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Sample records for bacterial chromosome organization

  1. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  2. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krawiec, S.; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction ...

  3. High-resolution mapping of the spatial organization of a bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung B K; Imakaev, Maxim V; Mirny, Leonid A; Laub, Michael T

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomes must be highly compacted and organized within cells, but how this is achieved in vivo remains poorly understood. We report the use of chromosome conformation capture coupled with deep sequencing (Hi-C) to map the structure of bacterial chromosomes. Analysis of Hi-C data and polymer modeling indicates that the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome consists of multiple, largely independent spatial domains that are probably composed of supercoiled plectonemes arrayed into a bottle brush-like fiber. These domains are stable throughout the cell cycle and are reestablished concomitantly with DNA replication. We provide evidence that domain boundaries are established by highly expressed genes and the formation of plectoneme-free regions, whereas the histone-like protein HU and SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) promote short-range compaction and the colinearity of chromosomal arms, respectively. Collectively, our results reveal general principles for the organization and structure of chromosomes in vivo. PMID:24158908

  4. Identification of bacterial cells by chromosomal painting.

    OpenAIRE

    Lanoil, B. D.; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal painting is a technique for the microscopic localization of genetic material. It has been applied at the subcellular level to identify regions of eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we describe the development of bacterial chromosomal painting (BCP), a related technology for the identification of bacterial cells. Purified genomic DNAs from six bacterial strains were labeled by nick translation with the fluorochrome Fluor-X, Cy3, or Cy5. The average size of the labeled fragments was ca. 5...

  5. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaran Narayanan; Qingwen Chen

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented...

  6. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Daniel E.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of sequence from one individual of a target species that can be isolated by screening, mapped onto karyotypes, and sequenced. With these techniques, researchers have identified differences and similarities in sex chromosome content and organization across amniotes and have addressed hypotheses regarding the frequency and direction of past changes. Here, we review studies of sex chromosome evolution in amniotes and the ways in which the field of research has been affected by the advent of BAC libraries. PMID:20981143

  7. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few thousands Kilobases. This is a critical range that encompasses isochores, interphase chromatin domains and boundaries, and chromosomal bands. The solution rests on the following key points: 1) the transition from the looped domains and sub-domains of interphase chromatin to the 30-nm fiber loops of early prophase chromosomes goes through the unfolding into an extended chromatin structure (probably a 10-nm “beads-on-a-string” structure); 2) the architectural proteins of interphase chromatin, such as CTCF and cohesin sub-units, are retained in mitosis and are part of the discontinuous protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes; 3) the conservation of the link between architectural proteins and their binding sites on DNA through the cell cycle explains the “mitotic memory” of interphase architecture and the reversibility of the interphase to mitosis process. The results presented here also lead to a general conclusion which concerns the existence of correlations between the isochore organization of the genome and the architecture of chromosomes from interphase to metaphase. PMID:26619076

  9. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  10. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  11. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Janes, Daniel E.; Nicole Valenzuela; Tariq Ezaz; Chris Amemiya; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of seque...

  12. Principles of chromosomal organization: lessons from yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Christophe; Fabre, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of genes and chromosomes plays an important role in the regulation of several DNA processes. However, the principles and forces underlying this nonrandom organization are mostly unknown. Despite its small dimension, and thanks to new imaging and biochemical techniques, studies of the budding yeast nucleus have led to significant insights into chromosome arrangement and dynamics. The dynamic organization of the yeast genome during interphase argues for both the physica...

  13. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  14. Physical Map and Organization of Chromosome 7 in the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe grisea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Heng; Blackmon, Barbara P.; Sasinowski, Maciek; Dean, Ralph A.

    1999-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea is a highly destructive plant pathogen and one of the most important for studying various aspects of host-plant interactions. It has been widely adopted as a model organism because it is ideally suited for genetic and biological studies. To facilitate map-based cloning, chromosome walking, and genome organization studies of M. grisea, a complete physical map of chromosome 7 was constructed using a large-insert (130 kb) bacterial artificial chromosome (...

  15. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis. PMID:27033694

  16. Replisome Assembly at Bacterial Chromosomes and Iteron Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna E; Gross, Marta; Uciechowska, Urszula; Konieczny, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The proper initiation and occurrence of DNA synthesis depends on the formation and rearrangements of nucleoprotein complexes within the origin of DNA replication. In this review article, we present the current knowledge on the molecular mechanism of replication complex assembly at the origin of bacterial chromosome and plasmid replicon containing direct repeats (iterons) within the origin sequence. We describe recent findings on chromosomal and plasmid replication initiators, DnaA and Rep proteins, respectively, and their sequence-specific interactions with double- and single-stranded DNA. Also, we discuss the current understanding of the activities of DnaA and Rep proteins required for replisome assembly that is fundamental to the duplication and stability of genetic information in bacterial cells. PMID:27563644

  17. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with (13)C and (18)O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions. PMID:26943624

  18. Horizontal transfer of DNA methylation patterns into bacterial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Eun; Lin, Chris; Lim, Han N

    2016-05-19

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the non-inherited acquisition of novel DNA sequences. HGT is common and important in bacteria because it enables the rapid generation of new phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance. Here we show that in vivo and in vitro DNA methylation patterns can be horizontally transferred into bacterial chromosomes to program cell phenotypes. The experiments were performed using a synthetic system in Escherichia coli where different DNA methylation patterns within the cis-regulatory sequence of the agn43 gene turn on or off a fluorescent reporter (CFP). With this system we demonstrated that DNA methylation patterns not only accompany the horizontal transfer of genes into the bacterial cytoplasm but can be transferred into chromosomes by: (i) bacteriophage P1 transduction; and (ii) transformation of extracellular synthetic DNA. We also modified the experimental system by replacing CFP with the SgrS small RNA, which regulates glucose and methyl α-D-glucoside uptake, and showed that horizontally acquired DNA methylation patterns can increase or decrease cell fitness. That is, horizontally acquired DNA methylation patterns can result in the selection for and against cells that have HGT. Findings from these proof-of-concept experiments have applications in synthetic biology and potentially broad implications for bacterial adaptation and evolution. PMID:27084942

  19. Construction and Characterization of Three Wheat Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries of wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Wangshuibai, germplasms T. monococcum TA2026 and TA2033. A total of 1,233,792,170,880 and 263,040 clones were picked and arrayed in 384-well plates. On the basis of genome sizes of 16.8 Gb for hexaploid wheat and 5.6 Gb for diploid wheat, the three libraries represented 9.05-, 2.60-, and 3.71-fold coverage of the haploid genomes, respectively. An improved descending pooling system for BAC libraries screening was established. This improved strategy can save 80% of the time and 68% of polymerase chain reaction (PCR with the same successful rate as the universal 6D pooling strategy.

  20. Physical map and organization of chromosome 7 in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Blackmon, B P; Sasinowski, M; Dean, R A

    1999-08-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea is a highly destructive plant pathogen and one of the most important for studying various aspects of host-plant interactions. It has been widely adopted as a model organism because it is ideally suited for genetic and biological studies. To facilitate map-based cloning, chromosome walking, and genome organization studies of M. grisea, a complete physical map of chromosome 7 was constructed using a large-insert (130 kb) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Using 147 chromosome 7-specific single-copy BAC clones and 20 RFLP markers on chromosome 7, 625 BAC clones were identified by hybridization. BAC clones were digested with HindIII, and fragments were size separated on analytical agarose gels to create DNA fingerprints. Hybridization contigs were constructed using a random cost algorithm, whereas fingerprinting contigs were constructed using the software package FPC. Results from both methods were generally in agreement, but numerous anomalies were observed. The combined data produced five robust anchored contigs after gap closure by chromosomal walking. The genetic and physical maps agreed closely. The final physical map was estimated to cover >95% of the 4.2 Mb of chromosome 7. Based on the contig maps, a minimum BAC tile containing 42 BAC clones was created, and organization of repetitive elements and expressed genes of the chromosome was investigated. PMID:10447509

  1. Long-Range Periodic Patterns in Microbial Genomes Indicate Significant Multi-Scale Chromosomal Organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome organization can be studied through analysis of chromosome position-dependent patterns in sequence-derived parameters. A comprehensive analysis of such patterns in prokaryotic sequences and genome-scale functional data has yet to be performed. We detected spatial patterns in sequence-derived parameters for 163 chromosomes occurring in 135 bacterial and 16 archaeal organisms using wavelet analysis. Pattern strength was found to correlate with organism-specific features such as genome size, overall GC content, and the occurrence of known motility and chromosomal binding proteins. Given additional functional data for Escherichia coli, we found significant correlations among chromosome position dependent patterns in numerous properties, some of which are consistent with previously experimentally identified chromosome macrodomains. These results demonstrate that the large-scale organization of most sequenced genomes is significantly nonrandom, and, moreover, that this organization is likely linked to genome size, nucleotide composition, and information transfer processes. Constraints on genome evolution and design are thus not solely dependent upon information content, but also upon an intricate multi-parameter, multi-length-scale organization of the chromosome.

  2. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana Dulal; Benjamin Silver; Hua Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination syste...

  3. Global features of sequences of bacterial chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed by analysis of oligonucleotide usage patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tümmler Burkhard

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligonucleotide frequencies were shown to be conserved signatures for bacterial genomes, however, the underlying constraints have yet not been resolved in detail. In this paper we analyzed oligonucleotide usage (OU biases in a comprehensive collection of 155 completely sequenced bacterial chromosomes, 316 plasmids and 104 phages. Results Two global features were analyzed: pattern skew (PS and variance of OU deviations normalized by mononucleotide content of the sequence (OUV. OUV reflects the strength of OU biases and taxonomic signals. PS denotes asymmetry of OU in direct and reverse DNA strands. A trend towards minimal PS was observed for almost all complete sequences of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids, however, PS was substantially higher in separate genomic loci and several types of plasmids and phages characterized by long stretches of non-coding DNA and/or asymmetric gene distribution on the two DNA strands. Five of the 155 bacterial chromosomes have anomalously high PS, of which the chromosomes of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c and Prochlorococcus marinus MIT9313 exhibit extreme PS values suggesting an intermediate unstable state of these two genomes. Conclusions Strand symmetry as indicated by minimal PS is a universally conserved feature of complete bacterial genomes that results from the matching mutual compensation of local OU biases on both replichors while OUV is more a taxon specific feature. Local events such as inversions or the incorporation of genome islands are balanced by global changes in genome organization to minimize PS that may represent one of the leading evolutionary forces driving bacterial genome diversification.

  4. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  5. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Banigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  6. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands for all human chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liehr Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome banding is widely used in cytogenetics. However, the biological nature of hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands of human chromosomes is an enigma and has not been, as yet, studied. Results Here we present for the first time the hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands in their sub-bands for all human chromosomes. To do this, array-proved multicolor banding (aMCB probe-sets for all human chromosomes were applied to normal metaphase spreads of three different G-band levels. We confirmed for all chromosomes to be a general principle that only Giemsa-dark bands split into dark and light sub-bands, as we demonstrated previously by chromosome stretching. Thus, the biological band splitting is in > 50% of the sub-bands different than implemented by the ISCN nomenclature suggesting also a splitting of G-light bands. Locus-specific probes exemplary confirmed the results of MCB. Conclusion Overall, the present study enables a better understanding of chromosome architecture. The observed difference of biological and ISCN band-splitting may be an explanation why mapping data from human genome project do not always fit the cytogenetic mapping.

  7. Lattice animal model of chromosome organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Balaji V. S.; Arya, Gaurav

    2012-07-01

    Polymer models tied together by constraints of looping and confinement have been used to explain many of the observed organizational characteristics of interphase chromosomes. Here we introduce a simple lattice animal representation of interphase chromosomes that combines the features of looping and confinement constraints into a single framework. We show through Monte Carlo simulations that this model qualitatively captures both the leveling off in the spatial distance between genomic markers observed in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments and the inverse decay in the looping probability as a function of genomic separation observed in chromosome conformation capture experiments. The model also suggests that the collapsed state of chromosomes and their segregation into territories with distinct looping activities might be a natural consequence of confinement.

  8. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α1, α2, β1, and β2) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β2-and α2-AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α1-AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β2-AR, and the β1-AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α2-AR, is located. In mouse, both α2-and β1-AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α1-AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α1-and β2-AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α2- and β1-AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  9. Chromosomes as Vehicle in Organization and Transmission of Characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the fundamental aspects of genomes is the organization of the genes in packages known as chromosomes. All organisms from the simplest to the most complex possess chromosomes as part of their genome and they are characterized by a particular morphology and number characteristic of each species. Chromosome mutations induce changes that can originate in mitotic o meiotic errors in an individual, and these can become fixed in the population during evolution. This results either if the particular changes represent a selective advantage, or they may result in severe effects on the phenotype and fertility of its carriers that may be manifested as a genetic syndrome. In this essay I demonstrate how, using conventional and recent cytogenetic and molecular techniques we have begun understanding the function of chromosome arrangements in the differentiation of species and how particular defects or individual changes in the morphology or number of chromosomes can result in serious dysfunctions that are recognized as genetic syndromes.

  10. Structural organization of the inactive X chromosome in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Luca; Lajoie, Bryan R; Carter, Ava C; Attia, Mikael; Zhan, Ye; Xu, Jin; Chen, Chong Jian; Kaplan, Noam; Chang, Howard Y; Heard, Edith; Dekker, Job

    2016-07-28

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) involves major reorganization of the X chromosome as it becomes silent and heterochromatic. During female mammalian development, XCI is triggered by upregulation of the non-coding Xist RNA from one of the two X chromosomes. Xist coats the chromosome in cis and induces silencing of almost all genes via its A-repeat region, although some genes (constitutive escapees) avoid silencing in most cell types, and others (facultative escapees) escape XCI only in specific contexts. A role for Xist in organizing the inactive X (Xi) chromosome has been proposed. Recent chromosome conformation capture approaches have revealed global loss of local structure on the Xi chromosome and formation of large mega-domains, separated by a region containing the DXZ4 macrosatellite. However, the molecular architecture of the Xi chromosome, in both the silent and expressed regions,remains unclear. Here we investigate the structure, chromatin accessibility and expression status of the mouse Xi chromosome in highly polymorphic clonal neural progenitors (NPCs) and embryonic stem cells. We demonstrate a crucial role for Xist and the DXZ4-containing boundary in shaping Xi chromosome structure using allele-specific genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) analysis, an assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) and RNA sequencing. Deletion of the boundary disrupts mega-domain formation, and induction of Xist RNA initiates formation of the boundary and the loss of DNA accessibility. We also show that in NPCs, the Xi chromosome lacks active/inactive compartments and topologically associating domains (TADs), except around genes that escape XCI. Escapee gene clusters display TAD-like structures and retain DNA accessibility at promoter-proximal and CTCF-binding sites. Furthermore, altered patterns of facultative escape genes indifferent neural progenitor clones are associated with the presence of different TAD

  11. A self-associating protein critical for chromosome attachment, division, and polar organization in caulobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2008-01-01

    Cell polarization is an integral part of many unrelated bacterial processes. How intrinsic cell polarization is achieved is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that Caulobacter crescentus uses a multimeric pole-organizing factor (PopZ) that serves as a hub to concurrently achieve several...... suggests that localization of PopZ largely relies on PopZ multimerization in chromosome-free regions, consistent with a self-organizing mechanism.......Cell polarization is an integral part of many unrelated bacterial processes. How intrinsic cell polarization is achieved is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that Caulobacter crescentus uses a multimeric pole-organizing factor (PopZ) that serves as a hub to concurrently achieve several...

  12. New approaches to understanding the spatial organization of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung Bk; Laub, Michael T

    2014-12-01

    In all organisms, chromosomal DNA must be compacted nearly three orders of magnitude to fit within the limited volume of a cell. However, chromosomes cannot be haphazardly packed, and instead must adopt structures compatible with numerous cellular processes, including DNA replication, chromosome segregation, recombination, and gene expression. Recent technical advances have dramatically enhanced our understanding of how chromosomes are organized in vivo and have begun to reveal the mechanisms and forces responsible. Here, we review the current arsenal of techniques used to query chromosome structure, focusing first on single-cell fluorescence microscopy approaches that directly examine chromosome structure and then on population-averaged biochemical methods that infer chromosome structure based on the interaction frequencies of different loci. We describe the power of these techniques, highlighting the major advances they have produced while also discussing their limitations. PMID:25305533

  13. Effect of chromosome tethering on nuclear organization in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Avşaroğlu

    Full Text Available Interphase chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are tethered to the nuclear envelope at their telomeres and to the spindle pole body (SPB at their centromeres. Using a polymer model of yeast chromosomes that includes these interactions, we show theoretically that telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope is a major determinant of gene positioning within the nucleus only for genes within 10 kb of the telomeres. We test this prediction by measuring the distance between the SPB and the silent mating locus (HML on chromosome III in wild-type and mutant yeast strains that contain altered chromosome-tethering interactions. In wild-type yeast cells we find that disruption of the telomere tether does not dramatically change the position of HML with respect to the SPB, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Alternatively, using a mutant strain with a synthetic tether that localizes an HML-proximal site to the nuclear envelope, we find a significant change in the SPB-HML distance, again as predicted by theory. Our study quantifies the importance of tethering at telomeres on the organization of interphase chromosomes in yeast, which has been shown to play a significant role in determining chromosome function such as gene expression and recombination.

  14. The development and characterisation of a bacterial artificial chromosome library for Fragaria vesca

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott Albert G; Monfort Amparo; Muñoz-Torres Monica C; Sargent Daniel J; Girona Elena; Bonet Julio; Arús Pere; Simpson David W; Davik Jahn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The cultivated strawberry Fragaria ×ananassa is one of the most economically-important soft-fruit species. Few structural genomic resources have been reported for Fragaria and there exists an urgent need for the development of physical mapping resources for the genus. The first stage in the development of a physical map for Fragaria is the construction and characterisation of a high molecular weight bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Methods A BAC library, cons...

  15. Generalized Gap Model for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone Fingerprint Mapping and Shotgun Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wendl, Michael C; Robert H Waterston

    2002-01-01

    We develop an extension to the Lander-Waterman theory for characterizing gaps in bacterial artificial chromosome fingerprint mapping and shotgun sequencing projects. It supports a larger set of descriptive statistics and is applicable to a wider range of project parameters. We show that previous assertions regarding inconsistency of the Lander-Waterman theory at higher coverages are incorrect and that another well-known but ostensibly different model is in fact the same. The apparent paradox ...

  16. Complete Genomes of Classical Swine Fever Virus Cloned into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, I; Uttenthal, Åse; De Beer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete genome amplification of viral RNA provides a new tool for the generation of modified pestiviruses. We have used our full-genome amplification strategy for generation of amplicons representing complete genomes of classical swine fever virus. The amplicons were cloned directly into a stable single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) generating full-length pestivirus DNAs from which infectious RNA transcripts could be also derived. Our strategy allows construction of stable infec...

  17. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones of Viruses Comprising the Towne Cytomegalovirus Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohong Cui; Adler, Stuart P.; Davison, Andrew J.; Larry Smith; EL-Sayed E. Habib; McVoy, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones have proven invaluable for genetic manipulation of herpesvirus genomes. BAC cloning can also be useful for capturing representative genomes that comprise a viral stock or mixture. The Towne live attenuated cytomegalovirus vaccine was developed in the 1970s by serial passage in cultured fibroblasts. Although its safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy have been evaluated in nearly a thousand human subjects, the vaccine itself has been little studied. I...

  18. Generating Transgenic Mice from Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: Transgenesis Efficiency, Integration and Expression Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Van Keuren, Margaret L.; Gavrilina, Galina B.; Filipiak, Wanda E.; Zeidler, Michael G.; Saunders, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic mice are widely used in biomedical research to study gene expression, developmental biology, and gene therapy models. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenes direct gene expression at physiological levels with the same developmental timing and expression patterns as endogenous genes in transgenic animal models. We generated 707 transgenic founders from 86 BAC transgenes purified by three different methods. Transgenesis efficiency was the same for all BAC DNA purification m...

  19. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC). Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron mic...

  20. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    OpenAIRE

    Fransz, P.; Jong, de, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence from interacting with DNA-binding proteins. Evidently, nucleosome positioning is a major factor in gene control and chromatin organization. Understanding the biological rules that govern the deposi...

  1. Quantitative analysis of mutation and selection pressures on base composition skews in bacterial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Carton W

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most bacterial chromosomes exhibit asymmetry of base composition with respect to leading vs. lagging strands (GC and AT skews. These skews reflect mainly those in protein coding sequences, which are driven by asymmetric mutation pressures during replication and transcription (notably asymmetric cytosine deamination plus subsequent selection for preferred structures, signals, amino acid or codons. The transcription-associated effects but not the replication-associated effects contribute to the overall skews through the uneven distribution of the coding sequences on the leading and lagging strands. Results Analysis of 185 representative bacterial chromosomes showed diverse and characteristic patterns of skews among different clades. The base composition skews in the coding sequences were used to derive quantitatively the effect of replication-driven mutation plus subsequent selection ('replication-associated pressure', RAP, and the effect of transcription-driven mutation plus subsequent selection at translation level ('transcription-associate pressure', TAP. While different clades exhibit distinct patterns of RAP and TAP, RAP is absent or nearly absent in some bacteria, but TAP is present in all. The selection pressure at the translation level is evident in all bacteria based on the analysis of the skews at the three codon positions. Contribution of asymmetric cytosine deamination was found to be weak to TAP in most phyla, and strong to RAP in all the Proteobacteria but weak in most of the Firmicutes. This possibly reflects the differences in their chromosomal replication machineries. A strong negative correlation between TAP and G+C content and between TAP and chromosomal size were also revealed. Conclusion The study reveals the diverse mutation and selection forces associated with replication and transcription in various groups of bacteria that shape the distinct patterns of base composition skews in the chromosomes during

  2. Rates of gyrase supercoiling and transcription elongation control supercoil density in a bacterial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Rovinskiy

    Full Text Available Gyrase catalyzes negative supercoiling of DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction that helps condense bacterial chromosomes into a compact interwound "nucleoid." The supercoil density (σ of prokaryotic DNA occurs in two forms. Diffusible supercoil density (σ(D moves freely around the chromosome in 10 kb domains, and constrained supercoil density (σ(C results from binding abundant proteins that bend, loop, or unwind DNA at many sites. Diffusible and constrained supercoils contribute roughly equally to the total in vivo negative supercoil density of WT cells, so σ = σ(C+σ(D. Unexpectedly, Escherichia coli chromosomes have a 15% higher level of σ compared to Salmonella enterica. To decipher critical mechanisms that can change diffusible supercoil density of chromosomes, we analyzed strains of Salmonella using a 9 kb "supercoil sensor" inserted at ten positions around the genome. The sensor contains a complete Lac operon flanked by directly repeated resolvase binding sites, and the sensor can monitor both supercoil density and transcription elongation rates in WT and mutant strains. RNA transcription caused (- supercoiling to increase upstream and decrease downstream of highly expressed genes. Excess upstream supercoiling was relaxed by Topo I, and gyrase replenished downstream supercoil losses to maintain an equilibrium state. Strains with TS gyrase mutations growing at permissive temperature exhibited significant supercoil losses varying from 30% of WT levels to a total loss of σ(D at most chromosome locations. Supercoil losses were influenced by transcription because addition of rifampicin (Rif caused supercoil density to rebound throughout the chromosome. Gyrase mutants that caused dramatic supercoil losses also reduced the transcription elongation rates throughout the genome. The observed link between RNA polymerase elongation speed and gyrase turnover suggests that bacteria with fast growth rates may generate higher supercoil densities

  3. Cloning the simian varicella virus genome in E. coli as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Wayne L.; Zhou, Fuchun; Noffke, Juliane; Tischer, B Karsten

    2011-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) is closely related to human varicella-zoster virus and causes varicella and zoster-like disease in nonhuman primates. In this study, a mini-F replicon was inserted into a SVV cosmid and infectious SVV was generated by co-transfection of Vero cells with overlapping SVV cosmids. The entire SVV genome, cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), was stably propagated upon serial passage in E. coli. Transfection of pSVV-BAC DNA into Vero cells yielded infectiou...

  4. Cloning of Bovine herpesvirus type 1 and type 5 as infectious bacterial artifical chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann Mathias; Fraefel Cornel; Gabev Evgeni; Tobler Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine herpesviruses type 1 (BoHV1) and type 5 (BoHV5) are two closely related pathogens of cattle. The identity of the two viruses on the amino acid level averages 82%. Despite their high antigenetic similarities the two pathogens induce distinctive clinical signs. BoHV1 causes respiratory and genital tract infections while BoHV5 leads to severe encephalitis in calves. Findings The viral genomes of BoHV1 and BoHV5 were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes...

  5. Construction of an Americn mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Nefedov, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library......BACKGROUND: Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. RESULTS: Here, we...... report the construction and characterization of the CHORI-231 BAC library constructed from a Danish-farmed, male American mink (Neovison vison). The library contains approximately 165,888 clones with an average insert size of 170 kb, representing approximately 10-fold coverage. High-density filters, each...

  6. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dulal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  7. Construction and characterization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing herpes simplex virus full-length genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are suitable vectors not only to maintain the large genomes of herpesviruses in Escherichia coli but also to enable the traceless introduction of any mutation using modern tools of bacterial genetics. To clone a herpes simplex virus genome, a BAC replication origin is first introduced into the viral genome by homologous recombination in eukaryotic host cells. As part of their nuclear replication cycle, genomes of herpesviruses circularize and these replication intermediates are then used to transform bacteria. After cloning, the integrity of the recombinant viral genomes is confirmed by restriction length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. The BACs may then be used to design virus mutants. Upon transfection into eukaryotic cells new herpesvirus strains harboring the desired mutations can be recovered and used for experiments in cultured cells as well as in animal infection models. PMID:24671676

  8. Construction and Preliminary Characterization Analysis of Wuzhishan Miniature Pig Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library with Approximately 8-Fold Genome Equivalent Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries have been invaluable tools for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. Here, we report the construction and characterization of a high-redundancy BAC library from a very valuable pig breed in China, Wuzhishan miniature pig (Sus scrofa, using its blood cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The library contains approximately 153,600 clones ordered in 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 152.3 kb, representing approximately 7.68 genome equivalents of the porcine haploid genome and a 99.93% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence in the library. 19 pairs of microsatellite marker primers covering porcine chromosomes were used for screening the BAC library, which showed that each of these markers was positive in the library; the positive clone number was 2 to 9, and the average number was 7.89, which was consistent with 7.68-fold coverage of the porcine genome. And there were no significant differences of genomic BAC library from blood cells and fibroblast cells. Therefore, we identified 19 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. As a result, this BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for gene identification, physical mapping, and comparative genomics and large-scale genome sequencing in the porcine.

  9. Organization of the R chromosome region in maize. Triennial report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermicle, J.L.

    1979-12-01

    Anthocyanin pigmentation in maize is strain and tissue specific. The primary source of variation is represented in maize races indigenous to widely separated geographic regions of North and South America. Secondary sources include variants which have appeared spontaneously in culture, arose following mutagenic treatment, or were incited through paramutation or by means of controlling elements. Much of the observed variation is attributable to a narrowly restricted segment of chromosome 10, designated the R region. The studies on R organization seek to analyze this variation in terms of the number, kind and arrangement of the components involved.

  10. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC. Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we observed that the replication foci contain decondensed chromatin as well as 80 and 130 nm globules, those were also found in condensed non-replicating chromatin domains. Using immunogolding, we demonstrated that DNA replication in S-phase PCC occurs in loose chromatin on the periphery of dense chromatin domains. Conclusion. Replication in PCC occurred in the decondensed chromatin neighboring the condensed chromatin without formation of special structures.

  11. A Model of Repetitive-DNA-Organized Chromatin Network of Interphase Chromosomes

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    Shao-Jun Tang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During interphase, chromosomes are relatively de-condensed in the nuclear space. Interphase chromosomes are known to occupy nuclear space in a non-random manner (chromosome territory; however, their internal structures are poorly defined. In particular, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that govern the internal organization of interphase chromosomes. The author recently proposed that pairing (or interaction of repetitive DNA-containing chromatin regions is a critical driving force that specifies the higher-order organization of eukaryotic chromosomes. Guided by this theoretical framework and published experimental data on the structure of interphase chromosomes and the spatial distribution of repetitive DNA in interphase nuclei, I postulate here a molecular structure of chromatin organization in interphase chromosomes. According to this model, an interphase chromosome is a chromatin mesh (or lattice that is formed by repeat pairing (RP. The mesh consists of two types of structural components: chromosome nodes and loose chromatin fibers. Chromosome nodes are DNA repeat assemblies (RAs that are formed via RP, while loose fibers include chromatin loops that radiate from the nodes. Different loops crosslink by RPs and form a large integrated chromatin network. I suggest that the organization of the chromatin network of a given interphase chromosome is intrinsically specified by the distribution of repetitive DNA elements on the linear chromatin. The stability of the organization is governed by the collection of RA-formed nodes, and the dynamics of the organization is driven by the assembling and disassembling of the nodes.

  12. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of the maize inbred line Qi319

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hua Mu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays L. has been the most cultivated crop and the crop with the largest yield in China since 2012. We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the maize inbred line Qi319, which may be used as a key source for disease-resistant maize breeding in China. The BAC contains 270,720 clones, with an average insert size of 90 kb. The coverage of the library is about 10.43 genome equivalents when considering a haploid genome size of 2300 Mb, providing a 99.99% likelihood of isolating any maize gene or sequence in the library. An average of 12 clones were obtained by polymerase chain reaction screening by using primer pairs linked to the genes for resistance to maize southern rust and rough dwarf. The results indicate that the library can satisfy the requirements for recovering specific sequences. The library is available to researchers to whom it may be of interest.

  13. A Plasmid Set for Efficient Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Fernando; Reynolds, Eric; Lewellis, Stephen W; Venkiteswaran, Gayatri; Knaut, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Transgenesis of large DNA constructs is essential for gene function analysis. Recently, Tol2 transposase-mediated transgenesis has emerged as a powerful tool to insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA constructs into the genome of zebrafish. For efficient transgenesis, the genomic DNA piece in the BAC construct needs to be flanked by Tol2 transposon sites, and the constructs should contain a transgenesis marker for easy identification of transgenic animals. We report a set of plasmids that contain targeting cassettes that allow the insertion of Tol2 sites and different transgenesis markers into BACs. Using BACs containing these targeting cassettes, we show that transgenesis is as efficient as iTol2, that preselecting for expression of the transgenesis marker increases the transgenesis rate, and that BAC transgenics faithfully recapitulate the endogenous gene expression patterns and allow for the estimation of the endogenous gene expression levels. PMID:26818072

  14. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries for Zhikong Scallop Chlamys farreri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang; ZHANG Xiaojun; Chantel F.SCHEURING; ZHANG Hongbin; LI Fuhua; XIANG Jianhai

    2008-01-01

    Two Large-insert genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri were constructed to promote our genetic and genomic research.High-quality megabase-sized DNA was isolated from the adductor muscle of the scallop and partially digested by BamH I and Mbo I,respectively.The BamH I library consisted of 53760 clones while the Mbo I library consisted of 7680 clones.Approximately 96% of the clones in BamH I library contained nuclear DNA inserts in average size of 100 kb,providing a coverage of 5.3 haploid genome equivalents.Similarly,the Mbo I library with an average insert of 145 kb and no insert-empty clones,thus providing a genome coverage of 1.1 haploid genome equivalents.

  15. DNA immunization with a herpes simplex virus 2 bacterial artificial chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) is described. BAC vector sequences were inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of HSV-2 by homologous recombination. DNA from cells infected with the resulting recombinant virus was transformed into E. coli, and colonies containing the HSV-2 BAC (HSV2-BAC) were isolated and analyzed for the expected genotype. HSV2-BAC DNA was infectious when transfected back into mammalian cells and the resulting virus was thymidine kinase negative. When used to immunize mice, the HSV2-BAC DNA elicited a strong HSV-2 specific antibody response that was equal to or greater than live virus immunization. Further, HSV2-BAC immunization was protective when animals were challenged with a lethal dose of virus. The utility of the HSV2-BAC for construction of recombinant virus genomes was demonstrated by elimination of the HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) gene. A recombinant HSV-2 BAC with the gD gene deleted was isolated and shown to be incapable of producing infectious virus following transfection unless an HSV gD gene was expressed in a complementing cell line. Immunization of mice with the HSV2 gD-BAC also elicited an HSV-2 specific antibody response and was protective. The results demonstrate the feasibility of DNA immunization with HSV-2 bacterial artificial chromosomes for replicating and nonreplicating candidate HSV-2 vaccines, as well as the utility of BAC technology for construction and maintenance of novel HSV-2 vaccines. The results further suggest that such technology will be a powerful tool for dissecting the immune response to HSV-2

  16. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek’s disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpe...

  17. Chromosome Painting In Silico in a Bacterial Species Reveals Fine Population Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2013-01-01

    Identifying population structure forms an important basis for genetic and evolutionary studies. Most current methods to identify population structure have limitations in analyzing haplotypes and recombination across the genome. Recently, a method of chromosome painting in silico has been developed to overcome these shortcomings and has been applied to multiple human genome sequences. This method detects the genome-wide transfer of DNA sequence chunks through homologous recombination. Here, we apply it to the frequently recombining bacterial species Helicobacter pylori that has infected Homo sapiens since their birth in Africa and shows wide phylogeographic divergence. Multiple complete genome sequences were analyzed including sequences from Okinawa, Japan, that we recently sequenced. The newer method revealed a finer population structure than revealed by a previous method that examines only MLST housekeeping genes or a phylogenetic network analysis of the core genome. Novel subgroups were found in Europe, Amerind, and East Asia groups. Examination of genetic flux showed some singleton strains to be hybrids of subgroups and revealed evident signs of population admixture in Africa, Europe, and parts of Asia. We expect this approach to further our understanding of intraspecific bacterial evolution by revealing population structure at a finer scale. PMID:23505045

  18. Construction of an infectious clone of canine herpesvirus genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Jun; Hushur, Orkash; Kato, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tohya, Yukinobu; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2006-04-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV) is an attractive candidate not only for use as a recombinant vaccine to protect dogs from a variety of canine pathogens but also as a viral vector for gene therapy in domestic animals. However, developments in this area have been impeded by the complicated techniques used for eukaryotic homologous recombination. To overcome these problems, we used bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to generate infectious BACs. Our findings may be summarized as follows: (i) the CHV genome (pCHV/BAC), in which a BAC flanked by loxP sites was inserted into the thymidine kinase gene, was maintained in Escherichia coli; (ii) transfection of pCHV/BAC into A-72 cells resulted in the production of infectious virus; (iii) the BAC vector sequence was almost perfectly excisable from the genome of the reconstituted virus CHV/BAC by co-infection with CHV/BAC and a recombinant adenovirus that expressed the Cre recombinase; and (iv) a recombinant virus in which the glycoprotein C gene was deleted was generated by lambda recombination followed by Flp recombination, which resulted in a reduction in viral titer compared with that of the wild-type virus. The infectious clone pCHV/BAC is useful for the modification of the CHV genome using bacterial genetics, and CHV/BAC should have multiple applications in the rapid generation of genetically engineered CHV recombinants and the development of CHV vectors for vaccination and gene therapy in domestic animals. PMID:16515874

  19. Cloning of Bovine herpesvirus type 1 and type 5 as infectious bacterial artifical chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Mathias

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesviruses type 1 (BoHV1 and type 5 (BoHV5 are two closely related pathogens of cattle. The identity of the two viruses on the amino acid level averages 82%. Despite their high antigenetic similarities the two pathogens induce distinctive clinical signs. BoHV1 causes respiratory and genital tract infections while BoHV5 leads to severe encephalitis in calves. Findings The viral genomes of BoHV1 and BoHV5 were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs. First, recombinant viruses carrying the genetic elements for propagation in bacteria were generated. Second, DNA from these recombinant viruses were transferred into prokaryotic cells. Third, DNA from these bacteria were transferred into eukaryotic cells. Progeny viruses from BAC transfections showed similar kinetics as their corresponding wild types. Conclusion The two viral genomes of BoHV1 and BoHV5 cloned as BACs are accessible to the tools of bacterial genetics. The ability to easily manipulate the viral genomes on a molecular level in future experiments will lead to a better understanding of the difference in pathogenesis induced by these two closely related bovine herpesviruses.

  20. Cytotoxic chromosomal targeting by CRISPR/Cas systems can reshape bacterial genomes and expel or remodel pathogenicity islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben B Vercoe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (Cas proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2 involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas-mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA-targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity.

  1. Self-organization in bacterial swarming: lessons from myxobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When colonizing surfaces, many bacteria are able to self-organize into an actively expanding biofilm, in which millions of cells move smoothly and orderly at high densities. This phenomenon is known as bacterial swarming. Despite the apparent resemblance to patterns seen in liquid crystals, the dynamics of bacterial swarming cannot be explained by theories derived from equilibrium statistical mechanics. To understand how bacteria swarm, a central question is how order emerges in dense and initially disorganized populations of bacterial cells. Here we briefly review recent efforts, with integrated computational and experimental approaches, in addressing this question

  2. Visualization of lymphatic vessels by Prox1-promoter directed GFP reporter in a bacterial artificial chromosome-based transgenic mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inho; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Choi, Dongwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Aguilar, Berenice

    2011-01-01

    Although the blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mouse has been an excellent tool to study vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, a lymphatic-specific fluorescent mouse model has not been established to date. Here we report a transgenic animal model that expresses the green fluorescent protein under the promoter of Prox1, a master control gene in lymphatic development. Generated using an approximately 200-kb-long bacterial artificial chromosome harboring the entire Prox1 gene, this Prox1-green fluorescent protein mouse was found to faithfully recapitulate the expression pattern of the Prox1 gene in lymphatic endothelial cells and other Prox1-expressing organs, and enabled us to conveniently visualize detailed structure and morphology of lymphatic vessels and networks throughout development. Our data demonstrate that this novel transgenic mouse can be extremely useful for detection, imaging, and isolation of lymphatic vessels and monitoring wound-associated lymphangiogenesis. Together, this Prox1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse will be a great tool for the lymphatic research. PMID:20962325

  3. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-Δ65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  4. Interplay of gene expression noise and ultrasensitive dynamics affects bacterial operon organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christian J Ray

    Full Text Available Bacterial chromosomes are organized into polycistronic cotranscribed operons, but the evolutionary pressures maintaining them are unclear. We hypothesized that operons alter gene expression noise characteristics, resulting in selection for or against maintaining operons depending on network architecture. Mathematical models for 6 functional classes of network modules showed that three classes exhibited decreased noise and 3 exhibited increased noise with same-operon cotranscription of interacting proteins. Noise reduction was often associated with a decreased chance of reaching an ultrasensitive threshold. Stochastic simulations of the lac operon demonstrated that the predicted effects of transcriptional coupling hold for a complex network module. We employed bioinformatic analysis to find overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon organization compared with randomized controls. Among constitutively expressed physically interacting protein pairs, higher coupling frequencies appeared at lower expression levels, where noise effects are expected to be dominant. Our results thereby suggest an important role for gene expression noise, in many cases interacting with an ultrasensitive switch, in maintaining or selecting for operons in bacterial chromosomes.

  5. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen M Adema

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available To provide a novel resource for analysis of the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, members of the international Biomphalaria glabrata Genome Initiative (biology.unm.edu/biomphalaria-genome.html, working with the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI and supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI, produced a high quality bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library. The BB02 strain B. glabrata, a field isolate (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil that is susceptible to several strains of Schistosoma mansoni, was selfed for two generations to reduce haplotype diversity in the offspring. High molecular weight DNA was isolated from ovotestes of 40 snails, partially digested with HindIII, and ligated into pAGIBAC1 vector. The resulting B. glabrata BAC library (BG_BBa consists of 61824 clones (136.3 kb average insert size and provides 9.05 × coverage of the 931 Mb genome. Probing with single/low copy number genes from B. glabrata and fingerprinting of selected BAC clones indicated that the BAC library sufficiently represents the gene complement. BAC end sequence data (514 reads, 299860 nt indicated that the genome of B. glabrata contains ~ 63% AT, and disclosed several novel genes, transposable elements, and groups of high frequency sequence elements. This BG_BBa BAC library, available from AGI at cost to the research community, gains in relevance because BB02 strain B. glabrata is targeted whole genome sequencing by NHGRI.

  6. Multiplex sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes for assembling complex plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Sebastian; Himmelbach, Axel; Schmutzer, Thomas; Felder, Marius; Taudien, Stefan; Mayer, Klaus F X; Platzer, Matthias; Stein, Nils; Scholz, Uwe; Mascher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Hierarchical shotgun sequencing remains the method of choice for assembling high-quality reference sequences of complex plant genomes. The efficient exploitation of current high-throughput technologies and powerful computational facilities for large-insert clone sequencing necessitates the sequencing and assembly of a large number of clones in parallel. We developed a multiplexed pipeline for shotgun sequencing and assembling individual bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) using the Illumina sequencing platform. We illustrate our approach by sequencing 668 barley BACs (Hordeum vulgare L.) in a single Illumina HiSeq 2000 lane. Using a newly designed parallelized computational pipeline, we obtained sequence assemblies of individual BACs that consist, on average, of eight sequence scaffolds and represent >98% of the genomic inserts. Our BAC assemblies are clearly superior to a whole-genome shotgun assembly regarding contiguity, completeness and the representation of the gene space. Our methods may be employed to rapidly obtain high-quality assemblies of a large number of clones to assemble map-based reference sequences of plant and animal species with complex genomes by sequencing along a minimum tiling path. PMID:26801048

  7. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Murine Gammaherpesivrus-68 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe the cloning of a sequenced WUMS isolate of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68, γHV-68, also known as MuHV-4 as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC. We engineered the insertion of the BAC sequence flanked by loxP sites into the left end of the viral genome before the M1 open reading frame. The infectious viruses were reconstituted following transfection of the MHV-68 BAC DNA into cells. The MHV-68 BAC-derived virus replicated indistinguishably from the wild-type virus in cultured cells. Excision of the BAC insert was efficiently achieved by coexpressing the Cre recombinase. Although the BAC insertion did not significantly affect acute productive infection in the lung, it severely compromised the ability of MHV-68 to establish splenic latency. Removal of the BAC sequence restored the wild-type level of latency. Site-specific mutagenesis was carried out by RecA-mediated recombination to demonstrate that this infectious BAC clone can be used for genetic studies of MHV-68.

  8. Homologous subfamilies of human alphoid repetitive DNA on different nucleolus organizing chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of alphoid repeated sequences on human nucleolus-organizing (NOR) chromosomes 13, 21, and 22 has been investigated. Analysis of hybridization of alphoid DNA probes to Southern transfers of restriction enzyme-digested DNA fragments from hybrid cells containing single human chromosomes shows that chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid repeats, whereas a different subfamily may be held in common by chromosomes 13 and 22. The sequences of cloned 680-base-pair EcoRI fragments of the alphoid DNA from chromosomes 13 and 21 show that the basic unit of this subfamily is indistinguishable on each chromosome. The sequence of cloned 1020-base-pair Xba I fragments from chromosome 22 is related to, but distinguishable from, that of the 680-base-pair EcoRI alphoid subfamily of chromosomes 13 and 21. These results suggest that, at some point after they originated and were homogenized, different subfamilies of alphoid sequences must have exchanged between chromosomes 13 and 21 and separately between chromosomes 13 and 22

  9. Visualization of lymphatic vessels by Prox1-promoter directed GFP reporter in a bacterial artificial chromosome-based transgenic mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Inho; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Choi, Dongwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Aguilar, Berenice; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Although the blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mouse has been an excellent tool to study vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, a lymphatic-specific fluorescent mouse model has not been established to date. Here we report a transgenic animal model that expresses the green fluorescent protein under the promoter of Prox1, a master control gene in lymphatic development. Generated using an approximately 200-kb-long bacterial artificial chromosome harboring the entire Prox1 gene, this Prox1-g...

  10. Highly Efficient Modification of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) Using Novel Shuttle Vectors Containing the R6Kγ Origin of Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Shiaoching; Yang, Xiangdong William; Li, Chenjian; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mediated transgenesis has proven to be a highly reliable way to obtain accurate transgene expression for in vivo studies of gene expression and function. A rate-limiting step in use of this technology to characterize large numbers of genes has been the process with which BACs can be modified by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. We report here a highly efficient method for modifying BACs by using a novel set of shuttle vectors that contain the ...

  11. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Weir Jerry P; Schmeisser Falko

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. Whi...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Cell Culture-Attenuated Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus Cloned as an Infectious Bacterial Artificial Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dongmei; Alam, Zohaib; Cui, Xiaohong; Chen, Michael; Sherrod, Carly J.; McVoy, Michael A.; Schleiss, Mark R.; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of attenuated guinea pig cytomegalovirus cloned as bacterial artificial chromosome N13R10 was determined. Comparison to pathogenic salivary gland-derived virus revealed 13 differences, 1 of which disrupted overlapping open reading frames encoding GP129 and GP130. Attenuation of N13R10 may arise from an inability to express GP129 and/or GP130.

  13. Cloning human herpes virus 6A genome into bacterial artificial chromosomes and study of DNA replication intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Borenstein, Ronen; Frenkel, Niza

    2009-01-01

    Cloning of large viral genomes into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) facilitates analyses of viral functions and molecular mutagenesis. Previous derivations of viral BACs involved laborious recombinations within infected cells. We describe a single-step production of viral BACs by direct cloning of unit length genomes, derived from circular or head-to-tail concatemeric DNA replication intermediates. The BAC cloning is independent of intracellular recombinations and DNA packaging constr...

  14. Higher-order genome organization in platypus and chicken sperm and repositioning of sex chromosomes during mammalian evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Dodge, Natasha; Mohr, Julia; Casey, Aaron; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kremitzki, Colin L.; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley C.; Grützner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, chromosomes occupy defined positions in sperm, whereas previous work in chicken showed random chromosome distribution. Monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are the most basal group of living mammals. They have elongated sperm like chicken and a complex sex chromosome system with homology to chicken sex chromosomes. We used platypus and chicken genomic clones to investigate genome organization in sperm. In chicken sperm, about half of the chromosomes investigated are organized non-ra...

  15. Biophysics of protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization

    OpenAIRE

    Marko, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The function of DNA in cells depends on its interactions with protein molecules, which recognize and act on base sequence patterns along the double helix. These notes aim to introduce basic polymer physics of DNA molecules, biophysics of protein-DNA interactions and their study in single-DNA experiments, and some aspects of large-scale chromosome structure. Mechanisms for control of chromosome topology will also be discussed.

  16. Effect of Chromosome Tethering on Nuclear Organization in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Avşaroğlu, Barış; Bronk, Gabriel; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Ham, Jungoh; Bressan, Debra A.; Haber, James E; Kondev, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Interphase chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are tethered to the nuclear envelope at their telomeres and to the spindle pole body (SPB) at their centromeres. Using a polymer model of yeast chromosomes that includes these interactions, we show theoretically that telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope is a major determinant of gene positioning within the nucleus only for genes within 10 kb of the telomeres. We test this prediction by measuring the distance between the SPB and the sil...

  17. Microhabitat heterogeneity across leaves and flower organs promotes bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Robert R; Keller, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryote-associated microbiomes interact with their hosts in multiple manners, thereby affecting the hosts' phenotype, physical condition and behaviour. In plants, bacteria have numerous functions, with variable net effects, both in natural and agricultural systems. However, information about the composition and diversity of the bacterial communities associated with different aboveground plant organs, particularly flowers, is lacking. In addition, the relative effects of microhabitat and environmental conditions on community establishment require further attention. Here, using culture-independent methods, we determine that leaves and three floral microhabitats (nectar, stamina and styles) of Metrosideros polymorpha (Myrtaceae), a tree endemic to Hawai'i, host unique indicator communities composed of relatively abundant bacterial taxa. These indicator communities are accompanied by a large number of ubiquitous or rare bacteria with lower abundances. In our study system, the strong effect of microhabitat filtering on plant-associated community composition and bacterial richness and diversity strongly exceeds the influence of environmental effects such as precipitation, altitude, substrate age and geographic distance. Thus, the bacterial richness of aboveground plant organs is strongly underestimated when only one microhabitat, e.g. leaves, is considered. Our study represents a first step towards a comprehensive characterization of the distribution, composition and underlying factors, of plant bacterial communities, with implications for future basic and applied research on plant health, pollination and reproduction. PMID:26253507

  18. Quality control of the sheep bacterial artificial chromosome library, CHORI-243

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkness Ewen F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sheep CHORI-243 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library is being used in the construction of the virtual sheep genome, the sequencing and construction of the actual sheep genome assembly and as a source of DNA for regions of the genome of biological interest. The objective of our study is to assess the integrity of the clones and plates which make up the CHORI-243 library using the virtual sheep genome. Findings A series of analyses were undertaken based on the mapping the sheep BAC-end sequences (BESs to the virtual sheep genome. Overall, very few plate specific biases were identified, with only three of the 528 plates in the library significantly affected. The analysis of the number of tail-to-tail (concordant BACs on the plates identified a number of plates with lower than average numbers of such BACs. For plates 198 and 213 a partial swap of the BESs determined with one of the two primers appear to have occurred. A third plate, 341, also with a significant deficit in tail-to-tail BACs, appeared to contain a substantial number of sequences determined from contaminating eubacterial 16 S rRNA DNA. Additionally a small number of eubacterial 16 S rRNA DNA sequences were present on two other plates, 111 and 338, in the library. Conclusions The comparative genomic approach can be used to assess BAC library integrity in the absence of fingerprinting. The sequences of the sheep CHORI-243 library BACs have high integrity, especially with the corrections detailed above. The library represents a high quality resource for use by the sheep genomics community.

  19. Rapid construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosomal (BAC) expression vector using designer DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Xinqing; Jin, Yingyu; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) vectors are increasingly being used in cloning large DNA fragments containing complex biosynthetic pathways to facilitate heterologous production of microbial metabolites for drug development. To express inserted genes using Streptomyces species as the production hosts, an integration expression cassette is required to be inserted into the BAC vector, which includes genetic elements encoding a phage-specific attachment site, an integrase, an origin of transfer, a selection marker and a promoter. Due to the large sizes of DNA inserted into the BAC vectors, it is normally inefficient and time-consuming to assemble these fragments by routine PCR amplifications and restriction-ligations. Here we present a rapid method to insert fragments to construct BAC-based expression vectors. A DNA fragment of about 130 bp was designed, which contains upstream and downstream homologous sequences of both BAC vector and pIB139 plasmid carrying the whole integration expression cassette. In-Fusion cloning was performed using the designer DNA fragment to modify pIB139, followed by λ-RED-mediated recombination to obtain the BAC-based expression vector. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this method by rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector with an insert of about 120 kb that contains the entire gene cluster for biosynthesis of immunosuppressant FK506. The empty BAC-based expression vector constructed in this study can be conveniently used for construction of BAC libraries using either microbial pure culture or environmental DNA, and the selected BAC clones can be directly used for heterologous expression. Alternatively, if a BAC library has already been constructed using a commercial BAC vector, the selected BAC vectors can be manipulated using the method described here to get the BAC-based expression vectors with desired gene clusters for heterologous expression. The rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector facilitates

  20. The development and characterisation of a bacterial artificial chromosome library for Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott Albert G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cultivated strawberry Fragaria ×ananassa is one of the most economically-important soft-fruit species. Few structural genomic resources have been reported for Fragaria and there exists an urgent need for the development of physical mapping resources for the genus. The first stage in the development of a physical map for Fragaria is the construction and characterisation of a high molecular weight bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library. Methods A BAC library, consisting of 18,432 clones was constructed from Fragaria vesca f. semperflorens accession 'Ali Baba'. BAC DNA from individual library clones was pooled to create a PCR-based screening assay for the library, whereby individual clones could be identified with just 34 PCR reactions. These pools were used to screen the BAC library and anchor individual clones to the diploid Fragaria reference map (FV×FN. Findings Clones from the BAC library developed contained an average insert size of 85 kb, representing over seven genome equivalents. The pools and superpools developed were used to identify a set of BAC clones containing 70 molecular markers previously mapped to the diploid Fragaria FV×FN reference map. The number of positive colonies identified for each marker suggests the library represents between 4× and 10× coverage of the diploid Fragaria genome, which is in accordance with the estimate of library coverage based on average insert size. Conclusion This BAC library will be used for the construction of a physical map for F. vesca and the superpools will permit physical anchoring of molecular markers using PCR.

  1. Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: A Functional Genomics Tool for the Study of Positive-strand RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetics, an approach to rescue infectious virus entirely from a cloned cDNA, has revolutionized the field of positive-strand RNA viruses, whose genomes have the same polarity as cellular mRNA. The cDNA-based reverse genetics system is a seminal method that enables direct manipulation of the viral genomic RNA, thereby generating recombinant viruses for molecular and genetic studies of both viral RNA elements and gene products in viral replication and pathogenesis. It also provides a valuable platform that allows the development of genetically defined vaccines and viral vectors for the delivery of foreign genes. For many positive-strand RNA viruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), however, the cloned cDNAs are unstable, posing a major obstacle to the construction and propagation of the functional cDNA. Here, the present report describes the strategic considerations in creating and amplifying a genetically stable full-length infectious JEV cDNA as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) using the following general experimental procedures: viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, cDNA subcloning and modification, assembly of a full-length cDNA, cDNA linearization, in vitro RNA synthesis, and virus recovery. This protocol provides a general methodology applicable to cloning full-length cDNA for a range of positive-strand RNA viruses, particularly those with a genome of >10 kb in length, into a BAC vector, from which infectious RNAs can be transcribed in vitro with a bacteriophage RNA polymerase. PMID:26780115

  2. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubells, Joseph F.; Schroeder, Jason P.; Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A.; Liles, L. Cameron; Squires, Katherine E.; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L.; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a “C” or a “T” at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh

  3. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubells, Joseph F; Schroeder, Jason P; Barrie, Elizabeth S; Manvich, Daniel F; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A; Liles, L Cameron; Squires, Katherine E; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a "C" or a "T" at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh deficiency

  4. Bacterial Selection from Shrimp Ponds for Degradation of Organic Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powtongsook, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of ammonia, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide in a shrimp pond is generally caused by incomplete degradation of residual organic matters from overfeeding and from organic wastes released by shrimps. The phenomenon affects shrimp growth and survival rate. The objectives of this investigation were to screen for a bacterial strain able to digest organic residues and to evaluate the changes of residues by bacterial activities under natural conditions. The results from this work showed that the isolated strain, Bacillus cereus S1, had the highest protease activity (57.1 U/ml with the presence of glucoamylase and lipase activities (4.5 and 0.13 U/ml, respectively. Under an aseptic condition in 1-L flasks containing seawater with 0.1% shrimp feed, B. cereus S1 degraded organic matters and significantly reduced chemical oxygen demand (COD (70.8%. An amount of ammonia-nitrogen was increased during the first 5 days of incubation due to the degradation of organic compounds in shrimp feed. However, it declined afterward with nitrate-nitrogen increase and unchanged nitrite nitrogen content. Under natural conditions in 10-L glass jars containing seawater with 0.05% shrimp feed and 0.05% sediment, B. cereus S1 and a commercial bacterial product (Inpicin-G could reduce COD (4.5% and 15.8%, respectively and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD (35.1 and 11.4%, respectively. However, similar changes of ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen contents in water samples were observed. The results indicate that this selected bacterium could reduce organic compound accumulations on a laboratory scale. In addition, the strain did not produce any enterotoxins compared to a toxin standard. Therefore, the bacterium, Bacillus cereus S1, could be applied to decrease organic matters accumulated in shrimp pond without any harm to shrimps or consumers.

  5. Recovery of infectious virus from full-length cowpox virus (CPXV) DNA cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Roth Swaantje J; Höper Dirk; Beer Martin; Feineis Silke; Tischer B Karsten; Osterrieder Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transmission from pet rats and cats to humans as well as severe infection in felids and other animal species have recently drawn increasing attention to cowpox virus (CPXV). We report the cloning of the entire genome of cowpox virus strain Brighton Red (BR) as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in Escherichia coli and the recovery of infectious virus from cloned DNA. Generation of a full-length CPXV DNA clone was achieved by first introducing a mini-F vector, which allows mainte...

  6. Fish Karyome version 2.1: a chromosome database of fishes and other aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Pati, Rameshwar; Rashid, Iliyas; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shri Prakash; Singh, Mahender; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Murali, S

    2016-01-01

    A voluminous information is available on karyological studies of fishes; however, limited efforts were made for compilation and curation of the available karyological data in a digital form. 'Fish Karyome' database was the preliminary attempt to compile and digitize the available karyological information on finfishes belonging to the Indian subcontinent. But the database had limitations since it covered data only on Indian finfishes with limited search options. Perceiving the feedbacks from the users and its utility in fish cytogenetic studies, the Fish Karyome database was upgraded by applying Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (pre hypertext processor) (LAMP) technologies. In the present version, the scope of the system was increased by compiling and curating the available chromosomal information over the globe on fishes and other aquatic organisms, such as echinoderms, molluscs and arthropods, especially of aquaculture importance. Thus, Fish Karyome version 2.1 presently covers 866 chromosomal records for 726 species supported with 253 published articles and the information is being updated regularly. The database provides information on chromosome number and morphology, sex chromosomes, chromosome banding, molecular cytogenetic markers, etc. supported by fish and karyotype images through interactive tools. It also enables the users to browse and view chromosomal information based on habitat, family, conservation status and chromosome number. The system also displays chromosome number in model organisms, protocol for chromosome preparation and allied techniques and glossary of cytogenetic terms. A data submission facility has also been provided through data submission panel. The database can serve as a unique and useful resource for cytogenetic characterization, sex determination, chromosomal mapping, cytotaxonomy, karyo-evolution and systematics of fishes. Database URL: http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/Fish_Karyome. PMID:26980518

  7. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae: emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes de Oliveira Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE. Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens.

  8. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies. PMID:19132072

  9. Aneuploidy: the impact of chromosome imbalance on nuclear organization and overall genome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, B; Coussement, A; Gilbert, T; Dumont, F; Jacques, S; Cuisset, L; Chicard, M; Hizem, S; Bourdoncle, P; Letourneur, F; Dupont, C; Vialard, F; Choiset, A; Dupont, J-M

    2016-07-01

    The organization and dynamics of chromatin within the interphase nucleus as chromosome territories (CTs) and the relationship with transcriptional regulation are not fully understood. We studied a natural example of chromosomal disorganization: aneuploidy due to trisomies 13, 18 and 21. We hypothesized that the presence of an extra copy of one chromosome alters the CT distribution, which perturbs transcriptional activity. We used 3D-FISH to study the position of the chromosomes of interest (18 and 21) in cultured amniocytes and chorionic villus cells from pregnancies with a normal or aneuploid karyotype. We studied the volumes of nuclei and CTs in both conditions and performed a compared transcriptome analysis. We did not observe any differences between euploid and aneuploid cells in terms of the radial and relative CT positions, suggesting that the same rules govern nuclear organization in cases of trisomy. We observed lower volumes for CTs 18 and 21. Overall genome expression profiles highlighted changes in the expression of a subset of genes in trisomic chromosomes, while the majority of transcriptional changes concerned genes located on euploid chromosomes. Our results suggest that a dosage imbalance of the genes on trisomic chromosomes is associated with a disturbance of overall genomic expression. PMID:27283765

  10. From organized internal traffic to collective navigation of bacterial swarms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial swarming resulting in collective navigation over surfaces provides a valuable example of cooperative colonization of new territories. The social bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits successful and diverse swarming strategies. When grown on hard agar surfaces with peptone, P. vortex develops complex colonies of vortices (rotating bacterial aggregates). In contrast, during growth on Mueller–Hinton broth gelled into a soft agar surface, a new strategy of multi-level organization is revealed: the colonies are organized into a special network of swarms (or ‘snakes’ of a fraction of millimeter in width) with intricate internal traffic. More specifically, cell movement is organized in two or three lanes of bacteria traveling between the back and the front of the swarm. This special form of cellular logistics suggests new methods in which bacteria can share resources and risk while searching for food or migrating into new territories. While the vortices-based organization on hard agar surfaces has been modeled before, here, we introduce a new multi-agent bacterial swarming model devised to capture the swarms-based organization on soft surfaces. We test two putative generic mechanisms that may underlie the observed swarming logistics: (i) chemo-activated taxis in response to chemical cues and (ii) special align-and-push interactions between the bacteria and the boundary of the layer of lubricant collectively generated by the swarming bacteria. Using realistic parameters, the model captures the observed phenomena with semi-quantitative agreement in terms of the velocity as well as the dynamics of the swarm and its envelope. This agreement implies that the bacteria interactions with the swarm boundary play a crucial role in mediating the interplay between the collective movement of the swarm and the internal traffic dynamics. (paper)

  11. From organized internal traffic to collective navigation of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Gil; Shklarsh, Adi; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial swarming resulting in collective navigation over surfaces provides a valuable example of cooperative colonization of new territories. The social bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits successful and diverse swarming strategies. When grown on hard agar surfaces with peptone, P. vortex develops complex colonies of vortices (rotating bacterial aggregates). In contrast, during growth on Mueller-Hinton broth gelled into a soft agar surface, a new strategy of multi-level organization is revealed: the colonies are organized into a special network of swarms (or ‘snakes’ of a fraction of millimeter in width) with intricate internal traffic. More specifically, cell movement is organized in two or three lanes of bacteria traveling between the back and the front of the swarm. This special form of cellular logistics suggests new methods in which bacteria can share resources and risk while searching for food or migrating into new territories. While the vortices-based organization on hard agar surfaces has been modeled before, here, we introduce a new multi-agent bacterial swarming model devised to capture the swarms-based organization on soft surfaces. We test two putative generic mechanisms that may underlie the observed swarming logistics: (i) chemo-activated taxis in response to chemical cues and (ii) special align-and-push interactions between the bacteria and the boundary of the layer of lubricant collectively generated by the swarming bacteria. Using realistic parameters, the model captures the observed phenomena with semi-quantitative agreement in terms of the velocity as well as the dynamics of the swarm and its envelope. This agreement implies that the bacteria interactions with the swarm boundary play a crucial role in mediating the interplay between the collective movement of the swarm and the internal traffic dynamics.

  12. Nucleolar Organization, Ribosomal DNA Array Stability, and Acrocentric Chromosome Integrity Are Linked to Telomere Function

    OpenAIRE

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M.; Sullivan, Lori L; Kuo, Molly E.; Sullivan, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The short arms of the ten acrocentric human chromosomes share several repetitive DNAs, including ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). The rDNA arrays correspond to nucleolar organizing regions that coalesce each cell cycle to form the nucleolus. Telomere disruption by expressing a mutant version of telomere binding protein TRF2 (dnTRF2) causes non-random acrocentric fusions, as well as large-scale nucleolar defects. The mechanisms responsible for acrocentric chromosome sensitivity to dysfunctional tel...

  13. Chromosomal organization and phylogenetic relationships in Hypochaeris species (Asteraceae) from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Claudete de Fátima Ruas; André L.L. Vanzela; Melissa O. Santos; Fregonezi, Jeferson N; Paulo Maurício Ruas; Nelson I. Matzenbacher; Margarida L.R. Aguiar-Perecin

    2005-01-01

    The association of cytogenetic and molecular techniques has contributed to the analysis of chromosome organization and phylogeny in plants. The fluorochrome GC-specific CMA3, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) markers were used to investigate chromosome structure and genetic relationships in Hypochaeris (Asteraceae). Seven species native to South America, and two species introduced from Europe (H. glabra and Hypochaeris sp) were studied. FISH ...

  14. Construction of an American mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Knud

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. Results Here, we report the construction and characterization of the CHORI-231 BAC library constructed from a Danish-farmed, male American mink (Neovison vison. The library contains approximately 165,888 clones with an average insert size of 170 kb, representing approximately 10-fold coverage. High-density filters, each consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs, representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library. These included candidate genes for coat coloring, hair growth and length, coarseness, and some receptors potentially involved in viral diseases in mink. The extensive screening yielded positive results for 19 of these genes. Thirty-five clones corresponding to 19 genes were sequenced using 454 Roche, and large contigs (184 kb in average were assembled. Knowing the complete sequences of these candidate genes will enable confirmation of the association with a phenotype and the finding of causative mutations for the targeted phenotypes. Additionally, 1577 BAC clones were end sequenced; 2505 BAC end sequences (80% of BACs were obtained. An excess of 2 Mb has been analyzed, thus giving a snapshot of the mink genome. Conclusions The availability of the CHORI-321 American mink BAC library will aid in identification of genes and genomic regions of interest. We have demonstrated how the library can be used to identify specific genes of interest, develop genetic markers, and for BAC end sequencing and deep sequencing of selected clones. To our knowledge, this is the

  15. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  16. Spatial organization shapes the turnover of a bacterial transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Pandey, Shristi; Boettiger, Alistair N; Wang, Siyuan; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the transcriptome has emerged as a powerful means for regulating the post-transcriptional fate of RNA in eukaryotes; however, whether prokaryotes use RNA spatial organization as a mechanism for post-transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here we used super-resolution microscopy to image the E. coli transcriptome and observed a genome-wide spatial organization of RNA: mRNAs encoding inner-membrane proteins are enriched at the membrane, whereas mRNAs encoding outer-membrane, cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins are distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Membrane enrichment is caused by co-translational insertion of signal peptides recognized by the signal-recognition particle. Time-resolved RNA-sequencing revealed that degradation rates of inner-membrane-protein mRNAs are on average greater that those of the other mRNAs and that this selective destabilization of inner-membrane-protein mRNAs is abolished by dissociating the RNA degradosome from the membrane. Together, these results demonstrate that the bacterial transcriptome is spatially organized and suggest that this organization shapes the post-transcriptional dynamics of mRNAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13065.001 PMID:27198188

  17. Confinement-Induced Glassy Dynamics in a Model for Chromosome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongsuk; Yoon, Young-Gui; Thirumalai, D.; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, P (s )˜s-1 with the genomic distance s , are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of P (s ) varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosomes inside a nucleus as a homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction (ϕ ) inside the confinement approaches a critical value ϕc. The universal value of ϕc∞≈0.44 for a sufficiently long polymer (N ≫1 ) allows us to discuss genome dynamics using ϕ as the sole parameter. Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the segregated chromosome organization in humans (N ≈3 ×109, ϕ ≳ϕc∞), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast (N ≈108, ϕ organization.

  18. Nucleolar organization, ribosomal DNA array stability, and acrocentric chromosome integrity are linked to telomere function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    Full Text Available The short arms of the ten acrocentric human chromosomes share several repetitive DNAs, including ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA. The rDNA arrays correspond to nucleolar organizing regions that coalesce each cell cycle to form the nucleolus. Telomere disruption by expressing a mutant version of telomere binding protein TRF2 (dnTRF2 causes non-random acrocentric fusions, as well as large-scale nucleolar defects. The mechanisms responsible for acrocentric chromosome sensitivity to dysfunctional telomeres are unclear. In this study, we show that TRF2 normally associates with the nucleolus and rDNA. However, when telomeres are crippled by dnTRF2 or RNAi knockdown of TRF2, gross nucleolar and chromosomal changes occur. We used the controllable dnTRF2 system to precisely dissect the timing and progression of nucleolar and chromosomal instability induced by telomere dysfunction, demonstrating that nucleolar changes precede the DNA damage and morphological changes that occur at acrocentric short arms. The rDNA repeat arrays on the short arms decondense, and are coated by RNA polymerase I transcription binding factor UBF, physically linking acrocentrics to one another as they become fusogenic. These results highlight the importance of telomere function in nucleolar stability and structural integrity of acrocentric chromosomes, particularly the rDNA arrays. Telomeric stress is widely accepted to cause DNA damage at chromosome ends, but our findings suggest that it also disrupts chromosome structure beyond the telomere region, specifically within the rDNA arrays located on acrocentric chromosomes. These results have relevance for Robertsonian translocation formation in humans and mechanisms by which acrocentric-acrocentric fusions are promoted by DNA damage and repair.

  19. Chromosomal organization of simple sequence repeats in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas): (GGAT)4, (GT)7 and (TA)10 chromosome patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Bouilly; R. Chaves; A. Leitão; A. Benabdelmouna; H. Guedes-Pinto

    2008-08-01

    Chromosome identification is essential in oyster genomic research. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for the identification of oyster chromosomes. It has been used to locate satellite DNAs, telomeres or ribosomal DNA sequences. However, regarding chromosome identification, no study has been conducted with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). FISH was used to probe the physical organization of three particular SSRs, (GGAT)4, (GT)7 and (TA)10 onto metaphase chromosomes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Hybridization signals were observed in all the SSR probes, but the distribution and intensity of signals varied according to the oligonucleotide repeat. The intercalary, centromeric and telomeric bands were observed along the chromosomes, and for each particular repeat every chromosome pair presented a similar pattern, allowing karyotypic analysis with all the SSRs tested. Our study is the first in mollusks to show the application of SSR in situ hybridization for chromosome identification and karyotyping. This technique can be a useful tool for oyster comparative studies and to understand genome organization in different oyster taxa.

  20. Using Mahalanobis distance to compare genomic signatures between bacterial plasmids and chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Haruo; Sota, Masahiro; Brown, Celeste J.; Top, Eva M.

    2008-01-01

    Plasmids are ubiquitous mobile elements that serve as a pool of many host beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities. To understand the importance of plasmids in horizontal gene transfer, we need to gain insight into the ‘evolutionary history’ of these plasmids, i.e. the range of hosts in which they have evolved. Since extensive data support the proposal that foreign DNA acquires the host's nucleotide composition during long-term residence, comparison of nucleoti...

  1. Recovery of infectious virus from full-length cowpox virus (CPXV DNA cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Swaantje J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transmission from pet rats and cats to humans as well as severe infection in felids and other animal species have recently drawn increasing attention to cowpox virus (CPXV. We report the cloning of the entire genome of cowpox virus strain Brighton Red (BR as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC in Escherichia coli and the recovery of infectious virus from cloned DNA. Generation of a full-length CPXV DNA clone was achieved by first introducing a mini-F vector, which allows maintenance of large circular DNA in E. coli, into the thymidine kinase locus of CPXV by homologous recombination. Circular replication intermediates were then electroporated into E. coli DH10B cells. Upon successful establishment of the infectious BR clone, we modified the full-length clone such that recombination-mediated excision of bacterial sequences can occur upon transfection in eukaryotic cells. This self-excision of the bacterial replicon is made possible by a sequence duplication within mini-F sequences and allows recovery of recombinant virus progeny without remaining marker or vector sequences. The in vitro growth properties of viruses derived from both BAC clones were determined and found to be virtually indistinguishable from those of parental, wild-type BR. Finally, the complete genomic sequence of the infectious clone was determined and the cloned viral genome was shown to be identical to that of the parental virus. In summary, the generated infectious clone will greatly facilitate studies on individual genes and pathogenesis of CPXV. Moreover, the vector potential of CPXV can now be more systematically explored using this newly generated tool.

  2. Organization of the R chromosome region in maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermicle, J.

    1992-03-01

    The maize R gene is said to show more phenotypic variation than any other locus in higher plants. The locus is organized on a modular basis. Individual units -- termed genic elements'' since they function as independent genes -- differ by regulating the presence, intensity and timing of anthocyanin pigmentation in different plant parts. A given allele may comprise only one genic element or, more commonly, an allele comprises a complex of elements, organized as a small gene family. Different numbers and combinations of even a few genic elements gives a large number of possible complexes. Following molecular cloning of R we concentrated effort initially on a genic element that confers strong pigmentation only to the kernel. The functional limits of this gene (R-sc:124) had been defined genetically by extensive mutagenesis with the transposable element Dissociation. Subsequently, a set of contiguous probes were prepared from a genomic clone of R-sc:124. This set of probes distinguishes among various R-genic elements, providing physical evidence on gene complexes whose overall organization had been determined genetically. Some surprises were in store, as detailed below. These same tools made it possible to analyze the effect of position of Ds insertion within R-sc:124 on spotting phenotype, germinal reversion rate and frequency of Ds excision. Furthermore, we are now able to address in much more detail some of the unique phenomena of R action, such as a difference in kernel phenotype when certain alleles are transmitted by ovules relative to sperm. The last category of objectives is discussed in the section entitled updated research plan.''

  3. Organization of the R chromosome region in maize. [Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermicle, J.

    1992-03-01

    The maize R gene is said to show more phenotypic variation than any other locus in higher plants. The locus is organized on a modular basis. Individual units -- termed ``genic elements`` since they function as independent genes -- differ by regulating the presence, intensity and timing of anthocyanin pigmentation in different plant parts. A given allele may comprise only one genic element or, more commonly, an allele comprises a complex of elements, organized as a small gene family. Different numbers and combinations of even a few genic elements gives a large number of possible complexes. Following molecular cloning of R we concentrated effort initially on a genic element that confers strong pigmentation only to the kernel. The functional limits of this gene (R-sc:124) had been defined genetically by extensive mutagenesis with the transposable element Dissociation. Subsequently, a set of contiguous probes were prepared from a genomic clone of R-sc:124. This set of probes distinguishes among various R-genic elements, providing physical evidence on gene complexes whose overall organization had been determined genetically. Some surprises were in store, as detailed below. These same tools made it possible to analyze the effect of position of Ds insertion within R-sc:124 on spotting phenotype, germinal reversion rate and frequency of Ds excision. Furthermore, we are now able to address in much more detail some of the unique phenomena of R action, such as a difference in kernel phenotype when certain alleles are transmitted by ovules relative to sperm. The last category of objectives is discussed in the section entitled ``updated research plan.``

  4. Intestine Bacterial Composition of the Chromosomal forms of genus Nannospalax and Comparison of Some Rodent Species

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun, Yüksel; El-Namee, Ausama; KAYA, Alaettin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, five selected different rodent species, Meriones tristrami (karyotype 2n=72 from Mardin/Turkey), Nannospalax ehrenbergi (karyotype 2n=52 from Diyarbakır/Turkey and Mosul/Iraq), Nannospalax nehringi (karyotype 2n = 60 from Sivas/Turkey), Rattus rattus (karyotype 2n=42 from Diyarbakır/Turkey), Sciurus anomalus (karyotype 2n=40 from Bingöl/Turkey) were studied in respect to bacterial species.The results showed the presence of two types of bacteria Pantoea agglomerans and Serratia ...

  5. Domain organization of human chromosomes revealed by mapping of nuclear lamina interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelen, Lars; Pagie, Ludo; Brasset, Emilie; Meuleman, Wouter; Faza, Marius B; Talhout, Wendy; Eussen, Bert H; de Klein, Annelies; Wessels, Lodewyk; de Laat, Wouter; van Steensel, Bas

    2008-06-12

    The architecture of human chromosomes in interphase nuclei is still largely unknown. Microscopy studies have indicated that specific regions of chromosomes are located in close proximity to the nuclear lamina (NL). This has led to the idea that certain genomic elements may be attached to the NL, which may contribute to the spatial organization of chromosomes inside the nucleus. However, sequences in the human genome that interact with the NL in vivo have not been identified. Here we construct a high-resolution map of the interaction sites of the entire genome with NL components in human fibroblasts. This map shows that genome-lamina interactions occur through more than 1,300 sharply defined large domains 0.1-10 megabases in size. These lamina-associated domains (LADs) are typified by low gene-expression levels, indicating that LADs represent a repressive chromatin environment. The borders of LADs are demarcated by the insulator protein CTCF, by promoters that are oriented away from LADs, or by CpG islands, suggesting possible mechanisms of LAD confinement. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the human genome is divided into large, discrete domains that are units of chromosome organization within the nucleus. PMID:18463634

  6. SEX-DETector: A Probabilistic Approach to Study Sex Chromosomes in Non-Model Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyle, Aline; Käfer, Jos; Zemp, Niklaus; Mousset, Sylvain; Picard, Franck; Marais, Gabriel AB

    2016-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic framework to infer autosomal and sex-linked genes from RNA-seq data of a cross for any sex chromosome type (XY, ZW, and UV). Sex chromosomes (especially the non-recombining and repeat-dense Y, W, U, and V) are notoriously difficult to sequence. Strategies have been developed to obtain partially assembled sex chromosome sequences. Most of them remain difficult to apply to numerous non-model organisms, either because they require a reference genome, or because they are designed for evolutionarily old systems. Sequencing a cross (parents and progeny) by RNA-seq to study the segregation of alleles and infer sex-linked genes is a cost-efficient strategy, which also provides expression level estimates. However, the lack of a proper statistical framework has limited a broader application of this approach. Tests on empirical Silene data show that our method identifies 20–35% more sex-linked genes than existing pipelines, while making reliable inferences for downstream analyses. Approximately 12 individuals are needed for optimal results based on simulations. For species with an unknown sex-determination system, the method can assess the presence and type (XY vs. ZW) of sex chromosomes through a model comparison strategy. The method is particularly well optimized for sex chromosomes of young or intermediate age, which are expected in thousands of yet unstudied lineages. Any organisms, including non-model ones for which nothing is known a priori, that can be bred in the lab, are suitable for our method. SEX-DETector and its implementation in a Galaxy workflow are made freely available. PMID:27492231

  7. SEX-DETector: A Probabilistic Approach to Study Sex Chromosomes in Non-Model Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyle, Aline; Käfer, Jos; Zemp, Niklaus; Mousset, Sylvain; Picard, Franck; Marais, Gabriel Ab

    2016-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic framework to infer autosomal and sex-linked genes from RNA-seq data of a cross for any sex chromosome type (XY, ZW, and UV). Sex chromosomes (especially the non-recombining and repeat-dense Y, W, U, and V) are notoriously difficult to sequence. Strategies have been developed to obtain partially assembled sex chromosome sequences. Most of them remain difficult to apply to numerous non-model organisms, either because they require a reference genome, or because they are designed for evolutionarily old systems. Sequencing a cross (parents and progeny) by RNA-seq to study the segregation of alleles and infer sex-linked genes is a cost-efficient strategy, which also provides expression level estimates. However, the lack of a proper statistical framework has limited a broader application of this approach. Tests on empirical Silene data show that our method identifies 20-35% more sex-linked genes than existing pipelines, while making reliable inferences for downstream analyses. Approximately 12 individuals are needed for optimal results based on simulations. For species with an unknown sex-determination system, the method can assess the presence and type (XY vs. ZW) of sex chromosomes through a model comparison strategy. The method is particularly well optimized for sex chromosomes of young or intermediate age, which are expected in thousands of yet unstudied lineages. Any organisms, including non-model ones for which nothing is known a priori, that can be bred in the lab, are suitable for our method. SEX-DETector and its implementation in a Galaxy workflow are made freely available. PMID:27492231

  8. Interchanges in popcorn (Zea mays L.) involving the nucleolus organizer chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Suely Pagliarini; Gléia Laverde Ricci; Neide da Silva; Carlos Alberto Scapim

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of microsporogenesis in endogamous plants of popcorn (S5 to S7) showed several and distinctinterchanges which involve the nucleolus organizer (chromosome 6). The detection of cells with interchanges was facilitatedby the presence of two nucleoli of different sizes in contrast to normal ones with a single big nucleolus. Interchange points donot always seem to be at the same place. Whereas in several situations the interchange point clearly involved more than twochromosome pairs, a...

  9. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides

    OpenAIRE

    Akpınar, Bala Anı; Akpinar, Bala Ani; Yüce, Meral; Yuce, Meral; Lucas, Stuart J.; Vrana, Jan; Buresova, Veronika; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Budak, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    Wild emmer wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is the wild relative of Triticum turgidum, the progenitor of durum and bread wheat, and maintains a rich allelic diversity among its wild populations. The lack of adequate genetic and genomic resources, however, restricts its exploitation in wheat improvement. Here, we report next-generation sequencing of the flow-sorted chromosome 5B of T. dicoccoides to shed light into its genome structure, function and organization by exploring the repet...

  10. Chromosomal G-dark Bands Determine the Spatial Organization of Centromeric Heterochromatin in the Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Célia; Pereira, Henrique M.; Ferreira, João; Pina, Cristina; Mendonça, Denise; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression can be silenced by proximity to heterochromatin blocks containing centromeric α-satellite DNA. This has been shown experimentally through cis-acting chromosome rearrangements resulting in linear genomic proximity, or through trans-acting changes resulting in intranuclear spatial proximity. Although it has long been been established that centromeres are nonrandomly distributed during interphase, little is known of what determines the three-dimensional organization of these sile...

  11. Isolation and characterization of organic-sulfur degradation bacterial strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yu; DIAO Meng-xue; SHI Wu-yang; LI Li; DAI Qin-yun; QIU Guan-zhou

    2007-01-01

    A bacterial strain that was capable of degrading organic sulfur (dibenzothiophene) was isolated by enrichment techniques from the petroleum-contaminated soil collected from Zhongyuan Oil Field. The strain is named ZYX and is gram-positive.This strain undergoes bacilus-coccus morphological change, and forms yellow-pigment glossy circular colonies with 1.5 mm in diameter on average after 2 d incubation on Luria-Bertani(LB) plates. The full-length of 16S rDNA sequence of strain ZYX was determined and analyzed. Strain ZYX is found most relative with the genus of Arthrobacter. The similarity values between ZYX and Arthrobacter sp. P2 is 99.53%. The main morphological, biochemical and physiological features of strain ZYX accord with those of Arthrobacter. It is found that the optimal initial pH for growth is about 7.0, and the optimal concentration of dibenzothiophene(DBT)for growth is 0.10 g/L. Additionally, the results show that the best carbon source and nitrogen source are glycerol and glutamine,respectively.

  12. Volatile organic compounds adsorption onto neat and hybrid bacterial cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Violeta Alexandra; Pârvulescu, Oana Cristina; Dobre, Tănase

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption dynamics of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) vapour from air streams onto fixed bed adsorbent were measured and simulated under various operation conditions. Isopropanol (IPA) and n-hexane (HEX) were selected as representatives of polar and nonpolar VOCs, whereas bacterial cellulose (BC) and BC incorporated with magnetite nanoparticles (M/BC), were tested as adsorbents. An experimental study emphasizing the influence of air superficial velocity (0.7 cm/s and 1.7 cm/s), operation temperature (30 °C and 40 °C), adsorbate and adsorbent type, on fixed bed saturation curves was conducted. Optimal adsorption performances evaluated in terms of saturation adsorption capacity were obtained for the adsorption of polar compound (IPA) onto M/BC composite (0.805 g/g) and of nonpolar compound (HEX) onto neat BC (0.795 g/g), respectively, at high values of air velocity and operation temperature. A mathematical model including mass balance of VOC species, whose parameters were fitted based on experimental data, was developed in order to predict the fixed bed saturation curves. A 23 statistical model indicating a significant increase in adsorption performances with process temperature was validated under the experimental conditions.

  13. Bacterial utilization of size-fractionated dissolved organic matter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B; Bhosle, N.B

    ), dissolved uronic acid (DURA), delta13C, bacterial abundance (BA), and bacterial production (BP). The LMW fraction was isotopically heavier (delta13C = −23.7 to −21.7ppt) than the HMW fraction (delta13C = −27.0 to −26.2ppt), and the initial TDCHO content...

  14. Analysis of herpesvirus host specificity determinants using herpesvirus genomes as bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Jun; Kato, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tohya, Yukinobu; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2009-08-01

    Almost all mammalian alphaherpesviruses can grow in cells derived from several types of animals in vitro. However, FHV-1 can only infect feline cell lines. For this reason, FHV-1 should be a good model to investigate species barriers to herpesviruses in vivo. To apply bacterial mutagenesis of FHV-1, we cloned the FHV-1 genome as a BAC. Using lambda and flp recombinations, we introduced a monomeric red fluorescence protein into the C-terminus of glycoprotein D. Although GFP in the constructed recombinant FHV-1, a transfectant of the bacmid of FHV-1 that possessed the GFP, acted in non-feline cell lines, the virus could not enter non-feline cell lines, demonstrating that the host specificity of FHV-1 was restricted in an early step of infection. The host range of canine herpesvirus is limited to dogs in vitro and in vivo; it cannot enter non-canine cell lines as a result of infection but the GFP is active by transfection, revealing the same result that the restriction step is at an early stage of infection. These results suggest the possibility of breaking species barriers of FHV-1 and CHV by modifying the gene(s) that act at the early stage of infection. PMID:19659927

  15. Viral Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: Generation, Mutagenesis, and Removal of Mini-F Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Karsten Tischer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance and manipulation of large DNA and RNA virus genomes had presented an obstacle for virological research. BAC vectors provided a solution to both problems as they can harbor large DNA sequences and can efficiently be modified using well-established mutagenesis techniques in Escherichia coli. Numerous DNA virus genomes of herpesvirus and pox virus were cloned into mini-F vectors. In addition, several reverse genetic systems for RNA viruses such as members of Coronaviridae and Flaviviridae could be established based on BAC constructs. Transfection into susceptible eukaryotic cells of virus DNA cloned as a BAC allows reconstitution of recombinant viruses. In this paper, we provide an overview on the strategies that can be used for the generation of virus BAC vectors and also on systems that are currently available for various virus species. Furthermore, we address common mutagenesis techniques that allow modification of BACs from single-nucleotide substitutions to deletion of viral genes or insertion of foreign sequences. Finally, we review the reconstitution of viruses from BAC vectors and the removal of the bacterial sequences from the virus genome during this process.

  16. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  17. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of thermo-sensitive genic male-sterile rice 5460S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱芳; 金德敏; 伏健民; 张超良; 谢纬武; 王斌; 杨仁崔; 张洪斌

    1999-01-01

    In order to develop a detailed physical map of the thermo-sensitive genie male-sterile (TGMS) gene-encompassing region and finally clone the TGMS gene, a high-quality rice bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from TGMS rice 5460S was constructed. The method of constructing BAC library was examined and optimized. The 5460S library consists of 19 584 BAC clones with an average insert size of 110 kb, which represents about 5 times rice haploid genome equivalents. Rice inserts of up to 140 kb and 250 kb were isolated and appeared stable after 100 generations of serial growth. Hybridization of BAC clones with mitochondrial and chloroplastic genes as probes demonstrated that this library has no organellar contamination. The 5460S library was screened with 3 molecular markers linked to tmsl gene as probes and at least 1 BAC clone was identified with each probe. The insert ends of positive clones were successfully isolated using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) technique.

  18. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii: a new resource for plant comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapple Clint

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lycophytes are an ancient lineage of vascular plants that diverged from the seed plant lineage about 400 Myr ago. Although the lycophytes occupy an important phylogenetic position for understanding the evolution of plants and their genomes, no genomic resources exist for this group of plants. Results Here we describe the construction of a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Based on cell flow cytometry, this species has the smallest genome size among the different lycophytes tested, including Huperzia lucidula, Diphaiastrum digita, Isoetes engelmanii and S. kraussiana. The arrayed BAC library consists of 9126 clones; the average insert size is estimated to be 122 kb. Inserts of chloroplast origin account for 2.3% of the clones. The BAC library contains an estimated ten genome-equivalents based on DNA hybridizations using five single-copy and two duplicated S. moellendorffii genes as probes. Conclusion The S. moellenforffii BAC library, the first to be constructed from a lycophyte, will be useful to the scientific community as a resource for comparative plant genomics and evolution.

  19. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Blanco; Sara Hernando-Amado; Jose Antonio Reales-Calderon; Fernando Corona; Felipe Lira; Manuel Alcalde-Rico; Alejandra Bernardini; Maria Blanca Sanchez; Jose Luis Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of ant...

  20. A Self-Excisable Infectious Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone of Varicella-Zoster Virus Allows Analysis of the Essential Tegument Protein Encoded by ORF9▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tischer, B. Karsten; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Sommer, Marvin; Wussow, Felix; Ann M Arvin; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2007-01-01

    In order to facilitate the generation of mutant viruses of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the agent causing varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles), we generated a full-length infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of the P-Oka strain. First, mini-F sequences were inserted into a preexisting VZV cosmid, and the SuperCos replicon was removed. Subsequently, mini-F-containing recombinant virus was generated from overlapping cosmid clones, and full-length VZV DNA recov...

  1. Autoexcision of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Facilitated by Terminal Repeat-Mediated Homologous Recombination: a Novel Approach for Generating Traceless Genetic Mutants of Herpesviruses ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Fuchun; Li, Qiuhua; Wong, Scott W.; Gao, Shou-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of herpesviruses are powerful tools for genetic manipulation. However, the presence of BAC vector sequence in the viral genomes often causes genetic and phenotypic alterations. While the excision of the BAC vector cassette can be achieved by homologous recombination between extra duplicate viral sequences or loxP site-mediated recombination, these methods either are inefficient or leave a loxP site mark in the viral genome. Here we describe t...

  2. Cloning of the Full-Length Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Genome as an Infectious and Self-Excisable Bacterial Artificial Chromosome for Analysis of Viral Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, W. L. William; Peter A Barry

    2003-01-01

    Rigorous investigation of many functions encoded by cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) requires analysis in the context of virus-host interactions. To facilitate the construction of rhesus CMV (RhCMV) mutants for in vivo studies, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cassette was engineered into the intergenic region between unique short 1 (US1) and US2 of the full-length viral genome by Cre/lox-mediated recombination. Infectious virions were re...

  3. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii: a new resource for plant comparative genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Chapple Clint; Carlson John; Arumuganathan K; Mueller Christopher; Kudrna Dave; Weng Jing-Ke; Kim Hye Ran; Sisneros Nicholas; Luo Meizhong; Tanurdzic Milos; Wang Wenming; de Pamphilis Claude; Mandoli Dina; Tomkins Jeff; Wing Rod A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The lycophytes are an ancient lineage of vascular plants that diverged from the seed plant lineage about 400 Myr ago. Although the lycophytes occupy an important phylogenetic position for understanding the evolution of plants and their genomes, no genomic resources exist for this group of plants. Results Here we describe the construction of a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Based on cell flow cytomet...

  4. A high-throughput strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries and anchoring of clones on a genetic map constructed with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Deal Karin R; Ma Yaqin; Xu Kenong; Luo Ming-Cheng; Nicolet Charles M; Dvorak Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Current techniques of screening bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries for molecular markers during the construction of physical maps are slow, laborious and often assign multiple BAC contigs to a single locus on a genetic map. These limitations are the principal impediment in the construction of physical maps of large eukaryotic genomes. It is hypothesized that this impediment can be overcome by screening multidimensional pools of BAC clones using the highly para...

  5. Production of High-Titer Epstein-Barr Virus Recombinants Derived from Akata Cells by Using a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome System

    OpenAIRE

    Kanda, Teru; Yajima, Misako; Ahsan, Nazmul; Tanaka, Mika; Takada, Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    An Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome in Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell line Akata was cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector. The BAC clone, designated AK-BAC, was rapidly and precisely modified by means of efficient homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. This system was used to produce recombinant EBVs with transgenes. An expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted into AK-BAC, and the resultant BAC clone, AK-BAC-GFP, was transfected into Aka...

  6. A high-throughput strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries and anchoring of clones on a genetic map constructed with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ming-Cheng; Xu, Kenong; Ma, Yaqin; Karin R Deal; Nicolet, Charles M.; Dvorak, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background Current techniques of screening bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries for molecular markers during the construction of physical maps are slow, laborious and often assign multiple BAC contigs to a single locus on a genetic map. These limitations are the principal impediment in the construction of physical maps of large eukaryotic genomes. It is hypothesized that this impediment can be overcome by screening multidimensional pools of BAC clones using the highly parallel Illu...

  7. Association Between Pachytene Chromosomes and Linkage Groups in Carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of carrot (Daucus carota L.) consists of ~ 480 Mb/1C organized in 9 chromosome pairs. The importance of carrots in human nutrition is triggering the development of genomic resources, including carrot linkage maps, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone library and BAC end sequence...

  8. Interchanges in popcorn (Zea mays L. involving the nucleolus organizer chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suely Pagliarini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of microsporogenesis in endogamous plants of popcorn (S5 to S7 showed several and distinctinterchanges which involve the nucleolus organizer (chromosome 6. The detection of cells with interchanges was facilitatedby the presence of two nucleoli of different sizes in contrast to normal ones with a single big nucleolus. Interchange points donot always seem to be at the same place. Whereas in several situations the interchange point clearly involved more than twochromosome pairs, a simple terminal translocation seemed to occur in others. During diplotene, a cross-shaped configurationconnected with the nucleoli was observed in some meiocytes. Some heteromorphic bivalents were found during diakinesis,after which meiosis progressed normally to the end and gave rise to apparently normal tetrads with one normal nucleolus ineach microspore. Tests of pollen viability in fixed pollen grains showed 100% stainability in normal and in affected plants.This is the first report on chromosome interchanges in popcorn.

  9. Spatial Organization of Dual-Species Bacterial Aggregates on Leaf Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S E

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of cells within bacterial aggregates on leaf surfaces was determined for pair-wise mixtures of three different bacterial species commonly found on leaves, Pseudomonas syringae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Cells were coinoculated onto bean plants and allowed to grow under moist conditions, and the resulting aggregates were examined in situ by epifluorescence microscopy. Each bacterial strain could be localized because it expressed either the green...

  10. Dynamic spatial organization of multi-protein complexes controlling microbial polar organization, chromosome replication, and cytokinesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucille; Horowitz, Mark; Andersen, Gary; Downing, Kenneth; Earnest, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Gitai, Zemer; Larabell, Carolyn; Viollier, Patrick

    2012-06-18

    This project was a program to develop high-throughput methods to identify and characterize spatially localized multiprotein complexes in bacterial cells. We applied a multidisciplinary systems engineering approach to the detailed characterization of localized multi-protein structures in vivo a problem that has previously been approached on a fragmented, piecemeal basis.

  11. Chromosomal organization and phylogenetic relationships in Hypochaeris species (Asteraceae from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete de Fátima Ruas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The association of cytogenetic and molecular techniques has contributed to the analysis of chromosome organization and phylogeny in plants. The fluorochrome GC-specific CMA3, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA markers were used to investigate chromosome structure and genetic relationships in Hypochaeris (Asteraceae. Seven species native to South America, and two species introduced from Europe (H. glabra and Hypochaeris sp were studied. FISH with rDNA probes identified one or two loci of 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA in the South American Hypochaeris species and one locus in the European species. Only one 5S rDNA locus was seen in all species studied. Blocks of GC-rich heterochromatin (CMA-positive bands associated to 18S-5.8S-25SrDNA loci were detected in all species investigated. Co-location of 5S rDNA and CMA bands was also observed, except for three South American species and Hypochaeris sp. In two South American species, additional CMA bands not related to rDNA were observed on the long arm of chromosome 2, near to the centromere. Hypochaeris glabra exhibited additional CMA-positive signals distributed at pericentromeric regions, on the short arms of all chromosomes. A total of 122 RAPD markers were used to determine the genetic relationships among species. The level of polymorphism was very high, revealing two genetic groups comprising the South American and the European species, thus supporting a previous hypothesis of monophyly of the South American Hypochaeris species. The coefficients of genetic similarity between European and South American species were 0.35, on average. Polymorphism was also high within the two groups. The genetic associations observed with RAPD markers were consistent with chromosome characteristics. Species carrying similar distribution of 45S rDNA loci and CMA-positive signals were included in the same group revealed by RAPDs. Cytogenetic and molecular data support the view that

  12. Construction and Identification of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library for 0-613-2R in Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library containing a large genomic DNA insert is an important tool for genome physical mapping, map-based cloning, and genome sequencing. To isolate genes via a map-based cloning strategy and to perform physical mapping of the cotton genome, a high-quality BAC library containing large cotton DNA inserts is needed. We have developed a BAC library of the restoring line 0-613-2R for isolating the fertility restorer (Rf1) gene and genomic research in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The BAC library contains 97 825 clones stored in 255 pieces of a 384-well microtiter plate. Random samples of BACs digested with the Notl enzyme indicated that the average insert size is approximately 130 kb, with a range of 80-275 kb,and 95.7% of the BAC clones in the library have an average insert size larger than 100 kb. Based on a cotton genome size of 2 250 Mb, library coverage is 5.7 x haploid genome equivalents. Four clones were selected randomly from the library to determine the stability of the BAC clones. There were no different fingerprints for 0 and 100 generations of each clone digested with Notl and Hindlll enzymes. Thus, the stability of a single BAC clone can be sustained at least for 100 generations. Eight simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers flanking the Rf1 gene were chosen to screen the BAC library by pool using PCR method and 25 positive clones were identified with 3.1 positive clones per SSR marker.

  13. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and a preliminary genome survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoko Hidetoshi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Results The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 × 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6–28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50–90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. Conclusion We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  14. The R-Operon: A Model of Repetitive DNA-Organized Transcriptional Compartmentation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes for Coordinated Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to coordinate the activity of genes that function together to fulfill the same biological processes. Genomic organization likely plays a key role in coordinating transcription of different genes. However, little is known about how co-regulated genes are organized in the cell nucleus and how the chromosomal organization facilitates the co-regulation of different genes. I propose that eukaryotic genomes are organized into repeat assembly (RA)-based structural domains (“R-operons”) in the nuclear space. R-operons result from the interaction of homologous DNA repeats. In an R-operon, genes in different loci of the linear genome are brought into spatial vicinity and co-regulated by the same pool of transcription factors. This type of large-scale chromosomal organization may provide a mechanism for functional compartmentation of chromosomes to facilitate the transcriptional coordination of gene expression. PMID:27110825

  15. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization as a Genetic Technology to Analyzing Chromosomal Organization of Alien Wheat Recombinant Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization is a valuable method for physical mapping of DNA sequence to chromosomes and genomes and to analyzing their organization, diversity, evolution and function. Using genomic DNA the origin of chromatin in hybrids and alien introgression lines can be identified and followed through breeding programmes. We have applied this technology to study the chromosome composition of new recombinants and genomes derived from spontaneous and induced translocations in particular involving rye and the goat grass Thinoyrum intermedium that transfer disease and stress resistance to wheat. We have established flow diagrammes for easy identification of the alien chromosome material. (author)

  16. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Bala Ani; Yuce, Meral; Lucas, Stuart; Vrána, Jan; Burešová, Veronika; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    Wild emmer wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is the wild relative of Triticum turgidum, the progenitor of durum and bread wheat, and maintains a rich allelic diversity among its wild populations. The lack of adequate genetic and genomic resources, however, restricts its exploitation in wheat improvement. Here, we report next-generation sequencing of the flow-sorted chromosome 5B of T. dicoccoides to shed light into its genome structure, function and organization by exploring the repetitive elements, protein-encoding genes and putative microRNA and tRNA coding sequences. Comparative analyses with its counterparts in modern and wild wheats suggest clues into the B-genome evolution. Syntenic relationships of chromosome 5B with the model grasses can facilitate further efforts for fine-mapping of traits of interest. Mapping of 5B sequences onto the root transcriptomes of two additional T. dicoccoides genotypes, with contrasting drought tolerances, revealed several thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which 584 shared polymorphisms on 228 transcripts were specific to the drought-tolerant genotype. To our knowledge, this study presents the largest genomics resource currently available for T. dicoccoides, which, we believe, will encourage the exploitation of its genetic and genomic potential for wheat improvement to meet the increasing demand to feed the world. PMID:26084265

  17. Chromosomal organization of the ribosomal RNA genes in the genus Chironomus (Diptera, Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Gunderina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal localization of ribosomal RNA coding genes has been studied by using FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization in 21 species from the genus Chironomus Meigen, 1803. Analysis of the data has shown intra- and interspecific variation in number and location of 5.8S rDNA hybridization sites in 17 species from the subgenus Chironomus and 4 species from the subgenus Camptochironomus Kieffer, 1914. In the majority of studied species the location of rDNA sites coincided with the sites where active NORs (nucleolus organizer regions were found. The number of hybridization sites in karyotypes of studied chironomids varied from 1 to 6. More than half of the species possessed only one NOR (12 out of 21. Two rDNA hybridization sites were found in karyotypes of five species, three – in two species, and five and six sites – in one species each. NORs were found in all chromosomal arms of species from the subgenus Chironomus with one of them always located on arm G. On the other hand, no hybridization sites were found on arm G in four studied species from the subgenus Camptochironomus. Two species from the subgenus Chironomus – Ch. balatonicus Devai, Wuelker & Scholl, 1983 and Ch. “annularius” sensu Strenzke, 1959 – showed intraspecific variability in the number of hybridization signals. Possible mechanisms of origin of variability in number and location of rRNA genes in the karyotypes of species from the genus Chironomus are discussed.

  18. Ultraviolet light induced changes in the organization of mitotic chromosomes in porphyria cutanea tarda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome decondensation or attenuation can be induced with ultraviolet light, particularly in the presence of inhibitors of semiconservative DNA synthesis, such as hydroxyurea. The rate of decondensation of metaphase chromosomes from lymphocyte cultures of healthy controls and patients with porphyria cutanea tarda has been compared after ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of hydroxyurea. Chromosomes of the patients attenuated more readily than the control ones at all UV doses. The possibilities causing such differences in the profile of chromosome decondensation are discussed

  19. Bacterial meningitis in newborn and infant: correlation between organism, CT findings and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute bacterial meningitis often results in significant neurologic complications regardless of the antibiotics treatment Computed tomographic (CT) finding of tuberculous meningitis is fairly well known but not the findings of bacterial meningitis. This study was performed to determine the incidence of causative organisms and to correlate between the organisms and computed tomographic (CT) findings with clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis in newborns and infants. We analyzed the brain CT and clinical records of 15 infants who had been diagnosed as bacterial meningitis by CSF culture. We found that the most common organisms were Group B streptococcus in neonates without no neurologic complications in all but one and Hemophilus influenza in infants whose clinical outcomes were poor in all except one. CT findings related with poor prognosis in this study were cerebral edema, basal cisternal obliteration and enhancement, and cerebral infarction on initial CT and ventriculomegaly on follow-up CT. We concluded that CT diagnosed intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis well and could contributed to better treatment of bacterial meningitis

  20. Bioavailability of surface dissolved organic matter to aphotic bacterial communities in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Sipler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antarctic seas, and particularly the Amundsen Sea Polynya, are some of the most productive oceanic regions on Earth. Ice-algal production during austral spring is followed by open-water pelagic production later in the season. Although ice-free growth accounts for a greater percentage of the annual net primary production, ice algae provide an important source of nutrients to organisms throughout the water column and benthos in areas and seasons when open-water production is insignificant. The objectives of this study were to assess the bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM, sourced from ice algae or the chlorophyll maximum (chl max, to marine bacterioplankton and to determine the fate of carbon within these different DOM pools, including loss to respiration, incorporation into bacterial biomass and retention within the DOM pool itself. Nutrient concentrations and bacterial abundance, production, and cell volume were monitored during a 7-day bioassay study involving four treatments conducted shipboard in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica. The greatest response in bacterial abundance and activity was observed when ice-algal meltwater was supplied to aphotic zone bacterioplankton collected from 170-m depth. However, bacterial growth efficiency was higher (24% when chl max water was supplied to the same aphotic zone bacterial community compared to the bacterial growth efficiency of the ice-algal treatment (15%. Approximately 15% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC from the ice-algal source and 18% from the chl max was consumed by aphotic bacterial communities over the relatively short, one-week incubation. In contrast, 65% of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON added as an integral part of the ice-algal DOM was consumed, but none of the DON supplied with chl max water was labile. This study underscores the importance of considering DOM sources when investigating or predicting changes in carbon and nitrogen cycling within the

  1. Bacterial diversity in Greenlandic soils as affected by potato cropping and inorganic versus organic fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Charlotte Frydenlund; Pedas, Pai Rosager; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    limited research has been performed on the effects of these treatments on bacterial communities in Arctic and Subarctic agricultural soils. The major objective of this study was to investigate the short-term impact of conventional (NPK) and organic (sheep manure supplemented with nitrogen) fertilizer...... treatments on bacterial diversity, nutrient composition and crop yield in two Greenlandic agricultural soils. An effect of fertilizer was found on soil and plant nutrient levels and on crop yields. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences did not reveal any major changes in the overall bacterial community...... composition as a result of different fertilizer treatments, indicating a robust microbial community in these soils. In addition, differences in nutrient levels, crop yields and bacterial abundances were found between the two field sites and the two experimental growth seasons, which likely reflect differences...

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Donor-Derived Infections in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jessica D; Sifri, Costi D

    2016-06-01

    Although rare, donor-derived infections (DDIs) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria can have devastating consequences for organ transplant recipients. Recognition of MDR bacterial DDIs can be challenging, as MDR bacteria are prevalent in most hospitals and distinguishing their transmission through transplantation from other, more typical routes of acquisition are difficult. New technologies such as whole genome sequencing have recently proven to be a powerful advance in the investigation of MDR bacterial DDIs. Once recognized, the optimal treatment of MDR bacterial DDIs is not clear. Herein, we review the clinical manifestations, outcomes, and management of MDR bacterial DDIs, and identify areas of uncertainty toward which the transplant community should direct further research efforts. PMID:27115701

  3. Origin and molecular organization of supernumerary chromosomes of Prochilodus lineatus (characiformes, prochilodontidae) obtained by DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltolin, Tatiana Aparecida; Laudicina, Alejandro; Senhorini, José Augusto; Bortolozzi, Jehud; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2010-12-01

    In Prochilodus lineatus B-chromosomes are visualized as reduced size extra elements identified as microchromosomes and are variable in morphology and number. We describe the specific total probe (B-chromosome probe) in P. lineatus obtained by chromosome microdissection and a whole genomic probe (genomic probe) from an individual without B-chromosome. The specific B-chromosome was scraped and processed to obtain DNA with amplification by DOP-PCR, and so did the genomic probe DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using the B-chromosome probe labeled with dUTP-Tetramethyl-rhodamine and the genomic probe labeled with digoxigenin-FITC permitted to establish that in this species supernumerary chromosomes with varying number and morphology had different structure of chromatin when compared to that of the regular chromosomes or A complement, since only these extra elements were labeled in the metaphases. The present findings suggest that modifications in the chromatin structure of B-chromosomes to differentiate them from the A chromosomes could occur along their dispersion in the individuals of the population. PMID:20872170

  4. Brain organization in a reptile lacking sex chromosomes: effects of gonadectomy and exogenous testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, D; Coomber, P; Baldwin, R; Azad, N; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    1996-12-01

    In mammals, males and females differ both genetically and hormonally, making it difficult to assess the relative contributions of genetic constitution and fetal environment in the process of sexual differentiation. Many reptiles lack sex chromosomes, relying instead on the temperature of incubation to determine sex. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), an incubation temperature of 26 degrees C produces all females, whereas 32.5 degrees C results in mostly males. Incubation temperature is the primary determinant of differences both within and between the sexes in growth, physiology, and sociosexual behavior, as well as the volume and metabolic capacity of specific brain nuclei. To determine if incubation temperature organizes the brain directly rather than via gonadal sex hormones, the gonads of male and female leopard geckos from the two incubation temperatures were removed and, in some instances, animals were given exogenous testosterone. In vertebrates with sex chromosomes, the size of sexually dimorphic nuclei are sensitive to hormone levels in adulthood, but in all species studied to date, these changes are restricted to the male. Therefore, after behavior tests, morphometrics of certain limbic and nonlimbic brain areas were determined. Because nervous system tissue depends on oxidative metabolism for energy production and the level of cytochrome oxidase activity is coupled to the functional level of neuronal activity, cytochrome oxidase histochemistry also was performed on the same brains. Hormonal manipulation had little effect on the volume of the preoptic area or ventromedial hypothalamus in geckos from the all-female incubation temperature, but significantly influenced the volumes of these brain areas in males and females from the male-biased incubation temperature. A similar relationship was found for cytochrome oxidase activity of the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, dorsal ventricular ridge, and septum. The only sex difference observed was

  5. A BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOME CONTIG SPANNING THE MAJOR DOMESTICATION LOCUS Q IN WHEAT AND IDENTIFICATION OF A CANDIDATE GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Q locus played a major role in the domestication of wheat because it confers the free-threshing character and influences many other agronomically important traits. We constructed a physical contig spanning the Q locus using a Triticum monococcum BAC library. Four chromosome walking steps were ...

  6. Organic amendment of crop soil and its relation to hotspots of bacterial nitrogen cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily; McMillan, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Crop production in Australian soils requires a high use of fertilisers, including N, P and K for continues utilisation of the soil. Growers often grow crops in rotation of summer crop, such as cotton with winter crop, such as wheat in the same field. Growers are getting more and more aware about sustainability of the soil resources and the more adventurous ones use soil amendments, such as organic supplements in addition to the chemical fertilisers. We have collected soil samples from fields that were cultivated in preparation for planting cotton and tested the soil for its bacterial populations with potential to perform different functions, including those related to the nitrogen cycling. One of our aims was to determine whether organic amendments create hotspots for bacterial functions related to bacterial nitrogen cycling. This pan of the project will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  8. csi2p modulates microtubule dynamics and organizes the bipolar spindle for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Judite; Fu, Chuanhai; Khare, V. Mohini; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    Proper chromosome segregation is of paramount importance for proper genetic inheritance. Defects in chromosome segregation can lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Eukaryotic chromosome segregation is accomplished by the bipolar spindle. Additional mechanisms, such as the spindle assembly checkpoint and centromere positioning, further help to ensure complete segregation fidelity. Here we present the fission yeast csi2 +. csi2p localizes to the spindle poles, where it regul...

  9. Organ donation from a patient with bacterial meningoencephalitis -- the first case in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopcević, Aleksandar; Gavranović, Zeljka; Pavlović, Milan

    2011-06-01

    The growing number of patients with terminal organ failure waiting for transplantation and the limited number of available organs demand that explantation teams see brain-dead patients with infectious diseases such as bacterial meningoencephalitis as potential donors, although until recently organ explantation from such donors has been contraindicated. This paper presents the first case of successful organ explantation from a donor with confirmed bacterial meningoencephalitis in our country. In this previously healthy patient (only with mild arterial hypertension in personal history), bacterial meningoencephalitis caused fulminant worsening and he deteriorated from mild disorder of consciousness (GCS 12) to brain death within only 24 hours. After the transplantation of organs was performed (heart, kidneys, liver and corneas were explanted), antibiotic therapy was continued in all organ recipients and two days after the transplantation none of the recipients showed any signs of infectious complications. This paper proves that this type of patients should also be treated as potential donors, under condition of appropriate microbiological diagnosis, antibiotic therapy and sustained hemodynamic stability, which should enlarge the number of organs available for transplantation. PMID:22263393

  10. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ON ORGANIC CARBON MINERALIZATION IN SOIL, USING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purified lignin peroxidase was added to sterile and nonsterile silt loam soil to study the effects of bacterial lignin peroxidase ALip-P3 of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A on the rate of organic carbon turnover in soil. ignin peroxidase ALip-P3 appears to affect the short-term tur...

  11. Understanding the Dispersion and Assembly of Bacterial Cellulose in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Auren; Khan, Umar; Walsh, Melissa; Lee, Koon-Yang; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P; Coleman, Jonathan N; Bergin, Shane D

    2016-05-01

    The constituent nanofibrils of bacterial cellulose are of interest to many researchers because of their purity and excellent mechanical properties. Mechanisms to disrupt the network structure of bacterial cellulose (BC) to isolate bacterial cellulose nanofibrils (BCN) are limited. This work focuses on liquid-phase dispersions of BCN in a range of organic solvents. It builds on work to disperse similarly intractable nanomaterials, such as single-walled carbon nanotubes, where optimum dispersion is seen for solvents whose surface energies are close to the surface energy of the nanomaterial; bacterial cellulose is shown to disperse in a similar fashion. Inverse gas chromatography was used to determine the surface energy of bacterial cellulose, under relevant conditions, by quantifying the surface heterogeneity of the material as a function of coverage. Films of pure BCN were prepared from dispersions in a range of solvents; the extent of BCN exfoliation is shown to have a strong effect on the mechanical properties of BC films and to fit models based on the volumetric density of nanofibril junctions. Such control offers new routes to producing robust cellulose films of bacterial cellulose nanofibrils. PMID:27007744

  12. Construction of an Excisable Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Containing a Full-Length Infectious Clone of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1: Viruses Reconstituted from the Clone Exhibit Wild-Type Properties In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Michiko; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamanashi, Yuji; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, several laboratories have reported on the cloning of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genomes as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) in Escherichia coli and on procedures to manipulate these genomes by using the bacterial recombination machinery. However, the HSV-BACs reported so far are either replication incompetent or infectious, with a deletion of one or more viral genes due to the BAC vector insertion. For use as a multipurpose clone in research on HSV-1, we attem...

  13. The susceptibility of organisms associated with bacterial vaginosis to spermicidal compounds, in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, B.M.; Willcox, L M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a prevalent vaginal infection that is now regarded as a risk factor in more serious pelvic and obstetric complications. Spermicides are known to have antimicrobial activity against other sexually transmitted diseases and the aim of this study was to test whether the causative organisms of BV were also susceptible to spermicides, in vitro. DESIGN--Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations of five spermicidal compounds were determined for the organisms associated...

  14. The Selection and Use of Sorghum (Sorghum propinquum Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes as Cytogenetic FISH Probes for Maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie M. Figueroa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of genetic and physical maps of maize is progressing rapidly, but the cytogenetic maps lag behind, with the exception of the pachytene fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH maps of maize chromosome 9. We sought to produce integrated FISH maps of other maize chromosomes using Core Bin Marker loci. Because these 1 Kb restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP probes are below the FISH detection limit, we used BACs from sorghum, a small-genome relative of maize, as surrogate clones for FISH mapping. We sequenced 151 maize RFLP probes and compared in silico BAC selection methods to that of library filter hybridization and found the latter to be the best. BAC library screening, clone verification, and single-clone selection criteria are presented along with an example of transgenomic BAC FISH mapping. This strategy has been used to facilitate the integration of RFLP and FISH maps in other large-genome species.

  15. The selection and use of sorghum (Sorghum propinquum) bacterial artificial chromosomes as cytogenetic FISH probes for maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Davis, James D; Strobel, Cornelia; Conejo, Maria S; Beckham, Katherine D; Ring, Brian C; Bass, Hank W

    2011-01-01

    The integration of genetic and physical maps of maize is progressing rapidly, but the cytogenetic maps lag behind, with the exception of the pachytene fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) maps of maize chromosome 9. We sought to produce integrated FISH maps of other maize chromosomes using Core Bin Marker loci. Because these 1 Kb restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes are below the FISH detection limit, we used BACs from sorghum, a small-genome relative of maize, as surrogate clones for FISH mapping. We sequenced 151 maize RFLP probes and compared in silico BAC selection methods to that of library filter hybridization and found the latter to be the best. BAC library screening, clone verification, and single-clone selection criteria are presented along with an example of transgenomic BAC FISH mapping. This strategy has been used to facilitate the integration of RFLP and FISH maps in other large-genome species. PMID:21234422

  16. Role of antioxidant enzymes in bacterial resistance to organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno-Bárcena, Jose M; Azcárate-Peril, M Andrea; Hassan, Hosni M

    2010-05-01

    Growth in aerobic environments has been shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to cause oxidative stress in most organisms. Antioxidant enzymes (i.e., superoxide dismutases and hydroperoxidases) and DNA repair mechanisms provide protection against ROS. Acid stress has been shown to be associated with the induction of Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in Lactococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus. However, the relationship between acid stress and oxidative stress is not well understood. In the present study, we showed that mutations in the gene coding for MnSOD (sodA) increased the toxicity of lactic acid at pH 3.5 in Streptococcus thermophilus. The inclusion of the iron chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl (DIP), diethienetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), and O-phenanthroline (O-Phe) provided partial protection against 330 mM lactic acid at pH 3.5. The results suggested that acid stress triggers an iron-mediated oxidative stress that can be ameliorated by MnSOD and iron chelators. These findings were further validated in Escherichia coli strains lacking both MnSOD and iron SOD (FeSOD) but expressing a heterologous MnSOD from S. thermophilus. We also found that, in E. coli, FeSOD did not provide the same protection afforded by MnSOD and that hydroperoxidases are equally important in protecting the cells against acid stress. These findings may explain the ability of some microorganisms to survive better in acidified environments, as in acid foods, during fermentation and accumulation of lactic acid or during passage through the low pH of the stomach. PMID:20305033

  17. Efficient generation of recombinant RNA viruses using targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing full-length cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik;

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of RNA viruses. Here, a strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of classical swine fever viruses (CSFVs) from full-length cDNAs present within bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) is described. This...... strategy allows manipulation of viral cDNA by targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis within bacteria. Results A new CSFV-BAC (pBeloR26) derived from the Riems vaccine strain has been constructed and subsequently modified in the E2 coding sequence, using the targeted recombination strategy to enable...... rescue of chimeric pestiviruses (vR26_E2gif and vR26_TAV) with potential as new marker vaccine candidates. Sequencing of the BACs revealed a high genetic stability during passages within bacteria. The complete genome sequences of rescued viruses, after extensive passages in mammalian cells showed that...

  18. 棉花细菌人工染色体文库构建方法探讨%Studies on Construction Method of Cotton Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海燕; 王省芬; 刘方; 彭仁海; 张艳; 马峙英; 王坤波

    2013-01-01

    细菌人工染色体(Bacterial artificial chromosome,BAC)文库是开展基因组测序、基因图位克隆、分子标记、物理作图等研究的重要基因组资源.本文在构建了二倍体野生棉阿非利加棉(Gossypium herbaceum var.africanum)BAC文库的基础上,就棉花细菌人工染色体基因组文库构建过程中高分子量基因组DNA的提取、部分酶切片段选择、DNA的回收、连接转化以及BAC文库的保存等过程中一些细节和注意事项进行了比较详细的分析比较,希望能为棉花BAC文库的构建提供一些可供借鉴的经验.%Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library is an important genome resources to such research as genome sequencing, map-based cloning, molecular markers, and physical mapping. On the base of the construction of BAC library for Gossypi-um herbaceum var. africanum, this paper presents an exhaustive analysis on details and notices of the BAC library construction process. It includes extraction of high molecular weight (HMW) nuclear DNA, determination of the optimized enzyme for partial digestion of HMW DNA, two rounds of size fractionation, recovery of large fragments DNA, ligation and transformation of large fragments of DNA and storage of BAC library. Thus being able to supply an experience for constructing high efficiency cotton BAC library.

  19. Nucleolar organizer regions and a new chromosome number for Rhea americana (Aves: Rheiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo José Gunski

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequential banding analysis (Giemsa-C-banding-Ag NOR of chromosomes of the common rhea (Rhea americana was performed. Metaphases were obtained by peripheral blood lymphocyte culture and monolayer embryo cell culture. The diploid chromosome number was 80, different from the 2n = 82 in previous reports. Macrochromosome pairs 1, 2 and 5 were submetacentric and pair 3, subacrocentric. The 4th pair was acrocentric and all of the microchromosomes appeared to be acrocentric, with the exception of a clearly metacentric pair which was fully heterochromatic. The Z was slightly larger than the W, both being acrocentric and C-band negative. Nucleolar organizer regions were observed in the secondary constriction of a microchromosome pair. Correct identification of the NOR-bearing pair was possible only by sequential analyses, Giemsa staining followed by the Ag-NOR technique.Foram efetuadas análises seqüenciais de bandeamento cromossômico (Giemsa-banda-C-AgNOR em material da espécie Rhea americana (ema com o objetivo de identificar os cromossomos portadores de regiões organizadoras de nucléolos e confirmar o cariótipo desta espécie. As metáfases foram obtidas de culturas de leucócitos e de células de embrião. O número diplóide de cromossomos, determinado pela análise de metáfases oriundas de 19 espécimes, foi de 80 (2n = 80, NF = 95, o que difere da literatura. Os pares de macrocromossomos números 1, 2 e 5 eram submetacêntricos e o par 3 era sub-acrocêntrico, confirmado pelo bandeamento C. O par 4 era acrocêntrico, bem como todos os microcromossomos, com exceção de um metacêntrico inteiramente heterocromático. O cromossomo Z era ligeiramente maior que o W, sendo ambos acrocêntricos e banda-C negativos. A região organizadora de nucléolos foi observada na constrição secundária de um par de microcromossomos. A correta identificação do par portador da NOR só foi possível com a utilização da análise seqüencial de colora

  20. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Rahul; Vasudevan, Sona; Patil, Digvijay; Ashoura, Norah; Grimwade, Julia E; Crooke, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vicinity of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Upon limited proteolysis with trypsin or chymotrypsin ADP-DnaA, but not ATP-DnaA generated relatively stable proteolytic fragments of various sizes. Examined sites of limited protease susceptibility that differ between ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA largely reside in the amino terminal half of DnaA. The concentration of adenine nucleotide needed to induce conformational changes, as detected by these protease susceptibilities of DnaA, coincides with the conversion of an inactive bacterial origin recognition complex (bORC) to a replication efficient pre-replication complex (pre-RC) at the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). PMID:26610483

  1. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Saxena

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vicinity of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Upon limited proteolysis with trypsin or chymotrypsin ADP-DnaA, but not ATP-DnaA generated relatively stable proteolytic fragments of various sizes. Examined sites of limited protease susceptibility that differ between ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA largely reside in the amino terminal half of DnaA. The concentration of adenine nucleotide needed to induce conformational changes, as detected by these protease susceptibilities of DnaA, coincides with the conversion of an inactive bacterial origin recognition complex (bORC to a replication efficient pre-replication complex (pre-RC at the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC.

  2. Bacterial cell wall preservation during organic matter diagenesis in sediments off Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Niggemann, Jutta; Jørgensen, Bo Barker;

    evaluated from the percentage of carbon and nitrogen present as amino acid carbon and nitrogen, the ratio between protein precursors and their non-protein degradation products, compositional changes in the amino acid spectra and the percentage of carbon and nitrogen present as amino sugar carbon and...... nitrogen. The study clearly demonstrated a strong bacterial imprint in organic matter during early diagenesis. Hence, the key players in organic matter mineralization became an increasingly import component of refractory organic matter with ongoing degradation. Session #:053 Date: 01-27-09 Time: 11...

  3. Multicolor detection of every chromosome as a means of detecting mosaicism and nuclear organization in human embryonic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kara; Fowler, Katie; Fonseka, Gothami; Griffin, Darren; Ioannou, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revolutionized cytogenetics using fluorescently labelled probes with high affinity with target (nuclear) DNA. By the early 1990s FISH was adopted as a means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) sexing for couples at risk of transmitting X-linked disorders and later for detection of unbalanced translocations. Following a rise in popularity of PGD by FISH for sexing and the availability of multicolor probes (5-8 colors), the use of FISH was expanded to the detection of aneuploidy and selective implantation of embryos more likely to be euploid, the rationale being to increase pregnancy rates (referral categories were typically advanced maternal age, repeated IVF failure, repeated miscarriage or severe male factor infertility). Despite initial reports of an increase in implantation rates, reduction in trisomic offspring and spontaneous abortions criticism centered around experimental design (including lack of randomization), inadequate control groups and lack of report on live births. Eleven randomized control trials (RCTs) (2004-2010) showed that preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with FISH did not increase delivery rates with some demonstrating adverse outcomes. These RCTs, parallel improvements in culturing and cryopreservation and a shift to blastocyst biopsy essentially outdated FISH as a tool for PGS and it has now been replaced by newer technologies (array CGH, SNP arrays, qRT-PCR and NGS). Cell-by-cell follow up analysis of individual blastomeres in non-transferred embryos is however usually prohibitively expensive by these new approaches and thus FISH remains an invaluable resource for the study of mosaicism and nuclear organization. We thus developed the approach described herein for the FISH detection of chromosome copy number of all 24 human chromosomes. This approach involves 4 sequential layers of hybridization, each with 6 spectrally distinct fluorochromes and a bespoke capturing system. Here we report

  4. The clustering of CpG islands may constitute an important determinant of the 3D organization of interphase chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchanskaya, Ekaterina S; Artemov, Artem V; Ulyanov, Sergey V; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Kotova, Elena S; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Iarovaia, Olga V; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    We used the 4C-Seq technique to characterize the genome-wide patterns of spatial contacts of several CpG islands located on chromosome 14 in cultured chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells. We observed a clear tendency for the spatial clustering of CpG islands present on the same and different chromosomes, regardless of the presence or absence of promoters within these CpG islands. Accordingly, we observed preferential spatial contacts between Sp1 binding motifs and other GC-rich genomic elements, including the DNA sequence motifs capable of forming G-quadruplexes. However, an anchor placed in a gene/CpG island-poor area formed spatial contacts with other gene/CpG island-poor areas on chromosome 14 and other chromosomes. These results corroborate the two-compartment model of the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes and suggest that the clustering of CpG islands constitutes an important determinant of the 3D organization of the eukaryotic genome in the cell nucleus. Using the ChIP-Seq technique, we mapped the genome-wide CTCF deposition sites in the chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells that were used for the 4C analysis. We observed a good correlation between the density of CTCF deposition sites and the level of 4C signals for the anchors located in CpG islands but not for an anchor located in a gene desert. It is thus possible that CTCF contributes to the clustering of CpG islands observed in our experiments. PMID:24736527

  5. The clustering of CpG islands may constitute an important determinant of the 3D organization of interphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchanskaya, Ekaterina S; Artemov, Artem V; Ulyanov, Sergey V; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Kotova, Elena S; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Iarovaia, Olga V; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2014-07-01

    We used the 4C-Seq technique to characterize the genome-wide patterns of spatial contacts of several CpG islands located on chromosome 14 in cultured chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells. We observed a clear tendency for the spatial clustering of CpG islands present on the same and different chromosomes, regardless of the presence or absence of promoters within these CpG islands. Accordingly, we observed preferential spatial contacts between Sp1 binding motifs and other GC-rich genomic elements, including the DNA sequence motifs capable of forming G-quadruplexes. However, an anchor placed in a gene/CpG island-poor area formed spatial contacts with other gene/CpG island-poor areas on chromosome 14 and other chromosomes. These results corroborate the two-compartment model of the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes and suggest that the clustering of CpG islands constitutes an important determinant of the 3D organization of the eukaryotic genome in the cell nucleus. Using the ChIP-Seq technique, we mapped the genome-wide CTCF deposition sites in the chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells that were used for the 4C analysis. We observed a good correlation between the density of CTCF deposition sites and the level of 4C signals for the anchors located in CpG islands but not for an anchor located in a gene desert. It is thus possible that CTCF contributes to the clustering of CpG islands observed in our experiments. PMID:24736527

  6. A GFP-based bacterial biosensor with chromosomally integrated sensing cassette for quantitative detection of Hg(II) in environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Himanshu Priyadarshi; Absar Alam; Gireesh-Babu P; Rekha Das; Pankaj Kishore; Shivendra Kumar; Aparna Chaudhari

    2012-01-01

    A mercury biosensor was constructed by integrating biosensor genetic elements into E.coli JM109 chromosome in a single copy number,using the attP/attB recombination mechanism of λ phage.The genetic elements used include a regulatory protein gene (merR) along with operator/promoter (O/P) derived from the mercury resistance operon from pDU1358 plasmid of Serratia marcescens.The expression of reporter gene gfp is also controlled by merR/O/P.Integration of the construct into the chromosome was done to increase the stability and precision of the biosensor.This biosensor could detect Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the concentration range of 100-1700 mnol/L,and manifest the result as the expression of GFP.The GFP expression was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) for each concentration of inducing Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the detection range,which reduces the chances of misinterpretation of results.A model using regression method was also derived for the quantification of the concentration of Hg(Ⅱ) in water samples.

  7. Use of antinucleoside antibodies to probe the organization of chromosomes denatured by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet irradiation of methanol:acetic acid-fixed human and mouse metaphase chromosomes rendered them capable of binding antibodies specific for purine or pyrimidine bases. Since these antibodies react with single-stranded but not with native DNA, our results indicate that UV irradiation generated single-stranded regions in chromosomal DNA. Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique to detect antibody binding, highly characteristic, nonrandom patterns of antibody binding were observed. Antibodies to adenosine (anti-A) and thymidine (anti-T) produced identical patterns of binding which in most respects matched the chromosome banding patterns produced by quinacrine. However, additional foci of intense fluorescence were seen in the paracentromeric regions of constitutive heterochromatin on chromosomes 1, 9 and 16, regions which had been shown by in situ DNA--RNA hybridization to be the locations of AT-rich human satellite DNA. Antibodies to cytidine were also bound to the same region of chromosome 9. In mouse chromosome preparations, both anti-A and anti-T produced bright fluorescence of the region containing centromeric heterochromatin, which had been shown to be the location of the AT-rich satellite DNA of this species. (U.S.)

  8. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit. PMID:27106499

  9. Role of sedimentary organic matter in bacterial sulfate reduction: the G model tested

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory study of the bacterial decomposition of Long Island Sound plankton in oxygenated seawater over a period of 2 years shows that the organic material undergoes decomposition via first-order kinetics and can be divided into two decomposable fractions, of considerably different reactivity, and a nonmetabolized fraction. This planktonic material, after undergoing varying degrees of oxic degradation, was added in the laboratory to anoxic sediment taken from a depth of 1 m at the NWC site of Long Island Sound and the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in the sediment measured by the 35S radiotracer technique. The stimulated rate of sulfate reduction was in direct proportion to the amount of planktonic carbon added. This provides direct confirmation of the first-order decomposition, or G model, for marine sediments and proves that the in situ rate of sulfate reduction is organic-matter limited. Slower sulfate reduction rates resulted when oxically degraded plankton rather than fresh plankton was added, and the results confirm the presence of the same two fractions of organic matter deduced from the oxic degradation studies. Near-surface Long Island Sound sediment, which already contains abundant readily decomposable organic matter, was also subjected to anoxic decomposition by bacterial sulfate reduction. The decrease in sulfate reduction rate with time parallels decreases in the amount of organic matter, and these results also indicate the presence of two fractions of organic carbon of distinctly different reactivity. From plots of the log of reduction rate vs. time two first-order rate constants were obtained that agree well with those derived from the plankton addition experiment. Together, the two experiments confirm the use of a simple multi-first-order rate law for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments

  10. Lipid biomarkers and bacterial lipase activities as indicators of organic matter and bacterial dynamics in contrasted regimes at the DYFAMED site, NW Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguet, Nicolas; Goutx, Madeleine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Mével, Geneviève; Momzikoff, André; Mousseau, Laure; Guigue, Catherine; Garcia, Nicole; Raimbault, Patrick; Pete, Romain; Oriol, Louise; Lefèvre, Dominique

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the relationships between dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition and bacterial dynamics on short time scale during spring mesotrophic (March 2003) and summer oligotrophic (June 2003) regimes, in a 0-500 m depth water column with almost no advection, at the DYFAMED site, NW Mediterranean. DOM was characterized by analyzing dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and lipid class biotracers. Bacterial dynamic was assessed through the measurement of in situ bacterial lipase activity, abundance, production and bacterial community structure. We made the assumption that by coupling the ambient concentration of hydrolysable acyl-lipids with the measurement of their in situ bacterial hydrolysis rates (i.e. the free fatty acids release rate) would provide new insights about bacterial response to change in environmental conditions. The seasonal transition from spring to summer was accompanied by a significant accumulation of excess DOC (+5 μM) (ANOVA, plipolysis index and CDOM absorbance (from 0.24±0.17 to 0.39±0.13 and from 0.076±0.039 to 0.144±0.068; ANOVA, p<0.05, n=8, respectively), and the higher contribution of triglycerides, wax esters and phospholipids (from <5% to 12-31%) to the lipid pool reflected the change in the DOM quality. In addition to a strong increase of bacterial lipase activity per cell (51.4±29.4-418.3±290.6 Ag C cell -1 h -1), a significant percentage of ribotypes (39%) was different between spring and summer in the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layer in particular, suggesting a shift in the bacterial community structure due to the different trophic conditions. At both seasons, in the chlorophyll layers, diel variations of DOM and bacterial parameters reflected a better bioavailability and/or DOM utilization by bacteria at night (the ratio of free fatty acids release rate to bacterial carbon demand decreased), most likely related to the zooplankton trophic behaviour. In mesotrophic

  11. Fate of aerobic bacterial granules with fungal contamination under different organic loading conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, AJ; Zhang, T.; LI, XY

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic sludge granulation is an attractive new technology for biological wastewater treatment. However, the instability of aerobic granules caused by fungal growth is still one of the main problems encountered in granular bioreactors. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the fate and transformation of aerobic granules under different organic loading conditions. Bacterial granules (2-3 mm) in a poor condition with fungi-like black filamentous growth were seeded ...

  12. Influence of organic substrates on the kinetics of bacterial As(III) oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, T.; Joulian, C.; Bauda, P.; Hénault, C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil microflora plays a major role on the behavior of metals and metalloids. Arsenic speciation, in particular, is related to the activity of bacteria able to oxidize, reduce or methylate this element, and determines mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of As. Arsenite (AsIII) is more toxic and more mobile than arsenate (AsV). Bacterial As(III)-oxidation tends to reduce the toxicity of arsenic in soils and the risk of transfer toward underlying aquifers, that would affect the quality of water resources. Previous results suggest that organic matter may affect kinetics or efficiency of bacterial As(III)-oxidation in presence of oxygen, thus in conventional physico-chemical conditions of a surface soil. Different hypothesis can be proposed to explain the influence of organic matter on As(III) oxidation. Arsenic is a potential energy source for bacteria. The presence of easily biodegradable organic matter may inhibit the As(III) oxidation process because bacteria would first metabolize these more energetic substrates. A second hypothesis would be that, in presence of organic matter, the Ars system involved in bacterial resistance to arsenic would be more active and would compete with the Aio system of arsenite oxidation, decreasing the global As(III) oxidation rate. In addition, organic matter influences the solubility of iron oxides which often act as the main pitfalls of arsenic in soils. The concentration and nature of organic matter could therefore have a significant influence on the bioavailability of arsenic and hence on its environmental impact. The influence of organic matter on biological As(III) oxidation has not yet been determined in natural soils. In this context, soil amendment with organic matter during operations of phytostabilization or, considering diffuse pollutions, through agricultural practices, may affect the mobility and bio-availability of the toxic metalloid. The objective of the present project is to quantify the influence of organic matter

  13. Differential Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Availability and Bacterial Aminopeptidase Activity in Limnic and Marine Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanauskas; Edling; Tranvik

    1999-10-01

    Abstract Nitrogen often limits primary production in marine ecosystems and its loading from terrestrial sources is the major cause of enhanced coastal eutrophication worldwide. About 70% of nitrogen transported by rivers globally is dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Therefore, terrestrial DON is potentially an important component of the N dynamics in aquatic ecosystems, but the bioavailability of this organic nitrogen is poorly known. Bacterial extracellular hydrolysis of polymers is a bottleneck in the utilization of natural dissolved organic matter, mostly consisting of high molecular weight compounds. To study the bacterial utilization and extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of DON, we developed a bioassay employing natural DON as the only N source, and N as the limiting nutrient. Bacterial cell density and activity of an unspecific aminopeptidase (AMPase) were followed in the cultures. Natural DON stimulated the cell-specific AMPase activity. Furthermore, refractory and humus-rich DOM caused a stronger stimulation than labile DOM. We propose that the previously reported inhibitory effect of humic substances on enzyme activity was outweighed by the induction of enzyme synthesis caused by refractory substrates. AMPase activity and the estimated DON bioavailability were more than twofold higher in seawater than in freshwater with identical substrate additions. This indicates that hydrolysis and turnover of land-derived DON is enhanced when it enters coastal marine waters, enabling it to support elevated bacterioplankton and phytoplankton growth.http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00248/bibs/38n3p264.html

  14. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  15. Nucleotide sequence, genomic organization and chromosome localization of 5S rDNA in two species of Curimatidae (Teleostei, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandra Viviane de Rosa Santos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA of higher eukaryotes is organized in repeat units of tandem arrays composed of a 5S rDNA coding region, conserved even among non-related taxa, and a variable non-transcribed spacer sequence (NTS. To contribute to knowledge on the organization and evolution of vertebrate 5S rDNA we used PCR, nucleotide sequencing, Southern blot hybridization and chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to investigate 5S rDNA tandem repeats in the South American Curimatidae fish Steindachnerina insculpta and Cyphocharax modesta. 5S rDNA repeats of 180 base pairs (bp from both species were PCR-generated and sequenced evidencing the shortest 5S rDNA monomer so far described in eukaryote species. Southern blotting revealed that both species contained two tandem 5S rDNA classes, the PCR amplified fragment composed of 180 bp monomers and a class of 1600 bp monomers not detected by PCR. Chromosome mapping of the 5S rDNA repeats identified a major locus in both species and a second minor locus only in C. modesta. The Southern blot and chromosome mapping data indicate the presence of different types of 5S rDNA tandem repeats in the Curimatidae genome.

  16. Plant-Associated Bacterial Degradation of Toxic Organic Compounds in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dowling

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial or diffuse (e.g., agricultural contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants, have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

  17. Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Martina

    2009-08-01

    A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

  18. Bacterial chromatin: converging views at different scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Remus T; Tark-Dame, Mariliis

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized and compactly folded into a structure referred to as bacterial chromatin or the nucleoid. An important role in genome folding is attributed to Nucleoid-Associated Proteins, also referred to as bacterial chromatin proteins. Although a lot of molecular insight in the mechanisms of operation of these proteins has been generated in the test tube, knowledge on genome organization in the cellular context is still lagging behind severely. Here, we discuss important advances in the understanding of three-dimensional genome organization due to the application of Chromosome Conformation Capture and super-resolution microscopy techniques. We focus on bacterial chromatin proteins whose proposed role in genome organization is supported by these approaches. Moreover, we discuss recent insights into the interrelationship between genome organization and genome activity/stability in bacteria. PMID:26942688

  19. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed. PMID:26851837

  20. Dynamics of different bacterial communities are capable of generating sustainable electricity from microbial fuel cells with organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Araki, Yoko; Mochihara, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Tetsuya; Kubota, Hiroko; Chiba, Yusuke; Rubaba, Owen; Tashiro, Yosuke; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the bacterial communities in anolyte and anode biofilms and the electrochemical properties of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated when a complex organic waste-decomposing solution was continuously supplied to MFCs as an electron donor. The current density increased gradually and was maintained at approximately 100 to 150 mA m(-2). Polarization curve analyses revealed that the maximum power density was 7.4 W m(-3) with an internal resistance of 110 Ω. Bacterial community structures in the organic waste-decomposing solution and MFCs differed from each other. Clonal analyses targeting 16S rRNA genes indicated that bacterial communities in the biofilms on MFCs developed to specific communities dominated by novel Geobacter. Multidimensional scaling analyses based on DGGE profiles revealed that bacterial communities in the organic waste-decomposing solution fluctuated and had no dynamic equilibrium. Bacterial communities on the anolyte in MFCs had a dynamic equilibrium with fluctuations, while those of the biofilm converged to the Geobacter-dominated structure. These bacterial community dynamics of MFCs differed from those of control-MFCs under open circuit conditions. These results suggested that bacterial communities in the anolyte and biofilm have a gentle symbiotic system through electron flow, which resulted in the advance of current density from complex organic waste. PMID:24789988

  1. Bacterial regulatory networks—from self-organizing molecules to cell shape and patterns in bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Hengge, Regine; Sourjik, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The ESF–EMBO Conference on ‘Bacterial Networks' was held in March, 2013. It brought together molecular microbiologists, bacteral systems biologists and synthetic biologists to discuss the architecture, function and dynamics of regulatory networks in bacteria.

  2. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZα-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  3. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-α resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  4. Bacterial survival governed by organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasternas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g. sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis involved in the transference of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here we show cell survival of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean to be determined by phytoplankton extracellular carbon release (PER. PER represents the fraction of primary production released as dissolved organic carbon, and changes in the PER variability was explained by phytoplankton cell death, with the communities experiencing the highest phytoplankton cell mortality showing a larger proportion of extracellular carbon release. Both PER and the percent of dead phytoplankton cells increased from eutrophic to oligotrophic waters, while heterotrophic bacteria communities, including 60 to 95% of living cells (%LC, increased from the productive to the most oligotrophic waters. The percentage of living heterotrophic bacterial cells increased with increasing phytoplankton extracellular carbon release, across oligotrophic to productive waters in the NE Atlantic, where lower PER have resulted in a decrease in the flux of phytoplankton DOC per bacterial cell. The results highlight phytoplankton cell death as a process influencing the flow of dissolved photosynthetic carbon in the NE Atlantic Ocean, and demonstrated a close coupling between the fraction of primary production released and heterotrophic bacteria survival.

  5. Biodegradation of ethyl acetate in radioactive liquid organic waste by bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development program in reprocessing of low burn-up spent fuel elements began in Brazil in 70's, originating the lab -scale hot cell, known as CELESTE located at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The program was ended at the beginning of 90's and part of the radioactive waste generated mainly from the analytical laboratories is stored at the Waste Management Laboratory. Among various types of radioactive waste generated, the organic liquid represents a major problem for its management, because it can not be directly solidified with cement. The objective of this work is to develop a pretreatment methodology to degrade the ethyl acetate present in organic liquid waste so that it can subsequently be immobilized in cement. This work was divided into two parts: selection and adaptation of three bacterial communities for growth in medium containing ethyl acetate and degradation experiments of ethyl acetate present in radioactive organic liquid waste. The results showed that from bacterial communities the highest biodegradation level observed was 77%. (author)

  6. Effect of Organic Acids on Bacterial Cellulose Produced by Acetobacter xylinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the difference of bacterial cellulose production from rice saccharificate medium and chemical medium under static cultivation, effect of organic acids in the process of bacterial cellulose produced by A. xylinum was studied. The results showed that the kinds and contents of organic acids were different in both culture medium, in which accumulated oxalic acid and tartaric acid inhibited A. xylinum producing BC in chemical medium, while pyruvic acid, malic acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid and succinic acid, as ethanol, promoted A. xylinum to produce BC. Compared to the blank BC production 1.48 g/L, the optimum addition concentrations of pyruvic acid, malic acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and ethanol in chemical medium were 0.15%, 0.1%, 0.3%, 0.4%, 0.1%, 0.2% , 4% and the BC productions were 2.49 g/L, 2.83 g/L, 2.12 g/L, 2.54 g/L, 2.27 g/L, 1.88 g/L , 2.63 g/L, respectively. The co-existence of above organic acids and ethanol increased BC production even further.

  7. Effect of organic carbon and metal accumulation on the bacterial communities in sulphidogenic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueche, Matthieu; Junier, Pilar

    2016-06-01

    A unique geochemical setting in Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, has led to the accumulation of insoluble metal sulphides in the sedimentary record as the result of past airborne pollution. This offers an exceptional opportunity to study the effect of these metals on the bacterial communities in sediments, and in particular to investigate further the link between metal contamination and an increase in the populations of endospore-forming bacteria observed previously in other metal-contaminated sediments. A decrease in organic carbon and total bacterial counts was correlated with an increase in the numbers of endospores in the oldest sediment samples, showing the first environmental evidence of a decrease in nutrient availability as a trigger of sporulation. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the two dominant bacterial phyla throughout the sediment, the former in an area with high sulphidogenic activity, and the latter in the oldest samples. Even though the dominant Firmicutes taxa were stable along the sediment core and did not vary with changes in metal contamination, the prevalence of some molecular species like Clostridium sp. was positively correlated with metal sulphide concentration. However, this cannot be generalized to all endospore-forming species. Overall, the community composition supports the hypothesis of sporulation as the main mechanism explaining the dominance of endospore formers in the deepest part of the sediment core, while metal contamination in the form of insoluble metal sulphide deposits appears not to be linked with sporulation as a mechanism of metal tolerance in this sulphidogenic ecosystem. PMID:26780045

  8. Next-Generation Survey Sequencing and the Molecular Organization of Wheat Chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanaka, T.; Kobayashi, F.; Joshi, G.P.; Šimková, Hana; Nasuda, S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Handa, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2014), s. 103-114. ISSN 1340-2838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : wheat * chromosome 6B * genome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.477, year: 2014

  9. Assessment of genetic correlation between bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen index in a domesticated population of rainbow trout: identification of QTL on chromosome Omy19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Wiens

    Full Text Available Selective breeding of animals for increased disease resistance is an effective strategy to reduce mortality in aquaculture. However, implementation of selective breeding programs is limited by an incomplete understanding of host resistance traits. We previously reported results of a rainbow trout selection program that demonstrated increased survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD. Mechanistic study of disease resistance identified a positive phenotypic correlation between post-challenge survival and spleen somatic-index (SI. Herein, we investigated the hypothesis of a genetic correlation between the two traits influenced by colocalizing QTL. We evaluated the inheritance and calculated the genetic correlation in five year-classes of odd- and even-year breeding lines. A total of 322 pedigreed families (n = 25,369 fish were measured for disease resistance, and 251 families (n = 5,645 fish were evaluated for SI. Spleen index was moderately heritable in both even-year (h(2  = 0.56±0.18 and odd-year (h(2  = 0.60±0.15 lines. A significant genetic correlation between SI and BCWD resistance was observed in the even-year line (rg  = 0.45±0.20, P = 0.03 but not in the odd-year line (rg  = 0.16±0.12, P = 0.19. Complex segregation analyses of the even-year line provided evidence of genes with major effect on SI, and a genome scan of a single family, 2008132, detected three significant QTL on chromosomes Omy19, 16 and 5, in addition to ten suggestive QTL. A separate chromosome scan for disease resistance in family 2008132 identified a significant BCWD QTL on Omy19 that was associated with time to death and percent survival. In family 2008132, Omy19 microsatellite alleles that associated with higher disease resistance also associated with increased spleen size raising the hypothesis that closely linked QTL contribute to the correlation between

  10. Bacterial cellulose membrane as flexible substrate for organic light emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes produced by gram-negative, acetic acid bacteria (Gluconacetobacter xylinus), were used as flexible substrates for the fabrication of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). In order to achieve the necessary conductive properties indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited onto the membrane at room temperature using radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering with an r.f. power of 30 W, at pressure of 8 mPa in Ar atmosphere without any subsequent thermal treatment. Visible light transmittance of about 40% was observed. Resistivity, mobility and carrier concentration of deposited ITO films were 4.90 x 10-4 Ohm cm, 8.08 cm2/V-s and - 1.5 x 1021 cm-3, respectively, comparable with commercial ITO substrates. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of devices based on BC membranes three OLEDs with different substrates were produced: a reference one with commercial ITO on glass, a second one with a SiO2 thin film interlayer between the BC membrane and the ITO layer and a third one just with ITO deposited directly on the BC membrane. The observed OLED luminance ratio was: 1; 0.5; 0.25 respectively, with 2400 cd/m2 as the value for the reference OLED. These preliminary results show clearly that the functionalized biopolymer, biodegradable, biocompatible bacterial cellulose membranes can be successfully used as substrate in flexible organic optoelectronic devices

  11. Bacterial cellulose membrane as flexible substrate for organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, C.; Vilani, C. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Calil, V.L. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); LOEM-Molecular Optoelectronic Laboratory-Physics Department-PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barud, H.S. [Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Quirino, W.G. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); COPPE-Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ribeiro, S.J.L. [Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Cremona, M. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); LOEM-Molecular Optoelectronic Laboratory-Physics Department-PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br

    2008-12-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes produced by gram-negative, acetic acid bacteria (Gluconacetobacter xylinus), were used as flexible substrates for the fabrication of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). In order to achieve the necessary conductive properties indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited onto the membrane at room temperature using radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering with an r.f. power of 30 W, at pressure of 8 mPa in Ar atmosphere without any subsequent thermal treatment. Visible light transmittance of about 40% was observed. Resistivity, mobility and carrier concentration of deposited ITO films were 4.90 x 10{sup -4} Ohm cm, 8.08 cm{sup 2}/V-s and - 1.5 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}, respectively, comparable with commercial ITO substrates. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of devices based on BC membranes three OLEDs with different substrates were produced: a reference one with commercial ITO on glass, a second one with a SiO{sub 2} thin film interlayer between the BC membrane and the ITO layer and a third one just with ITO deposited directly on the BC membrane. The observed OLED luminance ratio was: 1; 0.5; 0.25 respectively, with 2400 cd/m{sup 2} as the value for the reference OLED. These preliminary results show clearly that the functionalized biopolymer, biodegradable, biocompatible bacterial cellulose membranes can be successfully used as substrate in flexible organic optoelectronic devices.

  12. Gene organization in the region containing a new gene involved in chromosome partition in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, J; Nishimura, Y.; Yamada, M.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y

    1988-01-01

    A new mutation, parC, causing abnormal chromosome segregation was identified in two thermosensitive mutants of Escherichia coli. The thermosensitive growth of the mutants was corrected by pLC4-14 in the Clarke-Carbon collection. This plasmid carries a putative gene which can suppress the cell division defect due to ftsI (pbpB) and has hence been termed sufI (sui). The nearness of parC to metC was confirmed, and cotransduction frequency of parC was 59% with metC and 20% with glc. The parC-sufI...

  13. Spatial Organization of Dual-Species Bacterial Aggregates on Leaf Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of cells within bacterial aggregates on leaf surfaces was determined for pair-wise mixtures of three different bacterial species commonly found on leaves, Pseudomonas syringae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Cells were coinoculated onto bean plants and allowed to grow under moist conditions, and the resulting aggregates were examined in situ by epifluorescence microscopy. Each bacterial strain could be localized because it expressed either the green or the cyan fluorescent protein constitutively, and the viability of individual cells was assessed by propidium iodide staining. Each pair of bacterial strains that was coinoculated onto leaves formed mixed aggregates. The degree of segregation of cells in mixed aggregates differed between the different coinoculated pairs of strains and was higher in mixtures of P. fluorescens A506 and P. agglomerans 299R and mixtures of P. syringae B728a and P. agglomerans 299R than in mixtures of two isogenic strains of P. agglomerans 299R. The fractions of the total cell population that were dead in mixed and monospecific aggregates of a gfp-marked strain of P. agglomerans 299R and a cfp-marked strain of P. agglomerans 299R, or of P. fluorescens A506 and P. agglomerans 299R, were similar. However, the proportion of dead cells in mixed aggregates of P. syringae B728a and P. agglomerans 299R was significantly higher (13.2% ± 8.2%) than that in monospecific aggregates of these two strains (1.6% ± 0.7%), and it increased over time. While dead cells in such mixed aggregates were preferentially found at the interface between clusters of cells of these strains, cells of these two strains located at the interface did not exhibit equal probabilities of mortality. After 9 days of incubation, about 77% of the P. agglomerans 299R cells located at the interface were dead, while only about 24% of the P. syringae B728a cells were dead. The relevance of our results to understanding bacterial interactions

  14. Dynamics of Different Bacterial Communities Are Capable of Generating Sustainable Electricity from Microbial Fuel Cells with Organic Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Araki, Yoko; Mochihara, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Tetsuya; KUBOTA, Hiroko; Chiba, Yusuke; Rubaba, Owen; Tashiro, Yosuke; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the bacterial communities in anolyte and anode biofilms and the electrochemical properties of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated when a complex organic waste-decomposing solution was continuously supplied to MFCs as an electron donor. The current density increased gradually and was maintained at approximately 100 to 150 mA m−2. Polarization curve analyses revealed that the maximum power density was 7.4 W m−3 with an internal resistance of 110 Ω. Bacterial co...

  15. A survey of veterinary hospitals in Nigeria for the presence of some bacterial organisms of nosocomial and zoonotic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Lawal; Abdullahi A. Magaji; Abdulkadir U. Junaidu; Mohammed D. Salihu; Mika'il B. Abubakar; Aminu Shittu; Faruk M. Tambuwal; Mahmud Danyaro

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the type and estimate the prevalence of bacterial organisms on contact surfaces of five close-to-patient facilities in three veterinary health care settings within the Sokoto metropolis of north-western Nigeria. A total of 30 samples (10 from each setting) were collected and analysed using culture, microscopy and biochemical testing. Bacterial species isolated from samples in this study included the following: Bacillus sp. (27.3%), Staphylococcus aureus ...

  16. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids...... and chromosomes from prokaryotic organisms. All known plasmid-encoded par loci specify three components: a cis-acting centromere-like site and two trans-acting proteins that form a nucleoprotein complex at the centromere (i.e. the partition complex). The proteins are encoded by two genes in an operon...... that is autoregulated by the par-encoded proteins. In all cases, the upstream gene encodes an ATPase that is essential for partitioning. Recent cytological analyses indicate that the ATPases function as adaptors between a host-encoded component and the partition complex and thereby tether plasmids and chromosomal...

  17. Associations between soil bacterial community structure and nutrient cycling functions in long-term organic farm soils following cover crop and organic fertilizer amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Adria L; Sheaffer, Craig C; Wyse, Donald L; Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Agricultural management practices can produce changes in soil microbial populations whose functions are crucial to crop production and may be detectable using high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA. To apply sequencing-derived bacterial community structure data to on-farm decision-making will require a better understanding of the complex associations between soil microbial community structure and soil function. Here 16S rRNA sequencing was used to profile soil bacterial communities following application of cover crops and organic fertilizer treatments in certified organic field cropping systems. Amendment treatments were hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), winter rye (Secale cereale), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus), buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), beef manure, pelleted poultry manure, Sustane(®) 8-2-4, and a no-amendment control. Enzyme activities, net N mineralization, soil respiration, and soil physicochemical properties including nutrient levels, organic matter (OM) and pH were measured. Relationships between these functional and physicochemical parameters and soil bacterial community structure were assessed using multivariate methods including redundancy analysis, discriminant analysis, and Bayesian inference. Several cover crops and fertilizers affected soil functions including N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activity. Effects, however, were not consistent across locations and sampling timepoints. Correlations were observed among functional parameters and relative abundances of individual bacterial families and phyla. Bayesian analysis inferred no directional relationships between functional activities, bacterial families, and physicochemical parameters. Soil functional profiles were more strongly predicted by location than by treatment, and differences were largely explained by soil physicochemical parameters. Composition of soil bacterial communities was predictive of soil functional profiles. Differences in soil function were

  18. Cloning of the Koi Herpesvirus Genome as an Infectious Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Demonstrates That Disruption of the Thymidine Kinase Locus Induces Partial Attenuation in Cyprinus carpio koi▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, B.; Fournier, G.; Michel, B.; Delforge, C.; Raj, V. Stalin; Dewals, B.; Gillet, L.; Drion, P.; Body, A.; Schynts, F.; Lieffrig, F.; Vanderplasschen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) is the causative agent of a lethal disease in koi and common carp. In the present study, we describe the cloning of the KHV genome as a stable and infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone that can be used to produce KHV recombinant strains. This goal was achieved by the insertion of a loxP-flanked BAC cassette into the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. This insertion led to a BAC plasmid that was stably maintained in bacteria and was able to regenerate virions when permissive cells were transfected with the plasmid. Reconstituted virions free of the BAC cassette but carrying a disrupted TK locus (the FL BAC-excised strain) were produced by the transfection of Cre recombinase-expressing cells with the BAC. Similarly, virions with a wild-type revertant TK sequence (the FL BAC revertant strain) were produced by the cotransfection of cells with the BAC and a DNA fragment encoding the wild-type TK sequence. Reconstituted recombinant viruses were compared to the wild-type parental virus in vitro and in vivo. The FL BAC revertant strain and the FL BAC-excised strain replicated comparably to the parental FL strain. The FL BAC revertant strain induced KHV infection in koi carp that was indistinguishable from that induced by the parental strain, while the FL BAC-excised strain exhibited a partially attenuated phenotype. Finally, the usefulness of the KHV BAC for recombination studies was demonstrated by the production of an ORF16-deleted strain by using prokaryotic recombination technology. The availability of the KHV BAC is an important advance that will allow the study of viral genes involved in KHV pathogenesis, as well as the production of attenuated recombinant candidate vaccines. PMID:18337580

  19. Exposure to persistent organic pollutants and sperm sex chromosome ratio in men from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, L; Giwercman, A; Weihe, P;

    2014-01-01

    ) congeners and 1,1,-dichloro-2,2,-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDE) influence sperm sex chromosome ratio in Faroese men, and whether these men differ regarding Y:X ratio compared to Greenland Inuit and Swedish fishermen. The study population (n=449) consisted of young men from the general population (n......,p'-DDE and ΣPCB correlated significantly (r=0.927, p<0.001), the results involving the exposure variables can be regarded as a single finding. The Y:X ratio for the total Faroese population was 0.500±0.018, which was statistically significantly lower than in both Inuit and Swedish fishermen (0.512 for both...

  20. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  1. Viability of Micro-Organisms Involved in Outbreaks of Bacterial Food Borne Diseases in Dry Extruded Pet Food

    OpenAIRE

    C. Adelantado; Lopez, S.(Instituto de F ısica Corpuscular (IFIC) and Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Departamento de Ingeniería Electrónica and Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM), University of Valencia and CSIC, Valencia, Spain); R. Inglada; L. Vilaseca; M.A. Calvo

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzed the viability of the main micro-organisms involved in outbreaks of bacterial food borne diseases together with two fungal strains experimentally inoculated into six different commercial dry extruded pet foods during six months. Growth of all micro-organisms analyzed decreased along the experimental period, indicating that dry extruded pet food is not an adequate substrate for microbial development and it is safe as pet food since most pathogenic micro-organisms did not ada...

  2. Isolation and characterization of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 from a cow affected by post partum metritis and cloning of the genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavirani Sandro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a gammaherpesvirus with a Worldwide distribution in cattle and is often isolated from the uterus of animals with postpartum metritis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Virus strain adaptation to an organ, tissue or cell type is an important issue for the pathogenesis of disease. To explore the mechanistic role of viral strain variation for uterine disease, the present study aimed to develop a tool enabling precise genetic discrimination between strains of BoHV-4 and to easily manipulate the viral genome. Methods A strain of BoHV-4 was isolated from the uterus of a persistently infected cow and designated BoHV-4-U. The authenticity of the isolate was confirmed by RFLP-PCR and sequencing using the TK and IE2 loci as genetic marker regions for the BoHV-4 genome. The isolated genome was cloned as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC and manipulated through recombineering technology Results The BoHV-4-U genome was successfully cloned as a BAC, and the stability of the pBAC-BoHV-4-U clone was confirmed over twenty passages, with viral growth similar to the wild type virus. The feasibility of using BoHV-4-U for mutagenesis was demonstrated using the BAC recombineering system. Conclusion The analysis of genome strain variation is a key method for investigating genes associated with disease. A resource for dissection of the interactions between BoHV-4 and host endometrial cells was generated by cloning the genome of BoHV-4 as a BAC.

  3. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for the Australian saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and its utilization in gene isolation and genome characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Crocodilians (Order Crocodylia) are an ancient vertebrate group of tremendous ecological, social, and evolutionary importance. They are the only extant reptilian members of Archosauria, a monophyletic group that also includes birds, dinosaurs, and pterosaurs. Consequently, crocodilian genomes represent a gateway through which the molecular evolution of avian lineages can be explored. To facilitate comparative genomics within Crocodylia and between crocodilians and other archosaurs, we have constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library for the Australian saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus. This is the first BAC library for a crocodile and only the second BAC resource for a crocodilian. Results The C. porosus BAC library consists of 101,760 individually archived clones stored in 384-well microtiter plates. NotI digestion of random clones indicates an average insert size of 102 kb. Based on a genome size estimate of 2778 Mb, the library affords 3.7 fold (3.7×) coverage of the C. porosus genome. To investigate the utility of the library in studying sequence distribution, probes derived from CR1a and CR1b, two crocodilian CR1-like retrotransposon subfamilies, were hybridized to C. porosus macroarrays. The results indicate that there are a minimum of 20,000 CR1a/b elements in C. porosus and that their distribution throughout the genome is decidedly non-random. To demonstrate the utility of the library in gene isolation, we probed the C. porosus macroarrays with an overgo designed from a C-mos (oocyte maturation factor) partial cDNA. A BAC containing C-mos was identified and the C-mos locus was sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignment of the C. porosus C-mos coding sequence with avian and reptilian C-mos orthologs reveals greater sequence similarity between C. porosus and birds (specifically chicken and zebra finch) than between C. porosus and squamates (green anole). Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of the

  4. Active Marine Subsurface Bacterial Population Composition in Low Organic Carbon Environments from IODP Expedition 320

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, A.; Reese, B. K.; Mills, H. J.; IODP Expedition 320 Shipboard Science Party

    2011-12-01

    The marine subsurface environment contains abundant and active microorganisms. These microbial populations are considered integral players in the marine subsurface biogeochemical system with significance in global geochemical cycles and reservoirs. However, variations in microbial community structure, activity and function associated with the wide-ranging sedimentary and geochemical environments found globally have not been fully resolved. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320 recovered sediments from site U1332. Two sampling depths were selected for analysis that spanned differing lithological units in the sediment core. Sediments were composed of mostly clay with zeolite minerals at 8 meters below sea floor (mbsf). At 27 mbsf, sediments were composed of alternating clayey radiolarian ooze and nannofossil ooze. The concentration of SO42- had little variability throughout the core and the concentration of Fe2+ remained close to, or below, detection limits (0.4 μM). Total organic carbon content ranged from a low of 0.03 wt% to a high of 0.07 wt% between 6 and 30 mbsf providing an opportunity to evaluate marine subsurface microbial communities under extreme electron donor limiting conditions. The metabolically active fraction of the bacterial population was isolated by the extraction and amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA transcripts and subsequent bioinformatic analyses provided a robust data set (15,931 total classified sequences) to characterize the community at a high resolution. As observed in other subsurface environments, the overall diversity of active bacterial populations decreased with depth. The population shifted from a diverse but evenly distributed community at approximately 8 mbsf to a Firmicutes dominated population at 27 mbsf (80% of sequences). A total of 95% of the sequences at 27 mbsf were grouped into three genera: Lactobacillus (phylum Firmicutes) at 80% of the total sequences, Marinobacter (phylum

  5. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Futahashi

    Full Text Available The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  6. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  7. The chromosomal passenger protein birc5b organizes microfilaments and germ plasm in the zebrafish embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelaja Nair

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microtubule-microfilament interactions are important for cytokinesis and subcellular localization of proteins and mRNAs. In the early zebrafish embryo, astral microtubule-microfilament interactions also facilitate a stereotypic segregation pattern of germ plasm ribonucleoparticles (GP RNPs, which is critical for their eventual selective inheritance by germ cells. The precise mechanisms and molecular mediators for both cytoskeletal interactions and GP RNPs segregation are the focus of intense research. Here, we report the molecular identification of a zebrafish maternal-effect mutation motley as Birc5b, a homolog of the mammalian Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC component Survivin. The meiosis and mitosis defects in motley/birc5b mutant embryos are consistent with failed CPC function, and additional defects in astral microtubule remodeling contribute to failures in the initiation of cytokinesis furrow ingression. Unexpectedly, the motley/birc5b mutation also disrupts cortical microfilaments and GP RNP aggregation during early cell divisions. Birc5b localizes to the tips of astral microtubules along with polymerizing cortical F-actin and the GP RNPs. Mutant Birc5b co-localizes with cortical F-actin and GP RNPs, but fails to associate with astral microtubule tips, leading to disorganized microfilaments and GP RNP aggregation defects. Thus, maternal Birc5b localizes to astral microtubule tips and associates with cortical F-actin and GP RNPs, potentially linking the two cytoskeletons to mediate microtubule-microfilament reorganization and GP RNP aggregation during early embryonic cell cycles in zebrafish. In addition to the known mitotic function of CPC components, our analyses reveal a non-canonical role for an evolutionarily conserved CPC protein in microfilament reorganization and germ plasm aggregation.

  8. Cloning of the Epstein-Barr Virus-Related Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome: a Loss-of-Function Mutation of the rhBARF1 Immune Evasion Gene ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ohashi, Makoto; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Rhesus macaques are naturally infected with a gammaherpesvirus which is in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genus as and closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus macaque LCV (rhLCV) contains a repertoire of genes identical to that of EBV, and experimental rhLCV infection of naive rhesus macaques accurately models acute and persistent EBV infection of humans. We cloned the LCL8664 rhLCV strain as a bacterial artificial chromosome to create recombinant rhLCV for investigation in ...

  9. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  10. Convenient and reversible site-specific targeting of exogenous DNA into a bacterial chromosome by use of the FLP recombinase: the FLIRT system.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, L C; Wood, E. A.; Cox, M M

    1997-01-01

    We have created a system that utilizes the FLP recombinase of yeast to introduce exogenous cloned DNA reversibly at defined locations in the Escherichia coli chromosome. Recombination target (FRT) sites can be introduced permanently at random locations in the chromosome on a modified Tn5 transposon, now designed so that the inserted FRT can be detected and its location mapped with base pair resolution. FLP recombinase is provided as needed through the regulated expression of its gene on a pla...

  11. Organization of some repetitive DNAs and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Leptysminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Allison; Loreto, Vilma; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes occur in approximately 15% of eukaryotes and are usually heterochromatic and rich in repetitive DNAs. Here we describe characteristics of a B chromosome in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) through classical cytogenetic methods and mapping of some repetitive DNAs, including multigene families, telomeric repeats and a DNA fraction enriched with repetitive DNAs obtained from DOP-PCR. Eumastusia koebelei koebelei presented 2n=23, X0 and, in one individual, two copies of the same variant of a B chromosome were noticed, which are associated during meiosis. The C-positive blocks were located in the pericentromeric regions of the standard complement and along the entire length of the B chromosomes. Some G+C-rich heterochromatic blocks were noticed, including conspicuous blocks in the B chromosomes. The mapping of 18S rDNA and U2 snDNA revealed only autosomal clusters, and the telomeric probe hybridized in terminal regions. Finally, the DOP-PCR probe obtained from an individual without a B chromosome revealed signals in the heterochromatic regions, including the entire length of the B chromosome. The possible intraspecific origin of the B chromosomes, due to the shared pool of repetitive DNAs between the A and B chromosomes and the possible consequences of their association are discussed. PMID:27551344

  12. Organization of the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome between kdg and the attachment site of the SP beta prophage: use of Long Accurate PCR and yeast artificial chromosomes for sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, V; Galleron, N; Pujic, P; Sorokin, A; Ehrlich, S D

    1996-11-01

    Within the Bacillus subtilis genome sequencing project, the region between lysA and ilvA was assigned to our laboratory. In this report we present the sequence of the last 36 kb of this region, between the kdg operon and the attachment site of the SP beta prophage. A two-step strategy was used for the sequencing. In the first step, total chromosomal DNA was cloned in phage M13-based vectors and the clones carrying inserts from the target region were identified by hybridization with a cognate yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) from our collection. Sequencing of the clones allowed us to establish a number of contigs. In the second step the contigs were mapped by Long Accurate (LA) PCR and the remaining gaps closed by sequencing of the PCR products. The level of sequence inaccuracy due to LA PCR errors appeared to be about 1 in 10,000, which does not affect significantly the final sequence quality. This two-step strategy is efficient and we suggest that it can be applied to sequencing of longer chromosomal regions. The 36 kb sequence contains 38 coding sequences (CDSs), 19 of which encode unknown proteins. Seven genetic loci already mapped in this region, xpt, metB, ilvA, ilvD, thyB, dfrA and degR were identified. Eleven CDSs were found to display significant similarities to known proteins from the data banks, suggesting possible functions for some of the novel genes: cspD may encode a cold shock protein; bcsA, the first bacterial homologue of chalcone synthase; exol, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, similar to that of DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli; and bsaA, a stress-response-associated protein. The protein encoded by yplP has homology with the transcriptional NifA-like regulators. The arrangement of the genes relative to possible promoters and terminators suggests 19 potential transcription units. PMID:8969496

  13. Bacterial assisted degradation of chlorpyrifos: The key role of environmental conditions, trace metals and organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Saira; Hashmi, Imran; Khan, Sher Jamal

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater from pesticide industries, agricultural or surface runoff containing pesticides and their residues has adverse environmental impacts. Present study demonstrates effect of petrochemicals and trace metals on chlorpyrifos (CP) biotransformation often released in wastewater of agrochemical industry. Biodegradation was investigated using bacterial strain Pseudomonas kilonensis SRK1 isolated from wastewater spiked with CP. Optimal environmental conditions for CP removal were CFU (306 × 10(6)), pH (8); initial CP concentration (150 mg/L) and glucose as additional carbon source. Among various organic solvents (petrochemicals) used in this study toluene has stimulatory effect on CP degradation process using SRK1, contrary to this benzene and phenol negatively inhibited degradation process. Application of metal ions (Cu (II), Fe (II) Zn (II) at low concentration (1 mg/L) took part in biochemical reaction and positively stimulated CP degradation process. Metal ions at high concentrations have inhibitory effect on degradation process. A first order growth model was shown to fit the data. It could be concluded that both type and concentration of metal ions and petrochemicals can affect CP degradation process. PMID:26692411

  14. Effects of assimilable organic carbon and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Liu

    Full Text Available Assimilable organic carbon (AOC is one of the most important factors affecting the re-growth of microorganisms in drinking water. High AOC concentrations result in biological instability, but disinfection kills microbes to ensure the safety of drinking water. Free chlorine is an important oxidizing agent used during the disinfection process. Therefore, we explored the combined effects of AOC and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water using flow cytometry (FCM. The initial AOC concentration was 168 μg.L(-1 in all water samples. Without free chlorine, the concentrations of intact bacteria increased but the level of AOC decreased. The addition of sodium hypochlorite caused an increase and fluctuation in AOC due to the oxidation of organic carbon. The concentrations of intact bacteria decreased from 1.1 × 10(5 cells.mL(-1 to 2.6 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.6 mg.L(-1 to 4.8 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.3 mg.L(-1 due to free chlorine originating from sodium hypochlorite. Additionally, free chlorine might be more obviously affected AOC concentrations than microbial growth did. These results suggested that AOC and free chlorine might have combined effects on microbial growth. In this study, our results showed concentrations determined by FCM were higher than those by HPC, which indicated that some E. coli detected by FCM might not be detected using HPC in drinking water. The level of free chlorine might restrain the consumption of AOC by inhibiting the growth of E. coli; on the other hand, chlorination might increase the level of AOC, thereby increase the potential for microbial growth in the drinking water network.

  15. Identification of Chromosomes from Multiple Rice Genomes Using a Universal Molecular Cytogenetic Marker System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaomin Tang; Weidong Bao; Wenli Zhang; Zhukuan Cheng

    2007-01-01

    To develop reliable techniques for chromosome identification is critical for cytogenetic research, especially for genomes with a large number and smaller-sized chromosomes. An efficient approach using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAG) clones as molecular cytological markers has been developed for many organisms. Herein, we present a set of chromosomal arm-specific molecular cytological markers derived from the gene-enriched regions of the sequenced rice genome. All these markers are able to generate very strong signals on the pachytene chromosomes of Oryza satlva L. (AA genome) when used as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. We further probed those markers to the pachytene chromosomes of O. punctata (BB genome) and O. officinalis (CC genome) and also got very strong signals on the relevant pachytene chromosomes. The signal position of each marker on the related chromosomes from the three different rice genomes was pretty much stable, which enabled us to identify different chromosomes among various rice genomes. We also constructed the karyotype for both O. punctata and O. officinalis with the BB and CC genomes, respectively, by analysis of 10 pachytene cells anchored by these chromosomal arm-specific markers.

  16. Bacterial production and their role in the removal of dissolved organic matter from tributaries of drinking water reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamjunke, Norbert; Oosterwoud, Marieke R; Herzsprung, Peter; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwaters are an increasing problem in drinking water reservoirs. In this study we investigated bacterial DOM degradation rates in the tributaries of the reservoirs and tested the hypotheses that (1) DOM degradation is high enough to decrease DOM loads to reservoirs considerably, (2) DOM degradation is affected by stream hydrology, and (3) phosphorus addition may stimulate bacterial DOM degradation. Bacterial biomass production, which was used as a measure of DOM degradation, was highest in summer, and was usually lower at upstream than at downstream sites. An important proportion of bacterial production was realized in epilithic biofilms. Production of planktonic and biofilm bacteria was related to water temperature. Planktonic production weakly correlated to DOM quality and to total phosphorus concentration. Addition of soluble reactive phosphorus did not stimulate bacterial DOM degradation. Overall, DOM was considerably degraded in summer at low discharge levels, whereas degradation was negligible during flood events (when DOM load in reservoirs was high). The ratio of DOM degradation to total DOM release was negatively related to discharge. On annual average, only 0.6-12% of total DOM released by the catchments was degraded within the tributaries. PMID:26799807

  17. Insights from Space: Potential Role of Diet in the Spatial Organization of Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M. O'Sullivan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We can now sequence and identify genome wide epigenetic patterns and perform a variety of “genomic experiments” within relatively short periods of time—ranging from days to weeks. Yet, despite these technological advances, we have a poor understanding of the inter-relationships between epigenetics, genome structure-function, and nutrition. Perhaps this limitation lies, in part, in our propensity to study epigenetics in terms of the linear arrangement of elements and genes. Here we propose that a more complete understanding of how nutrition impacts on epigenetics and cellular development resides within the inter-relationships between DNA and histone modification patterns and genome function, in the context of spatial organization of chromatin and the epigenome.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-02-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial diversification and speciation. This review discusses how the recent influx of complete chromosomal sequences of various microorganisms has allowed for a quantitative assessment of the scope, rate and impact of horizontally transmitted information on microbial evolution.

  19. Organization of genes for transcription and translation in the rif region of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lambda rif/sup d/18 transducing phage is known to carry several genes for components of transcriptional and translational machineries; these genes are clustered in the rif region at 88 min on the Escherichia coli genetic map. They include a set of genes for rRNA's (rrnB), a gene for spacer tRNA, tRNA2/sup Glu/(tgtB), one of the two genes for EF-TU (tufB), genes for four ribosomal proteins (rplK, A, J, and L), genes for the β and β' subunits of RNA polymerase (rpoB and rpoC), and genes for three tRNA's (tyrU, gluT, and thrT). An additional tRNA gene (subsequently identified as thrU by Landy and his co-workers) and a gene for a protein (protein U) with unknown functions were found to be carried by lambda rif/sup d/18. We analyzed the organization of these genes by using various deletion and hybrid phages derived from lambda rif/sup d/18 and lambda rif/sup d/12, a phage related to lambda rif/sup d/18. The expression of various genes was examined in uv-irradiated cells infected with these transducing phages. Two main conclusions were obtained. First, the four tRNA genes are not cotranscribed with the genes in rrnB, even though these tRNA genes are located close to the distal end of rrnB. Second, the four ribosomal protein genes are organized into two separate transcriptional units; rplK and A are in one unit and rplJ and L are in the second unit

  20. Solving the mysteries of the bacterial cell – application of novel techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Donczew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed how the development of fluorescent markers, triggered by the discovery of green fluorescence protein and its other color variants leading to the establishment of methods for studies of protein interactions with application of fluorescent proteins, affected the view of bacterial cell organization. Application of the new microscopic methods allowed localization of proteins and chromosomal regions, and observation of their migration in real time. These studies revealed the spatial organization of bacterial cells which includes specific subcellular localization of proteins, the presence of dynamic cytoskeletal structures, orchestrated and active segregation of chromosomes, and spatiotemporal gene regulation.

  1. Spatial organization of bacterial flora in normal and inflamed intestine:A fluorescence in situ hybridization study in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Swidsinski; Vera Loening-Baucke; Herbert Lochs; Laura P. Hale

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To studythe role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: The spatial organization of intestinal flora was investigated in normal mice and in two models of murine colitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization.RESULTS: The murine small intestine was nearly bacteriafree. The normal colonic flora was organized in three distinct compartments (crypt, interlaced, and fecal), each with different bacterial compositions. Crypt bacteria were present in the cecum and proximal colon. The fecal compartment was composed of homogeneously mixed bacterial groups that directly contacted the colonic wall in the cecum but were separated from the proximal colonic wall by a dense interlaced layer. Beginning in the middle colon, a mucus gap of growing thickness physically separated all intestinal bacteria from contact with the epithelium. Colonic inflammation was accompanied with a depletion of bacteria within the fecal compartment, a reduced surface area in which feces had direct contact with the colonic wall, increased thickness and spread of the mucus gap, and massive increases of bacterial concentrations in the crypt and interlaced compartments. Adhesive and infiltrative bacteria were observed in inflamed colon only, with dominant Bacteroides species.CONCLUSION: The proximal and distal colons are functionally different organs with respect to the intestinal flora, representing a bioreactor and a Segregation device.The highly organized structure of the colonic flora, its specific arrangement in different colonic segments, and its specialized response to inflammatory stimuli indicate that the intestinal flora is an innate part of host immunity that is under complex control.

  2. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization of 5S rDNA in Oreochromis mossambicus, O. urolepis hornorum and their hybrid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hua Ping Zhu; Mai Xin Lu; Feng Ying Gao; Zhang Han Huang; Li Ping Yang; Jain Fang Gui

    2010-08-01

    In this study, classical and molecular cytogenetic analyses were performed in tilapia fishes, Oreochromis mossambicus (XX/XY sex determination system), O. urolepis hornorum (WZ/ZZ sex determination system) and their hybrid by crossing O. mossambicus female × O. u. hornorum male. An identical karyotype (($2n = 44$, NF (total number of chromosomal arms) = 50) was obtained from three examined tilapia samples. Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples. Subsequently, 45S rDNA probes were also prepared, and six positive fluorescence signals were observed on three chromosome pairs in all analysed metaphases of the three tilapia samples. The correlation between 45 rDNA localization and nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) was confirmed by silver nitrate staining in tilapia fishes. Further, different chromosomal localizations of 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were verified by two different colour FISH probes. Briefly, the current data provide an insights for hybridization projects and breeding improvement of tilapias.

  3. The impact of dissolved organic carbon and bacterial respiration on pCO2 in experimental sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Kotovitch, M.; Kaartokallio, H.; Moreau, S.; Tison, J.-L.; Kattner, G.; Dieckmann, G.; Thomas, D. N.; Delille, B.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations have shown that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in sea ice brines is generally higher in Arctic sea ice compared to those from the Antarctic sea ice, especially in winter and early spring. We hypothesized that these differences result from the higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in Arctic seawater: Higher concentrations of DOC in seawater would be reflected in a greater DOC incorporation into sea ice, enhancing bacterial respiration, which in turn would increase the pCO2 in the ice. To verify this hypothesis, we performed an experiment using two series of mesocosms: one was filled with seawater (SW) and the other one with seawater with an addition of filtered humic-rich river water (SWR). The addition of river water increased the DOC concentration of the water from a median of 142 μmol Lwater-1 in SW to 249 μmol Lwater-1 in SWR. Sea ice was grown in these mesocosms under the same physical conditions over 19 days. Microalgae and protists were absent, and only bacterial activity has been detected. We measured the DOC concentration, bacterial respiration, total alkalinity and pCO2 in sea ice and the underlying seawater, and we calculated the changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in both media. We found that bacterial respiration in ice was higher in SWR: median bacterial respiration was 25 nmol C Lice-1 h-1 compared to 10 nmol C Lice-1 h-1 in SW. pCO2 in ice was also higher in SWR with a median of 430 ppm compared to 356 ppm in SW. However, the differences in pCO2 were larger within the ice interiors than at the surfaces or the bottom layers of the ice, where exchanges at the air-ice and ice-water interfaces might have reduced the differences. In addition, we used a model to simulate the differences of pCO2 and DIC based on bacterial respiration. The model simulations support the experimental findings and further suggest that bacterial growth efficiency in the ice might approach 0.15 and 0.2. It is thus credible

  4. A unique self-organization of bacterial sub-communities creates iridescence in Cellulophaga lytica colony biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kientz, Betty; Luke, Stephen; Vukusic, Peter; Péteri, Renaud; Beaudry, Cyrille; Renault, Tristan; Simon, David; Mignot, Tâm; Rosenfeld, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Iridescent color appearances are widespread in nature. They arise from the interaction of light with micron- and submicron-sized physical structures spatially arranged with periodic geometry and are usually associated with bright angle-dependent hues. Iridescence has been reported for many animals and marine organisms. However, iridescence has not been well studied in bacteria. Recently, we reported a brilliant “pointillistic” iridescence in colony biofilms of marine Flavobacteria that exhibit gliding motility. The mechanism of their iridescence is unknown. Here, using a multi-disciplinary approach, we show that the cause of iridescence is a unique periodicity of the cell population in the colony biofilm. Cells are arranged together to form hexagonal photonic crystals. Our model highlights a novel pattern of self-organization in a bacterial biofilm. ”Pointillistic” bacterial iridescence can be considered a new light-dependent phenomenon for the field of microbiology.

  5. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Stevens and its application to physically map the Sw-5 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassova, MI; Prins, M; Stevens, MR; Hille, J; Goldbach, RW; Spassova, Mariana I.; Stevens, Mikel R.; Goldbach, Rob W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sw-5 gene is a dominantly inherited resistance gene in tomato and functional against a number of tospovirus species. The gene has been mapped on chromosome 9, tightly linked to RFLP markers CT220 and SCAR421. To analyse the Sw-5 locus, a BAC genomic library was constructed of tomato cv. Stevens,

  6. Distribution, origin and transformation of amino sugars sand bacterial contribution to estuarine particulate organic matter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Bhosle, N.B.

    transformation and greater bacterial contribution to POM during the former season. Degradation trends observed with TPAS were well supported by those obtained with carbohydrates andaminoacids. Based on Murconcent rations,bacteria accounted for 24% to 35...

  7. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye eXia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and 5 phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50%-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application.

  8. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; DeBolt, Seth; Dreyer, Jamin; Scott, Delia; Williams, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon, and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root, and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and five phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application. PMID:26217348

  9. The leukemogenic t(8;21) fusion protein AML1-ETO controls ribosomal RNA genes and associates with nucleolar organizing regions at mitotic chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bakshi, Rachit; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Young, Daniel W; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2008-01-01

    RUNX1/AML1 is required for definitive hematopoiesis and is frequently targeted by chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). The t(8;21) related AML1-ETO fusion protein blocks differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Here, we show by immunofluorescence microscopy that during interphase, endogenous AML1-ETO localizes to nuclear microenvironments distinct from those containing native RUNX1/AML1 protein. At mitosis, we clearly detect binding of AML1-ETO to nucleolar organizing re...

  10. Effect of catchment land use and soil type on the concentration, quality, and bacterial degradation of riverine dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autio, Iida; Soinne, Helena; Helin, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effects of catchment characteristics (soil type and land use) on the concentration and quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in river water and on the bacterial degradation of terrestrial DOM. The share of organic soil was the strongest predictor of high concentrations of...... communities within 2–3 months. Simultaneously, the proportion of humic-like compounds in the DOM pool increased. Bioavailable DON accounted for approximately one-third of the total bioavailable dissolved nitrogen, and thus, terrestrial DON can markedly contribute to the coastal plankton dynamics and support...

  11. Is the Karyotype of Neotropical Boid Snakes Really Conserved? Cytotaxonomy, Chromosomal Rearrangements and Karyotype Organization in the Boidae Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Patrik F.; Ribeiro, Leila B.; Souza, George Myller; Chalkidis, Hipócrates de Menezes; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana

    2016-01-01

    Boids are primitive snakes from a basal lineage that is widely distributed in Neotropical region. Many of these species are both morphologically and biogeographically divergent, and the relationship among some species remains uncertain even with evolutionary and phylogenetic studies being proposed for the group. For a better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between these snakes, we cytogenetically analysed 7 species and 3 subspecies of Neotropical snakes from the Boidae family using different chromosomal markers. The karyotypes of Boa constrictor occidentalis, Corallus hortulanus, Eunectes notaeus, Epicrates cenchria and Epicrates assisi are presented here for the first time with the redescriptions of the karyotypes of Boa constrictor constrictor, B. c. amarali, Eunectes murinus and Epicrates crassus. The three subspecies of Boa, two species of Eunectes and three species of Epicrates exhibit 2n = 36 chromosomes. In contrast, C. hortulanus presented a totally different karyotype composition for the Boidae family, showing 2n = 40 chromosomes with a greater number of macrochromosomes. Furthermore, chromosomal mapping of telomeric sequences revealed the presence of interstitial telomeric sites (ITSs) on many chromosomes in addition to the terminal markings on all chromosomes of all taxa analysed, with the exception of E. notaeus. Thus, we demonstrate that the karyotypes of these snakes are not as highly conserved as previously thought. Moreover, we provide an overview of the current cytotaxonomy of the group. PMID:27494409

  12. Experimental insights into the importance of aquatic bacterial community composition to the degradation of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Jürg B; Stedmon, Colin A; Kellerman, Anne M; Nielsen, Nikoline J; Andersson, Anders F; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lindström, Eva S; Kritzberg, Emma S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria play a central role in the cycling of carbon, yet our understanding of the relationship between the taxonomic composition and the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still poor. In this experimental study, we were able to demonstrate a direct link between community composition and ecosystem functioning in that differently structured aquatic bacterial communities differed in their degradation of terrestrially derived DOM. Although the same amount of carbon was processed, both the temporal pattern of degradation and the compounds degraded differed among communities. We, moreover, uncovered that low-molecular-weight carbon was available to all communities for utilisation, whereas the ability to degrade carbon of greater molecular weight was a trait less widely distributed. Finally, whereas the degradation of either low- or high-molecular-weight carbon was not restricted to a single phylogenetic clade, our results illustrate that bacterial taxa of similar phylogenetic classification differed substantially in their association with the degradation of DOM compounds. Applying techniques that capture the diversity and complexity of both bacterial communities and DOM, our study provides new insight into how the structure of bacterial communities may affect processes of biogeochemical significance. PMID:26296065

  13. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Blanco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  14. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  15. Fossil bacterial ecosystem at methane seeps - Origin of organic matter from Be'eri sulfur deposit, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhan, R. Y. P.; Trendel, J. M.; Adam, P.; Wehrung, P.; Albrecht, P.; Nissenbaum, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Be'eri sulfur mine (Israel) is a unique deposit mainly composed of sandstone intercalated with biogenic mats and possessing organic matter exceptionally depleted in 13C. Molecular and isotopic studies of free and bound biomarkers were performed to unravel the source of the organic matter co-occurring with sulfur in this deposit and to propose a paleoenvironmental model of bacterial life in a type of extreme environment. They showed that the biomarkers are all extremely 13C-depleted and almost exclusively composed of hopanoids and biphytane derivatives of bacterial origin, notably methanotrophic bacteria and acidophilic archaea. δ 13C values of individual components and of bulk organic carbon are in the -80% to -90% range and are among the lowest values ever measured for hopanoids. Organic matter in the sandstone and the mats differ mainly by the occurrence of 3-methylated hopanoids in the mats, which may reflect either different bacterial populations or different conditions of growth. These data demonstrate that the complete biomass of this deposit primarily derives from methanotrophic hopanoid-synthesizing bacteria consuming methane having seeped toward the surface, and that all other organisms - apparently only archaea and bacteria - must have been thriving on methane-derived carbon (methane, CO 2, biomass of methanotrophic bacteria). Unambiguous evidence for photosynthetic organisms in the environment of deposition could not be found. The Be'eri sulfur deposit is thus a fossil remain of an exclusively bacterial ecosystem fueled by methane as sole carbon source and having developed in an interstitial aqueous medium within the sandstone. Elemental sulfur from the deposit probably originates from the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide seeping along with methane, which could have been oxidized either abiotically or biologically by sulfur-oxidizing Beggiatoa-like bacteria and archaea. Further oxidation of elemental sulfur might explain the high acidity of the deposit

  16. Chromosome Evolution in African Cichlid Fish: Contributions from the Physical Mapping of Repeated DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, I.A.; Poletto, A.B.; Kocher, T.D.; Mota-Velasco, J.C.; Penman, D.J.; Martins, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation that has led to extensive ecological diversity and because of their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To further understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, we have comparatively mapped the SATA satellite DNA, the transposable element ROn-1, and repeated sequences in the bacterial artificial chromosome clone BAC-C4E09 on the chromosomes of a range of African species of Cichlidae, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SATA satellite DNA was mapped in almost all the centromeres of all tilapiine and haplochromine species studied. The maintenance and centromeric distribution of the SATA satellite DNA in African cichlids suggest that this sequence plays an important role in the organization and function of the centromere in these species. Furthermore, analysis of SATA element distribution clarifies that chromosome fusions occurred independently in Oreochromis and Tilapia genera, and led to the reduced chromosome number detected in O. karongae and T. mariae. The comparative chromosome mapping of the ROn-1 SINE-like element and BAC-C4E09 shows that the repeated sequences have been maintained among tilapiine, haplochromine and hemichromine fishes and has demonstrated the homology of the largest chromosomes among these groups. Furthermore, the mapping of ROn-1 suggested that different chromosomal rearrangements could have occurred in the origin of the largest chromosome pairs of tilapiines and non-tilapiines. PMID:20606399

  17. Diagnosis and Prognostication of Ductal Adenocarcinomas of the Pancreas Based on Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling by Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Array-Based Methylated CpG Island Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Gotoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish diagnostic criteria for ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (PCs, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC array-based methylated CpG island amplification was performed using 139 tissue samples. Twelve BAC clones, for which DNA methylation status was able to discriminate cancerous tissue (T from noncancerous pancreatic tissue in the learning cohort with a specificity of 100%, were identified. Using criteria that combined the 12 BAC clones, T-samples were diagnosed as cancers with 100% sensitivity and specificity in both the learning and validation cohorts. DNA methylation status on 11 of the BAC clones, which was able to discriminate patients showing early relapse from those with no relapse in the learning cohort with 100% specificity, was correlated with the recurrence-free and overall survival rates in the validation cohort and was an independent prognostic factor by multivariate analysis. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling may provide optimal diagnostic markers and prognostic indicators for patients with PCs.

  18. Construction of BAC Libraries from Flow-Sorted Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Cloned DNA libraries in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) are the most widely used form of large-insert DNA libraries. BAC libraries are typically represented by ordered clones derived from genomic DNA of a particular organism. In the case of large eukaryotic genomes, whole-genome libraries consist of a hundred thousand to a million clones, which make their handling and screening a daunting task. The labor and cost of working with whole-genome libraries can be greatly reduced by constructing a library derived from a smaller part of the genome. Here we describe construction of BAC libraries from mitotic chromosomes purified by flow cytometric sorting. Chromosome-specific BAC libraries facilitate positional gene cloning, physical mapping, and sequencing in complex plant genomes. PMID:27511172

  19. Effects of the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum on bacterial production and carbon flow in experimental benthic systems under increasing organic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinga, Ronald; Kop, Arjen J.; Malschaert, Johannes F. P.; Van Duyl, Fleur C.

    1997-05-01

    Effects of the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum on benthic bacterial production were studied in marine sediment boxcosms, to which different amounts of organic matter (30, 60 and 90 g C m -2) were added. Bacterial production was estimated from incorporation rates of 3H-labelled leucine. The distribution of organic carbon in the boxcosm sediments was monitored. Measurements were done over a period of 27 days after the introduction of organic matter. Non-enriched boxcosms were used as controls. In macrobenthos-free boxcosms, the bacterial response to organic-matter additions mainly took place in the organic-matter layer on the sediment surface and in the upper 3 mm of the sediment. In the presence of E. cordatum, more organic matter was transported into the sediment, and the bacterial production rates in deeper sediment layers were higher. Increasing the organic loading did not further enhance these rates. It is concluded that E. cordatum stimulates bacterial production in deeper sediment layers by increasing the transport of organic matter into the sediment and perhaps also by promoting its degradation. At an increasing load with organic matter, the relative importance of the effects of E. cordatum decreases.

  20. Genomic organization, complete sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for human eotaxin (SCYA11), an eosinophil-specific CC chemokine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zepeda, E.A.; Sarafi, M.N.; Luster, A.D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)]|[Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine that is a specific chemoattractant for eosinophils and is implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. We describe the genomic organization, complete sequence, including 1354 bp 5{prime} of the RNA initiation site, and chromosomal localization of the human eotaxin gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis localized eotaxin to human chromosome 17, in the region q21.1-q21.2, and the human gene name SCYA11 was assigned. We also present the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the mouse eotaxin gene and have identified several regulatory elements that are conserved between the murine and the human promoters. In particular, the presence of elements such as NF-{Kappa}B, interferon-{gamma} response element, and glucocorticoid response element may explain the observed regulation of the eotaxin gene by cytokines and glucocorticoids. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Saxena; Sona Vasudevan; Digvijay Patil; Norah Ashoura; Grimwade, Julia E.; Elliott Crooke

    2015-01-01

    DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vi...

  2. The effect of organic matter and oxygen on the degradation of bacterial membrane lipids in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Rodger; Fallon, Robert D.; Patton, John S.

    1986-05-01

    The biodegradation of purified radiolabelled membrane lipids from a methanogenic bacterium and a pseudomonad were investigated in mangrove, beach and high marsh marine sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effect of organic matter on the amount and rate of degradation was also examined by supplementing beach sediments with humic acids. In aerobic sediments, CO 2 was the major product of lipid degradation while under anaerobic conditions both CO 2 and CH 4 were major end products and the overall rates were reduced (up to 40%) relative to aerobic conditions. Total bacterial numbers increased during all incubations with the largest increases occurring in anaerobic sediments supplemented with humic acids. No lipid degradation occurred in aerobic or anaerobic sediments treated with formaldehyde or autoclaving. In low organic beach sediments, the ester-linked phospholipid of the pseudomonad was degraded much more rapidly than the diphytanyl glycerol diether of the methanogen with 69% of the phospholipid degraded in 96 hours versus only 4% of the methanogen lipid. Lipid degradation in both aerobic and anaerobic sediments was highly correlated to organic matter content with increasing amounts of organic matter inhibiting degradation. Long incubations (75 days) of the diphytanyl glycerol ether resulted in 51% degraded to CO 2 in low (0.5%) organic mangrove sediments while only 9% was mineralized in high (10.8%) organic marsh sediments. Physicochemical sorption of membrane lipids to the organic matrix is proposed as a mechanism which protects membrane lipids from microbial attack and degradation.

  3. Natural organic matter (NOM) removal and structural changes in the bacterial community during artificial groundwater recharge with humic lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Langwaldt, Jörg H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluated the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and structural changes in the microbial community during infiltration of humic lake water at three artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) sites in Finland. The three sites were at waterworks in Hämeenlinna, Jyväskylä and Tuusula, sites A, B and C, respectively. Site A used groundwater recharge by both basin and sprinkling infiltration, site B used only sprinkling infiltration, and site C used only basin infiltration. Reductions of total organic carbon at sites A, B and C were 91%, 84% and 74%, respectively, in the winter, and 88%, 77% and 73%, respectively, in the summer. The Finnish national recommended value of 2 mg/l for TOC was achieved at all sites and the TOC of natural groundwater at site C was much lower, at 0.6 mg/l. Large molecular fractions of NOM were removed more efficiently than the smaller ones. Total amount of DAPI-stained cells decreased during infiltration at sites A, B and C in winter by 94%, 94% and 75% and in summer by 96%, 97% and 94%, respectively. Bacterial communities in raw waters and extracted groundwaters were diverse with changes occurring during infiltration, which was shown by DNA extraction followed by PCR of 16S rRNA genes and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting. While the natural groundwater microbial community was diverse, it was different from that of the extracted groundwater in the AGR area. Simultaneous organic carbon removal and the decrease of bacterial counts during infiltration indicated biodegradation. In addition, the changing DGGE profiles during the process of infiltration, demonstrated that changing environmental conditions were reflected by changes in bacterial community composition. PMID:17434565

  4. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Villa, Mateo Andres; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Aguiar; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Chaveerach, Arunrat

    2015-01-01

    Channid fishes, commonly referred to as "snakeheads", are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes. PMID:26067030

  5. Structural studies of lambda transducing bacteriophage carrying bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid from the metBJLF region of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger, J H; Johnson, J. R.; Greene, R C; Dresser, M

    1981-01-01

    The structures of several lambda dmet and related lambda darg transducing phage were studied by restriction fragment mapping and electron microscopic measurements of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes. A new transducing phage (lambda dmet141), in which metF is the only functional gene of the cluster, was isolated. In contrast, lambda dmet117, which expresses the entire metBJLF cluster, has only 3 kilobases more bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) than lambda dmet141. An EcoRI restriction fragm...

  6. Effect of particulate organic carbon on heterotrophic bacterial populations and nitrification efficiency in biological filters

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Luigi; Blancheton, Jean-paul; V. Bruni; Piedrahita, Raul

    2006-01-01

    Competition between heterotrophic and nitrifying bacteria is of major practical importance in aquaculture biofilter design and operation. This competition must be understood to minimize the negative impact of heterotrophic bacteria on an aquaculture system. On the other hand, the heterotrophic population is suspected of having a positive effect against pathogenic bacteria. Little information is available on the bacterial communities present within aquaculture systems, except for nitrifying ba...

  7. A survey of veterinary hospitals in Nigeria for the presence of some bacterial organisms of nosocomial and zoonotic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Lawal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to determine the type and estimate the prevalence of bacterial organisms on contact surfaces of five close-to-patient facilities in three veterinary health care settings within the Sokoto metropolis of north-western Nigeria. A total of 30 samples (10 from each setting were collected and analysed using culture, microscopy and biochemical testing. Bacterial species isolated from samples in this study included the following: Bacillus sp. (27.3%, Staphylococcus aureus (15.9%, Listeria sp. (13.6%, Streptococcus sp. (11.4%, Salmonella sp. (6.8%, Escherichia coli (4.5%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (4.5%, Citrobacter sp. (2.3%, Klebsiella sp. (2.3%, Lactobacillus sp. (2.3%, Micrococcus sp. (2.3%, Pasteurella sp. (2.3%, Proteus sp. (2.3%, and Yersinia sp. (2.3%. A higher percentage (64.3% of the total bacterial isolates were zoonotic in nature and hence of public health significance. Some pathogens have the potential of nosocomial spread. In this study, we seek to establish the first evidence of bacterial presence in the major veterinary health care settings in the Sokoto region of north-western Nigeria. Of particular interest is the hypothesis, which has not previously been formally tested, that nosocomial infections are especially likely to be implicated in both animals and occupational diseases in Nigeria. It was suggested that some of these isolates were associated with the risk of nosocomial and zoonotic infections and hence draws attention to the need to rigorously employ standard veterinary precautions as part of the hospital’s infection control programme in an attempt to protect both patients and staff from infections.

  8. Impact of well intake systems on bacterial, algae, and organic carbon reduction in SWRO desalination systems, SAWACO, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah

    2014-07-18

    The intake system can play a significant role in improving the feed water quality and ultimately influence the performance of downstream components of the seawater reverse osmosis desalination processes. In most cases, open-ocean intakes produce poor feed water quality in terms of the abundance of naturally occurring organic matter, which increases the risk of membrane fouling. An alternative intake is the subsurface system, which is based on the riverbank filtration concept that provides natural filtration and biological treatment of the feed water prior to the entry of the water into the desalination plant. The use of subsurface intakes normally improves the raw water quality by reducing suspended solids, algae, bacterial, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Therefore, the risk of biofouling caused by these substances can be reduced by implementing the appropriate type of intake system. The use of well intake systems was investigated along the Red Sea shoreline of Saudi Arabia in the Jeddah region. Data were collected from a seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant with a capacity of 10,000 m3/d. The well system produces feed water from an artificial-fill peninsula that was constructed atop of the seabed. Ten wells have been constructed on the peninsula for extracting raw seawater. Water samples were collected from nearby surface seawater as a reference and from selected individual wells. The percentage of algae and bacterial removal by induced filtration process was evaluated by comparison of the seawater concentrations with the well discharges. Transparent exopolymer particles and organic carbon fractions reduction was also measured. The quality of raw water extracted from the well systems was highly improved compared with the raw seawater source. It was observed that algae were virtually 100% removed and the bacterial concentration was significantly removed by the aquifer matrix. The detailed analysis of organic carbon fraction using liquid

  9. A genomic island present along the bacterial chromosome of the Parachlamydiaceae UWE25, an obligate amoebal endosymbiont, encodes a potentially functional F-like conjugative DNA transfer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Lionel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25, a Parachlamydia-related endosymbiont of free-living amoebae, was recently published, providing the opportunity to search for genomic islands (GIs. Results On the residual cumulative G+C content curve, a G+C-rich 19-kb region was observed. This sequence is part of a 100-kb chromosome region, containing 100 highly co-oriented ORFs, flanked by two 17-bp direct repeats. Two identical gly-tRNA genes in tandem are present at the proximal end of this genetic element. Several mobility genes encoding transposases and bacteriophage-related proteins are located within this chromosome region. Thus, this region largely fulfills the criteria of GIs. The G+C content analysis shows that several modules compose this GI. Surprisingly, one of them encodes all genes essential for F-like conjugative DNA transfer (traF, traG, traH, traN, traU, traW, and trbC, involved in sex pilus retraction and mating pair stabilization, strongly suggesting that, similarly to the other F-like operons, the parachlamydial tra unit is devoted to DNA transfer. A close relatedness of this tra unit to F-like tra operons involved in conjugative transfer is confirmed by phylogenetic analyses performed on concatenated genes and gene order conservation. These analyses and that of gly-tRNA distribution in 140 GIs suggest a proteobacterial origin of the parachlamydial tra unit. Conclusions A GI of the UWE25 chromosome encodes a potentially functional F-like DNA conjugative system. This is the first hint of a putative conjugative system in chlamydiae. Conjugation most probably occurs within free-living amoebae, that may contain hundreds of Parachlamydia bacteria tightly packed in vacuoles. Such a conjugative system might be involved in DNA transfer between internalized bacteria. Since this system is absent from the sequenced genomes of Chlamydiaceae, we hypothesize that it was acquired after the divergence between

  10. Specific deletion of Cdc42 does not affect meiotic spindle organization/migration and homologous chromosome segregation but disrupts polarity establishment and cytokinesis in mouse oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Zhang, Qing-Hua;

    2013-01-01

    female infertility in mice. Cdc42 deletion has little effect on meiotic spindle organization and migration to the cortex but inhibits polar body emission, although homologous chromosome segregation occurs. The failure of cytokinesis is due to the loss of polarized Arp2/3 accumulation and actin cap...... polarized actin cap and oocyte polarity, and it determines asymmetric divisions resulting in two polar bodies. Here we investigate the functions of Cdc42 in oocyte meiotic maturation by oocyte-specific deletion of Cdc42 through Cre-loxP conditional knockout technology. We find that Cdc42 deletion causes...

  11. Physical and bacterial controls on inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during a sea ice growth and decay experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J.; Delille, B.; Kaartokallio, H.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day experiment that included periods of both ice growth and decay. The experiment was performed...... major changes in DOC concentrations. (3) Different forms of DOC have different properties and hence incorporation efficiencies. In particular, the terrestrially-derived DOC from the river water was less efficiently incorporated into sea ice than the DOC in the seawater. Therefore the main factors...... regulating the distribution of the dissolved compounds within sea ice are clearly a complex interaction of brine dynamics, biological activity and in the case of dissolved organic matter, the physico-chemical properties of the dissolved constituents themselves....

  12. A Markovian analysis of bacterial genome sequence constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Skewes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of nucleotides within a bacterial chromosome is influenced by numerous factors. The degeneracy of the third codon within each reading frame allows some flexibility of nucleotide selection; however, the third nucleotide in the triplet of each codon is at least partly determined by the preceding two. This is most evident in organisms with a strong G + C bias, as the degenerate codon must contribute disproportionately to maintaining that bias. Therefore, a correlation exists between the first two nucleotides and the third in all open reading frames. If the arrangement of nucleotides in a bacterial chromosome is represented as a Markov process, we would expect that the correlation would be completely captured by a second-order Markov model and an increase in the order of the model (e.g., third-, fourth-…order would not capture any additional uncertainty in the process. In this manuscript, we present the results of a comprehensive study of the Markov property that exists in the DNA sequences of 906 bacterial chromosomes. All of the 906 bacterial chromosomes studied exhibit a statistically significant Markov property that extends beyond second-order, and therefore cannot be fully explained by codon usage. An unrooted tree containing all 906 bacterial chromosomes based on their transition probability matrices of third-order shares ∼25% similarity to a tree based on sequence homologies of 16S rRNA sequences. This congruence to the 16S rRNA tree is greater than for trees based on lower-order models (e.g., second-order, and higher-order models result in diminishing improvements in congruence. A nucleotide correlation most likely exists within every bacterial chromosome that extends past three nucleotides. This correlation places significant limits on the number of nucleotide sequences that can represent probable bacterial chromosomes. Transition matrix usage is largely conserved by taxa, indicating that this property is likely

  13. Impacts of Alterations of Organic Inputs on the Bacterial Community within the sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelius Marisa K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind Cave (WICA in the Black Hills of South Dakota, like many mostly dry caves in temperate regions is an energy-starved system.The biotic communities that reside in these systems are low in diversity and simple in structure, and sensitive to changes in externalinputs of organic matter. Caves open to tourist traffic offer an opportunity to study the impacts of organic matter amendments in theform of human and rodent hair and dander, clothing lint, material from rodent activity (nesting materials and feces, and algal growthin and around artificial lighting. This study reports on the impacts of carbon amendments from humans and rodents on the bacterialand archaeal communities within the sediments of WICA from annual surveys and from a manipulative study that added lint (‘L’;cellulose plus rodent dander and rodent hair, rodent feces (‘F’, and a combination of both (‘LF’. The survey confirmed that bacterialbiomass was higher in regions of the cave with the highest rates of lint (hair and natural clothing fibers input. The manipulative studyfound that organic amendments in the forms of lint (L and rodent feces (F altered the WICA bacterial community structure in bothabundance and diversity, with the combined lint and feces (LF amendment having the most significant response. The high similarityof the LF and L communities suggests that the cave bacterial community is more carbon than nitrogen limited. The implication ofcave development to management practices is immediate and practical. Even small amounts of lint and organic matter foreign tocave bacteria significantly compromise the integrity of the endemic community resulting in the replacement of undescribed speciesby assemblages with at best, unknown impacts to natural cave features.

  14. Influence of organic substrates on the kinetics of bacterial As(III) oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Lescure, Tiffanie; Joulian, Catherine; Bauda, Pascale; Hénault, Catherine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Soil microflora plays a major role on the behavior of metals and metalloids. Arsenic speciation, in particular, is related to the activity of bacteria able to oxidize, reduce or methylate this element, and determines mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of As. Arsenite (AsIII) is more toxic and more mobile than arsenate (AsV). Bacterial As(III)-oxidation tends to reduce the toxicity of arsenic in soils and the risk of transfer toward underlying aquifers, that would affect the quality of wat...

  15. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  16. Changes in bacterial community metabolism and composition during the degradation of dissolved organic matter from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Marine; Pringault, Olivier; Bouvy, Marc; Catala, Philippe; Oriol, Louise; Caparros, Jocelyne; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Intertaglia, Laurent; West, Nyree; Agis, Martin; Got, Patrice; Joux, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Spatial increases and temporal shifts in outbreaks of gelatinous plankton have been observed over the past several decades in many estuarine and coastal ecosystems. The effects of these blooms on marine ecosystem functioning and particularly on the dynamics of the heterotrophic bacteria are still unclear. The response of the bacterial community from a Mediterranean coastal lagoon to the addition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita, corresponding to an enrichment of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by 1.4, was assessed for 22 days in microcosms (8 l). The high bioavailability of this material led to (i) a rapid mineralization of the DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen from the jellyfish and (ii) the accumulation of high concentrations of ammonium and orthophosphate in the water column. DOM from jellyfish greatly stimulated heterotrophic prokaryotic production and respiration rates during the first 2 days; then, these activities showed a continuous decay until reaching those measured in the control microcosms (lagoon water only) at the end of the experiment. Bacterial growth efficiency remained below 20%, indicating that most of the DOM was respired and a minor part was channeled to biomass production. Changes in bacterial diversity were assessed by tag pyrosequencing of partial bacterial 16S rRNA genes, DNA fingerprints, and a cultivation approach. While bacterial diversity in control microcosms showed little changes during the experiment, the addition of DOM from the jellyfish induced a rapid growth of Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio species that were isolated. After 9 days, the bacterial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes, which appeared more adapted to metabolize high-molecular-weight DOM. At the end of the experiment, the bacterial community shifted toward a higher proportion of Alphaproteobacteria. Resilience of the bacterial community after the addition of DOM from the jellyfish was higher for metabolic functions than diversity

  17. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  18. Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in organic-rich sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, K S; Canfield, D E

    1997-01-01

    Isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated in the cyanobacterial microbial mats of Solar Lake, Sinai and the sediments of Logten Lagoon sulfuretum, Denmark. Fractionation was measured at different sediment depths, sulfate...... natural populations of sulfate reducers and previous measurements from pure cultures. This was somewhat surprising given the extremely high rates of sulfate reduction in the experiments. Our results are explained if we conclude that the fractionation was mainly controlled by the specific rate of sulfate...... reduction (mass cell-1 time-1) and not by the absolute rate (mass volume-1 time-1). Sedimentary sulfides (mainly FeS2) were on average 40% depleted in 34S compared to seawater sulfate. This amount of depletion was more than could be explained by the isotopic fractionations that we measured during bacterial...

  19. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  20. Net production and consumption of fluorescent colored dissolved organic matter by natural bacterial assemblages growing on marine phytoplankton exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Sarmento, Hugo; Alvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón; Gasol, Josep M; Marrasé, Celia

    2011-11-01

    An understanding of the distribution of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the oceans and its role in the global carbon cycle requires a better knowledge of the colored materials produced and consumed by marine phytoplankton and bacteria. In this work, we examined the net uptake and release of CDOM by a natural bacterial community growing on DOM derived from four phytoplankton species cultured under axenic conditions. Fluorescent humic-like substances exuded by phytoplankton (excitation/emission [Ex/Em] wavelength, 310 nm/392 nm; Coble's peak M) were utilized by bacteria in different proportions depending on the phytoplankton species of origin. Furthermore, bacteria produced humic-like substances that fluoresce at an Ex/Em wavelength of 340 nm/440 nm (Coble's peak C). Differences were also observed in the Ex/Em wavelengths of the protein-like materials (Coble's peak T) produced by phytoplankton and bacteria. The induced fluorescent emission of CDOM produced by prokaryotes was an order of magnitude higher than that of CDOM produced by eukaryotes. We have also examined the final compositions of the bacterial communities growing on the exudates, which differed markedly depending on the phytoplankton species of origin. Alteromonas and Roseobacter were dominant during all the incubations on Chaetoceros sp. and Prorocentrum minimum exudates, respectively. Alteromonas was the dominant group growing on Skeletonema costatum exudates during the exponential growth phase, but it was replaced by Roseobacter afterwards. On Micromonas pusilla exudates, Roseobacter was replaced by Bacteroidetes after the exponential growth phase. Our work shows that fluorescence excitation-emission matrices of CDOM can be a helpful tool for the identification of microbial sources of DOM in the marine environment, but further studies are necessary to explore the association of particular bacterial groups with specific fluorophores. PMID:21742918

  1. Enteropathogenic bacterial contamination of a latosol following application of organic fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alexandre Escosteguy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry manure is used as fertilizer in natura, but little is known about whether it contaminates the soil with pathogenic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of organic, organomineral and mineral fertilizers on soil contamination by enteric pathogens, using poultry manure as the organic fertilizer. Manure was applied in field experiments at rates of 7.0 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2008/2009, 8.0 ton. ha-1 (wheat crop, 2009 and 14 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2010/2011. Organomineral fertilizer was applied at the same rates but was comprised of 50% manure and 50% mineral fertilizer. At 30 and 70 days after fertilization, the organic fertilizer and the upper 0-5 cm layer of the soil were tested for the presence of helminth eggs and larvae and enteropathogenic bacteria. Fecal and non-fecal coliforms (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringes were found in the organic fertilizer, but neither Salmonella spp. nor enteroparasites were detected. The population of enteropathogenic bacteria in the soil was similar among the treatments for all crops at both evaluation times. The population of thermotolerant coliforms in the organic fertilizer was larger than the maximum level allowed in Brazil, but neither the organic or nor the organomineral fertilizer contaminated the soil.

  2. Bacterial Agents Andantibiogram of Most Common Isolated Organisms from Hands of Surgical Team Members after Scrubbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PS Mohseni- Meybodi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many post-surgical wound infections in hospitals cause morbidity and morality of patients and these are usually transmitted via hands of surgical personnel. The aim of the present study was to detect and antibiogram the bacterial agents following scrubbing of hands of surgical personnel before operation. Methods: Hands of 134 personnels of operation room were swabbed following scrubbing with antiseptic Betadine solution. Swab samples were inoculated on selective and differential media such as blood ager, McConky and manitol salt agar(MSA. Following incubation of media at 37c° for 24hr, bacterial species were identified using differential related tests. The isolated species were than antibiogramed and the results together with other data was analysed by SPSS software program. Results: Of the total of 134 cases, 81(60.4% were male and 53(39.6% female. The mean scrub time for each person was (206.1+/-103.2 seconds; 6 to 60 seconds base change. Increasing time of scrub was significantly correlated with decreasing rate of bacteria (P=0.003, (R=-0.254. Contamination was present in 129(96.3% cases following scrubbing. Maximum contamination was observed in nails (92.5%. Average number of bacteria for each individual was between 0 and 159. 62.6% of isolated bacteria were non- staphylococci and 7.7% were S. aureus. Vancomycin and ceftizoxim were the most sensitive, while penicillin was the least sensitive antibiotic. Conclusion: Results revealed that hand contamination was more than the expected standard level. Therefore, regarding the critical task of surgical personnel, training of all operation room staff is highly recommended to minimize the rate of contamination.

  3. The percentage of living bacterial cells related to organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lasternas; S. Agustí

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g., sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis) involved in the transfer of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here, we show the percentage of living heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtro...

  4. A FISH-based chromosome map for the European corn borer yields insights into ancient chromosomal fusions in the silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukochi, Y; Ohno, M; Shibata, F; Jouraku, A; Nakano, R; Ishikawa, Y; Sahara, K

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of the genomes of Lepidoptera, butterflies and moths, is the high conservation of chromosome organization. Recent remarkable progress in genome sequencing of Lepidoptera has revealed that syntenic gene order is extensively conserved across phylogenetically distant species. The ancestral karyotype of Lepidoptera is thought to be n=31; however, that of the most well-studied moth, Bombyx mori, is n=28, and diverse studies suggest that three chromosomal fusion events occurred in this lineage. To identify the boundaries between predicted ancient fusions involving B. mori chromosomes 11, 23 and 24, we constructed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based chromosome maps of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (n=31). We first determined a 511 Mb genomic sequence of the Asian corn borer, O. furnacalis, a congener of O. nubilalis, and isolated bacterial artificial chromosomes and fosmid clones that were expected to localize in candidate regions for the boundaries using these sequences. Combined with FISH and genetic analysis, we narrowed down the candidate regions to 40 kb-1.5 Mb, in strong agreement with a previous estimate based on the genome of a butterfly, Melitaea cinxia. The significant difference in the lengths of the candidate regions where no functional genes were observed may reflect the evolutionary time after fusion events. PMID:26264548

  5. Long-term organic-inorganic fertilization ensures great soil productivity and bacterial diversity after natural-to-agricultural ecosystem conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Weibing; Xu, Zhihui; Li, Wei; Ren, Yi; Huang, Ting; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-09-01

    Natural ecosystems comprise the planet's wild plant and animal resources, but large tracts of land have been converted to agroecosystems to support the demand for agricultural products. This conversion limits the number of plant species and decreases the soil biological diversity. Here we used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to evaluate the responses of soil bacterial communities in long-term converted and fertilized red soils (a type of Ferralic Cambisol). We observed that soil bacterial diversity was strongly affected by different types of fertilization management. Oligotrophic bacterial taxa demonstrated large relative abundances in chemically fertilized soil, whereas copiotrophic bacterial taxa were found in large relative abundances in organically fertilized and fallow management soils. Only organic-inorganic fertilization exhibited the same local taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity as that of a natural ecosystem. However, the independent use of organic or inorganic fertilizer reduced local taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity and caused biotic homogenization. This study demonstrated that the homogenization of bacterial communities caused by natural-to-agricultural ecosystem conversion can be mitigated by employing rational organic-inorganic fertilization management. PMID:27572510

  6. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Melanie; Garcia-Encina, Pedro A.; Munoz, Raul [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Stams, Alfons J.M. [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Lab. of Microbiology; Rosa, Francisco de la [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2011-05-15

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 {+-} 4% (20 days), 65 {+-} 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}OH and C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6}, respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO{sub 3}{sup -} instead of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH4 degradation from 0 to 33 {+-} 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 {+-} 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 {+-} 7% in the absence and 16 {+-} 2% in the presence of bicarbonate. (orig.)

  8. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  9. Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Nanoparticles for Bacterial Inhibition: Synthesis and Characterization of Doped and Undoped ONPs with Ag/Au NPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Huerta Aguilar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic nanoparticles (ONPs of lipoic acid and its doped derivatives ONPs/Ag and ONPs/Au were prepared and characterized by UV-Visible, EDS, and TEM analysis. The antibacterial properties of the ONPs ONPs/Ag and ONPs/Au were tested against bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and bacterial growth inhibition tests show that ONPs/Ag are more effective in limiting bacterial growth than other NPs, particularly, for Gram positive than for Gram-negative ones. The order of bacterial cell growth inhibition was ONPs/Ag > ONPs > ONPs/Au. The morphology of the cell membrane for the treated bacteria was analyzed by SEM. The nature of bond formation of LA with Ag or Au was analyzed by molecular orbital and density of state (DOS using DFT.

  10. Animal model of non-bacterial multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinglei ZHU; Shiwen WANG; Jie YANG; Tong YIN; Xiaoshun QIAN; Qiao XUE; Bin XU

    2004-01-01

    Objective To establish a model of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in the elderly (MODSE) by intraperitoneal injection of different doses of zymosan, and to compare the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in adult and in the elderly rats. Methods Adult and senile rats, injected with different doses of zymosan intraperitoneally were examined for the changes in the function and morphology of the vital organs, including heart, liver, brain, lungs, and kidneys using blood gas and biochemistry analysis and histopathological examination methods. Results Compared with the normal controls of the adult and the elderly rats, the blood gas and blood biochemistry changed in different degrees in the different dosed zymosan groups. Pathological changes were also found in the vital organs including lungs, heart, liver, brain, kidneys, erc in the experimental groups. Under the same concentrations of zymosan, the reductions in respiratory, cardiac and renal functions in the senile groups were much more severe than those in the corresponding adult group. In the similar degree of model duplication, the senile rats had the tendency to die later than the adult rats. Conclusions Zymosan can be used in both elderly and adult rats to induce MODS model, and the best dosage for MODSE was 0.Sg/kg injected peritoneally. The model would hopefully be used in the study of mechanisms and the therapeutics on MODSE.

  11. Organization of the Bacterial Light-Harvesting Apparatus Rationalized by Exciton Transport Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Harel, Elad

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light harvesting I-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM)1. Here, we report that the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane can be largely rationalized by a simple physical model that relies primarily on exciton transfer optimization. The process through which the light-harvesting complexes transfer excitation energy has been recognized to incorporate both coherent and incoherent processes mediated by the surrounding protein environment. Using the Haken-Strobl model, we show that the organization of the complexes in the membrane can be almost entirely explained by simple electrostatic considerations and that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robust...

  12. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

    2010-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and

  13. Role of Antioxidant Enzymes in Bacterial Resistance to Organic Acids ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno-Bárcena, Jose M.; Azcárate-Peril, M. Andrea; Hassan, Hosni M.

    2010-01-01

    Growth in aerobic environments has been shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to cause oxidative stress in most organisms. Antioxidant enzymes (i.e., superoxide dismutases and hydroperoxidases) and DNA repair mechanisms provide protection against ROS. Acid stress has been shown to be associated with the induction of Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in Lactococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus. However, the relationship between acid stress and oxidative stress is not well under...

  14. Dynamics of bacterial metabolic profile and community structure during the mineralization of organic carbon in intensive swine farm wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land application of intensive swine farm wastewater has raised serious environmental concerns due to the accumulation and microbially mediated transformation of large amounts of swine wastewater organic C (SWOC. Therefore, the study of SWOC mineralization and dynamics of wastewater microorganisms is essential to understand the environmental impacts of swine wastewater application. We measured the C mineralization of incubated swine wastewaters with high (wastewater H and low (wastewater L organic C concentrations. The dynamics of bacteria metabolic profile and community structure were also investigated. The results showed that SWOC mineralization was properly fitted by the two-simultaneous reactions model. The initial potential rate of labile C mineralization of wastewater H was 46% higher than that of wastewater L, whereas the initial potential rates of recalcitrant C mineralization of wastewaters H and L were both around 23 mg L-1 d-1. The bacterial functional and structural diversities significantly decreased for both the wastewaters during SWOC mineralization, and were all negatively correlated to specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; P < 0.01. The bacteria in the raw wastewaters exhibited functional similarity, and both metabolic profile and community structure changed with the mineralization of SWOC, mainly under the influence of SUVA254 (P < 0.001. These results suggested that SWOC mineralization was characterized by rapid mineralization of labile C and subsequent slow decomposition of recalcitrant C pool, and the quality of SWOC varied between the wastewaters with different amounts of organic C. The decreased bio-availability of dissolved organic matter affected the dynamics of wastewater bacteria during SWOC mineralization.

  15. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs. PMID:27350822

  16. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  17. What bacteria leave behind: bacterial organic matter quality and biomarker signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Kristoffer; Schramm, Andreas; Niggemann, Jutta;

    composition of prokaryotic cells was studied by re-growing a mixed community of native sediment bacteria in anoxic sediment pore water. Cellular concentrations of L- and D-amino acids and amino sugars were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The proportion of Archaea, Gram positive...... and Gram negative Bacteria in the prokaryotic community were determined using catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescent in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The results showed that the L-amino acid composition of native sediment prokaryotes was similar to that of other organic matter sources. It is...

  18. FORMATION OF BACTERIAL AND ZOOPLANKTON COMPONENT OF NATURAL FOOD BASE UNDER EFFECT OF TRADITIONAL ORGANIC FERTILIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krazhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Characterization of bacteria and zooplankton in rearing ponds using traditional fertilizers: cattle manure and bird droppings in modern conditions for fish farming. Methodology. Material collection and processing were carried out according to conventional hydrochemical and hydrobiological methods. Findings. We consider forming of bacteria and zooplankton component of natural food base of Irkliiv herbivorous fish nursery rearing ponds under the influenced of traditional organic fertilizers such as bird droppings (0,12 t/ha and cattle manure (2,0 t/ha. Each pond was planted by ongrowing Nyvka carp larvae (40,0 thousand ind./ha with silver carp (1,0 thousand ind./ha and grass carp larvae (1,0 thousand ind./ha. Qualitative and quantitative development of bacteria and zooplankton in fish-breeding ponds was investigated. The results show that in the development of the studied invertebrate groups of zooplankton in production ponds had no significant differences, except for rotifers, which group prevailed by the biomass to 3,6 times in the pond with the introduction of humus. Originality. The parameters of bacteria and zooplankton by the application of traditional organic fertilizers at present fish farming are studied. Practical value. These quantitative indicators of bacteria and zooplankton of fish-rearing ponds with water supply from Kremenchug reservoir, the application of cattle manure and bird droppings could be offered as an optimum data at present fish production stage.

  19. Biodegradation of semiconductor volatile organic compounds by four novel bacterial strains: a kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Chi-Wen; I, Yet-Po; Wu, Chih-Hung

    2012-09-01

    This study isolated pure microorganisms for further bioreactor applications. Four novel strains of Pseudomonas citronellolis YAIP521, Paracoccus versutus HSAC51, Burkholderia sp. HUEL671, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa JUPG561 were isolated and tested for biodegradation of isopropyl alcohol (IPA), acetone, ethyl lactate (EL), and propylene glycol mono methyl ether acetate (PGMEA), respectively. The maximum biodegradation rates for IPA, acetone, EL, and PGMEA were 5.27, 3.87, 26.86, and 48.93 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. The Haldane kinetic parameters determined for these strains when degrading targeted volatile organic compounds were maximum specific growth rate, half-saturation constant, and inhibition constant. The isolated strains have potential application in various bioreactors. The kinetic parameters obtained in this study provide a basis for further bioreactor experiments. PMID:22322527

  20. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qiu [University of California, San Diego; Nagarajan, Harish [University of California, San Diego; Embree, Mallory [University of California, San Diego; Shieu, Wendy [University of California, San Diego; Abate, Elisa [University of California, San Diego; Juarez, Katy [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Cho, Byung-Kwan [University of California, San Diego; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Nevin, Kelly P. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Barrett, Christian [University of California, San Diego; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Palsson, Bernhard O. [University of California, San Diego; Zengler, Karsten [University of California, San Diego

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  1. Assimilation of terrigenous organic matter via bacterial biomass as a food source for a brackish clam, Corbicula japonica (Mollusca: Bivalva)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Maki, Yonosuke; Matsumasa, Masatoshi

    2013-07-01

    Corbicula japonica collected from the Kitakami River estuary, northeastern Japan, showed lower δ34S values in soft-body parts (+1.7 to +11.0‰) than the ambient seawater sulfate sulfur (+21‰), and this value gradually decreased at successive sites up to 15.8 km upstream from the river mouth. Previous study using carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggests that the bivalve nonselectively assimilates particulate organic matter of marine and terrestrial origin by filter feeding. This pattern in δ34S values may indicate a considerable contribution of a food source derived from terrigenous organic matter, which has low δ34S values close to 0‰, and the bivalve has been reported to have cellulase and hemicellulase activities. Unique fatty acids (iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0 acids), both characteristic of sulfate-reducing bacteria, were observed in the salt-free, soft-body parts of the bivalve. The concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids, possibly derived from bacteria, was also high. Trace amounts of a polyunsaturated fatty acid (20:5ω3) specific to dinoflagellates were detected. In Corbicula habitats, reductive sandy layers with ample sulfides that were sporadically intercalated into the oxidative sandy sediment were often observed. The stable isotopic signatures of sediment sulfides (acid-volatile sulfide) and associated pore-water sulfates were -8.9 to +8.6‰ and +22.4 to +26.3‰, respectively, indicating the existence of bacterial sulfate-reducing activity and thiobios biomass. These isotopic signatures of the sediment, with the fatty acid composition of the bivalve, confirm the importance of a food source derived from bacteria belonging to the thiobios in the substrate sediments via pedal feeding, rather than direct digestion of terrigenous organic matter, in this estuarine ecosystem.

  2. Nitrogen dynamics in the shallow groundwater of a riparian wetland zone of the Garonne, SW France: nitrate inputs, bacterial densities, organic matter supply and denitrification measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sánchez-Pérez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study highlights the role of interactions between surface and sub-surface water of the riparian zone of a large river (the Garonne, SW France. Information is given about the role of surface water in supplying Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC to the riparian zone for nitrate removal processes. The densities of bacteria (up to 3.3 106 cell m L-1 in groundwater are strongly conditioned by the water moving during flood events. Total bacterial densities in groundwater were related to surface water bacterial densities. In sediment, total bacteria are attached mainly to fine particles (90% in the fraction Keywords: riparian zone, nitrate removal, spatial variations, alluvial groundwater

  3. Differential mercury volatilization by tobacco organs expressing a modified bacterial merA gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mercury pollution is a major environmental problem accompanying industrial activities. Most of the mercury released ends up and retained in the soil as complexes of the toxic ionic mercury (Hg2+), which then can be converted by microbes into the even more toxic methylmercury which tends to bioaccumulate. Mercury detoxification of the soil can also occur by microbes converting the ionic mercury into the least toxic metallic mercury (Hg0) form, which then evaporates. The remediation potential of transgenic plants carrying the MerA gene from E. Coli encoding mercuric ion reductase could be evaluated. A modified version of the gene, optimized for plant codon preferences (merApe9, Rugh et al. 1996), was introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disk transformation. Transgenic seeds were resistant to HgCl2 at 50 μM, and some of them (10-20%) could germinate on media containing as much as 350 μM HgCl2, while the control plants were fully inhibited or died on 50μM HgCl2. The rate of elemental mercury evolution from Hg2+ (added as HgCl2) was 5-8 times higher for transgenic plants than the control. Mercury volatilization by isolated organs standardized for fresh weight was higher (up to 5 times) in the roots than in shoots or the leaves. The data suggest that it is the root system of the transgenic plants that volatilizes most of the reduced mercury (Hg0). It also suggests that much of the mercury need not enter the vascular system to be transported to the leaves for volatilization. Transgenic plants with the merApe9 gene may be used to mercury detoxification for environmental improvement in mercury-contaminated regions more efficiently than it had been predicted based on data on volatilization of whole plants via the upper parts only (Rugh et al. 1996).

  4. Self-organization of bacterial biofilms is facilitated by extracellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloag, Erin S; Turnbull, Lynne; Huang, Alan; Vallotton, Pascal; Wang, Huabin; Nolan, Laura M; Mililli, Lisa; Hunt, Cameron; Lu, Jing; Osvath, Sarah R; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Charles, Ian G; Wand, Matt P; Gee, Michelle L; Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2013-07-01

    Twitching motility-mediated biofilm expansion is a complex, multicellular behavior that enables the active colonization of surfaces by many species of bacteria. In this study we have explored the emergence of intricate network patterns of interconnected trails that form in actively expanding biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have used high-resolution, phase-contrast time-lapse microscopy and developed sophisticated computer vision algorithms to track and analyze individual cell movements during expansion of P. aeruginosa biofilms. We have also used atomic force microscopy to examine the topography of the substrate underneath the expanding biofilm. Our analyses reveal that at the leading edge of the biofilm, highly coherent groups of bacteria migrate across the surface of the semisolid media and in doing so create furrows along which following cells preferentially migrate. This leads to the emergence of a network of trails that guide mass transit toward the leading edges of the biofilm. We have also determined that extracellular DNA (eDNA) facilitates efficient traffic flow throughout the furrow network by maintaining coherent cell alignments, thereby avoiding traffic jams and ensuring an efficient supply of cells to the migrating front. Our analyses reveal that eDNA also coordinates the movements of cells in the leading edge vanguard rafts and is required for the assembly of cells into the "bulldozer" aggregates that forge the interconnecting furrows. Our observations have revealed that large-scale self-organization of cells in actively expanding biofilms of P. aeruginosa occurs through construction of an intricate network of furrows that is facilitated by eDNA. PMID:23798445

  5. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  6. Influence of hydrogen in the presence of organic matter on bacterial activity under radioactive waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the French design for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), waste will be emplaced in an environment involving metallic materials into a geological clay formation. The presence of microorganisms has recently been evidenced in such environments. Therefore, based on current knowledge, the introduction of microbial species during the construction and operational phases, as well as the survival of bacteria after the disposal closure, have to be accounted for within the context of safety assessment. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity is notably expected to have an impact on corrosion processes, and thus influence the evolution of metallic and clay materials involved in a HLW disposal cell. The present work investigates the potential development of a SRB, Thermo-desulfovibrio hydrogeniphilus, in order to better assess its metabolism in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that is representative of the DOM present in an argillaceous pore water, as well as hydrogen that will be produced by the anaerobic corrosion of metallic materials. After 49 days of batch experiments, hydrogen enhances the bacterial development in presence of a low amount of DOM, whereas the DOM alone does not seem to sustain bacteria activities. (authors)

  7. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial and Ascaris ova loads and volatile organic compounds in municipal sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of biosolids that can be utilized for land applications. However, prior to their use, these biosolids must be treated to eliminate risks of infections and to reduce upsetting odors. In this study, microbiological and chemical analyzes were performed before and after treatment of sewage sludge with 3 MeV of an electron beam accelerator in a pilot processing plant. Thus, we determined that dose 4.5 kGy was required to reduce fecal coliform counts to safe levels for land applications of sludge while, 14.5 kGy was necessary to decrease Ascaris ova counts to safe levels. Furthermore, at low doses, electron beam irradiation showed little effect on the concentrations of volatile organic compounds, while some increase were recorded at high doses. The concentration of dimethyl sulfide was reduced by 50–70% at irradiation doses of 25.7 kGy and 30.7 kGy respectively. By contrast, electron beam irradiation increased dimethyl disulfide concentrations. We also showed that electron beam treatment was less energy-consuming with shorter processing times than conventional techniques used to decontaminate sludge. Hence opening new avenues for large urban agglomerations to save money and time when treating biosolids for land application. - Highlights: • Use of electron beam irradiation for the treatment of municipal sewage sludge. • Irradiation at 4.5 kGy is required to eliminate risks of bacterial infection. • Irradiation at 14.5 kGy is required to eliminate risks of helminth infection. • Electron beam technology is not effective for controlling volatile organic compounds. • Electron beam treatment of sludge is less expensive than traditional techniques

  8. The peripheral chromosome scaffold, a novel structural component of mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, Eugene V; Polyakov, Vladimir Y

    2008-06-01

    Using an original high-salt extraction protocol, we observed a novel chromosome substructure, referred to as the peripheral chromosome scaffold. This chromosome domain contained the perichromosomal layer proteins pKi-67, B23/nucleophosmin and fibrillarin, but no DNA fragments (i.e., the loop domain bases were not associated with the peripheral scaffold). Modern models of chromosome organization do not predict the existence of a peripheral chromosome scaffold domain, and thus our observations have conceptual implications for understanding chromosome architecture. PMID:18337132

  9. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate this...... and reliable method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were...... on the P1 par system. Using the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding...

  10. Effects of photochemical Transformations of Dissolved Organic Matter on Bacterial Metabolism and Diversity in Three Contrasting Coastal Sites in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea during Summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of photo transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on bacterial growth, production, respiration, growth efficiency, and diversity were investigated during summer in two lagoons and one oligo trophic coastal water samples from the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, differing widely in DOM and chromophoric DOM concentrations. Exposure of 0.2μm filtered waters to full sun radiation for 1 d resulted in small changes in optical properties and concentrations of DOM, and no changes in nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate concentrations. After exposure to sunlight or dark (control) treatments, the water samples were inoculated with the original bacterial com community. Photo transformation of DOM had contrasting effects on bacterial production and respiration, depending on the water's origin, resulting in an increase of bacterial growth efficiency for the oligo trophic coastal water sample (120%) and a decrease for the lagoon waters (20 to 40%) relative to that observed in dark treatments. We also observed that bacterial growth on DOM irradiated by full sun resulted in changes in community structure of total and metabolically active bacterial cells for the three locations studied when compared to the bacteria growing on unirradiated DOM, and that changes were mainly caused by photo transformation of DOM by UV radiation for the eutrophic lagoon and the oligo trophic coastal water and by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for the meso eutrophic lagoon. These initial results indicate that photo transformation of DOM significantly alters both bacterial metabolism and community structure in surface water for a variety of coastal ecosystems in the Mediterranean Sea. Further studies will be necessary to elucidate a more detailed appreciation of potential temporal and spatial variations of the effects measured. (author)

  11. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  12. Physical mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues on chromosome 11 of rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Irfan A Ghazi; Prem S Srivastava; Vivek Dalal; Kishor Gaikwad; Ashok K Singh; Tilak R Sharma; Nagendra K Singh; Trilochan Mohapatra

    2009-06-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome with a finished sequence and a model crop that has important syntenic relationships with other cereal species. The objectives of our study were to identify resistance gene analogue (RGA) sequences from chromosome 11 of rice, understand their expression in other cereals and dicots by in silico analysis, determine their presence on other rice chromosomes, and evaluate the extent of polymorphism and actual expression in a set of rice genotypes. A total of 195 RGAs were predicted and physically localised. Of these, 91.79% expressed in rice, and 51.28% expressed in wheat, which was the highest among other cereals. Among monocots, sugarcane showed the highest (78.92%) expression, while among dicots, RGAs were maximally expressed in Arabidopsis (11.79%). Interestingly, two of the chromosome 11-specific RGAs were found to be expressing in all the organisms studied. Eighty RGAs of chromosome 11 had significant homology with chromosome 12, which was the maximum among all the rice chromosomes. Thirty-one per cent of the RGAs used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed polymorphism in a set of rice genotypes. Actual gene expression analysis revealed post-inoculation induction of one RGA in the rice line IRBB-4 carrying the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa-4. Our results have implications for the development of sequence-based markers and functional validation of specific RGAs in rice.

  13. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division.

  14. Nitrogen dynamics in the shallow groundwater of a riparian wetland zone of the Garonne, SW France: nitrate inputs, bacterial densities, organic matter supply and denitrification measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, J. M.; Vervier, P.; Garabétian, F.; Sauvage, S.; Loubet, M.; Rols, J. L.; Bariac, T.; Weng, P.

    This study highlights the role of interactions between surface and sub-surface water of the riparian zone of a large river (the Garonne, SW France). Information is given about the role of surface water in supplying Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC ) to the riparian zone for nitrate removal processes. The densities of bacteria (up to 3.3 106 cell m L-1) in groundwater are strongly conditioned by the water moving during flood events. Total bacterial densities in groundwater were related to surface water bacterial densities. In sediment, total bacteria are attached mainly to fine particles (90% in the fraction organic carbon and nitrate content in groundwater at the site studied are correlated with exchanges between the groundwater and the river, from the upstream to the downstream part of the meander. Total bacterial densities, nitrate and decressing organic carbon concentrations follow the same pattern. These results suggest that, in this kind of riparian wetland, nitrate from alluvial groundwater influenced by agricultural practices may be denitrified by bacteria in the presence of organic carbon from river surface water.

  15. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  16. Genome Update: alignment of bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Jensen, Mette; Poulsen, Tine Rugh;

    2004-01-01

    There are four new microbial genomes listed in this month's Genome Update, three belonging to Gram-positive bacteria and one belonging to an archaeon that lives at pH 0; all of these genomes are listed in Table 1⇓. The method of genome comparison this month is that of genome alignment and......, as an example, an alignment of seven Staphylococcus aureus genomes and one Staphylococcus epidermidis genome is presented....

  17. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  18. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  19. Protection against Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli by Non-Genetically Modified Organism Receptor Mimic Bacterial Ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Adrienne W; Chen, Austen Y; Wang, Hui; McAllister, Lauren J; Höggerl, Florian; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Shewell, Lucy K; Jennings, Michael P; Morona, Renato; Lubitz, Werner; Paton, James C

    2015-09-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) causes severe gastrointestinal infections in humans that may lead to life-threatening systemic sequelae, such as the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Rapid diagnosis of STEC infection early in the course of disease opens a window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention, for example, by administration of agents that neutralize Shiga toxin (Stx) in the gut lumen. We previously developed a recombinant bacterium that expresses a mimic of the Stx receptor globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3) on its surface through modification of the lipopolysaccharide (A. W. Paton, R. Morona, and J. C. Paton, Nat Med 6:265-270, 2000, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/73111). This construct was highly efficacious in vivo, protecting mice from otherwise fatal STEC disease, but the fact that it is a genetically modified organism (GMO) has been a barrier to clinical development. In the present study, we have overcome this issue by development of Gb3 receptor mimic bacterial ghosts (BGs) that are not classified as GMOs. Gb3-BGs neutralized Stx1 and Stx2 in vitro with high efficiency, whereas alternative Gb3-expressing non-GMO subbacterial particles (minicells and outer membrane blebs) were ineffective. Gb3-BGs were highly efficacious in a murine model of STEC disease. All mice (10/10) treated with Gb3-BGs survived challenge with a highly virulent O113:H21 STEC strain and showed no pathological signs of renal injury. In contrast, 6/10 mice treated with control BGs succumbed to STEC challenge, and survivors exhibited significant weight loss, neutrophilia, and histopathological evidence of renal damage. Thus, Gb3-BGs offer a non-GMO approach to treatment of STEC infection in humans, particularly in an outbreak setting. PMID:26099582

  20. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of potentially functional biphenyl-degrading bacterial community in response to extracellular organic matter from Micrococcus luteus

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yin-Dong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Ding, Lin-Xian; Shen, Chao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Biphenyl (BP)-degrading bacteria were identified to degrade various polychlorinated BP (PCB) congers in long-term PCB-contaminated sites. Exploring BP-degrading capability of potentially useful bacteria was performed for enhancing PCB bioremediation. In the present study, the bacterial composition of the PCB-contaminated sediment sample was first investigated. Then extracellular organic matter (EOM) from M icrococcus luteus was used to enhance BP biodegradation. The effect of the EOM on the c...

  1. 大白菜细菌人工染色体文库的构建及鉴定%Construction and Characterization of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library from Chinese Cabbage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯大领; 石学萍; 杨煜; 王彦华; 轩淑欣; 赵建军; 申书兴

    2011-01-01

    以我国优良的大白菜自交系'85-1'为材料,利用 pIndigoBAC-5 为载体,通过对高分子量DNA 的制备、大片段 DNA 的选择、连接转化条件等几个方面的优化,构建了大白菜细菌人工染色体文库.该文库由 57 600个克隆组成,平均大小为98.4 kb,空载率为1.5%;覆盖大白菜基因组 10.3 倍;挑取 6 个克隆培养5 d 后,经HindⅢ完全酶切检测,其指纹图谱稳定一致.大白菜细菌人工染色体文库的构建为重要功能基因的克隆和定位及比较基因组研究奠定了基础.%A bacterial artificial chromosome library of Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis ( Lour.)Olsson (Chinese cabbage) was constructed from inbred line‘ 85-1’ with the vector pIndigoBAC-5. The key processes of the construction, such as preparation of high molecular weight DNA, selection of digested fragments, condition of ligation and transformation, were studied. The library consists of 57 600 clones in which the average insert size is about 98.4 kb and the empty clones are about 1.5%. The library represents an equivalent of 10.3 fold size of Chinese cabbage genome. Six clones randomly picked from this library show no HindⅢ fingerprint changes after 5 days' successive culture, which indicates that the clones in the library are stable. The library will lay the foundation for gene clone, location and comparative genomics research of Brassica.

  2. Experimental insights into the importance of aquatic bacterial community composition to the degradation of dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logue, J.B.; Stedmon, Colin; Kellerman, A.M.; Nielsen, N.J.; Andersson, A.F.; Laudon, H.; Lindström, E.S.; Kritzberg, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    and ecosystem functioning in that differently structured aquatic bacterial communities differed in their degradation of terrestrially derived DOM. Although the same amount of carbon was processed, both the temporal pattern of degradation and the compounds degraded differed among communities. We...

  3. Verification of the Chromosome Region 9q21 Association with Pelvic Organ Prolapse Using RegulomeDB Annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam B. Khadzhieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic organ prolapse (POP is a common highly disabling disorder with a large hereditary component. It is characterized by a loss of pelvic floor support that leads to the herniation of the uterus in or outside the vagina. Genome-wide linkage studies have shown an evidence of POP association with the region 9q21 and six other loci in European pedigrees. The aim of our study was to test the above associations in a case-control study in Russian population. Twelve SNPs including SNPs cited in the above studies and those selected using the RegulomeDB annotations for the region 9q21 were genotyped in 210 patients with POP (stages III-IV and 292 controls with no even minimal POP. Genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR–CTPP. Association analyses were conducted for individual SNPs, 9q21 haplotypes, and SNP-SNP interactions. SNP rs12237222 with the highest RegulomeDB score 1a appeared to be the key SNP in haplotypes associated with POP. Other RegulomeDB Category 1 SNPs, rs12551710 and rs2236479 (scores 1d and 1f, resp., exhibited epistatic effects. In this study, we verified the region 9q21 association with POP in Russians, using RegulomeDB annotations.

  4. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  5. Activity Of Bacterial Proteolytic Enzymes on Antinutritional Factors in Soybeans and the Effect on Growth and Organ Weights of Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuoGui-cheng; YangLi-jie; 等

    1999-01-01

    A significant reduction of trypsin inhibitory activity by selected bacterial proteolytic enzymes was demonstrated in vitro.Two trials were conducted to examine the capacity of the tested enzymes to inactivate soybean ANFs in vivo.In trial I,twenty-four piglets weaned at four weeks of age were assigned in replicate groups of 4 piglets per pen to one of three dietary treatments:(1)control;(2)Enzyme 1-supplemented(E1);(3)Enzyme 2-supplemented (E2).In trial II,twenty piglets weaned at five weeks of age were alloted to five treatment diets:(1)contro,1:(2) 0.1% P4-supplemented;(3)0.5% P4-supplemented;(4)0.1% P7-supplemented;(5)0.5% P7-supplemented.The optimum pH for hydrolysis was 8 for E.9-11 for E2,8.5 for P4 and nuctral for P7.After 17 days of the trial,daily gain of piglets on enzymes E1 and E2 was 36% and 18% more than that in the control group,although the difference was not significant.the animals on the treated groups had a tendency to have lighter heart(7.8 and 5.9%),spleen(11.1 and 7.4%) and pancreas(16.7 and 12.5% for E1 and E2 respectively)in relation to empty body weight than those in the control.the small intestine of pigs on the treated groups was significantly lighter(18.9 for E1 and 7.7% for E2) than that in the control(P<0.05).The stomach(26.4 and 24%,p=0.198) and cecum (21.9 and 9.4%,p=0.114) also showed the same pattern.The growth depression was attributed to reduced feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soybeans.It is concluded that supplements of proteolytic enzymes E1 or E2 had a positive effect on growth and efficiency and caused much less reaction in the gut as manifested by the weight of the tract and of its accessory organs.Dietary saupplements of P4 or P7 had no significant effect on growth,but reduced reaction of soybean antinutritional factors in the gut,especialy P4 in dose of 0.5%.The growth depression was attributed to low feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soybeans.

  6. Activity Of Bacterial Proteolytic Enzymes on Antinutritional Factors in Soybeans and the Effect on Growth and Organ Weights of Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A significant reduction of trypsin inhibitory activity by selected bacterial proteolytic enzymes was demon- strated in vitro. Two trials were conducted to examine the capacity of the tested enzymes to inactivate soybean ANFs in vivo. In trial I,twenty-four piglets weaned at four weeks of age were assigned in replicate groups of 4 piglets per pen to one of three dietary treatments: (1)control; (2)Enzyme 1-supplemented(E1); (3)Enzyme 2-supplemented (E2). In trial II,twenty piglets weaned at five weeks of age were alloted to five treatment di- ets:(1)contro,l: (2)0. 1% P4-supplemented; (3)0. 5% P4-supplemented; (4)0. 1% P7-supplemented; (5)0. 5% P7-supplemented. The optimum pH for hydrolysis was 8 for E,9-11 for E2,8.5 for P4 and nuctral for P7. After 17 days of the trial,daily gain of piglets on enzymes E1 and E2 was 36% and 18% more than that in the control group,although the difference was not significant. The animals on the treated groups had a tendency to have lighter heart(7.8 and 5.9%),spleen(11. 1 and 7.4%) and pancreas(16.7 and 12.5% for E1 and E2 respectively)in relation to empty body weight than those in the control. The small intestine of pigs on the treated groups was significantly lighter(18.9 for E1 and 7.7% for E2) than that in the control( P < 0.05 ). The stomach (26.4 and 24%,p=0. 198) and cecum(21.9and 9.4%,p=0. 114) also showed the same pat- tern. The growth depression was attributed to reduced feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soy beans. It is concluded that supplements of proteolytic enzymes E1 or E2 had a positive effect on growth and ef- ficiency and caused much less reaction in the gut as manifested by the weight of the tract and of its accessory organs. Dietary saupplements of P4 or P7 had no significant effect on growth,but reduced reaction of soybean antinutritional factors in the gut,especialy P4 in dose of 0.5%. The growth depression was attributed to low feed intake caused by antinutritional

  7. Are Longitudinal Patterns of Bacterial Community Composition and Dissolved Organic Matter Composition Linked Across a River Continuum? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, J.; Kaplan, L. A.; Kan, J.; Findlay, R. H.; Podgorski, D. C.; McKenna, A. M.; Branan, T. L.; Griffith, C.

    2013-12-01

    The River Continuum Concept (RCC), an early meta-ecosystem idea, was developed without the benefit of new frontiers in molecular microbial ecology and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. We have applied technical advances in these areas to address a hypothesis implicit in the RCC that the upstream legacy of DOM processing contributes to the structure and function of downstream bacterial communities. DOM molecular structure and microbial community structure were measured across river networks within three distinct forested catchments. High-throughput pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons and phospholipid fatty acid analysis were used to characterize bacterial communities, and ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry characterized the molecular composition of stream water DOM. Total microbial biomass varied among river networks but showed a trend of decreasing biomass in sediment with increasing stream order. There were distinct shifts in bacterial community structure and a trend of decreasing richness was observed traveling downstream in both sediment and epilithic habitats. The bacterial richness in the first order stream sediment habitats was 7728 genera which decreased to 6597 genera in the second order sites and 4867 genera in the third order streams. The richness in the epilithic biofilm habitats was 2830 genera in the first order, 2322 genera in the second order and 1629 genera in the third order sites. Over 45% of the sediment biofilm genera and 37% of the epilithic genera were found in all three orders. In addition to shifts in bacterial richness, we observed a longitudinal shift in bacterial functional-types. In the sediment biofilms, Rhodoplanes spp. (containing rhodopsin pigment) and Bradyrhizobium spp. (nitrogen fixing bacteria) were predominately found in the heavily forested first order streams, while the cyanobacteria Limnothrix spp. was dominant in the second order streams. The third order

  8. Analysis of the SOS response of Vibrio and other bacteria with multiple chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Alberola Neus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SOS response is a well-known regulatory network present in most bacteria and aimed at addressing DNA damage. It has also been linked extensively to stress-induced mutagenesis, virulence and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. Recently, the SOS response has been shown to regulate the activity of integrases in the chromosomal superintegrons of the Vibrionaceae, which encompasses a wide range of pathogenic species harboring multiple chromosomes. Here we combine in silico and in vitro techniques to perform a comparative genomics analysis of the SOS regulon in the Vibrionaceae, and we extend the methodology to map this transcriptional network in other bacterial species harboring multiple chromosomes. Results Our analysis provides the first comprehensive description of the SOS response in a family (Vibrionaceae that includes major human pathogens. It also identifies several previously unreported members of the SOS transcriptional network, including two proteins of unknown function. The analysis of the SOS response in other bacterial species with multiple chromosomes uncovers additional regulon members and reveals that there is a conserved core of SOS genes, and that specialized additions to this basic network take place in different phylogenetic groups. Our results also indicate that across all groups the main elements of the SOS response are always found in the large chromosome, whereas specialized additions are found in the smaller chromosomes and plasmids. Conclusions Our findings confirm that the SOS response of the Vibrionaceae is strongly linked with pathogenicity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance, and suggest that the characterization of the newly identified members of this regulon could provide key insights into the pathogenesis of Vibrio. The persistent location of key SOS genes in the large chromosome across several bacterial groups confirms that the SOS response plays an

  9. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Barber, L.B.; Aiken, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  10. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, F; Wu, J. Z.; Kanamori, H; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S; Sakaguchi, T; Šafář, J. (Jan); Šimková, H. (Hana); Mukai, Y.; M. Hamada; Saito, M; Hayakawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: A complete genome sequence is an essential tool for the genetic improvement of wheat. Because the wheat genome is large, highly repetitive and complex due to its allohexaploid nature, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) chose a strategy that involves constructing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical maps of individual chromosomes and performing BAC-by-BAC sequencing. Here, we report the construction of a physical map of chromosome 6B with t...

  11. Chromosome evolution in Solanum traced by cross-species BAC-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinay, Dóra; Wijnker, Erik; van den Berg, Ronald; Visser, Richard G F; de Jong, Hans; Bai, Yuling

    2012-08-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are relatively rare evolutionary events and can be used as markers to study karyotype evolution. This research aims to use such rearrangements to study chromosome evolution in Solanum. Chromosomal rearrangements between Solanum crops and several related wild species were investigated using tomato and potato bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) in a multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The BACs selected are evenly distributed over seven chromosomal arms containing inversions described in previous studies. The presence/absence of these inversions among the studied Solanum species were determined and the order of the BAC-FISH signals was used to construct phylogenetic trees.Compared with earlier studies, data from this study provide support for the current grouping of species into different sections within Solanum; however, there are a few notable exceptions, such as the tree positions of S. etuberosum (closer to the tomato group than to the potato group) and S. lycopersicoides (sister to S. pennellii). These apparent contradictions might be explained by interspecific hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting. This cross-species BAC painting technique provides unique information on genome organization, evolution and phylogenetic relationships in a wide variety of species. Such information is very helpful for introgressive breeding. PMID:22686400

  12. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  13. Dynamics of fecal indicator bacteria, bacterial pathogen genes, and organic wastewater contaminants in the Little Calumet River: Portage Burns Waterway, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on the co-occurrence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), bacterial pathogens, and organic wastewater-associated chemicals (OWCs) within Great Lakes tributaries. Fifteen watershed sites and one beach site adjacent to the Little Calumet River–Portage Burns Waterway (LCRPBW) on Lake Michigan were tested on four dates for pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, chloride, color, ammonia- and nitrate-nitrogen, soluble phosphorus, sulfate, turbidity, and atrazine; for concentrations of FIB; and for genes indicating the presence of human-pathogenic enterococci (ENT) and of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (EC) from various animal sources. Nineteen samples were also tested for 60 OWCs. Half of the watershed samples met EC recreational water quality standards; none met ENT standards. Human-wastewater-associated OWC detections were correlated with human-influence indicators such as population/km2, chloride concentrations, and the presence of WWTP effluents, but EC and ENT concentrations were not. Bacterial pathogen genes indicated rural human and several potential animal sources. OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern (musk fragrances AHTN and HHCB, alkylphenols, carbamazepine) and 3 bacterial pathogen genes were detected at the mouth of the LCRPBW, but no such OWCs and only 1 pathogen gene were detected at the beach. The LCRPBW has significant potential to deliver FIB, potential bacterial pathogens, and OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern to the nearshore of Lake Michigan, under conditions enhancing nearshore transport of the river plume. Nearshore mixing of lake and river water, and the lack of relationship between OWCs and FIB or pathogen genes, pose numerous challenges for watershed and nearshore assessment and remediation.

  14. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  15. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  16. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group) have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50), but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR). In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH) using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish. PMID:21787398

  17. Viral and bacterial septicaemic infections modulate the expression of PACAP splicing variants and VIP/PACAP receptors in brown trout immune organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Carpio, Yamila; Secombes, Christopher J; Taylor, Nick G H; Lugo, Juana María; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) and PACAP-Related Peptide (PRP) are structurally similar peptides encoded in the same transcripts. Their transcription has been detected not only in the brain but also in a wide range of peripheral tissues, even including organs of the immune system. PACAP exerts pleiotropic activities through G-protein coupled membrane receptors: the PACAP-specific PAC-1 and the VPAC-1 and VPAC-2 receptors that exhibit similar affinities for the Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) and PACAP. Recent findings added PACAP and its receptors to the growing list of mediators that allow cross-talk between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems in fish. In this study the expression of genes encoding for PACAP and PRP, as well as VIP/PACAP receptors was studied in laboratory-reared brown trout (Salmo trutta) after septicaemic infections. Respectively Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus (VHSV-Ia) or the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia ruckeri (ser. O1 - biot. 2) were used in infection challenges. Kidney and spleen, the teleost main lymphopoietic organs, were sampled during the first two weeks post-infection. RT-qPCR analysis assessed specific pathogens burden and gene expression levels. PACAP and PRP transcription in each organ was positively correlated to the respective pathogen burden, assessed targeting the VHSV-glycoprotein or Y. ruckeri 16S rRNA. Results showed as the transcription of PACAP splicing variants and VIP/PACAP receptors is modulated in these organs during an acute viral and bacterial septicaemic infections in brown trout. These gene expression results provide clues as to how the PACAP system is modulated in fish, confirming an involvement during active immune responses elicited by both viral and bacterial aetiological agents. However, further experimental evidence is still required to fully elucidate and characterize the role of PACAP and PRP for an efficient immune response against pathogens. PMID:26481517

  18. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  19. Nuclear RNAs confined to a reticular compartment between chromosome territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA polymerase II transcripts are confined to nuclear compartments. A detailed analysis of the nuclear topology of RNA from individual genes was performed for transcripts from the marker gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, expressed at a high level from the HTLV-1 LTR promoter. The construct was transfected into A293 cells where the RNA was organized as an extensive reticular network. We also studied the RNA distribution from combinations of neighboring HIV and bacterial resistance genes that co-integrated within the genome of COS-7 cells-revealing spherical or track-like accumulations of RNA that were extensively branched. There were many nuclei with distinct but overlapping RNA accumulations. Since the coding genes localized at the overlapping points, the RNAs are synthesized at a common region and diverge. The correlation between the frequency of the separation of the transcripts and the physical distance of the respective genes suggests a subcompartmentalization in the microenvironment of genes on the basis of geometric parameters. Thus, the more distant the genes are on the same chromosome, the more likely they are confined to separated subcompartments of an extensive reticular system. Co-delineation of the RNA transcripts with Cajal bodies and chromosome territories indicated the organization of nuclear RNA transcripts in a reticular interchromosome domain compartment

  20. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  1. UTILIZATION OF ORGANIC NITROGEN-SOURCES BY 2 PHYTOPLANKTON SPECIES AND A BACTERIAL ISOLATE IN PURE AND MIXED CULTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IETSWAART, T; SCHNEIDER, PJ; PRINS, RA

    1994-01-01

    Algal production of dissolved organic carbon and the regeneration of nutrients from dissolved organic carbon by bacteria are important aspects of nutrient cycling in the sea, especially when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Dissolved free amino acids are a major carbon source for bacteria and can be

  2. Impacts of Alterations of Organic Inputs on the Bacterial Community within the sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Chelius Marisa K.; Beresford Guy; Horton Howard; Quirk Megan; Selby Greg; Simpson Rodney T.; Horrocks Rodney; Moore John C.

    2009-01-01

    Wind Cave (WICA) in the Black Hills of South Dakota, like many mostly dry caves in temperate regions is an energy-starved system.The biotic communities that reside in these systems are low in diversity and simple in structure, and sensitive to changes in externalinputs of organic matter. Caves open to tourist traffic offer an opportunity to study the impacts of organic matter amendments in theform of human and rodent hair and dander, clothing lint, material from rodent activity (nesting mater...

  3. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Ye; DeBolt, Seth; Dreyer, Jamin; Scott, Delia; Williams, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed...

  4. Two Volatile Organic Compounds Trigger Plant Self-Defense against a Bacterial Pathogen and a Sucking Insect in Cucumber under Open Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Min Ryu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is a plant self-defense mechanism against a broad-range of pathogens and insect pests. Among chemical SAR triggers, plant and bacterial volatiles are promising candidates for use in pest management, as these volatiles are highly effective, inexpensive, and can be employed at relatively low concentrations compared with agrochemicals. However, such volatiles have some drawbacks, including the high evaporation rate of these compounds after application in the open field, their negative effects on plant growth, and their inconsistent levels of effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of volatile organic compound (VOC-mediated induced resistance against both the bacterial angular leaf spot pathogen, Pseudononas syringae pv. lachrymans, and the sucking insect aphid, Myzus persicae, in the open field. Using the VOCs 3-pentanol and 2-butanone where fruit yields increased gave unexpectedly, a significant increase in the number of ladybird beetles, Coccinella septempunctata, a natural enemy of aphids. The defense-related gene CsLOX was induced by VOC treatment, indicating that triggering the oxylipin pathway in response to the emission of green leaf volatiles can recruit the natural enemy of aphids. These results demonstrate that VOCs may help prevent plant disease and insect damage by eliciting induced resistance, even in open fields.

  5. Insights from twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jun, Se Ran [ORNL; Nookaew, Intawat [ORNL; Leuze, Michael Rex [ORNL; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Lund, Ole [Technical University of Denmark; Kora, Guruprasad H [ORNL; Wassenaar, Trudy [Molecular Microbiology & Genomics Consultants, Zotzenheim, Germany; Poudel, Suresh [ORNL; Ussery, David W [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Since the first two complete bacterial genome sequences were published in 1995, the science of bacteria has dramatically changed. Using third-generation DNA sequencing, it is possible to completely sequence a bacterial genome in a few hours and identify some types of methylation sites along the genome as well. Sequencing of bacterial genome sequences is now a standard procedure, and the information from tens of thousands of bacterial genomes has had a major impact on our views of the bacterial world. In this review, we explore a series of questions to highlight some insights that comparative genomics has produced. To date, there are genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. However, the distribution is quite skewed towards a few phyla that contain model organisms. But the breadth is continuing to improve, with projects dedicated to filling in less characterized taxonomic groups. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system provides bacteria with immunity against viruses, which outnumber bacteria by tenfold. How fast can we go? Second-generation sequencing has produced a large number of draft genomes (close to 90 % of bacterial genomes in GenBank are currently not complete); third-generation sequencing can potentially produce a finished genome in a few hours, and at the same time provide methlylation sites along the entire chromosome. The diversity of bacterial communities is extensive as is evident from the genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. Genome sequencing can help in classifying an organism, and in the case where multiple genomes of the same species are available, it is possible to calculate the pan- and core genomes; comparison of more than 2000 Escherichia coli genomes finds an E. coli core genome of about 3100 gene families and a total of about 89,000 different gene families. Why do we care about bacterial genome

  6. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  7. Marine organisms as source of extracts to disrupt bacterial communication: bioguided isolation and identification of quorum sensing inhibitors from Ircinia felix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Quintana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, 39 extracts from marine organisms were evaluated as quorum sensing inhibitors, collected in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and the Brazilian Coast including 26 sponges, seven soft corals, five algae and one zooanthid. The results showed that crude extracts from the soft coral Eunicea laciniata, and the sponges Svenzea tubulosa, Ircinia felix and Neopetrosia carbonaria were the most promising source of quorum sensing inhibitors compounds without affecting bacterial growth, unlike the raw extracts of Agelas citrina, Agelas tubulata, Iotrochota arenosa, Topsentia ophiraphidites, Niphates caycedoi, Cliona tenuis, Ptilocaulis walpersi, Petrosia pellasarca, and the algae Laurencia catarinensis and Laurencia obtusa, which displayed potent antibacterial activity against the biosensors employed. The crude extract from the sponge I. felix was fractionated, obtaining furanosesterterpenes which were identified and evaluated as quorum sensing inhibitors, showing a moderate activity without affecting the biosensor's growth.

  8. Genetic control of chromosome behaviour: Implications in evolution, crop improvement, and human biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes and chromosome pairing are pivotal to all biological sciences. The study of chromosomes helps unravel several aspects of an organism. Although the foundation of genetics occurred with the formulation of the laws of heredity in 1865, long before the discovery of chromosomes, their subsequ...

  9. Dual-In/Out strategy for genes integration into bacterial chromosome: a novel approach to step-by-step construction of plasmid-less marker-less recombinant E. coli strains with predesigned genome structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biryukova Irina V

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of modern producer strains with metabolically engineered pathways poses special problems that often require manipulating many genes and expressing them individually at different levels or under separate regulatory controls. The construction of plasmid-less marker-less strains has many advantages for the further practical exploitation of these bacteria in industry. Such producer strains are usually constructed by sequential chromosome modifications including deletions and integration of genetic material. For these purposes complex methods based on in vitro and in vivo recombination processes have been developed. Results Here, we describe the new scheme of insertion of the foreign DNA for step-by-step construction of plasmid-less marker-less recombinant E. coli strains with chromosome structure designed in advance. This strategy, entitled as Dual-In/Out, based on the initial Red-driven insertion of artificial φ80-attB sites into desired points of the chromosome followed by two site-specific recombination processes: first, the φ80 system is used for integration of the recombinant DNA based on selective marker-carrier conditionally-replicated plasmid with φ80-attP-site, and second, the λ system is used for excision of inserted vector part, including the plasmid ori-replication and the marker, flanked by λ-attL/R-sites. Conclusion The developed Dual-In/Out strategy is a rather straightforward, but convenient combination of previously developed recombination methods: phages site-specific and general Red/ET-mediated. This new approach allows us to detail the design of future recombinant marker-less strains, carrying, in particular, rather large artificial insertions that could be difficult to introduce by usually used PCR-based Recombineering procedure. The developed strategy is simple and could be particularly useful for construction of strains for the biotechnological industry.

  10. Phyloproteomic classification of unsequenced organisms by top-down identification of bacterial proteins using capLC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan J; Fenselau, Catherine

    2010-10-01

    Currently, most MS-based proteomic studies of bacteria and archea match experimental data to known amino acid sequences from the target organism. Top-down studies use a protein's molecular weight along with data gathered from MS/MS experiments to identify proteins by database matching. For Erwinia herbicola and Enterobacter cloacae, studied here, the necessary protein sequences are not available in protein sequence repositories. We apply top-down protein fragmentation, but match the experimental data with homologous proteins from related organisms with sequenced genomes, demonstrating considerable shared protein sequence between closely related bacteria. Using this homology-based approach, we are not only able to identify representative proteins, but are also able to place the two target bacteria in their correct phylogeny. Furthermore, we show that the unexpected mass delta between the experimental precursor and matched protein sequence can often be localized and characterized using accurate-mass precursor and fragment ion measurements. Finally, we demonstrate that proteins identified by top-down workflows provide strong experimental evidence for correct, missing, and misannotated bacterial protein sequences, not only in the analyzed organism, but also for homologous proteins in closely related species. PMID:20845332

  11. Characterization of Chenopodium quinoa chromosomes using fish and repetitive sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinoa is one of the underestimated crops, which recently attracted attention. During last few years many efforts were done to save the natural genetic diversity of quinoa cultivars and landraces as well as to obtained new variability by mutagenesis. Plant characteristics based mainly on morphological and molecular markers. Cytogenetic analysis was not used for these studies. Quinoa is an allotetraploid species with 36 small chromosomes. To follow the chromosomal rearrangement cause by spontaneous or induced mutations it is necessary to find cytogenetics markers for chromosomes and chromosome arms. The physical mapping of repetitive DNAs by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide a valuable tool in studies of genome organization and chromosome rearrangements. To characterized quinoa genome several repetitive sequences were used as DNA probes for FISH. Double FISH with rRNA genes as probes allowed to distinguished three pairs of homologue chromosomes. Telomeric repeats hybridisation signals were present only in terminal part of all chromosome arms and no intercalar position was observed. Other tandem repetitive sequence - minisatellite was characteristic for centromeric and pericentromeric region of all quinoa chromosomes although number of repeats differ between loci. It allowed to divided quinoa chromosomes into few groups. Disperse repetitive sequences such as mobile element-like sequences used in this study were detected in all eighteen chromosome pairs. Hybridization signals were characteristics for pericentromeric region of one or both chromosome arms as relatively weak but discrete signals although few chromosomes exhibited signals in intercalary position. Two others repetitive sequences also exhibited disperse organization; however they are not mobile elements. Their FISH signals were spread throughout whole chromosome arms but only one was present on all quinoa chromosomes. The other revealed hybridization signals only on the half of the

  12. The role of intestinal barrier failure and bacterial translocation in the development of systemic infection and multiple organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitch, E A

    1990-03-01

    Traditionally, evaluation of intestinal function has been limited largely to monitoring gastric pH and intestinal motility. This clinical approach has led clinicians to equate normal intestinal motility with normal intestinal function and to assume that if stress-induced gastric bleeding can be prevented, all will be well. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the gastrointestinal tract is not a passive organ and that intestinal dysfunction is not limited to ileus and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Instead, the gastrointestinal tract is recognized as having important endocrine, metabolic, immunologic, and barrier functions, as well as its traditional role in nutrient absorption. Over the last 5 years, there has been a resurgence of interest in the role of intestinal barrier failure in the development of systemic infection and multiple organ failure in the critically ill or injured patient. PMID:2407230

  13. Amino acid biogeochemistry and bacterial contribution to sediment organic matter along the western margin of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, L.; Garg, A.; Borole, D.V.

    influence burial of organic carbon (Cowie and Hedges, 1992; Burdige, 2007). OM buried in the marine sediments forms a major link between the "active" surface pools of carbon and inactive and/or slow cycling carbon pools (Burdige, 2007). In the open ocean... preserved in the marine sediments (Keil et al., 2000; Vandewiele et al., 2009). Moreover, natural occurrence and geochemical behavior of amino acids have been evaluated in several types of samples (Cowie and Hedges, 1992; Gupta and Kawahata, 2000...

  14. Genomic organization of the human gene (CA5) and pseudogene for mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase V and their localization to chromosomes 16q and 16p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiro; Sly, W.S.; Batanian, J.R. [St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Carbonic anhydrase V (CA V) is expressed in mitochondrial matrix in liver and several other tissues. It is of interest for its putative roles in providing bicarbonate to carbamoyl phosphate synthetase for ureagenesis and to pyruvate carboxylase for gluconeogenesis and its possible importance in explaining certain inherited metabolic disorders with hyperammonemia and hypoglycemia. Following the recent characterization of the cDNA for human CA V, we report the isolation of the human gene from two {lambda} genomic libraries and its characterization. The CA V gene (CA5) is approximately 50 kb long and contains 7 exons and 6 introns. The exon-intron boundaries are found in positions identical to those determined for the previously described CA II, CA III, and CA VII genes. Like the CA VII gene, CA5 does not contain typical TATA and CAAT promoter elements in the 5{prime} flanking region but does contain a TTTAA sequence 147 nucleotides upstream of the initiation codon. CA5 also contains a 12-bp GT-rich segment beginning 13 bp downstream of the polyadenylation signal in the 3{prime} untranslated region of exon 7. FISH analysis allowed CA5 to be assigned to chromosome 16q24.3. An unprocessed pseudogene containing sequence homologous to exons 3-7 and introns 3-6 was also isolated and was assigned by FISH analysis to chromosome 16p11.2-p12. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  16. Graphene Oxide/Silver Nanohybrid as Multi-functional Material for Highly Efficient Bacterial Disinfection and Detection of Organic Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Le Thi; Dinh, Ngo Xuan; Van Cuong, Nguyen; Van Quy, Nguyen; Huy, Tran Quang; Ngo, Duc-The; Mølhave, Kristian; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a multi-functional hybrid system consisting of graphene oxide and silver nanoparticles (GO-Ag NPs) was successfully synthesized by using a two-step chemical process. We firstly demonstrated noticeable bactericidal ability of the GO-Ag hybrid system. We provide more chemo-physical evidence explaining the antibacterial behavior of GO-Ag nanohybrid against Gram-negative Escherichia Coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus in light of ultrastructural damage analyses and Ag1+ ions release rate onto the cells/medium. A further understanding of the mode of antimicrobial action is very important for designing and developing advanced antimicrobial systems. Secondly, we have also demonstrated that the GO-Ag nanohybrid material could be used as a potential surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect and quantify organic dyes, e.g., methylene blue (MB), in aqueous media. Our findings revealed that the GO-Ag hybrid system showed better SERS performance of MB detection than that of pure Ag-NPs. MB could be detected at a concentration as low as 1 ppm. The GO-Ag-based SERS platform can be effectively used to detect trace concentrations of various types of organic dyes in aqueous media. With the aforementioned properties, the GO-Ag hybrid system is found to be very promising as a multi-functional material for advanced biomedicine and environmental monitoring applications.

  17. Bacterial contamination of enteral diets.

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1986-01-01

    Enteral feeding solutions can be contaminated by bacterial micro-organisms already present in the ingredients, or introduced during preparation or transport, or in the hospital ward. During jejunostomy feeding without pump or filter, ascending bacterial invasion of the feeding bag is possible. In patients with lowered immune response contaminated feedings can cause serious septic clinical problems. The progressive loss of the nutritional value of the enteral feeding solution by bacterial cont...

  18. Biopolymer organization upon confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biopolymers in vivo are typically subject to spatial restraints, either as a result of molecular crowding in the cellular medium or of direct spatial confinement. DNA in living organisms provides a prototypical example of a confined biopolymer. Confinement prompts a number of biophysics questions. For instance, how can the high level of packing be compatible with the necessity to access and process the genomic material? What mechanisms can be adopted in vivo to avoid the excessive geometrical and topological entanglement of dense phases of biopolymers? These and other fundamental questions have been addressed in recent years by both experimental and theoretical means. A review of the results, particularly of those obtained by numerical studies, is presented here. The review is mostly devoted to DNA packaging inside bacteriophages, which is the best studied example both experimentally and theoretically. Recent selected biophysical studies of the bacterial genome organization and of chromosome segregation in eukaryotes are also covered. (topical review)

  19. 2D and 3D Chromosome Painting in Malaria Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Phillip; Sharma, Atashi; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of whole arm chromosome probes is a robust technique for mapping genomic regions of interest, detecting chromosomal rearrangements, and studying three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromosomes in the cell nucleus. The advent of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and whole genome amplification (WGA) allows obtaining large quantities of DNA from single cells. The increased sensitivity of WGA kits prompted us to develop chromosome paints and to use them for exploring chromosome organization and evolution in non-model organisms. Here, we present a simple method for isolating and amplifying the euchromatic segments of single polytene chromosome arms from ovarian nurse cells of the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. This procedure provides an efficient platform for obtaining chromosome paints, while reducing the overall risk of introducing foreign DNA to the sample. The use of WGA allows for several rounds of re-amplification, resulting in high quantities of DNA that can be utilized for multiple experiments, including 2D and 3D FISH. We demonstrated that the developed chromosome paints can be successfully used to establish the correspondence between euchromatic portions of polytene and mitotic chromosome arms in An. gambiae. Overall, the union of LCM and single-chromosome WGA provides an efficient tool for creating significant amounts of target DNA for future cytogenetic and genomic studies. PMID:24429496

  20. Demonstration of organic volatile decomposition and bacterial sterilization by miniature dielectric barrier discharges on low-temperature cofired ceramic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk-jae; Shim, Yeun-keun; Park, Jeongwon; Kim, Hyung-jun; Han, Jeon-geon

    2016-04-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge is designed with low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) electrodes to achieve dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBSD). The environmental requirement (below 0.05 ppm) of the amount of byproducts (ozone and NO x ) produced during the process was met by optimizing the electrode design to produce a high dielectric barrier discharge for low-voltage (∼700 V) operation and minimizing the distance between electrodes to improve the plasma discharging efficiency. The concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within interior cabins of commercial vehicles were significantly reduced after 1-h treatment to improve air quality cost-effectively. This atmospheric-pressure plasma process was demonstrated for the sterilization of Escherichia coli to prevent food poisoning during the preservation of food in refrigerators.

  1. Histone modifications rather than the novel regional centromeres of Zymoseptoria tritici distinguish core and accessory chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schotanus, Klaas; Soyer, Jessica; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Happel, Petra; Smith, Kristina M.; Freitag, Michael; Stukenbrock, Eva H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Supernumerary chromosomes have been found in many organisms. In fungi, these “accessory” or “dispensable” chromosomes are present at different frequencies in populations and are usually characterized by higher repetitive DNA content and lower gene density when compared to the core chromosomes. In the reference strain of the wheat pathogen, Zymoseptoria tritici, eight discrete accessory chromosomes have been found. So far, no functional role has been assigned to these chromosomes; h...

  2. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  3. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial and Ascaris ova loads and volatile organic compounds in municipal sewage sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engohang-Ndong, Jean; Uribe, R. M.; Gregory, Roger; Gangoda, Mahinda; Nickelsen, Mike G.; Loar, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of biosolids that can be utilized for land applications. However, prior to their use, these biosolids must be treated to eliminate risks of infections and to reduce upsetting odors. In this study, microbiological and chemical analyzes were performed before and after treatment of sewage sludge with 3 MeV of an electron beam accelerator in a pilot processing plant. Thus, we determined that dose 4.5 kGy was required to reduce fecal coliform counts to safe levels for land applications of sludge while, 14.5 kGy was necessary to decrease Ascaris ova counts to safe levels. Furthermore, at low doses, electron beam irradiation showed little effect on the concentrations of volatile organic compounds, while some increase were recorded at high doses. The concentration of dimethyl sulfide was reduced by 50-70% at irradiation doses of 25.7 kGy and 30.7 kGy respectively. By contrast, electron beam irradiation increased dimethyl disulfide concentrations. We also showed that electron beam treatment was less energy-consuming with shorter processing times than conventional techniques used to decontaminate sludge. Hence opening new avenues for large urban agglomerations to save money and time when treating biosolids for land application.

  4. Rapid removal of bacterial endotoxin and natural organic matter in water by dielectric barrier discharge plasma: Efficiency and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Fang, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjun; Tian, Fang; Bai, Miao

    2016-11-15

    Low-temperature plasma was used to control bacteria, endotoxins and natural organic matter (NOM) in water by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device. Results indicate that DBD plasma has an obvious inactivation effect on various bacteria in water. The degree of inactivation from difficult to easy is as follows: Bacillus subtilis>Escherichia coli>Staphylococcus aureus. Activated ultrapure water treated using DBD plasma exhibited a sustained sterilization effect, but this sterilization effect decreased gradually after 1h. The total-endotoxin (free-endotoxin and bound-endotoxin) released by Escherichia coli during inactivation, as well as artificially simulated endotoxin in a control solution, was significantly controlled by DBD plasma. Both the metabolites that appeared after inactivation of microorganisms by plasma treatment, and the NOM in filtration effluent of a water treatment plant were well removed by DBD plasma if the treatment duration was sufficiently long. However, the acute toxicity increased significantly, and persisted for at least 2h, indicating that some long-life active substances were generated during the DBD process. Therefore, the removal of bacteria, endotoxins or NOM does not mean a safe water is produced. It is also important to eliminate the toxicity and byproducts produced during water treatment for the continuous promotion and industrial application of DBD plasma. PMID:27388420

  5. Organization and biology of the porcine serum amyloid A (SAA gene cluster: isoform specific responses to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle G Olsen

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A (SAA is a prominent acute phase protein. Although its biological functions are debated, the wide species distribution of highly homologous SAA proteins and their uniform behavior in response to injury or inflammation in itself suggests a significant role for this protein. The pig is increasingly being used as a model for the study of inflammatory reactions, yet only little is known about how specific SAA genes are regulated in the pig during acute phase responses and other responses induced by pro-inflammatory host mediators. We designed SAA gene specific primers and quantified the gene expression of porcine SAA1, SAA2, SAA3, and SAA4 by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in liver, spleen, and lung tissue from pigs experimentally infected with the Gram-negative swine specific bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, as well as from pigs experimentally infected with the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that: 1 SAA1 may be a pseudogene in pigs; 2 we were able to detect two previously uncharacterized SAA transcripts, namely SAA2 and SAA4, of which the SAA2 transcript is primarily induced in the liver during acute infection and presumably contributes to circulating SAA in pigs; 3 Porcine SAA3 transcription is induced both hepatically and extrahepatically during acute infection, and may be correlated to local organ affection; 4 Hepatic transcription of SAA4 is markedly induced in pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, but only weakly in pigs infected with S. aureus. These results for the first time establish the infection response patterns of the four porcine SAA genes which will be of importance for the use of the pig as a model for human inflammatory responses, e.g. within sepsis, cancer, and obesity research.

  6. Environmental Dissolved Organic Matter Governs Biofilm Formation and Subsequent Linuron Degradation Activity of a Linuron-Degrading Bacterial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horemans, Benjamin; Breugelmans, Philip; Hofkens, Johan; Smolders, Erik

    2013-01-01

    It was examined whether biofilm growth on dissolved organic matter (DOM) of a three-species consortium whose members synergistically degrade the phenylurea herbicide linuron affected the consortium's integrity and subsequent linuron-degrading functionality. Citrate as a model DOM and three environmental DOM (eDOM) formulations of different quality were used. Biofilms developed with all DOM formulations, and the three species were retained in the biofilm. However, biofilm biomass, species composition, architecture, and colocalization of member strains depended on DOM and its biodegradability. To assess the linuron-degrading functionality, biofilms were subsequently irrigated with linuron at 10 mg liter−1 or 100 μg liter−1. Instant linuron degradation, the time needed to attain maximal linuron degradation, and hence the total amount of linuron removed depended on both the DOM used for growth and the linuron concentration. At 10 mg liter−1, the final linuron degradation efficiency was as high as previously observed without DOM except for biofilms fed with humic acids which did not degrade linuron. At 100 μg liter−1 linuron, DOM-grown biofilms degraded linuron less efficiently than biofilms receiving 10 mg liter−1 linuron. The amount of linuron removed was more correlated with biofilm species composition than with biomass or structure. Based on visual observations, colocalization of consortium members in biofilms after the DOM feed appears essential for instant linuron-degrading activity and might explain the differences in overall linuron degradation. The data show that DOM quality determines biofilm structure and composition of the pesticide-degrading consortium in periods with DOM as the main carbon source and can affect subsequent pesticide-degrading activity, especially at micropollutant concentrations. PMID:23666338

  7. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z Q

    2016-09-01

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  8. Impacts of organic and inorganic fertilizers on nitrification in a cold climate soil are linked to the bacterial ammonia oxidizer community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fenliang; Yang, Qianbao; Li, Zhaojun; Wei, Dan; Cui, Xi'an; Liang, Yongchao

    2011-11-01

    The microbiology underpinning soil nitrogen cycling in northeast China remains poorly understood. These agricultural systems are typified by widely contrasting temperature, ranging from -40 to 38°C. In a long-term site in this region, the impacts of mineral and organic fertilizer amendments on potential nitrification rate (PNR) were determined. PNR was found to be suppressed by long-term mineral fertilizer treatment but enhanced by manure treatment. The abundance and structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) and archaeal (AOA) communities were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis techniques. The abundance of AOA was reduced by all fertilizer treatments, while the opposite response was measured for AOB, leading to a six- to 60-fold reduction in AOA/AOB ratio. The community structure of AOA exhibited little variation across fertilization treatments, whereas the structure of the AOB community was highly responsive. PNR was correlated with community structure of AOB rather than that of AOA. Variation in the community structure of AOB was linked to soil pH, total carbon, and nitrogen contents induced by different long-term fertilization regimes. The results suggest that manure amendment establishes conditions which select for an AOB community type which recovers mineral fertilizer-suppressed soil nitrification. PMID:21713434

  9. Feasibility of using a particle counter or flow-cytometer for bacterial enumeration in the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Jeon, Youchul; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-09-01

    Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is one of the major determinants of microbial growth and stability in drinking water distribution systems. Nevertheless, AOC measurements are rarely conducted in practice owing, in part, to the tedious and time-consuming nature of the bioassay. Herein, we compared three alternative cell count approaches [flow cytometry with staining (FC-S), flow cytometry without staining (FC-NS), and particle counting (Coulter counter; CC)] for bacterial enumeration as a means to expedite the AOC bioassay. Our results suggest that of the three methods only FC-S provides a suitable alternative to plate counting for rapid and accurate enumeration of both P17 and NOX in the AOC bioassay. While the cell counts obtained by FC-NS were linearly correlated with those obtained using the traditional heterotrophic plate count (HPC) method (FC-NS: R(2) = 0.89-0.96), the AOC values obtained by FC-NS were overestimated by 18-57 %. The CC approach was unsuccessful in enumerating Spirillum strain NOX cells because of the relatively small size of that organism. The CC counts were linearly correlated with HPC for Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P-17 (P17) cells (R(2) = 0.83) but like FC-NS, the CC approach also overestimated the AOC values (for P-17). The advantage of the FC-S method over the other two is improved sensitivity and the ability to specifically enumerate whole cells (and likely viable) as opposed to non-viable cells, cell debris, and other contaminating particles introduced by the test water itself or sample handling. PMID:26139595

  10. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  11. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  12. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  13. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  14. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  15. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  16. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen) of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate on whether or not muscle is actually sterile. The numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations often reflect those of the surrounding water. The role of the bacteria includes the ability to degrade complex m...

  17. Bacterioplankton Production in Humic Lake Örträsket in Relation to Input of Bacterial Cells and Input of Allochthonous Organic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström; Jansson

    2000-02-01

    In order to compare riverine bacteria input with lake water bacterial production and grazing loss with output loss, a bacterial cell budget was constructed for humic Lake Örträsket in northern Sweden. The riverine input of bacterial cells in 1997 represented 29% of the number of bacterial cells produced within the layer of the lake affected by inlet water. A large share of the in situ lake bacterial production was consumed by grazers, mainly flagellates, which stresses the importance of bacteria as energy mobilizers for the pelagic food web in the lake. The bacterial production in Lake Örträsket, which is almost entirely dependent on humic material as an energy source, was clearly stimulated by high flow episodes which brought high amounts of little degraded material into the lake. During base flow condition the bacterial production in the inlet rivers was high, which led to an input of more degraded material to the lake. This material did not stimulate the lake bacterial production. Internal factors that determined the utilization of the allochthonous DOC in the lake were the retention time and the exposure to light and high temperatures. Thus, the potential for in situ production of bacteria in Lake Örträsket was to a large extent a function of how precipitation and runoff conditions affected terrestrial losses and river transport of humic material. PMID:10833223

  18. The effect of dissolved organic carbon on bacterial adhesion to conditioning films adsorbed on glass from natural seawater collected during different seasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.P.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, H.C. van der

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of three marine bacterial strains, i.e. Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica with different cell surface hydrophobicities was measured on glass in a stagnation point flow chamber. Prior to bacterial adhesion, the glass surface was conditioned for 1 h

  19. The effect of dissolved organic carbon on bacterial adhesion to conditioning films adsorbed on glass from natural seawater collected during different seasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, DP; Klijnstra, JW; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of three marine bacterial strains, i.e. Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus , Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica with different cell surface hydrophobicities was measured on glass in a stagnation point flow chamber. Prior to bacterial adhesion, the glass surface was conditioned for 1 h

  20. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  1. Formation of new chromosomes as a virulence mechanism in yeast Candida glabrata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poláková, S.; Blume, C.; Zárate, J. A.;

    2009-01-01

    chromosomes were translocations of chromosomal arms. However, also larger segmental duplications were frequent and occasionally we observed novel chromosomes. Apparently, this yeast can generate a new chromosome by duplication of chromosome segments carrying a centromere and subsequently adding novel......In eukaryotes, the number and rough organization of chromosomes is well preserved within isolates of the same species. Novel chromosomes and loss of chromosomes are infrequent and usually associated with pathological events. Here, we analyzed 40 pathogenic isolates of a haploid and asexual yeast......, Candida glabrata, for their genome structure and stability. This organism has recently become the second most prevalent yeast pathogen in humans. Although the gene sequences were well conserved among different strains, their chromosome structures differed drastically. The most frequent events reshaping...

  2. Bacterial oesophagitis in an immunocompromised patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Radhi, J M; Schweiger, F

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial oesophagitis is an uncommon and poorly described entity affecting particularly the immunosuppressed patient. The diagnosis rests on the demonstration of bacterial invasion of the oesophageal wall in the absence of other pathological processes. The causative organisms usually are Gram-positive cocci and there may be associated bacteraemia. The case report describes a leukaemic patient with bacteraemic bacterial oesophagitis.

  3. The human DENN gene: genomic organization, alternative splicing, and localization to chromosome 11p11.21-p11.22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, V T; Lim, K M; Lim, D

    1998-08-01

    We have previously isolated and sequenced the cDNA of a novel gene, DENN, that exhibits differential mRNA expression in normal and neoplastic cells. The open reading frame of 4761 nucleotides encodes a putative hydrophilic protein of 1587 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 176,431 Da. Within DENN cDNA lies an alternative exon segment of 129 nucleotides encoding 43 amino acids, which may be excluded from some transcripts by alternative splicing. The serine- and leucine-rich DENN protein possesses a RGD cellular adhesion motif and a leucine-zipper-like motif associated with protein dimerization, and shows partial homology to the receptor binding domain of tumor necrosis factor alpha. DENN is virtually identical to MADD, a human MAP kinase-activating death domain protein that interacts with type I tumor necrosis factor receptor. DENN displays significant homology to Rab3 GEP, a rat GDP/GTP exchange protein specific for Rab3 small G proteins implicated in intracellular vesicle trafficking. DENN also exhibits strong similarity to Caenorhabditis elegans AEX-3, which interacts with Rab3 to regulate synaptic vesicle release. Composed of 15 exons (ranging in size from 73 to 1230 bp) and 14 introns (varying from about 170 bp to 5.3 kb), the DENN gene is estimated to span at least 28 kb. The alternative splicing event was traced to an alternative 5' donor site involving exon 7. DENN was mapped to chromosome region 11p11.21-p11.22 by FISH. Using polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide, Western blotting of MOLT-4 T-lymphoblastic leukemic cell proteins and immunoblotting of subcellular fractions of MOLT-4 cells and PLC/PRF/5 liver cancer cells yielded data corroborating the alternative splicing mechanism that generates two variant isoforms of the DENN protein that display differential expression in cells of different lineages. PMID:9796103

  4. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  5. Isolation and characterization of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) from a cow affected by post partum metritis and cloning of the genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Cavirani, Sandro; Sheldon, Iain Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is a gammaherpesvirus with a Worldwide distribution in cattle and is often isolated from the uterus of animals with postpartum metritis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Virus strain adaptation to an organ, tissue or cell type is an important issue for the pathogenesis of disease. To explore the mechanistic role of viral strain variation for uterine disease, the present study aimed to develop a tool enabling precise genetic discrimination between strains...

  6. Isolation and characterization of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) from a cow affected by post partum metritis and cloning of the genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Cavirani Sandro; Capocefalo Antonio; Franceschi Valentina; Donofrio Gaetano; Sheldon Iain

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is a gammaherpesvirus with a Worldwide distribution in cattle and is often isolated from the uterus of animals with postpartum metritis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Virus strain adaptation to an organ, tissue or cell type is an important issue for the pathogenesis of disease. To explore the mechanistic role of viral strain variation for uterine disease, the present study aimed to develop a tool enabling precise genetic discrimination betwee...

  7. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  8. Demasculinization of the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Kalle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of organisms sex-biased genes are non-randomly distributed between autosomes and the shared sex chromosome X (or Z. Studies on Anopheles gambiae have produced conflicting results regarding the underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X chromosome and it is unclear to what extent sexual antagonism, dosage compensation or X-inactivation in the male germline, the evolutionary forces that have been suggested to affect the chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes, are operational in Anopheles. Results We performed a meta-analysis of sex-biased gene expression in Anopheles gambiae which provides evidence for a general underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X-chromosome that increased in significance with the observed degree of sex-bias. A phylogenomic comparison between Drosophila melanogaster, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus also indicates that the Anopheles X chromosome strongly disfavours the evolutionary conservation of male-biased expression and that novel male-biased genes are more likely to arise on autosomes. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that transgenes situated on the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome are transcriptionally silenced in the male germline. Conclusion The data presented here support the hypothesis that the observed demasculinization of the Anopheles X chromosome is driven by X-chromosome inactivation in the male germline and by sexual antagonism. The demasculinization appears to be the consequence of a loss of male-biased expression, rather than a failure in the establishment or the extinction of male-biased genes.

  9. Effects of volatile organic compounds produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Waseem; Wang, Jichen; Wu, Yuncheng; Ling, Ning; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbes is an important characteristic for their selection as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens. In this study, we identified the VOCs produced by the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens T-5 and evaluated their impact on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The results showed that the VOCs of strain T-5 significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum in agar medium and in soil. In addition, VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, root colonization, biofilm formation, and production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides by R. solanacearum. However, no effect of VOCs on the production of hydrolytic enzymes by R. solanacearum was observed. The strain T-5 produced VOCs, including benzenes, ketones, aldehydes, alkanes, acids, and one furan and naphthalene compound; among those, 13 VOCs showed 1-10 % antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum in their produced amounts by T-5; however, the consortium of all VOCs produced on agar medium, in sterilized soil, and in natural soil showed 75, 62, and 85 % growth inhibition of R. solanacearum, respectively. The real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the results when the expression of different virulence- and metabolism-related genes in R. solanacearum cells was decreased after exposure to the VOCs of strain T-5. The results of this study clearly revealed the significance of VOCs in the control of plant pathogens. This information would help to better comprehend the microbial interactions mediated by VOCs in nature and to develop safer strategies to control plant disease. PMID:27183998

  10. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  11. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  12. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of SUV39H1 Reveals a Dominant Role in Heterochromatin Organization, Chromosome Segregation, and Mitotic Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Melcher, Martin; Schmid, Manfred; Aagaard, Louise; Selenko, Philipp; Laible, Götz; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    SUV39H1, a human homologue of the Drosophila position effect variegation modifier Su(var)3-9 and of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe silencing factor clr4, encodes a novel heterochromatic protein that transiently accumulates at centromeric positions during mitosis. Using a detailed structure-function analysis of SUV39H1 mutant proteins in transfected cells, we now show that deregulated SUV39H1 interferes at multiple levels with mammalian higher-order chromatin organization. First, forced express...

  14. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  15. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  16. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  17. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  18. Chromosome Evolution and Genome Miniaturization in Minifish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojun; Hui, Tan Heok; Tan, Sze Ley; Hong, Yunhan

    2012-01-01

    Background Paedocypris is a newly established genus of fish in Southeast Asia. Paedocypris is characterized by several unique features, including a tiny adult size (thus named miniature fish or minifish), fragmentary habitats of acidic peat blackwater swamps, an unusual reproduction mode and truncated development. These peculiarities lend themselves excellent for studying chromosome evolution and rapid speciation in vertebrates but also make them highly controversial for the phylogenetic position. Methodology and Principal Findings We have established an organ procedure to prepare chromosome spreads from tiny organs of minifish and performed a cytogenetic study on two species of the genus Paedocypris, namely P. carbunculus (Pc) and P. sp. “Singkep” (Ps). We found 30 and 34 chromosomes in diploid cells of Pc and Ps, respectively, which are unusual in teleost fishes. The diploid metaphase has 5 pairs of metacentrics and 7 pairs of subtelocentrics in Pc compared to 3 pairs of metacentrics and 11 pairs of subtelocentrics in Ps, whereas the haploid metaphase contains 5 metacentrics and 7 subtelocentrics in Pc compared to 3 metacentrics and 11 subtelocentrics Ps. Chromosome behavior in first meiosis revealed the presence of a chromosomal ring consisting of 2 metacentrics in Pc, suggesting that centric fusion rather than fission was responsible for the karyotypic evolution from Ps to Pc. Flow cytometry revealed that Pc had a 45% nuclear staining intensity relative to medaka whose genome is 700 Mb in size and contains 0.81 pg DNA. The Pc genome should have 315 Mb in length and 0.36 pg of DNA, which represent one of the smallest values in vertebrates, suggesting genome miniaturization in this organism. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that gross chromosome rearrangements and genome miniaturization have accompanied the evolution of Paedocypris fishes. Our data also place Paedocypris outside currently described taxa of the Cypriniformes. PMID:22615970

  19. Chromosomes. A comprehensive Xist interactome reveals cohesin repulsion and an RNA-directed chromosome conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minajigi, Anand; Froberg, John E; Wei, Chunyao; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Kesner, Barry; Colognori, David; Lessing, Derek; Payer, Bernhard; Boukhali, Myriam; Haas, Wilhelm; Lee, Jeannie T

    2015-07-17

    The inactive X chromosome (Xi) serves as a model to understand gene silencing on a global scale. Here, we perform "identification of direct RNA interacting proteins" (iDRiP) to isolate a comprehensive protein interactome for Xist, an RNA required for Xi silencing. We discover multiple classes of interactors-including cohesins, condensins, topoisomerases, RNA helicases, chromatin remodelers, and modifiers-that synergistically repress Xi transcription. Inhibiting two or three interactors destabilizes silencing. Although Xist attracts some interactors, it repels architectural factors. Xist evicts cohesins from the Xi and directs an Xi-specific chromosome conformation. Upon deleting Xist, the Xi acquires the cohesin-binding and chromosomal architecture of the active X. Our study unveils many layers of Xi repression and demonstrates a central role for RNA in the topological organization of mammalian chromosomes. PMID:26089354

  20. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  1. Microbes in crystalline bedrock. Assimilation of CO2 and introduced organic compounds by bacterial populations in groundwater from deep crystalline bedrock at Laxemar and Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assimilation of CO2 and of introduced organic compounds by bacterial populations in deep groundwater from fractured crystalline bedrock has been studied. Three depth horizons of the subvertical boreholes KLZ01 at Laxemar in southeastern Sweden, 830-841 m, 910-921 m and 999-1078 m, and V2 in the Stripa mine, 799-807m 812-820 m and 970-1240 m were sampled. The salinity profile of the KLX01 borehole is homogeneous and the groundwater had the following physico-chemical characteristics: pH values of 8.2, 8.4 and 8.5; Eh values of 270, no data and -220 mV; sulphide: 2.3, 11.0 and 5.6 μM; CO32-: 104, 98 and 190 μM; CH4: 26, 27 and 31 μl/l and N2: 47, 25 and 18 ml/l, respectively. The groundwater in V2 in Stripa were obtained from fracture systems without close hydraulic connections and had the following physico-chemical characteristics: pH values of 9.5, 9.4 and 10.2; Eh values of +205, +199 and -3 mV; sulphide: 0, 106 and 233 μM; CO32-: 50, 57 and 158 μM; CH4: 245, 170 and 290 μl/l and N2: 25, 31 and 25 ml/l, respectively. Biofilm reactors with hydrophilic glass surfaces were connected to the flowing groundwaters from each of the 3 depths with flow rates of approximately 3x10-3 m sec-1 over 19 days in Laxemar and 27 to 161 days in Stripa. There were between 0.15 to 0.68 x 105 unattached bacteria ml-1 groundwater and 0.94 to 1.2 x 105 attached bacteria cm-2 on the surface in Laxemar and from 1.6 x 103 up to 3.2 x 105 bacteria ml-1 groundwater and from 2.4 x 105 up to 1.1 x 107 bacteria cm-2 of colonized test surfaces in Stripa. Assuming a mean channel width of 0.1 mm, our results imply that there would be from 103 up to 106 more attached than unattached bacteria in a water conducting channel in crystalline bedrock. (54 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.) (au)

  2. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  3. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  4. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    AH Movahedian; R Moniri; Z Mosayebi

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI) broth accordi...

  5. Bacterial translocation: impact of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppsson, Bengt; Mangell, Peter; Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran

    2004-01-01

    There is a considerable amount of data in humans showing that patients who cannot take in nutrients enterally have more organ failure in the intensive care unit, a less favourable prognosis, and a higher frequency of septicaemia, in particular involving bacterial species from the intestinal tract. However, there is little evidence that this is connected with translocation of bacterial species in humans. Animal data more uniformly imply the existence of such a connection. The main focus of thi...

  6. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Ingar; Tribble, Gena D; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it a...

  7. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  8. Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic patients with Klinefelter's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anurag Mitra; Rima Dada; Rajeev Kumar; Narmada Prasad Gupta; Kiran Kucheria; Satish Kumar Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the occurrence of Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic patients with Klinefelter's syndrome (KFS). Methods: Blood and semen samples were collected from azoospermic patients with KFS (n = 14) and a control group of men of proven fertility (n = 13). Semen analysis was done according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Blood samples were processed for karyotyping, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and measurement of plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by radioimmunoassay. To determine Y chromosome microdeletions, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 16 sequence tagged sites (STS) and three genes (DFFRY, XKRY and RBM1 Y) was performed on isolated genomic DNA. Testicular fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was done in selected cases. Results: Y chromosome microdeletions spanning the azoospermia factor (AZF)a and AZFb loci were found in four of the 14 azoospermic patients with KFS. Karyotype and FISH analysis revealed that, of the four cases showing Y chromosome microdeletion, three cases had a 47,XXY/46,XY chromosomal pattern and one case had a 46,XY/47,XXY/48,XXXY/48,XXYY chromosomal pattern. The testicular FNAC of one sample with Y chromosome microdeletion revealed Sertoli cell-only type of morphology. However, no Y chromosome microdeletions were observed in any of the 13 fertile men. All patients with KFS had elevated plasma FSH levels. Conclusion:Patients with KFS may harbor Y chromosome microdeletions and screening for these should be a part of their diagnostic work-up, particularly in those considering assisted reproductive techniques.

  9. Chromosome Painting Reveals Asynaptic Full Alignment of Homologs and HIM-8–Dependent Remodeling of X Chromosome Territories during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)–spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners. PMID:21876678

  10. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  11. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  12. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  13. World Health Organization Estimates of the Global and Regional Disease Burden of 22 Foodborne Bacterial, Protozoal, and Viral Diseases, 2010: A Data Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Martyn D.; Pires, Sara Monteiro; Black, Robert E.;

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne diseases are important worldwide, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. To our knowledge, we present the first global and regional estimates of the disease burden of the most important foodborne bacterial, protozoal, and viral diseases. We synthesized data on the number of ...

  14. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  15. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  16. Spatial and topological organization of DNA chains induced by gene co-localization

    CERN Document Server

    Junier, Ivan; Képès, François; 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000678

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional activity has been shown to relate to the organization of chromosomes in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the bacterial nucleoid. In particular, highly transcribed genes, RNA polymerases and transcription factors gather into discrete spatial foci called transcription factories. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation of these foci and the resulting topological order of the chromosome remain to be elucidated. Here we consider a thermodynamic framework based on a worm-like chain model of chromosomes where sparse designated sites along the DNA are able to interact whenever they are spatially close-by. This is motivated by recurrent evidence that there exists physical interactions between genes that operate together. Three important results come out of this simple framework. First, the resulting formation of transcription foci can be viewed as a micro-phase separation of the interacting sites from the rest of the DNA. In this respect, a thermodynamic analysis suggests transcription factors to...

  17. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  18. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with...

  19. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  20. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  1. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  2. Chromosome Morphology in Kniphofia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J de Wet

    1960-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of species and varieties of the genus  Kniphofia (Liliaceae were studied cytologically. The somatic chromosome number is  2n = 12 in all the species. This is also true in  Notosceptrum natalense Baker.

  3. Detection and organization of atrazine-degrading genetic potential of seventeen bacterial isolates belonging to divergent taxa indicate a recent common origin of their catabolic functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Azhari, Najoi

    2007-01-01

    conjugation could play an important role in their dispersion. In addition, the observation of these genes (i) on the chromosome, (ii) on the same DNA fragment but on different plasmids and (iii) on DNA fragments also hybridizing with IS1071 suggests that transposition may also contribute to disperse...... the trzN-atzBC gene composition in Gram-negative bacteria such as Sinorhizobium sp. or Polaromonas sp. Three main atrazine-degrading gene combinations (i) trzN–atzBC, (ii) atzABC–trzD and (iii) atzABCDEF were observed. The atz and trz genes were often located on plasmids, suggesting that plasmid...

  4. Intrinsic bent DNA sites in the chromosomal replication origin of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gimenes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The features of the nucleotide sequences in both replication and promoter regions have been investigated in many organisms. Intrinsically bent DNA sites associated with transcription have been described in several prokaryotic organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate intrinsic bent DNA sites in the segment that holds the chromosomal replication origin, oriC, of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c. Electrophoretic behavior analyses, as well as in silico analyses of both the 2-D projection and helical parameters, were performed. The chromosomal segment analyzed contains the initial sequence of the rpmH gene, an intergenic region, the dnaA gene, the oriC sequence, and the 5' partial sequence of the dnaN gene. The analysis revealed fragments with reduced electrophoretic mobility, which indicates the presence of curved DNA segments. The analysis of the helical parameter ENDS ratio revealed three bent DNA sites (b1, b2, and b3 located in the rpmH-dnaA intergenic region, the dnaA gene, and the oriC 5' end, respectively. The chromosomal segment of X. fastidiosa analyzed here is rich in phased AT tracts and in CAnT motifs. The 2-D projection indicated a segment whose structure was determined by the cumulative effect of all bent DNA sites. Further, the in silico analysis of the three different bacterial oriC sequences indicated similar negative roll and twist >34.00° values. The DnaA box sequences, and other motifs in them, may be associated with the intrinsic DNA curvature.

  5. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  6. Molecular analysis of an integrative conjugative element, ICEH, present in the chromosome of different strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcos Pinto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of bacterial species and pathotypes is largely caused by lateral gene transfer (LGT of diverse mobile DNA elements such as plasmids, phages, transposons and genomic islands. Thus, acquisition of new phenotypes by LGT is very important for bacterial evolution and relationship with hosts. This paper reports a 23 kb region containing fourteen CDSs with similarity to the previous described Integrative Conjugal Element of Mycoplasma fermentans (ICEF. This element, named ICEH, is present as one copy at distinct integration sites in the chromosome of 7448 and 232 pathogenic strains and is absent in the type strain J (non-pathogenic. Notable differences in the nucleotide composition of the insertion sites were detected, and could be correlated to a lack of specificity of the ICEH integrase. Although present in strains of the same organism, the ICEH elements are more divergent than the typical similarity between other chromosomal locus of Mycoplasma hyopneunomiae, suggesting an accelerated evolution of these constins or an ongoing process of degeneration, while maintaining conservation of the tra genes. An extrachromosomal form of this element had been detected in the 7448 strain, suggesting a possible involvement in its mobilization and transference of CDSs to new hosts.

  7. Back to the roots: segregation of univalent sex chromosomes in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabig, Gunar; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2016-06-01

    In males of many taxa, univalent sex chromosomes normally segregate during the first meiotic division, and analysis of sex chromosome segregation was foundational for the chromosome theory of inheritance. Correct segregation of single or multiple univalent sex chromosomes occurs in a cellular environment where every other chromosome is a bivalent that is being partitioned into homologous chromosomes at anaphase I. The mechanics of univalent chromosome segregation vary among animal taxa. In some, univalents establish syntelic attachment of sister kinetochores to the spindle. In others, amphitelic attachment is established. Here, we review how this problem of segregation of unpaired chromosomes is solved in different animal systems. In addition, we give a short outlook of how mechanistic insights into this process could be gained by explicitly studying model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:26511278

  8. Roles for Dam methylation in bacterial chromosome replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Koch, Birgit; Skovgaard, Ole;

    these by whole genome sequencing. In one case the suppression was due to deletion of two Ts upstream of the ybfF gene. This led to increased SeqA production and presumably prolonged hemimethylation. The increased SeqA level affected replication initiation in two ways not described previously. First...... about one third of the cell cycle. During sequestration at least three mechanisms operate to lower the activity of the initiator protein, DnaA. First, the dnaA promoter, which also contains an excess of GATC sequences, is sequestered for the same period of time as oriC to prevent de novo DnaA synthesis...

  9. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  10. Speeding up chromosome evolution in Phaseolus: multiple rearrangements associated with a one-step descending dysploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsêca, Artur; Ferraz, Maria Eduarda; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The genus Phaseolus L. has been subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its global economic importance. It is considered karyotypically stable, with most of its ca. 75 species having 2n = 22 chromosomes, and only three species (Phaseolus leptostachyus, Phaseolus macvaughii, and Phaseolus micranthus), which form the Leptostachyus clade, having 2n = 20. To test whether a simple chromosomal fusion was the cause of this descending dysploidy, mitotic chromosomes of P. leptostachyus (2n = 20) were comparatively mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes. Our results corroborated the conservation of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites on ancestral chromosomes 10 and 6, respectively. The reduction from x = 11 to x = 10 was the result of the insertion of chromosome 10 into the centromeric region of chromosome 11, supporting a nested chromosome fusion (NCF) as the main cause of this dysploidy. Additionally, the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 6 was translocated to this larger chromosome. Surprisingly, the NCF was accompanied by several additional translocations and inversions previously unknown for the genus, suggesting that the dysploidy may have been associated to a burst of genome reorganization in this otherwise stable, diploid plant genus. PMID:26490170

  11. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Chen Chen; Taylor, J.F.; Sanders, J. O. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F{sub 2} full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F{sub 1} parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. All individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is (BM6017-6.1-TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3-BM2713-21.1-BM4604-2.4-BR215-12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321-1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA120-12.5-TGLA325-1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA30), with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA30, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Yp12-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xp14-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC204, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Correlations Between Bacterial Ecology and Mobile DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Irene L. G.; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2010-01-01

    Several factors can affect the density of mobile DNA in bacterial genomes including rates of exposure to novel gene pools, recombination, and reductive evolution. These traits are difficult to measure across a broad range of bacterial species, but the ecological niches occupied by an organism provide some indication of the relative magnitude of these forces. Here, by analyzing 384 bacterial genomes assigned to three ecological categories (obligate intracellular, facultative intracellular, and...

  13. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become in...... considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  14. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Chromosomes of Belonocnema treatae Mayr, 1881 (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Gokhman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomes of the asexual and sexual generation of the gall wasp Belonocnema treatae Mayr, 1881 (Cynipidae were analyzed. Females of both generations have 2n = 20, whereas males of the sexual generation have n = 10. Cyclical deuterotoky is therefore confirmed in this species. All chromosomes are acrocentric and form a continuous gradation in size. This karyotype structure is probably ancestral for many gall wasps and perhaps for the family Cynipidae in general. Chromosome no. 7 carries a characteristic achromatic gap that appears to represent a nucleolus organizing region.

  16. Rise, fall and resurrection of chromosome territories: a historical perspective. Part I. The rise of chromosome territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Cremer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is now generally accepted that chromosomes in the cell nucleus are organized in distinct domains, first called chromosome territories in 1909 by the great cytologist Theodor Boveri. Yet, even today chromosomes have remained enigmatic individuals, whose structures, arrangements and functions in cycling and post-mitotic cells still need to be explored in full detail. Whereas numerous recent reviews describe present evidence for a dynamic architecture of chromosome territories and discuss the potential significance within the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus, a comprehensive historical account of this important concept of nuclear organization was lacking so far. Here, we describe the early rise of chromosome territories within the context of the discovery of chromosomes and their fundamental role in heredity, covering a period from the 1870th to the early 20th century (part I, this volume. In part II (next volume we review the abandonment of the chromosome territory concept during the 1950th to 1980th and the compelling evidence, which led to its resurrection during the 1970th to 1980th.

  17. Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The genotype theory of Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) was an important contribution to the founding of classical genetics. This theory built on Johannsen's experimental demonstration that hereditary change is discontinuous, not continuous as had been widely assumed. Johannsen is also known for his criticism of traditional Darwinian evolution by natural selection, as well as his criticism of the classical Mendelian chromosome theory of heredity. He has often been seen as one of the anti-Darwinians that caused the "eclipse of Darwinism" in the early 20th century, before it was saved by the Modern Synthesis. This article focuses on Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory. He was indeed skeptical of the notion of the chromosomes as the sole carriers of heredity, but he praised the mapping of Mendelian genes on the chromosomes as a major step forward. Johannsen objected that these genes could not account for the whole of heredity, and that the stability of the genotype depended on much more than the stability of Mendelian genes. For Johannsen, the genotype, as a property of the whole organism, was the fundamental and empirically well-established entity. PMID:25345701

  18. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in four Serrasalmidae species (Characiformes)

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Braga Ribeiro; Daniele Aparecida Matoso; Eliana Feldberg

    2013-01-01

    The Serrasalmidae family is composed of a number of commercially interesting species, mainly in the Amazon region where most of these fishes occur. In the present study, we investigated the genomic organization of the 18S and 5S rDNA and telomeric sequences in mitotic chromosomes of four species from the basal clade of the Serrasalmidae family: Colossoma macropomum, Mylossoma aureum, M. duriventre, and Piaractus mesopotamicus, in order to understand the chromosomal evolution in the family. Al...

  19. Nature of telomere dimers and chromosome looping in human spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Solov'eva, Lyudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Bodinski, Dawn; Zalensky, Andrei O.

    2004-01-01

    Specific and well-organized chromosome architecture in human sperm cells is supported by the prominent interactions between centromeres and between telomeres. The telomere-telomere interactions result in telomere dimers that are positioned at the nuclear periphery. It is unknown whether composition of sperm telomere dimers is random or specific. We now report that telomere dimers result from specific interactions between the two ends of each chromosome. FISH using pairs of subtelomeric DNA pr...

  20. Genome-wide detection of chromosomal rearrangements, indels, and mutations in circular chromosomes by short read sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Ole; Bak, Mads; Løbner-Olesen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) with new short-read sequencing technologies has recently been applied for genome-wide identification of mutations. Genomic rearrangements have, however, often remained undetected by WGS, and additional analyses are required for their detection. Here, we have applied a...... combination of WGS and genome copy number analysis, for the identification of mutations that suppress the growth deficiency imposed by excessive initiations from the Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC. The E. coli chromosome, like the majority of bacterial chromosomes, is circular, and DNA...... inversion, and one was a large chromosomal duplication. The latter two mutations could not be detected solely by WGS, validating the present approach for identification of genomic rearrangements. We further suggest the use of copy number analysis in combination with WGS for validation of newly assembled...

  1. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement.

  2. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight into...... differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  3. Rescue of end fragments of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanson, G G; Hoekstra, M F; McElligott, D. L.; Evans, G A

    1991-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) provide a powerful tool for the isolation and mapping of large regions of mammalian chromosomes. We developed a rapid and efficient method for the isolation of DNA fragments representing the extreme ends of YAC clones by the insertion of a rescue plasmid into the YAC vector by homologous recombination. Two rescue vectors were constructed containing a yeast LYS2 selectable gene, a bacterial origin of replication, an antibiotic resistance gene, a polylinker c...

  4. How carotenoids protect bacterial photosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cogdell, R J; Howard, T. D.; Bittl, R.; Schlodder, E; Geisenheimer, I; Lubitz, W.

    2000-01-01

    The essential function of carotenoids in photosynthesis is to act as photoprotective agents, preventing chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls from sensitizing harmful photodestructive reactions in the presence of oxygen. Based upon recent structural studies on reaction centres and antenna complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria, the detailed organization of the carotenoids is described. Then with specific reference to bacterial antenna complexes the details of the photoprotective role, ...

  5. Genome landscape and evolutionary plasticity of chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonrandom distribution of rearrangements is a common feature of eukaryotic chromosomes that is not well understood in terms of genome organization and evolution. In the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, polymorphic inversions are highly nonuniformly distributed among five chromosomal arms and are associated with epidemiologically important adaptations. However, it is not clear whether the genomic content of the chromosomal arms is associated with inversion polymorphism and fixation rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of chromosomal inversions, we created a physical map for an Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, and compared it with the genome of An. gambiae. We also developed and deployed novel Bayesian statistical models to analyze genome landscapes in individual chromosomal arms An. gambiae. Here, we demonstrate that, despite the paucity of inversion polymorphisms on the X chromosome, this chromosome has the fastest rate of inversion fixation and the highest density of transposable elements, simple DNA repeats, and GC content. The highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving autosomal 2R arm had overrepresentation of genes involved in cellular response to stress supporting the role of natural selection in maintaining adaptive polymorphic inversions. In addition, the 2R arm had the highest density of regions involved in segmental duplications that clustered in the breakpoint-rich zone of the arm. In contrast, the slower evolving 2L, 3R, and 3L, arms were enriched with matrix-attachment regions that potentially contribute to chromosome stability in the cell nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results highlight fundamental differences in evolutionary dynamics of the sex chromosome and autosomes and revealed the strong association between characteristics of the genome landscape and rates of chromosomal evolution. We conclude that a unique combination of various

  6. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Neumann

    Full Text Available The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function.

  7. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblížková, Andrea; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Chocholová, Eva; Novák, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum) chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function. PMID:22737088

  8. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C C; Taylor, J F; Gallagher, D S; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Davis, S K

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F(2) full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F1 parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. Ml individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is [BM6017-6.1 -TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3 -BM2713 -21.1 -BM4604-2.4-BR215 - 12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321 - 1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA12O- 12.5-TGLA325- 1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA3O], with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA3O, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Ypl2-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xpl4-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC2O4, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. PMID:8833151

  9. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. PMID:25953959

  11. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  12. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  13. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  14. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan,; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A.; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed “reference-assisted chromosome assembly” (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that ou...

  15. A composite microbial agent containing bacterial and fungal species: Optimization of the preparation process, analysis of characteristics, and use in the purification for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuowei; Lu, Lichao; Kennes, Christian; Ye, Jiexu; Yu, Jianming; Chen, Dongzhi; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-10-01

    Proper preservation of microbial activity over long periods poses a considerable challenge for pollutant biopurification. A composite microbial agent, mainly composed of bacteria and fungi isolated by the current research team, was constructed in this study and its performance in the removal of mixed waste gases (containing α-pinene, n-butyl acetate and o-xylene) was investigated. According to the removal efficiency in the first 24h and the response to starvation, the optimal ratio of selected carriers (activated carbon, wheat bran and sawdust) was found to be 1:2:1. In some cases of storages, the removal capability of the microbial agent was more than twice that of the suspension. Microbial analysis showed that the inoculated bacterial and fungal strains dominated the agent preparation and utilization. These results indicated that the agent has potential for use in biopurification of mixed waste gas, favoring the reduction of environmental passives and longer retention of microbial activity. PMID:27423036

  16. Nuclear positioning, higher-order folding, and gene expression of Mmu15 sequences are refractory to chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Snow, Kathy J.; Wright, Sarah M.; Woo, Yong; Titus, Laura C.; Mills, Kevin D.; Shopland, Lindsay S.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear localization influences the expression of certain genes. Chromosomal rearrangements can reposition genes in the nucleus and thus could impact the expression of genes far from chromosomal breakpoints. However, the extent to which chromosomal rearrangements influence nuclear organization and gene expression is poorly understood. We examined mouse progenitor B cell lymphomas with a common translocation, der(12)t(12;15), which fuses a gene-rich region of mouse chromosome12 (Mmu12) with a ...

  17. Regulation of Heterochromatin Assembly on Unpaired Chromosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis by Components of a Small RNA-Mediated Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Xingyu She; Xia Xu; Alexander Fedotov; Kelly, William G; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2009-01-01

    Many organisms have a mechanism for down regulating the expression of non-synapsed chromosomes and chromosomal regions during meiosis. This phenomenon is thought to function in genome defense. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans, unpaired chromosomes (e.g., the male X chromosome) become enriched for a modification associated with heterochromatin and transcriptional repression, dimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9me2). This enrichment requires activity of the cellular RNA-d...

  18. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity of alpha satellite repetitive DNA: a survey of alphoid sequences from different human chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1987-01-01

    The human alpha satellite DNA family is composed of diverse, tandemly reiterated monomer units of approximately 171 basepairs localized to the centromeric region of each chromosome. These sequences are organized in a highly chromosome-specific manner with many, if not all human chromosomes being characterized by individually distinct alphoid subsets. Here, we compare the nucleotide sequences of 153 monomer units, representing alphoid components of at least 12 different human chromosomes. Base...

  19. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish, Revised

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, B.

    2006-01-01

    The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen) of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate about whether or not muscle is actually sterile. Using traditional culture-dependent techniques, the numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations generally reflect those of the surrounding water. More modern...

  20. Effect of Integrated Use of Inorganic Fertilizer and Organic Manures on Bacterial Wilt Incidence (BWI)and Tuber Yield in Potato Production Systems on Hill Slopes of Central Kenya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linus; M. M. Muriithi; Irungu; J. W

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial wilt (BW) caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most damaging diseases of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in Kenya and worldwide. In Kenya, potato tuber yield losses due to BW infection are estimated at 50 ~ 100%. Low soil fertility is also one of the most important constraints limiting potato production in central Kenya highlands. Farmers tackle this problem through use of inorganic fertilisers and organic manures, both of which amend the soil environment to influence bacterial wilt development.Undecomposed organic manures can also introduce the pathogen into a clean field. Between short rains 1999 and 2000, 10 on-farm extension-researcherfarmer-designed and farmer-managed trials were done at Kianjuki catchment in Embu District. The objective was to use farmers' participatory research approach and select the most suitable organic and inorganic fertiliser combination(s) with lowest BWI and acceptable usable tuber yields, and also to demonstrate use of some components of integrated disease management methods in reduction of disease incidence and spread. Seven treatments were proposed, presented to the farmers for discussion and the most relevant four were selected for evaluation.during the short rains 1999 and long rains 2000. BWI didn't result in significant differences between treatments but the tuber yields were significantly different in short rains of 1999 and 2000. During short rains 2000, both BWI and tuber yields and unusable tubers differed significantly between treatments. The results confirmed that welldecomposed manures or manures from pathogen-free areas can be used in combination with inorganic fertilisers to improve soil fertility and potato tuber yields in smallholder farms without influencing BWI.Use of certified seed tubers in pathogen free field and following recommended field sanitation measures resulted in apparently bacterial wilt free crop.Considering the high cost of inorganic fertiliser and its negative effects on the

  1. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.;

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...... to the survival of biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. A promising strategy may be the use of enzymes that can dissolve the biofilm matrix (e.g. DNase and alginate lyase) as well as quorum...

  2. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  3. 16S rRNA-based bacterial diversity in the organic-rich sediments underlying oxygen-deficient waters of the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Divya, B.; Parvathi, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.

    1990; Stramma et al. 2008). The seabed below the OMZ is a region of “large organic food falls” due to the deposition of particulate organic matter from the productive waters above, harbouring enormous and unique microbial biomass. Studying...) and functional gene diversity (Woebken et al. 2008; Ward et al. 2009). However, very little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic affiliation of bacteria in the underlying sediments of the AS-OMZ despite its contribution to the biogeochemical cycles...

  4. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  5. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  6. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  7. Haploinsufficiency and the sex chromosomes from yeasts to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haploinsufficient (HI genes are those for which a reduction in copy number in a diploid from two to one results in significantly reduced fitness. Haploinsufficiency is increasingly implicated in human disease, and so predicting this phenotype could provide insights into the genetic mechanisms behind many human diseases, including some cancers. Results In the present work we show that orthologues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HI genes are preferentially retained across the kingdom Fungi, and that the HI genes of S. cerevisiae can be used to predict haploinsufficiency in humans. Our HI gene predictions confirm known associations between haploinsufficiency and genetic disease, and predict several further disorders in which the phenotype may be relevant. Haploinsufficiency is also clearly relevant to the gene-dosage imbalances inherent in eukaryotic sex-determination systems. In S. cerevisiae, HI genes are over-represented on chromosome III, the chromosome that determines yeast's mating type. This may be a device to select against the loss of one copy of chromosome III from a diploid. We found that orthologues of S. cerevisiae HI genes are also over-represented on the mating-type chromosomes of other yeasts and filamentous fungi. In animals with heterogametic sex determination, accumulation of HI genes on the sex chromosomes would compromise fitness in both sexes, given X chromosome inactivation in females. We found that orthologues of S. cerevisiae HI genes are significantly under-represented on the X chromosomes of mammals and of Caenorhabditis elegans. There is no X inactivation in Drosophila melanogaster (increased expression of X in the male is used instead and, in this species, we found no depletion of orthologues to yeast HI genes on the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A special relationship between HI genes and the sex/mating-type chromosome extends from S. cerevisiae to Homo sapiens, with the microbe being a useful model for

  8. “The Farmer’s Dilemma”—an Interrupted Case Study for Learning Bacterial Genetics in the Context of the Impact of Microbes on the Organic Food Industry and Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stewart

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Case studies are well established pedagogical tools for engaging students in learning and offer the opportunity to use real world examples to give context to student learning. Finding a case study story that meets learning outcomes and resonates with students is a challenge. Our solution was an end-of-semester, capstone project for the honors students in our general microbiology course. “The Farmer’s Dilemma,” an interrupted case study with associated questions, was developed from a story line proposed by the students. The case and associated teaching notes indicate how we actively engage students in learning bacterial genetics via a story about the impact of microbes on the organic food industry and biotechnology.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  10. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  11. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  12. Integrative mapping analysis of chicken microchromosome 16 organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bed'hom Bertrand

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken karyotype is composed of 39 chromosome pairs, of which 9 still remain totally absent from the current genome sequence assembly, despite international efforts towards complete coverage. Some others are only very partially sequenced, amongst which microchromosome 16 (GGA16, particularly under-represented, with only 433 kb assembled for a full estimated size of 9 to 11 Mb. Besides the obvious need of full genome coverage with genetic markers for QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci mapping and major genes identification studies, there is a major interest in the detailed study of this chromosome because it carries the two genetically independent MHC complexes B and Y. In addition, GGA16 carries the ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes cluster, also known as the NOR (nucleolus organizer region. The purpose of the present study is to construct and present high resolution integrated maps of GGA16 to refine its organization and improve its coverage with genetic markers. Results We developed 79 STS (Sequence Tagged Site markers to build a physical RH (radiation hybrid map and 34 genetic markers to extend the genetic map of GGA16. We screened a BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library with markers for the MHC-B, MHC-Y and rRNA complexes. Selected clones were used to perform high resolution FISH (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization mapping on giant meiotic lampbrush chromosomes, allowing meiotic mapping in addition to the confirmation of the order of the three clusters along the chromosome. A region with high recombination rates and containing PO41 repeated elements separates the two MHC complexes. Conclusions The three complementary mapping strategies used refine greatly our knowledge of chicken microchromosome 16 organisation. The characterisation of the recombination hotspots separating the two MHC complexes demonstrates the presence of PO41 repetitive sequences both in tandem and inverted orientation. However, this region still needs to

  13. Listeria monocytogenes survival of UV-C radiation is enhanced by presence of sodium chloride, organic food material and by bacterial biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    biofilm for 7days before exposure. It is not known if this enhanced survival is due to physiological changes in the attached bacterial cells, a physical protection of the cells in the food matrix or a combination. In conclusion, we demonstrate that UV-C light is a useful extra bacteriocidal step and that......The bactericidal effect on food processing surfaces of ceiling-mounted UV-C light (wavelength 254nm) was determined in a fish smoke house after the routine cleaning and disinfection procedure. The total aerobic counts were reduced during UV-C light exposure (48h) and the number of Listeria...... numbers declined with 4–5log units during exposure of 8–10min. Bacteria grown in juice prepared from cold-smoked salmon were protected and numbers were reduced with 2–3log when UV-C light was used immediately after attachment whereas numbers did not change at all if bacteria had been allowed to form a...

  14. In vitro growth of the bacterial kidney disease organism Renibacterium salmoninarum on a nonserum, noncharcoal-based "homospecies-metabolite" medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teska, J D

    1994-07-01

    Laboratory and field trials were conducted to evaluate in vitro growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum in media without serum or charcoal. Growth of this bacterium, the cause of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in salmonids, is accelerated by addition of a growth enhancing "metabolite" of unknown composition to KDM2 medium, the medium commonly used for isolation of R. salmoninarum. KDM2 medium supplemented with greater than 1% (v/v) metabolite enhanced growth even without addition of either serum or charcoal. Medium containing 5% metabolite (denoted Five-M) allowed optimal growth in laboratory studies and was further evaluated as a primary plating medium for recovery of the bacterium isolated from chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exhibiting clinical BKD. Recovery rates of R. salmoninarum using Five-M medium were 4% and 36% higher, respectively, than comparable rates using a serum-based medium for the two salmon populations evaluated. Five-M medium is an effective, inexpensive alternative to serum-based or charcoal-based media. PMID:7933282

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  17. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Artemov

    Full Text Available Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC and 3R chromosomes (32D attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  20. ADN et chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Hélène

    2000-01-01

    Chaque chromosome contient une seule molécule d’ADN. L’ADN déroulé d’un noyau de cellule humaine mesurerait environ 1,8 m : chaque molécule d’ADN est enroulée et compactée en plusieurs étapes, grâce à l’association de différentes protéines, et loge dans le noyau de 6 µm de diamètre. Le degré de condensation de l’ADN est variable selon les régions chromosomiques et les régions les moins condensées sont les plus riches en gènes. L’ADN est composé d’une variété de séquences codantes ou non et ré...

  1. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  2. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  3. Physical descriptions of the bacterial nucleoid at large scales, and their biological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Benza, Vincenzo G; Dorfman, Kevin D; Scolari, Vittore F; Bromek, Krystyna; Cicuta, Pietro; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical approaches have attempted to quantify the physical organization (compaction and geometry) of the bacterial chromosome with its complement of proteins (the nucleoid). The genomic DNA exists in a complex and dynamic protein-rich state, which is highly organised at various length scales. This has implications on modulating (when not enabling) the core biological processes of replication, transcription, segregation. We overview the progress in this area, driven in the last few years by new scientific ideas and new interdisciplinary experimental techniques, ranging from high space- and time-resolution microscopy to high-throughput genomics employing sequencing to map different aspects of the nucleoid-related interactome. The aim of this review is to present the wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical findings coherently, from a physics viewpoint. We also discuss some attempts of interpretation that unify different results, highlighting the role that statistical and soft co...

  4. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  5. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  6. Interactions stabilizing DNA tertiary structure in the Escherichia coli chromosome investigated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the bacterial chromosome was investigated after introducing breaks in the DNA with gamma irradiation. It is demonstrated that irradiation of the chromosome in the cell prior to isolation results in partial unfolding of the isolated condensed DNA, while irradiation of the chromosome after it is released from the cell has no demonstrable effect on DNA folding. The results indicate that RNA/DNA interactions which stabilize DNA folds are unstable when breaks are introduced in the DNA prior to isolation of the chromosome. It is suggested that the supercoiled state of the DNA is required for the initial stabilization of some of the critical RNA/DNA interaction in the isolated nucleoid. However, some of these interactions are not affected by irradiation of the cells. Remnant supercoiling in partially relaxed chromosomes containing a limited number of DNA breaks has the same superhelical density as the unirradiated chromosome. This suggests that restraints on rotation of the packaged DNA are formed prior to the physical unwinding which occurs at the sites of the radiation induced DNA breaks. - Analysis of the in vitro irradiated chromosomes shows that there are 100 +- 30 domains of supercoiling per genome equivalent of DNA. The introduction of up to 50 double-strand breaks per nucleoid does not influence rotor speed effects of the sedimentation coefficient of the chromosome. (orig.)

  7. Chromosome evolution in dendropsophini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, P; Cardozo, D; Baldo, D; Pereyra, M O; Faivovich, J; Orrico, V G D; Catroli, G F; Grabiele, M; Bernarde, P S; Nagamachi, C Y; Haddad, C F B; Pieczarka, J C

    2013-01-01

    Dendropsophini is the most species-rich tribe within Hylidae with 234 described species. Although cytogenetic information is sparse, chromosome numbers and morphology have been considered as an important character system for systematic inferences in this group. Using a diversity of standard and molecular techniques, we describe the previously unknown karyotypes of the genera Xenohyla, Scarthyla and Sphaenorhynchus and provide new information on Dendropsophus and Lysapsus. Our results reveal significant karyotype diversity among Dendropsophini, with diploid chromosome numbers ranging from 2n = 22 in S. goinorum, 2n = 24 in Lysapsus, Scinax, Xenohyla, and almost all species of Sphaenorhynchus and Pseudis, 2n = 26 in S. carneus, 2n = 28 in P. cardosoi, to 2n = 30 in all known Dendropsophus species. Although nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and C-banding patterns show a high degree of variability, NOR positions in 2n = 22, 24 and 28 karyotypes and C-banding patterns in Lysapsus and Pseudis are informative cytological markers. Interstitial telomeric sequences reveal a diploid number reduction from 24 to 22 in Scarthyla by a chromosome fusion event. The diploid number of X. truncata corroborates the character state of 2n = 30 as a synapomorphy of Dendropsophus. PMID:24107475

  8. Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space of the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenin, Annelyse; Ein-Dor, Liat; Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Genomes undergo changes in organization as a result of gene duplications, chromosomal rearrangements and local mutations, among other mechanisms. In contrast to prokaryotes, in which genes of a common function are often organized in operons and reside contiguously along the genome, most eukaryotes show much weaker clustering of genes by function, except for few concrete functional groups. We set out to check systematically if there is a relation between gene function and gene organization in ...

  9. Assignment of genetic linkage maps to diploid Solanum tuberosum pachytene chromosomes by BAC-FISH technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, X.; Boer, de J.M.; Eck, van H.J.; Bachem, C.W.B.; Visser, R.G.F.; Jong, de J.H.

    2009-01-01

    A cytogenetic map has been developed for diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum), in which the arms of the 12 potato bivalents can be identified in pachytene complements using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a set of 60 genetically anchored bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)

  10. An integrated linkage, chromosome, and genome map for the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Timoshevskiy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito, is an efficient vector of arboviruses and a convenient model system for laboratory research. Extensive linkage mapping of morphological and molecular markers localized a number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs related to the mosquito's ability to transmit various pathogens. However, linking the QTLs to Ae. aegypti chromosomes and genomic sequences has been challenging because of the poor quality of polytene chromosomes and the highly fragmented genome assembly for this species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on the approach developed in our previous study, we constructed idiograms for mitotic chromosomes of Ae. aegypti based on their banding patterns at early metaphase. These idiograms represent the first cytogenetic map developed for mitotic chromosomes of Ae. aegypti. One hundred bacterial artificial chromosome clones carrying major genetic markers were hybridized to the chromosomes using fluorescent in situ hybridization. As a result, QTLs related to the transmission of the filarioid nematode Brugia malayi, the avian malaria parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum, and the dengue virus, as well as sex determination locus and 183 Mbp of genomic sequences were anchored to the exact positions on Ae. aegypti chromosomes. A linear regression analysis demonstrated a good correlation between positions of the markers on the physical and linkage maps. As a result of the recombination rate variation along the chromosomes, 12 QTLs on the linkage map were combined into five major clusters of QTLs on the chromosome map. CONCLUSION: This study developed an integrated linkage, chromosome, and genome map-iMap-for the yellow fever mosquito. Our discovery of the localization of multiple QTLs in a few major chromosome clusters suggests a possibility that the transmission of various pathogens is controlled by the same genomic loci. Thus, the iMap will facilitate the identification of genomic determinants of

  11. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  12. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  13. Preparation and Fluorescent Analysis of Plant Metaphase Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Good preparations are essential for informative analysis of both somatic and meiotic chromosomes, cytogenetics, and cell divisions. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized and counted, showing their morphology. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, populations, or individuals while changes occurring in breeding lines during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols can be assessed. The process of division can be followed during mitosis and meiosis including pairing and chiasma distribution, as well as DNA organization and structure during the evolution of chromosomes can be studied. This chapter presents protocols for pretreatment and fixation of material, including tips of how to grow plants to get good and healthy meristem with many divisions. The chromosome preparation technique is described using proteolytic enzymes, but acids can be used instead. Chromosome slide preparations are suitable for fluorochrome staining for fast screening (described in the chapter) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (see Schwarzacher and Heslop-Harrison, In situ hybridization. BIOS Scientific Publishers, Oxford, 2000). PMID:26659956

  14. Cytological and cytochemical characterization of the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: chironomidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromosome complement of a Brazilian Chironomus Species, C. Sancticaroli, was analyzed cytochemically. The polytene Chromosomes were identified and characterized and the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located by a technique of in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Constitutive heterochromatin and its distribution in relation to the NORs were studied. (Author)

  15. Chromosome conservation in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giovannotti, M.; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    Manchester : ICCS, 2011. 78-78. [Intarnational Chromosome Conference /18./. 29.08.2011-02.09.2011, Manchester] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : squamate reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  16. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot, but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes. Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  17. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  18. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bures, Jiri Cyrany, Darina Kohoutova, Miroslav Förstl, Stanislav Rejchrt, Jaroslav Kvetina, Viktor Vorisek, Marcela Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  19. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Bures, J.; Cyrany, J.; Kohoutova, D.; Förstl, M.; Rejchrt, S.; Kvetina, J.; Vorisek, V.; Kopacova, M.

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  20. Bacterial communication and group behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, E. Peter

    2003-01-01

    The existence of species-specific and interspecies bacterial cell-cell communication and group organization was only recently accepted. Researchers are now realizing that the ability of these microbial teams to communicate and form structures, known as biofilms, at key times during the establishment of infection significantly increases their ability to evade both host defenses and antibiotics. This Perspective series discusses the known signaling mechanisms, the roles they play in both chroni...

  1. Bacterial infections: antibiotics and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah

    Infectious disease is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and micro-organisms including the mycoplasmas, rickettsiae and chlamydiae. Most of the infections commonly encountered in the UK are caused either by bacteria or viruses. This article describes bacterial structure and function to explain how antibiotics work and the processes of decontamination such as cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation, which are important in infection control. PMID:15224613

  2. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  3. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  4. Spatial positioning of all 24 chromosomes in the lymphocytes of six subjects: evidence of reproducible positioning and spatial repositioning following DNA damage with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ioannou

    Full Text Available The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1 More peripheral radial organization; 2 Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3 More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively. Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms.

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  6. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  7. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Frank M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of the D-genome of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat genomics. The barley diploid genome also provides a good model for the Triticeae and T. aestivum since it is only slightly larger than the ancestor wheat D genome. Gene co-linearity between the grasses can be exploited by extrapolating from rice and Brachypodium distachyon to Ae. tauschii or barley, and then to wheat. Results We report the use of Ae. tauschii for the construction of the physical map of a large distal region of chromosome arm 3DS. A physical map of 25.4 Mb was constructed by anchoring BAC clones of Ae. tauschii with 85 EST on the Ae. tauschii and barley genetic maps. The 24 contigs were aligned to the rice and B. distachyon genomic sequences and a high density SNP genetic map of barley. As expected, the mapped region is highly collinear to the orthologous chromosome 1 in rice, chromosome 2 in B. distachyon and chromosome 3H in barley. However, the chromosome scale of the comparative maps presented provides new insights into grass genome organization. The disruptions of the Ae. tauschii-rice and Ae. tauschii-Brachypodium syntenies were identical. We observed chromosomal rearrangements between Ae. tauschii and barley. The comparison of Ae. tauschii physical and genetic maps showed that the recombination rate across the region dropped from 2.19 cM/Mb in the distal region to 0.09 cM/Mb in the proximal region. The size of the gaps between contigs was evaluated by comparing the recombination rate along the map with the local recombination rates calculated on single contigs. Conclusions The physical map reported here is the first physical map using fingerprinting of a complete

  8. A unique sex chromosome system in the knifefish Gymnotus bahianus with inferences about chromosomal evolution of Gymnotidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Josivanda S; Migues, Vitor H; Diniz, Débora; Affonso, Paulo Roberto A M

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in Neotropical electric knifefish of genus Gymnotus have shown a remarkable interspecific variability, including distinct sex chromosome systems. In this study, we present the first chromosomal data in Gymnotus bahianus from Contas River basin, northeastern South America. Based on extensive analyses, the modal diploid values were 2n = 36 (30m/sm + 6st) for females and 2n = 37 (32m/sm + 5st) for males. Therefore, a novel XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system is described for the genus. Single nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) interspersed to GC-rich sites were detected on a subtelocentric pair (7th) for both sexes and confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA probes. Heterochromatin was detected at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes and interspersed to NORs on pair 7 and 5S rDNA cistrons on pair 9. The highly differentiated karyotype of Gymnoytus bahianus, with low diploid numbers and a unique XX/XY1Y2 system, reinforces the independent origin of sex chromosomes in Gymnotiformes and seems to reflect the particular evolutionary history of this species in a small and isolated drainage system. Moreover, in spite of morphological similarities, the present results indicate a remarkable chromosomal divergence in relation to closely related species such as G. sylvius and G. carapo. PMID:25596613

  9. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Knob-associated tandem repeats on mitotic chromosomes in maize, Zea diploperennis and their hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zhiyong; GAO Yuan; HE Guanyuan; GU Mingguang; GUO Lequn; SONG Yunchun

    2004-01-01

    Knob-associated tandem repeats, 180-bp repeats and TR-1 elements, together with 45S rDNA were located on mitotic chromosomes of Zea diploperennis (DP),maize inbred line F102 and their hybrid. In DP, knobs on the short arm of chromosomes 1 and 4 and on the long arm of the chromosomes 4 and 5 are composed predominantly of the 180-bp repeats. In addition, 180-bp repeats existed together with TR-1 elements were also detected on the short arm of chromosomes 2 and 5 and on the long arm of the chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 8 and 9. In maize inbred line F102, 180-bp repeats were present in chromosomes 7S and one homologue of chromosomes 8L. TR-1 elements appeared on satellite of chromosome 6 and no detectable hybridization site co-located with 180-bp repeats was observed in maize F102. Polymorphism of size, number, and distribution of 180-bp and TR-1 signals were revealed among different chromosomes in these two species and heteromorphism existed between some homologous chromosomes in the same species.Using these excellent landmarks, the interspecific hybrid of maize and DP were identified. The results suggest that comparative analysis of 180-bp repeats and TR-1 elements may help understand the genome organization and the evolution in Zea.

  11. B-chromosomes in two Brazilian populations of Dendropsophus nanus (Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian R. Medeiros

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the presence of B-chromosomes in two populations of Dendropsophus nanus (= Hyla nana Boulenger, 1889 from São Paulo State, Brazil. Such chromosomes were observed in 4 out of 43 specimens (9.3% and in 9 out of 15 specimens (60% from the municipalities of Nova Aliança and Botucatu, respectively. The karyotype 2n = 30 + 1B found in D. nanus was similar to that of other species with 2n = 30 chromosomes, except for the presence of an additional small telocentric chromosome. In one specimen from Botucatu, cells with one to three extra chromosomes were observed. These B-chromosomes appeared as univalent in meiosis I and did not bear a nucleolar organizer region or exhibit constitutive heterochromatin.

  12. Repulsive forces between looping chromosomes induce entropy-driven segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Bohn

    Full Text Available One striking feature of chromatin organization is that chromosomes are compartmentalized into distinct territories during interphase, the degree of intermingling being much smaller than expected for linear chains. A growing body of evidence indicates that the formation of loops plays a dominant role in transcriptional regulation as well as the entropic organization of interphase chromosomes. Using a recently proposed model, we quantitatively determine the entropic forces between chromosomes. This Dynamic Loop Model assumes that loops form solely on the basis of diffusional motion without invoking other long-range interactions. We find that introducing loops into the structure of chromatin results in a multi-fold higher repulsion between chromosomes compared to linear chains. Strong effects are observed for the tendency of a non-random alignment; the overlap volume between chromosomes decays fast with increasing loop number. Our results suggest that the formation of chromatin loops imposes both compartmentalization as well as order on the system without requiring additional energy-consuming processes.

  13. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  14. Rapid De Novo Evolution of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Silene latifolia, a Plant with Young Sex Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Clothilde; Mousset, Sylvain; Widmer, Alex; Marais, Gabriel A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Silene latifolia is a dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes that have originated only ∼10 million years ago and is a promising model organism to study sex chromosome evolution in plants. Previous work suggests that S. latifolia XY chromosomes have gradually stopped recombining and the Y chromosome is undergoing degeneration as in animal sex chromosomes. However, this work has been limited by the paucity of sex-linked genes available. Here, we used 35 Gb of RNA-seq data from multiple males (XY) and females (XX) of an S. latifolia inbred line to detect sex-linked SNPs and identified more than 1,700 sex-linked contigs (with X-linked and Y-linked alleles). Analyses using known sex-linked and autosomal genes, together with simulations indicate that these newly identified sex-linked contigs are reliable. Using read numbers, we then estimated expression levels of X-linked and Y-linked alleles in males and found an overall trend of reduced expression of Y-linked alleles, consistent with a widespread ongoing degeneration of the S. latifolia Y chromosome. By comparing expression intensities of X-linked alleles in males and females, we found that X-linked allele expression increases as Y-linked allele expression decreases in males, which makes expression of sex-linked contigs similar in both sexes. This phenomenon is known as dosage compensation and has so far only been observed in evolutionary old animal sex chromosome systems. Our results suggest that dosage compensation has evolved in plants and that it can quickly evolve de novo after the origin of sex chromosomes. PMID:22529744

  15. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  16. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O.; Brown, Keith S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results i...

  17. Physical Model of Segregation of E.coli Chromosomes using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahhas, Faisal; Kharel, Savan

    2016-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is one of the most interesting physical processes during a bacterial cell cycle. We will use molecular dynamics simulations which will help us understand how strongly confined polymer segregates. In the presentation, we will discuss how segregation of initially overlapping circular chromosome occurs during a cell cycle. In particular, we will describe the role played by entropic mechanism in the demixing of overlapping circular polymer confined in a cylindrical boundary. We discuss how our polymer chains modeled as an E-coli chromosome experiences an effective repulsion, which ultimately leads to partition driven by the entropic forces. Also, we will also discuss how the segregation of circular chromosome in cylindrical confinement differs from a spherical confinement. Finally, we will discuss the role played by proteins and supercoiling in during the segregation process.

  18. Nanopores Structure in Electrospun Bacterial Cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Basmaji; Gabriel Molina de Olyveira; Ligia Maria Manzine Costa; Lauro Xavier Filho

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has established to be a remarkably versatile biomaterial and can be used in wide variety of applied scientific endeavours, especially for medical devices, lately, bacterial cellulose mats are used in the treatment of skin conditions such as burns and ulcers, because of the morphology of fibrous biopolymers serving as a support for cell proliferation, its pores allow gas exchange between the organism and the environment. Moreover, the nanostructure and morphological si...

  19. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  20. Modeling and simulation of bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Espeso, David

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis focus its efforts on developing a mathematical and experimental modelization of bacterial biofilms: bacterial colonies embedded into a polysaccharid matrix with a high resistance against removal processes, which result in a recurrent source of problems in other disciplines (medicine, engineering, etc). The behaviour of these organisms is highly dependant of the physical system in which they are present. So different case studies are faced here to show their complexity. Firs...