonstrating HMs contamination had a significant influence on the changes of bacterial community structure. Cr solely explained 19.4% (p<0.05) of the variation for bacterial community structure, and Cd explained 17.5% (p<0.05), indicating Cr and Cd were the major factors related to bacterial community structure changes. PMID:27046142

  2. Characterization of specificity of bacterial community structure within the burrow environment of the marine polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor

    OpenAIRE

    Pischedda, Laura; Militon, Cécile; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Bioturbation is known to stimulate microbial communities, especially in macrofaunal burrows where the abundance and activities of bacteria are increased. Until now, these microbial communities have been poorly characterized and an important ecological question remains: do burrow walls harbor similar or specific communities compared with anoxic and surface sediments? The bacterial community structure of coastal sediments inhabited by the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor was investigated. S...

  3. Bacterial and archaeal community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qun; LI Chaolun; DONG Yi; ZHANG Wenyan; ZHANG Wuchang; XIAO Tian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sedimentary ecosystem are determined by organic matter input, energy availability, and other environmental factors. However, global warming and earlier ice-cover melting are affecting the microbial diversity. To characterize the Arctic deep-sea sediment microbial diversity and its rela-tionship with environmental factors, we applied Roche 454 sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons from Arctic deep-sea sediment sample. Both bacterial and archaeal communities’ richness, compositions and structures as well as tax-onomic and phylogenetic affiliations of identified clades were characterized. Phylotypes relating to sulfur reduction and chemoorganotrophic lifestyle are major groups in the bacterial groups;while the archaeal community is domi-nated by phylotypes most closely related to the ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (96.66%) and methanogenic Euryarchaeota (3.21%). This study describes the microbial diversity in the Arctic deep marine sediment (>3 500 m) near the North Pole and would lay foundation for future functional analysis on microbial metabolic processes and pathways predictions in similar environments.

  4. Environmental context shapes the bacterial community structure associated to Peltigera cyanolichens growing in Tierra del Fuego, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Fernández, Lía; Zúñiga, Catalina; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2014-03-01

    The structure of the associated bacterial community of bipartite cyanolichens of the genus Peltigera from three different environmental contexts in the Karukinka Natural Park, Tierra del Fuego, Chile, was assessed. The sampling sites represent different habitat contexts: mature native forest, young native forest and grassland. Recently it has been determined that the bacterial community associated to lichens could be highly structured according to the mycobiont or photobiont identities, to the environmental context and/or to the geographic scale. However, there are some inconsistencies in defining which of these factors would be the most significant on determining the structure of the microbial communities associated with lichens, mainly because most studies compare the bacterial communities between different lichen species and/or with different photobiont types (algae vs. cyanobacteria). In this work bipartite lichens belonging to the same genus (Peltigera) symbiotically associated with cyanobacteria (Nostoc) were analyzed by TRFLP to determine the structure of the bacterial community intimately associated with the lichen thalli and the one present in the substrate where they grow. The results indicate that the bacterial community intimately associated differs from the one of the substrate, being the former more influenced by the environmental context where the lichen grows. PMID:24165746

  5. Bacterial Community Structure in Tree Hole Habitats of Ochlerotatus Triseriatus: Influences of Larval Feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Y.; Chen, S.; Kaufman, M. G.; Maknojia, S.; Bagdasarian, M; WALKER, E. D.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial community composition of tree holes in relation to the presence and absence of larvae of the mosquito Ochlerotatus triseriatus. Larvae were eliminated from a subset of natural tree holes with Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis, and total bacterial numbers, slow- and fast-growing colony-forming units on minimal media, and 16S rRNA gene sequence data from water column and leaf material were obtained. Total bacterial counts did not change significantly with ...

  6. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed tha...

  7. Bacterial community structure from the perspective of the uranium ore deposits of Domiasiat in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domiasiat (25°30'N 91°30'E) located in the west Khasi hill district of Meghalaya in northeast India is one of the largest sandstone-type uranium (U) ore deposit in India containing 9.22 million tonnes of ore reserves with an average ore grade of around 0.1 % U3O8. This geographically distinct U deposit of Domiasiat is un-mined and harbours diverse group of bacteria surviving the stressful environmental conditions prevalent in the ore deposit. Studies show that the diverse bacteria belonged to 10 different bacterial groups with occurrence of some previously uncharacterized bacteria. The cultured identified bacteria have been reported to tolerate substantial concentration of U and other metals and showed potent capacity for uptake and precipitation of U. Studying the bacterial community associated with such pre-mined U ore deposit are advantageous as it not only generates the baseline information on microbial community structure as resourceful indicator to estimate the impact of mining to be undertaken in future but also identifies the bacteria which can be explored for their potential as bioremediation agents for radionuclide/multi-metal waste sites. (author)

  8. Bacterial community structure across environmental gradients in permafrost thaw ponds: methanotroph-rich ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCrevecoeur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost thawing leads to the formation of thermokarst ponds that potentially emit CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. In the Nunavik subarctic region (northern Quebec, Canada, these numerous, shallow ponds become well stratified during summer. This creates a physico-chemical gradient of temperature and oxygen, with an upper oxic layer and a bottom low-oxygen or anoxic layer. Our objective was to determine the influence of stratification and related limnological and landscape properties on the community structure of potentially active bacteria in these waters. Samples for RNA analysis were taken from ponds in three contrasting valleys across a gradient of permafrost degradation. A total of 1296 operational taxonomic units were identified by high-throughput amplicon sequencing, targeting bacterial 16S rRNA that was reverse transcribed to cDNA. β-proteobacteria were the dominant group in all ponds, with highest representation by the genera Variovorax and Polynucleobacter. Methanotrophs were also among the most abundant sequences at most sites. They accounted for up to 27 % of the total sequences (median of 4.9 % for all samples, indicating the importance of methane as a bacterial energy source in these waters. Both oxygenic (cyanobacteria and anoxygenic (Chlorobi phototrophs were also well represented, the latter in the low oxygen bottom waters. Ordination analyses showed that the communities clustered according to valley and depth, with significant effects attributed to dissolved oxygen, pH, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids. These results indicate that the bacterial assemblages of permafrost thaw ponds are filtered by environmental gradients, and are complex consortia of functionally diverse taxa that likely affect the composition as well as magnitude of greenhouse gas emissions from these abundant waters.

  9. Characterization of specificity of bacterial community structure within the burrow environment of the marine polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischedda, Laura; Militon, Cécile; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Bioturbation is known to stimulate microbial communities, especially in macrofaunal burrows where the abundance and activities of bacteria are increased. Until now, these microbial communities have been poorly characterized and an important ecological question remains: do burrow walls harbor similar or specific communities compared with anoxic and surface sediments? The bacterial community structure of coastal sediments inhabited by the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor was investigated. Surface, burrow wall and anoxic sediments were collected at the Carteau beach (Gulf of Fos, Mediterranean Sea). Bacterial diversity was determined by analyzing small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) sequences from three clone libraries (168, 179 and 129 sequences for the surface, burrow wall and anoxic sediments, respectively). Libraries revealed 306 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to at least 15 bacterial phyla. Bioinformatic analyses and comparisons between the three clone libraries showed that the burrow walls harbored a specific bacterial community structure which differed from the surface and anoxic environments. More similarities were nevertheless found with the surface assemblage. Inside the burrow walls, the bacterial community was characterized by high biodiversity, which probably results from the biogeochemical heterogeneity of the burrow system. PMID:21946148

  10. Bacterial community composition and structure in an Urban River impacted by different pollutant sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, A Mark; Ma, Jincai; Murinda, Shelton E

    2016-10-01

    Microbial communities in terrestrial fresh water are diverse and dynamic in composition due to different environmental factors. The goal of this study was to undertake a comprehensive analysis of bacterial composition along different rivers and creeks and correlate these to land-use practices and pollutant sources. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to determine the total bacterial community composition, and bacterial communities that are potentially of fecal origin, and of relevance to water quality assessment. The results were analyzed using UniFrac coupled with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) to compare diversity, abundance, and community composition. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) were used to correlate bacterial composition in streams and creeks to different environmental parameters impacting bacterial communities in the sediment and surface water within the watershed. Bacteria were dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, with Bacteroidetes significantly (P<0.001) higher in all water samples than sediment, where as Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria where significantly higher (P<0.05) in all the sediment samples than surface water. Overall results, using the β diversity measures, coupled with PCoA and DCA showed that bacterial composition in sediment and surface water was significantly different (P<0.001). Also, there were differences in bacterial community composition between agricultural runoff and urban runoff based on parsimony tests using 454 pyrosequencing data. Fecal indicator bacteria in surface water along different creeks and channels were significantly correlated with pH (P<0.01), NO2 (P<0.03), and NH4N (P<0.005); and in the sediment with NO3 (P<0.015). Our results suggest that microbial community compositions were influenced by several environmental factors, and pH, NO2, and NH4 were the major environmental factors driving FIB in surface water

  11. Pyrosequencing-Based Assessment of Bacterial Community Structure Along Different Management Types in German Forest and Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, Heiko; Thürmer, Andrea; Wollherr, Antje; Will, Christiane; Hodac, Ladislav; Herold, Nadine; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Daniel, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Background Soil bacteria are important drivers for nearly all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and participate in most nutrient transformations in soil. In contrast to the importance of soil bacteria for ecosystem functioning, we understand little how different management types affect the soil bacterial community composition. Methodology/Principal Findings We used pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure in nine forest and nine grassland soils from the Schwäbische Alb that covered six different management types. The dataset comprised 598,962 sequences that were affiliated to the domain Bacteria. The number of classified sequences per sample ranged from 23,515 to 39,259. Bacterial diversity was more phylum rich in grassland soils than in forest soils. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (>1% of all sequences) were Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Significant variations in relative abundances of bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes, including Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Alphaproteobacteria, between the land use types forest and grassland were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Phenylobacter, Bacillus, Kribbella, Streptomyces, Agromyces, and Defluviicoccus. In addition, soil bacterial community structure showed significant differences between beech and spruce forest soils. The relative abundances of bacterial groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with soil pH, but little or no relationships to management type and other soil properties were found. Conclusions/Significance Soil bacterial community composition and diversity of the six analyzed management types showed significant differences between the land use types grassland

  12. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial community structure along different management types in German forest and grassland soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Nacke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil bacteria are important drivers for nearly all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and participate in most nutrient transformations in soil. In contrast to the importance of soil bacteria for ecosystem functioning, we understand little how different management types affect the soil bacterial community composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure in nine forest and nine grassland soils from the Schwäbische Alb that covered six different management types. The dataset comprised 598,962 sequences that were affiliated to the domain Bacteria. The number of classified sequences per sample ranged from 23,515 to 39,259. Bacterial diversity was more phylum rich in grassland soils than in forest soils. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (>1% of all sequences were Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Significant variations in relative abundances of bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes, including Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Alphaproteobacteria, between the land use types forest and grassland were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Phenylobacter, Bacillus, Kribbella, Streptomyces, Agromyces, and Defluviicoccus. In addition, soil bacterial community structure showed significant differences between beech and spruce forest soils. The relative abundances of bacterial groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with soil pH, but little or no relationships to management type and other soil properties were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Soil bacterial community composition and diversity of the six analyzed management types showed significant differences between the land

  13. Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belila, A; El-Chakhtoura, J; Otaibi, N; Muyzer, G; Gonzalez-Gil, G; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2016-05-01

    Microbial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m(3)/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during

  14. Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production

    KAUST Repository

    Belila, A.

    2016-02-18

    Microbial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m3/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during

  15. Differential response of high-elevation planktonic bacterial community structure and metabolism to experimental nutrient enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig E Nelson

    Full Text Available Nutrient enrichment of high-elevation freshwater ecosystems by atmospheric deposition is increasing worldwide, and bacteria are a key conduit for the metabolism of organic matter in these oligotrophic environments. We conducted two distinct in situ microcosm experiments in a high-elevation lake (Emerald Lake, Sierra Nevada, California, USA to evaluate responses in bacterioplankton growth, carbon utilization, and community structure to short-term enrichment by nitrate and phosphate. The first experiment, conducted just following ice-off, employed dark dilution culture to directly assess the impact of nutrients on bacterioplankton growth and consumption of terrigenous dissolved organic matter during snowmelt. The second experiment, conducted in transparent microcosms during autumn overturn, examined how bacterioplankton in unmanipulated microbial communities responded to nutrients concomitant with increasing phytoplankton-derived organic matter. In both experiments, phosphate enrichment (but not nitrate caused significant increases in bacterioplankton growth, changed particulate organic stoichiometry, and induced shifts in bacterial community composition, including consistent declines in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria. The dark dilution culture showed a significant increase in dissolved organic carbon removal in response to phosphate enrichment. In transparent microcosms nutrient enrichment had no effect on concentrations of chlorophyll, carbon, or the fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter, suggesting that bacterioplankton responses were independent of phytoplankton responses. These results demonstrate that bacterioplankton communities in unproductive high-elevation habitats can rapidly alter their taxonomic composition and metabolism in response to short-term phosphate enrichment. Our results reinforce the key role that phosphorus plays in oligotrophic lake ecosystems, clarify the nature of bacterioplankton nutrient

  16. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Flavia L. D.; Aquilina, Luc; De Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands.

  17. Structure and diversity of bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal communities in glacial cryoconite holes from the Arctic and the Antarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Karen A; Hodson, Andrew J; Osborn, A Mark

    2012-11-01

    The cryosphere presents some of the most challenging conditions for life on earth. Nevertheless, (micro)biota survive in a range of niches in glacial systems, including water-filled depressions on glacial surfaces termed cryoconite holes (centimetre to metre in diameter and up to 0.5 m deep) that contain dark granular material (cryoconite). In this study, the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic cryoconite communities from ten different locations in the Arctic and Antarctica was compared using T-RFLP analysis of rRNA genes. Community structure varied with geography, with greatest differences seen between communities from the Arctic and the Antarctic. DNA sequencing of rRNA genes revealed considerable diversity, with individual cryoconite hole communities containing between six and eight bacterial phyla and five and eight eukaryotic 'first-rank' taxa and including both bacterial and eukaryotic photoautotrophs. Bacterial Firmicutes and Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, eukaryotic Rhizaria, Haptophyta, Choanomonada and Centroheliozoa, and archaea were identified for the first time in cryoconite ecosystems. Archaea were only found within Antarctic locations, with the majority of sequences (77%) related to members of the Thaumarchaeota. In conclusion, this research has revealed that Antarctic and Arctic cryoconite holes harbour geographically distinct highly diverse communities and has identified hitherto unknown bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal taxa, therein. PMID:22168226

  18. Mucus sugar content shapes the bacterial community structure in thermally stressed Acropora muricata

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Sen-Lin eTang; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26°C to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed t...

  19. The Impact of Host Rock Geochemistry on Bacterial Community Structure in Oligotrophic Cave Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel A. Barton

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite extremely starved conditions, caves contain surprisingly diverse microbial communities. Our research is geared toward understanding what ecosystems drivers are responsible for this high diversity. To asses the effect of rock fabric and mineralogy, we carried out a comparative geomicrobiology study within Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, USA. Samples were collected from two different geologic locations within the cave: WF1 in the Massive Member of the Capitan Formation and sF88 in the calcareous siltstones of the Yates Formation. We examined the organic content at each location using liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy and analyzed microbial community structure using molecular phylogenetic analyses. In order to assess whether microbial activity was leading to changes in the bedrock at each location, the samples were also examined by petrology, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. Our results suggest that on the chemically complex Yates Formation (sF88, the microbial community was significantly more diverse than on the limestone surfaces of the Capitan (WF1, despite a higher total number of cells on the latter. Further, the broader diversity of bacterial species at sF88 reflected a larger range of potential metabolic capabilities, presumably due to opportunities to use ions within the rock as nutrients and for chemolithotrophic energy production. The use of these ions at sF88 is supported by the formation of a corrosion residue, presumably through microbial scavenging activities. Our results suggest that rock fabric and mineralogy may be an important driver of ecosystem function and should be carefully reviewed when carrying out microbial community analysis in cave environments.

  20. Influence of bioturbation by the polychaete Nereis diversicolor on the structure of bacterial communities in oil contaminated coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Philippe; Miralles, Gilles; Cornet-Barthaux, Véronique; Acquaviva, Monique; Stora, Georges; Grossi, Vincent; Gilbert, Franck

    2007-04-01

    Patterns of change in the structure of bacterial communities monitored by ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) in oil contaminated sediments inhabited or not by the marine polychaete Nereis diversicolor were studied during 45 days under laboratory conditions. Results supported by principal component analysis showed a marked response of the bacterial communities to the oil contamination and to the presence of N. diversicolor. Phylogenetic affiliation of specific RISA bands showed that, in the contaminated sediments, the presence of the marine polychaetes favoured the development of bacteria which may play an active role in natural bioremediation processes of oil polluted environments. PMID:17254615

  1. Bacterial diversity and community structure of a sub-surface aquifer exposed to realistic low herbicide concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipthay, Julia R. de; Johnsen, Kaare; Albrechtsen, H.-J.;

    2004-01-01

    community analyses. In contrast, no significant effect was found on the bacterial diversity, except for the culturable fraction where a significantly increased richness and Shannon index was found in the herbicide acclimated sediments. The results of this study show that in situ exposure of sub...... contaminants. We examined the effect of in situ exposure to realistic low concentrations of herbicides on the microbial diversity and community structure of sub-surface sediments from a shallow aquifer near Vejen (Denmark). Three different community analyses were performed: colony morphology typing, sole......-surface aquifers to realistic low concentrations of herbicides may alter the overall structure of a natural bacterial community, although significant effects on the genetic diversity and carbon substrate usage cannot be detected. The observed impact was probably due to indirect effects. In future investigations...

  2. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture

  3. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi, E-mail: shilpi@dbeb.iitd.ac.in

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture.

  4. Invertebrate footprints on detritus processing, bacterial community structure, and spatiotemporal redox profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Hunting, E.R.; Whatley, M. H.; Geest, van der, A.H.M.; Mulder, C; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A M; Admiraal, W.

    2012-01-01

    Detritus processing is driven by a complex interplay between macroinvertebrate and microbial activities. Bioturbation/feeding activities of invertebrates in sediments are known to influence decomposition rates. However, direct effects of invertebrates on bacterial communities and detritus processing remain ill-defined, mainly because identifying interactions between invertebrates and sediments is methodologically challenging. We incubated 5 macroinvertebrate species with various bioturbation/...

  5. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, O.; Musilová, L.; Rídl, Jakub; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Koubek, J.; Holečková, M.; Mackova, M.; Macek, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 20 (2013), s. 9245-9256. ISSN 0175-7598 Grant ostatní: EK(XE) 265946; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10041 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : plant secondary metabolites (PSM) * bacterial community * metabolic activity * bioremediation * pyrosequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.811, year: 2013

  6. The Effect of a Sublethal Temperature Elevation on the Structure of Bacterial Communities Associated with the Coral Porites compressa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Salerno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence points to a link between environmental stressors, coral-associated bacteria, and coral disease; however, few studies have examined the details of this relationship under tightly controlled experimental conditions. To address this gap, an array of closed-system, precision-controlled experimental aquaria were used to investigate the effects of an abrupt 1°C above summer ambient temperature increase on the bacterial community structure and photophysiology of Porites compressa corals. While the temperature treatment rapidly impacted the photophysiology of the coral host, it did not elicit a statistically significant shift in bacterial community structure from control, untreated corals as determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Two of three coral colonies harbored more closely related bacterial communities at the time of collection and, despite statistically significant shifts in bacterial community structure for both control and treatment corals during the 10-day acclimation period, maintained this relationship over the course of the experiment. The experimental design used in this study proved to be a robust, reproducible system for investigating coral microbiology in an aquarium setting.

  7. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

    2013-02-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two. PMID:22974374

  8. Effects of ecological engineered oxygenation on the bacterial community structure in an anoxic fjord in western Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forth, M.; Liljebladh, B.; Stigebrandt, A.;

    2015-01-01

    study, investigating the effects of an engineered oxygenation on long-term anoxic bottom waters. The strong stratification of the water column of the Byfjord was broken up by pumping surface water into the deeper layers, triggering several inflows of oxygen-rich water and increasing oxygen levels in the...... lower water column and the benthic zone up to 110 mumol l(-1).We used molecular ecologic methods to study changes in bacterial community structure in response to the oxygenation in the Byfjord. Water column samples from before, during and after the oxygenation as well as from two nearby control fjords...... after the oxygenation was accomplished. In contrast, aerobic species like SAR11 that initially were restricted to surface waters could later be detected deep into the water column. Overall, the bacterial community in the formerly anoxic bottom waters changed to a community structure similar to those...

  9. A multifactor analysis of fungal and bacterial community structure in the root microbiome of mature Populus deltoides trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migun Shakya

    Full Text Available Bacterial and fungal communities associated with plant roots are central to the host health, survival and growth. However, a robust understanding of the root-microbiome and the factors that drive host associated microbial community structure have remained elusive, especially in mature perennial plants from natural settings. Here, we investigated relationships of bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere and root endosphere of the riparian tree species Populus deltoides, and the influence of soil parameters, environmental properties (host phenotype and aboveground environmental settings, host plant genotype (Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR markers, season (Spring vs. Fall and geographic setting (at scales from regional watersheds to local riparian zones on microbial community structure. Each of the trees sampled displayed unique aspects to its associated community structure with high numbers of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs specific to an individual trees (bacteria >90%, fungi >60%. Over the diverse conditions surveyed only a small number of OTUs were common to all samples within rhizosphere (35 bacterial and 4 fungal and endosphere (1 bacterial and 1 fungal microbiomes. As expected, Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were dominant in root communities (>50% while other higher-level phylogenetic groups (Chytridiomycota, Acidobacteria displayed greatly reduced abundance in endosphere compared to the rhizosphere. Variance partitioning partially explained differences in microbiome composition between all sampled roots on the basis of seasonal and soil properties (4% to 23%. While most variation remains unattributed, we observed significant differences in the microbiota between watersheds (Tennessee vs. North Carolina and seasons (Spring vs. Fall. SSR markers clearly delineated two host populations associated with the samples taken in TN vs. NC, but overall host genotypic distances did not have a significant effect on corresponding communities

  10. A multifactor analysis of fungal and bacterial community structure of the root microbiome of mature Populus deltoides trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakya, Migun [ORNL; Gottel, Neil R [ORNL; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F [ORNL; Yang, Zamin [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Bonito, Gregory [Duke University; Vilgalys, Rytas [Duke University; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities associated with plant roots are central to the host- health, survival and growth. However, a robust understanding of root-microbiome and the factors that drive host associated microbial community structure have remained elusive, especially in mature perennial plants from natural settings. Here, we investigated relationships of bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere and root endosphere of the riparian tree species Populus deltoides, and the influence of soil parameters, environmental properties (host phenotype and aboveground environmental settings), host plant genotype (Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers), season (Spring vs. Fall) and geographic setting (at scales from regional watersheds to local riparian zones) on microbial community structure. Each of the trees sampled displayed unique aspects to it s associated community structure with high numbers of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) specific to an individual trees (bacteria >90%, fungi >60%). Over the diverse conditions surveyed only a small number of OTUs were common to all samples within rhizosphere (35 bacterial and 4 fungal) and endosphere (1 bacterial and 1 fungal) microbiomes. As expected, Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were dominant in root communities (>50%) while other higher-level phylogenetic groups (Chytridiomycota, Acidobacteria) displayed greatly reduced abundance in endosphere compared to the rhizosphere. Variance partitioning partially explained differences in microbiome composition between all sampled roots on the basis of seasonal and soil properties (4% to 23%). While most variation remains unattributed, we observed significant differences in the microbiota between watersheds (Tennessee vs. North Carolina) and seasons (Spring vs. Fall). SSR markers clearly delineated two host populations associated with the samples taken in TN vs. NC, but overall genotypic distances did not have a significant effect on corresponding communities that could be

  11. Controls on bacterial and archaeal community structure and greenhouse gas production in natural, mined, and restored Canadian peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBasiliko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands are important global C reservoirs, largely because of their slow rates of microbial C mineralization. Particularly in sites that are heavily influenced by anthropogenic disturbances, there is scant information about microbial ecology and whether or not microbial community structure influences greenhouse gas production. This work characterized communities of bacteria and archaea using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and functional genes across eight natural, mined, or restored peatlands in two locations in eastern Canada. Correlations were explored among chemical properties of peat, bacterial and archaeal community structure, and carbon dioxide and methane production rates under oxic and anoxic conditions. Bacteria and archaea similar to those found in other peat soil environments were detected. In contrast to other reports, methanogen diversity was low in our study, with only 2 groups of known or suspected methanogens. Although mining and restoration affected substrate availability and microbial activity, these land-uses did not consistently affect bacterial or archaeal community composition. In fact, larger differences were observed between the two locations and between oxic and anoxic peat samples than between mined and restored sites, with anoxic samples characterized by less detectable bacterial diversity and stronger dominance by members of the phylum Acidobacteria. There were also no apparent strong linkages between prokaryote community structure and methane or carbon dioxide production, suggesting that different organisms exhibit functional redundancy and/or that the same taxa function at very different rates when exposed to different peat substrates. In contrast to other earlier work focusing on fungal communities across similar mined and restored peatlands, bacterial and archaeal communities appeared to be more resistant or resilient to peat substrate changes brought

  12. Bioaugmentation of Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B affects hydrogen production through altering indigenous bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Shi, Xiaoshuang; He, Shuai; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Qiu, Yanling; Dang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-07-01

    Bioaugmentation can facilitate hydrogen production from complex organic substrates, but it still is unknown how indigenous microbial communities respond to the added bacteria. Here, using a Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B (named as LX-B) bioaugmentation experiments, the distribution of metabolites and the responses of indigenous bacterial communities were investigated via batch cultivation (BC) and repeated batch cultivation (RBC). In BC the LX-B/sludge ratio of 0.12 achieved substantial high hydrogen yield, which was over twice that of control. In RBC one-time bioaugmentation and repeated batch bioaugmentation of LX-B resulted in the hydrogen yield that was average 1.2-fold and 0.8-fold higher than that in control, respectively. This improved hydrogen production performance mainly benefited from a shift in composition of the indigenous bacterial community caused by LX-B bioaugmentation. The findings represented an important step in understanding the relationship between bioaugmentation, a shift in bacterial communities, and altered bioreactor performance. PMID:27023388

  13. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonny T M; Davy, Simon K; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral's mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose, and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont. PMID:27047481

  14. Mucus sugar content shapes the bacterial community structure in thermally stressed Acropora muricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonny T.M. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26°C to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally-stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont.

  15. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose, and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont. PMID:27047481

  16. Soil Parameters Drive the Structure, Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of the Bacterial Communities Across Temperate Beech Forest Soil Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbille, M; Buée, M; Bach, C; Cébron, A; Frey-Klett, P; Turpault, M P; Uroz, S

    2016-02-01

    Soil and climatic conditions as well as land cover and land management have been shown to strongly impact the structure and diversity of the soil bacterial communities. Here, we addressed under a same land cover the potential effect of the edaphic parameters on the soil bacterial communities, excluding potential confounding factors as climate. To do this, we characterized two natural soil sequences occurring in the Montiers experimental site. Spatially distant soil samples were collected below Fagus sylvatica tree stands to assess the effect of soil sequences on the edaphic parameters, as well as the structure and diversity of the bacterial communities. Soil analyses revealed that the two soil sequences were characterized by higher pH and calcium and magnesium contents in the lower plots. Metabolic assays based on Biolog Ecoplates highlighted higher intensity and richness in usable carbon substrates in the lower plots than in the middle and upper plots, although no significant differences occurred in the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities along the soil sequences as assessed using quantitative PCR. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundantly represented phyla. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Chlamydiae were significantly enriched in the most acidic and nutrient-poor soils compared to the Bacteroidetes, which were significantly enriched in the soils presenting the higher pH and nutrient contents. Interestingly, aluminium, nitrogen, calcium, nutrient availability and pH appeared to be the best predictors of the bacterial community structures along the soil sequences. PMID:26370112

  17. Early Changes in Soil Metabolic Diversity and Bacterial Community Structure in Sugarcane under Two Harvest Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Carvalho Basilio Azevedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preharvest burning is widely used in Brazil for sugarcane cropping. However, due to environmental restrictions, harvest without burning is becoming the predominant option. Consequently, changes in the microbial community are expected from crop residue accumulation on the soil surface, as well as alterations in soil metabolic diversity as of the first harvest. Because biological properties respond quickly and can be used to monitor environmental changes, we evaluated soil metabolic diversity and bacterial community structure after the first harvest under sugarcane management without burning compared to management with preharvest burning. Soil samples were collected under three sugarcane varieties (SP813250, SP801842 and RB72454 and two harvest management systems (without and with preharvest burning. Microbial biomass C (MBC, carbon (C substrate utilization profiles, bacterial community structure (based on profiles of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, and soil chemical properties were determined. MBC was not different among the treatments. C-substrate utilization and metabolic diversity were lower in soil without burning, except for the evenness index of C-substrate utilization. Soil samples under the variety SP801842 showed the greatest changes in substrate utilization and metabolic diversity, but showed no differences in bacterial community structure, regardless of the harvest management system. In conclusion, combined analysis of soil chemical and microbiological data can detect early changes in microbial metabolic capacity and diversity, with lower values in management without burning. However, after the first harvest, there were no changes in the soil bacterial community structure detected by PCR-DGGE under the sugarcane variety SP801842. Therefore, the metabolic profile is a more sensitive indicator of early changes in the soil microbial community caused by the harvest management system.

  18. Temporally invariable bacterial community structure in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Bandekar, M.; Gomes, J.; Shenoy, D.M.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, H.; Khandeparkar, R.; Ramaiah, N.

    matter hydrolysis. As Strom (2008) suggested, knowledge of bacterial community composition and their spatial and temporal variation is important for understanding their role in marine biogeochemistry. Intermediate layers in some of the most productive... occurring within the OMZ, phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of the microorganisms inhabiting therein are poorly known (Riemann et al 1999; Fuchs et al 2005, Stevens and Ulloa, 2008). The Arabian Sea is an intensely dynamic region modulated seasonally...

  19. Structural and functional response of the soil bacterial community to application of manure from difloxacin-treated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jechalke, Sven; Focks, Andreas; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Groeneweg, Joost; Siemens, Jan; Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Difloxacin (DIF) belongs to the class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics that have been intensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this field study was to compare the effect of manure from DIF-treated pigs and untreated pigs on the bacterial community structure and resistance gene abundance in bulk soil and rhizosphere of maize. A significant effect of DIF manure on the bacterial community composition in bulk soil was revealed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA. In few samples, quinolone resistance genes qnrB and qnrS1/qnrS2 were detected by PCR and subsequent hybridization, while qnrA was not detected. Quantitative PCR revealed an increased abundance of the integrase gene intI1 of class I integrons and sulfonamide resistance genes sul1 and sul2 in DIF manure-treated bulk soil and rhizosphere, relative to 16S rRNA genes, while traN genes specific for LowGC-type plasmids were increased only in bulk soil. Principal component analysis of DGGE profiles suggested a manure effect in soil until day 28, but samples of days 71 and 140 were found close to untreated soil, indicating resilience of soil community compositions from disturbances by manure. PMID:23962048

  20. Interspecific variation of the bacterial community structure in the phyllosphere of the three major plant components of mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouveia; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Luvizotto, Danice Mazzer; da Silva, João Luis; Nascimento, Rosely dos Santos; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2012-01-01

    Mangrove forests encompass a group of trees species that inhabit the intertidal zones, where soil is characterized by the high salinity and low availability of oxygen. The phyllosphere of these trees represent the habitat provided on the aboveground parts of plants, supporting in a global scale, a large and complex microbial community. The structure of phyllosphere communities reflects immigration, survival and growth of microbial colonizers, which is influenced by numerous environmental factors in addition to leaf physical and chemical properties. Here, a combination of culture-base methods with PCR-DGGE was applied to test whether local or plant specific factors shape the bacterial community of the phyllosphere from three plant species (Avicenia shaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle), found in two mangroves. The number of bacteria in the phyllosphere of these plants varied between 3.62 x 104 in A. schaeriana and 6.26 x 103 in R. mangle. The results obtained by PCR-DGGE and isolation approaches were congruent and demonstrated that each plant species harbor specific bacterial communities in their leaves surfaces. Moreover, the ordination of environmental factors (mangrove and plant species), by redundancy analysis (RDA), also indicated that the selection exerted by plant species is higher than mangrove location on bacterial communities at phyllosphere. PMID:24031877

  1. Host phylogeny and diet structure its bacterial community: a case study of various fig wasps coexisting in Ficus hispida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Niu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The composition of a microbial community may be driven by geographic isolation, diet, and the phylogenies of host organisms. A null hypothesis was that the evolutionary history of microbial communities reflects the phylogenies of their respective hymenopteran hosts. The objective of this study was to test this hypothesis using four fig wasp species (Ceratosolen solmsi Mayr, Apocrypta bakeri Joseph, Philotrypesis pilosa Mayr, and Philotrypesis sp. Forster, which coexist in the spatially isolated fig cavities of Ficus hispida Linnaeus. The bacterial communities of the four fig wasps were investigated using culture-independent methods. The results show that these wasps harbored a total of 53 operational taxonomic units (3% distance cutoff for 16S rDNA sequences, and were dominated by Proteobacteria. Herbivore C. solmsi mainly harbored γ-proteobacteria (65.3% and Actinobacteridae (23.9%. Potential omnivore P. pilosa was dominated by α- and γ-proteobacteria (80.5% and 4.9%. β-proteobacteria and Acidobacteria represented the majority of the bacterial communities of carnivores Philotrypesis sp. (51.2% and 16.8% and A. bakeri (52.7% and 12.5%. Contrary to our hypothesis, the bacterial communities of the four fig wasps were clustered into three groups, which might be structured by both the diet and phylogenies of the host species. The fig-fig wasp system provides an isolated model for the extensive exploration of the ecological associations between insects and their microbes.

  2. Short term exposure to elevated trinitrotoluene concentrations induced structural and functional changes in the soil bacterial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the acute impact of trinitrotoluene (TNT) contamination of soil on the aerobic bacterial community composition and function. The contamination of the environment with explosive residues presents a serious problem at sites across the world, with the highly toxic compound TNT being the most widespread explosive contaminant. We investigated the acute impact of trinitrotoluene (TNT) contamination of soil on the aerobic bacterial community composition and function. Soil microcosms were amended with a range of concentrations of TNT for 30 days. A polyphasic approach encompassing culture-independent molecular analysis by DGGE, community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) and cell enumeration revealed that the amendment of soils with TNT resulted in a shift from slower growing k-strategists towards faster growing r-strategists. Pseudomonads became prevalent at high concentrations of TNT. Pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) was observed as TNT concentrations increased. Chemical analyses revealed that TNT was reduced to its amino derivatives, products of reductive microbial transformation. The transformation to amino derivatives decreased at high concentrations of TNT, indicative of inhibition of microbial TNT transformation. - The bacterial community structure, function and diversity changed when soil was amended with TNT; pseudomonads increased in prevalence and tolerance to TNT toxicity increased

  3. Age polyethism drives community structure of the bacterial gut microbiota in the fungus-cultivating termite Odontotermes formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjie; Dietrich, Carsten; Zhu, Na; Mikaelyan, Aram; Ma, Bin; Pi, Ruoxi; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mengyi; Brune, Andreas; Mo, Jianchu

    2016-05-01

    Fungus-cultivating termites (Macrotermitinae) possess an elaborate strategy of lignocellulose digestion. It involves a lignocellulose-degrading fungal symbiont (genus Termitomyces), a diverse gut microbiota and a characteristic labour division in food processing. In this study, using pyrotag sequencing and electron microscopy, we analysed the bacterial microbiota in the hindgut of Odontotermes formosanus and its fungus comb to investigate the spatial organization, establishment and temporal succession of the bacterial communities colonizing specific microhabitats. Our results document strong differences between the communities at the hindgut epithelium and the luminal fluid of newly moulted, young and old worker termites. The differences in community structure were consistent with the density, morphology and spatial distribution of bacterial cells and the pools of microbial metabolites in the hindgut compartment, underlining that both gut development and the age-specific changes in diet affect the composition and functional role of their gut microbiota. These findings provide strong support for the concept that changes in diet and gut environment are important determinants of community structure because they create new niches for microbial symbionts. PMID:26346907

  4. Effect of amendments with excrements from CTC-treated cows on bacterial community structure in pasture soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chroňáková, Alica; Kyselková, Martina; Elhottová, Dana

    Braunschweig: Thünen Institute of Biodiversity, 2013. s. 72. [Thünen Symposium on Soil Metagenomics . Mining and Learning from Metagenomes /2./. 11.12.2013-13.12.2013, Braunschweig] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/2077; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13046 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : CTC-treated cows * bacterial community structure * pasture soils * excrements Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  5. Taxonomic Structure and Stability of the Bacterial Community in Belgian Sourdough Ecosystems as Assessed by Culture and Population Fingerprinting▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Scheirlinck, Ilse; Van der Meulen, Roel; Van Schoor, Ann; Vancanneyt, Marc; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter; Huys, Geert

    2008-01-01

    A total of 39 traditional sourdoughs were sampled at 11 bakeries located throughout Belgium which were visited twice with a 1-year interval. The taxonomic structure and stability of the bacterial communities occurring in these traditional sourdoughs were assessed using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. A total of 1,194 potential lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolates were tentatively grouped and identified by repetitive element sequence-based PCR, followed by sequence-base...

  6. Effect of Activated Carbon Amendment on Bacterial Community Structure and Functions in a PAH Impacted Urban Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Meynet, Paola; Hale, Sarah E.; Davenport, Russell J; Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D.; Werner, David

    2012-01-01

    We collected urban soil samples impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a sorbent-based remediation field trial to address concerns about unwanted side-effects of 2% powdered (PAC) or granular (GAC) activated carbon amendment on soil microbiology and pollutant biodegradation. After three years, total microbial cell counts and respiration rates were highest in the GAC amended soil. The predominant bacterial community structure derived from denaturing gradient gel electrophores...

  7. Effects of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on the bacterial community structure and degradation of pyrene in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecological consequences of antibiotics in the aquatic environment have been an issue of concern over the past years due to the potential risk for negative effects on indigenous microorganisms. Microorganisms provide important ecosystem services, such as nutrient recycling, organic matter mineralization and degradation of pollutants. In this study, effects of exposure to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on the bacterial diversity and pollutant degradation in natural marine sediments were studied using molecular methods (T-RFLP) in combination with radiorespirometry. In a microcosm experiment, sediment spiked with 14C-labelled pyrene was exposed to five concentrations of ciprofloxacin (0, 20, 200, 1000 and 2000 μg L-1) in a single dose to the overlying water. The production of 14CO2 (i.e. complete mineralization of pyrene) was measured during 11 weeks. Sediment samples for bacterial community structure analysis were taken after 7 weeks. Results showed a significant dose-dependent inhibition of pyrene mineralization measured as the total 14CO2 production. The nominal EC50 was calculated to 560 μg L-1, corresponding to 0.4 μg/kg d.w. sediment. The lowest effect concentration on the bacterial community structure was 200 μg L-1, which corresponds to 0.1 μg/kg d.w. sediment. Our results show that antibiotic pollution can be a potential threat to both bacterial diversity and an essential ecosystem service they perform in marine sediment

  8. Distinct bacterial community structure of 3 tropical volcanic soils from banana plantations contaminated with chlordecone in Guadeloupe (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Anne; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Harris-Hellal, Jennifer; Breeze, Dominique; Mouvet, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    In the French West Indies (FWI), the soil, andosols, ferralsols and nitisols, is highly polluted by chlordecone, although this organochlorine insecticide extensively applied to banana crops has been banned for 20years. This contamination has led to a major human health concern inducing the need for remediation of the contaminated soils. Work was conducted to help to evaluate the impact of remediation processes on the microbial communities from these soils. Microbial biomass was estimated after direct DNA extraction from three chlordecone-contaminated soils (an andosol, a ferralsol and a nitisol) and the bacterial community analyzed using t-RFLP. The FWI volcanic andosol was particularly recalcitrant to usual direct DNA extraction protocols hampering analysis of soil microbial communities until now, in contrast with the 2 other soils. For the first time, DNA was directly extracted from a FWI andosol based on yeast RNA addition at the lysis step. Differences in microbial biomass were thus observed between the 3 FWI soils. Moreover, the bacterial community structure was significantly distinct from each other's and related to soil physico-chemical characteristics. Interestingly, differences in bacterial diversity could not be exclusively attributed to the level of chlordecone contamination. PMID:23706897

  9. Effects of solid-phase denitrification on the nitrate removal and bacterial community structure in recirculating aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianlei; Liu, Lili; Gao, Min; Zhang, Lanhe; Tursun, Haireti; Wang, Xuming

    2016-06-01

    A solid-phase denitrification (SPD) reactor packed with poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) as a carbon source was incorporated into a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) to remove accumulated nitrate. Bacterial community structures in different parts of the RAS, including biofilter unit, SPD reactor, and culture water, were analyzed using Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. The data showed that nitrate levels decreased remarkably in the RAS connected with SPD reactor (RAS-DR). In contrast, nitrate levels increased continuously in the conventional RAS without SPD reactor (RAS-CK). Biofilter unit and culture water in RAS-DR developed lower species richness and higher bacterial community diversity than that in RAS-CK. The bacterial community structure of RAS was significantly affected by the SPD process and the changes included an increase in the proportion of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes and a decrease in Nitrospira abundance in RAS-DR. Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum (56.9 %) and mainly consisted of Clostridium sensu stricto (48.3 %) in SPD reactor. PMID:27125529

  10. The relationship between sea ice bacterial community structure and biogeochemistry: A synthesis of current knowledge and known unknowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff S. Bowman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sea ice plays an important role in high latitude biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems, and climate. A complete understanding of how sea ice biogeochemistry contributes to these processes must take into account the metabolic functions of the sea ice bacterial community. While the roles of sea ice bacteria in the carbon cycle and sea ice microbial loop are evidenced by high rates of bacterial production (BP, their metabolic diversity extends far beyond heterotrophy, and their functionality encompasses much more than carbon turnover. Work over the last three decades has identified an active role for sea ice bacteria in phosphate and nitrogen cycling, mutualistic partnerships with ice algae, and even prokaryotic carbon fixation. To better understand the role of sea ice bacteria in the carbon cycle the existing sea ice BP and primary production data were synthesized. BP in sea ice was poorly correlated with primary production, but had a strong, variable relationship with chlorophyll a, with a positive correlation below 50 mg chlorophyll a m-3 and a negative correlation above this value. These results concur with previous work suggesting that BP can be inhibited by grazing or the production of bacteriostatic compounds. To extend existing observations and predictions of other community functions a metabolic inference technique was used on the available 16S rRNA gene data. This analysis provided taxonomic support for some observed metabolic processes, as well as underexplored processes such as sulfur oxidation and nitrogen fixation. The decreasing spatial and temporal extent of sea ice, and altered timing of ice formation and melt, are likely to impact the structure and function of sea ice bacterial communities. An adequate modeling framework and studies that can resolve the functional dynamics of the sea ice bacterial community, such as community gene expression studies, are urgently needed to predict future change.

  11. Impacts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on nutrient removal from wastewater and bacterial community structure in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reti Hai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. AIMS: To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. METHODS: Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. RESULTS: Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. CONCLUSION: MWCNTs have adverse effects on

  12. Buccal swabbing as a noninvasive method to determine bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic microbial community structures in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Kirk, Michelle R; Jonker, Arjan; McCulloch, Alan; Janssen, Peter H

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of rumen microbial community structure based on small-subunit rRNA marker genes in metagenomic DNA samples provides important insights into the dominant taxa present in the rumen and allows assessment of community differences between individuals or in response to treatments applied to ruminants. However, natural animal-to-animal variation in rumen microbial community composition can limit the power of a study considerably, especially when only subtle differences are expected between treatment groups. Thus, trials with large numbers of animals may be necessary to overcome this variation. Because ruminants pass large amounts of rumen material to their oral cavities when they chew their cud, oral samples may contain good representations of the rumen microbiota and be useful in lieu of rumen samples to study rumen microbial communities. We compared bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic community structures in DNAs extracted from buccal swabs to those in DNAs from samples collected directly from the rumen by use of a stomach tube for sheep on four different diets. After bioinformatic depletion of potential oral taxa from libraries of samples collected via buccal swabs, bacterial communities showed significant clustering by diet (R = 0.37; analysis of similarity [ANOSIM]) rather than by sampling method (R = 0.07). Archaeal, ciliate protozoal, and anaerobic fungal communities also showed significant clustering by diet rather than by sampling method, even without adjustment for potentially orally associated microorganisms. These findings indicate that buccal swabs may in future allow quick and noninvasive sampling for analysis of rumen microbial communities in large numbers of ruminants. PMID:26276109

  13. Effects of temperature and fertilization on the structure of total versus active bacterial communities from sub-Antarctic seawater exposed to crude oil and diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Rodríguez-Blanco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polar environments are exposed to the risk of oil pollution. However, there is limited knowledge regarding how the variation of physicochemical factors influencing biodegradation may affect bacterial community structure. The effects of temperature (4, 10 and 20°C and organic fertilization (Inipol EAP 22 on community structure and diversity of bacteria inhabiting Kerguelen sub-Antarctic waters were studied in crude- and diesel-amended microcosms. Dynamics of total (i.e., 16S rDNA-based and metabolically active (i.e., 16S rRNA-based bacterial community structure and diversity were monitored using capillary-electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results showed that total and active community structures were differently influenced by temperature and fertilization in the presence of hydrocarbons. Both fertilization and temperature induced changes in total community structure in the presence of crude oil and diesel. However, temperature showed a limited influence on active community structure, and fertilization induced changes in the presence of crude oil only. Simpson's index decreased for total bacterial communities at all temperatures in the presence of crude oil and diesel, whereas a lower reduction was observed for active bacterial populations. In the presence of fertilizer, the diversity of the whole community approached control values after seven incubation weeks; this was not observed for the active bacterial community. This study evidenced qualitative differences in total and active bacterial community structures of Kerguelen seawaters in the presence of hydrocarbons and different responses relative to variation in temperature and fertilization. These factors and hydrocarbons composition have to be taken into account to understand bacterial community dynamics after an oil spill.

  14. Photoautotrophic symbiont and geography are major factors affecting highly structured and diverse bacterial communities in the lichen microbiome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodkinson, Brendan P [ORNL; Gottel, Neil R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Lutzoni, Francois [Duke University

    2011-01-01

    Although common knowledge dictates that the lichen thallus is formed solely by a fungus (mycobiont) that develops a symbiotic relationship with an alga and/or cyanobacterium (photobiont), the non-photoautotrophic bacteria found in lichen microbiomes are increasingly regarded as integral components of lichen thalli. For this study, comparative analyses were conducted on lichen-associated bacterial communities to test for effects of photobiont-types (i.e. green algal vs. cyanobacterial), mycobiont-types and large-scale spatial distances (from tropical to arctic latitudes). Amplicons of the 16S (SSU) rRNA gene were examined using both Sanger sequencing of cloned fragments and barcoded pyrosequencing. Rhizobiales is typically the most abundant and taxonomically diverse order in lichen microbiomes; however, overall bacterial diversity in lichens is shown to be much higher than previously reported. Members of Acidobacteriaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Brucellaceae and sequence group LAR1 are the most commonly found groups across the phylogenetically and geographically broad array of lichens examined here. Major bacterial community trends are significantly correlated with differences in large-scale geography, photobiont-type and mycobiont-type. The lichen as a microcosm represents a structured, unique microbial habitat with greater ecological complexity and bacterial diversity than previously appreciated and can serve as a model system for studying larger ecological and evolutionary principles.

  15. Structural and functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities following woody plant encroachment in the southern Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollister, Emily B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Ansley, R J [Texas A& M University; Boutton, Thomas W [Texas A& M University

    2010-01-01

    In the southern Great Plains (USA), encroachment of grassland ecosystems by Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite) is widespread. Mesquite encroachment alters net primary productivity, enhances stores of C and N in plants and soil, and leads to increased levels of soil microbial biomass and activity. While mesquite's impact on the biogeochemistry of the region is well established, it effects on soil microbial diversity and function are unknown. In this study, soils associated with four plant types (C{sub 3} perennial grasses, C{sub 4} midgrasses, C{sub 4} shortgrasses, and mesquite) from a mesquite-encroached mixed grass prairie were surveyed to in an attempt to characterize the structure, diversity, and functional capacity of their soil microbial communities. rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used in conjunction with the GeoChip functional gene array to evaluate these potential differences. Mesquite soil supported increased bacterial and fungal diversity and harbored a distinct fungal community relative to other plant types. Despite differences in composition and diversity, few significant differences were detected with respect to the potential functional capacity of the soil microbial communities. These results may suggest that a high level of functional redundancy exists within the bacterial portion of the soil communities; however, given the bias of the GeoChip toward bacterial functional genes, potential functional differences among soil fungi could not be addressed. The results of this study illustrate the linkages shared between above- and belowground communities and demonstrate that soil microbial communities, and in particular soil fungi, may be altered by the process of woody plant encroachment.

  16. Contrasting soil bacterial community structure between the phyla Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria in tropical Southeast Asian and temperate Japanese forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Naohiko T

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacterial community structures of six dominant phyla (Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria) and unclassified bacteria detected in tropical Sarawakian and temperate Japanese forests were compared based on 16S rRNA gene sequence variation. The class composition in each phylum was similar among the studied forests; however, significant heterogeneities of class frequencies were detected. Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were the most dominant phyla in all six forests, but differed in the level of bacterial species diversity, pattern of species occurrence and association pattern of species composition with physicochemical properties in soil. Species diversity among Acidobacteria was approximately half that among Proteobacteria, based on the number of clusters and the Chao1 index, even though a similar number of sequence reads were obtained for these two phyla. In contrast, species diversity within Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes was nearly as high as within Acidobacteria, despite many fewer sequence reads. The density of species (the number of sequence reads per cluster) correlated negatively with species diversity, and species density within Acidobacteria was approximately twice that within Proteobacteria. Although the percentage of forest-specific species was high for all bacterial groups, sampling site-specific species varied among bacterial groups, indicating limited inter-forest migration and differential movement of bacteria in forest soil. For five of the seven bacterial groups, including Acidobacteria, soil pH appeared to strongly influence species composition, but this association was not observed for Proteobacterial species. Topology of UPGMA trees and pattern of NMDS plots among the forests differed among the bacterial groups, suggesting that each bacterial group has adapted and evolved independently in each forest. PMID:26399766

  17. Differences in crop bacterial community structure between hoatzins from different geographical locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Leal, Sara J; Díaz, Wilmer A; Rosales, Judith; Goldfarb, Katherine C; García-Amado, María A; Michelangeli, Fabían; Brodie, Eoin L; Domínguez-Bello, María G

    2012-04-01

    The hoatzin is the only known folivorous bird with foregut fermentation, and is distributed in Venezuela in rivers of the central savannas to the eastern Orinoco River. Differences in diet are expected to affect the digestive microbiota and we hypothesized that hoatzins from different habitats might have a different crop microbiota. We thus characterized the microbiota of six birds from the Cojedes and Orinoco Rivers using the G2 PhyloChip and, in parallel, we compared plant availability and foraging behavior of the hoatzins from the two locations. Plant composition differed between the 2 locations, which shared 5 out of 18 plant families and 1 plant genus--Coccoloba--that was highly consumed in both locations. The PhyloChip detected ∼1600 phylotypes from 42 phyla. There was a core microbiota with ~50% of the OTUs shared by at least 4 of the 6 individuals, but there were also differences in the crop microbiota of animals from the two regions. There existed a higher relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria in the crops of birds from the Cojedes River and of Clostridia and Deltaproteobacteria in the crops of birds from the Orinoco River. The results showed both a core crop microbiota and also the bacterial taxa responsible for geographical differences among individuals from the two locations with different vegetation, suggesting an effect of both diet and geography in shaping the crop bacterial community of the hoatzin. PMID:22313738

  18. Spatial dynamics of the bacterial community structure in the gastrointestinal tract of red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meirong; Jin, Wei; Li, Yuanfei; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-06-01

    The quantification and community of bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum) of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were examined by using real-time PCR and paired-end Illumina sequencing. The quantification of bacteria showed that the number of bacteria in jejunum and rectum was significantly lower than that in colon and cecum (P Ruminococcaceae was the most dominant family in large intestine and the total relative abundance of unclassified bacteria was above 50 %. In identified genera, Dorea was the most important variable to discriminate large intestine and it was significantly higher in cecum than in stomach, small intestine and colon (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterium (21.89 %) was the only dominant genus in colon. Future work on culture in vitro and genome sequencing of those unidentified bacteria might give us insight into the function of these microorganisms in the GI tract. In addition, the comparison of the bacterial community in the foregut of kangaroos and other herbivores and the rumen might give us insight into the mechanism of fiber degradation and help us exploit approaches to improve the feed efficiency and subsequently, reduce the methane emission from herbivores. PMID:27116964

  19. Ocean acidification shows negligible impacts on high-latitude bacterial community structure in coastal pelagic mesocosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-S. Roy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ocean acidification and carbonation on microbial community structure was assessed during a large-scale in situ costal pelagic mesocosm study, included as part of the EPOCA 2010 Arctic campaign. The mesocosm experiment included ambient conditions (fjord and nine mesocosms, with pCO2 range from ~145 to ~1420 μatm. Samples collected at nine time points (t-1, t1, t5, t7, t12, t14, t22, t26 to t28 in seven treatments (ambient fjord (~145, 2×~185, ~270, ~685, ~820, ~1050 μatm were analysed for "free-living" and "particle associated" microbial community composition using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. This high-throughput sequencing analysis produced ~20 000 000 16S rRNA V4 reads, which comprised 7000 OTUs. The main variables structuring these communities were, sample origin (fjord or mesocosms and the filter size fraction (free-living or particle associated. The community was significantly different between the fjord and both the control and elevated 2 mesocosms (which were not significant different after nutrients were added to the mesocosms; suggesting that the addition of nutrients is the primary driver of the change in mesocosm community structure. The relative importance of each structuring variable depended greatly on the time at which the community was sampled in relation to the phytoplankton bloom. The size fraction was the second most important factor for community structure; separating free-living from particle-associated bacteria. When free-living and particle-associated bacteria were analysed separately at different time points, the only taxon pCO2 was found to significantly affect were the Gammaproteobacteria after nutrient addition. Finally, pCO2 treatment was found to be significantly correlated (non-linear with 15 rare taxa, most of which increased in abundance with higher CO2.

  20. Associations between soil bacterial community structure and nutrient cycling functions in long-term organic farm soils following cover crop and organic fertilizer amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Adria L; Sheaffer, Craig C; Wyse, Donald L; Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Agricultural management practices can produce changes in soil microbial populations whose functions are crucial to crop production and may be detectable using high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA. To apply sequencing-derived bacterial community structure data to on-farm decision-making will require a better understanding of the complex associations between soil microbial community structure and soil function. Here 16S rRNA sequencing was used to profile soil bacterial communities following application of cover crops and organic fertilizer treatments in certified organic field cropping systems. Amendment treatments were hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), winter rye (Secale cereale), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus), buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), beef manure, pelleted poultry manure, Sustane(®) 8-2-4, and a no-amendment control. Enzyme activities, net N mineralization, soil respiration, and soil physicochemical properties including nutrient levels, organic matter (OM) and pH were measured. Relationships between these functional and physicochemical parameters and soil bacterial community structure were assessed using multivariate methods including redundancy analysis, discriminant analysis, and Bayesian inference. Several cover crops and fertilizers affected soil functions including N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activity. Effects, however, were not consistent across locations and sampling timepoints. Correlations were observed among functional parameters and relative abundances of individual bacterial families and phyla. Bayesian analysis inferred no directional relationships between functional activities, bacterial families, and physicochemical parameters. Soil functional profiles were more strongly predicted by location than by treatment, and differences were largely explained by soil physicochemical parameters. Composition of soil bacterial communities was predictive of soil functional profiles. Differences in soil function were

  1. Effects of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on the bacterial community structure and degradation of pyrene in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeslund, Johan [Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: johan@ecology.su.se; Hedman, Jenny E.; Agestrand, Cecilia [Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-11-21

    The ecological consequences of antibiotics in the aquatic environment have been an issue of concern over the past years due to the potential risk for negative effects on indigenous microorganisms. Microorganisms provide important ecosystem services, such as nutrient recycling, organic matter mineralization and degradation of pollutants. In this study, effects of exposure to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on the bacterial diversity and pollutant degradation in natural marine sediments were studied using molecular methods (T-RFLP) in combination with radiorespirometry. In a microcosm experiment, sediment spiked with {sup 14}C-labelled pyrene was exposed to five concentrations of ciprofloxacin (0, 20, 200, 1000 and 2000 {mu}g L{sup -1}) in a single dose to the overlying water. The production of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} (i.e. complete mineralization of pyrene) was measured during 11 weeks. Sediment samples for bacterial community structure analysis were taken after 7 weeks. Results showed a significant dose-dependent inhibition of pyrene mineralization measured as the total {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production. The nominal EC{sub 50} was calculated to 560 {mu}g L{sup -1}, corresponding to 0.4 {mu}g/kg d.w. sediment. The lowest effect concentration on the bacterial community structure was 200 {mu}g L{sup -1}, which corresponds to 0.1 {mu}g/kg d.w. sediment. Our results show that antibiotic pollution can be a potential threat to both bacterial diversity and an essential ecosystem service they perform in marine sediment.

  2. Natural organic matter (NOM) removal and structural changes in the bacterial community during artificial groundwater recharge with humic lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Langwaldt, Jörg H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluated the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and structural changes in the microbial community during infiltration of humic lake water at three artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) sites in Finland. The three sites were at waterworks in Hämeenlinna, Jyväskylä and Tuusula, sites A, B and C, respectively. Site A used groundwater recharge by both basin and sprinkling infiltration, site B used only sprinkling infiltration, and site C used only basin infiltration. Reductions of total organic carbon at sites A, B and C were 91%, 84% and 74%, respectively, in the winter, and 88%, 77% and 73%, respectively, in the summer. The Finnish national recommended value of 2 mg/l for TOC was achieved at all sites and the TOC of natural groundwater at site C was much lower, at 0.6 mg/l. Large molecular fractions of NOM were removed more efficiently than the smaller ones. Total amount of DAPI-stained cells decreased during infiltration at sites A, B and C in winter by 94%, 94% and 75% and in summer by 96%, 97% and 94%, respectively. Bacterial communities in raw waters and extracted groundwaters were diverse with changes occurring during infiltration, which was shown by DNA extraction followed by PCR of 16S rRNA genes and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting. While the natural groundwater microbial community was diverse, it was different from that of the extracted groundwater in the AGR area. Simultaneous organic carbon removal and the decrease of bacterial counts during infiltration indicated biodegradation. In addition, the changing DGGE profiles during the process of infiltration, demonstrated that changing environmental conditions were reflected by changes in bacterial community composition. PMID:17434565

  3. Water-limiting conditions alter the structure and biofilm-forming ability of bacterial multispecies communities in the alfalfa rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bogino

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect. The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices.

  4. Structure and composition of bacterial and fungal community in soil under soybean monoculture in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D Bresolin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is the most important oilseed cultivated in the world and Brazil is the second major producer. Expansion of soybean cultivation has direct and indirect impacts on natural habitats of high conservation value, such as the Brazilian savannas (Cerrado. In addition to deforestation, land conversion includes the use of fertilizers and pesticides and can lead to changes in the soil microbial communities. This study evaluated the soil bacterial and fungal communities and the microbial biomass C in a native Cerrado and in a similar no-tillage soybean monoculture area using PCR-DGGE and sequencing of bands. Compared to the native area, microbial biomass C was lower in the soybean area and cluster analysis indicated that the structure of soil microbial communities differed. 16S and 18S rDNA dendrograms analysis did not show differences between row and inter-row samples, but microbial biomass C values were higher in inter-rows during soybean fructification and harvest. The study pointed to different responses and alterations in bacterial and fungal communities due to soil cover changes (fallow x growth period and crop development. These changes might be related to differences in the pattern of root exudates affecting the soil microbial community. Among the bands chosen for sequencing there was a predominance of actinobacteria, y-proteobacteria and ascomycetous divisions. Even under no-tillage management methods, the soil microbial community was affected due to changes in the soil cover and crop development, hence warning of the impacts caused by changes in land use.

  5. Effect of grazers and viruses on bacterial community structure and production in two contrasting trophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domaizon Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last 30 years, extensive studies have revealed the crucial roles played by microbes in aquatic ecosystems. It has been shown that bacteria, viruses and protozoan grazers are dominant in terms of abundance and biomass. The frequent interactions between these microbiological compartments are responsible for strong trophic links from dissolved organic matter to higher trophic levels, via heterotrophic bacteria, which form the basis for the important biogeochemical roles of microbial food webs in aquatic ecosystems. To gain a better understanding of the interactions between bacteria, viruses and flagellates in lacustrine ecosystems, we investigated the effect of protistan bacterivory on bacterial abundance, production and structure [determined by 16S rRNA PCR-DGGE], and viral abundance and activity of two lakes of contrasting trophic status. Four experiments were conducted in the oligotrophic Lake Annecy and the mesotrophic Lake Bourget over two seasons (early spring vs. summer using a fractionation approach. In situ dark vs. light incubations were performed to consider the effects of the different treatments in the presence and absence of phototrophic activity. Results The presence of grazers (i.e. Conclusions Our results highlight the importance of a synergistic effect, i.e. the positive influence of grazers on viral activities in sustaining (directly and indirectly bacterial production and affecting composition, in both oligotrophic and mesotrophic lakes.

  6. Comparison of Bacterial Community Structures in the Rhizoplane of Tomato Plants Grown in Soils Suppressive and Conducive towards Bacterial Wilt

    OpenAIRE

    Shiomi, Yoshitaka; Nishiyama, Masaya; Onizuka, Tomoko; Marumoto, Takuya

    1999-01-01

    It has been reported that the growth of Ralstonia solanacearum is suppressed at the rhizoplane of tomato plants and that tomato bacterial wilt is suppressed in plants grown in a soil (Mutsumi) in Japan. To evaluate the biological factors contributing to the suppressiveness of the soil in three treated Mutsumi soils (chloroform fumigated soil; autoclaved soil mixed with intact Mutsumi soil; and autoclaved soil mixed with intact, wilt-conducive Yamadai soil) infested with R. solanacearum, we bi...

  7. Phyllopshere Bacterial Community Structure of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea as Affected by Cultivar and Environmental Conditions at Time of Harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O. Falkinham III

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern molecular ecology techniques were used to demonstrate the effects of plant genotype and environmental conditions prior to harvest on the spinach epiphytic bacterial community. Three cultivars of spinach with different leaf topographies were collected at three different periods during the fall growing season. Leaf surface topography had an effect on diversity and number of culturable bacteria on the phylloepiphtyic community of spinach. Savoy cultivars, which had larger surface area and more stomata and glandular trichomes, where bacterial aggregates were observed, featured more diverse communities with increased richness and larger bacterial populations compared to flat-leaved cultivars. Bacterial community richness was compared using denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, while abundance was quantified using 16s rRNA primers for major phyla. The most diverse communities, both in richness and abundance, were observed during the first sampling period, immediately following a period of rapid spinach growth. Exposure to lower air and soil temperatures and decreased precipitation resulted in significantly reduced bacterial population size and bacterial community richness in November and December. This study describes the effect of the plant characteristics and environmental conditions that affect spinach microbiota population size and diversity, which might have implications in the survival of food and plant bacterial pathogens.

  8. Bacterial Community Structure in a Mollisol Under Long-Term Natural Restoration, Cropping, and Bare Fallow History Estimated by PCR-DGGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-Hua; JIN Jian; LIU Jun-Jie; CHEN Xue-Li; LIU Ju-Dong; LIU Xiao-Bing

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbial biomass and community structures are commonly used as indicators for soil quality and fertility.A investigation was performed to study the effects of long-term natural restoration,cropping,and bare fallow managements on the soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in depths of 0-10,20-30,and 40-50 cm in a black soil (Mollisol).Microbial biomass was estimated from chloroform fumigation-extraction,and bacterial community structures were determined by analysis of 16S rDNA using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCRDGGE).Experimental results showed that microbial biomass significantly declined with soil depth in the managements of restoration and cropping,but not in the bare fallow.DGGE profiles indicated that the band number in top 0-10 cm soils was less than that in depth of 20-30 or 40-50 cm.These suggested that the microbial population was high but the bacterial community structure was simple in the topsoil.Cluster and principle component analysis based on DGGE banding patterns showed that the bacterial community structure was affected by soil depth more primarily than by managements,and the succession of bacterial community as increase of soil depth has a similar tendency in the three managements.Fourteen predominating DGGE bands were excised and sequenced,in which 6 bands were identified as the taxa of Verrucomicrobia,2 bands as Actinobacteria,2 bands as α-Proteobacteria,and the other 4 bands as δ-Proteobacteria,Acidobacteria,Nitrospira,and unclassified bacteria.In addition,the sequences of 11 DGGE bands were closely related to uncultured bacteria.Thus,the bacterial community structure in black soil was stable,and the predominating bacterial groups were uncultured.

  9. Differences between the bacterial community structures of first- and multi-year Arctic sea ice in the Lincoln Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, I.; Beckers, J. F.; Haas, C.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice composition is shifting from predominantly thick perennial ice (multiyear ice -MYI) to thinner, seasonal ice (first year ice -FYI). The effects of the shift on the Arctic ecosystem and macro-organisms of the Arctic Ocean have been the focus of many studies and have also been extensively debated in the public domain. The effect of this shift on the microbial constituents of the Arctic sea ice has been grossly understudied, although it is a vast habitat for a microbial community that plays a key role in the biogeochemical cycles and energy flux of the Arctic Ocean. MYI and FYI differ in many chemical and physical attributes (e.g. bulk salinity, brine volume, thickness and age), therefore comparing and contrasting the structure and composition of microbial communities from both ice types will be crucial to our understanding of the challenges that the Arctic Ocean ecosystem faces as MYI cover continues to decline. Here, we contend that due to the differences in abiotic conditions, differences in bacterial community structure will be greater between samples from different ice types than within samples from the same ice type. We also argue that since FYI is younger, its community structure will be closer to that of the surface sea water (SW). To test this hypotheses, we extracted DNA and used high throughput sequencing to sequence V1-V3 regions of the bacterial 16s rRNA gene from 10 sea ice samples (5 for each ice type) and 4 surface sea water (SW) collected off the shore of Northern Ellesmere Island, NU, CAN, during the month of May from 2010-2012. Our results showed that observed richness was higher in FYI than MYI. FYI and MYI shared 26% and 36% of their observed richness respectively. While FYI shared 23% of its observed richness with SW, MYI only shared 17%. Both ice types showed similar levels of endemism (61% of the observed richness). This high level of endemism results in the grouping of microbial communities from MYI, FYI, and SW to three

  10. Comparison and Interpretation of Taxonomical Structure of Bacterial Communities in Two Types of Lakes on Yun-Gui plateau of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Maozhen; Gong, Yanhai; Zhou, Chunyu; Zhang, Junqian; Wang, Zhi; Ning, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial communities from freshwater lakes are shaped by various factors such as nutrients, pH value, temperature, etc. Their compositions and relative abundances would undergo changes to adapt the changing environments, and in turn could affect the environments of freshwater lakes. Analyses of the freshwater lake's bacterial communities under different environments would be of pivotal importance to monitor the condition of waterbody. In this study, we have collected freshwater samples from two lakes on Yun-Gui plateau of China, Lake Dianchi and Lake Haixihai, and analyzed the bacterial community structures from these samples based on 16S rRNA sequencing. Results have shown that: Firstly, the bacterial community of these samples have very different taxonomical structures, not only between two lakes but also among the intra-groups for samples collected from Dianchi. Secondly, the differences between samples from two lakes are highly associated with the chemical-geographical properties of the two lakes. Thirdly, for samples of Dianchi and Haixihai, analytical results of physicochemical, taxonomical structure and relative abundance of community revealed that extreme physicochemical factors caused by human activities have strongly affected the bacterial ecosystem in Dianchi. These results have clearly indicated the importance of combining biological profiling and chemical-geographical properties for monitoring Chinese plateau freshwater bacterial ecosystem, which could provide clues for Chinese freshwater ecosystem remediation on plateau. PMID:27461070

  11. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes. PMID:26528534

  12. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  13. Characterization of Bacterial Community Structure in a Drinking Water Distribution System during an Occurrence of Red Water▿

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dong; Li, Zheng; Yu, Jianwei; Cao, Nan; Liu, Ruyin; Yang, Min

    2010-01-01

    The role of bacteria in the occasional emergence of red water, which has been documented worldwide, has yet to be determined. To better understand the mechanisms that drive occurrences of red water, the bacterial community composition and the relative abundance of several functional bacterial groups in a water distribution system of Beijing during a large-scale red water event were determined using several molecular methods. Individual clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were constructed for...

  14. Pyrosequencing-Based Assessment of Bacterial Community Structure Along Different Management Types in German Forest and Grassland Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Nacke, Heiko; Thürmer, Andrea; Wollherr, Antje; Will, Christiane; Hodac, Ladislav; Herold, Nadine; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Daniel, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Background: Soil bacteria are important drivers for nearly all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and participate in most nutrient transformations in soil. In contrast to the importance of soil bacteria for ecosystem functioning, we understand little how different management types affect the soil bacterial community composition. Methodology/Principal Findings: We used pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to identify changes in bacterial dive...

  15. The living dead: bacterial community structure of a cadaver at the onset and end of the bloat stage of decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embriette R Hyde

    Full Text Available Human decomposition is a mosaic system with an intimate association between biotic and abiotic factors. Despite the integral role of bacteria in the decomposition process, few studies have catalogued bacterial biodiversity for terrestrial scenarios. To explore the microbiome of decomposition, two cadavers were placed at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility and allowed to decompose under natural conditions. The bloat stage of decomposition, a stage easily identified in taphonomy and readily attributed to microbial physiology, was targeted. Each cadaver was sampled at two time points, at the onset and end of the bloat stage, from various body sites including internal locations. Bacterial samples were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Our data show a shift from aerobic bacteria to anaerobic bacteria in all body sites sampled and demonstrate variation in community structure between bodies, between sample sites within a body, and between initial and end points of the bloat stage within a sample site. These data are best not viewed as points of comparison but rather additive data sets. While some species recovered are the same as those observed in culture-based studies, many are novel. Our results are preliminary and add to a larger emerging data set; a more comprehensive study is needed to further dissect the role of bacteria in human decomposition.

  16. The living dead: bacterial community structure of a cadaver at the onset and end of the bloat stage of decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Embriette R; Haarmann, Daniel P; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Petrosino, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    Human decomposition is a mosaic system with an intimate association between biotic and abiotic factors. Despite the integral role of bacteria in the decomposition process, few studies have catalogued bacterial biodiversity for terrestrial scenarios. To explore the microbiome of decomposition, two cadavers were placed at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility and allowed to decompose under natural conditions. The bloat stage of decomposition, a stage easily identified in taphonomy and readily attributed to microbial physiology, was targeted. Each cadaver was sampled at two time points, at the onset and end of the bloat stage, from various body sites including internal locations. Bacterial samples were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Our data show a shift from aerobic bacteria to anaerobic bacteria in all body sites sampled and demonstrate variation in community structure between bodies, between sample sites within a body, and between initial and end points of the bloat stage within a sample site. These data are best not viewed as points of comparison but rather additive data sets. While some species recovered are the same as those observed in culture-based studies, many are novel. Our results are preliminary and add to a larger emerging data set; a more comprehensive study is needed to further dissect the role of bacteria in human decomposition. PMID:24204941

  17. Influence of Vinasse Application in the Structure and Composition of the Bacterial Community of the Soil under Sugarcane Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, André Ferreira; Goulart, Karla Cristina Stropa; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Although the use of vinasse as a waste helps replenish soil nutrients and improves the quality of the sugarcane crop, it is known that vinasse residues alter the diversity of bacteria naturally present in the soil. The actual impacts of vinasse application on the selection of bacterial taxa are not understood because no studies have addressed this phenomenon directly. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone sequences from four soil types showed that the soil planted with sugarcane and fertilized with vinasse has a high diversity of bacteria compared to other biomes, where Acidobacteria were the second most abundant phylum. Although the composition and structure of bacterial communities differ significantly in the four environments (Libshuff's test), forest soils and soil planted with sugarcane without vinasse fertilizer were similar to each other because they share at least 28 OTUs related to Rhizobiales, which are important agents involved in nitrogen fixation. OTUs belonging to Actinomycetales were detected more often in the soil that had vinasse applied, indicating that these groups are more favored by this type of land management. PMID:27528875

  18. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  19. Influence of wet distillers grains diets on beef cattle fecal bacterial community structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice William C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high demand for ethanol in the U.S. has generated large stocks of wet distillers grains (DG, a byproduct from the manufacture of ethanol from corn and sorghum grains. Little is known, however, about the potential influence of dietary DG on fecal microbial community structure. A better understanding of the microbial population in beef cattle feces could be an important monitoring tool to facilitate goals of improving nutrient management, increasing animal growth performance and decreasing odors and/or shedding of pathogens. Five diets consisting of a traditional diet fed to finishing beef cattle in the Southern High Plains of Texas-CON (steam-flaked corn control with 0% DG, and four concentrations of DG in the dietary dry matter; 10 C (10% corn-based DG, 5S (5% sorghum-based DG, 10S (10% sorghum DG, and 15S (15% sorghum DG were fed to steers at the Texas Tech University Burnett Animal Center. Diets were essentially isonitrogenous with a formulated crude protein value of 13.5%. Results Fecal grab samples were obtained from 20 steers (n = 4 per diet and the barcoded DNA pyrosequencing method was used to generate 127,530 16S operational taxonomic units (OTUs. A total of 24 phyla were observed, distributed amongst all beef cattle on all diets, revealing considerable animal to animal variation, however only six phyla (core set were observed in all animals regardless of dietary treatment. The average abundance and range of abundance, respectively of the core phyla were as follows: Firmicutes (61%, 19 to 83%, Bacteroidetes (28%, 11 to 63%, Proteobacteria (3%, 0.34 to 17.5%, Tenericutes (0.15%, 0.0 to 0.35%, Nitrospirae (0.11%, 0.03 to 0.22%, and Fusobacteria (0.086%, 0.017 to 0.38%. Feeding DG-based diets resulted in significant shifts in the fecal microbial community structure compared with the traditional CON. Four low abundance phyla significantly responded to dietary treatments: Synergistetes (p = 0.01, WS3 (p = 0

  20. Analysis of bacterial community structures in two sewage treatment plants with different sludge properties and treatment performance by nested PCR-DGGE method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-chun; ZHANG Yu; YANG Min; WANG Zhen-yu; LV Wen-zhou

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community structures in two sewage treatment plants with different processes and performance were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments with group-specific primers. Samples of raw sewage and treated effluents were amplified using the whole-cell PCR method, and the activated sludge samples were amplified using the extracted genomic DNA before the PCR products were loaded on the same DGGE gel for bacterial community analysis. Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and actinomycetic community analysis were also carried out to investigate the relationship between specific population structures and system or sludge performance. The two plants demonstrated a similarity in bacterial community structures of raw sewage and activated sludge, but they had different effluent populations. Many dominant bacterial populations of raw sewage did not appear in the activated sludge samples, suggesting that the dominant bacterial populations in raw sewage might not play an important role during wastewater treatment. Although the two plants had different sludge properties in terms of settleability and foam forming ability, they demonstrated similar actinomycetic community structures. For activated sludge with bad settling performance, the treated water presented a similar DGGE pattern with that of activated sludge, indicating the nonselective washout of bacteria from the system. The plant with better ammonium removal efficiency showed higher ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) species richness. Analysis of sequencing results showed that the major populations in raw sewage were uncultured bacterium, while in activated sludge the predominant populations were beta proteobacteria.

  1. Characterizing the structural diversity of a bacterial community associated with filter materials in recirculating aquaculture systems of Scortum barcoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peng; Ye, Yangfang; Pei, Fangfang; Lu, Kaihong

    2012-03-01

    The bacterial community structure associated with filter materials in the recirculating aquaculture system of Scortum barcoo was investigated using the 16S rRNA gene clone library method. Preliminary results showed that the clone library constructed from the initial operation condition was characterized by 31 taxa of bacteria belonging to eight phyla including Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobiae, and Actinobacteria. There were 14 taxa of bacteria belonging to four phyla including Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetacia, and Nitrospirae from the stable operation condition where the water quality was well maintained. Nitrospirae was only found under the stable operation condition in this study. Our results further indicated that Nitrospira was dominated by members of the Nitrospira sp. lineages, with a minor fraction related to Nitrospira moscoviensis and an unknown Nitrospira cluster. These great differences of both diversity and composition between two operation conditions suggested that the composition of the microbial community varied with the degree of water quality in the recirculating aquaculture system of S. barcoo. PMID:22339297

  2. The effect of the native bacterial community structure on the predictability of E-coli O157 : H7 survival in manure-amended soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Overbeek, L. S.; Franz, E.; Semenov, A. V.; de Vos, O. J.; van Bruggen, A. H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The survival capability of pathogens like Escherichia coli O157:H7 in manure-amended soil is considered to be an important factor for the likelihood of crop contamination. The aim of this study was to reveal the effects of the diversity and composition of soil bacterial community structure on

  3. The effect of the native bacterial community structure on the predictability of E. coli O157:H7 survival in manure-amended soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, van L.S.; Franz, E.; Semenov, A.V.; Vos, de O.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The survival capability of pathogens like Escherichia coli O157:H7 in manure-amended soil is considered to be an important factor for the likelihood of crop contamination. The aim of this study was to reveal the effects of the diversity and composition of soil bacterial community structure on

  4. Dynamics of bacterial metabolic profile and community structure during the mineralization of organic carbon in intensive swine farm wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land application of intensive swine farm wastewater has raised serious environmental concerns due to the accumulation and microbially mediated transformation of large amounts of swine wastewater organic C (SWOC. Therefore, the study of SWOC mineralization and dynamics of wastewater microorganisms is essential to understand the environmental impacts of swine wastewater application. We measured the C mineralization of incubated swine wastewaters with high (wastewater H and low (wastewater L organic C concentrations. The dynamics of bacteria metabolic profile and community structure were also investigated. The results showed that SWOC mineralization was properly fitted by the two-simultaneous reactions model. The initial potential rate of labile C mineralization of wastewater H was 46% higher than that of wastewater L, whereas the initial potential rates of recalcitrant C mineralization of wastewaters H and L were both around 23 mg L-1 d-1. The bacterial functional and structural diversities significantly decreased for both the wastewaters during SWOC mineralization, and were all negatively correlated to specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; P < 0.01. The bacteria in the raw wastewaters exhibited functional similarity, and both metabolic profile and community structure changed with the mineralization of SWOC, mainly under the influence of SUVA254 (P < 0.001. These results suggested that SWOC mineralization was characterized by rapid mineralization of labile C and subsequent slow decomposition of recalcitrant C pool, and the quality of SWOC varied between the wastewaters with different amounts of organic C. The decreased bio-availability of dissolved organic matter affected the dynamics of wastewater bacteria during SWOC mineralization.

  5. Changes in bacterial community structure in the colon of pigs fed different experimental diets and after infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leser, Thomas D.; Lindecrona, Rikke Hvid; Jensen, Tim Kåre;

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial communities in the large intestines of pigs were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA. The pigs were fed different experimental diets based on either modified standard feed or cooked rice supplemented with...

  6. Changes in bacterial community structure in the colon of pigs fed different experimental diets and after infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leser, Thomas D.; Lindecrona, Rikke Hvid; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Jensen, Bent B.; Møller, Kristian

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial communities in the large intestines of pigs were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA. The pigs were fed different experimental diets based on either modified standard feed or cooked rice supplemented with die...

  7. Responses of soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure to closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures): A case study of Dongting Lake wetland, middle China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Juan; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Guo, Shenglian; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Lu; Lu, Lunhui; Yuan, Yujie

    2016-09-01

    Soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure, which are critical to global ecosystem and fundamental ecological processes, are sensitive to anthropogenic activities and environmental conditions. In this study, we examined the possible effects of closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures, ban on anthropogenic activity, widely employed for many important wetlands) on SMB, soil bacterial community structure and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling in Dongting Lake wetland. Soil samples were collected from management area (MA) and contrast area (CA: human activities, such as hunting, fishing and draining, are permitted) in November 2013 and April 2014. Soil properties, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and bacterial community structure were investigated. Comparison of the values of MA and CA showed that SMB and bacterial community diversity of the MA had a significant increase after 7 years closed-off management. The mean value of Shannon-Weiner diversity index of MA and CA respectively were 2.85 and 2.07. The gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nosZ of MA were significant higher than those of CA. the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nirK of MA were significant lower than those of CA. However, there was no significant change in the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nirS. PMID:27036597

  8. Characterization of Bacterial Community Structure and Diversity in Rhizosphere Soils of Three Plants in Rapidly Changing Salt Marshes Using 16S rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structure and diversity of the bacterial communities in rhizosphere soils of native Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter and alien Spartina alterniflora in the Yangtze River Estuary were investigated by constructing 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone libraries. The bacterial diversity was quantified by placing the clones into operational taxonomic unit (OTU) groups at the level of sequence similarity of > 97%. Phylogenetic analysis of the resulting 398 clone sequences indicated a high diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soils of these plants. The members of Alphaproteobacteria,Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria were the most abundant in rhizobacteria. Chao 1 nonparametric diversity estimator coupled with the reciprocal of Simpson's index (1/D) was applied to sequence data obtained from each library to evaluate total sequence diversity and quantitatively compare the level of dominance. The results showed that Phragmites, Scirpus, and Spartina rhizosphere soils contained 200, 668, and 382 OTUs, respectively. The bacterial communities in the Spartina and Phragmites rhizosphere soils displayed species dominance revealed by 1/D, whereas the bacterial community in Scirpus rhizosphere soil had uniform distributions of species abundance. Overall, analysis of 16S rDNA clone libraries from the rhizosphere soils indicates that the changes in bacterial composition may occur concomitantly with the shift of species composition in plant communities.

  9. Bottom-Up versus Top-Down Control of Hypo- and Epilimnion Free-Living Bacterial Community Structures in Two Neighboring Freshwater Lakes▿†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Berdjeb, Lyria; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Jacquet, Stéphan

    2011-01-01

    Bacterioplankton plays a central role in the microbial functioning of lacustrine ecosystems; however, factors that constrain its structural variation are still poorly understood. Here we evaluated the driving forces exerted by a large set of environmental and biological parameters on the temporal and spatial dynamics of free-living bacterial community structures (BCS) in two neighboring perialpine lakes, Lake Bourget and Lake Annecy, which differ in trophic status. We analyzed monthly data fr...

  10. Effect of activated carbon amendment on bacterial community structure and functions in a PAH impacted urban soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynet, Paola; Hale, Sarah E; Davenport, Russell J; Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D; Werner, David

    2012-05-01

    We collected urban soil samples impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a sorbent-based remediation field trial to address concerns about unwanted side-effects of 2% powdered (PAC) or granular (GAC) activated carbon amendment on soil microbiology and pollutant biodegradation. After three years, total microbial cell counts and respiration rates were highest in the GAC amended soil. The predominant bacterial community structure derived from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) shifted more strongly with time than in response to AC amendment. DGGE band sequencing revealed the presence of taxa with closest affiliations either to known PAH degraders, e.g. Rhodococcus jostii RHA-1, or taxa known to harbor PAH degraders, e.g. Rhodococcus erythropolis, in all soils. Quantification by real-time polymerase chain reaction yielded similar dioxygenases gene copy numbers in unamended, PAC-, or GAC-amended soil. PAH availability assessments in batch tests showed the greatest difference of 75% with and without biocide addition for unamended soil, while the lowest PAH availability overall was measured in PAC-amended, live soil. We conclude that AC had no detrimental effects on soil microbiology, AC-amended soils retained the potential to biodegrade PAHs, but the removal of available pollutants by biodegradation was most notable in unamended soil. PMID:22455603

  11. Age, sun and substrate: triggers of bacterial communities in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Steinová, Jana; Rabensteiner, Johannes; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial communities colonize the surfaces of lichens in a biofilm-like manner. The overall structure of the bacterial communities harboured by the lichens shows similarities, in particular the dominance of not yet cultured Alphaproteobacteria. Parameters causing variation in abundance, composition and spatial organization of the lichen-associated bacterial communities are so far poorly understood. As a first step, we used a microscopic approach to test the significance of both lichen-intrinsic and extrinsic environmental factors on the bacterial communities associated with 11 lichen samples, belonging to six species. Some of these species have thalli with a distinct age gradient. A statistically significant effect can be attributed to the age of the thallus parts, which is an intrinsic factor: growing parts of the lichens host bacterial communities that significantly differ from those of the ageing portions of the thalli. The substrate type (rock, tree, understory) and (at a lower extent) the exposition to the sun also affected the bacterial communities. Interestingly, the abundance of bacterial cells in the lichens was also influenced by the same structure-triggering factors. No effect on the composition with main bacterial groups was attributed to different lichen species, differentiated thallus parts or thallus growth type. Our results are important for the experimental designs in lichen-bacterial ecology. PMID:23757225

  12. Top-down controls on bacterial community structure: microbial network analysis of bacteria, T4-like viruses and protists

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Kim, Diane Y.; Sachdeva, Rohan; Caron, David A.; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing ecological relationships between viruses, bacteria and protists in the ocean are critical to understanding ecosystem function, yet these relationships are infrequently investigated together. We evaluated these relationships through microbial association network analysis of samples collected approximately monthly from March 2008 to January 2011 in the surface ocean (0–5 m) at the San Pedro Ocean Time series station. Bacterial, T4-like myoviral and protistan communities were desc...

  13. Effect of amendments with excrements from CTC-treated cows on bacterial community structure in pasture soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chroňáková, Alica; Kyselková, Martina; Elhottová, Dana

    Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2014. [COST Action No.ES1103: Microbial ecology & the earth system: collaborating for insight and success with the new generation of sequencing tools. Opening the microbial world with metagenomics . 07.05.2014-09.05.2014, Helsinki] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/2077; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13046 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tetracycline * cattle excrements * soil bacterial community * pasture Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  14. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3‑-N, and NH4+-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem.

  15. Diversity in soil bacterial communities structure in four high-altitude vineyards cultivated using different soil management techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsi, Francesca; Landa, Blanca; Zecca, Odoardo; Biddoccu, Marcella; Barmaz, Andrea; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    Some of the major wine producing countries are located in the Mediterranean regions, where viticulture represents one of the most widespread cultivations with economic and social importance. The area devoted to vineyards can also expand to mountain and steep slope zones, often characterized by small-scale high quality wine production, where viticulture contributes to the sustainable development from the ecological and environmental point of view. Farming practices adopted in sloping vineyards have the purpose to improve the soil physicochemical but also biological properties to avoid the degradation of the soil characteristics and resulting problems such as soil erosion and organic matter losses. A preliminary study was conducted during 2013 in four commercial vineyards located in Aosta Valley (north-western Italy), within a small area located in the adjacent municipalities of Chambave and Saint-Denis in order to minimize soil variability. Two sites have been identified on the lower (about 600 m asl) and higher (about 750 m asl) zone of the slope, each of which consist of two vineyards managed since at least ten years with different soil management techniques: grass cover and chemical weed control. The four experimental soils had a sandy loam texture with abundant skeleton, and were characterized by a slightly alkaline reaction. The organic matter content was greater in the lower zone (2.4%) than in the upper (1.5%), without specific differences between treatments. The low values of the C:N ratio reported (on average 6.2) reveal the increased organic matter mineralization; furthermore the CEC values were rather low, typical of loose soils. Soil microbiota are critical for the maintenance of soil health and quality, playing an important role in agricultural soil ecosystems. A 16S rDNA pyrosequencing approach was used for investigating differences, abundance and diversity in bacterial community structure of the four studied vineyards. Data from pyrosequencing

  16. Spatial distribution of marine airborne bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Seifried, Jasmin S; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of bacterial populations in marine bioaerosol samples was investigated during a cruise from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea via Skagerrak and Kattegat. The analysis of the sampled bacterial communities with a pyrosequencing approach revealed that the most abundant phyla were represented by the Proteobacteria (49.3%), Bacteroidetes (22.9%), Actinobacteria (16.3%), and Firmicutes (8.3%). Cyanobacteria were assigned to 1.5% of all bacterial reads. A core of 37 bacterial ...

  17. Effect of long-term different fertilization on bacterial community structures and diversity in citrus orchard soil of volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joa, Jae Ho; Weon, Hang Yeon; Hyun, Hae Nam; Jeun, Young Chull; Koh, Sang Wook

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess bacterial species richness, diversity and community distribution according to different fertilization regimes for 16 years in citrus orchard soil of volcanic ash. Soil samples were collected and analyzed from Compost (cattle manure, 2,000 kg/10a), 1/2 NPK+compost (14-20-14+2,000 kg/10a), NPK+compost (28-40-28+2,000 kg/10a), NPK (28-40-28 kg/10a), 3 NPK (84-120-84 kg/10a), and Control (no fertilization) plot which have been managed in the same manners with compost and different amount of chemical fertilization. The range of pyrosequencing reads and OTUs were 4,687-7,330 and 1,790-3,695, respectively. Species richness estimates such as Ace, Chao1, and Shannon index were higher in 1/2 NPK+compost than other treatments, which were 15,202, 9,112, 7.7, respectively. Dominant bacterial groups at level of phylum were Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Those were occupied at 70.9% in 1/2 NPK+compost. Dominant bacterial groups at level of genus were Pseudolabrys, Bradyrhizobium, and Acidobacteria. Those were distributed at 14.4% of a total of bacteria in Compost. Soil pH displayed significantly closely related to bacterial species richness estimates such as Ace, Chao1 (pfertilization management, soil pH changes and characteristics of volcanic ash. PMID:25467117

  18. Evaluating bacterial community structures in oil collected from the sea surface and sediment in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhanfei; Liu, Jiqing

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial community structures were evaluated in oil samples using culture-independent pyrosequencing, including oil mousses collected on sea surface and salt marshes during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead 1 year after the spill. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Erythrobacter, Rhodovulum, Stappia, and Thalassospira of Alphaproteobacteria were the prevailing groups in the oil mousses, which may relate to high temperatures and strong ...

  19. Effect of Different Fertilizer Treatments on Quantity of Soil Microbes and Structure of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacterial Community in a Calcareous Purple Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The quantity of soil microbes and the structure of ammonium oxidizing bacterial (AOB) community were analyzed using the dilution plate counting and most probable number method (MPN), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), respectively. Fertilizer application tended to increase the number of soil microbes and alter the AOB community compared to the control with no fertilizer application (CK). Among the eight fertilizer treatments, soil samples from the treatments of mineral fertilizers (e.g., N, P, K) in combination with farmyard manure (M) had greater numbers of soil microbes and more complex structure of AOB community than those receiving mineral fertilizers alone. The principal component analyses (PCA) for ammonium oxidizing bacterial community structure showed that the eight fertilizer treatments could be divided into two PCA groups (PCA1 and PCA2). For the soil sampled after rice harvest, PCA1 included NP, NM, NPM and NPKM fertilizer treatments, while PCA2 was consisted of CK, N, M and NPK fertilizer treatments. For soil samples collected after wheat harvest, PCA1 was consisted of M, NM, NPM and NPKM fertilizer treatments, while PCA2 was composed of CK, N, NP and NPK fertilizer treatments. For a given rotation, the richness of AOB community in PCA1 was greater than that in PCA2. In addition, AOB community structure was more complex in the soil after rice harvest than that after wheat harvest. The results indicated that different fertilizer treatments resulted in substantial changes of soil microbe number and AOB community. Furthermore, mineral fertilizers (N, NP, NPK) combined with farmyard manure were effective for increasing the quantity of soil microbes, enriching AOB community, and improving the soil biofertility.

  20. The structure of bacterial communities in natural and anthropogenic brown forest soils of the Botanical Garden on Murav'eva-Amurskogo Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, G. V.; Dobrovol'Skaya, T. G.; Golovacheva, A. V.

    2007-05-01

    The microbiological characterization of the brown forest soils in the territory of the Botanical Garden-Institute of the Far East Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences in southern Primor’e is given. The high humus content and weakly acid reaction of these soils were shown to provide the optimal conditions for the development of bacteria. In the brown forest soils differing in the thickness of the humus horizons, all the ecologic-trophic groups of bacteria were present and the bacterial communities were highly diverse. The structure of the bacterial communities was identical in all the organomineral horizons of the soils and varied greatly by the seasons. In the anthropogenically disturbed soils, the share of corynebacteria, which are resistant to stress and capable of the destruction of xenobiotics, decreased.

  1. Long-term Hg pollution-induced structural shifts of bacterial community in the terrestrial isopod (Porcellio scaber) gut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapanje, Ales, E-mail: ales@ifb.s [Institute of Physical Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zrimec, Alexis [Institute of Physical Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Rupnik, Maja [Institute of Public Health Maribor, Maribor (Slovenia)

    2010-10-15

    In previous studies we detected lower species richness and lower Hg sensitivity of the bacteria present in egested guts of Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda) from chronically Hg polluted than from unpolluted environment. Basis for such results were further investigated by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of mercury-resistant (Hg{sup r}) isolates and clone libraries. We observed up to 385 times higher numbers of Hg{sup r} bacteria in guts of animals from polluted than from unpolluted environment. The majority of Hg{sup r} strains contained merA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA clones from egested guts of animals from Hg-polluted environments showed elevated number of bacteria from Pseudomonas, Listeria and Bacteroidetes relatives groups. In animals from pristine environment number of bacteria from Achromobacter relatives, Alcaligenes, Paracoccus, Ochrobactrum relatives, Rhizobium/Agrobacterium, Bacillus and Microbacterium groups were elevated. Such bacterial community shifts in guts of animals from Hg-polluted environment could significantly contribute to P. scaber Hg tolerance. - Chronic environmental mercury pollution induces bacterial community shifts and presence of elevated number as well as increased diversity of Hg-resistant bacteria in guts of isopods.

  2. Bacterial Community Diversity Harboured by Interacting Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Bili

    Full Text Available All animals are infected by microbial partners that can be passengers or residents and influence many biological traits of their hosts. Even if important factors that structure the composition and abundance of microbial communities within and among host individuals have been recently described, such as diet, developmental stage or phylogeny, few studies have conducted cross-taxonomic comparisons, especially on host species related by trophic relationships. Here, we describe and compare the microbial communities associated with the cabbage root fly Delia radicum and its three major parasitoids: the two staphylinid beetles Aleochara bilineata and A. bipustulata and the hymenopteran parasitoid Trybliographa rapae. For each species, two populations from Western France were sampled and microbial communities were described through culture independent methods (454 pyrosequencing. Each sample harbored at least 59 to 261 different bacterial phylotypes but was strongly dominated by one or two. Microbial communities differed markedly in terms of composition and abundance, being mainly influenced by phylogenetic proximity but also geography to a minor extent. Surprisingly, despite their strong trophic interaction, parasitoids shared a very low proportion of microbial partners with their insect host. Three vertically transmitted symbionts from the genus Wolbachia, Rickettsia, and Spiroplasma were found in this study. Among them, Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were found in both the cabbage fly and at least one of its parasitoids, which could result from horizontal transfers through trophic interactions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this hypothesis may explain some but not all cases. More work is needed to understand the dynamics of symbiotic associations within trophic network and the effect of these bacterial communities on the fitness of their hosts.

  3. Evaluating bacterial community structures in oil collected from the sea surface and sediment in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanfei; Liu, Jiqing

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial community structures were evaluated in oil samples using culture-independent pyrosequencing, including oil mousses collected on sea surface and salt marshes during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead 1 year after the spill. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Erythrobacter, Rhodovulum, Stappia, and Thalassospira of Alphaproteobacteria were the prevailing groups in the oil mousses, which may relate to high temperatures and strong irradiance in surface Gulf waters. In the mousse collected from the leaves of Spartina alterniflora, Vibrio of Gammaproteobacteria represented 57% of the total operational taxonomic units, suggesting that this indigenous genus is particularly responsive to the oil contamination in salt marshes. The bacterial communities in oil-contaminated sediments were highly diversified. The relatively high abundance of the Methylococcus, Methylobacter, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chlorofexi bacteria resembles those found in certain cold-seep sediments with gas hydrates. Bacterial communities in the overlying water of the oil-contaminated sediment were dominated by Ralstonia of Betaproteobacteria, which can degrade small aromatics, and Saccharophagus degradans of Gammaproteobacteria, a cellulose degrader, suggesting that overlying water was affected by the oil-contaminated sediments, possibly due to the dissolution of small aromatics and biosurfactants produced during biodegradation. Overall, these results provided key information needed to evaluate oil degradation in the region and develop future bioremediation strategies. PMID:23568850

  4. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ManuelaCoci

    2014-07-01

    These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of the effects of AB.

  5. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Gianluca; Coci, Manuela; Giardina, Marco; Plechuk, Sonia; Campanile, Floriana; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of AB-resistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and productivity. New approaches are required to study the response of microbial communities rather than individual resistance genes. In this study a chemostat-based experiment with 4 coexisting bacterial strains has been performed to mimicking the response of a freshwater bacterial community to the presence of antibiotics in low and high doses. Bacterial abundance rapidly decreased by 75% in the presence of AB, independently of their concentration, and remained constant until the end of the experiment. The bacterial community was mainly dominated by Aeromonas hydrophila and Brevundimonas intermedia while the other two strains, Micrococcus luteus and Rhodococcus sp. never exceed 10%. Interestingly, the bacterial strains, which were isolated at the end of the experiment, were not AB-resistant, while reassembled communities composed of the 4 strains, isolated from treatments under AB stress, significantly raised their performance (growth rate, abundance) in the presence of AB compared to the communities reassembled with strains isolated from the treatment without AB. By investigating the phenotypic adaptations of the communities subjected to the different treatments, we found that the presence of AB significantly increased co-aggregation by 5-6 fold. These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of the effects of AB

  6. Comparison of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community structure in membrane-assisted bioreactors using PCR-DGGE and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziembińska, A; Ciesielski, S; Gnida, A; Zabczyńki, S; Surmacz-Górska, J; Miksch, K

    2012-08-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) communities in three membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were monitored for 2 months after an acclimation period in order to investigate the influence of sludge age and medium type on AOB changeability and its connection with nitrification effectiveness. One MBR with a sludge age of 4 days was fed with a synthetic medium, whereas the other two with sludge ages of 8 and 32 days were fed with landfill leachate. The research revealed that landfill leachate can be effectively treated in an MBR with a higher sludge age for longer periods of time and that this improvement in performance was correlated with an increase in AOB biodiversity. Interestingly, the medium type has a stronger influence on AOB biocenosis formation than the sludge age. PMID:22713978

  7. Application of Molecular Techniques to Elucidate the Influence of Cellulosic Waste on the Bacterial Community Structure at a Simulated Low-Level-Radioactive-Waste Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-level radioactive waste sites, including those at various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently contain cellulosic waste in the form of paper towels, cardboard boxes, or wood contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides such as chromium and uranium. To understand how the soil microbial community is influenced by the presence of cellulosic waste products, multiple soil samples were obtained from a non-radioactive model low-level waste test pit at the Idaho National Laboratory. Samples were analyzed using 16S rDNA clone libraries and 16S rRNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Both the clone library and PhyloChip results revealed changes in the bacterial community structure with depth. In all samples, the PhyloChip detected significantly more unique Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), and therefore more relative diversity, than the clone libraries. Calculated diversity indices suggest that diversity is lowest in the Fill (F) and Fill Waste (FW) layers and greater in the Wood Waste (WW) and Waste Clay (WC) layers. Principal coordinates analysis and lineage specific analysis determined that Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria phyla account for most of the significant differences observed between the layers. The decreased diversity in the FW layer and increased members of families containing known cellulose degrading microorganisms suggests the FW layer is an enrichment environment for cellulose degradation. Overall, these results suggest that the presence of the cellulosic material significantly influences the bacterial community structure in a stratified soil system.

  8. Human settlement as driver of bacterial, but not of archaeal, ammonia oxidizers abundance and community structure in tropical stream sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana De Paula Reis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms.

  9. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  10. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Kistler

    Full Text Available Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp, and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new

  11. Temperature increases from 55 to 75 C in a two-phase biogas reactor result in fundamental alterations within the bacterial and archaeal community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, Antje [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik; Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz; Nolte, Christine; Schoenberg, Mandy; Klocke, Michael [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik

    2012-10-15

    Agricultural biogas plants were operated in most cases below their optimal performance. An increase in the fermentation temperature and a spatial separation of hydrolysis/acetogenesis and methanogenesis are known strategies in improving and stabilizing biogas production. In this study, the dynamic variability of the bacterial and archaeal community was monitored within a two-phase leach bed biogas reactor supplied with rye silage and straw during a stepwise temperature increase from 55 to 75 C within the leach bed reactor (LBR), using TRFLP analyses. To identify the terminal restriction fragments that were obtained, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed. Above 65 C, the bacterial community structure changed from being Clostridiales-dominated toward being dominated by members of the Bacteroidales, Clostridiales, and Thermotogales orders. Simultaneously, several changes occurred, including a decrease in the total cell count, degradation rate, and biogas yield along with alterations in the intermediate production. A bioaugmentation with compost at 70 C led to slight improvements in the reactor performance; these did not persist at 75 C. However, the archaeal community within the downstream anaerobic filter reactor (AF), operated constantly at 55 C, altered by the temperature increase in the LBR. At an LBR temperature of 55 C, members of the Methanobacteriales order were prevalent in the AF, whereas at higher LBR temperatures Methanosarcinales prevailed. Altogether, the best performance of this two-phase reactor was achieved at an LBR temperature of below 65 C, which indicates that this temperature range has a favorable effect on the microbial community responsible for the production of biogas. (orig.)

  12. Bacterial communities of two ubiquitous Great Barrier Reef corals reveals both site- and species-specificity of common bacterial associates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charlotte E Kvennefors

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral-associated bacteria are increasingly considered to be important in coral health, and altered bacterial community structures have been linked to both coral disease and bleaching. Despite this, assessments of bacterial communities on corals rarely apply sufficient replication to adequately describe the natural variability. Replicated data such as these are crucial in determining potential roles of bacteria on coral. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used in a highly replicated approach to analyse bacterial communities on both healthy and diseased corals. Although site-specific variations in the bacterial communities of healthy corals were present, host species-specific bacterial associates within a distinct cluster of gamma-proteobacteria could be identified, which are potentially linked to coral health. Corals affected by "White Syndrome" (WS underwent pronounced changes in their bacterial communities in comparison to healthy colonies. However, the community structure and bacterial ribotypes identified in diseased corals did not support the previously suggested theory of a bacterial pathogen as the causative agent of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to employ large numbers of replicated samples to assess the bacterial communities of healthy and diseased corals, and the first culture-independent assessment of bacterial communities on WS affected Acroporid corals on the GBR. Results indicate that a minimum of 6 replicate samples are required in order to draw inferences on species, spatial or health-related changes in community composition, as a set of clearly distinct bacterial community profiles exist in healthy corals. Coral bacterial communities may be both site and species specific. Furthermore, a cluster of gamma-proteobacterial ribotypes may represent a group of specific common coral and marine

  13. Responses of Baltic Sea Ice and Open-Water Natural Bacterial Communities to Salinity Change

    OpenAIRE

    Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Laamanen, Maria; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the responses of Baltic Sea wintertime bacterial communities to changing salinity (5 to 26 practical salinity units), an experimental study was conducted. Bacterial communities of Baltic seawater and sea ice from a coastal site in southwest Finland were used in two batch culture experiments run for 17 or 18 days at 0°C. Bacterial abundance, cell volume, and leucine and thymidine incorporation were measured during the experiments. The bacterial community structure was assessed u...

  14. Metamorphosis of a butterfly-associated bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobin J Hammer

    Full Text Available Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies.

  15. Assessment of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes and bacterial community structure in a complex contaminated groundwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imfeld, Gwenaël; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Nikolausz, Marcell; Zeiger, Simone; Paschke, Heidrun; Drangmeister, Jörg; Grossmann, Jochen; Richnow, Hans H; Weber, Stefanie

    2008-02-01

    The occurrence of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes was investigated using an integrated approach in a complex groundwater system consisting of several geological units. The assessment of hydrogeochemistry and chlorinated ethenes distribution using principal component analysis (PCA) in combination with carbon stable isotope analysis revealed that chlorinated ethenes were subjected to substantial biodegradation. Shifts in isotopic values up to 20.4 per thousand, 13.9 per thousand, 20.1 per thousand and 31.4 per thousand were observed between geological units for tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), respectively. The use of specific biomarkers (16S rRNA gene) indicated the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA in 20 of the 33 evaluated samples. In parallel, the analysis of changes in the bacterial community composition in the aquifers using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated the predominant influence of the chlorinated ethene concentrations (56.3% of the variance, P=0.005). The integrated approach may open new prospects for the assessment of spatial and temporal functioning of bioattenuation in contaminated groundwater systems. PMID:17915287

  16. Bacterial community structure in High-Arctic snow and freshwater as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Møller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow over sea ice and an ice-covered freshwater lake were examined by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of cultivated isolates. Both the pyrosequence and cultivation data indicated that the phylogenetic composition of the microbial assemblages was different within the snow layers and between snow and freshwater. The highest diversity was seen in snow. In the middle and top snow layers, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria dominated, although Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were relatively abundant also. High numbers of chloroplasts were also observed. In the deepest snow layer, large percentages of Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were seen. In freshwater, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia were the most abundant phyla while relatively few Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria were present. Possibly, light intensity controlled the distribution of the Cyanobacteria and algae in the snow while carbon and nitrogen fixed by these autotrophs in turn fed the heterotrophic bacteria. In the lake, a probable lower light input relative to snow resulted in low numbers of Cyanobacteria and chloroplasts and, hence, limited input of organic carbon and nitrogen to the heterotrophic bacteria. Thus, differences in the physicochemical conditions may play an important role in the processes leading to distinctive bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow and freshwater.

  17. Investigation of Archaeal and Bacterial community structure of five different small drinking water networks with special regard to the nitrifying microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagymáté, Zsuzsanna; Homonnay, Zalán G; Márialigeti, Károly

    2016-01-01

    Total microbial community structure, and particularly nitrifying communities inhabiting five different small drinking water networks characterized with different water physical and chemical parameters was investigated, using cultivation-based methods and sequence aided Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. Ammonium ion, originated from well water, was only partially oxidized via nitrite to nitrate in the drinking water distribution systems. Nitrification occurred at low ammonium ion concentration (27-46μM), relatively high pH (7.6-8.2) and over a wide range of dissolved oxygen concentrations (0.4-9.0mgL(-1)). The nitrifying communities of the distribution systems were characterized by variable most probable numbers (2×10(2)-7.1×10(4) MPN L(-1)) and probably originated from the non-treated well water. The sequence aided T-RFLP method revealed that ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria (Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and Nitrospira moscoviensis, 'Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii') were present in different ratios in the total microbial communities of the distinct parts of the water network systems. The nitrate generated by nitrification was partly utilized by nitrate-reducing (and denitrifying) Bacteria, present in low MPN and characterized by sequence aided T-RFLP as Comamonas sp. and Pseudomonas spp. Different environmental factors, like pH, chemical oxygen demand, calculated total inorganic nitrogen content (moreover nitrite and nitrate concentration), temperature had important effect on the total bacterial and archaeal community distribution. PMID:27296965

  18. Unlocking the bacterial and fungal communities assemblages of sugarcane microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; Jorrín, Beatriz; Lozano, Núria; da Silva, Márcio José; González-Guerrero, Manuel; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Verza, Natália Cristina; Bagheri, Homayoun Chaichian; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Plant microbiome and its manipulation herald a new era for plant biotechnology with the potential to benefit sustainable crop production. However, studies evaluating the diversity, structure and impact of the microbiota in economic important crops are still rare. Here we describe a comprehensive inventory of the structure and assemblage of the bacterial and fungal communities associated with sugarcane. Our analysis identified 23,811 bacterial OTUs and an unexpected 11,727 fungal OTUs inhabiting the endophytic and exophytic compartments of roots, shoots, and leaves. These communities originate primarily from native soil around plants and colonize plant organs in distinct patterns. The sample type is the primary driver of fungal community assemblage, and the organ compartment plays a major role in bacterial community assemblage. We identified core bacterial and fungal communities composed of less than 20% of the total microbial richness but accounting for over 90% of the total microbial relative abundance. The roots showed 89 core bacterial families, 19 of which accounted for 44% of the total relative abundance. Stalks are dominated by groups of yeasts that represent over 12% of total relative abundance. The core microbiome described here comprise groups whose biological role underlies important traits in plant growth and fermentative processes. PMID:27358031

  19. Unlocking the bacterial and fungal communities assemblages of sugarcane microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; Jorrín, Beatriz; Lozano, Núria; da Silva, Márcio José; González-Guerrero, Manuel; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Verza, Natália Cristina; Bagheri, Homayoun Chaichian; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Plant microbiome and its manipulation herald a new era for plant biotechnology with the potential to benefit sustainable crop production. However, studies evaluating the diversity, structure and impact of the microbiota in economic important crops are still rare. Here we describe a comprehensive inventory of the structure and assemblage of the bacterial and fungal communities associated with sugarcane. Our analysis identified 23,811 bacterial OTUs and an unexpected 11,727 fungal OTUs inhabiting the endophytic and exophytic compartments of roots, shoots, and leaves. These communities originate primarily from native soil around plants and colonize plant organs in distinct patterns. The sample type is the primary driver of fungal community assemblage, and the organ compartment plays a major role in bacterial community assemblage. We identified core bacterial and fungal communities composed of less than 20% of the total microbial richness but accounting for over 90% of the total microbial relative abundance. The roots showed 89 core bacterial families, 19 of which accounted for 44% of the total relative abundance. Stalks are dominated by groups of yeasts that represent over 12% of total relative abundance. The core microbiome described here comprise groups whose biological role underlies important traits in plant growth and fermentative processes. PMID:27358031

  20. Mineral Type and Solution Chemistry Affect the Structure and Composition of Actively Growing Bacterial Communities as Revealed by Bromodeoxyuridine Immunocapture and 16S rRNA Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, L C; Colin, Y; Turpault, M-P; Uroz, S

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how minerals affect bacterial communities and their in situ activities in relation to environmental conditions are central issues in soil microbial ecology, as minerals represent essential reservoirs of inorganic nutrients for the biosphere. To determine the impact of mineral type and solution chemistry on soil bacterial communities, we compared the diversity, composition, and functional abilities of a soil bacterial community incubated in presence/absence of different mineral types (apatite, biotite, obsidian). Microcosms were prepared containing different liquid culture media devoid of particular essential nutrients, the nutrients provided only in the introduced minerals and therefore only available to the microbial community through mineral dissolution by biotic and/or abiotic processes. By combining functional screening of bacterial isolates and community analysis by bromodeoxyuridine DNA immunocapture and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, we demonstrated that bacterial communities were mainly impacted by the solution chemistry at the taxonomic level and by the mineral type at the functional level. Metabolically active bacterial communities varied with solution chemistry and mineral type. Burkholderia were significantly enriched in the obsidian treatment compared to the biotite treatment and were the most effective isolates at solubilizing phosphorous or mobilizing iron, in all the treatments. A detailed analysis revealed that the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the OTUs or isolated strains assigned as Burkholderia in our study showed high homology with effective mineral-weathering bacteria previously recovered from the same experimental site. PMID:27138048

  1. Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Opal, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    Steven Opal reviews the phenomenon of bacterial communities and discusses the role played by bacterial communication and cooperation in host-pathogen interactions, particularly in urinary tract infection.

  2. Nanoscale zerovalent iron alters soil bacterial community structure and inhibits chloroaromatic biodegradation potential in Aroclor 1242-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) has potential for the remediation of organochlorine-contaminated environments. Environmental safety concerns associated with in situ deployment of nZVI include potential negative impacts on indigenous microbes whose biodegradative functions could contribute to contaminant remediation. With respect to a two-step polychlorinated biphenyl remediation scenario comprising nZVI dechlorination followed by aerobic biodegradation, we examined the effect of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated nZVI (mean diameter = 12.5 nm) applied at 10 g nZVI kg−1 to Aroclor-1242 contaminated and uncontaminated soil over 28 days. nZVI had a limited effect on Aroclor congener profiles, but, either directly or indirectly via changes to soil physico-chemical conditions (pH, Eh), nZVI addition caused perturbation to soil bacterial community composition, and reduced the activity of chloroaromatic mineralizing microorganisms. We conclude that nZVI addition has the potential to inhibit microbial functions that could be important for PCB remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation. Highlights: ► Impact of nano-sized zerovalent iron on microbes was investigated in soil microcosms. ► Zerovalent iron had short-lived effects on redox potential and Aroclor dechlorination. ► Microbial populations also showed short-lived perturbations in their size. ► The activity of chloroaromatic degrading microbes did not recover within 28 days. ► Zerovalent iron application inhibits ensuing PCB bioremediative microbial functions. - nZVI inhibits microbial functions of potential importance for remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation.

  3. Surface-attached and suspended bacterial community structure as affected by C/N ratios: relationship between bacteria and fish production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ermeng; Xie, Jun; Wang, Jinlin; Ako, Harry; Wang, Guangjun; Chen, Zhanghe; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria play crucial roles in the combined system of substrate addition and C/N control, which has been demonstrated to improve aquaculture production. However, the complexity of surface-attached bacteria on substrates and suspended bacteria in the water column hamper further application of this system. This study firstly applied this combined system into the culture of grass carp, and then explored the relationship between microbial complexes from surface-attached and suspended bacteria in this system and the production of grass carp. In addition, this study investigated bacterial community structures as affected by four C/N ratios using Illumina sequencing technology. The results demonstrated that the weight gain rate and specific growth rate of grass carp in the CN20 group (C/N ratio 20:1) were the highest (P production of grass carp, and Verrucomicrobiae and Rhodobacter in the surface-attached bacterial community were potential probiotic bacteria that contributed to the enhanced growth of grass carp. PMID:27263011

  4. Anammox for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater: Effect of COD/N ratios on process performance and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Cíntia Dutra; Pereira, Alyne Duarte; Nunes, Fernando Terra; Ferreira, Luísa Ornelas; Coelho, Aline Carolina Cirilo; Bicalho, Sarah Kinaip; Mac Conell, Erika F Abreu; Ribeiro, Thiago Bressani; de Lemos Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto; de Araújo, Juliana Calábria

    2016-07-01

    Long-term effects of COD/N ratios on the nitrogen removal performance and bacterial community of an anammox reactor were evaluated by adding a synthetic medium (with glucose) and real anaerobic effluent to a SBR. At a COD/N ratio of 2.8 (COD, 390mg·L(-1)) ammonium removal efficiency was 66%, while nitrite removal remained high (99%). However, at a COD/N ratio of 5.0 (COD, 300mg·L(-1)), ammonium and nitrite removal efficiencies were high (84% and 99%, respectively). High COD, nitrite, and ammonium removal efficiencies (80%, 90% and 95%, respectively) were obtained on adding anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater (with nitrite) to the reactor. DGGE revealed that the addition of anaerobic effluent changed the bacterial community structure and selected for DNA sequences related to Brocadia sinica and Chloroflexi. Adding glucose and anaerobic effluent increased denitrifiers concentration threefold. Thus, the possibility of using the anammox process to remove nitrogen from anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater was demonstrated. PMID:27023380

  5. Structural and functional response of the soil bacterial community to application of manure from difloxacin-treated pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jechalke, S.; Focks, A.; Rosendahl, I.; Groeneweg, J.; Siemens, J.; Heuer, H.; Smalla, K.

    2014-01-01

    Difloxacin (DIF) belongs to the class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics that have been intensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this field study was to compare the effect of manure from DIF-treated pigs and untreated pigs on the bacterial c

  6. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Corno, Gianluca; Coci, Manuela; Giardina, Marco; Plechuk, Sonia; Campanile, Floriana; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of AB-resistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and ...

  7. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    ManuelaCoci; MarcoGiardina

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of ABresistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and p...

  8. Bacterial Diversity Stabilizes Community Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Scheu, Stefan; Jousset, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Background: Stability is a crucial ecosystem feature gaining particular importance in face of increasing anthropogenic stressors. Biodiversity is considered to be a driving biotic force maintaining stability, and in this study we investigate how different indices of biodiversity affect the stability of communities in varied abiotic (composition of available resources) and biotic (invasion) contexts. Methodology/Principal Findings: We set up microbial microcosms to study the effects of geno...

  9. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  10. Topographic diversity of fungal and bacterial communities in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Keisha; Oh, Julia; Yang, Joy; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton; Meyer, Jennifer A; Schoenfeld, Deborah; Nomicos, Effie; Park, Morgan; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2013-06-20

    Traditional culture-based methods have incompletely defined the microbial landscape of common recalcitrant human fungal skin diseases, including athlete's foot and toenail infections. Skin protects humans from invasion by pathogenic microorganisms and provides a home for diverse commensal microbiota. Bacterial genomic sequence data have generated novel hypotheses about species and community structures underlying human disorders. However, microbial diversity is not limited to bacteria; microorganisms such as fungi also have major roles in microbial community stability, human health and disease. Genomic methodologies to identify fungal species and communities have been limited compared with those that are available for bacteria. Fungal evolution can be reconstructed with phylogenetic markers, including ribosomal RNA gene regions and other highly conserved genes. Here we sequenced and analysed fungal communities of 14 skin sites in 10 healthy adults. Eleven core-body and arm sites were dominated by fungi of the genus Malassezia, with only species-level classifications revealing fungal-community composition differences between sites. By contrast, three foot sites--plantar heel, toenail and toe web--showed high fungal diversity. Concurrent analysis of bacterial and fungal communities demonstrated that physiologic attributes and topography of skin differentially shape these two microbial communities. These results provide a framework for future investigation of the contribution of interactions between pathogenic and commensal fungal and bacterial communities to the maintainenace of human health and to disease pathogenesis. PMID:23698366

  11. Bacterial community structure in High-Arctic snow and freshwater as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Søborg, Ditte Andreasen; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu;

    2013-01-01

    controlled the distribution of the Cyanobacteria and algae in the snow while carbon and nitrogen fixed by these autotrophs in turn fed the heterotrophic bacteria. In the lake, a probable lower light input relative to snow resulted in low numbers of Cyanobacteria and chloroplasts and, hence, limited input......The bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow over sea ice and an ice-covered freshwater lake were examined by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of cultivated isolates. Both the pyrosequence and cultivation data indicated that the phylogenetic composition...... of the microbial assemblages was different within the snow layers and between snow and freshwater. The highest diversity was seen in snow. In the middle and top snow layers, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria dominated, although Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were relatively abundant also. High numbers...

  12. Distribution of Archaeal and Bacterial communities in a subtropical reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Américo Soares

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: Microbial communities play a central role in environmental process such as organic matter mineralization and the nutrient cycling process in aquatic ecosystems. Despite their ecological importance, variability of the structure of archaeal and bacterial communities in freshwater remains understudied. Methods In the present study we investigated the richness and density of archaea and bacteria in the water column and sediments of the Itupararanga Reservoir. We also evaluated the relationship between the communities and the biotic and abiotic characteristics. Samples were taken at five depths in the water column next to the dam and three depths next to the reservoir entrance. Results PCR-DGGE evaluation of the archaeal and bacterial communities showed that both were present in the water column, even in oxygenated conditions. Conclusions The density of the bacteria (qPCR was greater than that of the archaea, a result of the higher metabolic plasticity of bacteria compared with archaea.

  13. Physicochemical conditions, metabolites and community structure of the bacterial microbiota in the gut of wood-feeding cockroaches (Blaberidae: Panesthiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Eugen; Lampert, Niclas; Mikaelyan, Aram; Köhler, Tim; Maekawa, Kiyoto; Brune, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    While the gut microbiota of termites and its role in symbiotic digestion have been studied for decades, little is known about the bacteria colonizing the intestinal tract of the distantly related wood-feeding cockroaches (Blaberidae: Panesthiinae). Here, we show that physicochemical gut conditions and microbial fermentation products in the gut of Panesthia angustipennis resemble that of other cockroaches. Microsensor measurements confirmed that all gut compartments were anoxic at the center and had a slightly acidic to neutral pH and a negative redox potential. While acetate dominated in all compartments, lactate and hydrogen accumulated only in the crop. The high, hydrogen-limited rates of methane emission from living cockroaches were in agreement with the restriction of F420-fluorescent methanogens to the hindgut. The gut microbiota of both P. angustipennis and Salganea esakii differed strongly between compartments, with the highest density and diversity in the hindgut, but similarities between homologous compartments of both cockroaches indicated a specificity of the microbiota for their respective habitats. While some lineages were most closely related to the gut microbiota of omnivorous cockroaches and wood- or litter-feeding termites, others have been encountered also in vertebrates, reinforcing the hypothesis that strong environmental selection drives community structure in the cockroach gut. PMID:25764554

  14. Panamanian frog species host unique skin bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Lisa K; Hughey, Myra C; Rebollar, Eria A; Umile, Thomas P; Loftus, Stephen C; Burzynski, Elizabeth A; Minbiole, Kevin P C; House, Leanna L; Jensen, Roderick V; Becker, Matthew H; Walke, Jenifer B; Medina, Daniel; Ibáñez, Roberto; Harris, Reid N

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates, including amphibians, host diverse symbiotic microbes that contribute to host disease resistance. Globally, and especially in montane tropical systems, many amphibian species are threatened by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), that causes a lethal skin disease. Bd therefore may be a strong selective agent on the diversity and function of the microbial communities inhabiting amphibian skin. In Panamá, amphibian population declines and the spread of Bd have been tracked. In 2012, we completed a field survey in Panamá to examine frog skin microbiota in the context of Bd infection. We focused on three frog species and collected two skin swabs per frog from a total of 136 frogs across four sites that varied from west to east in the time since Bd arrival. One swab was used to assess bacterial community structure using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and to determine Bd infection status, and one was used to assess metabolite diversity, as the bacterial production of anti-fungal metabolites is an important disease resistance function. The skin microbiota of the three Panamanian frog species differed in OTU (operational taxonomic unit, ~bacterial species) community composition and metabolite profiles, although the pattern was less strong for the metabolites. Comparisons between frog skin bacterial communities from Panamá and the US suggest broad similarities at the phylum level, but key differences at lower taxonomic levels. In our field survey in Panamá, across all four sites, only 35 individuals (~26%) were Bd infected. There was no clustering of OTUs or metabolite profiles based on Bd infection status and no clear pattern of west-east changes in OTUs or metabolite profiles across the four sites. Overall, our field survey data suggest that different bacterial communities might be producing broadly similar sets of metabolites across frog hosts and sites. Community structure and function may not be as tightly coupled in these skin symbiont

  15. Bacterial community analysis of Indonesian hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G C; Gaffar, S; Cowan, D A; Suharto, A R

    2001-06-12

    We report the first attempts to describe thermophilic bacterial communities in Indonesia's thermal springs using molecular phylogenetic analyses. 16S rRNA genes from laboratory cultures and DNA directly amplified from three hot springs in West Java were sequenced. The 22 sequences obtained were assignable to the taxa Proteobacteria, Bacillus and Flavobacterium, including a number of clades not normally associated with thermophily. PMID:11410357

  16. Bacterial Community Development in Experimental Gingivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kistler, James O; Veronica Booth; Bradshaw, David J.; Wade, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygi...

  17. Bacterial Community Development in Experimental Gingivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kistler, James O.; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J.; Wade, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygi...

  18. The abundance of functional genes, cbbL, nifH, amoA and apsA, and bacterial community structure of intertidal soil from Arabian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Jitendra; Yousuf, Basit; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-06-01

    The Gulf of Cambay is a trumpet-shaped inlet of the Arabian Sea, located along the west coast of India and confronts a high tidal range with strong water currents. The region belongs to a semi-arid zone and saline alkaline intertidal soils are considered biologically extreme. The selected four soil types (S1-S4) were affected by salinity, alkalinity and sodicity. Soil salinity ranged from 20 to 126 dS/m, soil pH 8.6-10.0 with high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP). Abundance of the key functional genes like cbbL, nifH, amoA and apsA involved in biogeochemical cycling were targeted using qPCR, which varied from (2.36 ± 0.03) × 10(4) to (2.87 ± 0.26) × 10(8), (1.18 ± 0.28) × 10(6) to (1.01 ± 0.26) × 10(9), (1.41 ± 0.21) × 10(6) to (1.29 ± 0.05) × 10(8) and (8.47 ± 0.23) × 10(4) to (1.73 ± 0.01) × 10(6) per gram dry weight, respectively. The microbial community structure revealed that soils S1 and S3 were dominated by phylum Firmicutes whereas S4 and S2 showed an abundance of Proteobacterial clones. These soils also represented Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria clones. Molecular phylogeny showed a significant variation in the bacterial community distribution among the intertidal soil types. A high number of novel taxonomic units were observed which makes the intertidal zone a unique reservoir of unidentified bacterial taxa that may be explored further. PMID:25862282

  19. Soil bacterial communities associated with natural and commercial Cyclopia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Anneke; Slabbert, Etienne; Postma, Ferdinand; Jacobs, Karin

    2016-03-01

    The commercially important plants in the genus Cyclopia spp. are indigenous to the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa and are used to manufacture an herbal tea known as honeybush tea. Growing in the low nutrient fynbos soils, these plants are highly dependent on symbiotic interactions with soil microorganisms for nutrient acquisition. The aim of this study was to investigate the soil bacterial communities associated with two commercially important Cyclopia species, namely C. subternata and C. longifolia. Specific interest was the differences between rhizosphere and bulk soil collected from natural sites and commercially grown plants. Samples were collected on two occasions to include a dry summer and wet winter season. Results showed that the dominant bacterial taxa associated with these plants included Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Commercial and natural as well as rhizosphere and bulk soil samples were highly similar in bacterial diversity and species richness. Significant differences were detected in bacterial community structures and co-occurrence patterns between the wet and dry seasons. The results of this study improved our knowledge on what effect commercial Cyclopia plantations and seasonal changes can have on soil bacterial communities within the endemic fynbos biome. PMID:26850159

  20. Marine bacterial communities are resistant to elevated carbon dioxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Anna E; Newbold, Lindsay K; Whiteley, Andrew S; van der Gast, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that the release of anthropogenic-derived CO2 into the atmosphere will be mainly absorbed by the oceans, with a concomitant drop in pH, a process termed ocean acidification. As such, there is considerable interest in how changes in increased CO2 and lower pH will affect marine biota, such as bacteria, which play central roles in oceanic biogeochemical processes. Set within an ecological framework, we investigated the direct effects of elevated CO2, contrasted with ambient conditions on the resistance and resilience of marine bacterial communities in a replicated temporal seawater mesocosm experiment. The results of the study strongly indicate that marine bacterial communities are highly resistant to the elevated CO2 and lower pH conditions imposed, as demonstrated from measures of turnover using taxa–time relationships and distance–decay relationships. In addition, no significant differences in community abundance, structure or composition were observed. Our results suggest that there are no direct effects on marine bacterial communities and that the bacterial fraction of microbial plankton holds enough flexibility and evolutionary capacity to withstand predicted future changes from elevated CO2 and subsequent ocean acidification. PMID:25756110

  1. Bacterial community diversity in municipal waste landfill sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan; Wang, Yangqing; Tang, Wei; Lei, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the bacterial diversity of landfills and how environmental factors impact the diversity. In this study, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was used to investigate the bacterial communities of ten landfill leachate samples from five landfill sites in China. A total of 137 K useable sequences from the V3-V6 regions of the 16S rRNA gene were retrieved from 205 K reads. These sequences revealed the presence of a large number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the landfills (709-1599 OTUs per sample). The most predominant bacterial representatives in the landfills investigated, regardless of geographic area, included Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The phyla Fusobacteria and Tenericutes were also found for the first time to be predominant in the landfills. The phylum Fusobacteria predominated (51.5 and 48.8%) in two semi-arid landfills, and the phylum Tenericutes dominated (30.6%) at one humid, subtropical landfill. Further, a large number of Pseudomonas was detected in most samples, comprising the dominant group and accounting for 40.9 to 92.4% of the total abundance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis based on OTU abundance showed that the abundant taxa separated the bacterial community. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) suggested that precipitation and landfilling age significantly impact on the bacterial community structure. The bacterial community function (e.g., cellulolytic bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), sulfate-oxidizing bacteria, and xenobiotic organic compound (XOC)-degrading bacteria) was also diverse, but the pattern is unclear. PMID:25981996

  2. Screening and degrading characteristics and community structure of a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium from contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run Sun; Jinghua Jin; Guangdong Sun; Ying Liu; Zhipei Liu

    2010-01-01

    Inoculation with efficient microbes had been proved to be the most important way for the bioremediation of polluted environments.For the treatment of abandoned site of Beijing Coking Chemical Plant contaminated with high level of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs),a bacterial consortium capable of degrading HMW-PAHs,designated 1-18-1,was enriched and screened from HMW-PAHs contaminated soil.Its degrading ability was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC),and the community structure was investigated by construction and analyses of the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (A,B and F) at different transfers.The results indicated that 1-18-1 was able to utilize pyrene,fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene as sole carbon and energy source for growth.The degradation rate of pyrene and fluoranthene reached 82.8% and 96.2% after incubation for 8 days at 30℃,respectively;while the degradation rate of benzo[a]pyrene was only 65.1% after incubation for 28 days at 30℃.Totally,108,100 and 100 valid clones were randomly selected and sequenced from the libraries A,B,and E Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the clones could be divided into 5 groups,Bacteroidetes,α-Proteobacteria,Actinobacteria,β-Proteobacteria and γ-Proteobacteria.Sequence similarity analyses showed total 39 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the libraries.The predominant bacterial groups were α-Proteobacteria (19 OTUs,48.7%),γ-Proteobacteria (9 OTUs,23.1%) and β-Protcobacteria (8 OTUs,20.5%).During the transfer process,the proportions of α-Proteobacteria and β-Proteobacteria increased greatly (from 47% to 93%),while γ-Proteobacteria decreased from 32% (library A) to 6% (library F);and Bacteroidetes group disappeared in libraries B and F.

  3. Amazonian dark Earth and plant species from the Amazon region contribute to shape rhizosphere bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Lima, Amanda; Cannavan, Fabiana Souza; Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-05-01

    Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE) or Terra Preta de Índio formed in the past by pre-Columbian populations are highly sustained fertile soils supported by microbial communities that differ from those extant in adjacent soils. These soils are found in the Amazon region and are considered as a model soil when compared to the surrounding and background soils. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ADE and its surrounding soil on the rhizosphere bacterial communities of two leguminous plant species that frequently occur in the Amazon region in forest sites (Mimosa debilis) and open areas (Senna alata). Bacterial community structure was evaluated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and bacterial community composition by V4 16S rRNA gene region pyrosequencing. T-RFLP analysis showed effect of soil types and plant species on rhizosphere bacterial community structure. Differential abundance of bacterial phyla, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes, revealed that soil type contributes to shape the bacterial communities. Furthermore, bacterial phyla such as Firmicutes and Nitrospira were mostly influenced by plant species. Plant roots influenced several soil chemical properties, especially when plants were grown in ADE. These results showed that differences observed in rhizosphere bacterial community structure and composition can be influenced by plant species and soil fertility due to variation in soil attributes. PMID:25103911

  4. Continuous desulfurization and bacterial community structure of an integrated bioreactor developed to treat SO2 from a gas stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Li, Lin; Ding, Wenjie; Zhang, Jingying; Liu, Junxin

    2015-11-01

    Sulfide dioxide (SO2) is often released during the combustion processes of fossil fuels. An integrated bioreactor with two sections, namely, a suspended zone (SZ) and immobilized zone (IZ), was applied to treat SO2 for 6months. Sampling ports were set in both sections to investigate the performance and microbial characteristics of the integrated bioreactor. SO2 was effectively removed by the synergistic effect of the SZ and IZ, and more than 85% removal efficiency was achieved at steady state. The average elimination capacity of SO2 in the bioreactor was 2.80g/(m(3)·hr) for the SZ and 1.50g/(m(3)·hr) for the IZ. Most SO2 was eliminated in the SZ. The liquid level of the SZ and the water content ratio of the packing material in the IZ affected SO2 removal efficiency. The SZ served a key function not only in SO2 elimination, but also in moisture maintenance for the IZ. The desired water content in IZ could be feasibly maintained without any additional pre-humidification facilities. Clone libraries of 16S rDNA directly amplified from the DNA of each sample were constructed and sequenced to analyze the community composition and diversity in the individual zones. The desulfurization bacteria dominated both zones. Paenibacillus sp. was present in both zones, whereas Ralstonia sp. existed only in the SZ. The transfer of SO2 to the SZ involved dissolution in the nutrient solution and biodegradation by the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. This work presents a potential biological treatment method for waste gases containing hydrophilic compounds. PMID:26574096

  5. Distinct soil bacterial communities revealed under a diversely managed agroecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymon S Shange

    Full Text Available Land-use change and management practices are normally enacted to manipulate environments to improve conditions that relate to production, remediation, and accommodation. However, their effect on the soil microbial community and their subsequent influence on soil function is still difficult to quantify. Recent applications of molecular techniques to soil biology, especially the use of 16S rRNA, are helping to bridge this gap. In this study, the influence of three land-use systems within a demonstration farm were evaluated with a view to further understand how these practices may impact observed soil bacterial communities. Replicate soil samples collected from the three land-use systems (grazed pine forest, cultivated crop, and grazed pasture on a single soil type. High throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to generate sequence datasets. The different land use systems showed distinction in the structure of their bacterial communities with respect to the differences detected in cluster analysis as well as diversity indices. Specific taxa, particularly Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and classes of Proteobacteria, showed significant shifts across the land-use strata. Families belonging to these taxa broke with notions of copio- and oligotrphy at the class level, as many of the less abundant groups of families of Actinobacteria showed a propensity for soil environments with reduced carbon/nutrient availability. Orders Actinomycetales and Solirubrobacterales showed their highest abundance in the heavily disturbed cultivated system despite the lowest soil organic carbon (SOC values across the site. Selected soil properties ([SOC], total nitrogen [TN], soil texture, phosphodiesterase [PD], alkaline phosphatase [APA], acid phosphatase [ACP] activity, and pH also differed significantly across land-use regimes, with SOM, PD, and pH showing variation consistent with shifts in community structure and composition. These results suggest that use of

  6. The dynamics of biofilm bacterial communities is driven by flow wax and wane in a temporary stream

    OpenAIRE

    Timoner Amer, Xisca; Borrego i Moré, Carles; Acuña i Salazar, Vicenç; Sabater, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm communities are exposed to long periods of desiccation in temporary streams. We investigated how water flow intermittency affected the bacterial community structure colonizing three different streambed compartments in a Mediterranean stream. Massive parallel sequencing revealed different bacterial communities in biofilms from sand sediments and cobbles. Bacterial communities were similar (62% of shared operational taxonomic units) in the epipsammic and hyporheic biofilms, and more div...

  7. Bacterial phylogeny structures soil resistomes across habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Patel, Sanket; Gibson, Molly K.; Lauber, Christian L.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-05-01

    Ancient and diverse antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have previously been identified from soil, including genes identical to those in human pathogens. Despite the apparent overlap between soil and clinical resistomes, factors influencing ARG composition in soil and their movement between genomes and habitats remain largely unknown. General metagenome functions often correlate with the underlying structure of bacterial communities. However, ARGs are proposed to be highly mobile, prompting speculation that resistomes may not correlate with phylogenetic signatures or ecological divisions. To investigate these relationships, we performed functional metagenomic selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from 18 agricultural and grassland soils. The 2,895 ARGs we discovered were mostly new, and represent all major resistance mechanisms. We demonstrate that distinct soil types harbour distinct resistomes, and that the addition of nitrogen fertilizer strongly influenced soil ARG content. Resistome composition also correlated with microbial phylogenetic and taxonomic structure, both across and within soil types. Consistent with this strong correlation, mobility elements (genes responsible for horizontal gene transfer between bacteria such as transposases and integrases) syntenic with ARGs were rare in soil by comparison with sequenced pathogens, suggesting that ARGs may not transfer between soil bacteria as readily as is observed between human pathogens. Together, our results indicate that bacterial community composition is the primary determinant of soil ARG content, challenging previous hypotheses that horizontal gene transfer effectively decouples resistomes from phylogeny.

  8. Comparison of bacterial communities of conventional and A-stage activated sludge systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Lotti, T.; Garcia-Ruiz, M.J.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of 10 different wastewater treatment systems and their influents has been investigated through pyrosequencing, yielding a total of 283486 reads. These bioreactors had different technological configurations: conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems and very highly

  9. Effect of increased load of high-strength food wastewater in thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge on bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Young Mo; Park, Jong Moon

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, anaerobic co-digestion (AcoD) has been widely used to improve reactor performance, especially methane production. In this study, we applied two different operating temperatures (thermophilic and mesophilic) and gradually increased the load of food wastewater (FWW) to investigate the bacterial communities during the AcoD of waste activated sludge (WAS) and FWW. As the load of FWW was increased, methane production rate (MPR; L CH4/L d) and methane content (%) in both Thermophilic AcoD (TAcoD) and Mesophilic AcoD (MAcoD) increased significantly; the highest MPR and methane content in TAcoD (1.423 L CH4/L d and 68.24%) and MAcoD (1.233 L CH4/L d and 65.21%) were observed when the FWW mixing ratio was 75%. However, MPR and methane yield in both reactors decreased markedly and methane production in TAcoD ceased completely when only FWW was fed into the reactor, resulting from acidification of the reactor caused by accumulation of organic acids. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed a decrease in bacterial diversity in TAcoD and a markedly different composition of bacterial communities between TAcoD and MAcoD with an increase in FWW load. For example, Bacterial members belonging to two genera Petrotoga (assigned to phylum Thermotogae) and Petrimonas (assigned to phylum Bacteroidetes) became dominant in TAcoD and MAcoD with an increase in FWW load, respectively. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results showed higher bacterial and archaeal populations (expressed as 16S rRNA gene concentration) in TAcoD than MAcoD with an increase in FWW load and showed maximum population when the FWW mixing ratio was 75% in both reactors. Collectively, this study demonstrated the dynamics of key bacterial communities in TAcoD and MAcoD, which were highly affected by the load of FWW. PMID:27155112

  10. Bacterial Communities in Rhizosphere of Maize Studied by T-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondreičková Katarína

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism munities from different collecting places was evaluated was used to determine the bacterial diversity in rhizo- by principal component analysis. Results showed that sphere of maize (Zea mays L. collected from four sites the most different bacterial community originated from of experimental field plot in two dates of the vegetation marginal part of the experimental field plot collected in season (July and September. The 16S rRNA gene was September was caused probably by combination of the amplified from metagenomic DNA using universal eubac- marginal effect and drought before sampling date in Sep- terial primers and PCR products were digested separately tember. Other rhizosphere samples showed from moderate with three restriction enzymes. Significant differences in to small differences in the structure of the bacterial com- the number of terminal restriction fragments among rhi- munity. Nevertheless, significant differences among all zosphere samples and between sampling dates were not collected bacterial communities were not observed. detected (P < 0.05. Variation within the bacterial communities from different collecting places was evaluated by principal component analysis. Results showed that the most different bacterial community originated from marginal part of the experimental field plot collected in September was caused probably by combination of the marginal effect and drought before sampling date in September. Other rhizosphere samples showed from moderate to small differences in the structure of the bacterial community. Nevertheless, significant differences among all collected bacterial communities were not observed.

  11. Quantitative comparison of bacterial communities in two Mediterranean sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Noyer, Charlotte; Hamilton, A.; Sacristan-Soriano, Oriol; Becerro, Mikel

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges can host in their tissues abundant and diverse bacterial communities. Lack of truly quantitative data on bacterial abundance and dynamics limits our understanding of the organization and functioning of these endobiotic communities. In this technical note, we describe a quantitative polymerase chain reaction approach to quantify the relative abundance of multiple clades of three major sponge-associated bacterial phyla: Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. To test our ...

  12. Gut bacterial communities across tadpole ecomorphs in two diverse tropical anuran faunas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vences, Miguel; Lyra, Mariana L.; Kueneman, Jordan G.; Bletz, Molly C.; Archer, Holly M.; Canitz, Julia; Handreck, Svenja; Randrianiaina, Roger-Daniel; Struck, Ulrich; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Geffers, Robert; McKenzie, Valerie J.; Tebbe, Christoph C.; Haddad, Célio F. B.; Glos, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Animal-associated microbial communities can play major roles in the physiology, development, ecology, and evolution of their hosts, but the study of their diversity has yet focused on a limited number of host species. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of partial sequences of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to assess the diversity of the gut-inhabiting bacterial communities of 212 specimens of tropical anuran amphibians from Brazil and Madagascar. The core gut-associated bacterial communities among tadpoles from two different continents strongly overlapped, with eight highly represented operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in common. In contrast, the core communities of adults and tadpoles from Brazil were less similar with only one shared OTU. This suggests a community turnover at metamorphosis. Bacterial diversity was higher in tadpoles compared to adults. Distinct differences in composition and diversity occurred among gut bacterial communities of conspecific tadpoles from different water bodies and after experimental fasting for 8 days, demonstrating the influence of both environmental factors and food on the community structure. Communities from syntopic tadpoles clustered by host species both in Madagascar and Brazil, and the Malagasy tadpoles also had species-specific isotope signatures. We recommend future studies to analyze the turnover of anuran gut bacterial communities at metamorphosis, compare the tadpole core communities with those of other aquatic organisms, and assess the possible function of the gut microbiota as a reservoir for protective bacteria on the amphibian skin.

  13. Experimental insights into the importance of aquatic bacterial community composition to the degradation of dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logue, J.B.; Stedmon, Colin; Kellerman, A.M.; Nielsen, N.J.; Andersson, A.F.; Laudon, H.; Lindström, E.S.; Kritzberg, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    and ecosystem functioning in that differently structured aquatic bacterial communities differed in their degradation of terrestrially derived DOM. Although the same amount of carbon was processed, both the temporal pattern of degradation and the compounds degraded differed among communities. We...

  14. Stability of multispecies bacterial communities: signaling networks may stabilize microbiomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Kerényi

    Full Text Available Multispecies bacterial communities can be remarkably stable and resilient even though they consist of cells and species that compete for environmental resources. In silico models suggest that common signals released into the environment may help selected bacterial species cluster at common locations and that sharing of public goods (i.e. molecules produced and released for mutual benefit can stabilize this coexistence. In contrast, unilateral eavesdropping on signals produced by a potentially invading species may protect a community by keeping invaders away from limited resources. Shared bacterial signals, such as those found in quorum sensing systems, may thus play a key role in fine tuning competition and cooperation within multi-bacterial communities. We suggest that in addition to metabolic complementarity, signaling dynamics may be important in further understanding complex bacterial communities such as the human, animal as well as plant microbiomes.

  15. Using in situ bacterial communities to monitor contaminants in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuwei; Wang, Jizhong; Wu, Yaketon; Ren, Chen; Song, Chao; Yang, Jianghua; Yu, Hongxia; Giesy, John P; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial communities in sediments of human-impacted rivers are exposed to multiple anthropogenic contaminants and eventually lead to biodiversity lost and ecological functions disable. Nanfei River of Anhui province has been contaminated by pollutants from industrial and/or agricultural sources. This study was conducted to investigate the structure of in situ sediment bacterial communities in Nanfei River and to examine the correlation between the different taxonomic components and contaminant concentrations. The bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi. Both the profiles of environmental predictors and the composition of microbial communities differed among agriculture, industrial and confluence regions. There were significant associations between bacterial community phylogenies and the measured contaminants in the sediments. Nutrients (TN and TP) and two metals (Cd and Zn) were negatively correlated with the essential "core" of the bacterial interaction network (Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria). Metals (Fe, Ni and Zn) and nutrients (TN and TP) had higher impact on bacterial community compositions than PAHs, OPs and PRTs according to the correlation and network analyses. Furthermore, several sensitive candidate genera were identified as potential bioindicators to monitor key contaminants by species contaminant correlation analysis. Overall, in situ bacterial communities could provide a useful tool for monitoring and assessing ecological stressors in freshwater sediments. PMID:26866572

  16. Phylogenetic characterization of the heterotrophic bacterial communities inhabiting a marine recirculating aquaculture system

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, L; Lo Giudice, A; Troussellier, Marc; Smedile, F; Bruni, V.; Blancheton, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present work was to characterize the heterotrophic bacterial community of a marine recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). Methods and Results: An experimental RAS was sampled for the rearing water (RW) and inside the biofilter. Samples were analysed for bacterial abundances, community structure and composition by using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The most represented species detected among biofilter clones was Pseudomonas stutzeri, whi...

  17. Large scale distribution of bacterial communities in the upper Paraná River floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Barros Chiaramonte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial community has a central role in nutrient cycle in aquatic habitats. Therefore, it is important to analyze how this community is distributed throughout different locations. Thirty-six different sites in the upper Paraná River floodplain were surveyed to determine the influence of environmental variable in bacterial community composition. The sites are classified as rivers, channels, and floodplain lakes connected or unconnected to the main river channel. The bacterial community structure was analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique, based on frequency of the main domains Bacteria and Archaea, and subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria (Alpha-proteobacteria, Beta-proteobacteria, Gamma-proteobacteria and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster. It has been demonstrated that the bacterial community differed in density and frequency of the studied groups. And these differences responded to distinct characteristics of the three main rivers of the floodplain as well as to the classification of the environments found in this floodplain. We conclude that dissimilarities in the bacterial community structure are related to environmental heterogeneity, and the limnological variables that most predicted bacterial communities in the upper Paraná River floodplain was total and ammoniacal nitrogen, orthophosphate and chlorophyll-a.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Epiphytic Bacterial Communities on Charophycean Green Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Madeline M.; Wilcox, Lee W.; Linda E Graham

    1998-01-01

    Epiphytic bacterial communities within the sheath material of three filamentous green algae, Desmidium grevillii, Hyalotheca dissiliens, and Spondylosium pulchrum (class Charophyceae, order Zygnematales), collected from a Sphagnum bog were characterized by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA. A total of 20 partial sequences and nine different sequence types were obtained, and one sequence type was recovered from the bacterial communities on all three algae. By phyl...

  19. Variations in Bacterial Community in a Temperate Lake Associated with an Agricultural Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan; Li, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrially derived carbon and nutrients are washed into lakes, providing nutritional drivers for both microbial heterotrophy and phototrophy. Changes in the quantity and diversity of carbon and nutrients exported from watersheds in response to alterations in long-term land use have led to a need for evaluation of the linkage between watershed-exported carbon and nutrients and bacterial community structure in watershed associated lakes. To learn more about these interactions, we investigated Muskrat Lake in Michigan, which has a well-defined moderately sized watershed dominated by agriculture. We measured the water chemistry, characterized the dissolved organic carbon, and determined the structure of the bacterial communities at the inlet and center of this lake (five depths per site) over the summer and fall of 2008. The lake had temporal and rain event-based fluctuations in water chemistry, as well as temporal and rain event-dependent shifts in bacterial communities as measured by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Agricultural watershed inputs were observed in the lake during and after rain events. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities indicated that there were differences over time and that the dominant phylotypes shifted between summer and late fall. Some populations (e.g., Polynucleobacter and Mycobacterium) increased during fall, while others (e.g., Gemmatimonas) diminished. Redundancy and partitioning analyses showed that water chemistry is highly correlated with variations in the bacterial community of the lake, which explained 34 % of the variations in the bacterial community. Dissolved organic carbon had the greatest effects on variations in the Muskrat Lake bacterial community (2 %). The results of this study provide information that will enable a better understanding of the interaction between the bacterial community of lakes and changes in chemical properties as a

  20. Functional recovery of biofilm bacterial communities after copper exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential of bacterial communities in biofilms to recover after copper exposure was investigated. Biofilms grown outdoor in shallow water on glass dishes were exposed in the laboratory to 0.6, 2.1, 6.8 μmol/l copper amended surface water and a reference and subsequently to un-amended surface water. Transitions of bacterial communities were characterised with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and community-level physiological profiles (CLPP). Exposure to 6.8 μmol/l copper provoked distinct changes in DGGE profiles of bacterial consortia, which did not reverse upon copper depuration. Exposure to 2.1 and 6.8 μmol/l copper was found to induce marked changes in CLPP of bacterial communities that proved to be reversible during copper depuration. Furthermore, copper exposure induced the development of copper-tolerance, which was partially lost during depuration. It is concluded that bacterial communities exposed to copper contaminated water for a period of 26 days are capable to restore their metabolic attributes after introduction of unpolluted water in aquaria for 28 days. - Genetically different bacterial communities can have similar functions and tolerance to copper

  1. Bacterial community analysis of contaminant soils from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: Shortly after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, vegetation, contaminated soil and other radioactive debris were buried in situ in trenches. The aims of this work are to analyse the structure of bacterial communities evolving in this environment since 20 years, and to evaluate the potential role of microorganisms in radionuclide migration in soils. Therefore, soil samples exhibiting contrasted radionuclides content were collected in and around the trench number 22. Bacterial communities were examined using a genetic fingerprinting method that allowed a comparative profiling of the samples (DGGE), with universal and group-specific PCR primers. Our results indicate that Chernobyl soil samples host a wide diversity of Bacteria, with stable patterns for Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and more variable for Proteobacteria. A collection of 650 aerobic and anaerobic culturable isolates was also constructed. A phylogenetic analysis of 250 heterotrophic aerobic isolates revealed that 5 phyla are represented: Beta-, Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and spore-forming Firmicutes, which is largely dominant. These collection will be screened for the presence of radionuclide-accumulating species in order to estimate the potential influence of microorganisms in radionuclides migration in soils

  2. Bacterial and protist community changes during a phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to characterize the change in the composition and structure of the bacterial and microzooplankton planktonic communities in relation to the phytoplankton community composition during a bloom. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of regions of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene was undertaken on samples collected during a 20 day (d) mesocosm experiment incorporating two different nutrient addition treatments [Nitrate and Phosphate (NPc) and Nitrate, Phosphate and Silicate (NPSc)] as well as a control. This approach allowed us to discriminate the changes in species composition across a broad range of phylogenetic groups using a common taxonomic level. Diatoms dominated the bloom in the NPSc treatment while dinoflagellates were the dominant phytoplankton in the control and NPc treatment. Network correlations highlighted significant interactions between OTUs within each treatment including changes in the composition of Paraphysomonas OTUs when the dominant Chaetoceros OTU switched. The microzooplankton community composition responded to changes in the phytoplankton composition while the prokaryotic community responded more to changes in ammonia concentration.

  3. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial community change in biofilm formed on seawater reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In S; Lee, Jinwook; Kima, Sung-Jo; Yu, Hye-Weon; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    The change in bacterial community structure induced by bacterial competition and succession was investigated during seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) in order to elucidate a possible link between the bacterial consortium on SWRO membranes and biofouling. To date, there has been no definitive characterization of the microbial diversity in SWRO in terms of distinguishing time-dependent changes in the richness or abundance of bacterial species. For bacterial succession within biofilms on the membrane surface, SWRO using a cross-flow filtration membrane test unit was operated for 5 and 100h, respectively. As results of the pyrosequencing analysis, bacterial communities differed considerably among seawater and the 5 and 100 h samples. From a total of 33,876 pyrosequences (using a 95% sequence similarity), there were less than 1% of shared species, confirming the influence of the operational time factor and lack of similarity of these communities. During SWRO operation, the abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri BBSPN3 (GU594474) belonging to gamma-Proteobacteria suggest that biofouling of SWRO membrane might be driven by the dominant influence of a specific species. In addition, among the bacterial competition of five bacterial species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus sp., Rhodobacter sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Mycobacterium sp.) competing for bacterial colonization on the SWRO membrane surfaces, it was exhibited that Bacillus sp. was the most dominant. The dominant influences ofPseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. on biofouling during actual SWRO is decisive depending on higher removal efficiency of the seawater pretreatment. PMID:24600849

  4. Distinct soil bacterial communities along a small-scale elevational gradient in alpine tundra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong eShen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The elevational diversity pattern for microorganisms has received great attention recently but is still understudied, and phylogenetic relatedness is rarely studied for microbial elevational distributions. Using a bar-coded pyrosequencing technique, we examined the biodiversity patterns for soil bacterial communities of tundra ecosystem along 2000–2500 m elevations on Changbai Mountain in China. Bacterial taxonomic richness displayed a linear decreasing trend with increasing elevation. Phylogenetic diversity and mean nearest taxon distance (MNTD exhibited a unimodal pattern with elevation. Bacterial communities were more phylogenetically clustered than expected by chance at all elevations based on the standardized effect size of MNTD metric. The bacterial communities differed dramatically among elevations, and the community composition was significantly correlated with soil total carbon, total nitrogen, C:N ratio, and dissolved organic carbon. Multiple ordinary least squares regression analysis showed that the observed biodiversity patterns strongly correlated with soil total carbon and C:N ratio. Taken together, this is the first time that a significant bacterial diversity pattern has been observed across a small-scale elevational gradient. Our results indicated that soil carbon and nitrogen contents were the critical environmental factors affecting bacterial elevational distribution in Changbai Mountain tundra. This suggested that ecological niche-based environmental filtering processes related to soil carbon and nitrogen contents could play a dominant role in structuring bacterial communities along the elevational gradient.

  5. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial community in deep-sea sediment from the western Pacific "warm pool"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A depth profile of bacterial community structure in one deep-sea sediment core of the western Pacific "warm pool" (WP) was investigated and compared with that in a sediment sample from the eastern Pacific (EP) by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA fragments.Five bacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed, and t33 clones with different restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP) patterns were sequenced. A phylogenetic analysis of these sequences revealed that the bacterial diversity in a sample from the WP was more abundant than that in the EP sample. The bacterial population in the sediment core of WP was composed of eight major lineages of the domain bacteria. Among them the γ-Proteobacteria was the predominant and most diverse group in each section of WP sediment core, followed by the α-Proteobacteria. The genus Colwellia belonging to γ-Proteobacteria was predominant in this sample.The shift of bacterial communities among different sections of the WP sediment core was δ-, ε-Proteobacteria, and Cytopahga-Flexibacteria-Bacteroides (CFB) group. The ratios between them in the bacterial communities all showed inversely proportional to the depth of sediment. The sequences related to sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were detected in every section. The bacterial community structure in this sediment core might be related to the environmental characteristics of the surface seawater of the western Pacific WP.

  7. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Barbato, Marta

    2016-02-02

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities\\' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities\\' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments.

  8. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Chouaia, Bessem; Armeni, Monica; Marasco, Ramona; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2016-03-15

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments. PMID:26849913

  9. Bacterial communities associated with the leaves and the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Bodenhausen

    Full Text Available Diverse communities of bacteria inhabit plant leaves and roots and those bacteria play a crucial role for plant health and growth. Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model to study plant pathogen interactions, but little is known about its associated bacterial community under natural conditions. We used 454 pyrosequencing to characterize the bacterial communities associated with the roots and the leaves of wild A. thaliana collected at 4 sites; we further compared communities on the outside of the plants with communities in the endophytic compartments. We found that the most heavily sequenced bacteria in A. thaliana associated community are related to culturable species. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes are the most abundant phyla in both leaf and root samples. At the genus level, sequences of Massilia and Flavobacterium are prevalent in both samples. Organ (leaf vs root and habitat (epiphytes vs endophytes structure the community. In the roots, richness is higher in the epiphytic communities compared to the endophytic compartment (P = 0.024, while the reverse is true for the leaves (P = 0.032. Interestingly, leaf and root endophytic compartments do not differ in richness, diversity and evenness, while they differ in community composition (P = 0.001. The results show that although the communities associated with leaves and roots share many bacterial species, the associated communities differ in structure.

  10. Impact of Soil Salinity on the Structure of the Bacterial Endophytic Community Identified from the Roots of Caliph Medic (Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud W Yaish

    Full Text Available In addition to being a forage crop, Caliph medic (Medicago truncatula is also a model legume plant and is used for research focusing on the molecular characterization of the interaction between rhizobia and plants. However, the endophytic microbiome in this plant is poorly defined. Endophytic bacteria play a role in supplying plants with the basic requirements necessary for growth and development. Moreover, these bacteria also play a role in the mechanism of salinity stress adaptation in plants. As a prelude to the isolation and utilization of these bacteria in Caliph medic farming, 41 bacterial OTUs were identified in this project from within the interior of the roots of this plant by pyrosequencing of the small ribosomal subunit gene (16S rDNA using a cultivation-independent approach. In addition, the differential abundance of these bacteria was studied following exposure of the plants to salinity stress. About 29,064 high-quality reads were obtained from the sequencing of six libraries prepared from control and salinity-treated tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of ~70% of the OTUs was significantly (p ≤ 0.05 altered in roots that were exposed to salinity stress. Sequence analysis showed a similarity between some of the identified species and other, known, growth-promoting bacteria, marine and salt-stressed soil-borne bacteria, and nitrogen-fixing bacterial isolates. Determination of the amendments to the bacterial community due to salinity stress in Caliph medic provides a crucial step toward developing an understanding of the association of these endophytes, under salt stress conditions, in this model plant. To provide direct evidence regarding their growth promoting activity, a group of endophytic bacteria were isolated from inside of plant roots using a cultivation-dependent approach. Several of these isolates were able to produce ACC-deaminase, ammonia and IAA; and to solubilize Zn+2 and PO4-3. This data is

  11. Impact of Soil Salinity on the Structure of the Bacterial Endophytic Community Identified from the Roots of Caliph Medic (Medicago truncatula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Mahmoud W; Al-Lawati, Abbas; Jana, Gerry Aplang; Vishwas Patankar, Himanshu; Glick, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being a forage crop, Caliph medic (Medicago truncatula) is also a model legume plant and is used for research focusing on the molecular characterization of the interaction between rhizobia and plants. However, the endophytic microbiome in this plant is poorly defined. Endophytic bacteria play a role in supplying plants with the basic requirements necessary for growth and development. Moreover, these bacteria also play a role in the mechanism of salinity stress adaptation in plants. As a prelude to the isolation and utilization of these bacteria in Caliph medic farming, 41 bacterial OTUs were identified in this project from within the interior of the roots of this plant by pyrosequencing of the small ribosomal subunit gene (16S rDNA) using a cultivation-independent approach. In addition, the differential abundance of these bacteria was studied following exposure of the plants to salinity stress. About 29,064 high-quality reads were obtained from the sequencing of six libraries prepared from control and salinity-treated tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of ~70% of the OTUs was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) altered in roots that were exposed to salinity stress. Sequence analysis showed a similarity between some of the identified species and other, known, growth-promoting bacteria, marine and salt-stressed soil-borne bacteria, and nitrogen-fixing bacterial isolates. Determination of the amendments to the bacterial community due to salinity stress in Caliph medic provides a crucial step toward developing an understanding of the association of these endophytes, under salt stress conditions, in this model plant. To provide direct evidence regarding their growth promoting activity, a group of endophytic bacteria were isolated from inside of plant roots using a cultivation-dependent approach. Several of these isolates were able to produce ACC-deaminase, ammonia and IAA; and to solubilize Zn+2 and PO4-3. This data is consistent with the

  12. Life history determines biogeographical patterns of soil bacterial communities over multiple spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, A; Richardson, A E; Baker, G; Wakelin, S; Thrall, P H

    2010-10-01

    The extent to which the distribution of soil bacteria is controlled by local environment vs. spatial factors (e.g. dispersal, colonization limitation, evolutionary events) is poorly understood and widely debated. Our understanding of biogeographic controls in microbial communities is likely hampered by the enormous environmental variability encountered across spatial scales and the broad diversity of microbial life histories. Here, we constrained environmental factors (soil chemistry, climate, above-ground plant community) to investigate the specific influence of space, by fitting all other variables first, on bacterial communities in soils over distances from m to 10² km. We found strong evidence for a spatial component to bacterial community structure that varies with scale and organism life history (dispersal and survival ability). Geographic distance had no influence over community structure for organisms known to have survival stages, but the converse was true for organisms thought to be less hardy. Community function (substrate utilization) was also shown to be highly correlated with community structure, but not to abiotic factors, suggesting nonstochastic determinants of community structure are important Our results support the view that bacterial soil communities are constrained by both edaphic factors and geographic distance and further show that the relative importance of such constraints depends critically on the taxonomic resolution used to evaluate spatio-temporal patterns of microbial diversity, as well as life history of the groups being investigated, much as is the case for macro-organisms. PMID:25241408

  13. Comparison of rhizosphere bacterial communities in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, John W; Wolfe, Gordon V; Blee, Kristopher A

    2008-02-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible systemic plant defense against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, with the potential to secrete antimicrobial compounds into the soil. However, its impact on rhizosphere bacteria is not known. In this study, we examined fingerprints of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine the effect of SAR on bacterial community structure and diversity. We compared Arabidopsis mutants that are constitutive and non-inducible for SAR and verified SAR activation by measuring pathogenesis-related protein activity via a beta-glucoronidase (GUS) reporter construct driven by the beta-1-3 glucanase promoter. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of MspI- and HaeIII-digested 16S rDNA to estimate bacterial rhizosphere community diversity, with Lactobacillus sp. added as internal controls. T-RFLP analysis showed a clear rhizosphere effect on community structure, and diversity analysis of both rhizosphere and bulk soil operational taxonomic units (as defined by terminal restriction fragments) using richness, Shannon-Weiner, and Simpson's diversity indices and evenness confirmed that the presence of Arabidopsis roots significantly altered bacterial communities. This effect of altered soil microbial community structure by plants was also seen upon multivariate cluster analysis of the terminal restriction fragments. We also found visible differences in the rhizosphere community fingerprints of different Arabidopsis SAR mutants; however, there was no clear decrease of rhizosphere diversity because of constitutive SAR expression. Our study suggests that SAR can alter rhizosphere bacterial communities, opening the door to further understanding and application of inducible plant defense as a driving force in structuring soil bacterial assemblages. PMID:17619212

  14. Robustness of the Bacterial Community in the Cabbage White Butterfly Larval Midgut

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Courtney J; Schloss, Patrick; Ramos, Yolied; Raffa, Kenneth; Handelsman, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Microbial communities typically vary in composition and structure over space and time. Little is known about the inherent characteristics of communities that govern various drivers of these changes, such as random variation, changes in response to perturbation, or susceptibility to invasion. In this study, we use 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences to describe variation among bacterial communities in the midguts of cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) larvae and examine the influence of commun...

  15. Structuring of Forest Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Farber

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Structuring forest communities is considered as a pre-studying procedure. The paper defines the fundamental structuring terms and describes the theory behind it. Factors hampering forest typology development are discussed. The areas of forest typology promising regarding sustainable and multi-purposed forest management are outlined.

  16. Endophytic bacterial community of a Mediterranean marine angiosperm (Posidonia oceanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus eGarcias-Bonet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial endophytes are crucial for the survival of many terrestrial plants, but little is known about the presence and importance of bacterial endophytes of marine plants. We conducted a survey of the endophytic bacterial community of the long-living Mediterranean marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica in surface-sterilized tissues (roots, rhizomes and leaves by DGGE. A total of 26 Posidonia oceanica meadows around the Balearic Islands were sampled, and the band patterns obtained for each meadow were compared for the three sampled tissues. Endophytic bacterial sequences were detected in most of the samples analyzed. A total of 34 OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units were detected. The main OTUs of endophytic bacteria present in P. oceanica tissues belonged primarily to Proteobacteria (α, γ and δ subclasses and Bacteroidetes. The OTUs found in roots significantly differed from those of rhizomes and leaves. Moreover, some OTUs were found to be associated to each type of tissue. Bipartite network analysis revealed differences in the bacterial endophyte communities present on different islands. The results of this study provide a pioneering step toward the characterization of the endophytic bacterial community associated with tissues of a marine angiosperm and reveal the presence of bacterial endophytes that differed among locations and tissue types.

  17. Bacterial Community Mapping of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Shenghua; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Jin-Na; Lv, Xiaoman; WANG Kun; Duan, Li-Ping; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further a...

  18. Regulation of bacterial communities through antimicrobial activity by the coral holobiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvennefors, E Charlotte E; Sampayo, Eugenia; Kerr, Caroline; Vieira, Genyess; Roff, George; Barnes, Andrew C

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between corals and associated bacteria and amongst these bacterial groups are likely to play a key role in coral health. However, the complexity of these interactions is poorly understood. We investigated the functional role of specific coral-associated bacteria in maintaining microbial communities on the coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg 1834) and the ability of coral mucus to support or inhibit bacterial growth. Culture-independent techniques were used to assess bacterial community structures whilst bacterial culture was employed to assess intra- and inter-specific antimicrobial activities of bacteria. Members of Pseudoalteromonas and ribotypes closely related to Vibrio coralliilyticus displayed potent antimicrobial activity against a range of other cultured isolates and grew readily on detached coral mucus. Although such bacterial ribotypes would be expected to have a competitive advantage, they were rare or absent on intact and healthy coral colonies growing in situ (analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing). The most abundant bacterial ribotypes found on healthy corals were Gammaproteobacteria, previously defined as type A coral associates. Our results indicate that this group of bacteria and specific members of the Alphaproteobacteria described here as 'type B associates' may be important functional groups for coral health. We suggest that bacterial communities on coral are kept in check by a combination of host-derived and microbial interactions and that the type A associates in particular may play a key role in maintaining stability of microbial communities on healthy coral colonies. PMID:21984347

  19. Co-occurrence patterns in aquatic bacterial communities across changing permafrost landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Comte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost thaw ponds and lakes are widespread across the northern landscape and may play a central role in global biogeochemical cycles, yet knowledge about their microbial ecology is limited. We sampled a set of thaw ponds and lakes as well as shallow rock-basin lakes that are located in distinct valleys along a North–South permafrost degradation gradient. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to determine co-occurrence patterns among bacterial taxa, and then analyzed these results relative to environmental variables to identify factors controlling bacterial community structure. Network analysis was applied to identify possible ecological linkages among the bacterial taxa and with abiotic and biotic variables. The results showed an overall high level of shared taxa among bacterial communities within each valley, however the bacterial co-occurrence patterns were non-random, with evidence of habitat preferences. There were taxonomic differences in bacterial assemblages among the different valleys that were statistically related to dissolved organic carbon concentration, conductivity and phytoplankton biomass. Co-occurrence networks revealed complex interdependencies within the bacterioplankton communities and showed contrasting linkages to environmental conditions among the main bacterial phyla. The thaw pond networks were composed of a limited number of highly connected taxa. This "small world network" property would render the communities more robust to environmental change but vulnerable to the loss of microbial keystone species.

  20. Nitrogen deposition alters soil chemical properties and bacterial communities in the Inner Mongolia grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximei Zhang; Xingguo Han

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition has dramatically altered biodiversity and ecosystem functioning on the earth; however,its effects on soil bacterial community and the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not been thoroughly examined.Changes in ecosystems caused by nitrogen deposition have traditionally been attributed to increased nitrogen content.In fact,nitrogen deposition not only leads to increased soil total N content,but also changes in the NH4+-N content,NO3--N content and pH,as well as changes in the heterogeneity of the four indexes.The soil indexes for these four factors,their heterogeneity and even the plant community might be routes through which nitrogen deposition alters the bacterial community.Here,we describe a 6-year nitrogen addition experiment conducted in a typical steppe ecosystem to investigate the ecological mechanism by which nitrogen deposition alters bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.We found that various characteristics of the bacterial community were explained by different environmental factors.Nitrogen deposition decreased bacterial abundance that is positively related to soil pH value.In addition,nitrogen addition decreased bacterial diversity,which is negatively related to soil total N content and positively related to soil NO3--N heterogeneity.Finally,nitrogen.addition altered bacterial composition that is significantly related to soil NH4+-N content.Although nitrogen deposition significantly altered plant biomass,diversity and composition,these characteristics of plant community did not have a significant impact on processes of nitrogen deposition that led to alterations in bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.Therefore,more sensitive molecular technologies should be adopted to detect the subtle shifts of microbial community structure induced by the changes of plant community upon nitrogen deposition.

  1. Characterization of the bacterial communities of life stages of free living lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jo Williams-Newkirk

    Full Text Available The lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum is an abundant and aggressive biter of humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in the southeastern-central USA and an important vector of several known and suspected zoonotic bacterial pathogens. However, the biological drivers of bacterial community variation in this tick are still poorly defined. Knowing the community context in which tick-borne bacterial pathogens exist and evolve is required to fully understand the ecology and immunobiology of the ticks and to design effective public health and veterinary interventions. We performed a metagenomic survey of the bacterial communities of questing A. americanum and tested 131 individuals (66 nymphs, 24 males, and 41 females from five sites in three states. Pyrosequencing was performed with barcoded eubacterial primers targeting variable 16S rRNA gene regions 5-3. The bacterial communities were dominated by Rickettsia (likely R. amblyommii and an obligate Coxiella symbiont, together accounting for 6.7-100% of sequences per tick. DNAs from Midichloria, Borrelia, Wolbachia, Ehrlichia, Pseudomonas, or unidentified Bacillales, Enterobacteriaceae, or Rhizobiales groups were also detected frequently. Wolbachia and Midichloria significantly co-occurred in Georgia (p<0.00001, but not in other states. The significance of the Midichloria-Wolbachia co-occurrence is unknown. Among ticks collected in Georgia, nymphs differed from adults in both the composition (p = 0.002 and structure (p = 0.002 of their bacterial communities. Adults differed only in their community structure (p = 0.002 with males containing more Rickettsia and females containing more Coxiella. Comparisons among adult ticks collected in New York and North Carolina supported the findings from the Georgia collection despite differences in geography, collection date, and sample handling, implying that the differences detected are consistent attributes. The data also suggest that some members of

  2. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    OpenAIRE

    James Angus Chandler; James, Pamela M.; Guillaume Jospin; Lang, Jenna M.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adu...

  3. Changes in soil bacterial communities induced by the invasive plant Pennisetum setaceum in a semiarid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Gema; Caravaca, Fuensanta; del Mar Alguacil, María; Fernández-López, Manuel; José Fernández-González, Antonio; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Roldán, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Invasive alien species are considered as a global threat being among the main causes of biodiversity loss. Plant invasions have been extensively studied from different disciplines with the purpose of identifying predictor traits of invasiveness and finding solutions. However, less is known about the implication of the rhizosphere microbiota in these processes, even when it is well known the importance of the interaction between plant rhizosphere and microbial communities. The objective of this study was to determine whether native and invasive plants support different bacterial communities in their rhizospheres and whether there are bacterial indicator species that might be contributing to the invasion process of these ecosystems. We carried out a study in five independent locations under Mediterranean semiarid conditions, where the native Hyparrhenia hirta is being displaced by Pennisetum setaceum, an aggressive invasive Poaceae and soil bacterial communities were amplified and 454-pyrosequenced. Changes in the composition and structure of the bacterial communities, owing to the invasive status of the plant, were detected when the richness and alpha-diversity estimators were calculated as well as when we analyzed the PCoA axes scores. The Indicator Species Analysis results showed a higher number of indicators for invaded communities at all studied taxonomic levels. In conclusion, the effect of the invasiveness and its interaction with the soil location has promoted shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial communities which might be facilitating the invader success in these ecosystems.

  4. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper contamination on China’s arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg-1 in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass.

  5. Plant and soil fungal but not soil bacterial communities are linked in long-term fertilized grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassman, Noriko A.; Leite, Marcio F. A.; Pan, Yao; de Hollander, Mattias; van Veen, Johannes A.; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-03-01

    Inorganic fertilization and mowing alter soil factors with subsequent effects–direct and indirect - on above- and below-ground communities. We explored direct and indirect effects of long-term fertilization (N, P, NPK, Liming) and twice yearly mowing on the plant, bacterial and fungal communities and soil factors. We analyzed co-variation using 16S and 18S rRNA genes surveys, and plant frequency and edaphic factors across treatments. The plant and fungal communities were distinct in the NPK and L treatments, while the bacterial communities and soil factors were distinct in the N and L treatments. Plant community diversity and evenness had low diversity in the NPK and high diversity in the liming treatment, while the diversity and evenness of the bacterial and fungal communities did not differ across treatments, except of higher diversity and evenness in the liming treatment for the bacteria. We found significant co-structures between communities based on plant and fungal comparisons but not between plant and bacterial nor bacterial and fungal comparisons. Our results suggested that the plant and fungal communities are more tightly linked than either community with the bacterial community in fertilized soils. We found co-varying plant, bacterial and fungal taxa in different treatments that may indicate ecological interactions.

  6. Antagonistic interactions are sufficient to explain self-assemblage of bacterial communities in a homogeneous environment: a computational modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román eZapién-Campos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies in Ecology have been devoted to analyzing the effects the environment has on individuals, populations, and communities, thus neglecting the effects of biotic interactions on the system dynamics. In the present work we study the structure of bacterial communities in the oligotrophic shallow water system of Churince, Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico. Since the physicochemical conditions of this water system are homogeneous and quite stable in time, it is an excellent candidate to study how biotic factors influence the structure of bacterial communities. In a previous study, the binary antagonistic interactions of 78 bacterial strains, isolated from Churince, were experimentally determined. We employ these data to develop a computer algorithm to simulate growth experiments in a cellular grid representing the pond. Remarkably, in our model, the dynamics of all the simulated bacterial populations is determined solely by antagonistic interactions. Our results indicate that all bacterial strains (even those that are antagonized by many other bacteria survive in the long term, and that the underlying mechanism is the formation of bacterial community patches. Patches corresponding to less antagonistic and highly susceptible strains are consistently isolated from the highly-antagonistic bacterial colonies by patches of neutral strains. These results concur with the observed features of the bacterial community structure previously reported. Finally, we study how our findings depend on factors like initial population size, differential population growth rates, homogeneous population death rates, and enhanced bacterial diffusion.

  7. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species. PMID:21108068

  8. Response of bacterial communities to environmental changes in a mesoscale subtropical watershed, Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anyi; Yang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Nengwang; Hou, Liyuan; Ma, Ying; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2014-02-15

    This study used 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing (16S-pyrotag) to investigate both planktonic and benthic bacterial communities in two main tributaries (North River and West River) of the Jiulong River Watershed (JRW), a mesoscale subtropical watershed that has experienced intensive human perturbation in recent decades. The results of 16S-pyrotag showed that benthic bacterial communities were clearly more diverse and uniform than surface bacterioplankton communities. The results of taxonomic assignments indicated that Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in planktonic than in benthic communities, whereas the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Delta-, Gammaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Nitrospira were higher in sediment than in water samples. In particular, several sewer- and fecal-pollution bacterial indicators were observed in water samples, implying that the water bodies of the JRW were contaminated by fecal pollution. Using the typical freshwater bacteria (TFB) taxonomic framework, 57.6 ± 10%, 27.6 ± 10.9% and 10.4 ± 6.9% of sequences recovered from planktonic communities could be assigned to lineages, clades and tribes of TFB, respectively. The relatively lower abundance of TFB implied that some unknown or unique autochthonous bacterioplankton populations occurred in the JRW. The principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and one way analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) analysis demonstrated that planktonic bacterial community structures were significantly different between North River and West River, whereas benthic communities from these two tributaries were grouped together. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry were the key drivers of both α- and β-diversity patterns of bacterioplankton communities. Overall, our results indicate that the diversity, composition and structure of planktonic bacterial communities are sensitive to water chemistry (e.g., nutrient

  9. The intestinal bacterial community in the food waste-reducing larvae of Hermetia illucens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyunbum; Park, Soyoung; Choi, Jiyoung; Jeong, Gilsang; Lee, Sang-Beom; Choi, Youngcheol; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2011-05-01

    As it is known that food waste can be reduced by the larvae of Hermetia illucens (Black soldier fly, BSF), the scientific and commercial value of BSF larvae has increased recently. We hypothesised that the ability of catabolic degradation by BSF larvae might be due to intestinal microorganisms. Herein, we analysed the bacterial communities in the gut of BSF larvae by pyrosequencing of extracting intestinal metagenomic DNA from larvae that had been fed three different diets. The 16S rRNA sequencing results produced 9737, 9723 and 5985 PCR products from larval samples fed food waste, cooked rice and calf forage, respectively. A BLAST search using the EzTaxon program showed that the bacterial community in the gut of larvae fed three different diets was mainly composed of the four phyla with dissimilar proportions. Although the composition of the bacterial communities depended on the different nutrient sources, the identified bacterial strains in the gut of BSF larvae represented unique bacterial species that were unlike the intestinal microflora of other insects. Thus, our study analysed the structure of the bacterial communities in the gut of BSF larvae after three different feedings and assessed the application of particular bacteria for the efficient degradation of organic compounds. PMID:21267722

  10. The dual oxidase gene BdDuox regulates the intestinal bacterial community homeostasis of Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhichao; Wang, Ailin; Li, Yushan; Cai, Zhaohui; Lemaitre, Bruno; Zhang, Hongyu

    2016-05-01

    The guts of metazoans are in permanent contact with the microbial realm that includes beneficial symbionts, nonsymbionts, food-borne microbes and life-threatening pathogens. However, little is known concerning how host immunity affects gut bacterial community. Here, we analyze the role of a dual oxidase gene (BdDuox) in regulating the intestinal bacterial community homeostasis of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis. The results showed that knockdown of BdDuox led to an increased bacterial load, and to a decrease in the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Leuconostocaceae bacterial symbionts in the gut. The resulting dysbiosis, in turn, stimulates an immune response by activating BdDuox and promoting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that regulates the composition and structure of the gut bacterial community to normal status by repressing the overgrowth of minor pathobionts. Our results suggest that BdDuox plays a pivotal role in regulating the homeostasis of the gut bacterial community in B. dorsalis. PMID:26565723

  11. Soil bacterial community responses to warming and grazing in a Tibetan alpine meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaoming; Lin, Qiaoyan; Wang, Shiping; Li, Xiangzhen; Liu, Wentso; Luo, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhu, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Lili; Li, Xine

    2016-01-01

    Warming and grazing significantly affect the structure and function of an alpine meadow ecosystem. Yet, the responses of soil microbes to these disturbances are not well understood. Controlled asymmetrical warming (+1.2/1.7°C during daytime/nighttime) with grazing experiments were conducted to study microbial response to warming, grazing and their interactions. Significant interactive effects of warming and grazing were observed on soil bacterial α-diversity and composition. Warming only caused significant increase in bacterial α-diversity under no-grazing conditions. Grazing induced no substantial differences in bacterial α-diversity and composition irrespective of warming. Warming, regardless of grazing, caused a significant increase in soil bacterial community similarity across space, but grazing only induced significant increases under no-warming conditions. The positive effects of warming on bacterial α-diversity and grazing on community similarity were weakened by grazing and warming, respectively. Soil and plant variables explained well the variations in microbial communities, indicating that changes in soil and plant properties may primarily regulate soil microbial responses to warming in this alpine meadow. The results suggest that bacterial communities may become more similar across space in a future, warmed climate and moderate grazing may potentially offset, at least partially, the effects of global warming on the soil microbial diversity. PMID:26635411

  12. The bacterial community of entomophilic nematodes and host beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Sneha L; Salinas, Heilly; Flores, Gilberto E; Hong, Ray L

    2016-05-01

    Insects form the most species-rich lineage of Eukaryotes and each is a potential host for organisms from multiple phyla, including fungi, protozoa, mites, bacteria and nematodes. In particular, beetles are known to be associated with distinct bacterial communities and entomophilic nematodes. While entomopathogenic nematodes require symbiotic bacteria to kill and reproduce inside their insect hosts, the microbial ecology that facilitates other types of nematode-insect associations is largely unknown. To illuminate detailed patterns of the tritrophic beetle-nematode-bacteria relationship, we surveyed the nematode infestation profiles of scarab beetles in the greater Los Angeles area over a five-year period and found distinct nematode infestation patterns for certain beetle hosts. Over a single season, we characterized the bacterial communities of beetles and their associated nematodes using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found significant differences in bacterial community composition among the five prevalent beetle host species, independent of geographical origin. Anaerobes Synergistaceae and sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrionaceae were most abundant in Amblonoxia beetles, while Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae were common in Cyclocephala beetles. Unlike entomopathogenic nematodes that carry bacterial symbionts, insect-associated nematodes do not alter the beetles' native bacterial communities, nor do their microbiomes differ according to nematode or beetle host species. The conservation of Diplogastrid nematodes associations with Melolonthinae beetles and sulphate-reducing bacteria suggests a possible link between beetle-bacterial communities and their associated nematodes. Our results establish a starting point towards understanding the dynamic interactions between soil macroinvertebrates and their microbiota in a highly accessible urban environment. PMID:26992100

  13. Impact of manufactured TiO2 nanoparticles on planktonic and sessile bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we conducted a 2 week microcosm experiment with a natural freshwater bacterial community to assess the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) at various concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) on planktonic and sessile bacteria under dark conditions. Results showed an increase of planktonic bacterial abundance at the highest TiO2-NP concentration, concomitant with a decrease from that of sessile bacteria. Bacterial assemblages were most affected by the 100 mg/L TiO2-NP exposure and overall diversity was found to be lower for planktonic bacteria and higher for sessile bacteria at this concentration. In both compartments, a 100 mg/L TiO2-NPs exposure induced a decrease in the ratio between the Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. For planktonic communities, a decrease of Comamonadaceae was observed concomitant with an increase of Oxalobacteraceae and Cytophagaceae (especially Emticicia). For sessile communities, results showed a strong decrease of Betaproteobacteria and particularly of Comamonadaceae. - Highlights: • Microcosm experiments with natural water exposed to TiO2-NPs. • Toxicity of TiO2-NPs assessed on both planktonic and sessile bacteria. • Effects on bacterial community structure and diversity. • Shift occurs in the Betaproteobacteria/Bacteroidetes repartition in communities. - TiO2-NPs increase abundance of planktonic bacteria, decrease that of sessile bacteria, and affect diversity and structure of communities in both cases

  14. Dynamics of different bacterial communities are capable of generating sustainable electricity from microbial fuel cells with organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Araki, Yoko; Mochihara, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Tetsuya; Kubota, Hiroko; Chiba, Yusuke; Rubaba, Owen; Tashiro, Yosuke; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the bacterial communities in anolyte and anode biofilms and the electrochemical properties of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated when a complex organic waste-decomposing solution was continuously supplied to MFCs as an electron donor. The current density increased gradually and was maintained at approximately 100 to 150 mA m(-2). Polarization curve analyses revealed that the maximum power density was 7.4 W m(-3) with an internal resistance of 110 Ω. Bacterial community structures in the organic waste-decomposing solution and MFCs differed from each other. Clonal analyses targeting 16S rRNA genes indicated that bacterial communities in the biofilms on MFCs developed to specific communities dominated by novel Geobacter. Multidimensional scaling analyses based on DGGE profiles revealed that bacterial communities in the organic waste-decomposing solution fluctuated and had no dynamic equilibrium. Bacterial communities on the anolyte in MFCs had a dynamic equilibrium with fluctuations, while those of the biofilm converged to the Geobacter-dominated structure. These bacterial community dynamics of MFCs differed from those of control-MFCs under open circuit conditions. These results suggested that bacterial communities in the anolyte and biofilm have a gentle symbiotic system through electron flow, which resulted in the advance of current density from complex organic waste. PMID:24789988

  15. Bacterial and archaeal communities in Lake Nyos (Cameroon, Central Africa)

    OpenAIRE

    Tiodjio, Rosine E.; Sakatoku, Akihiro; Nakamura, Akihiro; Tanaka, Daisuke; Fantong, Wilson Y.; Tchakam, Kamtchueng B.; Tanyileke, Gregory; Ohba, Takeshi; Hell, Victor J.; Kusakabe, Minoru; Nakamura, Shogo; Ueda, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the microbial diversity associated with Lake Nyos, a lake with an unusual chemistry in Cameroon. Water samples were collected during the dry season on March 2013. Bacterial and archaeal communities were profiled using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) approach of the 16S rRNA gene. The results indicate a stratification of both communities along the water column. Altogether, the physico-chemical data and microbial s...

  16. Successional Trajectories of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities over Consecutive Seasons

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Eoin L. Brodie; Zhou, Jizhong; Firestone, Mary

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional p...

  17. High-throughput nucleotide sequence analysis of diverse bacterial communities in leachates of decomposing pig carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hak Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The leachate generated by the decomposition of animal carcass has been implicated as an environmental contaminant surrounding the burial site. High-throughput nucleotide sequencing was conducted to investigate the bacterial communities in leachates from the decomposition of pig carcasses. We acquired 51,230 reads from six different samples (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 14 week-old carcasses and found that sequences representing the phylum Firmicutes predominated. The diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in the leachate was the highest at 6 weeks, in contrast to those at 2 and 14 weeks. The relative abundance of Firmicutes was reduced, while the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria increased from 3–6 weeks. The representation of phyla was restored after 14 weeks. However, the community structures between the samples taken at 1–2 and 14 weeks differed at the bacterial classification level. The trend in pH was similar to the changes seen in bacterial communities, indicating that the pH of the leachate could be related to the shift in the microbial community. The results indicate that the composition of bacterial communities in leachates of decomposing pig carcasses shifted continuously during the study period and might be influenced by the burial site.

  18. Robustness of the bacterial community in the cabbage white butterfly larval midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Courtney J; Schloss, Patrick; Ramos, Yolied; Raffa, Kenneth; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-02-01

    Microbial communities typically vary in composition and structure over space and time. Little is known about the inherent characteristics of communities that govern various drivers of these changes, such as random variation, changes in response to perturbation, or susceptibility to invasion. In this study, we use 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences to describe variation among bacterial communities in the midguts of cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) larvae and examine the influence of community structure on susceptibility to invasion. We compared communities in larvae experiencing the same conditions at different times (temporal variation) or fed different diets (perturbation). The most highly represented phylum was Proteobacteria, which was present in all midgut communities. The observed species richness ranged from six to 15, and the most abundant members affiliated with the genera Methylobacteria, Asaia, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Pantoea. Individual larvae subjected to the same conditions at the same time harbored communities that were highly similar in structure and membership, whereas the communities observed within larval populations changed with diet and over time. In addition, structural changes due to perturbation coincided with enhanced susceptibility to invasion by Enterobacter sp. NAB3R and Pantoea stewartii CWB600, suggesting that resistance to invasion is in part governed by community structure. These findings along with the observed conservation of membership at the phylum level, variation in structure and membership at lower taxonomic levels, and its relative simplicity make the cabbage white butterfly larval community an attractive model for studying community dynamics and robustness. PMID:19924467

  19. Comparing actinomycete and bacterial soil and sediment communities for metagenomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hill, P.; Krištůfek, Václav; Feijoo, A. M.; Caballero, S.; van Elsas, D.

    Praha: Výzkumný ústav rostlinné výroby, Praha, 2005. s. 10. [Život v pode /6./. 01.02.2005-02.02.2005, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : actinomycete * bacterial soil and sediment communities * metagenomics Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  20. Bacterial community profiles in low microbial abundance sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Giles, Emily

    2012-09-04

    It has long been recognized that sponges differ in the abundance of associated microorganisms, and they are therefore termed either \\'low microbial abundance\\' (LMA) or \\'high microbial abundance\\' (HMA) sponges. Many previous studies concentrated on the dense microbial communities in HMA sponges, whereas little is known about microorganisms in LMA sponges. Here, two LMA sponges from the Red Sea, two from the Caribbean and one from the South Pacific were investigated. With up to only five bacterial phyla per sponge, all LMA sponges showed lower phylum-level diversity than typical HMA sponges. Interestingly, each LMA sponge was dominated by a large clade within either Cyanobacteria or different classes of Proteobacteria. The overall similarity of bacterial communities among LMA sponges determined by operational taxonomic unit and UniFrac analysis was low. Also the number of sponge-specific clusters, which indicate bacteria specifically associated with sponges and which are numerous in HMA sponges, was low. A biogeographical or host-dependent distribution pattern was not observed. In conclusion, bacterial community profiles of LMA sponges are clearly different from profiles of HMA sponges and, remarkably, each LMA sponge seems to harbour its own unique bacterial community. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  1. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    Soil bacteria and archaea are essential for ecosystem functioning and plant growth through their degradation of organic matter and turnover of nutrients. But since the majority of soil bacteria and archaea are unclassified and “nonculturable” the functionality of the microbial community and its o...... different fertilizer treatments were found, demonstrating a high robustness of the soil microbiota.......Soil bacteria and archaea are essential for ecosystem functioning and plant growth through their degradation of organic matter and turnover of nutrients. But since the majority of soil bacteria and archaea are unclassified and “nonculturable” the functionality of the microbial community and its...... overall importance for ecosystem function in soil is poorly understood. Global change factors may affect the diversity and functioning of soil prokaryotes and thereby ecosystem functioning. To gain a better understanding of the effects of global changes it is of fundamental importance to classify the...

  2. Effects of sulfadiazine on soil bacterial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangler, Martin

    investigate the fate and transport of SDZ at the interphase between dewatered SDZ-amended sewage sludge and soil. SDZ was not mineralized within sludge aggregates and travelled more than 10 mm into the surrounding soil. The strongest PICT response was observed in soils fertilized with organic fertilizers or...... as fertilizers on agricultural lands they represent a route for antibiotics into the soil environment where they may persist and affect levels of antibiotic resistance in soil microbial communities over time. In this work the level of tolerance to the antibiotic sulfadiazine (SDZ) was studied in a...... number of soils applying the pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT)-approach. As SDZ is amphoteric and thus exist on either neutral, anionic or cationic form soil pH is likely to influence the toxicity and bioavailability of SDZ to soil bacteria. In manuscript I the aim was to set a baseline, a...

  3. Bacterial communities in batch and continuous-flow wetlands treating the herbicide S-metolachlor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of wetland bacterial communities in the context of pesticide contamination and hydrological regime is scarce. We investigated the bacterial composition in constructed wetlands receiving Mercantor Gold® contaminated water (960 g L−1 of the herbicide S-metolachlor, > 80% of the S-enantiomer) operated under continuous-flow or batch modes to evaluate the impact of the hydraulic regime. In the continuous-flow wetland, S-metolachlor mass removal was > 40%, whereas in the batch wetland, almost complete removal of S-metolachlor (93–97%) was observed. Detection of ethanesulfonic and oxanilic acid degradation products further indicated S-metolachlor biodegradation in the two wetlands. The dominant bacterial populations were characterised by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 pyrosequencing. The bacterial profiles evolved during the first 35 days of the experiment, starting from a composition similar to that of inlet water, with the use of nitrate and to a lesser extent sulphate and manganese as terminal electron acceptors for microbial metabolism. Proteobacteria were the most abundant phylum, with Beta-, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria representing 26%, 19% and 17% respectively of total bacterial abundance. Bacterial composition in wetland water changed gradually over time in continuous-flow wetland and more abruptly in the batch wetland. Differences in overall bacterial water structure in the two systems were modest but significant (p = 0.008), and S-metolachlor, nitrate, and total inorganic carbon concentrations correlated with changes in the bacterial profiles. Together, the results highlight that bacterial composition profiles and their dynamics may be used as bioindicators of herbicide exposure and hydraulic disturbances in wetland systems. - Highlights: • We evaluated the bacterial composition in wetlands treating S-metolachlor • Hydraulic regime impacted biogeochemical processes and S-metolachlor removal • Bacterial

  4. [Algo-bacterial communities of the Kulunda steppe (Altai region, Russia) soda lakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samylina, O S; Sapozhnikov, F V; Gaĭnanova, O Iu; Riabova, A V; Nikitin, M A; Sorokin, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    The composition and macroscopic structure of the floating oxygenic phototrophic communities from Kulunda steppe soda lakes (Petukhovskoe sodovoe, Tanatara VI, and Gorchiny 3) was described based on the data of the 2011 and 2012 expeditions (Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology). The algo-bacterial community with a green alga Ctenocladus circinnatus as an edificator was the typical one. Filamentous Geitlerinema sp. and Nodosilinea sp. were the dominant cyanobacteria. Apart from C. circinnatus, the algological component of the community contained unicellular green algae Dunaliella viridis and cf. Chlorella minutissima, as well as diatoms (Anomeoneis sphaerophora, Brchysira brebissonii, Brachysira zellensis, Mastogloia pusilla var. subcapitata, Nitzschia amphibia, Nitzschia communis, and Nitzschia sp.1). The latter have not been previously identified in the lakes under study. In all lakes, a considerable increase in salinity was found to result in changes in the composition and macroscopic structure of algo-bacterial communities. PMID:25916153

  5. High-Resolution Melt Analysis for Rapid Comparison of Bacterial Community Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Bælum, Jacob; Feld, Louise; Holben, William E.; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr

    2014-01-01

    -resolution melt (HRM) analysis is the study of the melt behavior of specific PCR products. Here we describe a novel high-throughput approach in which we used HRM analysis targeting the 16S rRNA gene to rapidly screen multiple complex samples for differences in bacterial community composition. We hypothesized that......In the study of bacterial community composition, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is today among the preferred methods of analysis. The cost of nucleotide sequence analysis, including requisite computational and bioinformatic steps, however, takes up a large part of many research budgets. High...... HRM analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes from a soil ecosystem could be used as a screening tool to identify changes in bacterial community structure. This hypothesis was tested using a soil microcosm setup exposed to a total of six treatments representing different combinations of pesticide and...

  6. Responses of the coastal bacterial community to viral infection of the algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheik, A.R.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Lavik, G.; Lam, P.; Musat, N.; Krupke, A.; Littmann, S.; Strous, M.; Kuypers, M.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    The release of organic material upon algal cell lyses has a key role in structuring bacterial communities and affects the cycling of biolimiting elements in the marine environment. Here we show that already before cell lysis the leakage or excretion of organic matter by infected yet intact algal cel

  7. Effects of Fertilization and Sampling Time on Composition and Diversity of Entire and Active Bacterial Communities in German Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Sarah; Wemheuer, Franziska; Wemheuer, Bernd; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria are major players in driving and regulating ecosystem processes. Thus, the identification of factors shaping the diversity and structure of these communities is crucial for understanding bacterial-mediated processes such as nutrient transformation and cycling. As most studies only target the entire soil bacterial community, the response of active community members to environmental changes is still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fertilizer application and sampling time on structure and diversity of potentially active (RNA-based) and the entire (DNA-based) bacterial communities in German grassland soils. Analysis of more than 2.3 million 16S rRNA transcripts and gene sequences derived from amplicon-based sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that fertilizer application and sampling time significantly altered the diversity and composition of entire and active bacterial communities. Although the composition of both the entire and the active bacterial community was correlated with environmental factors such as pH or C/N ratio, the active community showed a higher sensitivity to environmental changes than the entire community. In addition, functional analyses were performed based on predictions derived from 16S rRNA data. Genes encoding the uptake of nitrate/nitrite, nitrification, and denitrification were significantly more abundant in fertilized plots compared to non-fertilized plots. Hence, this study provided novel insights into changes in dynamics and functions of soil bacterial communities as response to season and fertilizer application. PMID:26694644

  8. Diversity and spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial communities : physicochemical and other drivers along an acid mine drainage

    OpenAIRE

    Volant, A; Bruneel, Odile; Desoeuvre, A.; Hery, M; Casiot, C.; Bru, N.; Delpoux, S.; Fahy, A.; Javerliat, F.; Bouchez, O.; Duran, R.; Bertin, P. N.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F.; Lauga, B.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the biotic and abiotic factors that control microbial community structure over time and along an environmental gradient is a pivotal question in microbial ecology. Carnoules mine (France), which is characterized by acid waters and very high concentrations of arsenic, iron, and sulfate, provides an excellent opportunity to study these factors along the pollution gradient of Reigous Creek. To this end, biodiversity and spatiotemporal distribution of bacterial communities were charac...

  9. Dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities associated with eggshells during incubation

    OpenAIRE

    Grizard, Stéphanie; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Tieleman, B Irene; Salles, Joana F

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are closely associated with eggs and may play a determinant role in embryo survival. Yet, the majority of studies focusing on this association relied on culture-based methodology, eventually leading to a skewed assessment of microbial communities. By targeting the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, we, respectively, described bacterial and fungal communities on eggshells of the homing pigeon Columba livia. We explored their structure, abundance, and com...

  10. Diazotrophic potential among bacterial communities associated with wild and cultivated Agave species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgarennes, Damaris; Garrido, Etzel; Torres-Gomez, Miryam J; Peña-Cabriales, Juan J; Partida-Martinez, Laila P

    2014-12-01

    Agaves are major biotic resources in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Despite their ecological, economical and cultural relevance, many aspects of the microbial communities associated with agaves are still unknown. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities associated with two Agave species by 16S rRNA- Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of biotic and abiotic factors in the structure of the bacterial communities. In parallel, we isolated and characterized diazotrophic bacteria associated with agaves, as Agave soils are characterized by their low nitrogen content. Our results demonstrate that in Agave, the structure of prokaryotic assemblages was mostly influenced by the community group, where the soil, episphere, and endosphere were clearly distinct. Proteobacteria (γ and α), Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria were the dominant phyla. Bacterial communities in the episphere of agaves were mainly influenced by the host species, whereas in the endosphere were affected by the season. Fifteen bacterial taxa were common and abundant in the endosphere of both Agave species during the dry season. Notably, some of the confirmed diazotrophic strains belonged to this group, suggesting a possible beneficial role in planta. PMID:25314594

  11. Safe-Site Effects on Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities in a High-Altitude Alpine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Ciccazzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rhizosphere effect on bacterial communities associated with three floristic communities (RW, FI, and M sites which differed for the developmental stages was studied in a high-altitude alpine ecosystem. RW site was an early developmental stage, FI was an intermediate stage, M was a later more matured stage. The N and C contents in the soils confirmed a different developmental stage with a kind of gradient from the unvegetated bare soil (BS site through RW, FI up to M site. The floristic communities were composed of 21 pioneer plants belonging to 14 species. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis showed different bacterial genetic structures per each floristic consortium which differed also from the BS site. When plants of the same species occurred within the same site, almost all their bacterial communities clustered together exhibiting a plant species effect. Unifrac significance value (P<0.05 on 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed significant differences (P<0.05 between BS site and the vegetated sites with a weak similarity to the RW site. The intermediate plant colonization stage FI did not differ significantly from the RW and the M vegetated sites. These results pointed out the effect of different floristic communities rhizospheres on their soil bacterial communities.

  12. Comparison of bacterial communities in sands and water at beaches with bacterial water quality violations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Halliday

    Full Text Available Recreational water quality, as measured by culturable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB, may be influenced by persistent populations of these bacteria in local sands or wrack, in addition to varied fecal inputs from human and/or animal sources. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to generate short sequence tags of the 16S hypervariable region ribosomal DNA from shallow water samples and from sand samples collected at the high tide line and at the intertidal water line at sites with and without FIB exceedance events. These data were used to examine the sand and water bacterial communities to assess the similarity between samples, and to determine the impact of water quality exceedance events on the community composition. Sequences belonging to a group of bacteria previously identified as alternative fecal indicators were also analyzed in relationship to water quality violation events. We found that sand and water samples hosted distinctly different overall bacterial communities, and there was greater similarity in the community composition between coastal water samples from two distant sites. The dissimilarity between high tide and intertidal sand bacterial communities, although more similar to each other than to water, corresponded to greater tidal range between the samples. Within the group of alternative fecal indicators greater similarity was observed within sand and water from the same site, likely reflecting the anthropogenic contribution at each beach. This study supports the growing evidence that community-based molecular tools can be leveraged to identify the sources and potential impact of fecal pollution in the environment, and furthermore suggests that a more diverse bacterial community in beach sand and water may reflect a less contaminated site and better water quality.

  13. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouser, P.J.; N' Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  14. Bacterial community survey of sediments at Naracoorte Caves, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Andrew S.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial diversity in sediments at UNESCO World Heritage listed Naracoorte Caves was surveyed as part of an investigation carried out in a larger study on assessing microbial communities in caves. Cave selection was based on tourist accessibility; Stick Tomato and Alexandra Cave (> 15000 annual visits and Strawhaven Cave was used as control (no tourist access. Microbial analysis showed that Bacillus was the most commonly detected microbial genus by culture dependent and independent survey of tourist accessible and inaccessible areas of show (tourist accessible and control caves. Other detected sediment bacterial groups were assigned to the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. The survey also showed differences in bacterial diversity in caves with human access compared to the control cave with the control cave having unique microbial sequences (Acinetobacter, Agromyces, Micrococcus and Streptomyces. The show caves had higher bacterial counts, different 16S rDNA based DGGE cluster patterns and principal component groupings compared to Strawhaven. Different factors such as human access, cave use and configurations could have been responsible for the differences observed in the bacterial community cluster patterns (tourist accessible and inaccessible areas of these caves. Cave sediments can therefore act as reservoirs of microorganisms. This might have some implications on cave conservation activities especially if these sediments harbor rock art degrading microorganisms in caves with rock art.

  15. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, James Angus; James, Pamela M; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila. PMID:25101226

  16. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Angus Chandler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila.

  17. Co-occurrence patterns in aquatic bacterial communities across changing permafrost landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, J.; Lovejoy, C.; Crevecoeur, S.; Vincent, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Permafrost thaw ponds and lakes are widespread across the northern landscape and may play a central role in global biogeochemical cycles, yet knowledge about their microbial ecology is limited. We sampled a set of thaw ponds and lakes as well as shallow rock-basin lakes that are located in distinct valleys along a north-south permafrost degradation gradient. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to determine co-occurrence patterns among bacterial taxa (operational taxonomic units, OTUs), and then analyzed these results relative to environmental variables to identify variables controlling bacterial community structure. Network analysis was applied to identify possible ecological linkages among the bacterial taxa and with abiotic and biotic variables. The results showed an overall high level of shared taxa among bacterial communities within each valley; however, the bacterial co-occurrence patterns were non-random, with evidence of habitat preferences. There were taxonomic differences in bacterial assemblages among the different valleys that were statistically related to dissolved organic carbon concentration, conductivity and phytoplankton biomass. Co-occurrence networks revealed complex interdependencies within the bacterioplankton communities and showed contrasting linkages to environmental conditions among the main bacterial phyla. The thaw pond networks were composed of a limited number of highly connected taxa. This "small world network" property would render the communities more robust to environmental change but vulnerable to the loss of microbial "keystone species". These highly connected nodes (OTUs) in the network were not merely the numerically dominant taxa, and their loss would alter the organization of microbial consortia and ultimately the food web structure and functioning of these aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Responses of Bacterial Communities to Simulated Climate Changes in Alpine Meadow Soil of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Junpeng; Li, Jiabao; Wang, Shiping; An, Jiaxing; Liu, Wen-tso; Lin, Qiaoyan; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Li, Xiangzhen

    2015-09-01

    The soil microbial community plays an important role in terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling. However, microbial responses to climate warming or cooling remain poorly understood, limiting our ability to predict the consequences of future climate changes. To address this issue, it is critical to identify microbes sensitive to climate change and key driving factors shifting microbial communities. In this study, alpine soil transplant experiments were conducted downward or upward along an elevation gradient between 3,200 and 3,800 m in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau to simulate climate warming or cooling. After a 2-year soil transplant experiment, soil bacterial communities were analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The results showed that the transplanted soil bacterial communities became more similar to those in their destination sites and more different from those in their "home" sites. Warming led to increases in the relative abundances in Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, while cooling had opposite effects on bacterial communities (symmetric response). Soil temperature and plant biomass contributed significantly to shaping the bacterial community structure. Overall, climate warming or cooling shifted the soil bacterial community structure mainly through species sorting, and such a shift might correlate to important biogeochemical processes such as greenhouse gas emissions. This study provides new insights into our understanding of soil bacterial community responses to climate warming and cooling. PMID:26116682

  19. Highly heterogeneous bacterial communities associated with the South China Sea reef corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Coral harbor diverse and specific bacteria play significant roles in coral holobiont function. Bacteria associated with three of the common and phylogenetically divergent reef-building corals in the South China Sea, Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora, were investigated using 454 barcoded-pyrosequencing. Three colonies of each species were sampled, and 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed individually. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities associated with the three coral species were more diverse than previous estimates based on corals from the Caribbean Sea, Indo-Pacific reefs and the Red Sea. Three candidate phyla, including BRC1, OD1 and SR1, were found for the first time in corals. Bacterial communities were separated into three groups: P. lutea and G. fascicular, A. millepora and seawater. P. lutea and G. fascicular displayed more similar bacterial communities, and bacterial communities associated with A. millepora differed from the other two coral species. The three coral species shared only 22 OTUs, which were distributed in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria and an unclassified bacterial group. The composition of bacterial communities within each colony of each coral species also showed variation. The relatively small common and large specific bacterial communities in these corals implies that bacterial associations may be structured by multiple factors at different scales and that corals may associate with microbes in terms of similar function, rather than identical species.

  20. Procalcitonin for detecting community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Gusmaiyanto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Pneumonia can be of bacterial or viral origin. It is difficult to distinguish between these two agents based on clinical manifestations, as well as radiological and laboratory examinations. Furthermore, bacterial cultures take time to incubate and positive results may only be found in 10-30% of bacterial pneumonia cases. Procalcitonin has been used as a marker to distinguish etiologies, as bacterial infections tend to increase serum procalcitonin levels. Objective To determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of procalcitonin in community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Pediatric Health Department of Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Padang. Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling. Procalcitonin measurements and PCR screening were performed on blood specimens from 32 pneumonia patients and compared. Results Of the 32 subjects, most were boys (56.25%, under 5 years of age (99%, and had poor nutritional status (68.75%. Using a cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin level had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 88%, and negative predictive value 60% for diagnosing bacterial pneumonia. Using a cut-off point of 0.5 ng/mL, procalcitonin level had a specificity of 46%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 91%, and negative predictive value 25%. Conclusion A cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL of procalcitonin level may be more useful to screen for bacterial pneumonia than a cut-off point of 0.5 ng / mL. However, if the 0.25 ng/mL cut-off point is used, careful monitoring will be required for negative results, as up to 40% may actually have bacterial pneumonia. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:65-9.].

  1. Spatial Distribution of Bacterial Communities Driven by Multiple Environmental Factors in a Beach Wetland of the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eDing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distributions of bacterial communities may be driven by multiple environmental factors. Thus, understanding the relationships between bacterial distribution and environmental factors is critical for understanding wetland stability and the functioning of freshwater lakes. However, little research on the bacterial communities in deep sediment layers exists. In this study, thirty clone libraries of 16S rRNA were constructed from a beach wetland of the Poyang Lake along both horizontal (distance to the water-land junction and vertical (sediment depth gradients to assess the effects of sediment properties on bacterial community structure and diversity. Our results showed that bacterial diversity increased along the horizontal gradient and decreased along the vertical gradient. The heterogeneous sediment properties along gradients substantially affected the dominant bacterial groups at the phylum and species levels. For example, the NH4+ concentration decreased with increasing depth, which was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. The changes in bacterial diversity and dominant bacterial groups showed that the top layer had a different bacterial community structure than the deeper layers. Principal component analysis revealed that both gradients, not each gradient independently, contributed to the shift in the bacterial community structure. A multiple linear regression model explained the changes in bacterial diversity and richness along the depth and distance gradients. Overall, our results suggest that spatial gradients associated with sediment properties shaped the bacterial communities in the Poyang Lake beach wetland.

  2. Molecular survey of bacterial communities associated with bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tieshan; Mandal, Rabindra K; Wideman, Robert F; Khatiwara, Anita; Pevzner, Igal; Min Kwon, Young

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) is recognized as an important cause of lameness in commercial broiler chickens (meat-type chickens). Relatively little is known about the microbial communities associated with BCO. This study was conducted to increase our understanding of the microbial factors associated with BCO using a culture-independent approach. Using Illumina sequencing of the hyper-variable region V6 in the 16S rRNA gene, we characterized the bacterial communities in 97 femoral or tibial heads from normal and lame broilers carefully selected to represent diverse variations in age, line, lesion type, floor type, clinical status and bone type. Our in-depth survey based on 14 million assembled sequence reads revealed that complex bacterial communities exist in all samples, including macroscopically normal bones from clinically healthy birds. Overall, Proteobacteria (mean 90.9%) comprised the most common phylum, followed by Firmicutes (6.1%) and Actinobacteria (2.6%), accounting for more than 99% of all reads. Statistical analyses demonstrated that there are differences in bacterial communities in different types of bones (femur vs. tibia), lesion types (macroscopically normal femora or tibiae vs. those with pathognomonic BCO lesions), and among individual birds. This analysis also showed that BCO samples overrepresented genera Staphylococcus, whose species have been frequently isolated in BCO samples in previous studies. Rarefaction analysis demonstrated the general tendency that increased severities of BCO lesions were associated with reduced species diversity in both femoral and tibial samples when compared to macroscopically normal samples. These observations suggest that certain bacterial subgroups are preferentially selected in association with the development of BCO lesions. Understanding the microbial species associated with BCO will identify opportunities for understanding and modulating the pathogenesis of this form of lameness in

  3. Molecular survey of bacterial communities associated with bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO in broilers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan Jiang

    Full Text Available Bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO is recognized as an important cause of lameness in commercial broiler chickens (meat-type chickens. Relatively little is known about the microbial communities associated with BCO. This study was conducted to increase our understanding of the microbial factors associated with BCO using a culture-independent approach. Using Illumina sequencing of the hyper-variable region V6 in the 16S rRNA gene, we characterized the bacterial communities in 97 femoral or tibial heads from normal and lame broilers carefully selected to represent diverse variations in age, line, lesion type, floor type, clinical status and bone type. Our in-depth survey based on 14 million assembled sequence reads revealed that complex bacterial communities exist in all samples, including macroscopically normal bones from clinically healthy birds. Overall, Proteobacteria (mean 90.9% comprised the most common phylum, followed by Firmicutes (6.1% and Actinobacteria (2.6%, accounting for more than 99% of all reads. Statistical analyses demonstrated that there are differences in bacterial communities in different types of bones (femur vs. tibia, lesion types (macroscopically normal femora or tibiae vs. those with pathognomonic BCO lesions, and among individual birds. This analysis also showed that BCO samples overrepresented genera Staphylococcus, whose species have been frequently isolated in BCO samples in previous studies. Rarefaction analysis demonstrated the general tendency that increased severities of BCO lesions were associated with reduced species diversity in both femoral and tibial samples when compared to macroscopically normal samples. These observations suggest that certain bacterial subgroups are preferentially selected in association with the development of BCO lesions. Understanding the microbial species associated with BCO will identify opportunities for understanding and modulating the pathogenesis of this form of

  4. The inoculum effect on the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities in parallel sequential batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittebolle, Lieven; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-09-01

    Three identical sequential batch reactors (SBRs) were each inoculated with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) treating a waste stream of different origin, i.e. a hospital, a meat processing company, and a municipal WWTP. The SBRs were run in parallel for 84 consecutive days to investigate whether the reactors would become more phylogenetically similar or stay separated concerning their functionality and microbial communities. Overall, the nitrification functionality was high throughout the experiment, and the size and structure of the sludge flocs were very similar. The total bacterial and ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) communities were analyzed by PCR-DGGE. Cluster analysis demonstrated very distinct bacterial communities in the three SBRs, not showing any trend becoming more similar. The carrying capacity, dynamics and functional organization of the communities were assessed by DGGE analysis and based on these patterns the range-weighted richness, moving window analysis, and constructing Pareto-Lorenz evenness distribution curves were calculated. Between the SBRs, highly comparable internal structure and dynamics of the AOB communities were observed, although they had only one AOB DGGE band in common. These observations indicate that community characteristics such as the extent of biodiversity and dynamics are more important indicators of good microbial functionality than the presence of certain specific species. PMID:19596129

  5. Bacterial communities associated with the surfaces of fresh fruits and vegetables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W Leff

    Full Text Available Fresh fruits and vegetables can harbor large and diverse populations of bacteria. However, most of the work on produce-associated bacteria has focused on a relatively small number of pathogenic bacteria and, as a result, we know far less about the overall diversity and composition of those bacterial communities found on produce and how the structure of these communities varies across produce types. Moreover, we lack a comprehensive view of the potential effects of differing farming practices on the bacterial communities to which consumers are exposed. We addressed these knowledge gaps by assessing bacterial community structure on conventional and organic analogs of eleven store-bought produce types using a culture-independent approach, 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Our results demonstrated that the fruits and vegetables harbored diverse bacterial communities, and the communities on each produce type were significantly distinct from one another. However, certain produce types (i.e., sprouts, spinach, lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, and strawberries tended to share more similar communities as they all had high relative abundances of taxa belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae when compared to the other produce types (i.e., apples, peaches, grapes, and mushrooms which were dominated by taxa belonging to the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria phyla. Although potentially driven by factors other than farming practice, we also observed significant differences in community composition between conventional and organic analogs within produce types. These differences were often attributable to distinctions in the relative abundances of Enterobacteriaceae taxa, which were generally less abundant in organically-grown produce. Taken together, our results suggest that humans are exposed to substantially different bacteria depending on the types of fresh produce they consume with differences between conventionally and organically

  6. Bacterial diversity and community composition from seasurface to subseafloor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Emily A; Kirkpatrick, John B; Rutherford, Scott D; Smith, David C; Sogin, Mitchell; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-04-01

    We investigated compositional relationships between bacterial communities in the water column and those in deep-sea sediment at three environmentally distinct Pacific sites (two in the Equatorial Pacific and one in the North Pacific Gyre). Through pyrosequencing of the v4-v6 hypervariable regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we characterized 450 104 pyrotags representing 29 814 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% similarity). Hierarchical clustering and non-metric multidimensional scaling partition the samples into four broad groups, regardless of geographic location: a photic-zone community, a subphotic community, a shallow sedimentary community and a subseafloor sedimentary community (⩾1.5 meters below seafloor). Abundance-weighted community compositions of water-column samples exhibit a similar trend with depth at all sites, with successive epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssopelagic communities. Taxonomic richness is generally highest in the water-column O2 minimum zone and lowest in the subseafloor sediment. OTUs represented by abundant tags in the subseafloor sediment are often present but represented by few tags in the water column, and represented by moderately abundant tags in the shallow sediment. In contrast, OTUs represented by abundant tags in the water are generally absent from the subseafloor sediment. These results are consistent with (i) dispersal of marine sedimentary bacteria via the ocean, and (ii) selection of the subseafloor sedimentary community from within the community present in shallow sediment. PMID:26430855

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of bacterial communities in high alpine water spring sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Engel, Michael; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Daprà, Luca; Penna, Daniele; Comiti, Francesco; Zerbe, Stefan; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Water springs are complex, fragile and taxa-rich environments, especially in highly dynamic ecosystems such as glacier forefields experiencing glacier retreat. Bacterial communities are important actors in alpine water body metabolism, and have shown both high seasonal and spatial variations. Seven springs from a high alpine valley (Matsch Valley, South Tyrol, Italy) were examined via a multidisciplinary approach using both hydrochemical and microbiological techniques. Amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and electric conductivity (EC) measurements, as well as elemental composition and water stable isotopic analyses, were performed. Our target was to elucidate whether and how bacterial community structure is influenced by water chemistry, and to determine the origin and extent of variation in space and time. There existed variations in both space and time for all variables measured. Diversity values more markedly differed at the beginning of summer and then at the end; the extent of variation in space was prevalent over the time scale. Bacterial community structural variation responded to hydrochemical parameter changes; moreover, the stability of the hydrochemical parameters played an important role in shaping distinctive bacterial communities. PMID:26776565

  8. Influence of housing characteristics on bacterial and fungal communities in homes of asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, K C; Gent, J F; Leaderer, B P; Peccia, J

    2016-04-01

    Variations in home characteristics, such as moisture and occupancy, affect indoor microbial ecology as well as human exposure to microorganisms. Our objective was to determine how indoor bacterial and fungal community structure and diversity are associated with the broader home environment and its occupants. Next-generation DNA sequencing was used to describe fungal and bacterial communities in house dust sampled from 198 homes of asthmatic children in southern New England. Housing characteristics included number of people/children, level of urbanization, single/multifamily home, reported mold, reported water leaks, air conditioning (AC) use, and presence of pets. Both fungal and bacterial community structures were non-random and demonstrated species segregation (C-score, P children, and pets) characteristics. Occupant density measures were associated with beneficial bacterial taxa, including Lactobacillus johnsonii as measured by qPCR. A more complete knowledge of indoor microbial communities is useful for linking housing characteristics to human health outcomes. Microbial assemblies in house dust result, in part, from the building's physical and occupant characteristics. PMID:25833176

  9. Natural Sunlight Shapes Crude Oil-Degrading Bacterial Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Surface Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacosa, Hernando P; Liu, Zhanfei; Erdner, Deana L

    2015-01-01

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in 2010, an enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Surface waters are characterized by intense sunlight and high temperature during summer. While the oil-degrading bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of natural sunlight on those in oil polluted surface waters remains unexplored to date. In this study, we incubated surface water from the DWH site with amendments of crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both for 36 days under natural sunlight in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bacterial community was analyzed over time for total abundance, density of alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, and community composition via pyrosequencing. Our results showed that, for treatments with oil and/or Corexit, sunlight significantly reduced bacterial diversity and evenness and was a key driver of shifts in bacterial community structure. In samples containing oil or dispersant, sunlight greatly reduced abundance of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus but increased the relative abundances of Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Labrenzia, Sandarakinotalea, Bartonella, and Halomonas. Dark samples with oil were represented by members of Thalassobius, Winogradskyella, Alcanivorax, Formosa, Pseudomonas, Eubacterium, Erythrobacter, Natronocella, and Coxiella. Both oil and Corexit inhibited the Candidatus Pelagibacter with or without sunlight exposure. For the first time, we demonstrated the effects of light in structuring microbial communities in water with oil and/or Corexit. Overall, our findings improve understanding of oil pollution in surface water, and provide unequivocal evidence that sunlight is a key factor in determining bacterial community composition and dynamics in oil polluted marine waters. PMID:26648916

  10. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  11. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  12. Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

    2010-03-01

    Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

  13. Diversity and functions of bacterial community in drinking water biofilms revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping,; Tong ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water (DW) systems may cause various problems to water quality. To investigate the community structure of biofilms on different pipe materials and the global/specific metabolic functions of DW biofilms, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing data for 16S rRNA genes and Illumina metagenomic data were generated and analysed. Considerable differences in bacterial diversity and taxonomic structure were identified between biofilms formed on stainless steel and biofilm...

  14. Bacterial Community Composition in Lake Tanganyika: Vertical and Horizontal Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    De Wever, Aaike; Muylaert, Koenraad; Van der Gucht, Katleen; Pirlot, Samuel; Cocquyt, Christine; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Vyverman, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Vertical and latitudinal differences in bacterial community composition (BCC) in Lake Tanganyika were studied during the dry season of 2002 by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified 16S RNA fragments. Dominant bands were sequenced and identified as members of the Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, green nonsulfur bacteria, and Firmicutes divisions and the Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria subdivisions. The BCC in the lake displayed both vertical and l...

  15. Bacterial Communities Established in Bauxite Residues with Different Restoration Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Schmalenberger, Achim; O'Sullivan, Orla; Gahan, Jacinta; Cotter, Paul D.; Courtney, Ronan

    2013-01-01

    Bauxite residue is the alkaline byproduct generated when alumina is extracted from bauxite ores and is commonly deposited in impoundments. These sites represent hostile environments with increased salinity and alkalinity and little prospect of revegetation when left untreated. This study reports the establishment of bacterial communities in bauxite residues with and without restoration amendments (compost and gypsum addition, revegetation) in samples taken in 2009 and 2011 from 0 to 10 cm dep...

  16. Influence of anerobic fungi of biogas producing bacterial community

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jakub; Štrosová, Lenka; Fliegerová, Kateřina

    Aberdeen : Rowett Institute -INRA, 2010. s. 1-1. [7th joint symposium of Rowett - INRA. 23.06. - 25.06.2010, Aberdeen] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP503/10/P394; GA ČR GD525/08/H060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : anaerobic fungi * biogas * bacterial community Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  17. Bacterial community survey of sediments at Naracoorte Caves, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Ball Andrew S.; Kirby Greg; Bourne Steven; Cao Xiangsheng; Mazaheri Nezhad Fard Ramin; Adetutu Eric M.; Shahsavari Esamaeil; Thorpe Krystal

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in sediments at UNESCO World Heritage listed Naracoorte Caves was surveyed as part of an investigation carried out in a larger study on assessing microbial communities in caves. Cave selection was based on tourist accessibility; Stick Tomato and Alexandra Cave (> 15000 annual visits) and Strawhaven Cave was used as control (no tourist access). Microbial analysis showed that Bacillus was the most commonly detected microbial genus by culture dependent and independent survey ...

  18. Environmental and anthropogenic controls over bacterial communities in wetland soils

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Wyatt H.; Curtis J Richardson; Vilgalys, Rytas; Bruland, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    Soil bacteria regulate wetland biogeochemical processes, yet little is known about controls over their distribution and abundance. Bacteria in North Carolina swamps and bogs differ greatly from Florida Everglades fens, where communities studied were unexpectedly similar along a nutrient enrichment gradient. Bacterial composition and diversity corresponded strongly with soil pH, land use, and restoration status, but less to nutrient concentrations, and not with wetland type or soil carbon. Sur...

  19. Relationships between host phylogeny, host type and bacterial community diversity in cold-water coral reef sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Schöttner

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral reefs are known to locally enhance the diversity of deep-sea fauna as well as of microbes. Sponges are among the most diverse faunal groups in these ecosystems, and many of them host large abundances of microbes in their tissues. In this study, twelve sponge species from three cold-water coral reefs off Norway were investigated for the relationship between sponge phylogenetic classification (species and family level, as well as sponge type (high versus low microbial abundance, and the diversity of sponge-associated bacterial communities, taking also geographic location and water depth into account. Community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA showed that as many as 345 (79% of the 437 different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs detected in the dataset were shared between sponges and sediments, while only 70 (16% appeared purely sponge-associated. Furthermore, changes in bacterial community structure were significantly related to sponge species (63% of explained community variation, sponge family (52% or sponge type (30%, whereas mesoscale geographic distances and water depth showed comparatively small effects (<5% each. In addition, a highly significant, positive relationship between bacterial community dissimilarity and sponge phylogenetic distance was observed within the ancient family of the Geodiidae. Overall, the high diversity of sponges in cold-water coral reefs, combined with the observed sponge-related variation in bacterial community structure, support the idea that sponges represent heterogeneous, yet structured microbial habitats that contribute significantly to enhancing bacterial diversity in deep-sea ecosystems.

  20. Bacterial community mapping of the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Gu

    Full Text Available Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further analyses of the 283,234 valid sequences obtained from pyrosequencing revealed that the gastric, duodenal, large intestinal and fecal samples had higher phylogenetic diversity than the jejunum and ileum samples did. The microbial communities found in the small intestine and stomach were different from those seen in the large intestine and fecal samples. A greater proportion of Lactobacillaceae were found in the stomach and small intestine, while a larger proportion of anaerobes such as Bacteroidaceae, Prevotellaceae, Rikenellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae were found in the large intestine and feces. In addition, inter-mouse variations of microbiota were observed between the large intestinal and fecal samples, which were much smaller than those between the gastric and small intestinal samples. As far as we can ascertain, ours is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice.

  1. Procalcitonin for detecting community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Gusmaiyanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children under five years of age. Pneumonia can be ofbacterial or viral origin. It is difficult to distinguish between thesetwo agents based on clinical manifestations, as well as radiologicaland laboratory examinations. Furthermore, bacterial cultures taketime to incubate and positive results may only be found in 10-30%of bacterial pneumonia cases. Procalcitonin has been used as amarker to distinguish etiologies, as bacterial infections tend toincrease serum procalcitonin levels.Objective To determine the sensitivity, specificity, positivepredictive value and negative predictive value of procalcitoninin community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in thePediatric Health Department of Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Padang.Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling. Procalcitoninmeasurements and PCR screening were performed on bloodspecimens from 32 pneumonia patients and compared.Results Of the 32 subjects, most were boys (56.25%, under 5years of age (99%, and had poor nutritional status (68.75%.Using a cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin level hada sensitivity of 92%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 88%, and negative predictive value 60% for diagnosing bacterial pneumonia. Using a cut-off point of 0.5 ng/mL, procalcitonin level had a specificity of 46%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 91%, and negative predictive value 25%.Conclusion A cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL of procalcitonin level may be more useful to screen for bacterial pneumonia than a cutoff point of 0.5 ng / mL. However, if the 0.25 ng/mL cut-off point is used, careful monitoring will be required for negative results, as up to 40% may actually have bacterial pneumonia. [PaediatrIndones. 2015;55:65-9.].

  2. Dynamics and functions of bacterial communities in bark, charcoal and sand filters treating greywater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalahmeh, Sahar S; Jönsson, Håkan; Hylander, Lars D; Hui, Nan; Yu, Dan; Pell, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    This study explored the effects of greywater application on the dynamics and functions of biofilms developed in bark, activated charcoal and sand filters used for removal of organic matter and nitrogen. Duplicate columns (20 cm diameter, 60 cm deep) were packed with bark, charcoal or sand with effective size 1.4 mm and uniformity coefficient 2.2, and dosed with 32 L m(-2) day(-1) of an artificial greywater (14 g BOD5 m(-2) day(-1)) for 116 days. Potential respiration rate (PRR), determined in filter samples after addition of excess glucose, and bacterial diversity and composition, analysed by 454-pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA, were measured at different times and depths in the filters. The bark and charcoal filters were more efficient in removing BOD5 than the sand (98, 97% and 75%, respectively). The highest PRR in the 0-2 cm layer of the columns on day 84 was found in the bark filters, followed by the charcoal and sand filters (632 ± 66, 222 ± 34 and 56 ± 2 mg O2 L(-1), respectively; n = 2). Bacterial community in the bark filters showed the highest richness. The charcoal and sand filters both developed more diverse and dynamic (changing over time and depth) bacterial communities than the bark. In addition to the greywater, the lignocelluosic composition of the bark and its lower pH probably selected for the bacterial community structure and the organic content provided additional substrate, as shown by its higher PRR and its different nitrifying bacterial genera. In the oligotrophic charcoal and sand, the composition of the greywater itself defined the bacterial community. Thus, the initially low bacterial biomass in the latter filters was enriched over time, allowing a diversified bacterial community to develop. The top layers of the bark and charcoal filters displayed a high dominance of Rhizobium, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter, which were less evident in the 60 cm layer, whereas in the sand filters these genera were

  3. Effect of Copper Treatment on the Composition and Function of the Bacterial Community in the Sponge Haliclona cymaeformis

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, R.-M.

    2014-11-04

    Marine sponges are the most primitive metazoan and host symbiotic microorganisms. They are crucial components of the marine ecological system and play an essential role in pelagic processes. Copper pollution is currently a widespread problem and poses a threat to marine organisms. Here, we examined the effects of copper treatment on the composition of the sponge-associated bacterial community and the genetic features that facilitate the survival of enriched bacteria under copper stress. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed that the sponge Haliclona cymaeformis harbored symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae and photosynthetic Cyanobacteria as dominant species. However, these autotrophic bacteria decreased substantially after treatment with a high copper concentration, which enriched for a heterotrophic-bacterium-dominated community. Metagenomic comparison revealed a varied profile of functional genes and enriched functions, including bacterial motility and chemotaxis, extracellular polysaccharide and capsule synthesis, virulence-associated genes, and genes involved in cell signaling and regulation, suggesting short-period mechanisms of the enriched bacterial community for surviving copper stress in the microenvironment of the sponge. Microscopic observation and comparison revealed dynamic bacterial aggregation within the matrix and lysis of sponge cells. The bacteriophage community was also enriched, and the complete genome of a dominant phage was determined, implying that a lytic phage cycle was stimulated by the high copper concentration. This study demonstrated a copper-induced shift in the composition of functional genes of the sponge-associated bacterial community, revealing the selective effect of copper treatment on the functions of the bacterial community in the microenvironment of the sponge. IMPORTANCE This study determined the bacterial community structure of the common sponge Haliclona cymaeformis and examined the effect of copper

  4. Dynamics of bacterial communities in soils of rainforest fragments under restoration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Rafael; Zucchi, Tiago; Taketani, Rodrigo; Andreote, Fernando; Cardoso, Elke

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest ("Mata Atlântica") has been largely studied due to its valuable and unique biodiversity. Unfortunately, this priceless ecosystem has been widely deforested and only 10% of its original area still remains. Many projects have been successfully implemented to restore its fauna and flora but there is a lack of information on how the soil bacterial communities respond to this process. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the influence of soil attributes and seasonality on soil bacterial communities of rainforest fragments under restoration processes. Soil samples from a native site and two ongoing restoration fragments with different ages of implementation (10 and 20 years) were collected and assayed by using culture-independent approaches. Our findings demonstrate that seasonality barely altered the bacterial distribution whereas soil chemical attributes and plant diversity highly influenced the bacterial community structure during the restoration process. Moreover, the strict relationship observed for two bacterial groups, Solibacteriaceae and Verrucomicrobia, one with the youngest (10 years) and the other with the oldest (native) site suggests their use as bioindicators of soil quality and soil recovery of forest fragments under restoration.

  5. Bacterial community characterization in the soils of native and restored rainforest fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Rafael L F; Zucchi, Tiago D; Taketani, Rodrigo G; Andreote, Fernando D; Cardoso, Elke J B N

    2014-11-01

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest ("Mata Atlântica") has been largely studied due to its valuable and unique biodiversity. Unfortunately, this priceless ecosystem has been widely deforested and only 10 % of its original area is still untouched. Some projects have been successfully implemented to restore its fauna and flora but there is a lack of information on how the soil bacterial communities respond to this process. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the influence of soil attributes and seasonality on soil bacterial communities of rainforest fragments under restoration processes. Soil samples from a native site and two ongoing restoration fragments with different times of implementation (10 and 20 years) were collected and assayed by using culture-independent approaches. Our findings demonstrate that seasonality barely altered the bacterial distribution whereas soil chemical attributes and plant species were related to bacterial community structure during the restoration process. Moreover, the strict relationship observed for two bacterial groups, Solibacteriaceae and Verrucomicrobia, increasing from the more recently planted (10 years) to the native site, with the 20 year old restoration site in the middle, which may suggest their use as bioindicators of soil quality and recovery of forest fragments being restored. PMID:25155863

  6. Activity and stability of a complex bacterial soil community under simulated Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Merrison, Jonathan; Nørnberg, Per; Aagaard Lomstein, Bente; Finster, Kai

    2005-04-01

    A simulation experiment with a complex bacterial soil community in a Mars simulation chamber was performed to determine the effect of Martian conditions on community activity, stability and survival. At three different depths in the soil core short-term effects of Martian conditions with and without ultraviolet (UV) exposure corresponding to 8 Martian Sol were compared. Community metabolic activities and functional diversity, measured as glucose respiration and versatility in substrate utilization, respectively, decreased after UV exposure, whereas they remained unaffected by Martian conditions without UV exposure. In contrast, the numbers of culturable bacteria and the genetic diversity were unaffected by the simulated Martian conditions both with and without UV exposure. The genetic diversity of the soil community and of the colonies grown on agar plates were evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on DNA extracts. Desiccation of the soil prior to experimentation affected the functional diversity by decreasing the versatility in substrate utilization. The natural dominance of endospores and Gram-positive bacteria in the investigated Mars-analogue soil may explain the limited effect of the Mars incubations on the survival and community structure. Our results suggest that UV radiation and desiccation are major selecting factors on bacterial functional diversity in terrestrial bacterial communities incubated under simulated Martian conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that forward contamination of Mars is a matter of great concern in future space missions.

  7. Bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of Vitis vinifera L. cultivated under distinct agricultural practices in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Avila, A D; Gumiere, T; Andrade, P A M; Lima-Perim, J E; Durrer, A; Baigori, M; Vazquez, F; Andreote, F D

    2015-02-01

    Plants interact with a myriad of microbial cells in the rhizosphere, an environment that is considered to be important for plant development. However, the differential structuring of rhizosphere microbial communities due to plant cultivation under differential agricultural practices remains to be described for most plant species. Here we describe the rhizosphere microbiome of grapevine cultivated under conventional and organic practices, using a combination of cultivation-independent approaches. The quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA and nifH genes, by quantitative PCR (qPCR), revealed similar amounts of these genes in the rhizosphere in both vineyards. PCR-DGGE was used to detect differences in the structure of bacterial communities, including both the complete whole communities and specific fractions, such as Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and those harboring the nitrogen-fixing related gene nifH. When analyzed by a multivariate approach (redundancy analysis), the shifts observed in the bacterial communities were poorly explained by variations in the physical and chemical characteristics of the rhizosphere. These approaches were complemented by high-throughput sequencing (67,830 sequences) based on the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, identifying the major bacterial groups present in the rhizosphere of grapevines: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Acidobacteria, Cloroflexi, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes, which occur in distinct proportions in the rhizosphere from each vineyard. The differences might be related to the selection of plant metabolism upon distinct reservoirs of microbial cells found in each vineyard. The results fill a gap in the knowledge of the rhizosphere of grapevines and also show distinctions in these bacterial communities due to agricultural practices. PMID:25527391

  8. Evident bacterial community changes but only slight degradation when polluted with pyrene in a red soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaidi eRen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the potential for PAH degradation by indigenous microbiota and the influence of PAHs on native microbial communities is of great importance for bioremediation and ecological evaluation. Various studies have focused on the bacterial communities in the environment where obvious PAH degradation was observed, little is known about the microbiota in the soil where poor degradation was observed. Soil microcosms were constructed with a red soil by supplementation with a high-molecular-weight PAH (pyrene at three dosages (5, 30, and 70 mg.kg-1. Real-time PCR was used to evaluate the changes in bacterial abundance and pyrene dioxygenase gene (nidA quantity. Illumina sequencing was used to investigate changes in diversity, structure, and composition of bacterial communities. After 42 days of incubation, no evident degradation was observed. The poor degradation ability was associated with the stability or significant decrease of abundance of the nidA gene. Although the abundance of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was not affected by pyrene, the bacterial richness and diversity were decreased with increasing dosage of pyrene and the community structure was changed. Phylotypes affected by pyrene were comprehensively surveyed: (1 at the high taxonomic level, seven of the abundant phyla/classes (relative abundance >1.0% including Chloroflexi, AD3, WPS-2, GAL5, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria and one rare phylum Crenarchaeota were significantly decreased by at least one dosage of pyrene, while 3 phyla/classes (Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were significantly increased; and (2 at the lower taxonomic level, the relative abundances of twelve orders were significantly depressed, whereas those of nine orders were significantly increased. This work enhanced our understanding of the biodegradation potential of pyrene in red soil and the effect of pyrene on soil ecosystems at the microbial community

  9. Bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity in temperate streambed sediment during drying and rewetting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Pohlon

    Full Text Available Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany. Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes

  10. Endosymbiont dominated bacterial communities in a dwarf spider.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Vanthournout

    Full Text Available The microbial community of spiders is little known, with previous studies focussing primarily on the medical importance of spiders as vectors of pathogenic bacteria and on the screening of known cytoplasmic endosymbiont bacteria. These screening studies have been performed by means of specific primers that only amplify a selective set of endosymbionts, hampering the detection of unreported species in spiders. In order to have a more complete overview of the bacterial species that can be present in spiders, we applied a combination of a cloning assay, DGGE profiling and high-throughput sequencing on multiple individuals of the dwarf spider Oedothorax gibbosus. This revealed a co-infection of at least three known (Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Cardinium and the detection of a previously unreported endosymbiont bacterium (Rhabdochlamydia in spiders. 16S rRNA gene sequences of Rhabdochlamydia matched closely with those of Candidatus R. porcellionis, which is currently only reported as a pathogen from a woodlouse and with Candidatus R. crassificans reported from a cockroach. Remarkably, this bacterium appears to present in very high proportions in one of the two populations only, with all investigated females being infected. We also recovered Acinetobacter in high abundance in one individual. In total, more than 99% of approximately 4.5M high-throughput sequencing reads were restricted to these five bacterial species. In contrast to previously reported screening studies of terrestrial arthropods, our results suggest that the bacterial communities in this spider species are dominated by, or even restricted to endosymbiont bacteria. Given the high prevalence of endosymbiont species in spiders, this bacterial community pattern could be widespread in the Araneae order.

  11. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition. PMID:23808339

  12. Glyphosate effects on soil rhizosphere-associated bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Molli M; Hoilett, Nigel; Lorenz, Nicola; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture with predictions that 1.35 million metric tons will be used annually by 2017. With the advent of glyphosate tolerant (GT) cropping more than 10 years ago, there is now concern for non-target effects on soil microbial communities that has potential to negatively affect soil functions, plant health, and crop productivity. Although extensive research has been done on short-term response to glyphosate, relatively little information is available on long-term effects. Therefore, the overall objective was to investigate shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community following long-term glyphosate application on GT corn and soybean in the greenhouse. In this study, rhizosphere soil was sampled from rhizoboxes following 4 growth periods, and bacterial community composition was compared between glyphosate treated and untreated rhizospheres using next-generation barcoded sequencing. In the presence or absence of glyphosate, corn and soybean rhizospheres were dominated by members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Proteobacteria (particularly gammaproteobacteria) increased in relative abundance for both crops following glyphosate exposure, and the relative abundance of Acidobacteria decreased in response to glyphosate exposure. Given that some members of the Acidobacteria are involved in biogeochemical processes, a decrease in their abundance could lead to significant changes in nutrient status of the rhizosphere. Our results also highlight the need for applying culture-independent approaches in studying the effects of pesticides on the soil and rhizosphere microbial community. PMID:26580738

  13. Deodorants and antiperspirants affect the axillary bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callewaert, Chris; Hutapea, Prawira; Van de Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-10-01

    The use of underarm cosmetics is common practice in the Western society to obtain better body odor and/or to prevent excessive sweating. A survey indicated that 95 % of the young adult Belgians generally use an underarm deodorant or antiperspirant. The effect of deodorants and antiperspirants on the axillary bacterial community was examined on nine healthy subjects, who were restrained from using deodorant/antiperspirant for 1 month. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the individual microbial dynamics. The microbial profiles were unique for every person. A stable bacterial community was seen when underarm cosmetics were applied on a daily basis and when no underarm cosmetics were applied. A distinct community difference was seen when the habits were changed from daily use to no use of deodorant/antiperspirant and vice versa. The richness was higher when deodorants and antiperspirants were applied. Especially when antiperspirants were applied, the microbiome showed an increase in diversity. Antiperspirant usage led toward an increase of Actinobacteria, which is an unfavorable situation with respect to body odor development. These initial results show that axillary cosmetics modify the microbial community and can stimulate odor-producing bacteria. PMID:25077920

  14. Changes in sediment bacterial community in response to long-term nutrient enrichment in a subtropical seagrass-dominated estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Rafael; Ikenaga, Makoto; Dean, Amanda L; Pisani, Cristina; Boyer, Joseph N

    2014-10-01

    Florida Bay exhibits a natural gradient of strong P limitation in the east which shifts to weak P or even N limitation at the western boundary. This nutrient gradient greatly affects seagrass abundance and productivity across the bay. We assessed the effects of N and P additions on sediment bacterial community structure in relation to the existing nutrient gradient in Florida Bay. Sediment samples from 24 permanent 0.25 m(2) plots in each of six sites across Florida Bay were fertilized with granular N and P in a factorial design for 26 months. Sediment bacterial community structure was analyzed using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and a cloning strategy from DGGE bands. The phylogenetic positions of 16S rRNA sequences mostly fell into common members found in marine sediments such as sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteriodetes. Twenty-eight common DGGE bands were found in all sediment samples; however, some DGGE bands were only found or were better represented in eastern sites. Bacterial community diversity (Shannon-Weiner index) showed similar values throughout all sediment samples. The N treatment had no effect on the bacterial community structures across the bay. Conversely, the addition of P significantly influenced the bacterial community structure at all but the most western site, where P is least limiting due to inputs from the Gulf of Mexico. P additions enhanced DGGE band sequences related to Cytophagales, Ectothiorhodospiraceae, and Desulfobulbaceae, suggesting a shift toward bacterial communities with increased capability to degrade polymeric organic matter. In addition, a band related to Deferribacteres was enhanced in eastern sites. Thus, indigenous environmental conditions were the primary determining factors controlling the bacterial communities, while the addition of P was a secondary determining factor. This P-induced change in community

  15. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata

    KAUST Repository

    Closek, Collin J.

    2014-06-20

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. © 2014 International Society for Microbial Ecology. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential Impacts of Willow and Mineral Fertilizer on Bacterial Communities and Biodegradation in Diesel Fuel Oil-Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leewis, Mary-Cathrine; Uhlik, Ondrej; Fraraccio, Serena; McFarlin, Kelly; Kottara, Anastasia; Glover, Catherine; Macek, Tomas; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research there is limited understanding of how vegetation impacts the ability of microbial communities to process organic contaminants in soil. Using a combination of traditional and molecular assays, we examined how phytoremediation with willow and/or fertilization affected the microbial community present and active in the transformation of diesel contaminants. In a pot study, willow had a significant role in structuring the total bacterial community and resulted in significant decreases in diesel range organics (DRO). However, stable isotope probing (SIP) indicated that fertilizer drove the differences seen in community structure and function. Finally, analysis of the total variance in both pot and SIP experiments indicated an interactive effect between willow and fertilizer on the bacterial communities. This study clearly demonstrates that a willow native to Alaska accelerates DRO degradation, and together with fertilizer, increases aromatic degradation by shifting microbial community structure and the identity of active naphthalene degraders. PMID:27313574

  17. Reactor performance in terms of COD and nitrogen removal and bacterial community structure of a three-stage rotating bioelectrochemical contactor

    KAUST Repository

    Sayess, Rassil R.

    2013-02-01

    Integrating microbial fuel cell (MFC) into rotating biological contactor (RBC) creates an opportunity for enhanced removal of COD and nitrogen coupled with energy generation from wastewater. In this study, a three-stage rotating bioelectrochemical contactor (referred to as RBC-MFC unit) integrating MFC with RBC technology was constructed for simultaneous removal of carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds and electricity generation from a synthetic medium containing acetate and ammonium. The performance of the RBC-MFC unit was compared to a control reactor (referred to as RBC unit) that was operated under the same conditions but without current generation (i.e. open-circuit mode). The effect of hydraulic loading rate (HLR) and COD/N ratio on the performance of the two units was investigated. At low (3.05 gCOD g-1N) and high COD/N ratio (6.64 gCOD g-1N), both units achieved almost similar COD and ammonia-nitrogen removal. However, the RBC-MFC unit achieved significantly higher denitrification and nitrogen removal compared to the RBC unit indicating improved denitrification at the cathode due to current flow. The average voltage under 1000 Ω external resistance ranged between 0.03 and 0.30 V and between 0.02 and 0.21 V for stages 1 and 2 of the RBC-MFC unit. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed high bacterial diversity at the anode and cathode of both units. Genera that play a role in nitrification (Nitrospira; Nitrosomonas), denitrification (Comamonas; Thauera) and electricity generation (Geobacter) were identified at the electrodes. Geobacter was only detected on the anode of the RBC-MFC unit. Nitrifiers and denitrifiers were more abundant in the RBC-MFC unit compared to the RBC unit and were largely present on the cathode of both units suggesting that most of the nitrogen removal occurred at the cathode. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention

  19. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Heine, R.; Xu, F.; Suhonen, H.; Helfen, L.; Rosenhahn, A.; Gorniak, T.; Kirchen, S.; Schwartz, T.; Baumbach, T.

    2013-10-01

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention.

  20. The social structure of microbial community involved in colonization resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S; Guo, Lihong; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that host-associated microbial communities can interfere with the colonization and establishment of microbes of foreign origins, a phenomenon often referred to as bacterial interference or colonization resistance. However, due to the complexity of the indigenous microbiota, it has been extremely difficult to elucidate the community colonization resistance mechanisms and identify the bacterial species involved. In a recent study, we have established an in vitro mice oral microbial community (O-mix) and demonstrated its colonization resistance against an Escherichia coli strain of mice gut origin. In this study, we further analyzed the community structure of the O-mix by using a dilution/regrowth approach and identified the bacterial species involved in colonization resistance against E. coli. Our results revealed that, within the O-mix there were three different types of bacterial species forming unique social structure. They act as 'Sensor', 'Mediator' and 'Killer', respectively, and have coordinated roles in initiating the antagonistic action and preventing the integration of E. coli. The functional role of each identified bacterial species was further confirmed by E. coli-specific responsiveness of the synthetic communities composed of different combination of the identified players. The study reveals for the first time the sophisticated structural and functional organization of a colonization resistance pathway within a microbial community. Furthermore, our results emphasize the importance of 'Facilitation' or positive interactions in the development of community-level functions, such as colonization resistance. PMID:24088624

  1. Disturbance promotes non-indigenous bacterial invasion in soil microcosms:analysis of the roles of resource availability and community structure

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Manqiang; Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Rønn, Regin; Christensen, Søren; Ekelund, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasion-biology is largely based on non-experimental observation of larger organisms. Here, we apply an experimental approach to the subject. By using microbial-based microcosm-experiments, invasion-biology can be placed on firmer experimental, and hence, less anecdotal ground. A better understanding of the mechanisms that govern invasion-success of bacteria in soil communities will provide knowledge on the factors that hinder successful establishment of bacteria artificially inoc...

  2. Viral impacts on bacterial communities in Arctic cryoconite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surfaces of glaciers are extreme ecosystems dominated by microbial communities. Viruses are found in abundance here, with a high frequency of bacteria displaying visible virus infection. In this study, viral and bacterial production was measured in Arctic cryoconite holes to address the control that viruses play in these highly truncated ecosystems. Mean bacterial carbon production in the sediments of cryoconite holes was found to be 57.8 ± 12.9 ng C g−1 dry wt. h−1, which predicted a mean of 1.89–5.41 × 106 cells g−1 dry wt. h−1 based on a range of conversion factors. Relative to this, virus production was found to be high, up to 8.98 × 107 virus like particles g−1 dry wt. h−1 were produced, which is comparable to virus production in sediments around the globe. The virus burst size was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and found to be amongst the lowest recorded in the literature (mean 2.4). Hence, to account for the measured virus production, the viral induced bacterial mortality was calculated to be more than capable of accounting for the mortality of all bacterial production. The data presented here, therefore, suggests that viral induced mortality is a dominant process for the release and recycling of carbon and nutrients in supraglacial ecosystems. (letter)

  3. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.;

    2015-01-01

    The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78º...

  4. Bacterial communities in full-scale wastewater treatment systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial metabolism determines the effectiveness of biological treatment of wastewater. Therefore, it is important to define the relations between the species structure and the performance of full-scale installations. Although there is much laboratory data on microbial consortia, our understanding of dependencies between the microbial structure and operational parameters of full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is limited. This mini-review presents the types of microbial consortia in...

  5. Mesocosms of aquatic bacterial communities from the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (Mexico): a tool to test bacterial community response to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Bonilla-Rosso, German; Travisano, Michael; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Microbial communities are responsible for important ecosystem processes, and their activities are regulated by environmental factors such as temperature and solar ultraviolet radiation. Here we investigate changes in aquatic microbial community structure, diversity, and evenness in response to changes in temperature and UV radiation. For this purpose, 15 mesocosms were seeded with both microbial mat communities and plankton from natural pools within the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (Mexico). Clone libraries (16S rRNA) were obtained from water samples at the beginning and at the end of the experiment (40 days). Phylogenetic analysis indicated substantial changes in aquatic community composition and structure in response to temperature and UV radiation. Extreme treatments with elevation in temperature or UV radiation reduced diversity in relation to the Control treatments, causing a reduction in richness and increase in dominance, with a proliferation of a few resistant operational taxonomic units. Each phylum was affected differentially by the new conditions, which translates in a differential modification of ecosystem functioning. This suggests that the impact of environmental stress, at least at short term, will reshape the aquatic bacterial communities of this unique ecosystem. This work also demonstrates the possibility of designing manageable synthetic microbial community ecosystems where controlled environmental variables can be manipulated. Therefore, microbial model systems offer a complementary approach to field and laboratory studies of global research problems associated with the environment. PMID:22460437

  6. Analysis of bacterial community structure in Saba-Narezushi (Narezushi of Mackerel) by 16S rRNA gene clone library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroki; Tsuchiya, Rie; Isobe, Yuka; Narita, Miyo

    2013-08-01

    Narezushi, a derivation of sushi, is a traditional Japanese food made by fermenting salted fish meat and cooked rice together. In this study, the microbial diversity of saba-narezushi (narezushi of mackerel, Scomber japonicus) was analyzed by the 16S ribosomal RNA gene clone library method. Chemical composition was also analyzed to compare with different kinds of narezushi. The chemical composition of the narezushi was similar to those obtained from samma-narezushi. Ninety-four clones were randomly selected and DNA sequences of cloned fragments (approx. 890 bp) were analyzed. The DNA sequences obtained were phylogenetically analyzed. The expected operational taxonomy units (OTUs) by Chao1 estimates and Shannon-Wiener index (H') at 97% identity threshold were 48 and 1.822, respectively. The sequence similarity of the cloned fragment was equal to or higher than 98% of the sequence of cultivated bacterial species in the public database. Most of the clones (85%) belonged to lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus curvatus was the most abundant species followed by Lactococcus piscium and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum, suggesting that these bacteria play important roles in the fermentation of saba-narezushi. PMID:24425983

  7. Inoculation with Phosphate-Solubilizing Fungi Diversifies the Bacterial Community in Rhizospheres of Maize and Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-Hua; JIN Jian; XU Mei-Na; PAN Xiang-Wen; G.TANG

    2007-01-01

    Application of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms(PSMs)has been reported to increase P uptake and plant growth.However,no information is available regarding the ecological consequences of the inoculation with PSMs.The effect of inoculation with phosphate-solubilizing fungal(PSF)isolates Aspergillus niger P39 and Penicillium oxalicumreaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(PCR-DGGE).Compared with the control,the number of culturable microbes for soybean Was significantly greater with P39,whereas for maize,the same Was significantly greater with P66.In addition,a greater number of microbes were fouud in the rhizosphere of maize compared with soybean.The fingerprint of DGGE for 16S rDNA indicated that inoculation with PSF also increased bacterial communities,with the P66 treatment having higher numbers of DGGE bands and a higher Shannon-Weaver diversity index compared with P39;the composition of the microbial community was also more complex with the P66 treatment.Overall,complex interactions between plant species and exotic PSMs affected the structure of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere.but plant species were more important in determining the bacterial community structure than the introduction of exotic microorganisms.

  8. Development of a novel multi-triplex qPCR method for the assessment of bacterial community structure in oral populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciric, Lena; Pratten, Jonathan; Wilson, Michael; Spratt, David

    2010-12-01

    Gingivitis and dental caries are two of the most predominant diseases in humans. Both conditions are easily treated with the removal of the plaque biofilm by brushing or the use of oral hygiene products. In both cases, pathogenic taxa found within the plaque biofilm are the causal agents of the disease. Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotalla intermedia have all been implicated in the development of gingivitis, while Streptococcus mutans is the main organism associated with dental caries. Many studies have so far focused on the use of culture methods to detect and enumerate the pathogenic taxa within plaque samples. However, these methods are both labour intensive and biased towards culturable taxa. In the present study, a novel high-throughput multi-triplex quantitative PCR method was developed with the aim to investigate the community dynamics associated with oral communities. Three triplex assays were designed targeting taxa associated with gingivitis and dental caries as well as oral health. Saliva samples collected from healthy individuals were used in order to validate the newly developed method. PMID:23766283

  9. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inceoglu, Özgül; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Salles, Joana Falcão;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. Methodology/Principal Findings: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize the stru...... cultivar-dependent bacterial community structures, which disappeared in the flowering and senescence stages. Furthermore, Pseudomonas, Beta-, Alpha- and Deltaproteobacteria flourished under different ecological conditions than the Acidobacteria....

  10. Fecal Bacterial Community Changes Associated with Isoflavone Metabolites in Postmenopausal Women after Soy Bar Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Arthur Armstrong; Clavijo, Andrea P.; Martin, Berdine R.; Stephen Barnes; Weaver, Connie M.

    2014-01-01

    Soy isoflavones and their metabolism by intestinal microbiota have gained attention because of potential health benefits, such as the alleviation of estrogen/hormone-related conditions in postmenopausal women, associated with some of these compounds. However, overall changes in gut bacterial community structure and composition in response to addition of soy isoflavones to diets and their association with excreted isoflavone metabolites in postmenopausal women has not been studied. The aim of ...

  11. Bacterial communities of two parthenogenetic aphid species cocolonizing two host plants across the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Bressan, Alberto; Greenwell, April M; Fierer, Noah

    2011-12-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) have been the focus of several studies with respect to their interactions with inherited symbionts, but bacterial communities of most aphid species are still poorly characterized. In this research, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities in aphids. Specifically, we examined the diversity of bacteria in two obligately parthenogenetic aphid species (the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii, and the cardamom aphid, Pentalonia caladii) cocolonizing two plant species (taro, Colocasia esculenta, and ginger, Alpinia purpurata) across four Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu). Results from this study revealed that heritable symbionts dominated the bacterial communities for both aphid species. The bacterial communities differed significantly between the two species, and A. gossypii harbored a more diverse bacterial community than P. caladii. The bacterial communities also differed across aphid populations sampled from the different islands; however, communities did not differ between aphids collected from the two host plants. PMID:21965398

  12. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities and gene transfer agents in northern South China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA major capsid gene (g5 was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS, temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments.

  13. Shifts in bacterial community composition associated with increased carbon cycling in a mosaic of phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Marine; Blain, Stéphane; Christaki, Urania; Monchy, Sébastien; Obernosterer, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Marine microbes have a pivotal role in the marine biogeochemical cycle of carbon, because they regulate the turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM), one of the largest carbon reservoirs on Earth. Microbial communities and DOM are both highly diverse components of the ocean system, yet the role of microbial diversity for carbon processing remains thus far poorly understood. We report here results from an exploration of a mosaic of phytoplankton blooms induced by large-scale natural iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean. We show that in this unique ecosystem where concentrations of DOM are lowest in the global ocean, a patchwork of blooms is associated with diverse and distinct bacterial communities. By using on-board continuous cultures, we identify preferences in the degradation of DOM of different reactivity for taxa associated with contrasting blooms. We used the spatial and temporal variability provided by this natural laboratory to demonstrate that the magnitude of bacterial production is linked to the extent of compositional changes. Our results suggest that partitioning of the DOM resource could be a mechanism that structures bacterial communities with a positive feedback on carbon cycling. Our study, focused on bacterial carbon processing, highlights the potential role of diversity as a driving force for the cycling of biogeochemical elements. PMID:26196334

  14. Viral impacts on bacterial communities in Arctic cryoconite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Telling, Jon; Stibal, Marek; Tranter, Martyn; Davis, Sean

    2013-01-01

    The surfaces of glaciers are extreme ecosystems dominated by microbial communities. Viruses are found in abundance here, with a high frequency of bacteria displaying visible virus infection. In this study, viral and bacterial production was measured in Arctic cryoconite holes to address the control...... this, virus production was found to be high, up to 8.98 x 10(7) virus like particles g(-1) dry wt. h(-1) were produced, which is comparable to virus production in sediments around the globe. The virus burst size was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and found to be amongst the lowest...

  15. Ecological drift and local exposures drive enteric bacterial community differences within species of Galápagos iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankau, Emily W; Hong, Pei-Ying; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-04-01

    Diet strongly influences the intestinal microbial communities through species sorting. Alternatively, these communicates may differ because of chance variation in local microbial exposures or species losses among allopatric host populations (i.e. ecological drift). We investigated how these forces shape enteric communities of Galápagos marine and land iguanas. Geographically proximate populations shared more similar communities within a host ecotype, suggesting a role for ecological drift during host colonization of the islands. Additionally, evidence of taxa sharing between proximate heterospecific host populations suggests that contemporary local exposures also influence the gut community assembly. While selective forces such as host-bacterial interactions or dietary differences are dominant drivers of intestinal community differences among hosts, historical and contemporary processes of ecological drift may lead to differences in bacterial composition within a host species. Whether such differences in community structure translate into geographic variation in benefits derived from these intimate microbial communities remains to be explored. PMID:22369350

  16. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Pedro R.; Roll, Katharina; Bergauer, Kristin; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associated with the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has therefore remained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibit a similar specificity towards coral hosts and whether they vary in the same fashion over spatial gradients and between reef locations. We used microbial community profiling (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, T-RFLP) and clone library sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to compare the diversity and community structure of dominant archaeal and bacterial communities associating with the mucus of three common reef-building coral species (Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Orbicella annularis) over different spatial scales on a Caribbean fringing reef. Sampling locations included three reef sites, three reef patches within each site and two depths. Reference sediment samples and ambient water were also taken for each of the 18 sampling locations resulting in a total of 239 samples. While only 41% of the bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) characterized by T-RFLP were shared between mucus and the ambient water or sediment, for archaeal OTUs this percentage was 2-fold higher (78%). About half of the mucus-associated OTUs (44% and 58% of bacterial and archaeal OTUs, respectively) were shared between the three coral species. Our multivariate statistical analysis (ANOSIM, PERMANOVA and CCA) showed that while the bacterial community composition was determined by habitat (mucus, sediment or seawater), host coral species, location and spatial distance, the archaeal community composition was solely determined by the habitat. This study highlights that mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities differ in their degree of community turnover over reefs and in their host-specificity. PMID:26788724

  17. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R Frade

    Full Text Available Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associated with the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has therefore remained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibit a similar specificity towards coral hosts and whether they vary in the same fashion over spatial gradients and between reef locations. We used microbial community profiling (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, T-RFLP and clone library sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to compare the diversity and community structure of dominant archaeal and bacterial communities associating with the mucus of three common reef-building coral species (Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Orbicella annularis over different spatial scales on a Caribbean fringing reef. Sampling locations included three reef sites, three reef patches within each site and two depths. Reference sediment samples and ambient water were also taken for each of the 18 sampling locations resulting in a total of 239 samples. While only 41% of the bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs characterized by T-RFLP were shared between mucus and the ambient water or sediment, for archaeal OTUs this percentage was 2-fold higher (78%. About half of the mucus-associated OTUs (44% and 58% of bacterial and archaeal OTUs, respectively were shared between the three coral species. Our multivariate statistical analysis (ANOSIM, PERMANOVA and CCA showed that while the bacterial community composition was determined by habitat (mucus, sediment or seawater, host coral species, location and spatial distance, the archaeal community composition was solely determined by the habitat. This study highlights that mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities differ in their degree of community turnover over reefs and in their host-specificity.

  18. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Pedro R; Roll, Katharina; Bergauer, Kristin; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associated with the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has therefore remained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibit a similar specificity towards coral hosts and whether they vary in the same fashion over spatial gradients and between reef locations. We used microbial community profiling (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, T-RFLP) and clone library sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to compare the diversity and community structure of dominant archaeal and bacterial communities associating with the mucus of three common reef-building coral species (Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Orbicella annularis) over different spatial scales on a Caribbean fringing reef. Sampling locations included three reef sites, three reef patches within each site and two depths. Reference sediment samples and ambient water were also taken for each of the 18 sampling locations resulting in a total of 239 samples. While only 41% of the bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) characterized by T-RFLP were shared between mucus and the ambient water or sediment, for archaeal OTUs this percentage was 2-fold higher (78%). About half of the mucus-associated OTUs (44% and 58% of bacterial and archaeal OTUs, respectively) were shared between the three coral species. Our multivariate statistical analysis (ANOSIM, PERMANOVA and CCA) showed that while the bacterial community composition was determined by habitat (mucus, sediment or seawater), host coral species, location and spatial distance, the archaeal community composition was solely determined by the habitat. This study highlights that mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities differ in their degree of community turnover over reefs and in their host-specificity. PMID:26788724

  19. Bacterial communities in batch and continuous-flow wetlands treating the herbicide S-metolachlor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, O.F. [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France); Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM), UMR 7156 University of Strasbourg/CNRS (France); Maillard, E. [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France); Vuilleumier, S. [Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM), UMR 7156 University of Strasbourg/CNRS (France); Imfeld, G., E-mail: imfeld@unistra.fr [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France)

    2014-11-15

    Knowledge of wetland bacterial communities in the context of pesticide contamination and hydrological regime is scarce. We investigated the bacterial composition in constructed wetlands receiving Mercantor Gold{sup ®} contaminated water (960 g L{sup −1} of the herbicide S-metolachlor, > 80% of the S-enantiomer) operated under continuous-flow or batch modes to evaluate the impact of the hydraulic regime. In the continuous-flow wetland, S-metolachlor mass removal was > 40%, whereas in the batch wetland, almost complete removal of S-metolachlor (93–97%) was observed. Detection of ethanesulfonic and oxanilic acid degradation products further indicated S-metolachlor biodegradation in the two wetlands. The dominant bacterial populations were characterised by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 pyrosequencing. The bacterial profiles evolved during the first 35 days of the experiment, starting from a composition similar to that of inlet water, with the use of nitrate and to a lesser extent sulphate and manganese as terminal electron acceptors for microbial metabolism. Proteobacteria were the most abundant phylum, with Beta-, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria representing 26%, 19% and 17% respectively of total bacterial abundance. Bacterial composition in wetland water changed gradually over time in continuous-flow wetland and more abruptly in the batch wetland. Differences in overall bacterial water structure in the two systems were modest but significant (p = 0.008), and S-metolachlor, nitrate, and total inorganic carbon concentrations correlated with changes in the bacterial profiles. Together, the results highlight that bacterial composition profiles and their dynamics may be used as bioindicators of herbicide exposure and hydraulic disturbances in wetland systems. - Highlights: • We evaluated the bacterial composition in wetlands treating S-metolachlor • Hydraulic regime impacted biogeochemical processes and S-metolachlor removal

  20. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zilian; Chen, Yi; Wang, Rui; Cai, Ruanhong; Fu, Yingnan; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Most marine bacteria produce exopolysaccharides (EPS), and bacterial EPS represent an important source of dissolved organic carbon in marine ecosystems. It was proposed that bacterial EPS rich in uronic acid is resistant to mineralization by microbes and thus has a long residence time in global oceans. To confirm this hypothesis, bacterial EPS rich in galacturonic acid was isolated from Alteromonas sp. JL2810. The EPS was used to amend natural seawater to investigate the bioavailability of this EPS by native populations, in the presence and absence of ammonium and phosphate amendment. The data indicated that the bacterial EPS could not be completely consumed during the cultivation period and that the bioavailability of EPS was not only determined by its intrinsic properties, but was also determined by other factors such as the availability of inorganic nutrients. During the experiment, the humic-like component of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) was freshly produced. Bacterial community structure analysis indicated that the class Flavobacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes was the major contributor for the utilization of EPS. This report is the first to indicate that Flavobacteria are a major contributor to bacterial EPS degradation. The fraction of EPS that could not be completely utilized and the FDOM (e.g., humic acid-like substances) produced de novo may be refractory and may contribute to the carbon storage in the oceans. PMID:26571122

  1. Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities in a membrane bioreactor for the treatment of metal-working fluid wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Garbisu, Carlos; Martín, Iker; Etxebarria, Javier; Gutierrez-Mañero, F Javier; Lucas Garcia, Jose Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An extensive microbiological study has been carried out in a membrane bioreactor fed with activated sludge and metal-working fluids. Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities were studied with different approaches. Functional diversity of culturable bacterial communities was studied with different Biolog™ plates. Structure and dynamics of bacterial communities were studied in culturable and in non-culturable fractions using a 16S rRNA analysis. Among the culturable bacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were the predominant classes. However, changes in microbial community structure were detected over time. Culture-independent analysis showed that Betaproteobacteria was the most frequently detected class in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) community with Zoogloea and Acidovorax as dominant genera. Also, among non-culturable bacteria, a process of succession was observed. Longitudinal structural shifts observed were more marked for non-culturable than for culturable bacteria, pointing towards an important role in the MBR performance. Microbial community metabolic abilities assessed with Biolog™ Gram negative, Gram positive and anaerobic plates also showed differences over time for Shannon's diversity index, kinetics of average well colour development, and the intensely used substrates by bacterial community in each plate. PMID:26608762

  2. Effects of depleted uranium on decomposition and soil bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soil microcosm experiment was used to analyze effects of depleted uranium on soil community function. Uranium treatment levels were 0, 50, 500, 5,000, 10,000, and 25,000 ppm. Decomposition was followed through measurement of mass loss of several different plant litter types, as well as through analysis of soil respiration. Litter types tested were lignin, cellulose, and both high-nitrogen and low-nitrogen grass. Functional diversity of soil bacteria was assessed using the BIOLOG system of sole carbon source utilization. There was a significant reduction in litter decomposition at the 25,000 ppm level versus the control for all litter types except the high-nitrogen grass. Changes in functional diversity of the soil bacterial communities were more pronounced. Changes were observed both in terms of the number of carbon sources utilized, as well as in the intensity of utilization

  3. [Effects of different catch modes on soil enzyme activities and bacterial community in the rhizosphere of cucumber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wu, Feng-zhi

    2014-12-01

    Effects of different catch modes on soil enzyme activities and bacterial community in the rhizosphere of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) were analyzed by conventional chemical method, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR methods. Pot experiment was carried out in the greenhouse for three consecutive years with cucumber as the main crop, and scallion (Allium fistulosum), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and oilseed rape (Brassica campestri) as catch crops. Results showed that, with the increase of crop planting times, soil urease, neutral phosphatase and invertase activities in the wheat treatment were significantly) higher than in the scallion and oilseed rape treatments, and these enzyme activities in the oilseed rape treatment were significantly higher than in the scallion treatment. PCR-DGGR analysis showed that cucumber rhizosphere bacterial community structures were different among treatments. Scallion and wheat treatments maintained relatively higher diversity indices of bacterial community structure. qPCR results showed that the abundance of soil bacterial community in the wheat treatment was significantly higher than in the scallion and oilseed rape treatments. In conclusion, different catch treatments affected soil enzyme activities and bacteria community and changed the soil environment. Wheat used as summer catch crop could maintain relatively higher soil enzyme activities, bacterial community diversity and abundance. PMID:25876408

  4. The bacterial community during early production stages of intensively reared halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Rannveig Björnsdóttir 1959

    2010-01-01

    High bacterial numbers and the establishment of an unfavourable bacterial community has been identified as possible causes of the high mortalities commonly observed during early life stages of intensively reared Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.). The impact of particular bacterial species is, however, poorly defined and still remains disputable. Highly variable larval survival and overall success were observed and analysis of the bacterial community revealed a high variatio...

  5. Two Different Bacterial Community Types Are Linked with the Low-Methane Emission Trait in Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Cesar S Pinares-Patiño; Seedorf, Henning; Kirk, Michelle R.; Ganesh, Siva; McEwan, John C; Janssen, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    The potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is produced in the rumens of ruminant animals from hydrogen produced during microbial degradation of ingested feed. The natural animal-to-animal variation in the amount of CH4 emitted and the heritability of this trait offer a means for reducing CH4 emissions by selecting low-CH4 emitting animals for breeding. We demonstrate that differences in rumen microbial community structure are linked to high and low CH4 emissions in sheep. Bacterial community str...

  6. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected

  7. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected.

  8. Bacterial communities in an ultrapure water containing storage tank of a power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohus, Veronika; Kéki, Zsuzsa; Márialigeti, Károly; Baranyi, Krisztián; Patek, Gábor; Schunk, János; Tóth, Erika M

    2011-12-01

    Ultrapure waters (UPWs) containing low levels of organic and inorganic compounds provide extreme environment. On contrary to that microbes occur in such waters and form biofilms on surfaces, thus may induce corrosion processes in many industrial applications. In our study, refined saltless water (UPW) produced for the boiler of a Hungarian power plant was examined before and after storage (sampling the inlet [TKE] and outlet [TKU] waters of a storage tank) with cultivation and culture independent methods. Our results showed increased CFU and direct cell counts after the storage. Cultivation results showed the dominance of aerobic, chemoorganotrophic α-Proteobacteria in both samples. In case of TKU sample, a more complex bacterial community structure could be detected. The applied molecular method (T-RFLP) indicated the presence of a complex microbial community structure with changes in the taxon composition: while in the inlet water sample (TKE) α-Proteobacteria (Sphingomonas sp., Novosphingobium hassiacum) dominated, in the outlet water sample (TKU) the bacterial community shifted towards the dominance of α-Proteobacteria (Rhodoferax sp., Polynucleobacter sp., Sterolibacter sp.), CFB (Bacteroidetes, formerly Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group) and Firmicutes. This shift to the direction of fermentative communities suggests that storage could help the development of communities with an increased tendency toward corrosion. PMID:22207294

  9. Associations between bacterial communities of house dust and infant gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human gut is host to a diverse and abundant community of bacteria that influence health and disease susceptibility. This community develops in infancy, and its composition is strongly influenced by environmental factors, notably perinatal anthropogenic exposures such as delivery mode (Cesarean vs. vaginal) and feeding method (breast vs. formula); however, the built environment as a possible source of exposure has not been considered. Here we report on a preliminary investigation of the associations between bacteria in house dust and the nascent fecal microbiota from 20 subjects from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study using high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene. Despite significant differences between the dust and fecal microbiota revealed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis, permutation analysis confirmed that 14 bacterial OTUs representing the classes Actinobacteria (3), Bacilli (3), Clostridia (6) and Gammaproteobacteria (2) co-occurred at a significantly higher frequency in matched dust–stool pairs than in randomly permuted pairs, indicating an association between these dust and stool communities. These associations could indicate a role for the indoor environment in shaping the nascent gut microbiota, but future studies will be needed to confirm that our findings do not solely reflect a reverse pathway. Although pet ownership was strongly associated with the presence of certain genera in the dust for dogs (Agrococcus, Carnobacterium, Exiguobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Leifsonia and Neisseria) and cats (Escherichia), no clear patterns were observed in the NMDS-resolved stool community profiles as a function of pet ownership

  10. Associations between bacterial communities of house dust and infant gut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konya, T.; Koster, B. [Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto (Canada); Maughan, H. [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto (Canada); Escobar, M. [Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto (Canada); Azad, M.B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta (Canada); Guttman, D.S. [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto (Canada); Sears, M.R. [Department of Medicine, McMaster University (Canada); Becker, A.B. [University of Manitoba (Canada); Brook, J.R. [Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto (Canada); Environment Canada (Canada); Takaro, T.K. [Faculty of Health Science, Simon Fraser University (Canada); Kozyrskyj, A.L. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta (Canada); Scott, J.A., E-mail: james.scott@utoronto.ca [Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    The human gut is host to a diverse and abundant community of bacteria that influence health and disease susceptibility. This community develops in infancy, and its composition is strongly influenced by environmental factors, notably perinatal anthropogenic exposures such as delivery mode (Cesarean vs. vaginal) and feeding method (breast vs. formula); however, the built environment as a possible source of exposure has not been considered. Here we report on a preliminary investigation of the associations between bacteria in house dust and the nascent fecal microbiota from 20 subjects from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study using high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene. Despite significant differences between the dust and fecal microbiota revealed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis, permutation analysis confirmed that 14 bacterial OTUs representing the classes Actinobacteria (3), Bacilli (3), Clostridia (6) and Gammaproteobacteria (2) co-occurred at a significantly higher frequency in matched dust–stool pairs than in randomly permuted pairs, indicating an association between these dust and stool communities. These associations could indicate a role for the indoor environment in shaping the nascent gut microbiota, but future studies will be needed to confirm that our findings do not solely reflect a reverse pathway. Although pet ownership was strongly associated with the presence of certain genera in the dust for dogs (Agrococcus, Carnobacterium, Exiguobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Leifsonia and Neisseria) and cats (Escherichia), no clear patterns were observed in the NMDS-resolved stool community profiles as a function of pet ownership.

  11. Bacterial community variation and microbial mechanism of triclosan (TCS) removal by constructed wetlands with different types of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Congcong; Xie, HuiJun; Xu, Jingtao; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jingmin

    2015-02-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum synthetic antimicrobial agent that is toxic to microbes and other aquatic organisms. Constructed wetlands (CWs) are now popular in TCS removal. However, knowledge on the effects of TCS on the bacterial community and microbial removal mechanism in CWs is lacking. The effects of TCS (60 μg L(-1)) on bacterial communities in batch-loaded CWs with emergent (Typha angustifolia), submerged (Hydrilla verticillata), and floating plant (Salvinia natans) were analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing technology. After six periods of experiment, the TCS removal efficiencies were over 90% in CWs, and negative effects of TCS on bacterial community richness and diversity were observed. Moreover, plant species effect existed. Bacterial strains that contributed to TCS biodegradation in CWs were successfully identified. In TCS-treated T. angustifolia and H. verticillata CWs, beta-Proteobacteria increased by 16.63% and 18.20%, respectively. In TCS-treated S. natans CWs, delta- and gamma-Proteobacteria and Sphingobacteria increased by 9.36%, 19.49%, and 31.37%, respectively, and could relate to TCS biodegradation. TCS affected the development of certain bacteria, and eventually, the bacterial community structures in CWs. This research provided ecologically relevant information on bacterial community and microbial removal mechanism in CWs under TCS treatment. PMID:25461066

  12. Investigation of bacterial community composition and abundance in a lowland arable catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Albaggar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the bacterial community composition and abundance in the River Wensum in Norfolk using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM), automated ribosomal intergenic analysis (ARISA) and 454 pyrosequencing. It also aimed to determine the effects of spatial and temporal variations and environmental factors on bacterial community composition and abundance in this intensively farmed lowland catchment. The three techniques provided the same trends in bacterial community composi...

  13. Responses of bacterial communities in arable soils in a rice-wheat cropping system to different fertilizer regimes and sampling times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhao

    Full Text Available Soil physicochemical properties, soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in a rice-wheat cropping system subjected to different fertilizer regimes were investigated in two seasons (June and October. All fertilizer regimes increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Both fertilizer regime and time had a significant effect on soil physicochemical properties and bacterial community structure. The combined application of inorganic fertilizer and manure organic-inorganic fertilizer significantly enhanced the bacterial diversity in both seasons. The bacterial communities across all samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi at the phylum level. Permutational multivariate analysis confirmed that both fertilizer treatment and season were significant factors in the variation of the composition of the bacterial community. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis distances further revealed that bacterial communities were separated primarily by season. The effect of fertilizer treatment is significant (P = 0.005 and accounts for 7.43% of the total variation in bacterial community. Soil nutrients (e.g., available K, total N, total P and organic matter rather than pH showed significant correlation with the majority of abundant taxa. In conclusion, both fertilizer treatment and seasonal changes affect soil properties, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure. The application of NPK plus manure organic-inorganic fertilizer may be a sound fertilizer practice for sustainable food production.

  14. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2012-08-03

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals.

  15. Molecular characterization of bacterial community in aerobic granular sludge stressed by pentachlorophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU He; LI Guangwei; LI Xiufen; CHEN Jian

    2008-01-01

    To characterize the effects of pentachlorophenol (PCP) on the performance and microbial community of aerobic granular sludge insequencing batch reactor (SBR), the web-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) techniques were used to explore the bacterial community structure. When PCP increased from 0 to 50 mg/L, the COD removalrate changed little, while the ammonia removal rate dropped from 100% to 64.9%. The results of molecular characterization showedthat the quantity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) kept constantly, although the number of bacteria species decreased with theincrease of PCP concentation. Significant shift in bacterial community structure at different PCP stresses was observed within aerobicgranular sludge. When the PCP was absent, there are 69 strains in aerobic granular sludge detected by T-RFLP method. With theincrease of PCP, most of bacteria disappeared and only 19 bacteria existed at all five PCP concentrations. These results contributed tocomprehensive understanding of the microbial community structure under the PCP stress and its relationship with the performance forwastewater treatment by aerobic granular sludge.

  16. Spatio-temporal variability of airborne bacterial communities and their correlation with particulate matter chemical composition across two urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, I; Bertolini, V; Bestetti, G; Ambrosini, R; Innocente, E; Rampazzo, G; Papacchini, M; Franzetti, A

    2015-06-01

    The study of spatio-temporal variability of airborne bacterial communities has recently gained importance due to the evidence that airborne bacteria are involved in atmospheric processes and can affect human health. In this work, we described the structure of airborne microbial communities in two urban areas (Milan and Venice, Northern Italy) through the sequencing, by the Illumina platform, of libraries containing the V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene and estimated the abundance of airborne bacteria with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Airborne microbial communities were dominated by few taxa, particularly Burkholderiales and Actinomycetales, more abundant in colder seasons, and Chloroplasts, more abundant in warmer seasons. By partitioning the variation in bacterial community structure, we could assess that environmental and meteorological conditions, including variability between cities and seasons, were the major determinants of the observed variation in bacterial community structure, while chemical composition of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) had a minor contribution. Particularly, Ba, SO4 (2-) and Mg(2+) concentrations were significantly correlated with microbial community structure, but it was not possible to assess whether they simply co-varied with seasonal shifts of bacterial inputs to the atmosphere, or their variation favoured specific taxa. Both local sources of bacteria and atmospheric dispersal were involved in the assembling of airborne microbial communities, as suggested, to the one side by the large abundance of bacteria typical of lagoon environments (Rhodobacterales) observed in spring air samples from Venice and to the other by the significant effect of wind speed in shaping airborne bacterial communities at all sites. PMID:25592734

  17. Associations between ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacterial needle endophytes in Pinus radiata: implications for biotic selection of microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Arlene Rúa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and their associated microbes have long been focused on single microbes, or single microbial guilds, but in reality, plants associate with a diverse array of microbes from a varied set of guilds. As such, multitrophic interactions among plant-associated microbes from multiple guilds represent an area of developing research, and can reveal how complex microbial communities are structured around plants. Interactions between coniferous plants and their associated microbes provide a good model system for such studies, as conifers host a suite of microorganisms including mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi and foliar bacterial endophytes. To investigate the potential role ECM fungi play in structuring foliar bacterial endophyte communities, we sampled three isolated, native populations of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata, and used constrained analysis of principal coordinates to relate the community matrices of the ECM fungi and bacterial endophytes. Our results suggest that ECM fungi may be important factors for explaining variation in bacterial endophyte communities but this effect is influenced by population and environmental characteristics, emphasizing the potential importance of other factors — biotic or abiotic — in determining the composition of bacterial communities. We also classified ECM fungi into categories based on known fungal traits associated with substrate exploration and nutrient mobilization strategies since variation in these traits allows the fungi to acquire nutrients across a wide range of abiotic conditions and may influence the outcome of multi-species interactions. Across populations and environmental factors, none of the traits associated with fungal foraging strategy types significantly structured bacterial assemblages, suggesting these ECM fungal traits are not important for understanding endophyte-ECM interactions. Overall, our results suggest

  18. Associations between Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Bacterial Needle Endophytes in Pinus radiata: Implications for Biotic Selection of Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa, Megan A; Wilson, Emily C; Steele, Sarah; Munters, Arielle R; Hoeksema, Jason D; Frank, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and their associated microbes have long been focused on single microbes, or single microbial guilds, but in reality, plants associate with a diverse array of microbes from a varied set of guilds. As such, multitrophic interactions among plant-associated microbes from multiple guilds represent an area of developing research, and can reveal how complex microbial communities are structured around plants. Interactions between coniferous plants and their associated microbes provide a good model system for such studies, as conifers host a suite of microorganisms including mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and foliar bacterial endophytes. To investigate the potential role ECM fungi play in structuring foliar bacterial endophyte communities, we sampled three isolated, native populations of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata), and used constrained analysis of principal coordinates to relate the community matrices of the ECM fungi and bacterial endophytes. Our results suggest that ECM fungi may be important factors for explaining variation in bacterial endophyte communities but this effect is influenced by population and environmental characteristics, emphasizing the potential importance of other factors - biotic or abiotic - in determining the composition of bacterial communities. We also classified ECM fungi into categories based on known fungal traits associated with substrate exploration and nutrient mobilization strategies since variation in these traits allows the fungi to acquire nutrients across a wide range of abiotic conditions and may influence the outcome of multi-species interactions. Across populations and environmental factors, none of the traits associated with fungal foraging strategy types significantly structured bacterial assemblages, suggesting these ECM fungal traits are not important for understanding endophyte-ECM interactions. Overall, our results suggest that both biotic species

  19. Associations between Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Bacterial Needle Endophytes in Pinus radiata: Implications for Biotic Selection of Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa, Megan A.; Wilson, Emily C.; Steele, Sarah; Munters, Arielle R.; Hoeksema, Jason D.; Frank, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and their associated microbes have long been focused on single microbes, or single microbial guilds, but in reality, plants associate with a diverse array of microbes from a varied set of guilds. As such, multitrophic interactions among plant-associated microbes from multiple guilds represent an area of developing research, and can reveal how complex microbial communities are structured around plants. Interactions between coniferous plants and their associated microbes provide a good model system for such studies, as conifers host a suite of microorganisms including mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and foliar bacterial endophytes. To investigate the potential role ECM fungi play in structuring foliar bacterial endophyte communities, we sampled three isolated, native populations of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata), and used constrained analysis of principal coordinates to relate the community matrices of the ECM fungi and bacterial endophytes. Our results suggest that ECM fungi may be important factors for explaining variation in bacterial endophyte communities but this effect is influenced by population and environmental characteristics, emphasizing the potential importance of other factors — biotic or abiotic — in determining the composition of bacterial communities. We also classified ECM fungi into categories based on known fungal traits associated with substrate exploration and nutrient mobilization strategies since variation in these traits allows the fungi to acquire nutrients across a wide range of abiotic conditions and may influence the outcome of multi-species interactions. Across populations and environmental factors, none of the traits associated with fungal foraging strategy types significantly structured bacterial assemblages, suggesting these ECM fungal traits are not important for understanding endophyte-ECM interactions. Overall, our results suggest that both biotic

  20. Initial community and environment determine the response of bacterial communities to dispersant and oil contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Alice C; Lu, YueHan

    2015-01-15

    Bioremediation of seawater by natural bacterial communities is one potential response to coastal oil spills, but the success of the approach may vary, depending on geographical location, oil composition and the timing of spill. The short term response of coastal bacteria to dispersant, oil and dispersed oil was characterized using 16S rRNA gene tags in two mesocosm experiments conducted two months apart. Despite differences in the amount of oil-derived alkanes across the treatments and experiments, increases in the contributions of hydrocarbon degrading taxa and decreases in common estuarine bacteria were observed in response to dispersant and/or oil. Between the two experiments, the direction and rates of changes in particulate alkane concentrations differed, as did the magnitude of the bacterial response to oil and/or dispersant. Together, our data underscore large variability in bacterial responses to hydrocarbon pollutants, implying that bioremediation success varies with starting biological and environmental conditions. PMID:25487088

  1. Phylogenetic diversity of dominant bacterial communities during bioremediation of crude oil-polluted soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Thomas Cloete

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollutants is advantageous owing to the cost-effectiveness of the technology and the ubiquity of hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms in the soil. Soil microbial diversity is affected by hydrocarbon perturbation thus selective enrichment of hydrocarbon utilizers occurs. Hydrocarbons interact with the soil matrix and soil microorganisms determining the fate of the contaminants relative to their chemical nature and microbial degradative capabilities respectively. Bacterial dynamics in crude oil-polluted soil microcosms undergoing bioremediation were investigated over a 42-day period. Four out of the five microcosms containing 4kg of pristine soil each were contaminated with 4% Arabian light crude oil. Three microcosms were amended with either 25g of NPK fertilizer, calcium ammonium nitrate or poultry droppings respectively while the fourth designated oil-contaminated control was unamended. The fifth microcosm had only pristine soil and was set up to ascertain indigenous bacterial community structure pre-contamination. Biostimulated soils were periodically tilled and watered. Hydrocarbon degradation was measured throughout the experimental period by gas chromatography. Gas chromatographic tracing of residual hydrocarbons in biostimulated soils showed marked attenuation of contaminants starting from the second (day 14 till the sixth (day 42 week after contamination whereas no significant reduction in hydrocarbon peaks was seen in the oil contaminated control soil throughout the 6-week experimental period. Molecular fingerprints of bacterial communities involved in aerobic biodegradation of crude oil hydrocarbons in biostimulated soils and controls were generated with DGGE using PCR-amplification of 16S rRNA gene obtained from extracted total soil community DNA. DGGE fingerprints demonstrated that NPK, calcium ammonium nitrate and poultry droppings selected different bacterial populations during the active phase of oil

  2. Changes in northern Gulf of Mexico sediment bacterial and archaeal communities exposed to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemical changes in marine sediments during coastal water hypoxia are well described, but less is known about underlying changes in microbial communities. Bacterial and archaeal communities in Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) hypoxic zone sediments were characterized by py...

  3. Deterministic Assembly of Complex Bacterial Communities in Guts of Germ-Free Cockroaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaelyan, Aram; Thompson, Claire L; Hofer, Markus J; Brune, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiota of termites plays important roles in the symbiotic digestion of lignocellulose. However, the factors shaping the microbial community structure remain poorly understood. Because termites cannot be raised under axenic conditions, we established the closely related cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a germ-free model to study microbial community assembly and host-microbe interactions. In this study, we determined the composition of the bacterial assemblages in cockroaches inoculated with the gut microbiota of termites and mice using pyrosequencing analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. Although the composition of the xenobiotic communities was influenced by the lineages present in the foreign inocula, their structure resembled that of conventional cockroaches. Bacterial taxa abundant in conventional cockroaches but rare in the foreign inocula, such as Dysgonomonas and Parabacteroides spp., were selectively enriched in the xenobiotic communities. Donor-specific taxa, such as endomicrobia or spirochete lineages restricted to the gut microbiota of termites, however, either were unable to colonize germ-free cockroaches or formed only small populations. The exposure of xenobiotic cockroaches to conventional adults restored their normal microbiota, which indicated that autochthonous lineages outcompete foreign ones. Our results provide experimental proof that the assembly of a complex gut microbiota in insects is deterministic. PMID:26655763

  4. Imaging the Population Dynamics of Bacterial Communities in the Zebrafish Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael; Burns, Adam; Zac Stephens, W.; Hampton, Jennifer; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-03-01

    The vertebrate gut is home to a diverse microbial ecosystem whose composition has a strong influence on the development and health of the host organism. While researchers are increasingly able to identify the constituent members of the microbiome, very little is known about the spatial and temporal dynamics of commensal microbial communities, including the mechanisms by which communities nucleate, grow, and interact. We address these issues using a model organism: the larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) prepared microbe-free and inoculated with controlled compositions of fluorophore-expressing bacteria. Live imaging with light sheet fluorescence microscopy enables visualization of individual bacterial cells as well as growing colonies over the entire volume of the gut over periods up to 24 hours. We analyze the structure and dynamics of imaged bacterial communities, uncovering correlations between population size, growth rates, and the timing of inoculations that suggest the existence of active changes in the host environment induced by early bacterial exposure. Our data provide the first visualizations of gut microbiota development over an extended period of time in a vertebrate.

  5. Changes in bacterial communities accompanied by aggregation in a fed-batch composting reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Keiko; Nagao, Norio; Toda, Tatsuki; Kurosawa, Norio

    2008-05-01

    The contents of fed-batch composting (FBC) reactors often aggregate after prolonged operation. This process leads to irreversible breakdown of the decomposition reaction and possible alteration of the bacterial communities. We compared the structures of bacterial communities in reactors under aggregate and optimal conditions. The results of 16S rRNA gene clone analysis showed that populations of the family Bacillaceae (such as Bacillus spp., Cerasibacillus spp., Gracilibacillus spp.), which dominate (98%) under optimal condition, were significantly decreased under aggregate condition. In contrast, populations of the family Staphylococcaceae considerably increased after aggregation and accounted for 53% of the total. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that anaerobes or facultative anaerobes related to Tetragenococcus halophilus, Atopostipes suicloacalis, Jeotgalicoccus pinnipedialis, and Staphylococcus spp. were dominant in the aggregates. These results suggested that aerobic Gram-positive bacteria mainly contributed to organic degradation and that aggregation created some anaerobic environment, which promoted the growth of bacterial communities usually not found in well-functioning FBC reactors. PMID:18231830

  6. Bacterial community in Haemaphysalis ticks of domesticated animals from the Orang Asli communities in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Jing-Jing; Chen, Fezshin; Kho, Kai Ling; Ahmad Shanizza, Azzy Iyzati; Lim, Fang-Shiang; Tan, Kim-Kee; Chang, Li-Yen; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-07-01

    Ticks are vectors in the transmission of many important infectious diseases in human and animals. Ticks can be readily found in the semi-forested areas such as the settlements of the indigenous people in Malaysia, the Orang Asli. There is still minimal information available on the bacterial agents associated with ticks found in Malaysia. We performed a survey of the bacterial communities associated with ticks collected from domestic animals found in two Orang Asli villages in Malaysia. We collected 62 ticks, microscopically and molecularly identified as related to Haemaphysalis wellingtoni, Haemaphysalis hystricis and Haemaphysalis bispinosa. Bacterial 16s rRNA hypervariable region (V6) amplicon libraries prepared from the tick samples were sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM platform. We detected a total of 392 possible bacterial genera after pooling and sequencing 20 samples, indicating a diverse bacterial community profile. Dominant taxa include the potential tick endosymbiont, Coxiella. Other dominant taxa include the tick-associated pathogen, Rickettsia, and environmental bacteria such as Bacillus, Mycobacterium, Sphingomonas and Pseudomonas. Other known tick-associated bacteria were also detected, including Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsiella and Wolbachia, albeit at very low abundance. Specific PCR was performed on selected samples to identify Rickettsia and Coxiella. Sequence of Rickettsia felis, which causes spotted fever in human and cats, was identified in one sample. Coxiella endosymbionts were detected in three samples. This study provides the baseline knowledge of the microbiome of ticks in Malaysia, focusing on tick-associated bacteria affecting the Orang Asli communities. The role of the herein found Coxiella and Rickettsia in tick physiology or disease transmission merits further investigation. PMID:27132518

  7. 浓香型皇台大曲可培养细菌群落结构及其产淀粉酶的研究%Study on the cultivable bacterial community structure and amylase in Huangtai Liquor Daqu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈林; 赵志瑞; 王菲; 任迪峰; 李祖明; 白志辉

    2012-01-01

    The cultivable bacterial community structure in Huangtai Liquor Daqu was assessed by dilution plate method and 16S rDNA gene directed PCR. The producing ainglase property of bacteria in the Daqu was investigated by clear zone and submerged fermentation (SmF).23 strains of cultivable bacteria isolated from Huangtai Daqu were identified as Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens,Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus sonerensis and Brevibacillus sp. respectively. That the strains of Bacillus licheniformis produced amylase were the most abundant bacteria in the Daqu, as well as effective amylase producer.Bacillus licheniformis might play an important role in the brewing of Huangtai liquor.%采用稀释平板法,从浓香型皇台大曲中分离纯化出73株细菌菌株,经PCR扩增其16S rDNA并测序,比对分析发现这些纯化的细菌菌株中有23株16S rDNA序列各异的可培养细菌,这些菌株分别为Bacillus licheniformis16株、Bacillus subtilis2株、Bacillus amyloliquefaciens1株、Bacillus cereus1株、Bacillus atrophaeus1株、Bacillus sonorensis1株和Brevibacillus sp.1株;采用透明圈法和液态发酵法对大曲中可培养细菌产淀粉酶性能进行检测,结果表明Bacilluslicheniformis、Bacillus subtilis和Bacillus cereus的一些菌株产淀粉酶的活性较高,其中,Bacillus licheniformis的数量最多,是重要的白酒酿造功能菌。

  8. Metagenomic profile of the bacterial communities associated with Ixodes ricinus ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Carpi

    Full Text Available Assessment of the microbial diversity residing in arthropod vectors of medical importance is crucial for monitoring endemic infections, for surveillance of newly emerging zoonotic pathogens, and for unraveling the associated bacteria within its host. The tick Ixodes ricinus is recognized as the primary European vector of disease-causing bacteria in humans. Despite I. ricinus being of great public health relevance, its microbial communities remain largely unexplored to date. Here we evaluate the pathogen-load and the microbiome in single adult I. ricinus by using 454- and Illumina-based metagenomic approaches. Genomic DNA-derived sequences were taxonomically profiled using a computational approach based on the BWA algorithm, allowing for the identification of known tick-borne pathogens at the strain level and the putative tick core microbiome. Additionally, we assessed and compared the bacterial taxonomic profile in nymphal and adult I. ricinus pools collected from two distinct geographic regions in Northern Italy by means of V6-16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing and community based ecological analysis. A total of 108 genera belonging to representatives of all bacterial phyla were detected and a rapid qualitative assessment for pathogenic bacteria, such as Borrelia, Rickettsia and Candidatus Neoehrlichia, and for other bacteria with mutualistic relationship or undetermined function, such as Wolbachia and Rickettsiella, was possible. Interestingly, the ecological analysis revealed that the bacterial community structure differed between the examined geographic regions and tick life stages. This finding suggests that the environmental context (abiotic and biotic factors and host-selection behaviors affect their microbiome.Our data provide the most complete picture to date of the bacterial communities present within I. ricinus under natural conditions by using high-throughput sequencing technologies. This study further demonstrates a novel detection

  9. Determination Of Uncultured Endo phytic Bacterial Community From Rice Root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culture-independent approaches were developed for rapid analysis of microbial community diversity in various environments. Direct analysis based on 16S rDNA as the phylogenetic markers is the most ordinary, conventional and suitable methods for bacterial diversity analysis. The objective of this study is to investigate the microbial diversity from the rice root tissues using culture-independent approach by 16S rDNA library construction. The 16S rDNAs were directly extracted from a total genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using with the bacteria-specific primer set. The 16S rDNAs were subsequently analysed by cloning and restriction digestion. The amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) clustered the 16S rDNAs into eight majority patterns. These predominant patterns were analysed by DNA sequencing. A better understanding at microbial diversity level is critical to potentiate the endophyte as plant growth promoters. (author)

  10. Dynamics of bacterial community in the gut of Cornu aspersum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA KOLEVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the bacterial community in the intestinal tract of Cornu aspersum was investigated during different states of its life cycle. Two approaches were applied – culture and non-culture. The non-culture approach was performed by ARDRA of 16S rDNA using two of the six tested endonucleases. Data were analyzed by hierarchical cluster analysis. The restriction of 16S rDNA samples from the snail of different physiological states with endonucleases HinfI and Csp6I resulted in generation of different profiles depending on the snail states. By the culture approach we found that the total number of cultivable bacteria, representatives of Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, amylolitic and cellulolytic bacteria were the most abundant in active state of the snails. Cellulolytic bacteria were not detected in juveniles of C. aspersum. Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens as well as bacteria from the genus Salmonella, Shigella and Pseudomonas were not detected. Bacteria of the genus Aeromonas were found in juveniles of C. aspersum, after that their number decrease and were not found in hibernating snails. On the base of the two applied approaches this study shows that the bacterial flora in the intestinal tract of C. aspersum is affected by the seasonal and environmental variations and undergoes quantitative and qualitative changes during the different states of the life cycle. The snails harbor in their gut intestinal bacteria, which possess biochemical potentiality to degrade the plant components.

  11. Experimental insights into the importance of aquatic bacterial community composition to the degradation of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Jürg B; Stedmon, Colin A; Kellerman, Anne M; Nielsen, Nikoline J; Andersson, Anders F; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lindström, Eva S; Kritzberg, Emma S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria play a central role in the cycling of carbon, yet our understanding of the relationship between the taxonomic composition and the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still poor. In this experimental study, we were able to demonstrate a direct link between community composition and ecosystem functioning in that differently structured aquatic bacterial communities differed in their degradation of terrestrially derived DOM. Although the same amount of carbon was processed, both the temporal pattern of degradation and the compounds degraded differed among communities. We, moreover, uncovered that low-molecular-weight carbon was available to all communities for utilisation, whereas the ability to degrade carbon of greater molecular weight was a trait less widely distributed. Finally, whereas the degradation of either low- or high-molecular-weight carbon was not restricted to a single phylogenetic clade, our results illustrate that bacterial taxa of similar phylogenetic classification differed substantially in their association with the degradation of DOM compounds. Applying techniques that capture the diversity and complexity of both bacterial communities and DOM, our study provides new insight into how the structure of bacterial communities may affect processes of biogeochemical significance. PMID:26296065

  12. Altamira cave Paleolithic paintings harbor partly unknown bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabereiter-Gurtner, Claudia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lubitz, Werner; Rölleke, Sabine

    2002-05-21

    Since it has been reported that microorganisms can affect painting pigments, Paleolithic painting microbiology deserves attention. The present study is the first report on the bacterial colonization of the valuable Paleolithic paintings in the famous Altamira cave (Spain). One sample taken from a painting area in the Polychromes Hall was analyzed culture-independently. This was the first time microbiologists were allowed to take sample material directly from Altamira paintings. Identification methods included PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) and community fingerprinting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The applied approach gave insight into a great bacterial taxonomic diversity, and allowed the detection of unexpected and unknown bacteria with potential effects on the conservation of the painting. Regarding the number of 29 visible DGGE bands in the community fingerprint, the numbers of analyzed clones described about 72% of the phylogenetic diversity present in the sample. Thirty-eight percent of the sequences analyzed were phylogenetically most closely related to cultivated bacteria, while the majority (62%) were most closely related to environmental 16S rDNA clones. Bacteria identified in Altamira were related with sequence similarities between 84.8 and 99.4% to members of the cosmopolitan Proteobacteria (52.3%), to members of the Acidobacterium division (23.8%), Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides phylum (9.5%), green non-sulfur bacteria (4.8%), Planctomycetales (4.8%) and Actinobacteria (4.8%). The high number of clones most closely related to environmental 16S rDNA clones showed the broad spectrum of unknown and yet to be cultivated bacteria in Altamira cave. PMID:12052543

  13. Ecology and biogeography of bacterial communities associated with chloroethene-contaminated aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PierreRossi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Massive usage, along with careless handling, storage, spills and leakages made chloroethenes (CEs one of the most abundant classes of groundwater contaminants. Anaerobic organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB can couple reductive dechlorination of CEs with energy conservation, a central microbial process in (enhanced natural attenuation of CE-contaminated aquifers. Spatial variability of OHRB guild members present in contaminated sites has not yet been investigated in detail and it is not known whether the spatial localization of contaminated sites could impact differentially remediation capacities. The goal of this study was to investigate how spatially-distant microbial communities responded to the presence of CEs. Bacterial communities associated with five geographically distant European CEs-contaminated aquifers were analyzed with terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Numerical ecology tools were used to assess the separate and combined effects on the communities of their spatial localization, their local environmental conditions and their contaminant concentrations. Three spatial scales were used for the assessment of the structuration of the communities as a function of geographical distances, namely at the aquifer scale, at medium (50 km and long (ca. 1000 km distances between aquifers. As a result, bacterial communities were structured with an almost identical contribution by both the geographical position of the aquifer and local environmental variables, especially electron donors and acceptors. The impact of environmental factors decreased with distance between aquifers, with the concomitant increase in importance of a geographical factor. Contrastingly, CEs contributed at a low extent at the medium scale and became important only when all aquifers were considered together, at a large geographical scale, suggesting that distant communities were structured partially by a common niche specialization in organohalide

  14. Epiphytic bacterial community composition on two common submerged macrophytes in brackish water and freshwater

    OpenAIRE

    Blindow Irmgard; Blume Maja; Hempel Melanie; Gross Elisabeth M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plants and their heterotrophic bacterial biofilm communities possibly strongly interact, especially in aquatic systems. We aimed to ascertain whether different macrophytes or their habitats determine bacterial community composition. We compared the composition of epiphytic bacteria on two common aquatic macrophytes, the macroalga Chara aspera Willd. and the angiosperm Myriophyllum spicatum L., in two habitats, freshwater (Lake Constance) and brackish water (Schaproder Bodd...

  15. Bacterial communities in Arctic first-year drift ice during the winter/spring transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Piiparinen, Jonna; Karkman, Antti; Lyra, Christina; Gerland, Sebastian; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2016-08-01

    Horizontal and vertical variability of first-year drift-ice bacterial communities was investigated along a North-South transect in the Fram Strait during the winter/spring transition. Two different developmental stages were captured along the transect based on the prevailing environmental conditions and the differences in bacterial community composition. The differences in the bacterial communities were likely driven by the changes in sea-ice algal biomass (2.6-5.6 fold differences in chl-a concentrations). Copiotrophic genera common in late spring/summer sea ice, such as Polaribacter, Octadecabacter and Glaciecola, dominated the bacterial communities, supporting the conclusion that the increase in the sea-ice algal biomass was possibly reflected in the sea-ice bacterial communities. Of the dominating bacterial genera, Polaribacter seemed to benefit the most from the increase in algal biomass, since they covered approximately 39% of the total community at the southernmost stations with higher (>6 μg l(-1) ) chl-a concentrations and only 9% at the northernmost station with lower chl-a concentrations (<6 μg l(-1) ). The sea-ice bacterial communities also varied between the ice horizons at all three stations and thus we recommend that for future studies multiple ice horizons be sampled to cover the variability in sea-ice bacterial communities in spring. PMID:27264318

  16. Seasonal dynamics and community structure of bacterioplankton in upper Paraná River floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Josiane Barros; Roberto, Maria do Carmo; Pagioro, Thomaz Aurélio

    2013-11-01

    Knowing the bacterial community, as well as understanding how it changes during a hydrological pulse, is very important to understand nutrient cycles in floodplain systems. The bacterial community structure was analyzed in the 12 sites of upper Paraná River floodplain, and its changes during a flood pulse were described. In order to understand how high and low water phases change bacterial community by changing abiotical variables, the bacterial community distribution was determined in superficial water of 12 different sampling stations, every 3 months, from December 2010 to September 2011. The bacterial community structure and diversity was analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization, considering the main domains Bacteria and Archaea and the subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria) and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster. Smaller densities were observed on ebb and low water periods and the highest density was observed in March 2011. The high water period caused a decrease in diversity because of the lost of equitability. The highest values of Shannon-Wiener index were found on December 2010 and September 2011. The nutrients runoff to the aquatic environments of the floodplain promoted an increase in the total bacterial density during the high water phase as well as changes in bacterial community composition. The bacterial community presented both spatial and temporal differences. Yet, temporal changes in limnological characteristics of the floodplain were the most important predictor of bacterial community and also influenced its diversity. PMID:24046074

  17. Soil bacterial community response to differences in agricultural management along with seasonal changes in a Mediterranean region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Bevivino

    Full Text Available Land-use change is considered likely to be one of main drivers of biodiversity changes in grassland ecosystems. To gain insight into the impact of land use on the underlying soil bacterial communities, we aimed at determining the effects of agricultural management, along with seasonal variations, on soil bacterial community in a Mediterranean ecosystem where different land-use and plant cover types led to the creation of a soil and vegetation gradient. A set of soils subjected to different anthropogenic impact in a typical Mediterranean landscape, dominated by Quercus suber L., was examined in spring and autumn: a natural cork-oak forest, a pasture, a managed meadow, and two vineyards (ploughed and grass covered. Land uses affected the chemical and structural composition of the most stabilised fractions of soil organic matter and reduced soil C stocks and labile organic matter at both sampling season. A significant effect of land uses on bacterial community structure as well as an interaction effect between land uses and season was revealed by the EP index. Cluster analysis of culture-dependent DGGE patterns showed a different seasonal distribution of soil bacterial populations with subgroups associated to different land uses, in agreement with culture-independent T-RFLP results. Soils subjected to low human inputs (cork-oak forest and pasture showed a more stable bacterial community than those with high human input (vineyards and managed meadow. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the predominance of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes phyla with differences in class composition across the site, suggesting that the microbial composition changes in response to land uses. Taken altogether, our data suggest that soil bacterial communities were seasonally distinct and exhibited compositional shifts that tracked with changes in land use and soil management. These findings may contribute to future searches for bacterial bio

  18. Oligotyping reveals stronger relationship of organic soil bacterial community structure with N-amendments and soil chemistry in comparison to that of mineral soil at Harvard Forest, MA, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Turlapati, Swathi A.; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Ramsdell, Jordan; Minocha, Subhash C

    2015-01-01

    The impact of chronic nitrogen amendments on bacterial communities was evaluated at Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, USA. Thirty soil samples (3 treatments × 2 soil horizons × 5 subplots) were collected in 2009 from untreated (control), low nitrogen-amended (LN; 50 kg NH4NO3 ha-1 yr-1) and high nitrogen-amended (HN; 150 kg NH4NO3 ha-1 yr-1) plots. PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA gene sequences made from soil DNA were subjected to pyrosequencing (Turlapati et al., 2013) and analyses using oligoty...

  19. Bacterial Communities in Malagasy Soils with Differing Levels of Disturbance Affecting Botanical Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Blasiak, Leah C.; Schmidt, Alex W.; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Wendy L Applequist; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P.; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communitie...

  20. Modulation of Post-Antibiotic Bacterial Community Reassembly and Host Response by Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Erb Downward, John R.; Falkowski, Nicole R.; Mason, Katie L.; Ryan Muraglia; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Candida albicans into cefoperazone-treated mice results in changes in bacterial community reassembly. Our objective was to use high-throughput sequencing to characterize at much greater depth the specific changes in the bacterial microbiome. The colonization of C. albicans significantly altered bacterial community reassembly that was evident at multiple taxonomic levels of resolution. There were marked changes in the levels of Bacteriodetes and Lactobacillaceae. Lachnospir...

  1. Effects of copper amendment on the bacterial community in agricultural soil analyzed by the T-RFLP technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tom-Petersen, Andreas; Leser, Thomas D.; Marsh, Terence L.;

    2003-01-01

    . In parallel, bioavailable copper was determined with a copper-specific bioluminescent Pseudomonas reporter strain. The amounts of total Cu as well as of bioavailable Cu in the field declined throughout the experiment. Bacterial community structure was examined by terminal restriction fragment length...

  2. The Prestige oil spill: bacterial community dynamics during a field biostimulation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, N.; Solanas, A.M. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology; Vinas, M. [GIRO Technological Centre, Mollet del Valles (Spain); Bayona, J.M.; Albaiges, J. [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2007-12-15

    A field bioremediation assay using the oleophilic fertilizer S200 was carried out 12 months after the Prestige heavy fuel-oil spill on a beach on the Cantabrian coast (north Spain). This assay showed that S200-enhanced oil degradation, particularly of high-molecular-weight n-alkanes and alkylated PAHs, suggesting an increase in the microbial bioavailability of these compounds. The bacterial community structure was determined by cultivation-independent analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Bacterial community was mainly composed of {alpha}-Proteobacteria (Rhodobacteriaceae and Sphingomonadaceae). Representatives of {gamma}-Proteobacteria (Chromatiales, Moraxellaceae, and Halomonadaceae), Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteriaceae), and Actinobacteria group (Nocardiaceae and Corynebacteriaceae) were also found. The addition of the fertilizer led to the appearance of the bacterium Mesonia algae in the early stages, with a narrow range of growth substrates, which has been associated with the common alga Achrosiphonia sonderi. The presence of Mesonia algae may be attributable to the response of the microbial community to the addition of N and P rather than indicating a role in the biodegradation process. The Rhodococcus group appeared in both assay plots, especially at the end of the experiment. It was also found at another site on the Galician coast that had been affected by the same spill. This genus has been associated with the degradation of n-alkanes up to C{sub 36}. Taking into account the high content of heavy alkanes in the Prestige fuel, these microorganisms could play a significant role in the degradation of such fuel. A similar bacterial community structure was observed at another site that showed a similar degree of fuel weathering. (orig.)

  3. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26807915

  4. Molecular Analysis of the Bacterial Communities in Crude Oil Samples from Two Brazilian Offshore Petroleum Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenblum, Elisa; Souza, Diogo Bastos; Penna, Monica; Seldin, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Crude oil samples with high- and low-water content from two offshore platforms (PA and PB) in Campos Basin, Brazil, were assessed for bacterial communities by 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries. RDP Classifier was used to analyze a total of 156 clones within four libraries obtained from two platforms. The clone sequences were mainly affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria (78.2% of the total clones); however, clones associated with Betaproteobacteria (10.9%), Alphaproteobacteria (9%), and Firmicutes (1.9%) were also identified. Pseudomonadaceae was the most common family affiliated with these clone sequences. The sequences were further analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 81 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) grouped at 97% stringency. Richness estimators also calculated by MOTHUR indicated that oil samples with high-water content were the most diverse. Comparison of bacterial communities present in these four samples using LIBSHUFF and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated that the water content significantly influenced the community structure only of crude oil obtained from PA. Differences between PA and PB libraries were observed, suggesting the importance of the oil field as a driver of community composition in this habitat. PMID:22319534

  5. Combined effect of temperature and copper pollution on soil bacterial community: climate change and regional variation aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Isabel; Araújo, Susana; Pereira, Anabela; Menezes-Oliveira, Vanessa B; Correia, António; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined effects of temperature and copper (Cu) contamination in the structure of soil bacterial community. For this, contaminated or spiked and control soils from two different geographic origins (PT-Portugal and DK-Denmark) were used. The DK soil was from a historically contaminated study field, representing a long-term exposure to Cu while the PT soil was from a clean site and freshly spiked with Cu. Soil bacterial communities were exposed in mesocosms during 84 days to 3 different temperatures based on values typically found in each geographic region and temperature conditions that simulated a warming scenario. Obtained results indicate that Cu stress alters the structure of bacterial community and that this effect is, to some extent, temperature-dependent. Effects on bacterial diversity for both soils were also observed. Differences in the DK and PT communities' response were apparent, with the community from the historically contaminated soil being more resilient to temperature fluctuations. This study presents evidence to support the hypothesis that temperature alters the effect of metals on soils. Further, our results suggest that the definition of soils quality criteria must be based on studies performed under temperatures selected for the specific geographic region. Studies taking into account temperature changes are needed to model and predict risks, this is important to e.g. future adjustments of the maximum permissible levels for soil metal contamination. PMID:25450928

  6. Composition of the Cutaneous Bacterial Community in Japanese Amphibians: Effects of Captivity, Host Species, and Body Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Bletz, Molly Catherine; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Shimizu, Norio; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Vences, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The cutaneous microbiota plays a significant role in the biology of their vertebrate hosts, and its composition is known to be influenced both by host and environment, with captive conditions often altering alpha diversity. Here, we compare the cutaneous bacterial communities of 61 amphibians (both wild and captive) from Hiroshima, Japan, using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of a segment of the 16S rRNA gene. The majority of these samples came from a captive breeding facility at Hiroshima University where specimens from six species are maintained under highly standardized conditions for several generations. This allowed to identify host effects on the bacterial communities under near identical environmental conditions in captivity. We found the structure of the cutaneous bacterial community significantly differing between wild and captive individuals of newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster, with a higher alpha diversity found in the wild individuals. Community structure also showed distinct patterns when comparing different species of amphibians kept under highly similar conditions, revealing an intrinsic host effect. Bacterial communities of dorsal vs. ventral skin surfaces did not significantly differ in most species, but a trend of higher alpha diversity on the ventral surface was found in Oriental fire-bellied toads, Bombina orientalis. This study confirms the cutaneous microbiota of amphibians as a highly dynamic system influenced by a complex interplay of numerous factors. PMID:27278778

  7. A snapshot on spatial and vertical distribution of bacterial communities in the eastern Indian Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; KAN Jinjun; BORECKI Laura; ZHANG Xiaodong; WANG Dongxiao; SUN Jun

    2016-01-01

    Besides being critical components of marine food web, microorganisms play vital roles in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and elements in the ocean. Currently little is known about microbial population structure and their distributions in the eastern Indian Ocean. In this study, we applied molecular approaches including polymerase chain reaction-denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and High-Throughput next generation sequencing to investigate bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the equatorial regions and the adjacent Bay of Bengal in the eastern Indian Ocean. In general,Bacteroidetes,Proteobacteria (mainlyAlpha, andGamma),Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria andPlanctomycetes dominated the microbial communities. Horizontally distinct spatial distribution of major microbial groups was observed from PCR-DGGE gel image analyses. However, further detailed characterization of community structures by pyrosequencing suggested a more pronounced stratified distribution pattern:Cyanobacteria andActinobacteria were more predominant at surface water (25 m);Bacteroidetes dominated at 25 m and 150 m whileProteobacteria (mainlyAlphaproteobacteria) occurred more frequently at 75 m water depth. With increasing water depth, the bacterial communities from different locations tended to share high similarity, indicating a niche partitioning for minor groups of bacteria recovered with high throughput sequencing approaches. This study provided the first “snapshot” on biodiversity and spatial distribution ofBacteria in water columns in the eastern Indian Ocean, and the findings further emphasized the potential functional roles of these microbes in energy and resource cycling in the eastern Indian Ocean.

  8. Microbial Community Structure of Casing Soil During Mushroom Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Wei-Ming; YAO Huai-Ying; FENG Wei-Lin; JIN Qun-Li; LIU Yue-Yan; LI Nan-Yi; ZHENG Zhong

    2009-01-01

    The culturable bacterial population and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA)profile of casing soil were investigated at different mushroom (Agaricus bisporusI cropping stages.The change in soil bacterial PLFAs was always accompanied by a change in the soil culturable bacterial population in the first flush.Comparatively higher culturable bacterial population and bacterial PLFAs were found in the casing soil at the primordia formation stage of the first flush.There was a significant increase in the ratio of fungal to bacterial PLFAs during mushroom growth.Multivariate analysis of PLFA data demonstrated that the mushroom cropping stage could considerably affect the microbial community structure of the casing soil.The bacterial population increased significantly from casing soil application to the primordia formation stage of the first flush.Casing soil application resulted in an increase in the ratio of gram-negative bacterial PLFAs to gram-positive bacterial PLFAs,suggesting that some gram-negative bacteria might play an important role in mushroom sporophore initiation.

  9. Coral-associated bacterial communities on Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceh, Janja; Van Keulen, Mike; Bourne, David G

    2011-01-01

    Coral-associated microbial communities from three coral species (Pocillopora damicornis, Acropora tenuis and Favites abdita) were examined every 3 months (January, March, June, October) over a period of 1 year on Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia. Tissue from corals was collected throughout the year and additional sampling of coral mucus and seawater samples was performed in January. Tissue samples were also obtained in October from P. damicornis coral colonies on Rottnest Island off Perth, 1200 km south of Ningaloo Reef, to provide comparisons between coral-microbial associates in different locations. The community structures of the coral-associated microorganisms were analysed using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, which demonstrated highly diverse microbial profiles among all the coral species sampled. Principal component analysis revealed that samples grouped according to time and not species, indicating that coral-microbial associations may be a result of environmental drivers such as oceanographic characteristics, benthic community structure and temperature. Tissue samples from P. damicornis at Rottnest Island revealed similarities in bacteria to the samples at Ningaloo Reef. This study highlights that coral-associated microbial communities are highly diverse; however, the complex interactions that determine the stability of these associations are not necessarily dependent on coral host specificity. PMID:21044100

  10. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frade, P.R.; Roll, K.; Bergauer, K.; Herndl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associatedwith the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has thereforeremained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibita similar specificity towards coral hosts a

  11. Divergent responses of viral and bacterial communities in the gut microbiome to dietary disturbances in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Adina; Ringus, Daina L; Williams, Ryan J; Choo, Zi-Ning; Greenwald, Stephanie M.; Owens, Sarah M.; Coleman, Maureen L; Meyer, Folker; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-05-01

    To improve our understanding of the stability of mammalian intestinal communities, we characterized the responses of both bacterial and viral communities in murine fecal samples to dietary changes between high- and low-fat (LF) diets. Targeted DNA extraction methods for bacteria, virus-like particles and induced prophages were used to generate bacterial and viral metagenomes as well as 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons. Gut microbiome communities from two cohorts of C57BL/6 mice were characterized in a 6-week diet perturbation study in response to high fiber, LF and high-refined sugar, milkfat (MF) diets. The resulting metagenomes from induced bacterial prophages and extracellular viruses showed significant overlap, supporting a largely temperate viral lifestyle within these gut microbiomes. The resistance of baseline communities to dietary disturbances was evaluated, and we observed contrasting responses of baseline LF and MF bacterial and viral communities. In contrast to baseline LF viral communities and bacterial communities in both diet treatments, baseline MF viral communities were sensitive to dietary disturbances as reflected in their non-recovery during the washout period. The contrasting responses of bacterial and viral communities suggest that these communities can respond to perturbations independently of each other and highlight the potentially unique role of viruses in gut health.

  12. Divergent responses of viral and bacterial communities in the gut microbiome to dietary disturbances in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Adina; Ringus, Daina L; Williams, Ryan J; Choo, Zi-Ning; Greenwald, Stephanie M; Owens, Sarah M; Coleman, Maureen L; Meyer, Folker; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-05-01

    To improve our understanding of the stability of mammalian intestinal communities, we characterized the responses of both bacterial and viral communities in murine fecal samples to dietary changes between high- and low-fat (LF) diets. Targeted DNA extraction methods for bacteria, virus-like particles and induced prophages were used to generate bacterial and viral metagenomes as well as 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons. Gut microbiome communities from two cohorts of C57BL/6 mice were characterized in a 6-week diet perturbation study in response to high fiber, LF and high-refined sugar, milkfat (MF) diets. The resulting metagenomes from induced bacterial prophages and extracellular viruses showed significant overlap, supporting a largely temperate viral lifestyle within these gut microbiomes. The resistance of baseline communities to dietary disturbances was evaluated, and we observed contrasting responses of baseline LF and MF bacterial and viral communities. In contrast to baseline LF viral communities and bacterial communities in both diet treatments, baseline MF viral communities were sensitive to dietary disturbances as reflected in their non-recovery during the washout period. The contrasting responses of bacterial and viral communities suggest that these communities can respond to perturbations independently of each other and highlight the potentially unique role of viruses in gut health. PMID:26473721

  13. Structure and Function of the Bacterial Root Microbiota in Wild and Domesticated Barley

    OpenAIRE

    Bulgarelli, D.; Garrido Oter, R.; Muench, P.; Weiman, A.; Droege, J.; Pan, Y.; McHardy, A; Schulze-Lefert, P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The microbial communities inhabiting the root interior of healthy plants, as well as the rhizosphere, which consists of soil particles firmly attached to roots, engage in symbiotic associations with their host. To investigate the structural and functional diversification among these communities, we employed a combination of 16S rRNA gene profiling and shotgun metagenome analysis of the microbiota associated with wild and domesticated accessions of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Bacterial f...

  14. Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in human urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Rosen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs. These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18% urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41% urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29% of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001. Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22% had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45% had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The

  15. Nanopores Structure in Electrospun Bacterial Cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Basmaji; Gabriel Molina de Olyveira; Ligia Maria Manzine Costa; Lauro Xavier Filho

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has established to be a remarkably versatile biomaterial and can be used in wide variety of applied scientific endeavours, especially for medical devices, lately, bacterial cellulose mats are used in the treatment of skin conditions such as burns and ulcers, because of the morphology of fibrous biopolymers serving as a support for cell proliferation, its pores allow gas exchange between the organism and the environment. Moreover, the nanostructure and morphological si...

  16. In-depth characterization of wastewater bacterial community in response to algal growth using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangho; Lee, Juyoun; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woo, Sung-Geun; Baek, Gyu Seok; Park, Joonhong

    2013-10-28

    Microalgae have been regarded as a natural resource for sustainable materials and fuels, as well as for removal of nutrients and micropollutants from wastewater, and their interaction with bacteria in wastewater is a critical factor to consider because of the microbial diversity and complexity in a variety of wastewater conditions. Despite their importance, very little is known about the ecological interactions between algae and bacteria in a wastewater environment. In this study, we characterized the wastewater bacterial community in response to the growth of a Selenastrum gracile UTEX 325 population in a real municipal wastewater environment. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing technique was used for indepth analysis of amplicons of 16S rRNA genes from different conditions in each reactor, with and without the algal population. The algal growth reduced the bacterial diversity and affected the bacterial community structure in the wastewater. The following in-depth analysis of the deep-sequenced amplicons showed that the algal growth selectively stimulated Sphingobacteria class members, especially the Sediminibacterium genus population, in the municipal wastewater environment. PMID:23867704

  17. Response of polar front phytoplankton and bacterial community to micronutrient amendments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, R.K.; Gomes, J.; Bandekar, M.; Bhat, M.; Mesquita, A.; Ramaiah, N.

    in very low concentrations in the open ocean (Ellwood, 2004, 2008; Ellwood et al. 2005; Croot et al. 2011; Hassler et al. 2012). They readily react with organic compounds and organic ligands (Ellwood, 2004, 2008; Ellwood et al. 2005; Lohan et al. 2005...; Morel et al. 1994; Sunda and Huntsman, 1995; Coale et al. 1996; Boyd et al. 2000; Buitenhuis et al. 2003; Saito and Goepfert, 2008; Saito et al. 2008). However, the impact of these dynamics on bacterial community (BC) structure is not that well...

  18. Profile of bacterial communities in South African mine-water samples using Illumina next-generation sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Jitendra; Mankazana, Boitumelo B J; Momba, Maggy N B

    2015-04-01

    Mine water is an example of an extreme environment that contains a large number of diverse and specific bacteria. It is imperative to gain an understanding of these bacterial communities in order to develop effective strategies for the bioremediation of polluted aquatic systems. In this study, the high-throughput sequencing approach was used to characterize the bacterial communities in two different mine waters of South Africa: vanadium and gold mine water. Over 2629 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered from 15,802 reads of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. They represented 8 phyla, 43 orders, 84 families and 105 genera. Proteobacteria and unclassified bacterial sequences were the most dominant. Apart from these, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Candidate phylum OD1, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Deinococcus-Thermus were the recovered phyla, although their relative abundance differed between both the mine-water samples. Yet, diversity indices suggested that the bacterial communities inhabiting the vanadium mine water were more diverse than those in gold mine water. Interestingly, substantial percentages of the reads from either sample (58 % in vanadium and 17 % in gold mine water) could not be assigned to any phylum and remained unclassified, suggesting hitherto unidentified populations, and vast untapped microbial diversity. Overall, the results of this study exhibited bacterial community structures with high diversity in mine water, which can be explored further for their role in bioremediation and environmental management. PMID:25416590

  19. Functional profiling and distribution of the forest soil bacterial communities along the soil mycorrhizosphere continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, S; Courty, P E; Pierrat, J C; Peter, M; Buée, M; Turpault, M P; Garbaye, J; Frey-Klett, P

    2013-08-01

    An ectomycorrhiza is a multitrophic association between a tree root, an ectomycorrhizal fungus, free-living fungi and the associated bacterial communities. Enzymatic activities of ectomycorrhizal root tips are therefore result of the contribution from different partners of the symbiotic organ. However, the functional potential of the fungus-associated bacterial communities remains unknown. In this study, a collection of 80 bacterial strains randomly selected and isolated from a soil-ectomycorrhiza continuum (oak-Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizas, the ectomycorrhizosphere and the surrounding bulk soil) were characterized. All the bacterial isolates were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequences as members of the genera Burkholderia, Collimonas, Dyella, Mesorhizobium, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium and Sphingomonas. The bacterial strains were then assayed for β-xylosidase, β-glucosidase, N-acetyl-hexosaminidase, β-glucuronidase, cellobiohydrolase, phosphomonoesterase, leucine-aminopeptidase and laccase activities, chitin solubilization and auxin production. Using these bioassays, we demonstrated significant differences in the functional distribution of the bacterial communities living in the different compartments of the soil-ectomycorrhiza continuum. The surrounding bulk soil was significantly enriched in bacterial isolates capable of hydrolysing cellobiose and N-acetylglucosamine. In contrast, the ectomycorrhizosphere appeared significantly enriched in bacterial isolates capable of hydrolysing glucopyranoside and chitin. Notably, chitinase and laccase activities were found only in bacterial isolates belonging to the Collimonas and Pseudomonas genera. Overall, the results suggest that the ectomycorrhizal fungi favour specific bacterial communities with contrasting functional characteristics from the surrounding soil. PMID:23455431

  20. Bacterial Communities of different Mediterranean Sponge Species - Basic investigations for biotechnological sponge cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerce, Berna

    2011-01-01

    The aim to use sponges and their associated microorganisms for the supply of natural compounds for their investigation in clinical trials for subsequent development of drugs was the motivation for the investigation of bacterial communities of sponges. The investigation revealed surface- and tissue-associated bacterial communities of free-living sponges were different from each other and microbial communities and secondary metabolites of sponges remain stable during biotechnological cultivation.

  1. Trophic network architecture of root-associated bacterial communities determines pathogen invasion and plant health

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Zhong; Yang, Tianjie; Friman, Ville-Petri; Xu, Yangchun; Shen, Qirong; Jousset, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Host-associated bacterial communities can function as an important line of defence against pathogens in animals and plants. Empirical evidence and theoretical predictions suggest that species-rich communities are more resistant to pathogen invasions. Yet, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we experimentally test how the underlying resource competition networks of resident bacterial communities affect invasion resistance to the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in microcosms and ...

  2. 芦苇秸秆厌氧联产氢气甲烷过程中细菌群落演替规律%Bacterial community structure succession in fermentative biohydrogen with methanogenesis integration from reed straw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾璇; 任连海; 李鸣晓; 席北斗; 祝超伟; 赵由才

    2016-01-01

    .36 times higher than the control in methane prodution stage. However, the highest methane proportion of 68.4% in control test was similar to those under cellulase pretreatment. Therefore, the cellulase pretreatment has the benefit of structural damage on refractory organics while improving the hydrogen production potential in this study. Usually, hydrogen and methane formation is accompanied by volatile fatty acids (VFAs) generation during anaerobic digestion process. Hence, the composition and concentration of soluble metabolites produced were useful indicators for monitoring the hydrogenogenic process. The investigation of the soluble metabolites at the end of each stage showed that the main VFAs were distributed under cellulase pretreatment compared with the control. The composition of VFAs in hydrogenogenic stage was butyric acid and acetic acid, indicating that butyric-acid type fermentation was established. During the methanogenic stage, the butyric acid was consumed and the propionic and valeric acid were produced more. These results showed that cellulase pretreatment might be attributed to the diversity of microbial populations in 2 stages after enrichment. The sequences of 16S rDNA DGGE predominant band fragments were determined by comparison with NCBI database. The DGGE patterns showed that the 2 stages experienced different microbial community structure changes during the period. Early in hydrogenogenic stage, the low similarity of bacterial communities was observed. And then the high similarity with Deiss coefficient of 83.6% (lane: H3, H4) and 87.4% (lane: M6, M7) was obtained in peak production period of hydrogen and methane, respectively. The Cs value was reduced to 51.5 at the end of methane production stage (lane: M6, M9). The majority of the sequences obtained were affiliated withClostridium thermocellum (Band 20),Enterobacter aerogenes (Band 28) andSedimentibacter (Band 29). In hydrogenogenic stage, the dominant microorganism wasEnterobacter aerogenes

  3. FoodMicrobionet: A database for the visualisation and exploration of food bacterial communities based on network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Eugenio; Cocolin, Luca; De Filippis, Francesca; Zotta, Teresa; Ferrocino, Ilario; O'Sullivan, Orla; Neviani, Erasmo; De Angelis, Maria; Cotter, Paul D; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-02-16

    Amplicon targeted high-throughput sequencing has become a popular tool for the culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Although the data obtained with this approach are portable and the number of sequences available in public databases is increasing, no tool has been developed yet for the analysis and presentation of data obtained in different studies. This work describes an approach for the development of a database for the rapid exploration and analysis of data on food microbial communities. Data from seventeen studies investigating the structure of bacterial communities in dairy, meat, sourdough and fermented vegetable products, obtained by 16S rRNA gene targeted high-throughput sequencing, were collated and analysed using Gephi, a network analysis software. The resulting database, which we named FoodMicrobionet, was used to analyse nodes and network properties and to build an interactive web-based visualisation. The latter allows the visual exploration of the relationships between Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and samples and the identification of core- and sample-specific bacterial communities. It also provides additional search tools and hyperlinks for the rapid selection of food groups and OTUs and for rapid access to external resources (NCBI taxonomy, digital versions of the original articles). Microbial interaction network analysis was carried out using CoNet on datasets extracted from FoodMicrobionet: the complexity of interaction networks was much lower than that found for other bacterial communities (human microbiome, soil and other environments). This may reflect both a bias in the dataset (which was dominated by fermented foods and starter cultures) and the lower complexity of food bacterial communities. Although some technical challenges exist, and are discussed here, the net result is a valuable tool for the exploration of food bacterial communities by the scientific community and food industry. PMID:26704067

  4. Dynamics of bacterial communities before and after distribution in a full-scale drinking water network

    KAUST Repository

    El-Chakhtoura, Joline

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the biological stability of drinking water distribution systems is imperative in the framework of process control and risk management. The objective of this research was to examine the dynamics of the bacterial community during drinking water distribution at high temporal resolution. Water samples (156 in total) were collected over short time-scales (minutes/hours/days) from the outlet of a treatment plant and a location in its corresponding distribution network. The drinking water is treated by biofiltration and disinfectant residuals are absent during distribution. The community was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and flow cytometry as well as conventional, culture-based methods. Despite a random dramatic event (detected with pyrosequencing and flow cytometry but not with plate counts), the bacterial community profile at the two locations did not vary significantly over time. A diverse core microbiome was shared between the two locations (58-65% of the taxa and 86-91% of the sequences) and found to be dependent on the treatment strategy. The bacterial community structure changed during distribution, with greater richness detected in the network and phyla such as Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes becoming abundant. The rare taxa displayed the highest dynamicity, causing the major change during water distribution. This change did not have hygienic implications and is contingent on the sensitivity of the applied methods. The concept of biological stability therefore needs to be revised. Biostability is generally desired in drinking water guidelines but may be difficult to achieve in large-scale complex distribution systems that are inherently dynamic.

  5. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham G Willsey

    Full Text Available Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment.

  6. Analysis of bacterial communities and bacterial pathogens in a biogas plant by the combination of ethidium monoazide, PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the changes of bacterial community composition including bacterial pathogens along a biogas plant, i.e. from the influent, to the biogas reactor and to the post-digester. The effects of post-digestion temperature and time on the changes of bacterial community...... had a significant effect on the changes of bacterial community composition. The changes of bacterial community composition were also reflected in the changes of relative abundance of bacterial pathogens. The richness and relative abundance of bacterial pathogens were reduced after anaerobic digestion...... in the biogas reactor. It was found in batch experiments that bacterial pathogens showed the highest relative abundance and richness after 30days' post-digestion. Streptococcus bovis was found in all the samples. Our results showed that special attention should be paid to the post-digestion since the...

  7. Differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia by thin-section computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and objective: The management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends, in part, on the identification of the causative agents. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of thin-section computed tomography (CT) in differentiating bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia. Patients and methods: Thin-section CT studies were prospectively examined in hospitalized CAP patients within 2 days of admission, followed by retrospective assessment by two pulmonary radiologists. Thin-section CT findings on the pneumonias caused by each pathogen were examined, and two types of pneumonias were compared. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced. Results: Among 183 CAP episodes (181 patients, 125 men and 56 women, mean age ± S.D.: 61.1 ± 19.7) examined by thin-section CT, the etiologies of 125 were confirmed (94 bacterial pneumonia and 31 non-bacterial pneumonia). Centrilobular nodules were specific for non-bacterial pneumonia and airspace nodules were specific for bacterial pneumonia (specificities of 89% and 94%, respectively) when located in the outer lung areas. When centrilobular nodules were the principal finding, they were specific but lacked sensitivity for non-bacterial pneumonia (specificity 98% and sensitivity 23%). To distinguish the two types of pneumonias, centrilobular nodules, airspace nodules and lobular shadows were found to be important by multivariate analyses. ROC curve analysis discriminated bacterial pneumonia from non-bacterial pneumonia among patients without underlying lung diseases, yielding an optimal point with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 79%, respectively, but was less effective when all patients were analyzed together (70% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Thin-section CT examination was applied for the differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonias. Though showing some potential, this examination at the present time would not

  8. Fecal bacterial community changes associated with isoflavone metabolites in postmenopausal women after soy bar consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy H Nakatsu

    Full Text Available Soy isoflavones and their metabolism by intestinal microbiota have gained attention because of potential health benefits, such as the alleviation of estrogen/hormone-related conditions in postmenopausal women, associated with some of these compounds. However, overall changes in gut bacterial community structure and composition in response to addition of soy isoflavones to diets and their association with excreted isoflavone metabolites in postmenopausal women has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine fecal bacterial community changes in 17 postmenopausal women after a week of diet supplementation with soy bars containing isoflavones, and to determine correlations between microbial community changes and excreted isoflavone metabolites. Using DGGE profiles of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes (V3 region to compare microbial communities in fecal samples collected one week before and one week during soy supplementation revealed significant differences (ANOSIM p<0.03 before and after soy supplementation in all subjects. However, between subjects comparisons showed high inter-individual variation that resulted in clustering of profiles by subjects. Urinary excretion of isoflavone (daidzein metabolites indicated four subjects were equol producers and all subjects produced O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA. Comparison of relative proportions of 16S rRNA genes from 454 pyrosequencing of the last fecal samples of each treatment session revealed significant increases in average proportions of Bifidobacterium after soy consumption, and Bifidobacterium and Eubacterium were significantly greater in equol vs non-S-(-equol producers. This is the first in vivo study using pyrosequencing to characterize significant differences in fecal community structure and composition in postmenopausal women after a week of soy diet-supplementation, and relate these changes to differences in soy isoflavones and isoflavone metabolites.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00244907.

  9. Are Longitudinal Patterns of Bacterial Community Composition and Dissolved Organic Matter Composition Linked Across a River Continuum? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, J.; Kaplan, L. A.; Kan, J.; Findlay, R. H.; Podgorski, D. C.; McKenna, A. M.; Branan, T. L.; Griffith, C.

    2013-12-01

    The River Continuum Concept (RCC), an early meta-ecosystem idea, was developed without the benefit of new frontiers in molecular microbial ecology and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. We have applied technical advances in these areas to address a hypothesis implicit in the RCC that the upstream legacy of DOM processing contributes to the structure and function of downstream bacterial communities. DOM molecular structure and microbial community structure were measured across river networks within three distinct forested catchments. High-throughput pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons and phospholipid fatty acid analysis were used to characterize bacterial communities, and ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry characterized the molecular composition of stream water DOM. Total microbial biomass varied among river networks but showed a trend of decreasing biomass in sediment with increasing stream order. There were distinct shifts in bacterial community structure and a trend of decreasing richness was observed traveling downstream in both sediment and epilithic habitats. The bacterial richness in the first order stream sediment habitats was 7728 genera which decreased to 6597 genera in the second order sites and 4867 genera in the third order streams. The richness in the epilithic biofilm habitats was 2830 genera in the first order, 2322 genera in the second order and 1629 genera in the third order sites. Over 45% of the sediment biofilm genera and 37% of the epilithic genera were found in all three orders. In addition to shifts in bacterial richness, we observed a longitudinal shift in bacterial functional-types. In the sediment biofilms, Rhodoplanes spp. (containing rhodopsin pigment) and Bradyrhizobium spp. (nitrogen fixing bacteria) were predominately found in the heavily forested first order streams, while the cyanobacteria Limnothrix spp. was dominant in the second order streams. The third order

  10. Quantum dot conjugates for SEM of bacterial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; Mielke, Randall; Clarke, Samuel

    2009-05-01

    Biologically compatible quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles are hybrid inorganic-organic materials with increasing popularity as fluorescent probes for studying biological specimens. QDs have several advantageous optical features compared to fluorescent dyes and they are electron-dense, allowing for correlated fluorescence and electron microscopic imaging. Despite these features, widespread use of QDs as biological probes has generally been limited by the complex chemistry required for their synthesis and the conjugation. In this work, we show that easily prepared quantum dot (QD) probes provide excellent contrast for fluorescent confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analysis of pure microbial cultures and microbial communities. Two conjugation strategies were employed in order to specifically target the QDs to bacterial cell surfaces. The first was biotinylation of the bacteria followed by labeling with commercially available QDs incorporating the high-affinity partner for biotin (QD-streptavidin). Second, we designed a novel QD probe for Gram negative bacteria: QD-polymyxin B (PMB), which binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the Gram negative cell wall. Pure cultures of Gram positive and Gram negative strains were used to illustrate that QDs impart electron density and irradiation stability to the cells, and so no other preparation apart from QD labeling is required. The techniques were then extended to a set of recently characterized microbial communities of perennial cold springs in the Canadian High Arctic, which live in close association with unusual sulfur crystals. Using correlated confocal and and ESEM, we were able to image these organisms in living samples and illustrate their relationship to the minerals.

  11. Influences of Plant Species, Season and Location on Leaf Endophytic Bacterial Communities of Non-Cultivated Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Melcher, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are known to be associated endophytically with plants. Research on endophytic bacteria has identified their importance in food safety, agricultural production and phytoremediation. However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities and the forces that shape their compositions in non-cultivated plants are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we explored the diversity, community structure, and dynamics of endophytic bacteria in different plant species in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve of northern Oklahoma, USA. High throughput sequencing of amplified segments of bacterial rDNA from 81 samples collected at four sampling times from five plant species at four locations identified 335 distinct OTUs at 97% sequence similarity, representing 16 phyla. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the communities, followed by the phyla Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria. Bacteria from four classes of Proteobacteria were detected with Alphaproteobacteria as the dominant class. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that host plant species and collecting date had significant influences on the compositions of the leaf endophytic bacterial communities. The proportion of Alphaproteobacteria was much higher in the communities from Asclepias viridis than from other plant species and differed from month to month. The most dominant bacterial groups identified in LDA Effect Size analysis showed host-specific patterns, indicating mutual selection between host plants and endophytic bacteria and that leaf endophytic bacterial compositions were dynamic, varying with the host plant’s growing season in three distinct patterns. In summary, next generation sequencing has revealed variations in the taxonomic compositions of leaf endophytic bacterial communities dependent primarily on the nature of the plant host species. PMID:26974817

  12. Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre C. Rooney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural improvement of seminatural grasslands has been shown to result in changes to plant and microbial diversity, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. A microcosm approach was used to elucidate the effects of two key components of agricultural improvement (nitrogen addition and liming on ammonia-oxidising bacterial (AOB communities in an upland grassland soil. Plant species characteristic of unimproved and improved pastures (A. capillaris and L. perenne were planted in microcosms, and lime, nitrogen (NH4NO3, or lime plus nitrogen added. The AOB community was profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP of the amoA gene. AOB community structure was largely altered by NH4NO3 addition, rather than liming, although interactions between nitrogen addition and plant species were also evident. Results indicate that nitrogen addition drives shifts in the structure of key microbial communities in upland grassland soils, and that plant species may play a significant role in determining AOB community structure.

  13. Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural improvement of semi natural grasslands has been shown to result in changes to plant and microbial diversity, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. A microcosm approach was used to elucidate the effects of two key components of agricultural improvement (nitrogen addition and liming) on ammonia-oxidising bacterial (AOB) communities in an upland grassland soil. Plant species characteristic of unimproved and improved pastures (A. capillaries and L. perenne) were planted in microcosms, and lime, nitrogen (NH4NO3), or lime plus nitrogen added. The AOB community was profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of the amoA gene. AOB community structure was largely altered by NH4NO3 addition, rather than liming, although interactions between nitrogen addition and plant species were also evident. Results indicate that nitrogen addition drives shifts in the structure of key microbial communities in upland grassland soils, and that plant species may play a significant role in determining AOB community structure

  14. Bacterial community analysis of Tatsoi cultivated by hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ok K; Kim, Hun; Kim, Hyun J; Baker, Christopher A; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-07-01

    Tatsoi (Brassica narinosa) is a popular Asian salad green that is mostly consumed as a source of fresh produce. The purpose of this study was to assess the microbial diversity of Tatsoi cultivated in a hydroponic system and of its ecosystem. Tatsoi leaves, nutrient solution, and perlite/earth samples from a trickle feed system (TFS) and an ebb-and-flow system (EFS) were collected and their microbial communities were analyzed by pyrosequencing analysis. The results showed that most bacteria in the leaves from the TFS contained genus Sporosarcina (99.6%), while Rhizobium (60.4%) was dominant in the leaves from the EFS. Genus Paucibacter (18.21%) and Pelomonas (12.37%) were the most abundant microbiota in the nutrient solution samples of the TFS. In the EFS, the nutrient solution samples contained mostly genus Rhodococcus and Acinetobacter. Potential microbial transfer between the leaves and the ecosystem was observed in the EFS, while samples in the TFS were found to share only one species between the leaves, nutrient solution, and earth. Together, these results show that the bacterial populations in Tatsoi and in its ecosystem are highly diverse based on the cultivation system. PMID:27070460

  15. Metabolic and phylogenetic profile of bacterial community in Guishan coastal water (Pearl River Estuary), South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaojuan; Liu, Qing; Li, Zhuojia; He, Zhili; Gong, Yingxue; Cao, Yucheng; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-10-01

    Characteristics of a microbial community are important as they indicate the status of aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, the metabolic and phylogenetic profile of the bacterioplankton community in Guishan coastal water (Pearl River Estuary), South China Sea, at 12 sites (S1-S12) were explored by community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) with BIOLOG Eco-plate and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results showed that the core mariculture area (S6, S7 and S8) and the sites associating with human activity and sewage discharge (S11 and S12) had higher microbial metabolic capability and bacterial community diversity than others (S1-5, S9-10). Especially, the diversity index of S11 and S12 calculated from both CLPP and DGGE data ( H>3.2) was higher than that of others as sewage discharge may increase water nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient. The bacterial community structure of S6, S8, S11 and S12 was greatly influenced by total phosphorous, salinity and total nitrogen. Based on DGGE fingerprinting, proteobacteria, especially γ- and α-proteobacteria, were found dominant at all sites. In conclusion, the aquaculture area and wharf had high microbial metabolic capability. The structure and composition of bacterial community were closely related to the level of phosphorus, salinity and nitrogen.

  16. Dynamics of bacterial communities in two unpolluted soils after spiking with phenanthrene: soil type specific and common responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Chun eDing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Considering their key role for ecosystem processes, it is important to understand the response of microbial communities in unpolluted soils to pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. Phenanthrene, a model compound for PAH, was spiked to a Cambisol and a Luvisol soil. Total community DNA from phenanthrene-spiked and control soils collected on days 0, 21 and 63 were analyzed based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genefragments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprints of bacterial communities increasingly deviated with time between spiked and control soils. In taxon specific DGGE, significant responses of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria became only detectable after 63 days, while significant effects on Betaproteobacteria were detectable in both soils after 21 days. Comparison of the taxonomic distribution of bacteria in spiked and control soils on day 63 as revealed by pyrosequencing indicated soil type specific negative effects of phenanthrene on several taxa, many of them belonging to the Gamma-, Beta- or Deltaproteobacteria. Bacterial richness and evenness decreased in spiked soils. Despite the significant differences in the bacterial community structure between both soils on day 0, similar genera increased in relative abundance after PAH spiking, especially Sphingomonas and Polaromonas. However, this did not result in an increased overall similarity of the bacterial communities in both soils.

  17. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Ti...tle Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  18. Cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans and captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushida, Kazunari; Segawa, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Murata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Preservation of indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota is deemed to be critical for successful captive breeding of endangered wild animals, yet its biology is poorly understood. Here, we investigated cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans (Lagopus muta japonica) and compared them with those in Svalbard rock ptarmigans (L. m. hyperborea) in captivity. Ultra-deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated that the community structure of cecal microbiota in wild rock ptarmigans was remarkably different from that in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Fundamental differences between bacterial communities in the two groups of birds were detected at the phylum level. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes were the major phyla detected in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans, whereas Firmicutes alone occupied more than 80% of abundance in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Furthermore, unclassified genera of Coriobacteriaceae, Synergistaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Actinomycetaceae, Veillonellaceae and Clostridiales were the major taxa detected in wild individuals, whereas in zoo-reared birds, major genera were Ruminococcus, Blautia, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia. Zoo-reared birds seemed to lack almost all rock ptarmigan-specific bacteria in their intestine, which may explain the relatively high rate of pathogenic infections affecting them. We show evidence that preservation and reconstitution of indigenous cecal microflora are critical for successful ex situ conservation and future re-introduction plan for the Japanese rock ptarmigan. PMID:26468217

  19. Bacterial communities in full-scale wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial metabolism determines the effectiveness of biological treatment of wastewater. Therefore, it is important to define the relations between the species structure and the performance of full-scale installations. Although there is much laboratory data on microbial consortia, our understanding of dependencies between the microbial structure and operational parameters of full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is limited. This mini-review presents the types of microbial consortia in WWTP. Information is given on extracellular polymeric substances production as factor that is key for formation of spatial structures of microorganisms. Additionally, we discuss data on microbial groups including nitrifiers, denitrifiers, Anammox bacteria, and phosphate- and glycogen-accumulating bacteria in full-scale aerobic systems that was obtained with the use of molecular techniques, including high-throughput sequencing, to shed light on dependencies between the microbial ecology of biomass and the overall efficiency and functional stability of wastewater treatment systems. Sludge bulking in WWTPs is addressed, as well as the microbial composition of consortia involved in antibiotic and micropollutant removal. PMID:26931606

  20. Moonmilk deposits originate from specific bacterial communities in Altamira Cave (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Maria C; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2011-01-01

    The influence of bacterial communities on the formation of carbonate deposits such as moonmilk was investigated in Altamira Cave (Spain). The study focuses on the relationship between the bacterial communities at moonmilk deposits and those forming white colonizations, which develop sporadically throughout the cave. Using molecular fingerprinting of the metabolically active bacterial communities detected through RNA analyses, the development of white colonizations and moonmilk deposits showed similar bacterial profiles. White colonizations were able to raise the pH as a result of their metabolism (reaching in situ pH values above 8.5), which was proportional to the nutrient supply. Bacterial activity was analyzed by nanorespirometry showing higher metabolic activity from bacterial colonizations than uncolonized areas. Once carbonate deposits were formed, bacterial activity decreased drastically (down to 5.7% of the white colonization activity). This study reports on a specific type of bacterial community leading to moonmilk deposit formation in a cave environment as a result of bacterial metabolism. The consequence of this process is a macroscopic phenomenon of visible carbonate depositions and accumulation in cave environments. PMID:20717660

  1. Stratification and seasonal stability of diverse bacterial communities in a Pinus merkusii (pine) forest soil in central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krave, Agna S; Lin, Bin; Braster, Martin; Laverman, Anniet M; van Straalen, Nico M; Röling, Wilfred F M; van Verseveld, Henk W

    2002-06-01

    In Java, Indonesia, many nutrient-poor soils are intensively reforested with Pinus merkusii (pine). Information on nutrient cycles and microorganisms involved in these cycles will benefit the management of these important forests. Here, seasonal effects on the stratification of bacterial community structure in the soil profile of a tropical pine forest are described, and differences in bacterial communities are related to chemical and physical soil parameters. Culture-independent community profiles of litter, fragmented litter and mineral soil layers were made by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments. The community profiles of the different soil layers clustered separately, correlating with significant differences in organic matter content between the three layers. The bacterial communities appeared to be stable during the wet season of 1998. The drought in 1997, caused by the El Niño climatic effect, did not influence the bacterial communities in fragmentation and mineral soil, although moisture content and other soil parameters were markedly lower than in the wet season. However, communities in litter were influenced by drought. In the litter layer, the moisture content was significantly lower than in the fragmentation and mineral layers during the dry season. A clone library was made from a litter sample taken during the wet season. Partial sequencing of 74 clones and linking the DGGE banding positions of these clones to bands in the DGGE profile of the sample from which the clone library was derived showed considerable bacterial diversity. Alpha-proteobacteria (40.5% of the clones, of which 57% belonged to the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium group) and high-G+C content, Gram-positive bacteria (36.5%) dominated the clone library. PMID:12071981

  2. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Biodegradation Rates in Untreated and Oily Soils During PAH Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach taken in this study represents an attempt to address the possible selective effects of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on the bacterial community structure of an untreated garden soil (S) and a chronically contaminated oily soil (CS). Untreated and chronically hydrocarbon polluted soils, collected from Egypt were enriched in shaking flasks containing 50 mg/l anthracene as a sole source of carbon over a period of 15 days. Bacterial communities in each soil were profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the PCR amplified 16 S r DNA gene fragments after 0, 5, 10, and 15 days. Culture able biodegrading bacterial counts on minerals- Silica gel- Oil (MSD) plates as well as anthracene degradation for both soils were followed up at the same time intervals. Nine bacterial species were found to be dominant in the pristine soil before enrichment with the model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), eight of them disappeared after live days of enrichment with the domination of one new species. It stayed dominant in soil until 15 days - exposure to anthracene. Therefore it can be used as a bio marker for PAH pollution. The chronically contaminated soil revealed a remarkable increase in the diversity directly after 5 days exposure to PAH HPLC analysis of the extracted anthracene remained in the biodegradation flasks after different degradation periods revealed that a higher biodegradation rates were accomplished by the oily soil consortium rather than by the pristine one. Before exposure to PAH, counts of culture able biodegrading bacteria were found to be higher in the untreated soil rather than in the oily one. After exposure the situation has been a bit altered as the counts in the untreated soil revealed a temporary suppression with a prolongation of the time required for growth as a result of the hydrocarbon stress

  3. Bacterial communities in termite fungus combs are comprised of consistent gut deposits and contributions from the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otani, Saria; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren J;

    2016-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites (subfamily Macrotermitinae) mix plant forage with asexual spores of their plant-degrading fungal symbiont Termitomyces in their guts and deposit this blend in fungus comb structures, within which the plant matter is degraded. As Termitomyces grows, it produces nodules with...... asexual spores, which the termites feed on. Since all comb material passes through termite guts, it is inevitable that gut bacteria are also deposited in the comb, but it has remained unknown which bacteria are deposited and whether distinct comb bacterial communities are sustained. Using high......-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we explored the bacterial community compositions of 33 fungus comb samples from four termite species (three genera) collected at four South African geographic locations in 2011 and 2013. We identified 33 bacterial phyla, with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria...

  4. Plasmids spread very fast in heterogeneous bacterial communities.

    OpenAIRE

    Dionisio, Francisco; Matic, Ivan; Radman, Miroslav; Rodrigues, Olivia R; Taddei, François

    2002-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids can mediate gene transfer between bacterial taxa in diverse environments. The ability to donate the F-type conjugative plasmid R1 greatly varies among enteric bacteria due to the interaction of the system that represses sex-pili formations (products of finOP) of plasmids already harbored by a bacterial strain with those of the R1 plasmid. The presence of efficient donors in heterogeneous bacterial populations can accelerate plasmid transfer and can spread by several order...

  5. Procalcitonin for detecting community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Devi Gusmaiyanto; Finny Fitry Yani; Efrida Efrida; Rizanda Machmud

    2016-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children under five years of age. Pneumonia can be ofbacterial or viral origin. It is difficult to distinguish between thesetwo agents based on clinical manifestations, as well as radiologicaland laboratory examinations. Furthermore, bacterial cultures taketime to incubate and positive results may only be found in 10-30%of bacterial pneumonia cases. Procalcitonin has been used as amarker to distinguish etiologies, as bacterial...

  6. Identification of Bacterial Community Composition in Freshwater Aquaculture System Farming of Litopenaeus vannamei Reveals Distinct Temperature-Driven Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyi Tang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Change in temperature is often a major environmental factor in triggering waterborne disease outbreaks. Previous research has revealed temporal and spatial patterns of bacterial population in several aquatic ecosystems. To date, very little information is available on aquaculture environment. Here, we assessed environmental temperature effects on bacterial community composition in freshwater aquaculture system farming of Litopenaeus vannamei (FASFL. Water samples were collected over a one-year period, and aquatic bacteria were characterized by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Resulting DGGE fingerprints revealed a specific and dynamic bacterial population structure with considerable variation over the seasonal change, suggesting that environmental temperature was a key driver of bacterial population in the FASFL. Pyrosequencing data further demonstrated substantial difference in bacterial community composition between the water at higher (WHT and at lower (WLT temperatures in the FASFL. Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the highest abundant phyla in the FASFL, however, a large number of unclassified bacteria contributed the most to the observed variation in phylogenetic diversity. The WHT harbored remarkably higher diversity and richness in bacterial composition at genus and species levels when compared to the WLT. Some potential pathogenenic species were identified in both WHT and WLT, providing data in support of aquatic animal health management in the aquaculture industry.

  7. Characterization of bacterial communities in lithobionts and soil niches from Victoria Valley, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goethem, Marc W; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Valverde, Angel; Cary, Stephen C; Cowan, Don A

    2016-04-01

    Here we provide the first exploration of microbial diversity from three distinct Victoria Valley edaphic habitats, namely lithobionts (hypoliths, endoliths) and surface soils. Using a combination of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing we assess community structure and diversity patterns, respectively. Our analysis revealed that habitat type (endolithic versus hypolithic versus surface soils) significantly influenced bacterial community composition, even though dominant phyla such as Actinobacteria (41% of total reads) were common to all samples. Consistent with previous surveys in other Dry Valley ecosystems, we found that lithobionts were colonized by a few highly dominant phylotypes (such asGemmatimonasandLeptolyngbya). Our analyses also show that soil bacteria were more diverse and evenly distributed than initially expected based on previous evidence. In contrast to total bacteria, the distribution of Cyanobacteria was not strongly influenced by habitat type, although soil- and endolith-specific cyanobacterial lineages were found. The detection of cyanobacterial lineages in these habitats appears to be influenced by the dispersal of aquatic inocula from lacustrine communities or benthic mats which are abundant in Victoria Valley. Together, our results provide insights into the phylogenetic variation and community structure across niche habitats in Victoria Valley. PMID:26946500

  8. Short-term disturbance of a grazer has long-term effects on bacterial communities-Relevance of trophic interactions for recovery from pesticide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about the transfer of pesticide effects from higher trophic levels to bacterial communities by grazing. We investigated the effects of pulse exposure to the pyrethroid Fenvalerate on a grazer-prey system that comprised populations of Daphnia magna and bacterial communities. We observed the abundance and population size structure of D. magna by image analysis. Aquatic bacteria were monitored with regard to abundance (by cell staining) and community structure (by a 16S ribosomal RNA fingerprinting method). Shortly after exposure (2 days), the abundance of D. magna decreased. In contrast, the abundance of bacteria increased; in particular fast-growing bacteria proliferated, which changed the bacterial community structure. Long after pulse exposure (26 days), the size structure of D. magna was still affected and dominated by a cohort of small individuals. This cohort of small D. magna grazed actively on bacteria, which resulted in low bacterial abundance and low percentage of fast-growing bacteria. We identified grazing pressure as an important mediator for translating long-term pesticide effects from a grazer population on its prey. Hence, bacterial communities are potentially affected throughout the period that their grazers show pesticide effects concerning abundance or population size structure. Owing to interspecific interactions, the recovery of one species can only be assessed by considering its community context.

  9. Short-term disturbance of a grazer has long-term effects on bacterial communities-Relevance of trophic interactions for recovery from pesticide effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foit, Kaarina, E-mail: kaarina.foit@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of System Ecotoxicology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Chatzinotas, Antonis, E-mail: antonis.chatzinotas@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Liess, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.liess@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of System Ecotoxicology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Little is known about the transfer of pesticide effects from higher trophic levels to bacterial communities by grazing. We investigated the effects of pulse exposure to the pyrethroid Fenvalerate on a grazer-prey system that comprised populations of Daphnia magna and bacterial communities. We observed the abundance and population size structure of D. magna by image analysis. Aquatic bacteria were monitored with regard to abundance (by cell staining) and community structure (by a 16S ribosomal RNA fingerprinting method). Shortly after exposure (2 days), the abundance of D. magna decreased. In contrast, the abundance of bacteria increased; in particular fast-growing bacteria proliferated, which changed the bacterial community structure. Long after pulse exposure (26 days), the size structure of D. magna was still affected and dominated by a cohort of small individuals. This cohort of small D. magna grazed actively on bacteria, which resulted in low bacterial abundance and low percentage of fast-growing bacteria. We identified grazing pressure as an important mediator for translating long-term pesticide effects from a grazer population on its prey. Hence, bacterial communities are potentially affected throughout the period that their grazers show pesticide effects concerning abundance or population size structure. Owing to interspecific interactions, the recovery of one species can only be assessed by considering its community context.

  10. Short-term disturbance of a grazer has long-term effects on bacterial communities--relevance of trophic interactions for recovery from pesticide effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foit, Kaarina; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Liess, Matthias

    2010-08-15

    Little is known about the transfer of pesticide effects from higher trophic levels to bacterial communities by grazing. We investigated the effects of pulse exposure to the pyrethroid Fenvalerate on a grazer-prey system that comprised populations of Daphnia magna and bacterial communities. We observed the abundance and population size structure of D. magna by image analysis. Aquatic bacteria were monitored with regard to abundance (by cell staining) and community structure (by a 16S ribosomal RNA fingerprinting method). Shortly after exposure (2 days), the abundance of D. magna decreased. In contrast, the abundance of bacteria increased; in particular fast-growing bacteria proliferated, which changed the bacterial community structure. Long after pulse exposure (26 days), the size structure of D. magna was still affected and dominated by a cohort of small individuals. This cohort of small D. magna grazed actively on bacteria, which resulted in low bacterial abundance and low percentage of fast-growing bacteria. We identified grazing pressure as an important mediator for translating long-term pesticide effects from a grazer population on its prey. Hence, bacterial communities are potentially affected throughout the period that their grazers show pesticide effects concerning abundance or population size structure. Owing to interspecific interactions, the recovery of one species can only be assessed by considering its community context. PMID:20554058

  11. Temporal dynamics of sediment bacterial communities in monospecific stands of Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Sousa, A I; Lillebø, A I; Queiroga, H; Gomes, N C M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we used 16S rRNA barcoded pyrosequencing to investigate to what extent monospecific stands of different salt marsh plant species (Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima), sampling site and temporal variation affect sediment bacterial communities. We also used a bioinformatics tool, PICRUSt, to predict metagenome gene functional content. Our results showed that bacterial community composition from monospecific stands of both plant species varied temporally, but both host plant species maintained compositionally distinct communities of bacteria. Juncus sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Rhodospirillales, NB1-j and Ignavibacteriales, while Spartina sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Anaerolineae, Synechococcophycidae, Desulfobacterales, SHA-20 and Rhodobacterales. The differences in composition and higher taxon abundance between the sediment bacterial communities of stands of both plant species may be expected to affect overall metabolic diversity. In line with this expectation, there were also differences in the predicted enrichment of selected metabolic pathways. In particular, bacterial communities of Juncus sediment were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the degradation of various (xenobiotic) compounds. Bacterial communities of Spartina sediment in turn were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the biosynthesis of various bioactive compounds. Our study highlights the differences in composition and predicted functions of sediment-associated bacterial communities from two different salt marsh plant species. Loss of salt marsh habitat may thus be expected to both adversely affect microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and have consequences for environmental processes such as nutrient cycling and pollutant remediation. PMID:27061465

  12. Structural correlations in bacterial metabolic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lizana Ludvig; Gerlee Philip; Bernhardsson Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Evolution of metabolism occurs through the acquisition and loss of genes whose products acts as enzymes in metabolic reactions, and from a presumably simple primordial metabolism the organisms living today have evolved complex and highly variable metabolisms. We have studied this phenomenon by comparing the metabolic networks of 134 bacterial species with known phylogenetic relationships, and by studying a neutral model of metabolic network evolution. Results We consider t...

  13. Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Communities Along an Altitudinal Gradient in Alpine Forest Soils: What Are the Driving Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, José A; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    Shifts in soil microbial communities over altitudinal gradients and the driving factors are poorly studied. Their elucidation is indispensable to gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of ecosystems to global climate change. Here, we investigated soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities at four Alpine forest sites representing a climosequence, over an altitudinal gradient from 545 to 2000 m above sea level (asl), regarding abundance and diversity by using qPCR and Illumina sequencing, respectively. Archaeal community was dominated by Thaumarchaeota, and no significant shifts were detected in abundance or community composition with altitude. The relative bacterial abundance increased at higher altitudes, which was related to increasing levels of soil organic matter and nutrients with altitude. Shifts in bacterial richness and diversity as well as community structure (comprised basically of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) significantly correlated with several environmental and soil chemical factors, especially soil pH. The site at the lowest altitude harbored the highest bacterial richness and diversity, although richness/diversity community properties did not show a monotonic decrease along the gradient. The relative size of fungal community also increased with altitude and its composition comprised Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Changes in fungal richness/diversity and community structure were mainly governed by pH and C/N, respectively. The variation of the predominant bacterial and fungal classes over the altitudinal gradient was the result of the environmental and soil chemical factors prevailing at each site. PMID:26961712

  14. Development of bacterial community composition in the topsoil during spontaneous succession on mine deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Michaela; Kopecký, J.; Marečková, M.; Kyselková, M.; Elhottová, Dana; Baldrian, Petr

    Uppsala : Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 2009. s. 347. [BAGECO 10. Bacterial Genetics and Ecology - Coexisting on a Changing Planet. 15.06.2009-19.06.2009, Uppsala] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : bacterial communities * spontaneous succession * mine deposits Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Adriani

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brai

  16. Salt marsh sediment characteristics as key regulators on the efficiency of hydrocarbons bioremediation by Juncus maritimus rhizospheric bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Almeida, C Marisa R; Magalhães, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Mucha, Ana P

    2015-01-01

    Mitigation of petroleum hydrocarbons was investigated during a 5-month greenhouse experiment, to assess the rhizoremediation (RR) potential in sediments with different characteristics colonized by Juncus maritimus, a salt marsh plant commonly found in temperate estuaries. Furthermore, the efficiency of two bioremediation treatments namely biostimulation (BS) by the addition of nutrients, and bioaugmentation (BA) by addition of indigenous microorganisms, was tested in combination with RR. The effect of the distinct treatments on hydrocarbon degradation, root biomass weight, and bacterial community structure was assessed. Our result showed higher potential for hydrocarbon degradation (evaluated by total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis) in coarse rhizosediments with low organic matter (OM), than rhizosediments with high OM, and small size particles. Moreover, the bacterial community structure was shaped according to the rhizosediment characteristics, highlighting the importance of specific microbe-particle associations to define the structure of rhizospheric bacterial communities, rather than external factors, such as hydrocarbon contamination or the applied treatments. The potential for hydrocarbon RR seems to depend on root system development and bacterial diversity, since biodegradation efficiencies were positively related with these two parameters. Treatments with higher root biomass, and concomitantly with higher bacterial diversity yielded higher hydrocarbon degradation. Moreover, BS and BA did not enhance hydrocarbons RR. In fact, it was observed that higher nutrient availability might interfere with root growth and negatively influence hydrocarbon degradation performance. Therefore, our results suggested that to conduct appropriate hydrocarbon bioremediation strategies, the effect of sediment characteristics on root growth/exploration should be taken into consideration, a feature not explored in previous studies. Furthermore, strategies aiming for the recovery

  17. Potential use of bacterial community succession for estimating post-mortem interval as revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juanjuan; Fu, Xiaoliang; Liao, Huidan; Hu, Zhenyu; Long, Lingling; Yan, Weitao; Ding, Yanjun; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Guo, Yadong; Yan, Jie; Chang, Yunfeng; Cai, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition is a complex process involving the interaction of both biotic and abiotic factors. Microbes play a critical role in the process of carrion decomposition. In this study, we analysed bacterial communities from live rats and rat remains decomposed under natural conditions, or excluding sarcosaphagous insect interference, in China using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. A total of 1,394,842 high-quality sequences and 1,938 singleton operational taxonomic units were obtained. Bacterial communities showed notable variation in relative abundance and became more similar to each other across body sites during the decomposition process. As decomposition progressed, Proteobacteria (mostly Gammaproteobacteria) became the predominant phylum in both the buccal cavity and rectum, while Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the mouth and rectum, respectively, gradually decreased. In particular, the arrival and oviposition of sarcosaphagous insects had no obvious influence on bacterial taxa composition, but accelerated the loss of biomass. In contrast to the rectum, the microbial community structure in the buccal cavity of live rats differed considerably from that of rats immediately after death. Although this research indicates that bacterial communities can be used as a "microbial clock" for the estimation of post-mortem interval, further work is required to better understand this concept. PMID:27052375

  18. Humpback Whale Populations Share a Core Skin Bacterial Community: Towards a Health Index for Marine Mammals?

    OpenAIRE

    Apprill, Amy; Robbins, Jooke; Eren, A. Murat; Pack, Adam A.; Reveillaud, Julie; Mattila, David; Moore, Michael; Niemeyer, Misty; Kathleen M T Moore; Mincer, Tracy J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are now well regarded for their important role in mammalian health. The microbiology of skin – a unique interface between the host and environment - is a major research focus in human health and skin disorders, but is less explored in other mammals. Here, we report on a cross-population study of the skin-associated bacterial community of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), and examine the potential for a core bacterial community and its variability with host (endogenous) or geo...

  19. Genetic difference but functional similarity among fish gut bacterial communities through molecular and biochemical fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Mouchet, M.A.; Bouvier, C.; Bouvier, T.; Troussellier, Marc; Escalas, A.; Mouillot, D.

    2012-01-01

    Considering the major involvement of gut microflora in the digestive function of various macro-organisms, bacterial communities inhabiting fish guts may be the main actors of organic matter degradation by fish. Nevertheless, the extent and the sources of variability in the degradation potential of gut bacterial communities are largely overlooked. Using Biolog Ecoplate (TM) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), we explored functional (i.e. the ability to degrade organic matter) a...

  20. Rumen bacterial communities can be acclimated faster to high concentrate diets than currently implemented feedlot programs

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, C L; Schneider, C.J.; Erickson, G.E.; MacDonald, J C; Fernando, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Recent studies have demonstrated RAMP ®, a complete starter feed, to have beneficial effects for animal performance. However, how RAMP may elicit such responses is unknown. To understand if RAMP adaptation results in changes in the rumen bacterial community that can potentially affect animal performance, we investigated the dynamics of rumen bacterial community composition in corn‐adapted and RAMP‐adapted cattle. Methods and Results During gradual acclimation of the rumen bacter...

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Composition of Intestinal Bacterial Communities in Dastarcus helophoroides Fed Different Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Wei; He, Cai; Cui, Jun; Wang, Hai-dong; Li, Meng-Lou

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) larvae and adults was assayed by PCR-DGGE to determine whether different artificial diets could influence these bacterial communities. Two diets were used for feeding the larvae and four for the adults. Escherichia, Desemzia, Staphylococcus, Asticcacaulis, Cellvibrio, Aurantimonas, and Planomicrobium were isolated from the gut of the adults, with Escherichia and Staphylococ...

  2. Bacterial communities associated with white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) larvae at early developmental stages

    OpenAIRE

    ANTONIUS SUWANTO; YULIN LESTARI; MAGGY TENNAWIJAYA SUHARTONO; ARTINI PANGASTUTI

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) larvae at early developmental stages. Biodiversitas 11 (2): 65-68.Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used to monitor the dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with early developmental stages of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) larvae. Samples for analysis were egg, hatching nauplii, 24 hours old nauplii, and 48 hours old nauplii which were collected from one cycle of production ...

  3. Culture dependent and independent analysis of bacterial communities associated with commercial salad leaf vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Colin R.; Randolph, Kevin C; Osborn, Shelly L; Heather L. Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants harbor a diverse bacterial community, both as epiphytes on the plant surface and as endophytes within plant tissue. While some plant-associated bacteria act as plant pathogens or promote plant growth, others may be human pathogens. The aim of the current study was to determine the bacterial community composition of organic and conventionally grown leafy salad vegetables at the point of consumption using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Results Total cu...

  4. Community structure and criminal victimization

    OpenAIRE

    Anzick, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    This research has attempted to better understand property crime victimization by studying the important role of community structures, while controlling for the following demographic variables: age, gender, race, and income. Three different types of analyses were used: (1) bivariate analysis; (2) multivariate analysis, and (3) path analysis. Bivariate analysis was used in order to gain a better understanding of the following zero-order relationships: (1) the relationship between...

  5. Bacterial communities in women with bacterial vaginosis: high resolution phylogenetic analyses reveal relationships of microbiota to clinical criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis (BV is a common condition that is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes and is characterized by poorly understood changes in the vaginal microbiota. We sought to describe the composition and diversity of the vaginal bacterial biota in women with BV using deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with species-level taxonomic identification. We investigated the associations between the presence of individual bacterial species and clinical diagnostic characteristics of BV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR and pyrosequencing were performed on vaginal swabs from 220 women with and without BV. BV was assessed by Amsel's clinical criteria and confirmed by Gram stain. Taxonomic classification was performed using phylogenetic placement tools that assigned 99% of query sequence reads to the species level. Women with BV had heterogeneous vaginal bacterial communities that were usually not dominated by a single taxon. In the absence of BV, vaginal bacterial communities were dominated by either Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus iners. Leptotrichia amnionii and Eggerthella sp. were the only two BV-associated bacteria (BVABs significantly associated with each of the four Amsel's criteria. Co-occurrence analysis revealed the presence of several sub-groups of BVABs suggesting metabolic co-dependencies. Greater abundance of several BVABs was observed in Black women without BV. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The human vaginal bacterial biota is heterogeneous and marked by greater species richness and diversity in women with BV; no species is universally present. Different bacterial species have different associations with the four clinical criteria, which may account for discrepancies often observed between Amsel and Nugent (Gram stain diagnostic criteria. Several BVABs exhibited race-dependent prevalence when analyzed in separate groups by BV status which may contribute to increased

  6. The impact of structure dimensions on initial bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Ralf; Günther, Denise; Friedrichs, Jens; Rößler, Florian; Lasagni, Andrés; Werner, Carsten

    2016-07-21

    Substrate topography can have profound effects on initial bacterial adhesion during biofilm formation. We applied Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli cells onto periodically structured substrates with different structure dimensions, structure types and wetting properties. We found a strong dependence of cell retention on the structure dimensions of the applied substrates. Periodicities in the range of the cell size increased, whereas smaller periodicities decreased cell retention, independent of contact time (minutes to hours) and hydrophobicity. These novel insights on the role of surface topography on bacterial retention might facilitate the development of non-fouling surfaces in the future. PMID:27232637

  7. Bacterial community composition of a wastewater treatment system reliant on N{sub 2} fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, N.M.; Bowers, T.H.; Lloyd-Jones, G. [Scion, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    2008-05-15

    The temporal stability and change of the dominant phylogenetic groups of the domain bacteria were studied in a model plant-based industrial wastewater treatment system showing high levels of organic carbon removal supported by high levels of N{sub 2} fixation. Community profiles were obtained through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and cloning of 16S rRNA amplicons followed by sequencing. Bacterial community profiles showed that ten common terminal restriction fragments made up approximately 50% of the measured bacterial community. As much as 42% of the measured bacterial community could be monitored by using quantitative PCR and primers that targeted three dominant operational taxonomic units. Despite changes in wastewater composition and dissolved oxygen levels, the bacterial community composition appeared stable and was dominated by {alpha}-Proteobacteria and {beta}-Proteobacteria, with a lesser amount of the highly diverse bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes. A short period of considerable change in the bacterial community composition did not appear to affect treatment performance indicating functional redundancy in this treatment system. (orig.)

  8. Effect of Metal-Rich Sewage Sludge Application on the Bacterial Communities of Grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Barkay, Tamar; Tripp, Susan C.; Betty H. Olson

    1985-01-01

    The effect of long-term application of heavy metal-laden sewage sludge on the total heterotrophic aerobic and the cadmium-resistant soil bacterial communities was studied. Gram-positive bacteria were completely absent from resistant communities. These findings suggest that this group is highly susceptible to Cd. Shannon's diversity indices estimated for total communities did not reveal negative effects on the communities that developed in the presence of sludge. However, Cd-resistant communit...

  9. Ecological structuring of bacterial and archaeal taxa in surface ocean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Iversen, Morten H; Hankeln, Wolfgang; Kottmann, Renzo; Quast, Christian; Glöckner, Frank O

    2012-08-01

    The Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) expedition is currently the largest and geographically most comprehensive metagenomic dataset, including samples from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. This study makes use of the wide range of environmental conditions and habitats encompassed within the GOS sites in order to investigate the ecological structuring of bacterial and archaeal taxon ranks. Community structures based on taxonomically classified 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragments at phylum, class, order, family, and genus rank levels were examined using multivariate statistical analysis, and the results were inspected in the context of oceanographic environmental variables and structured habitat classifications. At all taxon rank levels, community structures of neritic, oceanic, estuarine biomes, as well as other exotic biomes (salt marsh, lake, mangrove), were readily distinguishable from each other. A strong structuring of the communities with chlorophyll a concentration and a weaker yet significant structuring with temperature and salinity were observed. Furthermore, there were significant correlations between community structures and habitat classification. These results were used for further investigation of one-to-one relationships between taxa and environment and provided indications for ecological preferences shaped by primary production for both cultured and uncultured bacterial and archaeal clades. PMID:22416918

  10. Ultradeep 16S rRNA sequencing analysis of geographically similar but diverse unexplored marine samples reveal varied bacterial community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairmandurai Aravindraja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial community composition in the marine environment differs from one geographical location to another. Reports that delineate the bacterial diversity of different marine samples from geographically similar location are limited. The present study aims to understand whether the bacterial community compositions from different marine samples harbour similar bacterial diversity since these are geographically related to each other. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, 16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. A total of 22.44 million paired end reads were obtained from the metagenomic DNA of Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater and the epibacterial DNA of Seaweed and Seagrass. Diversity index analysis revealed that Marine sediment has the highest bacterial diversity and the least bacterial diversity was observed in Rhizosphere sediment. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant taxa present in all the marine samples. Nearly 62-71% of rare species were identified in all the samples and most of these rare species were unique to a particular sample. Further taxonomic assignment at the phylum and genus level revealed that the bacterial community compositions differ among the samples. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that supports the fact that, bacterial community composition is specific for specific samples irrespective of its similar geographical location. Existence of specific bacterial community for each sample may drive overall difference in bacterial structural composition of each sample. Further studies like whole metagenomic sequencing will throw more insights to the key stone players and its interconnecting metabolic pathways. In addition, this is one of the very few reports that depicts the unexplored bacterial diversity of marine samples (Marine sediment, Rhizosphere sediment, Seawater and the host associated

  11. Inter- and Intraspecific Variations of Bacterial Communities Associated with Marine Sponges from San Juan Island, Washington

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2009-04-10

    This study attempted to assess whether conspecific or congeneric sponges around San Juan Island, Washington, harbor specific bacterial communities. We used a combination of culture-independent DNA fingerprinting techniques (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) and culture-dependent approaches. The results indicated that the bacterial communities in the water column consisted of more diverse bacterial ribotypes than and were drastically different from those associated with the sponges. High levels of similarity in sponge-associated bacterial communities were found only in Myxilla incrustans and Haliclona rufescens, while the bacterial communities in Halichondria panicea varied substantially among sites. Certain terminal restriction fragments or DGGE bands were consistently obtained for different individuals of M. incrustans and H. rufescens collected from different sites, suggesting that there are stable or even specific associations of certain bacteria in these two sponges. However, no specific bacterial associations were found for H. panicea or for any one sponge genus. Sequencing of nine DGGE bands resulted in recovery of seven sequences that best matched the sequences of uncultured Proteobacteria. Three of these sequences fell into the sponge-specific sequence clusters previously suggested. An uncultured alphaproteobacterium and a culturable Bacillus sp. were found exclusively in all M. incrustans sponges, while an uncultured gammaproteobacterium was unique to H. rufescens. In contrast, the cultivation approach indicated that sponges contained a large proportion of Firmicutes, especially Bacillus, and revealed large variations in the culturable bacterial communities associated with congeneric and conspecific sponges. This study revealed sponge species-specific but not genus- or site-specific associations between sponges and bacterial communities and emphasized the importance of using a combination

  12. Comparison of bacterial and archaeal communities in depth-resolved zones in an LNAPL body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianni-Renno, Maria; Akhbari, Daria; Olson, Mitchell R; Byrne, Adam P; Lefèvre, Emilie; Zimbron, Julio; Lyverse, Mark; Sale, Thomas C; De Long, Susan K

    2016-04-01

    Advances in our understanding of the microbial ecology at sites impacted by light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are needed to drive development of optimized bioremediation technologies, support longevity models, and develop culture-independent molecular tools. In this study, depth-resolved characterization of geochemical parameters and microbial communities was conducted for a shallow hydrocarbon-impacted aquifer. Four distinct zones were identified based on microbial community structure and geochemical data: (i) an aerobic, low-contaminant mass zone at the top of the vadose zone; (ii) a moderate to high-contaminant mass, low-oxygen to anaerobic transition zone in the middle of the vadose zone; (iii) an anaerobic, high-contaminant mass zone spanning the bottom of the vadose zone and saturated zone; and (iv) an anaerobic, low-contaminant mass zone below the LNAPL body. Evidence suggested that hydrocarbon degradation is mediated by syntrophic fermenters and methanogens in zone III. Upward flux of methane likely contributes to promoting anaerobic conditions in zone II by limiting downward flux of oxygen as methane and oxygen fronts converge at the top of this zone. Observed sulfate gradients and microbial communities suggested that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis both contribute to hydrocarbon degradation in zone IV. Pyrosequencing revealed that Syntrophus- and Methanosaeta-related species dominate bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively, in the LNAPL body below the water table. Observed phylotypes were linked with in situ anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in LNAPL-impacted soils. PMID:26691516

  13. Two different bacterial community types are linked with the low-methane emission trait in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kittelmann

    Full Text Available The potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4 is produced in the rumens of ruminant animals from hydrogen produced during microbial degradation of ingested feed. The natural animal-to-animal variation in the amount of CH4 emitted and the heritability of this trait offer a means for reducing CH4 emissions by selecting low-CH4 emitting animals for breeding. We demonstrate that differences in rumen microbial community structure are linked to high and low CH4 emissions in sheep. Bacterial community structures in 236 rumen samples from 118 high- and low-CH4 emitting sheep formed gradual transitions between three ruminotypes. Two of these (Q and S were linked to significantly lower CH4 yields (14.4 and 13.6 g CH4/kg dry matter intake [DMI], respectively than the third type (H; 15.9 g CH4/kg DMI; p<0.001. Low-CH4 ruminotype Q was associated with a significantly lower ruminal acetate to propionate ratio (3.7±0.4 than S (4.4±0.7; p<0.001 and H (4.3±0.5; p<0.001, and harbored high relative abundances of the propionate-producing Quinella ovalis. Low-CH4 ruminotype S was characterized by lactate- and succinate-producing Fibrobacter spp., Kandleria vitulina, Olsenella spp., Prevotella bryantii, and Sharpea azabuensis. High-CH4 ruminotype H had higher relative abundances of species belonging to Ruminococcus, other Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Catabacteriaceae, Coprococcus, other Clostridiales, Prevotella, other Bacteroidales, and Alphaproteobacteria, many of which are known to form significant amounts of hydrogen. We hypothesize that lower CH4 yields are the result of bacterial communities that ferment ingested feed to relatively less hydrogen, which results in less CH4 being formed.

  14. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Inceoğlu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize the structure of bacterial communities in a field cropped with potato. The rhizospheres of six cultivars denoted Aveka, Aventra, Karnico, Modena, Premiere and Desiree, at three growth stages (young, flowering and senescence were examined, in addition to corresponding bulk soils. Around 350,000 sequences were obtained (5,700 to 38,000 per sample. Across all samples, rank abundance distributions best fitted the power law model, which indicates a community composed of a few highly dominant species next to numerous rare species. Grouping of the sequences showed that members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, next to as-yet-unclassified bacteria, dominated. Other groups that were consistently found, albeit at lower abundance, were Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Principal components analyses revealed that rhizosphere samples were significantly different from corresponding bulk soil in each growth stage. Furthermore, cultivar effects were found in the young plant stage, whereas these became insignificant in the flowering and senescence stages. Besides, an effect of time of season was observed for both rhizosphere and bulk soils. The analyzed rhizosphere samples of the potato cultivars were grouped into two groups, in accordance with the allocation of carbon to starch in their tubers, i.e. Aveka, Aventra and Karnico (high versus Premiere and Desiree (low and thus replicates per group were established. CONCLUSIONS: Across all potato cultivars, the young plant stages revealed cultivar-dependent bacterial community structures, which disappeared in the flowering and senescence stages. Furthermore, Pseudomonas, Beta-, Alpha- and

  15. 2,4-D impact on bacterial communities, and the activity and genetic potential of 2,4-D degrading communities in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonod, Laure Vieublé; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Chenu, Claire

    2006-12-01

    The key role of telluric microorganisms in pesticide degradation is well recognized but the possible relationships between the biodiversity of soil microbial communities and their functions still remain poorly documented. If microorganisms influence the fate of pesticides, pesticide application may reciprocally affect soil microorganisms. The objective of our work was to estimate the impact of 2,4-D application on the genetic structure of bacterial communities and the 2,4-D-degrading genetic potential in relation to 2,4-D mineralization. Experiments combined isotope measurements with molecular analyses. The impact of 2,4-D on soil bacterial populations was followed with ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. The 2,4-D degrading genetic potential was estimated by real-time PCR targeted on tfdA sequences coding an enzyme specifically involved in 2,4-D mineralization. The genetic structure of bacterial communities was significantly modified in response to 2,4-D application, but only during the intense phase of 2,4-D biodegradation. This effect disappeared 7 days after the treatment. The 2,4-D degrading genetic potential increased rapidly following 2,4-D application. There was a concomitant increase between the tfdA copy number and the 14C microbial biomass. The maximum of tfdA sequences corresponded to the maximum rate of 2,4-D mineralization. In this soil, 2,4-D degrading microbial communities seem preferentially to use the tfd pathway to degrade 2,4-D. PMID:17117994

  16. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  17. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C Blasiak

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  18. Analysis of the distal gut bacterial community by 454-pyrosequencing in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahal, Ousama; Valdes, Eduardo V; McBride, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the structure of the fecal bacterial community of five giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) at Disney's Animal Kingdom, FL. Fecal genomic DNA was extracted and variable regions 1-3 of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and then sequenced. The MOTHUR software-program was used for sequence processing, diversity analysis, and classification. A total of 181,689 non-chimeric bacterial sequences were obtained, and average number of sequences per sample was 36,338 -± 8,818. Sequences were assigned to 8,284 operational taxonomic units (OTU) with 95% of genetic similarity, which included 2,942 singletons (36%). Number of OTUs per sample was 2,554 ± 264. Samples were normalized and alpha (intra-sample) diversity indices; Chao1, Inverse Simpson, Shannon, and coverage were estimated as 3,712 ± 430, 116 -± 70, 6.1 ± 0.4, and 96 ± 1%, respectively. Thirteen phyla were detected and Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes were the most dominant phyla (more than 2% of total sequences), and constituted 92% of the classified sequences, 66% of total sequences, and 43% of total OTUs. Our computation predicted that three OTUs were likely to be present in at least three of the five samples at greater than 1% dominance rate. These OTUs were Treponema, an unidentified OTU belonging to the order Bacteroidales, and Ruminococcus. This report was the first to characterize the bacterial community of the distal gut in giraffes utilizing fecal samples, and it demonstrated that the distal gut of giraffes is likely a potential reservoir for a number of undocumented species of bacteria. Zoo Biol. 35:42-50, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26584008

  19. Effect of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) treatment on the composition and function of the bacterial community in the sponge Haliclona cymaeformis.

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Ren-Mao

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges play important roles in benthic environments and are sensitive to environmental stresses. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants since the 1970s and are cytotoxic and genotoxic to organisms. In the present study, we studied the short-period effect of PBDE-47 (2,2\\',4,4\\'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) treatment on the community structure and functional gene composition of the bacterial community inhabiting the marine sponge Haliclona cymaeformis. Our results showed that the bacterial community shifted from an autotrophic bacteria-dominated community to a heterotrophic bacteria-dominated community in response to PBDE-47 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. A potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) was dominant (>80% in abundance) in the untreated sponge. However, exposure to a high concentration (1 μg/L) of PBDE-47 caused a substantial decrease in the potential symbiont and an enrichment of heterotrophic bacteria like Clostridium. A metagenomic analysis showed a selective effect of the high concentration treatment on the functional gene composition of the enriched heterotrophic bacteria, revealing an enrichment for the functions responsible for DNA repair, multidrug efflux pumping, and bacterial chemotaxis and motility. This study demonstrated that PBDE-47 induced a shift in the composition of the community and functional genes in the sponge-associated bacterial community, revealing the selective effect of PBDE-47 treatment on the functions of the bacterial community in the microenvironment of the sponge.

  20. Effect of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE treatment on the composition and function of the bacterial community in the sponge Haliclona cymaeformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renmao eTian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges play important roles in benthic environments and are sensitive to environmental stresses. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs have been widely used as flame retardants since the 1970s and are cytotoxic and genotoxic to organisms. In the present study, we studied the short-period effect of PBDE-47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether treatment on the community structure and functional gene composition of the bacterial community inhabiting the marine sponge Haliclona cymaeformis. Our results showed that the bacterial community shifted from an autotrophic bacteria-dominated community to a heterotrophic bacteria-dominated community in response to PBDE-47 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. A potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB was dominant (>80% in abundance in the untreated sponge. However, exposure to a high concentration (1 µg/L of PBDE-47 caused a substantial decrease in the potential symbiont and an enrichment of heterotrophic bacteria like Clostridium. A metagenomic analysis showed a selective effect of the high concentration treatment on the functional gene composition of the enriched heterotrophic bacteria, revealing an enrichment for the functions responsible for DNA repair, multidrug efflux pumping, and bacterial chemotaxis and motility. This study demonstrated that PBDE-47 induced a shift in the composition of the community and functional genes in the sponge-associated bacterial community, revealing the selective effect of PBDE-47 treatment on the functions of the bacterial community in the microenvironment of the sponge.

  1. Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25°C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken

  2. First report of bacterial community from a Bat Guano using Illumina next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit De Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available V4 hypervariable region of 16S rDNA was analyzed for identifying the bacterial communities present in Bat Guano from the unexplored cave — Pnahkyndeng, Meghalaya, Northeast India. Metagenome comprised of 585,434 raw Illumina sequences with a 59.59% G+C content. A total of 416,490 preprocessed reads were clustered into 1282 OTUs (operational taxonomical units comprising of 18 bacterial phyla. The taxonomic profile showed that the guano bacterial community is dominated by Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota which account for 70.73% of all sequence reads and 43.83% of all OTUs. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI under the accession no. SRP051094. This study is the first to characterize Bat Guano bacterial community using next-generation sequencing approach.

  3. Bacterial communities associated with the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Camille; Breitbart, Mya

    2012-10-01

    Residing in a phylum of their own, ctenophores are gelatinous zooplankton that drift through the ocean's water column. Although ctenophores are known to be parasitized by a variety of eukaryotes, no studies have examined their bacterial associates. This study describes the bacterial communities associated with the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and its natural predator Beroe ovata in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Investigations using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that ctenophore bacterial communities were distinct from the surrounding water. In addition, each ctenophore genus contained a unique microbiota. Ctenophore samples contained fewer bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) by T-RFLP and lower diversity communities by 16S rRNA gene sequencing than the water column. Both ctenophore genera contained sequences related to bacteria previously described in marine invertebrates, and sequences similar to a sea anemone pathogen were abundant in B. ovata. Temporal sampling revealed that the ctenophore-associated bacterial communities varied over time, with no single OTU detected at all time points. This is the first report of distinct and dynamic bacterial communities associated with ctenophores, suggesting that these microbial consortia may play important roles in ctenophore ecology. Future work needs to elucidate the functional roles and mode of acquisition of these bacteria. PMID:22571334

  4. Bacterial community in sclerotia of Cenococcum species and soil in sub-alpine forest, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonoyama, Y.; Narisawa, K.; Ohta, H.; Watanabe, M.

    2009-04-01

    Species of Cenococcum, ectomycorrhizal fungi, may be particularly abundant in cold- or nutrient-stressed habitats. The fungus is easily recognized by its jet-black hyphae, and distinct compact masses of fungal mycelium called sclerotia. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and can provide sufficient inoculums for several years. The purpose of this study is to investigate bacterial community inside sclerotia, with an interest on contribution of sclerotia to microbial diversity in rhizosphere. To investigate bacterial community inside of the fungal sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from sub-alpine forest soil in central Japan. Furthermore, three sclerotium grains were applied to investigate internal bacteria community by culture method. The isolated bacterial strains were then proceeded to determine their 16S rDNA partial sequences. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes with DNA from the sclerotia was Acidobacteria in both sclerotia and soil. Bacterial community of sclerotia showed higher diversity compared to soil. On the contrary, bacterial flora isolated from single sclerotium differed each other. Additionally, the bacterial community was composed by limited species of related genus.

  5. Three common metal contaminants of urban runoff (Zn, Cu and Pb) accumulate in freshwater biofilm and modify embedded bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the absorption rates of zinc, copper and lead in freshwater biofilm and assessed whether biofilm bacterial populations are affected by exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals in flow chamber microcosms. Metals were rapidly accumulated by the biofilm and then retained for at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. Changes in bacterial populations were assessed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Significant differences in bacterial community structure occurred within only three days of exposure to metals and remained detectable at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. The rapid uptake of stormwater-associated metals and their retention in the biofilm highlight the potential role of biofilms in the transfer of metals to organisms at higher trophic levels. The sensitivity of stream biofilm bacterial populations to metal exposure supports their use as an indicator of stream ecological health. - The rapid accumulation of metals in biofilms and their impact on bacterial communities provide new insights into how these contaminants affect freshwater ecosystems.

  6. Invasive lionfish harbor a different external bacterial community than native Bahamian fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. L.; Olson, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The introduction and subsequent spread of lionfish into the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea has become a worldwide conservation issue. These highly successful invaders may also be capable of introducing non-native microorganisms to the invaded regions. This study compared the bacterial communities associated with lionfish external tissue to those of native Bahamian fishes and ambient water. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses demonstrated that lionfish bacterial communities were significantly different than those associated with three native Bahamian fishes. Additionally, all fishes harbored distinct bacterial communities from the ambient bacterioplankton. Analysis of bacterial clone libraries from invasive lionfish and native squirrelfish indicated that lionfish communities were more diverse than those associated with squirrelfish, yet did not contain known fish pathogens. Using microscopy and molecular genetic approaches, lionfish eggs were examined for the presence of bacteria to evaluate the capacity for vertical transmission. Eggs removed from the ovaries of gravid females were free of bacteria, suggesting that lionfish likely acquire bacteria from the environment. This study was the first examination of bacterial communities associated with the invasive lionfish and indicated that they support different communities of environmentally derived bacteria than Caribbean reef fishes.

  7. Potential mechanisms and environmental controls of TiO2 nanoparticle effects on soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Schimel, Joshua P; Holden, Patricia A

    2013-12-17

    It has been reported that engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) alter soil bacterial communities, but the underlying mechanisms and environmental controls of such effects remain unknown. Besides direct toxicity, ENPs may indirectly affect soil bacteria by changing soil water availability or other properties. Alternatively, soil water or other environmental factors may mediate ENP effects on soil bacterial communities. To test, we incubated nano-TiO2-amended soils across a range of water potentials for 288 days. Following incubation, the soil water characteristics, organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, and respiration upon rewetting (an indicator of bioavailable organic carbon) were measured. Bacterial community shifts were characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The endpoint soil water holding had been reported previously as not changing with this nano-TiO2 amendment; herein, we also found that some selected soil properties were unaffected by the treatments. However, we found that nano-TiO2 altered the bacterial community composition and reduced diversity. Nano-TiO2-induced community dissimilarities increased but tended to approach a plateau when soils became drier. Taken together, nano-TiO2 effects on soil bacteria appear to be a result of direct toxicity rather than indirectly through nano-TiO2 affecting soil water and organic matter pools. However, such directs effects of nano-TiO2 on soil bacterial communities are mediated by soil water. PMID:24256577

  8. Differences between Bacterial Communities in the Gut of a Soil-Feeding Termite (Cubitermes niokoloensis) and Its Mounds▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Saliou; Hamelin, Jérôme; Ndiaye, Farma; Assigbetse, Komi; Aragno, Michel; Chotte, Jean Luc; Brauman, Alain

    2007-01-01

    In tropical ecosystems, termite mound soils constitute an important soil compartment covering around 10% of African soils. Previous studies have shown (S. Fall, S. Nazaret, J. L. Chotte, and A. Brauman, Microb. Ecol. 28:191-199, 2004) that the bacterial genetic structure of the mounds of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes niokoloensis) is different from that of their surrounding soil. The aim of this study was to characterize the specificity of bacterial communities within mounds with respect to the digestive and soil origins of the mound. We have compared the bacterial community structures of a termite mound, termite gut sections, and surrounding soil using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. DGGE analysis revealed a drastic difference between the genetic structures of the bacterial communities of the termite gut and the mound. Analysis of 266 clones, including 54 from excised bands, revealed a high level of diversity in each biota investigated. The soil-feeding termite mound was dominated by the Actinobacteria phylum, whereas the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla dominate the gut sections of termites and the surrounding soil, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a distinct clustering of Actinobacteria phylotypes between the mound and the surrounding soil. The Actinobacteria clones of the termite mound were diverse, distributed among 10 distinct families, and like those in the termite gut environment lightly dominated by the Nocardioidaceae family. Our findings confirmed that the soil-feeding termite mound (C. niokoloensis) represents a specific bacterial habitat in the tropics. PMID:17574999

  9. Impact of cadmium on the bacterial communities in the gut of Metaphire posthuma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chen, Mu-Hsuan; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Colin S. [Department of Biotechnology, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jiun-Hong [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ssu Ching, E-mail: osycchna@ksts.seed.net.tw [Department of Biotechnology, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-30

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) contamination in soil onto the bacterial communities of the guts pooled from ten Metaphire posthuma were addressed during 14 days' incubation. We found that about 50% of Cd (5 mg/kg, dry weight soil) in the contaminated soil was bio-accumulated into the earthworms. DNA was extracted from the guts of M. posthuma and their dwelling soil irrespective of Cd treatment for the analysis of the bacterial communities of guts in M. posthuma and in soil by PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). A distinctive cluster of bacterial communities of the guts in the earthworm with and without Cd treatment using the analysis of unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages (UPGMA) was observed, indicating that the bacterial community of guts could be changed by Cd. However, no differences in the bacterial communities in soil irrespective of Cd treatment were observed, which could be resulted from the bioremediation of Cd by earthworms leading to insignificant effect of Cd on bacterial communities in soil. For the sequencing of some of the dominant bands in the DGGE profile, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Stenotrophomonas sp. D2, and Labrys, sp. CC-BB4, whose sequences display an identity of more than 97% using blast program against a known sequence in the GeneBank database and Ribosomal database, were identified. Collectively, our results showed that earthworm treatment can decrease the concentrations of Cd in soil, and Cd cause a shift in the bacterial communities in the guts of M. posthuma. The application of M. posthuma for Cd bioremediation would be desired.