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Sample records for bacterial cells integrated

  1. Mast cells in bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnberg, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in immunity towards bacterial infection, but the molecular mechanisms by which mast cells contribute to the host response are only partially understood. Previous studies have examined how mast cells react to purified bacterial cell wall components, such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. To investigate how mast cells react to live bacteria we co-cultured mast cells and the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus equi (S. equi) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)...

  2. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.BEWLEY,M.C.

    2002-10-01

    aggregation and/or mislfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  3. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.; BEWLEY,M.C.

    2001-12-03

    /or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  4. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    /or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins

  5. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-α resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  6. TBK1 protects vacuolar integrity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Radtke

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1 is an integral component of Type I interferon induction by microbial infection. The importance of TBK1 and Type I interferon in antiviral immunity is well established, but the function of TBK1 in bacterial infection is unclear. Upon infection of murine embryonic fibroblasts with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella, more extensive bacterial proliferation was observed in tbk1(-/- than tbk1(+/+ cells. TBK1 kinase activity was required for restriction of bacterial infection, but interferon regulatory factor-3 or Type I interferon did not contribute to this TBK1-dependent function. In tbk1(-/-cells, Salmonella, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pyogenes escaped from vacuoles into the cytosol where increased replication occurred, which suggests that TBK1 regulates the integrity of pathogen-containing vacuoles. Knockdown of tbk1 in macrophages and epithelial cells also resulted in increased bacterial localization in the cytosol, indicating that the role of TBK1 in maintaining vacuolar integrity is relevant in different cell types. Taken together, these data demonstrate a requirement for TBK1 in control of bacterial infection distinct from its established role in antiviral immunity.

  7. Bacterial cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Materials 1. Glass culture tubes with metal caps and labels - Growth medium, from media room or customized - Glass pipette tubes - Parafilm ### Equipment 1. Vortexer - Fireboy or Bunsen burner - Motorized pipette - Micropipettes and sterile tips ### Procedure For a typical liquid culture, use 5 ml of appropriate medium. The amount in each tube does not have to be exact if you are just trying to culture cells for their precious DNA. 1. Streak an a...

  8. System-level design of bacterial cell cycle control

    OpenAIRE

    McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the cell cycle control logic in Caulobacter has progressed to the point where we now have an integrated view of the operation of an entire bacterial cell cycle system functioning as a state machine. Oscillating levels of a few temporally-controlled master regulator proteins in a cyclical circuit drive cell cycle progression. To a striking degree, the cell cycle regulation is a whole cell phenomenon. Phospho-signaling proteins and proteases dynamically deployed to specific loc...

  9. Modeling bacterial chemotaxis inside a cell

    OpenAIRE

    Ouannes, Nesrine; Djedi, Noureddine; Luga, Hervé; Duthen, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a bacterial system that reproduces a population of bacteria that behave by simulating the internal reactions of each bacterial cell. The chemotaxis network of a cell is modulated by a hybrid approach that uses an algebraic model for the receptor clusters activity and an ordinary differential equation for the adaptation dynamics. The experiments are defined in order to simulate bacterial growth in an environment where nutrients are regularly added to it. The results show a...

  10. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  11. Bacterial Probiotic Modulation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Drakes, Maureen; Blanchard, Thomas; Czinn, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal dendritic cells are continually exposed to ingested microorganisms and high concentrations of endogenous bacterial flora. These cells can be activated by infectious agents and other stimuli to induce T-cell responses and to produce chemokines which recruit other cells to the local environment. Bacterial probiotics are of increasing use against intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. They act as nonpathogenic stimuli within the gut to regain immunologic quiescence. ...

  12. Identification of bacterial cells by chromosomal painting.

    OpenAIRE

    Lanoil, B. D.; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal painting is a technique for the microscopic localization of genetic material. It has been applied at the subcellular level to identify regions of eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we describe the development of bacterial chromosomal painting (BCP), a related technology for the identification of bacterial cells. Purified genomic DNAs from six bacterial strains were labeled by nick translation with the fluorochrome Fluor-X, Cy3, or Cy5. The average size of the labeled fragments was ca. 5...

  13. Application of Coarse Integration to Bacterial Chemotaxis

    CERN Document Server

    Setayeshgar, S; Othmer, H G; Kevrekidis, Yu G

    2003-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a numerical evolution scheme for a class of stochastic problems in which the temporal evolution occurs on widely-separated time scales, and for which the slow evolution can be described in terms of a small number of moments of an underlying probability distribution. We demonstrate this method via a numerical simulation of chemotaxis in a population of motile, independent bacteria swimming in a prescribed gradient of a chemoattractant. The microscopic stochastic model, which is simulated using a Monte Carlo method, uses a simplified deterministic model for excitation/adaptation in signal transduction, coupled to a realistic, stochastic description of the flagellar motor. We show that projective time integration of ``coarse'' variables can be carried out on time scales long compared to that of the microscopic dynamics. Our coarse description is based on the spatial cell density distribution. Thus we are assuming that the system ``closes'' on this variable so that it can be desc...

  14. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  15. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivetal, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.piv@netcmail.com [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Royet, David [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Ciuta, Georgeta [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Frenea-Robin, Marie [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Haddour, Naoufel [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric [Univ Limoges, CNRS, SPCTS UMR 7513, 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges (France); Simonet, Pascal [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France)

    2015-04-15

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology.

  16. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology

  17. Messenger Functions of the Bacterial Cell Wall-derived Muropeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau, Marc A.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial muropeptides are soluble peptidoglycan structures central to recycling of the bacterial cell wall, and messengers in diverse cell-signaling events. Bacteria sense muropeptides as signals that antibiotics targeting cell-wall biosynthesis are present, and eukaryotes detect muropeptides during the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This review summarizes the roles of bacterial muropeptides as messengers, with a special emphasis on bacterial muropeptide structures and the re...

  18. Integrated circuit cell library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    According to the invention, an ASIC cell library for use in creation of custom integrated circuits is disclosed. The ASIC cell library includes some first cells and some second cells. Each of the second cells includes two or more kernel cells. The ASIC cell library is at least 5% comprised of second cells. In various embodiments, the ASIC cell library could be 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, 40% or more, 50% or more, 60% or more, 70% or more, 80% or more, 90% or more, or 95% or more comprised of second cells.

  19. Expression of bacterial luciferase in eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of Bacterial luciferase enzyme (lux) in mammalian cells would be a powerful bioreporter protein system for in vivo imaging because eukaryotic luciferases need expensive substrates. However, only a few efforts have been made to express bacterial luciferase enzyme in mammalian cells. As the result of this, we attempted to construct bicistronic vector including two bacterial luciferase genes (LuxA and LuxB) for assessing the potential to be visualized in vitro or in vivo by optical imaging system after transfection to mammalian cells. We designed and synthesized luxA and luxB genes from Photorhabdus Luminescens. To co-express both luxA and luxB genes from a single promoter, we cloned as a bicistronic transcript fused with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). This bicistronic transcript was transfected by Superfect to HEK 293T cell line. We also transfected lux A and lux B vector to HEK 293T cells separately. To evaluate gene expression, n-decanal and FMNH2 were supplemented to transfected HEK 293T cell lines which were measured by In Vivo Imaging System. The luxA gene was cloned into the MCS(A) of pIRESGFP via the 5' SalI and 3' EcoRI restriction sites to generate pIRESluxA. The luxB gene was cleaved via a 5' NcoI and 3' NotI site from luxB and cloned into the MCS(B) of pIRESluxA to generate pIRESluxAB. LuxA and B genes was cleaved by 5' EcoRI and 3' SpeI and cloned into the pcDNA3.1 mammalian expression vector to create pcDNALuxA and pcDNALuxB. We constructed bicistronic vector system which is composed of bacterial luciferase genes (lux A and B) on the single reading frame. These results hold a promise of an available development of an autonomous light generating lux reporter system in mammalian cells

  20. Efficient Gene Transfer in Bacterial Cell Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Babic, Ana; Berkmen, Melanie B.; Lee, Catherine A.; Grossman, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer contributes to evolution and the acquisition of new traits. In bacteria, horizontal gene transfer is often mediated by conjugative genetic elements that transfer directly from cell to cell. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs; also known as conjugative transposons) are mobile genetic elements that reside within a host genome but can excise to form a circle and transfer by conjugation to recipient cells. ICEs contribute to the spread of genes involved in pathoge...

  1. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    cantilever coated with the commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. We applied the method to study adhesion of living cells to abiotic surfaces at the single-cell level. Immobilisation of single bacterial cells to the cantilever was stable for several hours, and viability was confirmed by Live/Dead staining and......Bacteria initiate attachment to surfaces with the aid of different extracellular proteins and polymeric adhesins. To quantitatively analyse the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions provided by bacterial adhesins, it is essential to go down to single cell level where cell-to-cell variation can be...... considered. We have developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface by approaching a tipless AFM...

  2. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  3. One bacterial cell, one complete genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Woyke

    Full Text Available While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200-900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  4. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll...... cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that...

  5. Septins regulate bacterial entry into host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Mostowy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Septins are conserved GTPases that form filaments and are required in many organisms for several processes including cytokinesis. We previously identified SEPT9 associated with phagosomes containing latex beads coated with the Listeria surface protein InlB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated septin function during entry of invasive bacteria in non-phagocytic mammalian cells. We found that SEPT9, and its interacting partners SEPT2 and SEPT11, are recruited as collars next to actin at the site of entry of Listeria and Shigella. SEPT2-depletion by siRNA decreased bacterial invasion, suggesting that septins have roles during particle entry. Incubating cells with InlB-coated beads confirmed an essential role for SEPT2. Moreover, SEPT2-depletion impaired InlB-mediated stimulation of Met-dependent signaling as shown by FRET. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these findings highlight novel roles for SEPT2, and distinguish the roles of septin and actin in bacterial entry.

  6. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  7. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Żur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability.

  8. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A. Batt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform.

  9. Apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cells after bacterial invasion.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J. M.; Eckmann, L; Savidge, T. C.; Lowe, D C; Witthöft, T; Kagnoff, M F

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cells that line the human intestinal mucosa are the initial site of host invasion by bacterial pathogens. The studies herein define apoptosis as a new category of intestinal epithelial cell response to bacterial infection. Human colon epithelial cells are shown to undergo apoptosis following infection with invasive enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella or enteroinvasive Escherichia coli. In contrast to the rapid onset of apoptosis seen after bacterial infection of mouse monocyte-ma...

  10. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  11. Single-molecule investigations of the stringent response machinery in living bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    English, Brian P.; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Sanamrad, Arash; Tankov, Stoyan; Dekker, Nynke H.; Elf, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The RelA-mediated stringent response is at the heart of bacterial adaptation to starvation and stress, playing a major role in the bacterial cell cycle and virulence. RelA integrates several environmental cues and synthesizes the alarmone ppGpp, which globally reprograms transcription, translation, and replication. We have developed and implemented novel single-molecule tracking methodology to characterize the intracellular catalytic cycle of RelA. Our single-molecule experiments show that Re...

  12. An electrochemical impedance model for integrated bacterial biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cells attachment onto solid surfaces and the following growth into mature microbial biofilms may result in highly antibiotic resistant biofilms. Such biofilms may be incidentally formed on tissues or implanted devices, or intentionally formed by directed deposition of microbial sensors on whole-cell bio-chip surface. A new method for electrical characterization of the later on-chip microbial biofilm buildup is presented in this paper. Measurement of impedance vs. frequency in the range of 100 mHz to 400 kHz of Escherichia coli cells attachment to indium-tin-oxide-coated electrodes was carried out while using optical microscopy estimating the electrode area coverage. We show that impedance spectroscopy measurements can be interpreted by a simple electrical equivalent model characterizing both attachment and growth of the biofilm. The correlation of extracted equivalent electrical lumped components with the visual biofilm parameters and their dependence on the attachment and growth phases is confirmed.

  13. Participation of ezrin in bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophoblast giant (TG cells are involved in systematic removal of bacterial pathogens from the maternal-fetal interface of the placenta. In particular, TG cells have the ability to take up extracellular antigens by active phagocytosis induced by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma. We previously reported that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 present on the surface of TG cells mediated the uptake of Brucella abortus. However, the mechanism of bacterial uptake by TG cells is not completely understood. Here we identified ezrin, a member of ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM protein family, as a molecule associated with Hsc70. Methods Mouse TG cells were employed in all experiments, and B. abortus was used as the bacterial antigen. Confirmation of the binding capacity of ERM protein was assessed by pull-down assay and ELISA using recombinant Hsc70 and ERM proteins. Ezrin was depleted using siRNA and the depletion examined by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence staining. Results The expression level of ezrin was higher in TG cells than in trophoblast stem (TS cells, and ezrin knockdown TG cells showed a reduction in bacterial uptake ability. Although tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin was not related to bacterial uptake activity, localization of Hsc70 on the membrane was affected by the depletion of ezrin in TG cells. Conclusion Ezrin associates with Hsc70 that locates on the membrane of TG cells and participates in the bacterial uptake by TG cells.

  14. Osmotic Pressure, Bacterial Cell Walls, and Penicillin: A Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, John E.

    1984-01-01

    An easily constructed apparatus that models the effect of penicillin on the structure of bacterial cells is described. Background information and procedures for using the apparatus during a classroom demonstration are included. (JN)

  15. Quantification of bacterial invasion into adherent cells by flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pils, Stefan; Schmitter, Tim; Neske, Florian; Hauck, Christof R.

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of invasive, intracellular bacteria is critical in many areas of cellular microbiology and immunology. We describe a novel and fast approach to determine invasion of bacterial pathogens in adherent cell types such as epithelial cells or fibroblasts based on flow cytometry. Using the CEACAM-mediated uptake of Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a well-characterized model of bacterial invasion, we demonstrate that the flow cytometry-based method yields results comparable to a...

  16. RECOVERY OF POLYHYDROXYALKANOATES (PHAs) FROM BACTERIAL CELLS USING ENZYMATIC PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    S. Marsudi

    2012-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are intracellular material accumulated by several bacteria. Commercial production of PHAs faces the issue of high production cost especially substrate cost and recovery/separation cost. An alternative to reduce the production cost is to use enzyme and or chemical to recover PHAs from bacterial cells. Recovery of PHAs from bacterial cells was done using enzyme, chemical, and a mixture of enzyme and chemical. Enzyme (s) and or chemical(s) were added into culture bro...

  17. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis. PMID:27033694

  18. CISA: contig integrator for sequence assembly of bacterial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Hung Lin

    Full Text Available A plethora of algorithmic assemblers have been proposed for the de novo assembly of genomes, however, no individual assembler guarantees the optimal assembly for diverse species. Optimizing various parameters in an assembler is often performed in order to generate the most optimal assembly. However, few efforts have been pursued to take advantage of multiple assemblies to yield an assembly of high accuracy. In this study, we employ various state-of-the-art assemblers to generate different sets of contigs for bacterial genomes. A tool, named CISA, has been developed to integrate the assemblies into a hybrid set of contigs, resulting in assemblies of superior contiguity and accuracy, compared with the assemblies generated by the state-of-the-art assemblers and the hybrid assemblies merged by existing tools. This tool is implemented in Python and requires MUMmer and BLAST+ to be installed on the local machine. The source code of CISA and examples of its use are available at http://sb.nhri.org.tw/CISA/.

  19. Conductivity and Dielectric Dispersion of Gram-Positive Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal A; Minor; Norde; Zehnder; Lyklema

    1997-02-01

    The conductivity of bacterial cell suspensions has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths and is interpreted in terms of their cell wall properties. The experimental data have been analyzed after improving the high kappaa double-layer theory of Fixman, by accounting for ionic mobility in the hydrodynamically stagnant layer, i.e., in the bacterial wall. Static conductivity and dielectric dispersion measurements both show that the counterions in the porous gel-like cell wall give rise to a considerable surface conductance. From a comparison of the mobile charge with the total cell wall charge it is inferred that the mobilities of the ions in the bacterial wall are of the same order but somewhat lower than those in the bulk electrolyte solution. The occurrence of surface conductance reduces the electrophoretic mobility in electrophoresis studies. If this effect is not taken into account, the zeta-potential will be underestimated, especially at low electrolyte concentrations. PMID:9056304

  20. RECOVERY OF POLYHYDROXYALKANOATES (PHAs FROM BACTERIAL CELLS USING ENZYMATIC PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marsudi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are intracellular material accumulated by several bacteria. Commercial production of PHAs faces the issue of high production cost especially substrate cost and recovery/separation cost. An alternative to reduce the production cost is to use enzyme and or chemical to recover PHAs from bacterial cells. Recovery of PHAs from bacterial cells was done using enzyme, chemical, and a mixture of enzyme and chemical. Enzyme (s and or chemical(s were added into culture broth to disrupt cells after adjusting pH and temperature of the culture broth. Treatment by adding enzyme or chemical only into culture broth showed a low level of PHAs recovered from bacterial cells. Treatment by adding a mixture of enzymes and chemicals showed the best result among 22 examined combinations, i.e. a mixture of EDTA, lisozyme, papain enzyme, and SDS. This combination gave a PHA recovery of 65 % w/w.

  1. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Transcriptional activity around bacterial cell death reveals molecular biomarkers for cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteriology, the ability to grow in selective media and to form colonies on nutrient agar plates is routinely used as a retrospective criterion for the detection of living bacteria. However, the utilization of indicators for bacterial viability-such as the presence of specific transcripts or membrane integrity-would overcome bias introduced by cultivation and reduces the time span of analysis from initiation to read out. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between transcriptional activity, membrane integrity and cultivation-based viability in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Results We present microbiological, cytological and molecular analyses of the physiological response to lethal heat stress under accurately defined conditions through systematic sampling of bacteria from a single culture exposed to gradually increasing temperatures. We identified a coherent transcriptional program including known heat shock responses as well as the rapid expression of a small number of sporulation and competence genes, the latter only known to be active in the stationary growth phase. Conclusion The observed coordinated gene expression continued even after cell death, in other words after all bacteria permanently lost their ability to reproduce. Transcription of a very limited number of genes correlated with cell viability under the applied killing regime. The transcripts of the expressed genes in living bacteria – but silent in dead bacteria-include those of essential genes encoding chaperones of the protein folding machinery and can serve as molecular biomarkers for bacterial cell viability.

  3. Bacterial-induced cell reprogramming to stem cell-like cells: new premise in host-pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Samuel; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a myriad of strategies to alter host tissue cell functions for bacterial advantage during infection. Recent advances revealed a fusion of infection biology with stem cell biology by demonstrating developmental reprogramming of lineage committed host glial cells to progenitor/stem cell-like cells by an intracellular bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Acquisition of migratory and immunomodulatory properties of such reprogrammed cells provides an added advantage ...

  4. An integral parametrization of the bacterial growth curve experimental demonstration with E. coli C600 bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work an integral parametrization of the bacterial growth curve is presented. The values of the parameters are obtained by fitting to the experimental data. Those parameters, with allow to describe the growth in its different phases, are the followings: slopes of the curve in its three parts and the time which divides the last two phases of the bacterial growth. The experimental data are bacterial densities measured by optical methods. The bacteria used was the E. coli C600. (Author)

  5. Single Cell Analysis of a Bacterial Sender-Receiver System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Tiago; Meyer, Andrea; Mückl, Andrea; Kapsner, Korbinian; Gerland, Ulrich; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression dynamics on the single cell level provides important information on cellular heterogeneity and stochasticity, and potentially allows for more accurate quantitation of gene expression processes. We here study bacterial senders and receivers genetically engineered with components of the quorum sensing system derived from Aliivibrio fischeri on the single cell level using microfluidics-based bacterial chemostats and fluorescence video microscopy. We track large numbers of bacteria over extended periods of time, which allows us to determine bacterial lineages and filter out subpopulations within a heterogeneous population. We quantitatively determine the dynamic gene expression response of receiver bacteria to varying amounts of the quorum sensing inducer N-3-oxo-C6-homoserine lactone (AHL). From this we construct AHL response curves and characterize gene expression dynamics of whole bacterial populations by investigating the statistical distribution of gene expression activity over time. The bacteria are found to display heterogeneous induction behavior within the population. We therefore also characterize gene expression in a homogeneous bacterial subpopulation by focusing on single cell trajectories derived only from bacteria with similar induction behavior. The response at the single cell level is found to be more cooperative than that obtained for the heterogeneous total population. For the analysis of systems containing both AHL senders and receiver cells, we utilize the receiver cells as 'bacterial sensors' for AHL. Based on a simple gene expression model and the response curves obtained in receiver-only experiments, the effective AHL concentration established by the senders and their 'sending power' is determined. PMID:26808777

  6. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics. PMID:27066459

  7. The molecularly crowded cytoplasm of bacterialcCells : Dividing cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevors, J. T.; van Elsas, J. D.; Bej, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss the cytoplasm in actively growing bacterial cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Actively growing bacterial cells contain a more molecularly crowded and organized cytoplasm, and are capable of completing their cell cycle resulting in cell divi

  8. Aerotactic Cell Density Variations in Bacterial Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Vicente; Smriga, Steven; Menolascina, Filippo; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2015-11-01

    Concentrated suspensions of motile bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis exhibit group dynamics much larger than the scale of an individual bacterium, visual similar to high Reynolds number turbulence. These suspensions represent a microscale realization of active matter. Individually, B. subtilis are also aerotactic, and will accumulate near oxygen sources. Using a microfluidic device for generating oxygen gradients, we investigate the relationship between individuals' attraction to oxygen and the collective motion resultant from hydrodynamic interactions. We focus on changes in density revealed by a fluorescently labeled sub-population of B. subtilis in the dense suspension. This approach allows us to examine changes in density during the onset of collective motion as well as fully developed bacterial turbulence.

  9. Chip integrated fuel cell accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M.; Erdler, G.; Frerichs, H.-P.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    A unique new design of a chip integrated fuel cell accumulator is presented. The system combines an electrolyser and a self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with integrated palladium hydrogen storage on a silicon substrate. Outstanding advantages of this assembly are the fuel cell with integrated hydrogen storage, the possibility of refuelling it by electrolysis and the opportunity of simply refilling the electrolyte by adding water. By applying an electrical current, wiring the palladium hydrogen storage as cathode and the counter-electrode as anode, the electrolyser produces hydrogen at the palladium surface and oxygen at the electrolyser cell anode. The generated hydrogen is absorbed by the palladium electrode and the hydrogen storage is refilled consequently enabling the fuel cell to function.

  10. Chip integrated fuel cell accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H. [Laboratory for Process Technology, IMTEK-Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Erdler, G.; Frerichs, H.-P. [Micronas GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Strasse 19, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    A unique new design of a chip integrated fuel cell accumulator is presented. The system combines an electrolyser and a self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with integrated palladium hydrogen storage on a silicon substrate. Outstanding advantages of this assembly are the fuel cell with integrated hydrogen storage, the possibility of refuelling it by electrolysis and the opportunity of simply refilling the electrolyte by adding water. By applying an electrical current, wiring the palladium hydrogen storage as cathode and the counter-electrode as anode, the electrolyser produces hydrogen at the palladium surface and oxygen at the electrolyser cell anode. The generated hydrogen is absorbed by the palladium electrode and the hydrogen storage is refilled consequently enabling the fuel cell to function. (author)

  11. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies from bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peternel Špela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells.

  12. Heavy metal biosorption by bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchio, A.; Finoli, C.; Di Simine, D.; Andreoni, V. [Department of Food Science and Microbiology, State University, Milan (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Microbial biomass provides available ligand groups on which metal ions bind by different mechanisms. Biosorption of these elements from aqueous solutions represents a remediation technology suitable for the treatment of metal-contaminated effluents. The purpose of the present investigation was the assessment of the capability of Brevibacterium sp. cells to remove bivalent ions, when present alone or in pairs, from aqueous solutions, using immobilized polyacrylamide cells of the microorganism in a flow-through system. The biosorption capacity of Brevibacterium cells was studied for lead, cadmium and copper. The metal cell binding capacity followed the order Cu > Pb > Cd, based on estimated q{sub max}. These values, expressed as mmol metal/g dry weight cells, were 0.54 for Cu, 0.36 for Pb and 0.14 for Cd. Polyacrylamide-gel immobilized cells were effective in Pb, Cu and Cd removal. Lead removal was not affected by the presence of Cd and Cu; lead instead inhibited Cd and Cu removal. The desorption of the metal, by fluxing a chelating solution, restored the metal binding capacity of the cells, thus affording the multiple use of the same biomass in the remediation treatment. (orig.) (orig.) With 5 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  13. Expression of Bacterial β-Galactosidase in Animal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    An, Gynheung; Hidaka, Katsuhiko; Siminovitch, Louis

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing the gene for bacterial β-galactosidase, situated close to the simian virus 40 early promoter, has been constructed. Transfection of CHO, L, and COS-1 cells with this plasmid led to the expression and appearance of the enzyme. Using this system, we have developed a series of promoter cloning vehicles capable of accepting promoter signals for animal genes.

  14. In situ probing the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a novel approach to probe the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometre resolution by combining focused ion beam (FIB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After removing layers of pre-defined thickness in the order of 100 nm on the target bacterial cells with FIB milling, AFM of different modes can be employed to probe the cellular interior under both ambient and aqueous environments. Our initial investigations focused on the surface topology induced by FIB milling and the hydration effects on AFM measurements, followed by assessment of the sample protocols. With fine-tuning of the process parameters, in situ AFM probing beneath the bacterial cell wall was achieved for the first time. We further demonstrate the proposed method by performing a spatial mapping of intracellular elasticity and chemistry of the multi-drug resistant strain Klebsiella pneumoniae cells prior to and after it was exposed to the ‘last-line’ antibiotic polymyxin B. Our results revealed increased stiffness occurring in both surface and interior regions of the treated cells, suggesting loss of integrity of the outer membrane from polymyxin treatments. In addition, the hydrophobicity measurement using a functionalized AFM tip was able to highlight the evident hydrophobic portion of the cell such as the regions containing cell membrane. We expect that the proposed FIB–AFM platform will help in gaining deeper insights of bacteria–drug interactions to develop potential strategies for combating multi-drug resistance. (paper)

  15. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell-cell and cell-surface scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Knut; Cisneros, Luis H; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E; 10.1073/pnas.1019079108

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell-cell and cell-surface scattering - the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell-cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dom...

  16. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  17. Bursting the bubble on bacterial biofilms: a flow cell methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Shanika A. Crusz; Popat, Roman; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Cámara, Miguel; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Diggle, Stephen P.; Williams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The flow cell biofilm system is an important and widely used tool for the in vitro cultivation and evaluation of bacterial biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions of flow. This paper provides an introduction to the background and use of such systems, accompanied by a detailed guide to the assembly of the apparatus including the description of new modifications which enhance its performance. As such, this is an essential guide for the novice biofilm researcher as well as providing valuable trou...

  18. The Role of Lipid Domains in Bacterial Cell Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Muchová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are vital structures for cellular life forms. As thin, hydrophobic films, they provide a physical barrier separating the aqueous cytoplasm from the outside world or from the interiors of other cellular compartments. They maintain a selective permeability for the import and export of water-soluble compounds, enabling the living cell to maintain a stable chemical environment for biological processes. Cell membranes are primarily composed of two crucial substances, lipids and proteins. Bacterial membranes can sense environmental changes or communication signals from other cells and they support different cell processes, including cell division, differentiation, protein secretion and supplementary protein functions. The original fluid mosaic model of membrane structure has been recently revised because it has become apparent that domains of different lipid composition are present in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. In this review, we summarize different aspects of phospholipid domain formation in bacterial membranes, mainly in Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. We describe the role of these lipid domains in membrane dynamics and the localization of specific proteins and protein complexes in relation to the regulation of cellular function.

  19. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  20. Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P; Holt, J

    2008-07-28

    In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how

  1. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Satya Prakash; Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska

    2008-01-01

    Satya Prakash, Aleksandra Malgorzata UrbanskaBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physiology, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastr...

  2. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  3. Microarray Analysis to Monitor Bacterial Cell Wall Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hee-Jeon; Hesketh, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomics, the genome-wide analysis of gene transcription, has become an important tool for characterizing and understanding the signal transduction networks operating in bacteria. Here we describe a protocol for quantifying and interpreting changes in the transcriptome of Streptomyces coelicolor that take place in response to treatment with three antibiotics active against different stages of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The results defined the transcriptional responses associated with cell envelope homeostasis including a generalized response to all three antibiotics involving activation of transcription of the cell envelope stress sigma factor σ(E), together with elements of the stringent response, and of the heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress regulons. Many antibiotic-specific transcriptional changes were identified, representing cellular processes potentially important for tolerance to each antibiotic. The principles behind the protocol are transferable to the study of cell envelope homeostatic mechanisms probed using alternative chemical/environmental insults or in other bacterial strains. PMID:27311662

  4. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  5. Crystal structure of MraY, an essential membrane enzyme for bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ben C; Zhao, Jinshi; Gillespie, Robert A; Kwon, Do-Yeon; Guan, Ziqiang; Hong, Jiyong; Zhou, Pei; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2013-08-30

    MraY (phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes an essential step of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis: the transfer of the peptidoglycan precursor phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide to the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate. MraY has long been considered a promising target for the development of antibiotics, but the lack of a structure has hindered mechanistic understanding of this critical enzyme and the enzyme superfamily in general. The superfamily includes enzymes involved in bacterial lipopolysaccharide/teichoic acid formation and eukaryotic N-linked glycosylation, modifications that are central in many biological processes. We present the crystal structure of MraY from Aquifex aeolicus (MraYAA) at 3.3 Å resolution, which allows us to visualize the overall architecture, locate Mg(2+) within the active site, and provide a structural basis of catalysis for this class of enzyme. PMID:23990562

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  7. Homeostatic interplay between bacterial cell-cell signaling and iron in virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Hazan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria use interconnected multi-layered regulatory networks, such as quorum sensing (QS networks to sense and respond to environmental cues and external and internal bacterial cell signals, and thereby adapt to and exploit target hosts. Despite the many advances that have been made in understanding QS regulation, little is known regarding how these inputs are integrated and processed in the context of multi-layered QS regulatory networks. Here we report the examination of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs MvfR regulatory network and determination of its interaction with the QS acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL RhlR network. The aim of this work was to elucidate paradigmatically the complex relationships between multi-layered regulatory QS circuitries, their signaling molecules, and the environmental cues to which they respond. Our findings revealed positive and negative homeostatic regulatory loops that fine-tune the MvfR regulon via a multi-layered dependent homeostatic regulation of the cell-cell signaling molecules PQS and HHQ, and interplay between these molecules and iron. We discovered that the MvfR regulon component PqsE is a key mediator in orchestrating this homeostatic regulation, and in establishing a connection to the QS rhlR system in cooperation with RhlR. Our results show that P. aeruginosa modulates the intensity of its virulence response, at least in part, through this multi-layered interplay. Our findings underscore the importance of the homeostatic interplay that balances competition within and between QS systems via cell-cell signaling molecules and environmental cues in the control of virulence gene expression. Elucidation of the fine-tuning of this complex relationship offers novel insights into the regulation of these systems and may inform strategies designed to limit infections caused by P. aeruginosa and related human pathogens.

  8. Lung Dendritic Cells Facilitate Extrapulmonary Bacterial Dissemination during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alva eRosendahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DC-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DC-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection.

  9. A LytM Domain Dictates the Localization of Proteins to the Mother Cell-Forespore Interface during Bacterial Endospore Formation▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Meisner, Jeffrey; Moran, Charles P.

    2010-01-01

    A large number of proteins are known to reside at specific subcellular locations in bacterial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which many of these proteins are anchored at these locations remains unclear. During endospore formation in Bacillus subtilis, several integral membrane proteins are located specifically at the interface of the two adjacent cells of the developing sporangium, the mother cell and forespore. The mother cell membrane protein SpoIIIAH recognizes the cell-cell i...

  10. Fate of deposited cells in an aerobic binary bacterial biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biofilm is a matrix of microbial cells and their extracellular products that is associated with a solid surface. Previous studies on biofilm development have employed only dissolved compounds as growth limiting substrates, without the influence of microbial species invading from the bulk liquid. The goal of this research project was to quantify the kinetics of processes governing suspended biomass turnover in biofilm systems, and the accompanying effects of suspended cell deposition on biofilm population dynamics. Experiments were conducted with two species of bacteria, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 grown on glucose, and Hyphomicrobium ZV620 grown on methanol. Cryptic growth and particulate hydrolysis studies were evaluated, using combinations of these two bacteria, by measuring the uptake of radiolabelled cell lysis products, under batch conditions. Biofilms studies were performed to investigate bacterial deposition, continual biofilm removal by shear induced erosion, and biofilm ecology. Biofilms were developed in a flow cell reactor, under laminar flow conditions. Bacterial species were differentiated by radioactively labelling each species with their carbon substrate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the biofilm ecology of mixed cultures. The equations developed predict biofilm accumulation, as well as substrate and oxygen consumption. Results indicate that cryptic growth will occur for bacteria growing on their own species soluble lysis products and in some cases, bacteria growing on the soluble lysis products of other species. Particulate hydrolysis only occurred for Pseudomonas putida growing on Pseudomonas putida lysis products, but the lack of particulate hydrolysis occurring in the other studies may have been due to the short experimental period

  11. Softness of the bacterial cell wall of Streptococcus mitis as probed by micro-electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, V.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2002-01-01

    Chemical and structural complexity of bacterial cell surfaces complicate accurate quantification of cell surfaces properties. The presence of fibrils, fimbriae or other surface appendages on bacterial cell surfaces largely influence those properties and would therefore play a major function in inter

  12. Putative bacterial interactions from metagenomic knowledge with an integrative systems ecology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordron, Philippe; Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, Maria-Paz; González, Mauricio; Thiele, Sven; Siegel, Anne; Maass, Alejandro; Eveillard, Damien

    2016-02-01

    Following the trend of studies that investigate microbial ecosystems using different metagenomic techniques, we propose a new integrative systems ecology approach that aims to decipher functional roles within a consortium through the integration of genomic and metabolic knowledge at genome scale. For the sake of application, using public genomes of five bacterial strains involved in copper bioleaching: Acidiphilium cryptum, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, we first reconstructed a global metabolic network. Next, using a parsimony assumption, we deciphered sets of genes, called Sets from Genome Segments (SGS), that (1) are close on their respective genomes, (2) take an active part in metabolic pathways and (3) whose associated metabolic reactions are also closely connected within metabolic networks. Overall, this SGS paradigm depicts genomic functional units that emphasize respective roles of bacterial strains to catalyze metabolic pathways and environmental processes. Our analysis suggested that only few functional metabolic genes are horizontally transferred within the consortium and that no single bacterial strain can accomplish by itself the whole copper bioleaching. The use of SGS pinpoints a functional compartmentalization among the investigated species and exhibits putative bacterial interactions necessary for promoting these pathways. PMID:26677108

  13. Principles of bacterial cell-size determination revealed by cell wall synthesis perturbations

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Tropini; Timothy K. Lee; Jen Hsin; Samantha M. Desmarais; Tristan Ursell; Russell D. Monds; Kerwyn Casey Huang

    2014-01-01

    Although bacterial cell morphology is tightly controlled, the principles of size regulation remain elusive. In Escherichia coli, perturbation of cell-wall synthesis often results in similar morphologies, making it difficult to deconvolve the complex genotype-phenotype relationships underlying morphogenesis. Here we modulated cell width through heterologous expression of sequences encoding the essential enzyme PBP2 and through sublethal treatments with drugs that inhibit PBP2 and the MreB cyto...

  14. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations. PMID:26235130

  15. (p)ppGpp and the bacterial cell cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aanisa Nazir; Rajendran Harinarayanan

    2016-06-01

    Genes of the Rel/Spo homolog (RSH) superfamily synthesize and/or hydrolyse the modified nucleotides pppGpp/ppGpp (collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp) and are prevalent across diverse bacteria and in plant chloroplasts. Bacteria accumulate (p)ppGpp in response to nutrient deprivation (generically called the stringent response) and elicit appropriate adaptive responses mainly through the regulation of transcription. Although at different concentrations (p)ppGpp affect the expression of distinct set of genes, the two well-characterized responses are reduction in expression of the protein synthesis machinery and increase in the expression of genes coding for amino acid biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli, the cellular (p)ppGpp level inversely correlates with the growth rate and increasing its concentration decreases the steady state growth rate in a defined growth medium. Since change in growth rate must be accompanied by changes in cell cycle parameters set through the activities of the DNA replication and cell division apparatus, (p)ppGpp could coordinate protein synthesis (cell mass increase) with these processes. Here we review the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial cell cycle regulation.

  16. Phase Diagram of Collective Motion of Bacterial Cells in a Shallow Circular Pool

    OpenAIRE

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Tsukamoto, Shota; Yamamoto, Ken; Katori, Makoto; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The collective motion of bacterial cells in a shallow circular pool is systematically studied using the bacterial species $Bacillus$ $subtilis$. The ratio of cell length to pool diameter (i.e., the reduced cell length) ranges from 0.06 to 0.43 in our experiments. Bacterial cells in a circular pool show various types of collective motion depending on the cell density in the pool and the reduced cell length. The motion is classified into six types, which we call random motion, turbulent motion,...

  17. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping; Bennett, Eric P; Pietz, Greg; Saunders, Kristen; Spence, Jean; Nudelman, Edward; Levery, Steven B; White, Thayer; Neveu, John M; Lane, William S; Bourne, Yves; Olsson, Martin L; Henrissat, Bernard; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-04-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this technology to clinical practice has been the lack of efficient glycosidase enzymes. Here we report two bacterial glycosidase gene families that provide enzymes capable of efficient removal of A and B antigens at neutral pH with low consumption of recombinant enzymes. The crystal structure of a member of the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase family reveals an unusual catalytic mechanism involving NAD+. The enzymatic conversion processes we describe hold promise for achieving the goal of producing universal RBCs, which would improve the blood supply while enhancing the safety of clinical transfusions. PMID:17401360

  18. Bacterial Cell Wall-Induced Arthritis: Chemical Composition and Tissue Distribution of Four Lactobacillus Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Šimelyte, Egle; Rimpiläinen, Marja; Lehtonen, Leena; Zhang, Xiang; Toivanen, Paavo

    2000-01-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls...

  19. Integration of bacterial expansin-like proteins into cellulosome promotes the cellulose degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Cui, Zhenling; Song, Xiangfei; Liu, Ya-Jun; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2016-03-01

    Cellulosomes are multi-enzyme complexes assembled by cellulases and hemicellulases through dockerin-cohesin interactions, which are the most efficient system for the degradation of lignocellulosic resources in nature. Recent genomic analysis of a cellulosome-producing anaerobe Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732 revealed that two expansin-like proteins, Clocl_1298 and Clocl_1862, contain a dockerin module, which suggests that they are components of the cellulosome. Bacterial expansin-like proteins do not have hydrolytic activities, but can facilitate the degradation of cellulosic biomass via synergistic effects with cellulases. In this study, the synergistic effect of the expansin-like proteins with both native and designer cellulosomes was investigated. The free expansin-like proteins, including expansin-like domains of Clocl_1298 and Clocl_1862, as well as a well-studied bacterial expansin-like protein BsEXLX1 from Bacillus subtilis, promoted the cellulose degradation by native cellulosomes, indicating the cellulosomal expansin-like proteins have the synergistic function. When they were integrated into a trivalent designer cellulosome, the synergistic effect was further amplified. The sequence and structure analyses indicated that these cellulosomal expansin-like proteins share the conserved functional mechanism with other bacterial expansin-like proteins. These results indicated that non-catalytic expansin-like proteins in the cellulosome can enhance the activity of the cellulosome in lignocellulose degradation. The involvement of functional expansin-like proteins in the cellulosome also implies new physiological functions of bacterial expansin-like proteins and cellulosomes. PMID:26521249

  20. Host response to respiratory bacterial pathogens as identified by integrated analysis of human gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of infectious death in the world and a major health concern complicated by the rise of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Therapeutics that modulate host genes essential for pathogen infectivity could potentially avoid multi-drug resistance and provide a wider scope of treatment options. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of published human gene expression data generated under challenges from the gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively. We applied a previously described differential gene and pathway enrichment analysis pipeline to publicly available host mRNA GEO datasets resulting from exposure to bacterial infection. We found 72 canonical human pathways common between four GEO datasets, representing P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae. Although the majority of these pathways are known to be involved with immune response, we found several interesting new interactions such as the SUMO1 pathway that might have a role in bacterial infections. Furthermore, 36 host-bacterial pathways were also shared with our previous results for respiratory virus host gene expression. Based on our pathway analysis we propose several drug-repurposing opportunities supported by the literature.

  1. Integrally heated electrochemical cell method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, J.A.; Kane, W.T.; Brouneus, H.A.; Layton, M.M.; Walsh, P.L.

    1987-04-21

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising: an electrolyte; integral cell electrode/heater means contacting the electrolyte and adapted for heating at least a portion of the electrolyte to an elevated temperature for ionic conduction operation; a pair of lead means each extending from a different location on the integral cell electrode/heater means for coupling the integral cell electrode/heater means in a circuit across an electric current source; a second cell electrode means separately contacting the electrolyte and adapted for developing an ionic conduction across the heated electrolyte and a related emf with the integral cell electrode/heater. A method is described of operating an apparatus for sensing a particular gaseous substance, the apparatus comprising an electrochemical cell heated to an elevated temperature for ionic conduction operation and circuit means for responding to ionic emf developed by the electrochemical cell.

  2. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  3. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  4. Integrated Electrowetting Nanoinjector for Single Cell Transfection

    OpenAIRE

    Elaheh Shekaramiz; Ganeshkumar Varadarajalu; Day, Philip J.; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2016-01-01

    Single cell transfection techniques are essential to understand the heterogeneity between cells. We have developed an integrated electrowetting nanoinjector (INENI) to transfect single cells. The high transfection efficiency, controlled dosage delivery and ease of INENI fabrication promote the widespread application of the INENI in cell transfection assays.

  5. Selective removal of DNA from dead cells of mixed bacterial communities by use of ethidium monoazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocker, Andreas; Camper, Anne K

    2006-03-01

    The distinction between viable and dead bacterial cells poses a major challenge in microbial diagnostics. Due to the persistence of DNA in the environment after cells have lost viability, DNA-based quantification methods overestimate the number of viable cells in mixed populations or even lead to false-positive results in the absence of viable cells. On the other hand, RNA-based diagnostic methods, which circumvent this problem, are technically demanding and suffer from some drawbacks. A promising and easy-to-use alternative utilizing the DNA-intercalating dye ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) was published recently. This chemical is known to penetrate only into "dead" cells with compromised cell membrane integrity. Subsequent photoinduced cross-linking was reported to inhibit PCR amplification of DNA from dead cells. We provide evidence here that in addition to inhibition of amplification, most of the DNA from dead cells is actually lost during the DNA extraction procedure, probably together with cell debris which goes into the pellet fraction. Exposure of bacteria to increasing stress and higher proportions of dead cells in defined populations led to increasing loss of genomic DNA. Experiments were performed using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as model pathogens and using real-time PCR for their quantification. Results showed that EMA treatment of mixed populations of these two species provides a valuable tool for selective removal of DNA of nonviable cells by using conventional extraction protocols. Furthermore, we provide evidence that prior to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, EMA treatment of a mature mixed-population drinking-water biofilm containing a substantial proportion of dead cells can result in community fingerprints dramatically different from those for an untreated biofilm. The interpretation of such fingerprints can have important implications in the field of microbial ecology. PMID:16517648

  6. Cell Wall Integrity Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that is responsible for protecting the cell from rapid changes in external osmotic potential. The wall is also critical for cell expansion during growth and morphogenesis. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the various signal transduction pathways that allow cells to monitor the state of the cell wall and respond to environmental challenges to this structure. The cell wall integrity signaling pathway controlled by the small...

  7. CLA-1 and its splicing variant CLA-2 mediate bacterial adhesion and cytosolic bacterial invasion in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Kurlander, Roger; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Baranova, Irina N.; CHEN, ZHIGANG; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Tsokos, Maria; Malide, Daniela; Basso, Federica; Remaley, Alan; Csako, Gyorgy; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Patterson, Amy P.

    2006-01-01

    CD36 and LIMPII analog 1, CLA-1, and its splicing variant, CLA-2 (SR-BI and SR-BII in rodents), are human high density lipoprotein receptors with an identical extracellular domain which binds a spectrum of ligands including bacterial cell wall components. In this study, CLA-1- and CLA-2-stably transfected HeLa and HEK293 cells demonstrated several-fold increases in the uptake of various bacteria over mock-transfected cells. All bacteria tested, including both Gram-negatives (Escherichia coli ...

  8. Resonant mass biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit; Akin, Demir; Bashir, Rashid

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a surface micromachined cantilever beam based oscillator detector for biological applications. This study used a novel microfabrication technique of merged epitaxial lateral overgrowth (MELO) and chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to fabricate thin, low stress, single-crystal silicon cantilever beams. Vibration spectra of the cantilever beams, excited by thermal and ambient noise, was measured in air using a Digital Instrument Dimension 3100 Series scanning probe microscope (SPM). The cantilever beams were calibrated by obtaining the spring constant using the added-mass method. The sensors were used to detect the presence of Listeria innocua bacteria by applying increasing concentration of bacteria suspension on the same cantilever beam and measuring the resonant frequency changes in air. Cantilever beams were also used to detect the mass of the adsorbed antibodies and used to show selective capture of bacterial cells. The results indicate that the developed biosensor is capable of rapid and ultra-sensitive detection of bacteria and promises significant potential for enhancement of microbiological research and diagnostics.

  9. Bacterial colonization of host cells in the absence of cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey D Gilk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. DHCR24(-/- MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24(-/- MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24(-/- MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in -cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated α(Vβ(3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24(-/- MEFs lacked the CD63-positive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions.

  10. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping;

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  11. EEVD motif of heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of abortion-inducing pathogens by trophoblast giant (TG cells is a key event in infectious abortion. However, little is known about phagocytic functions of TG cells against the pathogens. Here we show that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 contributes to bacterial uptake by TG cells and the EEVD motif of Hsc70 plays an important role in this. Methods Brucella abortus and Listeria monocytogenes were used as the bacterial antigen in this study. Recombinant proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains were constructed and confirmation of the binding capacity to Hsc70 was assessed by ELISA. The recombinant TPR proteins were used for investigation of the effect of TPR proteins on bacterial uptake by TG cells and on pregnancy in mice. Results The monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial uptake by TG cells reacted with the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Bacterial TPR proteins bound to the C-terminal of Hsc70 through its EEVD motif and this binding inhibited bacterial uptake by TG cells. Infectious abortion was also prevented by blocking the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that surface located Hsc70 on TG cells mediates the uptake of pathogenic bacteria and proteins containing the TPR domain inhibit the function of Hsc70 by binding to its EEVD motif. These molecules may be useful in the development of methods for preventing infectious abortion.

  12. STD NMR spectroscopy: a case study of fosfomycin binding interactions in living bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milagre, Cintia D.F.; Cabeca, Luis Fernando; Martins, Lucas G.; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: anita@iq [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    A saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiment was successfully employed to observe the binding interactions of fosfomycin resistant and non-resistant bacterial strains using living cell suspensions, without the need for isotopic labelling of the ligand or receptor. (author)

  13. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  14. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Kozjak-Pavlovic

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m. Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m. The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection.

  15. Phase Diagram of Collective Motion of Bacterial Cells in a Shallow Circular Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Ken; Katori, Makoto; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The collective motion of bacterial cells in a shallow circular pool is systematically studied using the bacterial species $Bacillus$ $subtilis$. The ratio of cell length to pool diameter (i.e., the reduced cell length) ranges from 0.06 to 0.43 in our experiments. Bacterial cells in a circular pool show various types of collective motion depending on the cell density in the pool and the reduced cell length. The motion is classified into six types, which we call random motion, turbulent motion, one-way rotational motion, two-way rotational motion, random oscillatory motion, and ordered oscillatory motion. Two critical values of reduced cell lengths are evaluated, at which drastic changes in collective motion are induced. A phase diagram is proposed in which the six phases are arranged.

  16. A Bacterial Analysis Platform: An Integrated System for Analysing Bacterial Whole Genome Sequencing Data for Clinical Diagnostics and Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Ahrenfeldt, Johanne; Bellod Cisneros, Jose Luis;

    2016-01-01

    and antimicrobial resistance genes. A short printable report for each sample will be provided and an Excel spreadsheet containing all the metadata and a summary of the results for all submitted samples can be downloaded. The pipeline was benchmarked using datasets previously used to test the...... web-based tools we developed a single pipeline for batch uploading of whole genome sequencing data from multiple bacterial isolates. The pipeline will automatically identify the bacterial species and, if applicable, assemble the genome, identify the multilocus sequence type, plasmids, virulence genes...... platform was developed and made publicly available, providing easy-to-use automated analysis of bacterial whole genome sequencing data. The platform may be of immediate relevance as a guide for investigators using whole genome sequencing for clinical diagnostics and surveillance. The platform is freely...

  17. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Tu; Jia Yin; Jun Fu; Jennifer Herrmann; Yuezhong Li; Yulong Yin; Francis Stewart, A.; Rolf Müller; Youming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and re...

  18. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard;

    2010-01-01

    plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  19. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson CY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Christa Y Watson, Ramon M Molina, Andressa Louzada, Kimberly M Murdaugh, Thomas C Donaghey, Joseph D BrainCenter for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USABackground: Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV administration.Materials and methods: First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively.Results: We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, reflecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of

  20. Toxicity of a polymer-graphene oxide composite against bacterial planktonic cells, biofilms, and mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías Carpio, Isis E.; Santos, Catherine M.; Wei, Xin; Rodrigues, Debora F.

    2012-07-01

    It is critical to develop highly effective antimicrobial agents that are not harmful to humans and do not present adverse effects on the environment. Although antimicrobial studies of graphene-based nanomaterials are still quite limited, some researchers have paid particular attention to such nanocomposites as promising candidates for the next generation of antimicrobial agents. The polyvinyl-N-carbazole (PVK)-graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite (PVK-GO), which contains only 3 wt% of GO well-dispersed in a 97 wt% PVK matrix, presents excellent antibacterial properties without significant cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. The high polymer content in this nanocomposite makes future large-scale material manufacturing possible in a high-yield process of adiabatic bulk polymerization. In this study, the toxicity of PVK-GO was assessed with planktonic microbial cells, biofilms, and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. The antibacterial effects were evaluated against two Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli and Cupriavidus metallidurans; and two Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis and Rhodococcus opacus. The results show that the PVK-GO nanocomposite presents higher antimicrobial effects than the pristine GO. The effectiveness of the PVK-GO in solution was demonstrated as the nanocomposite ``encapsulated'' the bacterial cells, which led to reduced microbial metabolic activity and cell death. The fact that the PVK-GO did not present significant cytotoxicity to fibroblast cells offers a great opportunity for potential applications in important biomedical and industrial fields.It is critical to develop highly effective antimicrobial agents that are not harmful to humans and do not present adverse effects on the environment. Although antimicrobial studies of graphene-based nanomaterials are still quite limited, some researchers have paid particular attention to such nanocomposites as promising candidates for the next generation of antimicrobial agents. The polyvinyl

  1. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmir; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip

    2015-05-01

    A method for in vitro identification of individual bacterial cells is presented. The method is based on a combination of optical tweezers for spatial trapping of individual bacterial cells and Raman microspectroscopy for acquisition of spectral "Raman fingerprints" obtained from the trapped cell. Here, Raman spectra were taken from the biofilm-forming cells without the influence of an extracellular matrix and were compared with biofilm-negative cells. Results of principal component analyses of Raman spectra enabled us to distinguish between the two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, we propose that Raman tweezers can become the technique of choice for a clearer understanding of the processes involved in bacterial biofilms which constitute a highly privileged way of life for bacteria, protected from the external environment.

  2. Cell order in bacterial swarms arises from reversals of moving direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yilin; Jiang, Yi; Kaiser, Dale; Alber, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial swarms are a beautiful example of the emergent behavior of systems of self-propelled rods. In swarming rod-shaped bacteria cells move smoothly even though they are packed together in high density. Experimental evidence shows that long-distance signaling is not required for bacterial swarming. It naturally raises the question how a swarm develops its order. Using a biomechanical model, we show here that regular periodic reversals of gliding direction in general systems of self-propelled rod shaped bacteria can lead to the extensive ordering of cells. We also show that an optimal reversal period and an optimal cell shape exist for producing such order. Given the observations of reversing behavior in several bacterial species,we suggest that the capacity to swarm depends less on the motility engine employed by individual cells, but more on the behavioral algorithm that enhances the flow of densely packed cells near the swarming edge.

  3. Integrated continuous winemaking process involving sequential alcoholic and malolactic fermentations with immobilized cells

    OpenAIRE

    Genisheva, Zlatina Asenova; Mota, A; Mussatto, Solange I.; Oliveira, J.M.; Teixeira, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated winemaking process – including sequential alcoholic and malolactic fermentations operated continuously – was developed. For the continuous alcoholic fermentation, yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were immobilized either on grape stems or on grape skins, while bacterial cells (Oenococcus oeni) used for conducting continuous malolactic fermentation were immobilized on grape skins only. The produced wines were subjected to chemical analysis by HPLC (ethanol, glycerol, sugars ...

  4. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Norris, Steven J; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and ...

  5. Enhanced Toxic Metal Accumulation in Engineered Bacterial Cells Expressing Arabidopsis thaliana Phytochelatin Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Cuiné, Stéphan; Carrier, Patrick; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Luu, Doan-Trung; Peltier, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-binding cysteine-rich peptides, enzymatically synthesized in plants and yeasts from glutathione in response to heavy metal stress by PC synthase (EC 2.3.2.15). In an attempt to increase the ability of bacterial cells to accumulate heavy metals, the Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding PC synthase (AtPCS) was expressed in Escherichia coli. A marked accumulation of PCs was observed in vivo together with a decrease in the glutathione cellular content. When bacterial ...

  6. Type 1 pilus-mediated bacterial invasion of bladder epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Juan J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Schilling, Joel D.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Most strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encode filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili. We have determined that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, mediates not only bacterial adherence, but also invasion of human bladder epithelial cells. In contrast, adherence mediated by another pilus adhesin, PapG, did not initiate bacterial internalization. FimH-mediated invasion required localized host actin reorganization, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activation and host...

  7. TLR4-dependent hepcidin expression by myeloid cells in response to bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Peyssonnaux, Carole; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Datta, Vivekanand; Lauth, Xavier; Johnson, Randall S; Nizet, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Hepcidin is an antimicrobial peptide secreted by the liver during inflammation that plays a central role in mammalian iron homeostasis. Here we demonstrate the endogenous expression of hepcidin by macrophages and neutrophils in vitro and in vivo. These myeloid cell types produced hepcidin in response to bacterial pathogens in a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent fashion. Conversely, bacterial stimulation of macrophages triggered a TLR4-dependent reduction in the iron exporter ferroportin. ...

  8. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. PMID:24681053

  9. Selective Removal of DNA from Dead Cells of Mixed Bacterial Communities by Use of Ethidium Monoazide

    OpenAIRE

    Nocker, Andreas; Camper, Anne K.

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between viable and dead bacterial cells poses a major challenge in microbial diagnostics. Due to the persistence of DNA in the environment after cells have lost viability, DNA-based quantification methods overestimate the number of viable cells in mixed populations or even lead to false-positive results in the absence of viable cells. On the other hand, RNA-based diagnostic methods, which circumvent this problem, are technically demanding and suffer from some drawbacks. A prom...

  10. Bacterial ‘Cell’ Phones: Do cell phones carry potential pathogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran Chawla; Chiranjay Mukhopadhayay; Bimala Gurung; Priya Bhate; Indira Bairy

    2009-01-01

    Cell phones are important companions for professionals especially health care workers (HCWs) for better communication in hospital. The present study compared the nature of the growth of potentially pathogenic bacterial flora on cell phones in hospital and community. 75% cell phones from both the categories grew at least one potentially pathogenic organism. Cell phones from HCWs grew significantly more potential pathogens like MRSA (20%), Acinetobacter species (5%), Pseudomonas species (2.5%) ...

  11. Regulation of the immune response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide by adherent cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Citron, M O; Michael, J G

    1981-01-01

    Immune response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide is usually short lived, but it often reappears without additional stimulus in a cyclic fashion. Activated adherent cells, presumably macrophages, were found to have a role in the reduction of the immune response to Escherichia coli O127 lipopolysaccharide. The suppressive activity of the adherent cells was abrogated before renewal of the responsiveness.

  12. Microspectrometric insights on the uptake of antibiotics at the single bacterial cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquin, Bertrand; Maigre, Laure; Pinet, Elizabeth; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Stavenger, Robert A.; Mills, Scott; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance is a significant health issue. A key challenge, particularly in Gram-negative antibacterial research, is to better understand membrane permeation of antibiotics in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Passing through the membrane barrier to reach the required concentration inside the bacterium is a pivotal step for most antibacterials. Spectrometric methodology has been developed to detect drugs inside bacteria and recent studies have focused on bacterial cell imaging. Ultimately, we seek to use this method to identify pharmacophoric groups which improve penetration, and therefore accumulation, of small-molecule antibiotics inside bacteria. We developed a method to quantify the time scale of antibiotic accumulation in living bacterial cells. Tunable ultraviolet excitation provided by DISCO beamline (synchrotron Soleil) combined with microscopy allows spectroscopic analysis of the antibiotic signal in individual bacterial cells. Robust controls and measurement of the crosstalk between fluorescence channels can provide real time quantification of drug. This technique represents a new method to assay drug translocation inside the cell and therefore incorporate rational drug design to impact antibiotic uptake. PMID:26656111

  13. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    (ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings on titanium. We investigate the ability of a high density poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) coating to resist bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from three clinically relevant bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus...... cultures. The high density PLL-g-PEG coatings completely resisted bacterial colonization, whereas conventional coatings couldn’t resist colonization by S. epidermidis. The unique ability of S. epidermidis to colonize conventional PLL-g-PEG coatings was investigated by looking into the composition of S......Bacteria initiate attachment to the surfaces with the aid of different extracellular polymers. To quantitatively study how these polymers mediate bacterial adhesion and possibly their interactions, it is essential to go down to single cell level, with in mind that cell-to-cell variation should be...

  14. Search for MicroRNAs Expressed by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens in Infected Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Finethy, Ryan; Saka, Hector A.; Xet-Mull, Ana M.; Sisk, Dana M.; Smith, Kristen L. Jurcic; Lee, Sunhee; Coers, Jörn; Valdivia, Raphael H.; Tobin, David M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin. PMID:25184567

  15. Search for microRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens in infected mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Furuse

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼ 23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin.

  16. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment. PMID:26472159

  17. Solving the mysteries of the bacterial cell – application of novel techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Donczew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed how the development of fluorescent markers, triggered by the discovery of green fluorescence protein and its other color variants leading to the establishment of methods for studies of protein interactions with application of fluorescent proteins, affected the view of bacterial cell organization. Application of the new microscopic methods allowed localization of proteins and chromosomal regions, and observation of their migration in real time. These studies revealed the spatial organization of bacterial cells which includes specific subcellular localization of proteins, the presence of dynamic cytoskeletal structures, orchestrated and active segregation of chromosomes, and spatiotemporal gene regulation.

  18. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  19. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.W.; Collins, S.A.; Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 10(6) bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, "planktonic" state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system. PMID:27148183

  1. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C.; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 106 bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, “planktonic” state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system.

  2. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC, which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  3. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms. (paper)

  4. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  5. Fluorescence imaging for bacterial cell biology: from localization to dynamics, from ensembles to single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhizhong; Carballido-López, Rut

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins and developments in superresolution (nanoscopy) and single-molecule techniques bring high sensitivity, speed, and one order of magnitude gain in spatial resolution to live-cell imaging. These technologies have only recently been applied to prokaryotic cell biology, revealing the exquisite subcellular organization of bacterial cells. Here, we review the parallel evolution of fluorescence microscopy methods and their application to bacteria, mainly drawing examples from visualizing actin-like MreB proteins in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We describe the basic principles of nanoscopy and conventional techniques and their advantages and limitations to help microbiologists choose the most suitable technique for their biological question. Looking ahead, multidimensional live-cell nanoscopy combined with computational image analysis tools, systems biology approaches, and mathematical modeling will provide movie-like, mechanistic, and quantitative description of molecular events in bacterial cells. PMID:25002084

  6. Heterotrophic free-living and particle-bound bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its downstream tributaries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S Harsha; Sadanand M Yamakanamardi; M Mahadevaswamy

    2007-03-01

    This is the first comprehensive study on planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its important tributaries in Karnataka State, India. The initial hypothesis that the mean cell size of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria in the four tributaries are markedly different from each other and also from that in the main river Cauvery was rejected, because all five watercourses showed similar planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size. Examination of the correlation between mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables showed four correlations in the river Arkavathy and two in the river Shimsha. Regression analysis revealed that 18% of the variation in mean heterotrophic free-living bacterial cell size was due to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to surface water velocity (SWV) in the river Cauvery and 11% due to temperature in the river Kapila. Heterotrophic particle-bound bacterial cell size variation was 28% due to chloride and BOD in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to conductivity in the river Kapila and 8% due to calcium in the river Cauvery. This type of relationship between heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables suggests that, though the mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size was similar in all the five water courses, different sets of environmental variables apparently control the heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the various water bodies studied in this investigation. The possible cause for this environmental (bottom–up) control is discussed.

  7. Enteric bacterial invasion of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro is dramatically enhanced using a vertical diffusion chamber model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Neveda; Mills, Dominic C; Wren, Brendan W; Dorrell, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of bacterial pathogens with host cells have been investigated extensively using in vitro cell culture methods. However as such cell culture assays are performed under aerobic conditions, these in vitro models may not accurately represent the in vivo environment in which the host-pathogen interactions take place. We have developed an in vitro model of infection that permits the coculture of bacteria and host cells under different medium and gas conditions. The Vertical Diffusion Chamber (VDC) model mimics the conditions in the human intestine where bacteria will be under conditions of very low oxygen whilst tissue will be supplied with oxygen from the blood stream. Placing polarized intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) monolayers grown in Snapwell inserts into a VDC creates separate apical and basolateral compartments. The basolateral compartment is filled with cell culture medium, sealed and perfused with oxygen whilst the apical compartment is filled with broth, kept open and incubated under microaerobic conditions. Both Caco-2 and T84 IECs can be maintained in the VDC under these conditions without any apparent detrimental effects on cell survival or monolayer integrity. Coculturing experiments performed with different C. jejuni wild-type strains and different IEC lines in the VDC model with microaerobic conditions in the apical compartment reproducibly result in an increase in the number of interacting (almost 10-fold) and intracellular (almost 100-fold) bacteria compared to aerobic culture conditions. The environment created in the VDC model more closely mimics the environment encountered by C. jejuni in the human intestine and highlights the importance of performing in vitro infection assays under conditions that more closely mimic the in vivo reality. We propose that use of the VDC model will allow new interpretations of the interactions between bacterial pathogens and host cells. PMID:24192850

  8. Contribution of bacterial cell nitrogen to soil humic fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living cells of Serratia marcescens, uniformly labelled with 15N, were added to samples of maple (Acer saccharum) and black spruce (Picea mariana) forest soils. After different periods of incubation from zero time to 100 days, the soils were subjected to alkali-acid and phenol extraction to provide humic acid, fulvic acid, humin and 'humoprotein' fractions. Significant amounts of the cell nitrogen were recovered in the humic and fulvic acids immediately after addition. After incubation, less cell nitrogen appeared in the humic acid and more in the fulvic acid. The amount of cell nitrogen recovered in the humin fraction increased with incubation. Roughly 5 to 10 per cent of the added cell nitrogen was found as amino acid nitrogen from humoprotein in a phenol extract of the humic acid. The data are consistent with the occurrence of co-precipitation of biologically labile biomass nitrogen compounds with humic polymers during the alkaline extraction procedure involved in the humic-fulvic fractionation. (orig.)

  9. Enhanced metalloadsorption of bacterial cells displaying poly-His peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, C.; Cebolla, A.; Lorenzo, V. de [CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-08-01

    The properties of Escherichia coli cells, acquired by cell surface presentation of one or two hexahistidine (His) clusters carried by the outer membrane LamB protein, have been examined. Strains producing LamB hybrids with the His chains accumulated greater than 11-fold more Cd{sup 2} than E. coli cells expressing the protein without the His insert. Furthermore, the hexa-His chains on the cell surface caused cells to adhere reversibly to a Ni{sup 2+}-containing solid matrix in a metal-dependent fashion. Thus, expression of poly-His peptides enables bacteria to act as a metalloaffinity adsorbent. These results open up the possibility for biosorption of heavy ions using engineered microorganisms. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  11. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process. PMID:27554145

  12. Effect of Structure on the Interactions between Five Natural Antimicrobial Compounds and Phospholipids of Bacterial Cell Membrane on Model Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella W. Nowotarska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of the naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde, and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. The lipid monolayers consist of 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE, 1,2-dihexa- decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol (DPPG, and 1,1',2,2'-tetratetradecanoyl cardiolipin (cardiolipin. Surface pressure–area (π-A and surface potential–area (Δψ-A isotherms were measured to monitor changes in the thermodynamic and physical properties of the lipid monolayers. Results of the study indicated that the five compounds modified the three lipid monolayer structures by integrating into the monolayer, forming aggregates of antimicrobial –lipid complexes, reducing the packing effectiveness of the lipids, increasing the membrane fluidity, and altering the total dipole moment in the monolayer membrane model. The interactions of the five antimicrobial compounds with bacterial phospholipids depended on both the structure of the antimicrobials and the composition of the monolayers. The observed experimental results provide insight into the mechanism of the molecular interactions between naturally-occurring antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of the bacterial cell membrane that govern activities.

  13. Streptomyces: A Screening Tool for Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I.; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J.; Nodwell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors. PMID:25256667

  14. Effects of bacterial cells and two types of extracellular polymers on bioclogging of sand columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Sun, Zhaoyue; Wang, Leyun

    2016-04-01

    Microbially induced reductions in the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, of natural porous media, conventionally called bioclogging, occurs frequently in natural and engineered subsurface systems. Bioclogging can affect artificial groundwater recharge, in situ bioremediation of contaminated aquifers, or permeable reactive barriers. In this study, we designed a series of percolation experiments to simulate the growth and metabolism of bacteria in sand columns. The experimental results showed that the bacterial cell amount gradually increased to a maximum of 8.91 log10 CFU/g sand at 144 h during the bioclogging process, followed by a decrease to 7.89 log10 CFU/g sand until 336 h. The same variation pattern was found for the concentration of tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS), which had a peak value of 220.76 μg/g sand at 144 h. In the same experiments, the concentration of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) increased sharply from 54.45 to 575.57 μg/g sand in 192 h, followed by a slight decline to 505.04 μg/g sand. The increase of the bacterial cell amount along with the other two concentrations could reduce the Ks of porous media, but their relative contributions varied to a large degree during different percolation stages. At the beginning of the tests (e.g., 48 h before), bacterial cells were likely responsible for the Ks reduction of porous media because no increase was found for the other two concentrations. With the accumulation of cells and EPS production from 48 to 144 h, both were important for the reduction of Ks. However, in the late period of percolation tests from 144 to 192 h, LB-EPS was probably responsible for the further reduction of Ks, as the bacterial cell amount and TB-EPS concentration decreased. Quantitative contributions of bacterial cell amount and the two types of extracellular polymers to Ks reductions were also evaluated.

  15. Biosynthesis of a Fully Functional Cyclotide inside Living Bacterial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R H; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Shekhtman, A

    2007-04-05

    The cyclotide MCoTI-II is a powerful trypsin inhibitor recently isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis, a plant member of cucurbitaceae family. We report for the first time the in vivo biosynthesis of natively-folded MCoTI-II inside live E. coli cells. Our biomimetic approach involves the intracellular backbone cyclization of a linear cyclotide-intein fusion precursor mediated by a modified protein splicing domain. The cyclized peptide then spontaneously folds into its native conformation. The use of genetically engineered E. coli cells containing mutations in the glutathione and thioredoxin reductase genes considerably improves the production of folded MCoTI-II in vivo. Biochemical and structural characterization of the recombinant MCoTI-II confirmed its identity. Biosynthetic access to correctly-folded cyclotides allows the possibility of generating cell-based combinatorial libraries that can be screened inside living cells for their ability to modulate or inhibit cellular processes.

  16. Bacterial toxins fuel disease progression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Lindahl, Lise M;

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) bacterial infections constitute a major clinical problem caused by compromised skin barrier and a progressive immunodeficiency. Indeed, the majority of patients with advanced disease die from infections with bacteria, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus...

  17. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1: a biomarker for bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Determann; M. Weisfelt; J. de Gans; A. van der Ende; M.J. Schultz; D. van de Beek

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1) in CSF can serve as a biomarker for the presence of bacterial meningitis and outcome in patients with this disease. Design: Retrospective study of diagnostic accuracy. Setting and patients: CSF was coll

  18. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  19. Specific labeling of peptidoglycan precursors as a tool for bacterial cell wall studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Olrichs, N.K.; Breukink, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Wall chart: The predominant component of the bacterial cell wall, peptidoglycan, consists of long alternating stretches of aminosugar subunits interlinked in a large three-dimensional network and is formed from precursors through several cytosolic and membrane-bound steps. The high tolerance of the

  20. The Role of Lipid Domains in Bacterial Cell Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Katarína Muchová; Imrich Barák

    2013-01-01

    Membranes are vital structures for cellular life forms. As thin, hydrophobic films, they provide a physical barrier separating the aqueous cytoplasm from the outside world or from the interiors of other cellular compartments. They maintain a selective permeability for the import and export of water-soluble compounds, enabling the living cell to maintain a stable chemical environment for biological processes. Cell membranes are primarily composed of two crucial substances, lipids and proteins....

  1. Spring constants and adhesive properties of native bacterial biofilm cells measured by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, C B; Ferguson, M A; Aidala, K E; Spain, E M; Núñez, M E

    2008-11-15

    Bacterial biofilms were imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their elasticity and adhesion to the AFM tip were determined from a series of tip extension and retraction cycles. Though the five bacterial strains studied included both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria and both environmental and laboratory strains, all formed simple biofilms on glass surfaces. Cellular spring constants, determined from the extension portion of the force cycle, varied between 0.16+/-0.01 and 0.41+/-0.01 N/m, where larger spring constants were measured for Gram-positive cells than for Gram-negative cells. The nonlinear regime in the extension curve depended upon the biomolecules on the cell surface: the extension curves for the smooth Gram-negative bacterial strains with the longest lipopolysaccharides on their surface had a larger nonlinear region than the rough bacterial strain with shorter lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Adhesive forces between the retracting silicon nitride tip and the cells varied between cell types in terms of the force components, the distance components, and the number of adhesion events. The Gram-negative cells' adhesion to the tip showed the longest distance components, sometimes more than 1 microm, whereas the shortest distance adhesion events were measured between the two Gram-positive cell types and the tip. Fixation of free-swimming planktonic cells by NHS and EDC perturbed both the elasticity and the adhesive properties of the cells. Here we consider the biochemical meaning of the measured physical properties of simple biofilms and implications to the colonization of surfaces in the first stages of biofilm formation. PMID:18815013

  2. Bacterial neuraminidase increases IL-8 production in lung epithelial cells via NF-κB-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial neuraminidase, a sialic acid-degrading enzyme, is one of the virulent factors produced in pathogenic bacteria like as other bacterial components. However little is known about whether bacterial neuraminidase can initiate or modify a cellular response, such as cytokine production, in epithelial cells at infection and inflammation. We demonstrate here that bacterial neuraminidase, but not heat-inactivated neuraminidase, up-regulates expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein in lung epithelial A549 and NCI-H292 cells. We also show that bacterial neuraminidase significantly up-regulates IL-8 promoter activity as well as nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) reporter activity. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB signaling suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression induced by bacterial neuraminidase. Taken together, desialylation-induced IL-8 production in lung epithelial cells may play an important role in infection-associated inflammatory events.

  3. Note: An automated image analysis method for high-throughput classification of surface-bound bacterial cell motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Simon; Syal, Karan; Tao, Nongjian; Wang, Shaopeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a Single-Cell Motion Characterization System (SiCMoCS) to automatically extract bacterial cell morphological features from microscope images and use those features to automatically classify cell motion for rod shaped motile bacterial cells. In some imaging based studies, bacteria cells need to be attached to the surface for time-lapse observation of cellular processes such as cell membrane-protein interactions and membrane elasticity. These studies often generate large volumes of images. Extracting accurate bacterial cell morphology features from these images is critical for quantitative assessment. Using SiCMoCS, we demonstrated simultaneous and automated motion tracking and classification of hundreds of individual cells in an image sequence of several hundred frames. This is a significant improvement from traditional manual and semi-automated approaches to segmenting bacterial cells based on empirical thresholds, and a first attempt to automatically classify bacterial motion types for motile rod shaped bacterial cells, which enables rapid and quantitative analysis of various types of bacterial motion. PMID:26724085

  4. Note: An automated image analysis method for high-throughput classification of surface-bound bacterial cell motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Simon; Syal, Karan; Tao, Nongjian; Wang, Shaopeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a Single-Cell Motion Characterization System (SiCMoCS) to automatically extract bacterial cell morphological features from microscope images and use those features to automatically classify cell motion for rod shaped motile bacterial cells. In some imaging based studies, bacteria cells need to be attached to the surface for time-lapse observation of cellular processes such as cell membrane-protein interactions and membrane elasticity. These studies often generate large volumes of images. Extracting accurate bacterial cell morphology features from these images is critical for quantitative assessment. Using SiCMoCS, we demonstrated simultaneous and automated motion tracking and classification of hundreds of individual cells in an image sequence of several hundred frames. This is a significant improvement from traditional manual and semi-automated approaches to segmenting bacterial cells based on empirical thresholds, and a first attempt to automatically classify bacterial motion types for motile rod shaped bacterial cells, which enables rapid and quantitative analysis of various types of bacterial motion.

  5. Inclusion bodies, bacterial cells and compositions containing them and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Veciana Miró, Jaume; Ratera Bastardas, Inmaculada; Díez Gil, César; Villaverde Corrales, Antonio Pedro; Vázquez Gómez, Esther; García Fruitós, Elena

    2008-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to an isolated inclusion body comprising a polypeptide, characterised in that such inclusion body is in particulate formo The present invention also refers to a bacterial cell comprising said inclusion body. The present invention additionally refers to a composition comprising said inclusion body and a eukaryotic cell. The present invention moreover refers to a composition comprising said inclusion body and animal or plant tissue. The present invent...

  6. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of li...

  7. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a combination of high-resolution pulse-chase fluorescence microscopy, 3D computational microscopy, and detailed mechanistic simulations to explore how spatial patterning results in uniform growth and maintenance of cell shape. We show that growth is happening in discrete bursts randomly distributed over the cell surface, with a well-defined mean size and average rate. We further use these techniques to explore the effects of division and cell wall disrupting antibiotics, like cephalexin and A22, respectively, on the patterning of cell wall growth in E. coli. Finally, we explore the spatial correlation between presence of the bacterial actin-like cytoskeletal protein, MreB, and local cell wall growth. Together these techniques form a powerful method for exploring the detailed dynamics and involvement of antibiotics and cell wall-associated proteins in bacterial cell growth.[4pt] In collaboration with Kerwyn Huang, Stanford University.

  8. A novel mechanism of bacterial toxin transfer within host blood cell-derived microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-lie Ståhl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system.

  9. Metabolism of bacterial cells bound to solid carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escherichia coli 2260 cells bound to solid carriers (iodo-and bromoacetyl cellulose) were incubated in the Davis mineral medium and changes in respiratory activity, ATP level, 14C-valine and 14C-adenine incorporation and the number of bacteria able to multiply were investigated. As compared with suspended cells, no significant changes in the rate and capacity of the metabolic processes studied were recorded. Iodoacetyl cellulose had the smallest effect on the rates of nucleic acids and protein syntheses. (author). 3 figs., 2 tabs., 11 refs

  10. Cell wall mechanical properties as measured with bacterial thread made from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mendelson, N H; Thwaites, J J

    1989-01-01

    Engineering approaches used in the study of textile fibers have been applied to the measurement of mechanical properties of bacterial cell walls by using the Bacillus subtilis bacterial thread system. Improved methods have been developed for the production of thread and for measuring its mechanical properties. The best specimens of thread produced from cultures of strain FJ7 grown in TB medium at 20 degrees C varied in diameter by a factor of 1.09 over a 30-mm thread length. The stress-strain...

  11. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-02-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies. PMID:26907343

  12. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Chieng Yeo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  13. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  14. DNA-crosslinker cisplatin eradicates bacterial persister cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thammajun L; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-09-01

    For all bacteria, nearly every antimicrobial fails since a subpopulation of the bacteria enter a dormant state known as persistence, in which the antimicrobials are rendered ineffective due to the lack of metabolism. This tolerance to antibiotics makes microbial infections the leading cause of death worldwide and makes treating chronic infections, including those of wounds problematic. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug cisplatin [cis-diamminodichloroplatinum(II)], which mainly forms intra-strand DNA crosslinks, eradicates Escherichia coli K-12 persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. Additionally, cisplatin is more effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa persister cells than mitomycin C, which forms inter-strand DNA crosslinks, and cisplatin eradicates the persister cells of several pathogens including enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Cisplatin was also highly effective against clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, cisplatin has broad spectrum activity against persister cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1984-1992. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914280

  15. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  16. Induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity by the T cell line specific to bacterial peptidoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A T cell line specific for the chemically well-defined peptidoglycan of bacterial cell wall, disaccharide tetrapeptide, was established from Lewis rats immunized with the antigen covalently linked to the autologous rat serum albumin. The antigen specificity was examined with various analogues or derivatives of the peptidoglycan. The cell line was reactive to analogues with the COOH-terminal D-amino acid, but least reactive to those with L-amino acid as COOH terminus. Transferring of the T cell line into X-irradiated normal Lewis rats induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in an antigen specific manner

  17. The Eukaryotic Cell Originated in the Integration and Redistribution of Hyperstructures from Communities of Prokaryotic Cells Based on Molecular Complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vic Norris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the “ecosystems-first” approach to the origins of life, networks of non-covalent assemblies of molecules (composomes, rather than individual protocells, evolved under the constraints of molecular complementarity. Composomes evolved into the hyperstructures of modern bacteria. We extend the ecosystems-first approach to explain the origin of eukaryotic cells through the integration of mixed populations of bacteria. We suggest that mutualism and symbiosis resulted in cellular mergers entailing the loss of redundant hyperstructures, the uncoupling of transcription and translation, and the emergence of introns and multiple chromosomes. Molecular complementarity also facilitated integration of bacterial hyperstructures to perform cytoskeletal and movement functions.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Clearance, Bacterial Clearance, and Systemic Inflammatory Responses Are Regulated by Cell Type–Specific Functions of TLR4 during Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Meihong; Scott, Melanie J.; Loughran, Patricia; Gibson, Gregory; Sodhi, Chhinder; Watkins, Simon; Hackam, David; Billiar, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity associated with bacterial sepsis is the result of host immune responses to pathogens, which are dependent on pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors, such as TLR4. TLR4 is expressed on a range of cell types, yet the mechanisms by which cell-specific functions of TLR4 lead to an integrated sepsis response are poorly understood. To address this, we generated mice in which TLR4 was specifically deleted from myeloid cells (LysMTLR4KO) or hepatocytes (HCTLR4KO) and then...

  19. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. ► The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. ► Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. ► We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  20. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Hagen, Stephen J., E-mail: sjhagen@ufl.edu [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  1. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    The heavy ion accelerators of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research were used to study the regularities and mechanisms of formation of different types of mutations in prokaryote cells. The induction of direct (lac-, ton B-, col B) mutations for Esherichia coli cells and reverse his- → His+ mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis cells under the action of radiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) was studied. The regularities of formation of gene and structural (tonB trp-) mutations for Esherichia coli bacteria under the action of accelerated heavy ions were studied. It was demonstrated that the rate of gene mutations as a function of the dose under the action of Γ rays and accelerated heavy ions is described by linear-quadratic functions. For structural mutations, linear "dose-effect" dependences are typical. The quadratic character of mutagenesis dose curves is determined by the "interaction" of two independent "hitting" events in the course of SOS repair of genetic structures. The conclusion made was that gene mutations under the action of accelerated heavy ions are induced by δ electron regions of charged particle tracks. The methods of SOS chromotest, SOS lux test, and λ prophage induction were used to study the regularities of SOS response of cells under the action of radiations in a wide LET range. The following proposition was substantiated: the molecular basis for formation of gene mutations are cluster single-strand DNA breaks, and that for structural mutations, double-strand DNA breaks. It was found out that the LET dependence of the relative biological efficiency of accelerated ions is described by curves with a local maximum. It was demonstrated that the biological efficiency of ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics on cells with different genotype, estimated by the lethal action, induction of gene and deletion mutations, precision excision of transposons, is determined by the specific

  2. Comparison of bacterial cells and amine-functionalized abiotic surfaces as support for Pd nanoparticle synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Corte, Simon; Bechstein, Stefanie; Lokanathan, Arcot R.;

    2013-01-01

    An increasing demand for catalytic Pd nanoparticles has motivated the search for sustainable production methods. An innovative approach uses bacterial cells as support material for synthesizing Pd nanoparticles by reduction of Pd(II) with e.g. hydrogen or formate. Nevertheless, drawbacks of...... on these surfaces was higher than for Pd particles formed on Shewanella oneidensis cells. Smaller Pd nanoparticles generally have better catalytic properties, and previous studies have shown that the particle size can be lowered by increasing the amount of support material used during Pd particle...... materials were visualized by transmission electron microscopy, and their activity was evaluated by catalysis of p-nitrophenol reduction. Surfaces functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and chitosan were interesting alternatives to bacterial cells, as the catalytic activity of Pd particles formed...

  3. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping;

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this...... alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase family reveals an unusual catalytic mechanism involving NAD+. The enzymatic conversion processes we describe hold promise for achieving the goal of producing universal RBCs, which would improve the blood supply while enhancing the safety of clinical transfusions....

  4. Attachment and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis to host cells is related to surface hydrophobicity, bacterial cell size and capsule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Bartley

    Full Text Available We compared exemplar strains from two hypervirulent clonal complexes, strain NMB-CDC from ST-8/11 cc and strain MC58 from ST-32/269 cc, in host cell attachment and invasion. Strain NMB-CDC attached to and invaded host cells at a significantly greater frequency than strain MC58. Type IV pili retained the primary role for initial attachment to host cells for both isolates regardless of pilin class and glycosylation pattern. In strain MC58, the serogroup B capsule was the major inhibitory determinant affecting both bacterial attachment to and invasion of host cells. Removal of terminal sialylation of lipooligosaccharide (LOS in the presence of capsule did not influence rates of attachment or invasion for strain MC58. However, removal of either serogroup B capsule or LOS sialylation in strain NMB-CDC increased bacterial attachment to host cells to the same extent. Although the level of inhibition of attachment by capsule was different between these strains, the regulation of the capsule synthesis locus by the two-component response regulator MisR, and the level of surface capsule determined by flow cytometry were not significantly different. However, the diplococci of strain NMB-CDC were shown to have a 1.89-fold greater surface area than strain MC58 by flow cytometry. It was proposed that the increase in surface area without changing the amount of anchored glycolipid capsule in the outer membrane would result in a sparser capsule and increase surface hydrophobicity. Strain NMB-CDC was shown to be more hydrophobic than strain MC58 using hydrophobicity interaction chromatography and microbial adhesion-to-solvents assays. In conclusion, improved levels of adherence of strain NMB-CDC to cell lines was associated with increased bacterial cell surface and surface hydrophobicity. This study shows that there is diversity in bacterial cell surface area and surface hydrophobicity within N. meningitidis which influence steps in meningococcal pathogenesis.

  5. Predominance of single bacterial cells in composting bioaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galès, Amandine; Bru-Adan, Valérie; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Delabre, Karine; Catala, Philippe; Ponthieux, Arnaud; Chevallier, Michel; Birot, Emmanuel; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Wéry, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    Bioaerosols emitted from composting plants have become an issue because of their potential harmful impact on public or workers' health. Accurate knowledge of the particle-size distribution in bioaerosols emitted from open-air composting facilities during operational activity is a requirement for improved modeling of air dispersal. In order to investigate the aerodynamic diameter of bacteria in composting bioaerosols this study used an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor for sampling and quantitative real-time PCR for quantification. Quantitative PCR results show that the size of bacteria peaked between 0.95 μm and 2.4 μm and that the geometric mean diameter of the bacteria was 1.3 μm. In addition, total microbial cells were counted by flow cytometry and revealed that these qPCR results corresponded to single whole bacteria. Finally, the enumeration of cultivable thermophilic microorganisms allowed us to set the upper size limit for fragments at an aerodynamic diameter of ∼0.3 μm. Particle-size distributions of microbial groups previously used to monitor composting bioaerosols were also investigated. In collected the bioaerosols, the aerodynamic diameter of the actinomycetes Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula-and-relatives and also of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, appeared to be consistent with a majority of individual cells. Together, this study provides the first culture-independent data on particle-size distribution of composting bioaerosols and reveals that airborne single bacteria were emitted predominantly from open-air composting facilities.

  6. Enhanced treatment of tannery wastewater in an integrated multistage bioreactor (IMBR) by the predominant bacterial strains enriched from marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangdao; Fan, Guofeng; Liu, Guoguang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative integrated multistage bioreactor (IMBR) system, which was augmented with three predominant bacterial strains (Lactobacillus paracasei CL1107, Pichia jadinii CL1705, and Serratia marcescens CL1502) isolated from marine sediments, was developed to treat real tannery wastewater without performing physicochemical pretreatment, with the potential to reduce the generation of waste sludge and odors. The performance of the IMBR treatment system, with and without the inclusion of the predominant bacterial strains, was compared. The results indicated that the performance of the IMBR system without bioaugmentation by the predominant bacterial strains was poor. However, when in the presence of the predominant bacterial strains, the IMBR system exhibited high removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (97%), NH4(+)-N (97.7%), and total nitrogen (TN) (90%). In addition, the system had the capacity for the simultaneous removal of organics and nitrogen, heterotrophic nitrification and denitrification being carried out concurrently, thereby avoiding the strong inhibition of high concentrations of COD on nitrification. The system possessed excellent adaptability and ability to resist influent loading fluctuations, and had a good alkalinity balance such that it could achieve a high NH4(+)-N, and TN removal efficiency without a supplement of external alkalinity. In addition, an empirical performance modeling of the IMBR system was analyzed. PMID:26901723

  7. Lipid II: a central component in bacterial cell wall synthesis and a target for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijff, Ben; van Dam, Vincent; Breukink, Eefjan

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is mainly composed of peptidoglycan, which is a three-dimensional network of long aminosugar strands located on the exterior of the cytoplasmic membrane. These strands consist of alternating MurNAc and GlcNAc units and are interlinked to each other via peptide moieties that are attached to the MurNAc residues. Peptidoglycan subunits are assembled on the cytoplasmic side of the bacterial membrane on a polyisoprenoid anchor and one of the key components in the synthesis of peptidoglycan is Lipid II. Being essential for bacterial cell survival, it forms an attractive target for antibacterial compounds such as vancomycin and several lantibiotics. Lipid II consists of one GlcNAc-MurNAc-pentapeptide subunit linked to a polyiosoprenoid anchor 11 subunits long via a pyrophosphate linker. This review focuses on this special molecule and addresses three questions. First, why are special lipid carriers as polyprenols used in the assembly of peptidoglycan? Secondly, how is Lipid II translocated across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane? And finally, how is Lipid II used as a receptor for lantibiotics to kill bacteria? PMID:19008088

  8. PROCALCITONIN AS A BIOMARKER OF BACTERIAL INFECTION IN SICKLE CELL VASO-OCCLUSIVE CRISIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar Patel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection is an important trigger of vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC in sickle cell anaemia (SCA. SCA Patients with VOC have signs of inflammation and it is difficult to diagnose bacterial infection in them. This study was undertaken to evaluate serum procalcitonin (PCT as a biomarker of bacterial infection in acute sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis. Hundred SCA patients were studied at Sickle Cell Clinic and Molecular Biology Laboratory, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla, Odisha, India. SCA was diagnosed by haemoglobin electrophoresis, HPLC and molecular analysis. Patients were divided into 3categories namely Category-A (VOC/ACS with fever but without evidence of bacterial infection-66 patients; Category-B (VOC with fever and documentedbacterial infection-24 patients; and Category-C (Patients in steady statewithout VOC/ACS or fever-10 patients. Investigations like complete blood count, C-reactive protein estimation and PCT measurement was done in all the cases. There was no significant difference in total leucocytes count and C-reactiveprotein values between category A and B. In category A the PCT level was 0.5ng/mL with 87.5% of cases having >2ng/mL. In category C, PCT value was 2ng/mL is indicative of bacterial infection necessitating antimicrobial therapy. Patients with indeterminate PCT value of0.5-2ng/mL, need a repeat PCT estimation or an empirical antibiotic therapyawaiting the availability of microbiological report as deemed necessary.

  9. Cell-penetrating peptides mediated protein cross-membrane delivery and its use in bacterial vector vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jimei; Xu, Jinmei; Guan, Lingyu; Hu, Tianjian; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-07-01

    It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications. PMID:24746937

  10. Viability of adhered bacterial cells: tracking MinD protein oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Matt; Colville, Keegan; Schultz-Nielsen, Chris; Jericho, Manfred; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    To study bacterial cells using atomic force microscopy, it is necessary to immobilize the cells on a substrate. Because bacterial cells and common substrates such as glass and mica have a net negative charge, positively charged polymers such as poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) are commonly used as adhesion layers. However, the use of adhesion polymers could stress the cell and even render it inviable. Viable E. coli cells use oscillations of Min proteins along the axis of the rod-shaped cells to ensure accurate cell division. By tagging MinD proteins with GFP, oscillations can be observed using fluorescence microscopy. For a healthy cell in an ideal environment, the oscillation period is measured to be ˜40 s. Prior experiments have shown that PLL increases the oscillation period significantly (up to 80%). In the present study, we have used epifluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) to track MinD protein oscillations in E. coli bacteria adhered to a variety of positively charged polymers on mica as a function of polymer surface coverage.

  11. A STUDY ON BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF CELL PHONES OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS (HCW) AT KIMS HOSPITAL, AMALAPURAM

    OpenAIRE

    Padmaja; Nageswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    A random 100 samples of cell phones of HCWs workers and Doctors working in various wards, OPDs and laboratories, Blood Bank, Causality, ICU of KIMS Hospital were subjected to bacterial analysis by conventional methods to know about the Bacterial contamination of the cell phones from July 2011 to December 2011. The commonest organism isolated from the contaminated cell phone is MRSA - 20%, followed by MSSA - 5%, CONS - 10 %, Micrococcus - 15 %. The obvious observation is no...

  12. Integrated bacterial process for the treatment of a spent nickel catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosio, V; Viera, M; Donati, E

    2008-06-15

    Integrated biological processes involving the dissolution and subsequent precipitation have been used for the treatment of the spent material from the hydrogenation of vegetable oil containing a high-level of nickel. Our results show that nickel was successfully leached using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The percentages of nickel leached using A. thiooxidans were higher than those obtained with dilute sulphuric acid solutions. Due to the physical characteristics of the residue, the best results were obtained when the leaching process was carried out using sulphuric acid biogenerated by an A. thiooxidans biofilm. The recovery of nickel from the leachates was performed at room temperature by precipitating with sulphide generated by Desulfovibrio cells. Indirect precipitation using sulphide generated in Desulfovibrio sp. cultures allowed the recovery of nickel as the very insoluble nickel sulphide. PMID:18079054

  13. Solar cells from wastes of integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knev, S.; Lakova, M.; Stoyanov, V.; Vlayev, Kh.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented from using a defective silicon plates for making solar cells with reduces cost and satisfactory characteristics. These monocrystal plates were exposed to high-temperature processes for the formation of crystals of integrated circuits and subsequent mechanical and chemical procedures for removal of the diffusion transitions and to thin the plates. All of this could promote the manifestation of dislocations, fractures and as a result deteriorate the parameters of the current carriers in the initial plates, making them unsuitable for purposes of photoelectrical transformation of solar light. Data are presented which indicate the successful use of wastes for the fabrication of solar cells. Experiments were conducted on plates 50 X 76mm, structures of type n/sup +/-p, n/sup +/-p-p/sup +/, p/sup +/-n, p/sup +/-n-n/sup +/ were made. Studies were made of their main characteristics and it is indicated that the formed transitions have qualities suitable for creating solar cells with good parameters comparable to the solar cells made on the basis of new plates. This was illustrated by samples with efficiency to 15% under conditions of AM2. Decrease in the cost is due to the reduction in technological operation.

  14. Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: a hybrid system towards bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-09-30

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell-based sensors were developed and demonstrated for potential real-time bacterium detection by synchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold electrodes of silicon oxide substrates by a surface engineering technique, in which the gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion and the silicon oxide background was passivated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cell morphology and IR spectra of single, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared to reveal the detection capability of this cell-based sensing platform. The single-cell-based system was found to generate the most significant and consistent IR spectrum shifts upon exposure to LPS, thus providing the highest detection sensitivity. Changes in cell morphology and IR shifts upon cell exposure to LPS were found to be dependent on the LPS concentration and exposure time, which established a method for the identification of LPS concentration and infected cell population. Possibility of using this single-cell system with conventional IR spectroscopy as well as its limitation was investigated by comparing IR spectra of single-cell arrays with gold electrode surface areas of 25, 100, and 400 microm2 using both synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes. This cell-based platform may potentially provide real-time, label-free, and rapid bacterial detection, and allow for high-throughput statistical analyses, and portability. PMID:17560777

  15. Convergent development of anodic bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D

    2012-05-10

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are often inoculated from a single wastewater source. The extent that the inoculum affects community development or power production is unknown. The stable anodic microbial communities in MFCs were examined using three inocula: a wastewater treatment plant sample known to produce consistent power densities, a second wastewater treatment plant sample, and an anaerobic bog sediment. The bog-inoculated MFCs initially produced higher power densities than the wastewater-inoculated MFCs, but after 20 cycles all MFCs on average converged to similar voltages (470±20 mV) and maximum power densities (590±170 mW m(-2)). The power output from replicate bog-inoculated MFCs was not significantly different, but one wastewater-inoculated MFC (UAJA3 (UAJA, University Area Joint Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant)) produced substantially less power. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling showed a stable exoelectrogenic biofilm community in all samples after 11 cycles. After 16 cycles the predominance of Geobacter spp. in anode communities was identified using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (58±10%), fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) (63±6%) and pyrosequencing (81±4%). While the clone library analysis for the underperforming UAJA3 had a significantly lower percentage of Geobacter spp. sequences (36%), suggesting that a predominance of this microbe was needed for convergent power densities, the lower percentage of this species was not verified by FISH or pyrosequencing analyses. These results show that the predominance of Geobacter spp. in acetate-fed systems was consistent with good MFC performance and independent of the inoculum source.

  16. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  17. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  18. Integrated analysis of three bacterial conjunctivitis trials of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%: microbiological eradication outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris TW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy W Morris1, Lynne S Gearinger1, Dale W Usner2, Michael R Paterno2, Heleen H DeCory3, Timothy L Comstock3, Wolfgang Haas11Microbiology and Sterilization Sciences, 2Clinical Affairs, 3Global Pharmaceutical Medical Affairs, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY, USAPurpose: To assess clinical antimicrobial efficacy results obtained with besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%, administered three times a day (TID for 5 days, integrated across three clinical trials of bacterial conjunctivitis and to investigate any microbiological eradication failures.Methods: Clinical microbiological eradication data from three randomized, double-masked, parallel group studies of patients with bacterial conjunctivitis (two vehicle controlled; one active controlled with moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution, 0.5% were integrated. All bacterial samples isolated at baseline above the species-specific threshold value were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Samples isolated at subsequent visits were subjected to susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE to investigate the cause of eradication failures and the potential for drug resistance development.Results: Visit 2 (day 4 or 5 and visit 3 (day 8 overall microbiological eradication rates were 92.2% and 88.4% for besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension compared with 61.4% and 72.5% for vehicle and 91.6% and 85.7% for moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution. Visit 2 and visit 3 microbiological eradication rates for Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates and for individual species were consistent with the overall eradication rates. The majority of observed eradication failures in any treatment group were due to the persistence of the pathogen isolated at baseline. Eradication failures in the besifloxacin treatment group were not associated with lower antimicrobial susceptibility at baseline. PFGE data showed that the majority of bacterial strains in eyes with eradication failures were identical to

  19. A Communal Bacterial Adhesin Anchors Biofilm and Bystander Cells to Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Absalon, Cedric; Van Dellen, Katrina; Paula I. Watnick

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary The bacterial multilayer biofilm consists of matrix-enclosed cells attached to each other to form large aggregates. The base of these aggregates may be attached to a living or non-living surface. The biofilm matrix most often contains at least one exopolysaccharide component and may also contain protein and DNA. While much is known about the exopolysaccharide component of the Gram-negative biofilm matrix, little is known about the function of biofilm matrix proteins. We hypothe...

  20. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA

    OpenAIRE

    Belcourt, Michael F.; Penketh, Philip G.; Hodnick, William F.; Johnson, David A.; David H Sherman; Rockwell, Sara; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    1999-01-01

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduc...

  1. Testing an agent-based model of bacterial cell motility: How nutrient concentration affects speed distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Victor; Birbaumer, Mirko; Schweitzer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We revisit a recently proposed agent-based model of active biological motion and compare its predictions with own experimental findings for the speed distribution of bacterial cells, \\emph{Salmonella typhimurium}. Agents move according to a stochastic dynamics and use energy stored in an internal depot for metabolism and active motion. We discuss different assumptions of how the conversion from internal to kinetic energy $d(v)$ may depend on the actual speed, to conclude that $d_{2}v^{\\xi}$ w...

  2. Quantitative analysis of initial adhesion of bacterial vaginosis anaerobes in ME-180 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, António; Salgueiro, Débora; Harwich, Michael; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Cerca, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder in women of reproductive age [1]. Despite decades of research, the etiology of BV still remains elusive. It is well established that adhesion to host cells or tissues is a necessary early step in the establishment of infection [2]. Since it is often considered a polymicrobial condition, it has been proposed that some bacteria have a preponderant role as early colonizers, while others have an impact later in the development of a mu...

  3. Radiosensitization of hypoxic bacterial cells and animal tumours by membrane active drugs and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report deals with the results on phenothiazine derivatives such as promethazine (PMZ), trimeprazine (TMZ), trifluoperazine (TFP) and prochlorperazine (PCP) and their comparison with that of chlorpromazine (CPZ). Their efficiency in combination with hyperthermia, radiation and other anti-cancer drugs in treating murine tumors has also been presented herein. In addition, results on bacterial cells dealing with their mechanistic aspects are also included. (author). 57 refs., 27 figures, 13 tables

  4. Quantifying bacterial adhesion on antifouling polymer brushes via single-cell force spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Janel, S.; de los Santos Pereira, Andres; Bruns, M.; Lafont, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 31 (2015), s. 5740-5751. ISSN 1759-9954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-09368Y; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant ostatní: OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21545 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : antifouling polymer brushes * single-cell force spectroscopy * bacterial adhesion Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.520, year: 2014

  5. Biosynthesis of Bacterial Cellulose/Carboxylic Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Enzymatic Biofuel Cell Application

    OpenAIRE

    Pengfei Lv; Quan Feng; Qingqing Wang; Guohui Li; Dawei Li; Qufu Wei

    2016-01-01

    Novel nanocomposites comprised of bacterial cellulose (BC) with carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs) incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared through a simple method of biosynthesis. The biocathode and bioanode for the enzyme biological fuel cell (EBFC) were prepared using BC/c-MWCNTs composite injected by laccase (Lac) and glucose oxidase (GOD) with the aid of glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinking. Biosynthesis of BC/c-MWCNTs composite was characterized by digital photos, scan...

  6. Instrumental analysis of bacterial cells using vibrational and emission Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In biosciences and biotechnology, the expanding application of physicochemical approaches using modern instrumental techniques is an efficient strategy to obtain valuable and often unique information at the molecular level. In this work, we applied a combination of vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques, useful in overall structural and compositional analysis of bacterial cells of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, with 57Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) used for sensitive monitoring of metal binding and further transformations in live bacterial cells. The information obtained, together with ICP-MS analyses for metals taken up by the bacteria, is useful in analysing the impact of the environmental conditions (heavy metal stress) on the bacterial metabolism and some differences in the heavy metal stress-induced behaviour of non-endophytic (Sp7) and facultatively endophytic (Sp245) strains. The results show that, while both strains Sp7 and Sp245 take up noticeable and comparable amounts of heavy metals from the medium (0.12 and 0.13 mg Co, 0.48 and 0.44 mg Cu or 4.2 and 2.1 mg Zn per gram of dry biomass, respectively, at a metal concentration of 0.2 mM in the medium), their metabolic responses differ essentially. Whereas for strain Sp7 the FTIR measurements showed significant accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates as storage materials involved in stress endurance, strain Sp245 did not show any major changes in cellular composition. Nevertheless, EMS measurements showed rapid binding of cobalt(II) by live bacterial cells (chemically similar to metal binding by dead bacteria) and its further transformation in the live cells within an hour

  7. Instrumental analysis of bacterial cells using vibrational and emission Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, Alexander A. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: aakamnev@ibppm.sgu.ru; Tugarova, Anna V. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Antonyuk, Lyudmila P. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Tarantilis, Petros A. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Kulikov, Leonid A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perfiliev, Yurii D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Polissiou, Moschos G. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Gardiner, Philip H.E. [Division of Chemistry, School of Science and Mathematics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-28

    In biosciences and biotechnology, the expanding application of physicochemical approaches using modern instrumental techniques is an efficient strategy to obtain valuable and often unique information at the molecular level. In this work, we applied a combination of vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques, useful in overall structural and compositional analysis of bacterial cells of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, with {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) used for sensitive monitoring of metal binding and further transformations in live bacterial cells. The information obtained, together with ICP-MS analyses for metals taken up by the bacteria, is useful in analysing the impact of the environmental conditions (heavy metal stress) on the bacterial metabolism and some differences in the heavy metal stress-induced behaviour of non-endophytic (Sp7) and facultatively endophytic (Sp245) strains. The results show that, while both strains Sp7 and Sp245 take up noticeable and comparable amounts of heavy metals from the medium (0.12 and 0.13 mg Co, 0.48 and 0.44 mg Cu or 4.2 and 2.1 mg Zn per gram of dry biomass, respectively, at a metal concentration of 0.2 mM in the medium), their metabolic responses differ essentially. Whereas for strain Sp7 the FTIR measurements showed significant accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates as storage materials involved in stress endurance, strain Sp245 did not show any major changes in cellular composition. Nevertheless, EMS measurements showed rapid binding of cobalt(II) by live bacterial cells (chemically similar to metal binding by dead bacteria) and its further transformation in the live cells within an hour.

  8. Bacterial regulatory networks—from self-organizing molecules to cell shape and patterns in bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Hengge, Regine; Sourjik, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The ESF–EMBO Conference on ‘Bacterial Networks' was held in March, 2013. It brought together molecular microbiologists, bacteral systems biologists and synthetic biologists to discuss the architecture, function and dynamics of regulatory networks in bacteria.

  9. Biomechanical Loading Modulates Proinflammatory and Bone Resorptive Mediators in Bacterial-Stimulated PDL Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Vilas Boas Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate in vitro whether biomechanical loading modulates proinflammatory and bone remodeling mediators production by periodontal ligament (PDL cells in the presence of bacterial challenge. Cells were seeded on BioFlex culture plates and exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 and/or cyclic tensile strain (CTS of low (CTSL and high (CTSH magnitudes for 1 and 3 days. Synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 was evaluated by ELISA. Gene expression and protein secretion of osteoprotegerin (OPG and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. F. nucleatum increased the production of COX2 and PGE2, which was further increased by CTS. F. nucleatum-induced increase of PGE2 synthesis was significantly (P<0.05 increased when CTSH was applied at 1 and 3 days. In addition, CTSH inhibited the F. nucleatum-induced upregulation of OPG at 1 and 3 days, thereby increasing the RANKL/OPG ratio. OPG and RANKL mRNA results correlated with the protein results. In summary, our findings provide original evidence that CTS can enhance bacterial-induced syntheses of molecules associated with inflammation and bone resorption by PDL cells. Therefore, biomechanical, such as orthodontic or occlusal, loading may enhance the bacterial-induced inflammation and destruction in periodontitis.

  10. Mineralization of Iron Oxyhydroxides in the Presence and in the Absence of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châtellier, X.; West, M.; Rose, J.; Fortin, D.; Leppard, G. G.; Ferris, G.

    2001-12-01

    Because of their small size, iron oxides have a large surface area per unit weight ratio and are believed to play an important role as an adsorbing phase in lake sediments for various molecules, including potentially dangerous ones like heavy metals. They have been observed to form in close association with bacterial cells, by oxidation of ferrous ions. It is thus important to determine whether the presence of the bacterial cells can affect the mineralogy and the mesoscopic structure of the Fe-oxides particles, as well as their reactivity towards heavy metals. We synthesized in the lab nanoparticles of Fe-oxides by oxidation of ferrous ions. This was done in the presence and in the absence of various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Bacillus licheniformis) and of inorganic ligands (sulfate, phosphate, silicate). The Fe-oxides particles were then observed by TEM on thin sections and on whole mounts. The chemical composition was estimated by wet chemistry and by EDS. The mineralogy was determined by XRD, SAED and EXAFS. Surface area was investigated by BET. And adsorption of cadmium was also measured at various pH. We observed that the size and the morphology of the particles as well as their mesoscopic spatial organization can be affected by the presence of the cells, whereas the mineralogy is controlled by the chemistry of the solution. The adsorption isotherms of cadmium on the various Fe-oxides will be discussed at the light of these observations.

  11. Systems biology of bacterial nitrogen fixation: High-throughput technology and its integrative description with constraint-based modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resendis-Antonio Osbaldo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial nitrogen fixation is the biological process by which atmospheric nitrogen is uptaken by bacteroids located in plant root nodules and converted into ammonium through the enzymatic activity of nitrogenase. In practice, this biological process serves as a natural form of fertilization and its optimization has significant implications in sustainable agricultural programs. Currently, the advent of high-throughput technology supplies with valuable data that contribute to understanding the metabolic activity during bacterial nitrogen fixation. This undertaking is not trivial, and the development of computational methods useful in accomplishing an integrative, descriptive and predictive framework is a crucial issue to decoding the principles that regulated the metabolic activity of this biological process. Results In this work we present a systems biology description of the metabolic activity in bacterial nitrogen fixation. This was accomplished by an integrative analysis involving high-throughput data and constraint-based modeling to characterize the metabolic activity in Rhizobium etli bacteroids located at the root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris (bean plant. Proteome and transcriptome technologies led us to identify 415 proteins and 689 up-regulated genes that orchestrate this biological process. Taking into account these data, we: 1 extended the metabolic reconstruction reported for R. etli; 2 simulated the metabolic activity during symbiotic nitrogen fixation; and 3 evaluated the in silico results in terms of bacteria phenotype. Notably, constraint-based modeling simulated nitrogen fixation activity in such a way that 76.83% of the enzymes and 69.48% of the genes were experimentally justified. Finally, to further assess the predictive scope of the computational model, gene deletion analysis was carried out on nine metabolic enzymes. Our model concluded that an altered metabolic activity on these enzymes induced

  12. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  13. Temporal expression of bacterial proteins instructs host CD4 T cell expansion and Th17 development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Joo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens can substantially alter gene expression within an infected host depending on metabolic or virulence requirements in different tissues, however, the effect of these alterations on host immunity are unclear. Here we visualized multiple CD4 T cell responses to temporally expressed proteins in Salmonella-infected mice. Flagellin-specific CD4 T cells expanded and contracted early, differentiated into Th1 and Th17 lineages, and were enriched in mucosal tissues after oral infection. In contrast, CD4 T cells responding to Salmonella Type-III Secretion System (TTSS effectors steadily accumulated until bacterial clearance was achieved, primarily differentiated into Th1 cells, and were predominantly detected in systemic tissues. Thus, pathogen regulation of antigen expression plays a major role in orchestrating the expansion, differentiation, and location of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in vivo.

  14. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  15. Desquamated epithelial cells covered with a polymicrobial biofilm typical for bacterial vaginosis are present in randomly selected cryopreserved donor semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Dörffel, Yvonne; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Mendling, Werner; Verstraelen, Hans; Dieterle, Stefan; Schilling, Johannes

    2010-08-01

    We tested whether the bacterial biofilm typical for bacterial vaginosis (BV) can be found on desquamated epithelial cells in cryopreserved donor semen. Bacteria were detected with FISH. Bacterial biofilm, covering the epithelial layer in vaginal biopsies of 20 women with BV, was evaluated on desquamated epithelial cells found in the urine of these same women and their male partners (N=20) and compared with the bacterial biofilm found on desquamated epithelial cells in randomly selected cryopreserved semen samples (N=20). Urine from 20 healthy women of laboratory and clinic personnel and urine from their partners were used as controls. Desquamated epithelial cells covered with a polymicrobial Gardnerella biofilm were identified in urine samples from all women with BV and 13 of their male partners and in none of the female controls and their partners. Gardnerella biofilm, typical for BV, was found in the semen of three of the 20 donors. Donor semen might be a vector for BV. PMID:20497224

  16. Branched signal wiring of an essential bacterial cell-cycle phosphotransfer protein

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Jimmy A.; Xu, Qingping; Childers, W. Seth; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Kern, Justin W.; Eckart, Michael; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Vital to bacterial survival is the faithful propagation of cellular signals, and in Caulobacter crescentus ChpT is an essential mediator within the cell cycle circuit. ChpT functions as a histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (HPt) that shuttles a phosphoryl group from the receiver domain of CckA, the upstream hybrid histidine kinase (HK), to one of two downstream response regulators (RRs)—CtrA or CpdR—that controls cell cycle progression. To understand how ChpT interacts with multiple...

  17. Laser capture microdissection of bacterial cells targeted by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Mølbak, Lars; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Lindboe, Christian Frederik; Boye, Mette

    2005-01-01

    Direct cultivation-independent sequence retrieval of unidentified bacteria from histological tissue sections has been limited by the difficulty of selectively isolating specific bacteria from a complex environment. Here, a new DNA isolation approach is presented for prokaryotic cells. By this......RNA gene PCR was performed from the dissected microcolonies, and the subsequent DNA sequence analysis identified the dissected bacterial cells as belonging to the Brachyspira aalborgi cluster 1. The advantage of this technique is the ability to combine the histological recognition of the specific bacteria...

  18. Study on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells and fluidity changes in model bacterial membranes using optical microscopy techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Christine Shiang Yee

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis optical microscopy techniques are used to consider aspects of viral and bacterial infections. In part 1, the physical effects of cytomegalovirus on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells are studied; in part 2, the effects of an antimicrobial peptide on the fluidity of model bacterial membranes are studied. The optical microscopy techniques used to study the effects of murine-cytomegalovirus (mCMV) on lipid droplets in live NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells in real-time are...

  19. Targeting Bacterial Cell Wall Peptidoglycan Synthesis by Inhibition of Glycosyltransferase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesleh, Michael F; Rajaratnam, Premraj; Conrad, Mary; Chandrasekaran, Vasu; Liu, Christopher M; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Hwang, You Seok; Rye, Peter T; Muldoon, Craig; Becker, Bernd; Zuegg, Johannes; Meutermans, Wim; Moy, Terence I

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan requires glycosyltransferase enzymes that transfer the disaccharide-peptide from lipid II onto the growing glycan chain. The polymerization of the glycan chain precedes cross-linking by penicillin-binding proteins and is essential for growth for key bacterial pathogens. As such, bacterial cell wall glycosyltransferases are an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. However, significant challenges to the development of inhibitors for these targets include the development of suitable assays and chemical matter that is suited to the nature of the binding site. We developed glycosyltransferase enzymatic activity and binding assays using the natural products moenomycin and vancomycin as model inhibitors. In addition, we designed a library of disaccharide compounds based on the minimum moenomycin fragment with peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase inhibitory activity and based on a more drug-like and synthetically versatile disaccharide building block. A subset of these disaccharide compounds bound and inhibited the glycosyltransferase enzymes, and these compounds could serve as chemical entry points for antibiotic development. PMID:26358369

  20. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  1. Generating Transgenic Mice from Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: Transgenesis Efficiency, Integration and Expression Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Van Keuren, Margaret L.; Gavrilina, Galina B.; Filipiak, Wanda E.; Zeidler, Michael G.; Saunders, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic mice are widely used in biomedical research to study gene expression, developmental biology, and gene therapy models. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenes direct gene expression at physiological levels with the same developmental timing and expression patterns as endogenous genes in transgenic animal models. We generated 707 transgenic founders from 86 BAC transgenes purified by three different methods. Transgenesis efficiency was the same for all BAC DNA purification m...

  2. Analysis of bone marrow stromal cell transferred bacterial β-galactosidase gene by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIXE, Particle Induced X-ray Emission, is a powerful, multi-elemental analysis method which has many distinguishing features and has been used in varies research fields. Recently the method of applying baby cyclotrons for nuclear medicine to PIXE has been developed. This enables us to study biomedical phenomena from the physical point of view. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells were transferred bacterial β-galactosidase gene (LacZ gene) by murine retroviral vectors. Analysis of the bone marrow stromal cells with the LacZ gene by PIXE revealed remarkable changes of intracellular trace elements compared with the normal control cells. These results indicate that gene transfer by retroviral vectors may bring about a dynamic change of intracellular circumstances of the target cell. (author)

  3. Disruption of Bacterial Cells by Photocatalysis of Montmorillonite Supported Titanium Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Shaomin; GUO Gaoli; XIONG Bihua; GONG Wenqi; MEI Guangjun

    2009-01-01

    The photo-induced antibacterial capacity of montmorillonite supported titanium dioxide(TiO_2/Mmt for short)was evaluated by using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as modal organisms.The bactericidal activity of TiO_2/Mmt was examined by cell viability assay under different illumination modes.Atomic force microscopy(AFM)and total organic carbon/Total nitrogen (TOC/TN)analyses were employed to investigate the mechanism of the photocatalytic bactericidal process qualitatively and quantitatively.The kinetic data show that TiO_2/Mmt has excellent antibac-terial performance,and about 99%of both bacteria cells are inactivated within 75 min illumination.The AFM images demonstrate that the bacterial cells are irreversibly decomposed and some cell components are dissolved.Therefore,the content and phase of carbon and nitrogen in the solution are changed after photocatalytic reaction.

  4. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  5. Long acting β2-agonist and corticosteroid restore airway glandular cell function altered by bacterial supernatant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawrocki-Raby Béatrice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus releases virulence factors (VF that may impair the innate protective functions of airway cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist (salmeterol hydroxynaphthoate, Sal combined with a corticosteroid (fluticasone propionate, FP was able to regulate ion content and cytokine expression by airway glandular cells after exposure to S. aureus supernatant. Methods A human airway glandular cell line was incubated with S. aureus supernatant for 1 h and then treated with the combination Sal/FP for 4 h. The expression of actin and CFTR proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Videomicroscopy was used to evaluate chloride secretion and X-ray microanalysis to measure the intracellular ion and water content. The pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results When the cells were incubated with S. aureus supernatant and then with Sal/FP, the cellular localisation of CFTR was apical compared to the cytoplasmic localisation in cells incubated with S. aureus supernatant alone. The incubation of airway epithelial cells with S. aureus supernatant reduced by 66% the chloride efflux that was fully restored by Sal/FP treatment. We also observed that Sal/FP treatment induced the restoration of ion (Cl and S and water content within the intracellular secretory granules of airway glandular cells and reduced the bacterial supernatant-dependent increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL8 and TNFα. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that treatment with the combination of a corticosteroid and a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist after bacterial infection restores the airway glandular cell function. Abnormal mucus induced by defective ion transport during pulmonary infection could benefit from treatment with a combination of β2 adrenergic receptor agonist and glucocorticoid.

  6. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  7. Pretreatment of Epithelial Cells with Rifaximin Alters Bacterial Attachment and Internalization Profiles▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric L.; Xue, Qiong; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Yi; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2010-01-01

    Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed semisynthetic antibiotic derivative of rifampin licensed for use in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Rifaximin reduces the symptoms of enteric infection, often without pathogen eradication and with limited effects on intestinal flora. Epithelial cells (HEp-2 [laryngeal], HCT-8 [ileocecal], A549 [lung], and HeLa [cervical]) were pretreated with rifaximin (or control antibiotics) prior to the addition of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). EAEC adherence was significantly reduced following rifaximin pretreatment compared to pretreatment with rifampin or doxycycline for three of the four cell lines tested. The rifaximin-mediated changes to epithelial cells were explored further by testing the attachment and internalization of either Bacillus anthracis or Shigella sonnei into A549 or HeLa cells, respectively. The attachment and internalization of B. anthracis were significantly reduced following rifaximin pretreatment. In contrast, neither the attachment nor the internalization of S. sonnei was affected by rifaximin pretreatment of HeLa cells, suggesting that rifaximin-mediated modulation of host cell physiology affected bacteria utilizing distinct attachment/internalization mechanisms differently. In addition, rifaximin pretreatment of HEp-2 cells led to reduced concentrations of inflammatory cytokines from uninfected cells. The study provides evidence that rifaximin-mediated changes in epithelial cell physiology are associated with changes in bacterial attachment/internalization and reduced inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:19858255

  8. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  9. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    The development of next-generation, nanoscale technologies that interface biological systems will pave the way towards new understanding of such complex systems. Nanowires -- one-dimensional nanoscale structures -- have shown unique potential as an ideal physical interface to biological systems. Herein, we focus on the development of nanowire-based devices that can enable a wide variety of biological studies. First, we built upon standard nanofabrication techniques to optimize nanowire devices, resulting in perfectly ordered arrays of both opaque (Silicon) and transparent (Silicon dioxide) nanowires with user defined structural profile, densities, and overall patterns, as well as high sample consistency and large scale production. The high-precision and well-controlled fabrication method in conjunction with additional technologies laid the foundation for the generation of highly specialized platforms for imaging, electrochemical interrogation, and molecular biology. Next, we utilized nanowires as the fundamental structure in the development of integrated nanoelectronic platforms to directly interrogate the electrical activity of biological systems. Initially, we generated a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that allows for parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Our prototype device consisted of 16 individually addressable stimulation/recording sites, each containing an array of 9 electrically active silicon nanowires. We showed that these vertical nanowire electrode arrays could intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons similar to patch clamp electrodes. In addition, we used our intracellular electrode platform to measure multiple individual synaptic connections, which enables the reconstruction of the functional connectivity maps of neuronal circuits. In order to expand and improve the capability of this functional prototype device we designed

  10. Improving protein delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 from bacterial inclusion bodies used as cell culture substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Seras Franzoso, Joaquin; Peebo, Karl; Garcia Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez Gómez, Esther; Rinas, Ursula; Villaverde Corrales, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Altres ajuts: We are indebted CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN, Spain) for funding our research on inclusion bodies. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have recently been used to generate biocompatible cell culture interfaces, with diverse effects on cultured cells such as cell adhesion enhancement, stimulation of cell growth or induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Additionally, novel applications of IBs as sustained protein delivery systems with...

  11. Comparative study of HOCl-inflicted damage to bacterial DNA ex vivo and within cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suquet, Christine; Warren, Jeffrey J; Seth, Nimulrith; Hurst, James K

    2010-01-15

    The prospects for using bacterial DNA as an intrinsic probe for HOCl and secondary oxidants/chlorinating agents associated with it has been evaluated using both in vitro and in vivo studies. Single-strand and double-strand breaks occurred in bare plasmid DNA that had been exposed to high levels of HOCl, although these reactions were very inefficient compared to polynucleotide chain cleavage caused by the OH.-generating reagent, peroxynitrite. Plasmid nicking was not increased when intact Escherichia coli were exposed to HOCl; rather, the amount of recoverable plasmid diminished in a dose-dependent manner. At concentration levels of HOCl exceeding lethal doses, genomic bacterial DNA underwent extensive fragmentation and the amount of precipitable DNA-protein complexes increased several-fold. The 5-chlorocytosine content of plasmid and genomic DNA isolated from HOCl-exposed E. coli was also slightly elevated above controls, as measured by mass spectrometry of the deaminated product, 5-chlorouracil. However, the yields were not dose-dependent over the bactericidal concentration range. Genomic DNA recovered from E. coli that had been subjected to phagocytosis by human neutrophils occasionally showed small increases in 5-chlorocytosine content when compared to analogous cellular reactions where myeloperoxidase activity was inhibited by azide ion. Overall, the amount of isolable 5-chlorouracil from the HOCl-exposed bacterial cells was far less than the damage manifested in polynucleotide bond cleavage and cross-linking. PMID:19850004

  12. Staying in Shape: the Impact of Cell Shape on Bacterial Survival in Diverse Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Desirée C; Blair, Kris M; Salama, Nina R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria display an abundance of cellular forms and can change shape during their life cycle. Many plausible models regarding the functional significance of cell morphology have emerged. A greater understanding of the genetic programs underpinning morphological variation in diverse bacterial groups, combined with assays of bacteria under conditions that mimic their varied natural environments, from flowing freshwater streams to diverse human body sites, provides new opportunities to probe the functional significance of cell shape. Here we explore shape diversity among bacteria, at the levels of cell geometry, size, and surface appendages (both placement and number), as it relates to survival in diverse environments. Cell shape in most bacteria is determined by the cell wall. A major challenge in this field has been deconvoluting the effects of differences in the chemical properties of the cell wall and the resulting cell shape perturbations on observed fitness changes. Still, such studies have begun to reveal the selective pressures that drive the diverse forms (or cell wall compositions) observed in mammalian pathogens and bacteria more generally, including efficient adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, survival under low-nutrient or stressful conditions, evasion of mammalian complement deposition, efficient dispersal through mucous barriers and tissues, and efficient nutrient acquisition. PMID:26864431

  13. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  14. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  15. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  16. Emulsification efficiency of adsorbed chitosan for bacterial cells accumulation at the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archakunakorn, Somwit; Charoenrat, Nattapat; Khamsakhon, Somruethai; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Wongkongkatep, Pravit; Suphantharika, Manop; Wongkongkatep, Jirarut

    2015-04-01

    The use of bacterial cell or biocatalyst for industrial synthetic chemistry is on the way of significant growth since the biocatalyst requires low energy input compared to the chemical synthesis and can be considered as a green technology. However, majority of natural bacterial cell surface is hydrophilic which allows poor access to the hydrophobic substrate or product. In this study, Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a representative of hydrophilic bacterial cells were accumulated at the oil-water interface after association with chitosan at a concentration range of 0.75-750 mg/L. After association with negatively charged E coli having a ζ potential of -19.9 mV, a neutralization of positively charged chitosan occurred as evidenced by an increase in the ζ potential value of the mixtures with increasing chitosan concentration up to +3.5 mV at 750 mg/L chitosan. Both emulsification index and droplet size analysis revealed that chitosan-E. coli system is an excellent emulsion stabilizer to date because the threshold concentration was as low as 7.5 mg/L or 0.00075% w/v. A dramatic increase in the surface hydrophobicity of the E. coli as evidenced by an increase in contact angle from 19 to 88° with increasing chitosan concentration from 0 to 750 mg/L, respectively, resulted in an increase in the stability of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by chitosan-E. coli system. The emulsion was highly stable even the emulsification was performed under 20% salt condition, or temperature ranged between 20 and 50 °C. Emulsification was failed when the oil volume fraction was higher than 0.5, indicating that no phase inversion occurred. The basic investigation presented in this study is a crucial platform for its application in biocatalyst industry and bioremediation of oil spill. PMID:25341365

  17. Identification of Bacterial Cell Wall Lyases via Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Xin; Tang, Hua; Li, Wen-Chao; Wu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria becomes more and more serious. Therefore, it is interesting to develop a more reasonable way to solve this issue. Because they can destroy the bacterial cell structure and then kill the infectious bacterium, the bacterial cell wall lyases are suitable candidates of antibacteria sources. Thus, it is urgent to develop an accurate and efficient computational method to predict the lyases. Based on the consideration, in this paper, a set of objective and rigorous data was collected by searching through the Universal Protein Resource (the UniProt database), whereafter a feature selection technique based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to acquire optimal feature subset. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform prediction. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the optimal average accuracy of 84.82% was achieved with the sensitivity of 76.47% and the specificity of 93.16%. For the convenience of other scholars, we built a free online server called Lypred. We believe that Lypred will become a practical tool for the research of cell wall lyases and development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27437396

  18. Applications of whole-cell bacterial sensors in biotechnology and environmental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Kiyohito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    2007-01-15

    Biosensors have major advantages over chemical or physical analyses with regard to specificity, sensitivity, and portability. Recently, many types of whole-cell bacterial biosensors have been developed using recombinant DNA technology. The bacteria are genetically engineered to respond to the presence of chemicals or physiological stresses by synthesizing a reporter protein, such as luciferase, {beta}-galactosidase, or green fluorescent protein. In addition to an overview of conventional biosensors, this minireview discusses a novel type of biosensor using a photosynthetic bacterium as the sensor strain and the crtA gene, which is responsible for carotenoid synthesis, as the reporter. Since bacteria possess a wide variety of stress-response mechanisms, including antioxidation, heat-shock responses, nutrient-starvation, and membrane-damage responses, DNA response elements for several stress-response proteins can be fused with various reporter genes to construct a versatile set of bacterial biosensors for a variety of analytes. Portable biosensors for on-site monitoring have been developed using a freeze-dried biosensing strain, and cell array biosensors have been designed for high-throughput analysis. Moreover, in the future, the use of single-cell biosensors will permit detailed analyses of samples. Signals from such sensors could be detected with digital imaging, epifluorescence microscopy, and/or flow cytometry. (orig.)

  19. Identification of Bacterial Cell Wall Lyases via Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hua; Li, Wen-Chao; Wu, Hao; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria becomes more and more serious. Therefore, it is interesting to develop a more reasonable way to solve this issue. Because they can destroy the bacterial cell structure and then kill the infectious bacterium, the bacterial cell wall lyases are suitable candidates of antibacteria sources. Thus, it is urgent to develop an accurate and efficient computational method to predict the lyases. Based on the consideration, in this paper, a set of objective and rigorous data was collected by searching through the Universal Protein Resource (the UniProt database), whereafter a feature selection technique based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to acquire optimal feature subset. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform prediction. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the optimal average accuracy of 84.82% was achieved with the sensitivity of 76.47% and the specificity of 93.16%. For the convenience of other scholars, we built a free online server called Lypred. We believe that Lypred will become a practical tool for the research of cell wall lyases and development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27437396

  20. Simultaneous selection of soil electroactive bacterial communities associated to anode and cathode in a two-chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Carolina; Bacci, Giovanni; Fani, Renato; Mocali, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Different bacteria have evolved strategies to transfer electrons over their cell surface to (or from) their extracellular environment. This electron transfer enables the use of these bacteria in bioelectrochemical systems (BES) such as Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). In MFC research the biological reactions at the cathode have long been a secondary point of interest. However, bacterial biocathodes in MFCs represent a potential advantage compared to traditional cathodes, for both their low costs and their low impact on the environment. The main challenge in biocathode set-up is represented by the selection of a bacterial community able to efficiently accept electrons from the electrode, starting from an environmental matrix. In this work, a constant voltage was supplied on a two-chamber MFC filled up with soil over three weeks in order to simultaneously select an electron donor bacterial biomass on the anode and an electron acceptor biomass on the cathode, starting from the same soil. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis was performed to characterize the bacterial community of the initial soil, in the anode, in the cathode and in the control chamber not supplied with any voltage. Results highlighted that both the MFC conditions and the voltage supply affected the soil bacterial communities, providing a selection of different bacterial groups preferentially associated to the anode (Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Clostridia) and to the cathode (Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria). These results confirmed that several electroactive bacteria are naturally present within a top soil and, moreover, different soil bacterial genera could provide different electrical properties.

  1. Regulatory T cell suppressive potency dictates the balance between bacterial proliferation and clearance during persistent Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner M Johanns

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of persistent infection is dictated by the balance between opposing immune activation and suppression signals. Herein, virulent Salmonella was used to explore the role and potential importance of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells in dictating the natural progression of persistent bacterial infection. Two distinct phases of persistent Salmonella infection are identified. In the first 3-4 weeks after infection, progressively increasing bacterial burden was associated with delayed effector T cell activation. Reciprocally, at later time points after infection, reductions in bacterial burden were associated with robust effector T cell activation. Using Foxp3(GFP reporter mice for ex vivo isolation of regulatory T cells, we demonstrate that the dichotomy in infection tempo between early and late time points is directly paralleled by drastic changes in Foxp3(+ Treg suppressive potency. In complementary experiments using Foxp3(DTR mice, the significance of these shifts in Treg suppressive potency on infection outcome was verified by enumerating the relative impacts of regulatory T cell ablation on bacterial burden and effector T cell activation at early and late time points during persistent Salmonella infection. Moreover, Treg expression of CTLA-4 directly paralleled changes in suppressive potency, and the relative effects of Treg ablation could be largely recapitulated by CTLA-4 in vivo blockade. Together, these results demonstrate that dynamic regulation of Treg suppressive potency dictates the course of persistent bacterial infection.

  2. Probing interaction of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells with ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Aanchal; Bhargava, Richa; Poddar, Pankaj, E-mail: p.poddar@ncl.res.in

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, the physiological effects of the ZnO nanorods on the Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Aerobacter aerogenes) bacterial cells have been studied. The analysis of bacterial growth curves for various concentrations of ZnO nanorods indicates that Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cells show inhibition at concentrations of ∼ 64 and ∼ 256 μg/mL respectively. The marked difference in susceptibility towards nanorods was also validated by spread plate and disk diffusion methods. In addition, the scanning electron micrographs show a clear damage to the cells via changed morphology of the cells from rod to coccoid etc. The confocal optical microscopy images of these cells also demonstrate the reduction in live cell count in the presence of ZnO nanorods. These, results clearly indicate that the antibacterial activity of ZnO nanorods is higher towards Gram positive bacterium than Gram negative bacterium which indicates that the structure of the cell wall might play a major role in the interaction with nanostructured materials and shows high sensitivity to the particle concentration. Highlights: ► Effect of ZnO nanorods on the growth cycles of four bacterial strains. ► A relation has been established between growth rate of bacteria and concentration. ► Serious damage in the morphology of bacterial cells in the presence of ZnO nanorods. ► Microscopic studies to see the time dependent effect on bacterial cells.

  3. Dynamics of Different Bacterial Communities Are Capable of Generating Sustainable Electricity from Microbial Fuel Cells with Organic Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Araki, Yoko; Mochihara, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Tetsuya; KUBOTA, Hiroko; Chiba, Yusuke; Rubaba, Owen; Tashiro, Yosuke; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the bacterial communities in anolyte and anode biofilms and the electrochemical properties of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated when a complex organic waste-decomposing solution was continuously supplied to MFCs as an electron donor. The current density increased gradually and was maintained at approximately 100 to 150 mA m−2. Polarization curve analyses revealed that the maximum power density was 7.4 W m−3 with an internal resistance of 110 Ω. Bacterial co...

  4. Yeast Cell Wall Extract Induces Disease Resistance against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica Crop

    OpenAIRE

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated incre...

  5. Structural and functional studies of MinD ATPase: implications for the molecular recognition of the bacterial cell division apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Ikuko; Oyama, Takuji; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2001-01-01

    Proper placement of the bacterial cell division site requires the site-specific inactivation of other potential division sites. In Escherichia coli, selection of the correct mid-cell site is mediated by the MinC, MinD and MinE proteins. To clarify the functional role of the bacterial cell division inhibitor MinD, which is a membrane-associated ATPase that works as an activator of MinC, we determined the crystal structure of a Pyrococcus furiosus MinD homologue complexed with a substrate analo...

  6. Involvement of the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult in bacterial defense response of sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Konstantin V; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kurilenko, Valeria V

    2013-03-26

    Bacterial infections are one of the most important problems in mass aquaculture, causing the loss of millions of juvenile organisms. We isolated 22 bacterial strains from the cavity fluid of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus and used phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to separate the bacterial strains into 9 genera (Aliivibrio, Bizionia, Colwellia, Olleya, Paenibacillus, Photobacterium, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, and Vibrio). Incubating Strongylocentrotus intermedius larvae with a strain from each of the 9 bacterial genera, we investigated the viability of the larvae, the amount of pigment cells, and the level of polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression. Results of the assay on sea urchin development showed that all bacterial strains, except Pseudoalteromonas and Bizionia, suppressed sea urchin development (resulting in retardation of the embryos' development with cellular disorders) and reduced cell viability. We found that pks expression in the sea urchin larvae after incubation with the bacteria of 9 tested genera was significantly increased, while the sult expression was increased only after the treatment with Pseudoalteromonas and Shewanella. Shikimic acid, which is known to activate the biosynthesis of naphthoquinone pigments, increased the tolerance of the sea urchin embryos to the bacteria. In conclusion, we show that the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult are involved in the bacterial defense response of sea urchins. PMID:23548362

  7. Enteric Bacterial Invasion Of Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro Is Dramatically Enhanced Using a Vertical Diffusion Chamber Model

    OpenAIRE

    Naz, Neveda; Mills, Dominic C.; Wren, Brendan W.; Dorrell, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of bacterial pathogens with host cells have been investigated extensively using in vitro cell culture methods. However as such cell culture assays are performed under aerobic conditions, these in vitro models may not accurately represent the in vivo environment in which the host-pathogen interactions take place. We have developed an in vitro model of infection that permits the coculture of bacteria and host cells under different medium and gas conditions. The Vertical Diffusi...

  8. ATP-mediated Erk1/2 activation stimulates bacterial capture by filopodia, which precedes Shigella invasion of epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Romero S; Grompone G; Carayol N; Mounier J; Guadagnini S; Prevost MC; Sansonetti PJ; Nhieu GT

    2011-01-01

    Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery in humans, invades epithelial cells, using a type III secretory system (T3SS) to inject bacterial effectors into host cells and remodel the actin cytoskeleton. ATP released through connexin hemichanels on the epithelial membrane stimulates Shigella invasion and dissemination in epithelial cells. Here, we show that prior to contact with the cell body, Shigella is captured by nanometer-thin micropodial extensions (NMEs) at a distance from the...

  9. Influence of dietary nucleotide restriction on bacterial sepsis and phagocytic cell function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A D; Fanslow, W C; Drath, D B; Rudolph, F B; Van Buren, C T

    1986-02-01

    Although enzyme defects in purine metabolism have revealed the importance of these substrates to maintenance of a normal immune response, the role of exogenous nucleotides on the cells that mediate the host defense system has remained largely unexplored. Recent investigations have revealed that dietary nucleotides are vital to the maintenance of cell-mediated responses to antigen stimulation. To test the influence of dietary nucleotide deprivation on resistance to infection, Balb/c mice were maintained on chow, a nucleotide-free (NF) diet, or an NF diet repleted with adenine, uracil, or RNA. Mice on the NF diet suffered 100% mortality following intravenous challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, while chow-fed and RNA- or uracil-repleted mice demonstrated significantly greater resistance to this bacterial challenge. Macrophages from mice on the NF diet had decreased phagocytic activity as measured by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria compared with mice maintained on the NF diet supplemented with adenine, uracil, or RNA. No change in S aureus antibody response was noted on the various diets. Although the mechanism of this suppression of nonspecific immunity remains unclear, provision of nucleotides to defined diets appears vital to maintain host resistance to bacterial challenge. PMID:3947217

  10. Testing an agent-based model of bacterial cell motility: How nutrient concentration affects speed distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, V.; Birbaumer, M.; Schweitzer, F.

    2011-08-01

    We revisit a recently proposed agent-based model of active biological motion and compare its predictions with own experimental findings for the speed distribution of bacterial cells, Salmonella typhimurium. Agents move according to a stochastic dynamics and use energy stored in an internal depot for metabolism and active motion. We discuss different assumptions of how the conversion from internal to kinetic energy d( v) may depend on the actual speed, to conclude that d 2 v ξ with either ξ = 2 or 1 speed distribution of bacteria which were obtained in media of different nutrient concentration and at different times. We find that both hypotheses are in line with the experimental observations, with ξ between 1.67 and 2.0. Regarding the influence of a higher nutrient concentration, we conclude that the take-up of energy by bacterial cells is indeed increased. But this energy is not used to increase the speed, with 40 μm/s as the most probable value of the speed distribution, but is rather spend on metabolism and growth.

  11. Spatiotemporal development of the bacterial community in a tubular longitudinal microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Premier, Giuliano C. [Glamorgan Univ., Pontypridd (United Kingdom). Faculty of Advnaced Technology; Beecroft, Nelli J.; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio [Surrey Univ., Guildford (United Kingdom). Microbial Sciences; Varcoe, John R.; Slade, Robert C.T. [Surrey Univ., Guildford (United Kingdom). Chemical Sciences; Dinsdale, Richard M.; Guwy, Alan J. [Glamorgan Univ., Pontypridd (United Kingdom). Faculty of Health, Sport and Science; Thumser, Alfred [Surrey Univ., Guildford (United Kingdom). Biochemical Sciences

    2011-05-15

    The spatiotemporal development of a bacterial community in an exoelectrogenic biofilm was investigated in sucrose-fed longitudinal tubular microbial fuel cell reactors, consisting of two serially connected modules. The proportional changes in the microbial community composition were assessed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing in order to relate them to the performance and stability of the bioelectrochemical system. The reproducibility of duplicated reactors, evaluated by cluster analysis and Jaccard's coefficient, shows 80-90% similarity in species composition. Biofilm development through fed-batch start-up and subsequent stable continuous operation results in a population shift from {gamma}-Proteobacteria- and Bacteroidetes- to Firmicutes-dominated communities, with other diverse species present at much lower relative proportions. DGGE patterns were analysed by range-weighted richness (Rr) and Pareto-Lorenz evenness distribution curves to investigate the evolution of the bacterial community. The first modules shifted from dominance by species closely related to Bacteroides graminisolvens, Raoultella ornithinolytica and Klebsiella sp. BM21 at the start of continuous-mode operation to a community dominated by Paludibacter propionicigenes-, Lactococcus sp.-, Pantoea agglomerans- and Klebsiella oxytoca-related species with stable power generation (6.0 W/m{sup 3}) at day 97. Operational strategies that consider the dynamics of the population will provide useful parameters for evaluating system performance in the practical application of microbial fuel cells. (orig.)

  12. Integration of Rule Based Expert Systems and Case Based Reasoning in an Acute Bacterial Meningitis Clinical Decision Support System

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, Mariana Maceiras

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of the research carried out on the development of a medical diagnostic system applied to the Acute Bacterial Meningitis, using the Case Based Reasoning methodology. The research was focused on the implementation of the adaptation stage, from the integration of Case Based Reasoning and Rule Based Expert Systems. In this adaptation stage we use a higher level RBC that stores and allows reutilizing change experiences, combined with a classic rule-based inference engine. In order to take into account the most evident clinical situation, a pre-diagnosis stage is implemented using a rule engine that, given an evident situation, emits the corresponding diagnosis and avoids the complete process.

  13. Analysis of a Stochastic Model for Bacterial Growth and the Lognormality of the Cell-Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Wakita, Jun-ichi

    2016-07-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell division and the linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We find that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values that give a good lognormal approximation; thus, the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  14. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  15. Dynamics of different bacterial communities are capable of generating sustainable electricity from microbial fuel cells with organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Araki, Yoko; Mochihara, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Tetsuya; Kubota, Hiroko; Chiba, Yusuke; Rubaba, Owen; Tashiro, Yosuke; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the bacterial communities in anolyte and anode biofilms and the electrochemical properties of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated when a complex organic waste-decomposing solution was continuously supplied to MFCs as an electron donor. The current density increased gradually and was maintained at approximately 100 to 150 mA m(-2). Polarization curve analyses revealed that the maximum power density was 7.4 W m(-3) with an internal resistance of 110 Ω. Bacterial community structures in the organic waste-decomposing solution and MFCs differed from each other. Clonal analyses targeting 16S rRNA genes indicated that bacterial communities in the biofilms on MFCs developed to specific communities dominated by novel Geobacter. Multidimensional scaling analyses based on DGGE profiles revealed that bacterial communities in the organic waste-decomposing solution fluctuated and had no dynamic equilibrium. Bacterial communities on the anolyte in MFCs had a dynamic equilibrium with fluctuations, while those of the biofilm converged to the Geobacter-dominated structure. These bacterial community dynamics of MFCs differed from those of control-MFCs under open circuit conditions. These results suggested that bacterial communities in the anolyte and biofilm have a gentle symbiotic system through electron flow, which resulted in the advance of current density from complex organic waste. PMID:24789988

  16. Concentrating bacterial cells using a ratchet system: a lattice Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuguo; Slater, Gary

    2012-02-01

    Rectification of motile E. coli bacteria has been observed in the presence of funnel-like channels. We present a lattice Monte Carlo model which takes into account both the size and the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of autonomous bacterial cells. The motion of the cells is composed of alternating run and tumble periods. We show that the rectification effect of the funnels is strongly dependent upon the effective random walk step length of the run/tumble cycle as well as the size of the funnel's aperture. Our results agree with experimental observations, and also confirm some conclusions from a previous simulation model of point-like bacteria. We also explore series of funnels as a means to pump and concentrate cells. We observe deviations from theoretical predictions when the size of the cells is comparable to that of the aperture of the funnel. The current model can be extended to study cells with different shapes, e.g. cigar-shape bacteria.

  17. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  18. Colour removal from aqueous solutions of metal-complex azo dyes using bacterial cells of Shewanella strain J18 143.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie; Guthrie, James Thomas

    2010-06-01

    The decoloration treatment of textile dye effluents through biodegradation, using bacterial cells, has been studied as a possible means of solving some of the problems that are associated with the pollution of water sources by colorants. In this paper, the use of whole bacterial cells of Shewanella J18 143 for the reduction of aqueous solutions of selected mono-azo, metal-complex dyes, namely Irgalan Grey GLN, Irgalan Black RBLN and Irgalan Blue 3GL, was investigated. The effects of temperature, pH and dye concentration on colour removal were also investigated and shown to be important. The operative conditions for the removal of colour were 30 degrees C, at pH 6.8, with a final dye concentration of 0.12 g/L in the colour reduction system. This study provides an extension to the application of Shewanella strain J18 143 bacterial cells in the decoloration of textile wastewaters. PMID:20167478

  19. Fuel cell/gas turbine integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knickerbocker, T. [Allison Engine Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-10-19

    The Allison Engine Company`s very high efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle program is discussed. The power cycle has the following advantages: high system efficiency potential, reduced emissions inherent to fuel cells, unmanned operation(no boiler) particularly suited for distributed power, and existing product line matches fuel cell operating environment. Cost effectiveness, estimates, and projections are given.

  20. Integration of bovine herpesvirus 4 genome into cultured persistently infected host cell genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donofrio Gaetano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Persistent infection of macrophages with bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 has been proposed to play a secondary causal role, along with bacterial infection, in bovine post-partum metritis. Mechanisms of maintenance of BoHV-4 persistent infection are not understood. We previously generated in vitro models of BoHV-4 persistent infection in human rhadomyosarcoma and bovine macrophage cell lines by drug selection of cells infected with BoHV-4 carrying a drug-resistance marker, and demonstrated circular episomal BoHV-4 genomes. In the present study, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH to demonstrate BoHV-4 genomes also integrated into the genomes of these persistently infected cells.

  1. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to...

  2. Micro Corona Ionizer as an Ozone Source for Bacterial Cell Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Lim, Hyun Jeong; Chua, Beelee; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-04-01

    DNA extraction is a critical process of DNA assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarrays, molecular cloning, and DNA hybridization which has been well established and can be implemented by commercial kits. DNA extraction involves cell lysis, precipitation, and purification through the combination of physical and chemical processes. Cell lysis is essential to high DNA recovery yield which can be achieved via a variety of physical, chemical, and enzymatic methods. However, these methods were originally developed for bioassays that were labor intensive, time consuming, and vulnerable to contamination and inhibition. Here, we proposed to employ a micro corona ionizer as an ozone source to lyse bacterial cells. Ozone has been well known and used as a disinfectant which allows cell lysis and DNA extraction. Previously, we have shown that a micro corona ionizer is capable of generating a significant amount of ozone. In this study, we employed the micro corona ionizer for the bacterial cell lysis which consists of a 50 μm diameter cantilever wire as the discharge cathode and a 50 μm thick copper foil as anode. Applied voltages varied from 1900 to 2200 V with corresponding corona currents from 16 to 28 μA. The resultant ozone (concentration > 0.14 ppm) generated from the micro corona ionizer was bubbled into the sample via a miniature pump. We demonstrated the cell lysis of Pseudomonas putida as the target bacterium using the micro corona ionizer. At a flow rate of 38 ml/min and applied corona voltage of 2000 V, 98.5 ± 0.2% lysis (normalized to sonication result) was achieved after 10 min. In comparison, untreated and air-treated samples showed normalized % lysis of 11.9 ± 2.4 and 36.1 ± 1.7%, respectively. We also showed that the cell lysis efficiency could be significantly increased by increasing the flow rate and the applied corona voltage. By comparing the experimental results for continuous and pulsed treatment, we verified that the percentage of

  3. Antigen 43-mediated autotransporter display, a versatile bacterial cell surface presentation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Hasman, Henrik; Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2002-01-01

    the outer membrane and secretion through the cell envelope is contained within the protein itself. Ag43 consists of two subunits (alpha and beta), where the beta-subunit forms an integral outer membrane translocator to which the alpha-subunit is noncovalently attached. The simplicity of the Ag43...

  4. PREPARATION AND PURIFICATION OF DNA FROM BACTERIAL CELLS; CHARACTERIZATION OF PLASMID DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Praveen, G Adarsh, T Ramesh, M Ramesh*

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of genetic material to deliver genes for therapeutic purposes has been practiced for many years. With the advancement in genetic engineering, foreign genes of industrial applications can be inserted into cloning vector for mass production in various host cells. Escherichia coli is an extremely important model organism in modern biological engineering, the suitable growth media is essential for the optimal expression of the genes in E. coli. The present study aims at isolation and purification of genomic DNA from E. coli, the characterization of pBR322 plasmid DNA. Bacterial culture conditions were optimized in shake – flask cultures based on optimal temperature, inoculum size and medium composition. Solutions and methods are disclosed for the effective, simple isolation of DNA from bacterial cells. High bioprocess recovery and product quality were primarily associated with the complete removal of total cellular RNA impurity. The process was demonstrated without the use of animal-derived RNase. High-molecular-weight (HMW RNA and other impurities were removed by selective precipitation using calcium chloride at an optimal concentration.The optimal conditions for the growth of Escherichia coli were shown maximum absorbance as 7.5 at 370C temperature, 1% inoculum size using TB medium composition. The purified genomic DNA had concentration as 73.5 µg/ml and purity 1.8. The 0.5M CaCl2 was optimal concentration for removal of RNA. The plasmid DNA pBR322 was confirmed by comparing the band to 4.36 Kb, purity of plasmid was 1.85 and it contains 96.8% of super coiled DNA. The contaminants like chromosomal DNA, RNA, host cell proteins and mycoplasma were absent in the plasmid DNA.

  5. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  6. Antibiotic Discovery: Combatting Bacterial Resistance in Cells and in Biofilm Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahit Penesyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a rapidly escalating threat to public health as our arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Drug discovery has historically focused on bacteria growing in planktonic cultures. Many antibiotics were originally developed to target individual bacterial cells, being assessed in vitro against microorganisms in a planktonic mode of life. However, towards the end of the 20th century it became clear that many bacteria live as complex communities called biofilms in their natural habitat, and this includes habitats within a human host. The biofilm mode of life provides advantages to microorganisms, such as enhanced resistance towards environmental stresses, including antibiotic challenge. The community level resistance provided by biofilms is distinct from resistance mechanisms that operate at a cellular level, and cannot be overlooked in the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases. The review compares mechanisms of antibiotic resistance at cellular and community levels in the light of past and present antibiotic discovery efforts. Future perspectives on novel strategies for treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases are explored.

  7. Bacterial capsular polysaccharide prevents the onset of asthma through T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jenny L; Jones, Mark B; Cobb, Brian A

    2015-04-01

    Over the last four decades, increases in the incidence of immune-mediated diseases in the Western world have been linked to changes in microbial exposure. It is becoming increasingly clear that the normal microbiota in the gut can profoundly alter susceptibility to a wide range of diseases, such as asthma, in which immune homeostasis is disrupted, yet the mechanisms governing this microbial influence remains poorly defined. In this study, we show that gastrointestinal exposure to PSA, a capsular polysaccharide derived from the commensal bacterium Bacteroides fragilis, significantly limits susceptibility to the induction of experimental asthma. We report that direct treatment of mice with PSA generates protection from asthma, and this effect can be given to a naïve recipient by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells from PSA-exposed mice. Remarkably, we found that these PSA-induced T cells are not canonical FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, but that they potently inhibit both Th1 and Th2 models of asthma in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These findings reveal that bacterial polysaccharides link the microbiota with the peripheral immune system by activating CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells upon exposure in the gut, and they facilitate resistance to unnecessary inflammatory responses via the production of IL-10. PMID:25347992

  8. Cell resistant zwitterionic polyelectrolyte coating promotes bacterial attachment: an adhesion contradiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jessica S; Kelly, Kristopher D; Ghoussoub, Yara E; Delgado, Jose D; Keller Iii, Thomas C S; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2016-04-22

    Polymers of various architectures with zwitterionic functionality have recently been shown to effectively suppress nonspecific fouling of surfaces by proteins and prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (mammalian) cells as well as other microorganisms and environmental contaminants. In this work, zwitterionic copolymers were used to make thin coatings on substrates with the layer-by-layer method. Polyelectrolyte multilayers, PEMUs, were built with [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)], PAH, and copolymers of acrylic acid and either the AEDAPS zwitterionic group 3-[2-(acrylamido)-ethyldimethyl ammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-AEDAPS), or benzophenone (PAABp). Benzophenone allowed the PEMU to be toughened by photocrosslinking post-deposition. The attachment of two mammalian cell lines, rat aortic smooth muscle (A7r5) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3), and the biofilm-forming Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli was studied on PEMUs terminated with PAA-co-AEDAPS. Consistent with earlier studies, it is shown that PAH/PAA-co-AEDAPS PEMUs resist the adhesion of mammalian cells, but, contrary to our initial hypothesis, are bacterial adhesive and significantly so after maximizing the surface presentation of PAA-co-AEDAPS. This unexpected contrast in the adhesive behavior of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is explained by differences in adhesion mechanisms as well as different responses to the topology and morphology of the multilayer surface. PMID:26872345

  9. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  10. Technology Advancement for Integrative Stem Cell Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Yoon; Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have endeavored to use stem cells for a variety of applications ranging from basic science research to translational medicine. Population-based characterization of such stem cells, while providing an important foundation to further development, often disregard the heterogeneity inherent among individual constituents within a given population. The population-based analysis and characterization of stem cells and the problems associated with such a blanket approach only underscore the...

  11. Cell proliferation, viability, and in vitro differentiation of equine mesenchymal stem cells seeded on bacterial cellulose hydrogel scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favi, Pelagie M.; Benson, Roberto S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Neilsen, Nancy R. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Hammonds, Ryan L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Bates, Cassandra C. [Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Stephens, Christopher P. [Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Center for Materials Processing, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dhar, Madhu S., E-mail: mdhar@utk.edu [Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The culture of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells on natural biopolymers holds great promise for treatments of connective tissue disorders such as osteoarthritis. The safety and performance of such therapies relies on the systematic in vitro evaluation of the developed stem cell-biomaterial constructs prior to in vivo implantation. This study evaluates bacterial cellulose (BC), a biocompatible natural polymer, as a scaffold for equine-derived bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (EqMSCs) for application in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. An equine model was chosen due to similarities in size, load and types of joint injuries suffered by horses and humans. Lyophilized and critical point dried BC hydrogel scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm nanostructure morphology which demonstrated that critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. EqMSCs positively expressed the undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell surface markers CD44 and CD90. The BC scaffolds were shown to be cytocompatible, supporting cellular adhesion and proliferation, and allowed for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of EqMSCs. The cells seeded on the BC hydrogel were shown to be viable and metabolically active. These findings demonstrate that the combination of a BC hydrogel and EqMSCs are promising constructs for musculoskeletal tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► Critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. ► Cells positively expressed undifferentiated pluripotent stem cell markers. ► BCs were cytocompatible, supported cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation ► Cells seeded on BC scaffolds were viable and metabolically active. ► Findings demonstrate that BC and EqMSCs are promising tissue engineered constructs.

  12. Cell proliferation, viability, and in vitro differentiation of equine mesenchymal stem cells seeded on bacterial cellulose hydrogel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The culture of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells on natural biopolymers holds great promise for treatments of connective tissue disorders such as osteoarthritis. The safety and performance of such therapies relies on the systematic in vitro evaluation of the developed stem cell-biomaterial constructs prior to in vivo implantation. This study evaluates bacterial cellulose (BC), a biocompatible natural polymer, as a scaffold for equine-derived bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (EqMSCs) for application in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. An equine model was chosen due to similarities in size, load and types of joint injuries suffered by horses and humans. Lyophilized and critical point dried BC hydrogel scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm nanostructure morphology which demonstrated that critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. EqMSCs positively expressed the undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell surface markers CD44 and CD90. The BC scaffolds were shown to be cytocompatible, supporting cellular adhesion and proliferation, and allowed for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of EqMSCs. The cells seeded on the BC hydrogel were shown to be viable and metabolically active. These findings demonstrate that the combination of a BC hydrogel and EqMSCs are promising constructs for musculoskeletal tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► Critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. ► Cells positively expressed undifferentiated pluripotent stem cell markers. ► BCs were cytocompatible, supported cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation ► Cells seeded on BC scaffolds were viable and metabolically active. ► Findings demonstrate that BC and EqMSCs are promising tissue engineered constructs

  13. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure and delays hypersensitive response cell death induced by nonhost bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghee Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is the most widespread bacterial pathogen in plants. Several strains of P. syringae produce a phytotoxin, coronatine (COR, which acts as a jasmonic acid mimic and inhibits plant defense responses and contributes to disease symptom development. In this study, we found that COR inhibits early defense responses during nonhost disease resistance. Stomatal closure induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tabaci, was disrupted by COR in tomato epidermal peels. In addition, nonhost HR cell death triggered by P. syringae pv. tabaci on tomato was remarkably delayed when COR was supplemented along with P. syringae pv. tabaci inoculation. Using isochorismate synthase (ICS-silenced tomato plants and transcript profiles of genes in SA- and JA-related defense pathways, we show that COR suppresses SA-mediated defense during nonhost resistance.

  14. Quantification of bioavailable chlortetracycline in pig feces using a bacterial whole-cell biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Sørensen, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial whole-cell biosensors were used to measure the concentration of chlortetracycline (CTC) in the feces of pigs. In this study, the Escherichia coli biosensor used has a detection limit of 0.03 mg/kg CTC in pig feces. The tetracycline concentration was correlated with the appearance and...... maintenance of fecal coliform bacteria resistant to tetracycline. Initially, large quantities of water-extractable CTC were excreted from the pigs and measurable amounts were detected even at 30 days after treatment cessation. This led to a sharp rise in the number of tetracycline resistant coliform bacteria...... in the feces, to within the same order of magnitude as the total coliform count. The high level of tetracycline resistance was maintained in spite of the declining concentration of tetracycline. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Bacterial nanocellulose/Nafion composite membranes for low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gao-peng; Zhang, Jing; Qiao, Jin-li; Jiang, Yong-ming; Zarrin, Hadis; Chen, Zhongwei; Hong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Novel nanocomposite membranes aimed for both proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) are presented in this work. The membranes are based on blending bacterial nanocellulose pulp and Nafion (abbreviated as BxNy, where x and y indicates the mass ratio of bacterial cellulose to Nafion). The structure and properties of BxNy membranes are characterized by FTIR, SEM, TG, DMA and EIS, along with water uptake, swelling behavior and methanol permeability tests. It is found that the BxNy composite membranes with reinforced concrete-like structure show excellent mechanical and thermal stability regardless of annealing. The water uptake plus area and volume swelling ratios are all decreased compared to Nafion membranes. The proton conductivities of pristine and annealed B1N9 are 0.071 and 0.056 S cm-1, respectively, at 30 °C and 100% humidity. Specifically, annealed B1N1 exhibited the lowest methanol permeability of 7.21 × 10-7 cm2 s-1. Through the selectivity analysis, pristine and annealed B1N7 are selected to assemble the MEAs. The performances of annealed B1N7 in PEMFC and DMFC show the maximum power densities of 106 and 3.2 mW cm-2, respectively, which are much higher than those of pristine B1N7 at 25 °C. The performances of the pristine and annealed B1N7 reach a level as high as 21.1 and 20.4 mW cm-2 at 80 °C in DMFC, respectively.

  16. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h and 97.1% (18 h, as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l by 80.5% (3 h and 89.0% (18 h, was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l. No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved

  17. Quantification of the lateral detachment force for bacterial cells using atomic force microscope and centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the lateral detachment force for individual bacterial cells, a quantitative method using the contact mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM) was developed in this study. Three key factors for the proposed method, i.e. scan size, scan rate and cantilever choice, were evaluated and optimized. The scan size of 40x40 μm2 was optimal for capturing sufficient number of adhered cells in a microscopic field and provide adequate information for cell identification and detachment force measurement. The scan rate affected the measurement results significantly, and was optimized at 40 μm/s considering both force measurement accuracy and experimental efficiency. The hardness of applied cantilevers also influenced force determination. The proposed protocol for cantilever selection is to use those with the lowest spring constant first and then step up to a harder cantilever until all cells are detached. The lateral detachment force of Escherichia coli cells on polished stainless steel and a glass-slide coated with poly-L-lysine were measured as 0.763±0.167 and 0.639±0.136 nN, respectively. The results showed that the established method had good repeatability and sensitivity to various bacteria/substrata combinations. The detachment force quantified by AFM (0.639±0.136 nN) was comparable to that measured by the centrifugation method (1.12 nN). -- Research highlights: → A quantitative method via AFM is developed to measure the lateral detachment force of an attached cell. → The parameters of AFM operation for this method are optimized. → The tests using E. coli on different substrata show that the method has good repeatability and sensitivity. → The method could obtain reliable results that are comparable to those using the centrifugation approach.

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements of the Mechanical Properties of Cell Walls on Living Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Richard; Mullin, Nic; Turner, Robert; Foster, Simon; Hobbs, Jamie

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infection in humans, including the Methicillin resistant strain, MRSA. However, very little is known about the mechanical properties of these cells. Our investigations use AFM to examine live S. aureus cells to quantify mechanical properties. These were explored using force spectroscopy with different trigger forces, allowing the properties to be extracted at different indentation depths. A value for the cell wall stiffness has been extracted, along with a second, higher value which is found upon indenting at higher forces. This higher value drops as the cells are exposed to high salt, sugar and detergent concentrations, implying that this measurement contains a contribution from the internal turgor pressure. We have monitored these properties as the cells progress through the cell cycle. Force maps were taken over the cells at different stages of the growth process to identify changes in the mechanics throughout the progression of growth and division. The effect of Oxacillin has also been studied, to better understand its mechanism of action. Finally mutant strains of S. aureus and a second species Bacillus subtilis have been used to link the mechanical properties of the cell walls with the chain lengths and substructures involved.

  19. Quantitative investigation of bacterial chemotaxis at the single-cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Taejin

    Living cells sense and respond to constantly changing environmental conditions. Depending on the type of stimuli, the cell may response by altering gene expression pattern, secreting molecules, or migrating to a different environment. Directed movement of cells in response to chemical stimuli is called chemotaxis. In bacterial chemotaxis, small extracellular molecules bind receptor proteins embedded in the cell membrane, which then transmit the signal inside the cell through a cascade of protein-protein interactions. This chain of events influences the behavior of motor proteins that drive the rotation of helical filaments called flagella. Individual cells of the gut-dwelling bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) have many such flagella, whose collective action results in the swimming behavior of the cell. A recent study found that in absence of chemical stimuli, fluctuations in the protein cascade can cause non-Poissonian switching behavior in the flagellar motor (2). A corollary was that extension of such behavior to the whole-cell swimming level would have implications for E. coli's foraging strategy. However, existence of such behavior at the swimming cell level could not be predicted a priori, since the mapping from single flagellum behavior to the swimming behavior of a multi-flagellated cell is complex and poorly understood (3, 4). Here we characterize the chemotactic behavior of swimming E. coli cells using a novel optical trap-based measurement technique. This technique allows us to trap individual cells and monitor their swimming behavior over long time periods with high temporal resolution. We find that swimming cells exhibit non-Poissonian switching statistics between different swimming states, in a manner similar to the rotational direction-switching behavior seen in individual flagella. Furthermore, we develop a data analysis routine that allows us to characterize higher order swimming features such as reversal of swimming direction and existence of

  20. Phenotypic T cell exhaustion in a murine model of bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rohit; Wagener, Maylene; Breed, Elise R; Liang, Zhe; Yoseph, Benyam P; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2014-01-01

    While much of cancer immunology research has focused on anti-tumor immunity both systemically and within the tumor microenvironment, little is known about the impact of pre-existing malignancy on pathogen-specific immune responses. Here, we sought to characterize the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response following a bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice with established subcutaneous pancreatic adenocarcinomas were infected with Listeria monocytogenes, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were compared to those in control mice without cancer. While the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion and accumulation was comparable between the cancer and non-cancer groups, bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited increased expression of the coinhibitory receptors BTLA, PD-1, and 2B4. Furthermore, increased inhibitory receptor expression was associated with reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-2 production by bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the cancer group. Taken together, these data suggest that cancer's immune suppressive effects are not limited to the tumor microenvironment, but that pre-existing malignancy induces phenotypic exhaustion in T cells by increasing expression of coinhibitory receptors and may impair pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. PMID:24796533

  1. Phenotypic T cell exhaustion in a murine model of bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Mittal

    Full Text Available While much of cancer immunology research has focused on anti-tumor immunity both systemically and within the tumor microenvironment, little is known about the impact of pre-existing malignancy on pathogen-specific immune responses. Here, we sought to characterize the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response following a bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice with established subcutaneous pancreatic adenocarcinomas were infected with Listeria monocytogenes, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were compared to those in control mice without cancer. While the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion and accumulation was comparable between the cancer and non-cancer groups, bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited increased expression of the coinhibitory receptors BTLA, PD-1, and 2B4. Furthermore, increased inhibitory receptor expression was associated with reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-2 production by bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the cancer group. Taken together, these data suggest that cancer's immune suppressive effects are not limited to the tumor microenvironment, but that pre-existing malignancy induces phenotypic exhaustion in T cells by increasing expression of coinhibitory receptors and may impair pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation.

  2. Sensing the Structural Differences in Cellulose from Apple and Bacterial Cell Wall Materials by Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Zdunek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy was used for assessment of structural differences of celluloses of various origins. Investigated celluloses were: bacterial celluloses cultured in presence of pectin and/or xyloglucan, as well as commercial celluloses and cellulose extracted from apple parenchyma. FT-IR spectra were used to estimate of the Iβ content, whereas Raman spectra were used to evaluate the degree of crystallinity of the cellulose. The crystallinity index (XCRAMAN% varied from −25% for apple cellulose to 53% for microcrystalline commercial cellulose. Considering bacterial cellulose, addition of xyloglucan has an impact on the percentage content of cellulose Iβ. However, addition of only xyloglucan or only pectins to pure bacterial cellulose both resulted in a slight decrease of crystallinity. However, culturing bacterial cellulose in the presence of mixtures of xyloglucan and pectins results in an increase of crystallinity. The results confirmed that the higher degree of crystallinity, the broader the peak around 913 cm−1. Among all bacterial celluloses the bacterial cellulose cultured in presence of xyloglucan and pectin (BCPX has the most similar structure to those observed in natural primary cell walls.

  3. [Disinfectants - bacterial cells interactions in the view of hygiene and public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książczyk, Marta; Krzyżewska, Eva; Futoma-Kołoch, Bożena; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of biocides has increased rapidly. One common example is triclosan, with wide application in households as well as medical and industrial fields, especially food industry and animal husbandry. Chemical disinfection is a major mean to control and eliminate pathogenic bacteria, particularly those with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, exposition to biocides results in an adaptive response in microorganisms, causing them to display a wide range of resistance mechanisms. Numerous microorganisms are characterized by either natural resistance to chemical compounds or an ability to adapt to biocides using various strategies, such as: modification of cell surface structures (lipopolisaccharide), membrane fatty acids), over-expression of efflux pumps (a system for active transport of toxic compounds out of bacterial cell), enzymatic inactivation of biocides or altering biocide targets. For instance, it was shown that in vitro exposition of Salmonella Typhimurium to subinhibitory concentration of biocides (triclosan, quaternary ammonium compounds [QACs]) resulted in selection of variants resistant to tested biocides and, additionally, to acridine dyes and antibiotics. Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus strains isolated from chlorine dioxide containing disinfection devices were found to be resistant to chlorine dioxide and also to other oxidizing compounds, such as peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Interaction between chemical compounds, including disinfectants and microbial cells, can create a serious threat to public health and sanitary-hygienic security. This phenomenon is connected with factor risk that intensify the probability of selection and dissemination of multidrug resistance among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26400890

  4. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  5. Integrated biosensors for cell culture monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    De Micheli, Giovanni; Boero, Cristina; Olivo, Jacopo; Carrara, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors for endogenous compounds, such as glucose and lactate, are applied to monitor cell cultures. Cells can be cultivated for several purposes, such as understanding and modeling some biological mechanisms, the development of new drugs and therapies, and in the field of regenerative medicine. We have realized a self-contained monitoring system with remote readout. Metabolite detection is based on oxidases immobilized onto carbon nanotubes. We calibrate the system for glucose and lactate...

  6. INTEGRATED LAYOUT DESIGN OF CELLS AND FLOW PATHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhihua; Zhong Yifang; Zhou Ji

    2003-01-01

    The integrated layout problem in manufacturing systems is investigated. An integrated model for concurrent layout design of cells and flow paths is formulated. A hybrid approach combined an enhanced branch-and-bound algorithm with a simulated annealing scheme is proposed to solve this problem. The integrated layout method is applied to re-layout the gear pump shop of a medium-size manufacturer of hydraulic pieces. Results show that the proposed layout method can concurrently provide good solutions of the cell layouts and the flow path layouts.

  7. Evaluation of an in vitro cell assay to select attenuated bacterial mutants of Aeromonas hydrophila and Edwardsiella tarda to channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the feasibility of using an in vitro cell assay to select attenuated bacterial mutants. Using catfish gill cells G1B, the feasibility of using an in vitro assay instead of in vivo virulence assay using live fish to select attenuated bacterial mutants was evaluated in this study. Pearson ...

  8. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  9. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  10. Simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity in single cells in defined mixtures of pure cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Dalton, Helen M.; Angels, Mark; Marshall, Kevin C.; Molin, Søren; Goodman, Amanda E.

    1997-01-01

    A protocol was developed to achieve the simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity at the level of single cells: a chromogenic beta-galactosidase activity assay was combined with in situ hybridization of Fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes to rRNA. The method a...

  11. Highly variable individual donor cell fates characterize robust horizontal gene transfer of an integrative and conjugative element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavat, François; Mitri, Sara; Pelet, Serge; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-06-14

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important evolutionary mechanism for bacterial adaptation. However, given the typical low transfer frequencies in a bacterial population, little is known about the fate and interplay of donor cells and the mobilized DNA during transfer. Here we study transfer of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) among individual live bacterial cells. ICEs are widely distributed mobile DNA elements that are different than plasmids because they reside silent in the host chromosome and are maintained through vertical descent. Occasionally, ICEs become active, excise, and transmit their DNA to a new recipient, where it is reintegrated. We develop a fluorescent tool to differentiate excision, transfer, and reintegration of a model ICE named ICEclc (for carrying the clc genes for chlorocatechol metabolism) among single Pseudomonas cells by using time-lapse microscopy. We find that ICEclc activation is initiated in stationary phase cells, but excision and transfer predominantly occur only when such cells have been presented with new nutrients. Donors with activated ICE develop a number of different states, characterized by reduced cell division rates or growth arrest, persistence, or lysis, concomitant with ICE excision, and likely, ICE loss or replication. The donor cell state transitions can be described by using a stochastic model, which predicts that ICE fitness is optimal at low initiation rates in stationary phase. Despite highly variable donor cell fates, ICE transfer is remarkably robust overall, with 75% success after excision. Our results help to better understand ICE behavior and shed a new light on bacterial cellular differentiation during horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27247406

  12. Approaches in integrative bioinformatics towards the virtual cell

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approaches in Integrative Bioinformatics provides a basic introduction to biological information systems, as well as guidance for the computational analysis of systems biology. This book also covers a range of issues and methods that reveal the multitude of omics data integration types and the relevance that integrative bioinformatics has today. Topics include biological data integration and manipulation, modeling and simulation of metabolic networks, transcriptomics and phenomics, and virtual cell approaches, as well as a number of applications of network biology. It helps to illustrat

  13. Bacterial surface appendages strongly impact nanomechanical and electrokinetic properties of Escherichia coli cells subjected to osmotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Francius

    Full Text Available The physicochemical properties and dynamics of bacterial envelope, play a major role in bacterial activity. In this study, the morphological, nanomechanical and electrohydrodynamic properties of Escherichia coli K-12 mutant cells were thoroughly investigated as a function of bulk medium ionic strength using atomic force microscopy (AFM and electrokinetics (electrophoresis. Bacteria were differing according to genetic alterations controlling the production of different surface appendages (short and rigid Ag43 adhesins, longer and more flexible type 1 fimbriae and F pilus. From the analysis of the spatially resolved force curves, it is shown that cells elasticity and turgor pressure are not only depending on bulk salt concentration but also on the presence/absence and nature of surface appendage. In 1 mM KNO(3, cells without appendages or cells surrounded by Ag43 exhibit large Young moduli and turgor pressures (∼700-900 kPa and ∼100-300 kPa respectively. Under similar ionic strength condition, a dramatic ∼50% to ∼70% decrease of these nanomechanical parameters was evidenced for cells with appendages. Qualitatively, such dependence of nanomechanical behavior on surface organization remains when increasing medium salt content to 100 mM, even though, quantitatively, differences are marked to a much smaller extent. Additionally, for a given surface appendage, the magnitude of the nanomechanical parameters decreases significantly when increasing bulk salt concentration. This effect is ascribed to a bacterial exoosmotic water loss resulting in a combined contraction of bacterial cytoplasm together with an electrostatically-driven shrinkage of the surface appendages. The former process is demonstrated upon AFM analysis, while the latter, inaccessible upon AFM imaging, is inferred from electrophoretic data interpreted according to advanced soft particle electrokinetic theory. Altogether, AFM and electrokinetic results clearly demonstrate the

  14. Integrating transcriptional controls for plant cell expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Mockaitis, Keithanne; Estelle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The plant hormones auxin and brassinosteroid promote cell expansion by regulating gene expression. In addition to independent transcriptional responses generated by the two signals, recent microarray analyses indicate that auxin and brassinosteroid also coordinate the expression of a set of shared target genes.

  15. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Vladimir; Suo, Chen; Orear, Cedric; van den Oord, Joost; Balogh, Zsofia; Guegan, Justine; Job, Bastien; Meurice, Guillaume; Ripoche, Hugues; Calza, Stefano; Hasmats, Johanna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lacroix, Ludovic; Vielh, Philippe; Dufour, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridiz...

  16. Phospholipase D promotes Arcanobacterium haemolyticum adhesion via lipid raft remodeling and host cell death following bacterial invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlson Petteri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is an emerging bacterial pathogen, causing pharyngitis and more invasive infections. This organism expresses an unusual phospholipase D (PLD, which we propose promotes bacterial pathogenesis through its action on host cell membranes. The pld gene is found on a genomic region of reduced %G + C, suggesting recent horizontal acquisition. Results Recombinant PLD rearranged HeLa cell lipid rafts in a dose-dependent manner and this was inhibited by cholesterol sequestration. PLD also promoted host cell adhesion, as a pld mutant had a 60.3% reduction in its ability to adhere to HeLa cells as compared to the wild type. Conversely, the pld mutant appeared to invade HeLa cells approximately two-fold more efficiently as the wild type. This finding was attributable to a significant loss of host cell viability following secretion of PLD from intracellular bacteria. As determined by viability assay, only 15.6% and 82.3% of HeLa cells remained viable following invasion by the wild type or pld mutant, respectively, as compared to untreated HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopy of HeLa cells inoculated with A. haemolyticum strains revealed that the pld mutant was contained within intracellular vacuoles, as compared to the wild type, which escaped the vacuole. Wild type-infected HeLa cells also displayed the hallmarks of necrosis. Similarly inoculated HeLa cells displayed no signs of apoptosis, as measured by induction of caspase 3/7, 8 or 9 activities. Conclusions These data indicate that PLD enhances bacterial adhesion and promotes host cell necrosis following invasion, and therefore, may be important in the disease pathogenesis of A. haemolyticum infections.

  17. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Breukink, Eefjan

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated) proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues. PMID:27571111

  18. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs, have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues.

  19. A 16 × 16 CMOS Capacitive Biosensor Array Towards Detection of Single Bacterial Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couniot, Numa; Francis, Laurent A; Flandre, Denis

    2016-04-01

    We present a 16 × 16 CMOS biosensor array aiming at impedance detection of whole-cell bacteria. Each 14 μm × 16 μm pixel comprises high-sensitive passivated microelectrodes connected to an innovative readout interface based on charge sharing principle for capacitance-to-voltage conversion and subthreshold gain stage to boost the sensitivity. Fabricated in a 0.25 μm CMOS process, the capacitive array was experimentally shown to perform accurate dielectric measurements of the electrolyte up to electrical conductivities of 0.05 S/m, with maximal sensitivity of 55 mV/fF and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 37 dB. As biosensing proof of concept, real-time detection of Staphylococcus epidermidis binding events was experimentally demonstrated and provides detection limit of ca. 7 bacteria per pixel and sensitivity of 2.18 mV per bacterial cell. Models and simulations show good matching with experimental results and provide a comprehensive analysis of the sensor and circuit system. Advantages, challenges and limits of the proposed capacitive biosensor array are finally described with regards to literature. With its small area and low power consumption, the present capacitive array is particularly suitable for portable point-of-care (PoC) diagnosis tools and lab-on-chip (LoC) systems. PMID:25974947

  20. The impact of hypoxia on intestinal epithelial cell functions: consequences for invasion by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Chotikatum, Sucheera; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-12-01

    The maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in human tissues is mediated by several cellular adaptations in response to low-oxygen stress, called hypoxia. A decrease in tissue oxygen levels is initially counteracted by increasing local blood flow to overcome diminished oxygenation and avoid hypoxic stress. However, studies have shown that the physiological oxygen concentrations in several tissues are much lower than atmospheric (normoxic) conditions, and the oxygen supply is finely regulated in individual cell types. The gastrointestinal tract has been described to subsist in a state of physiologically low oxygen level and is thus depicted as a tissue in the state of constant low-grade inflammation. The intestinal epithelial cell layer plays a vital role in the immune response to inflammation and infections that occur within the intestinal tissue and is involved in many of the adaptation responses to hypoxic stress. This is especially relevant in the context of inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, this review aims to describe the intestinal epithelial cellular response to hypoxia and the consequences for host interactions with invading gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. PMID:27002817

  1. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcourt, M F; Penketh, P G; Hodnick, W F; Johnson, D A; Sherman, D H; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1999-08-31

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduced and activated intracellularly, producing cytotoxic semiquinone anion radical and hydroquinone reduction intermediates. In vitro, MCRA protects DNA from cross-linking by the hydroquinone reduction intermediate of these mitomycins by oxidizing the hydroquinone back to the parent molecule; thus, MCRA acts as a hydroquinone oxidase. These findings suggest potential therapeutic applications for MCRA in the treatment of cancer with the mitomycins and imply that intrinsic or selected mitomycin C resistance in mammalian cells may not be due solely to decreased bioactivation, as has been hypothesized previously, but instead could involve an MCRA-like mechanism. PMID:10468636

  2. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacicedo, Maximiliano L; León, Ignacio E; Gonzalez, Jimena S; Porto, Luismar M; Alvarez, Vera A; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors. PMID:26784658

  3. Biosynthesis of Bacterial Cellulose/Carboxylic Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Enzymatic Biofuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Lv

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel nanocomposites comprised of bacterial cellulose (BC with carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared through a simple method of biosynthesis. The biocathode and bioanode for the enzyme biological fuel cell (EBFC were prepared using BC/c-MWCNTs composite injected by laccase (Lac and glucose oxidase (GOD with the aid of glutaraldehyde (GA crosslinking. Biosynthesis of BC/c-MWCNTs composite was characterized by digital photos, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR. The experimental results indicated the successful incorporation of c-MWCNTs into the BC. The electrochemical and biofuel performance were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV. The power density and current density of EBFCs were recorded at 32.98 µW/cm3 and 0.29 mA/cm3, respectively. Additionally, the EBFCs also showed acceptable stability. Preliminary tests on double cells indicated that renewable BC have great potential in the application field of EBFCs.

  4. Studies on interfacial interactions of TiO2 nanoparticles with bacterial cells under light and dark conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swayamprava Dalai; Sunandan Pakrashi; Sujay Chakravarty; Shamima Hussain; N Chandrasekaran; Amitava Mukherjee

    2014-05-01

    The probable underlying mechanism(s) of bacterial cell–TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) interaction in the absence of photo-irradiation has been less studied since most of the prior cytotoxicity studies focused on irradiated TiO2. The present study draws attention to the possible role of cell surface–TiO2 NP interactions under dark conditions, through an array of spectroscopic and microscopic investigations. A dominant freshwater bacterial isolate, Bacillus licheniformis, which interacted with environmentally relevant concentrations of TiO2 NPs (1 g/mL), was analysed and compared under both light and dark conditions. Aggregation of cells upon NP interaction and adsorption of NPs onto the cell membrane was evident from the scanning electron micrographs under both light and dark conditions. The FT–IR and FT–Raman spectra suggested stress response of bacterial cells by elevated protein and polysaccharide content in the cell–NP interaction. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data substantiated the reduction of titanium from Ti(IV) to Ti(III) species which might have contributed to the redox interactions on the cell surface under light as well as dark conditions. The internalization of NPs in the cytoplasm were obvious from the transmission electron micrographs. The consequent cell death/damage was confirmed through fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. To conclude, the current study established the substantial role of interfacial interactions in cytotoxicity of the TiO2 NPs irrespective of the irradiation conditions.

  5. Interference of bacterial cell-to-cell communication: A new concept of antimicrobial chemotherapy breaks antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HidetadaHirakawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use a cell-to-cell communication activity termed “Quorum sensing” to coordinate group behaviors in a cell-density dependent manner. Quorum sensing influences the expression profile of diverse genes, including antibiotic tolerance and virulence determinants, via specific chemical compounds called “Auto-inducers”. During quorum sensing, Gram-negative bacteria typically use an acylated homoserine lactone (AHL called auto-inducer 1 (AI-1. Since the first discovery of quorum sensing in a marine bacterium, it has been recognized that more than 100 species possess this mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. In addition to being of interest from a biological standpoint, quorum sensing is a potential target for antimicrobial chemotherapy. This unique concept of antimicrobial control relies on reducing the burden of virulence rather than killing the bacteria. It is believed that this approach will not only suppress the development of antibiotic resistance, but will also improve the treatment of refractory infections triggered by multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. In this paper, we review and track recent progress in studies on AHL inhibitors/modulators from a biological standpoint. It has been discovered that both natural and synthetic compounds can disrupt quorum sensing by a variety of means, such as jamming signal transduction, inhibition of signal production and break-down and trapping of signal compounds. We also focus on the regulatory elements that attenuate quorum sensing activities and discuss their unique properties. Understanding the biological roles of regulatory elements might be useful in developing inhibitor applications and understanding how quorum sensing is controlled.

  6. Activation of p38α in T cells regulates the intestinal host defense against attaching and effacing bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Eun-Jin; Bang, Bo Ram; Kang, Seung-Goo; Ma, Jianhui; Otsuka, Motoyuki; Kang, Jiman; Stahl, Martin; Han, Jiahuai; Xiao, Changchun; Vallance, Bruce A.; Kang, Young Jun

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal infections by attaching and effacing (A/E) bacterial pathogens cause severe colitis and bloody diarrhea. Although p38α in intestine epithelial cells (IEC) plays an important role in promoting protection against A/E bacteria by regulating T cell recruitment, its impact on immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we show that activation of p38α in T cells is critical for the clearance of the A/E pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Mice deficient of p38α in T cells, but not in mac...

  7. Vigorous, but differential mononuclear cell response of cirrhotic patients to bacterial ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varenka J Barbero-Becerra; María Concepción Gutiérrez-Ruiz; Carmen Maldonado-Bernal; Félix I Téllez-Avila; Roberto Alfaro-Lara; Florencia Vargas-Vorácková

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in the pathogenesis of liver injury, specifically the activation of inflammatory mediators. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 20 out-patients were studied, 10 of them with cirrhosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and exposed to lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-10 secretion in supernatants was determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Higher CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression was observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cirrhotic patients, (P < 0.01, P < 0.006, P < 0.111) respectively. Lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid induced a further increase in CD14 expression (P < 0.111 lipopolysaccharide, P < 0.013 lipoteichoic acid), and a decrease in Toll-like receptor 2 (P < 0.008 lipopolysaccharide, P < 0.008 lipoteichoic acid) and Toll-like receptor 4 (P < 0.008 lipopolysaccharide, P < 0.028 lipoteichoic acid) expression. With the exception of TNFα, absolute cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was lower in cirrhotic patients under nonexposure conditions (P < 0.070 IL-6, P < 0.009 IL-1β, P < 0.022 IL-12). Once exposed to lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid, absolute cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was similar in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients, determining a more vigorous response in the former (P < 0.005 TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IL-10 lipopolysaccharide; P < 0.037 TNFα; P < 0.006 IL-1β; P < 0.005 IL-6; P < 0.007 IL-12; P < 0.014 IL-10 lipoteichoic acid). Response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was more intense after lipopolysaccharide than after lipoteichoic acid exposure. CONCLUSION: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cirrhotic patients are able to respond to a sudden bacterial ligand exposure, particularly lipopolysaccharide

  8. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Labuda, Tord; Zhang, Qian; Mathiesen, Anne-Merethe; Geisler, Carsten; Svejgaard, Arne; Wasik, Mariusz A; Odum, Niels

    2007-01-01

    malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant......-promoting effect depends on direct cell-cell contact and soluble factors such as interleukin-2. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SE triggers a bidirectional cross talk between nonmalignant T cells and malignant CTCL cells that promotes growth of the malignant cells. This represents a novel mechanism by which...

  9. Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevents DSS-induced IBD by restoring the reduced population of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Jang, Ji-Hun; Yoon, Il-Joo; Oh, Seung-Su; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, In-Young; Choi, Ha-Rim; Ko, Ki-sung; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan has more advantages in terms of cost, yield and efficiency than that derived from mushrooms, plants, yeasts and fungi. We have previously developed a novel and high-yield β-(1,3)-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. R259. This study aimed to elucidate the functional mechanism and therapeutic efficacy of bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Mice were orally pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan at daily doses of 2.5 or 5mg/kg for 2 weeks. After 6 days of DSS treatment, clinical assessment of IBD severity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated. In vivo cell proliferation was examined by immunohistochemistry using Ki-67 and ER-TR7 antibodies. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Natural killer (NK) activity and IgA level were evaluated using NK cytotoxicity assay and ELISA.The deterioration of body weight gain, colonic architecture, disease score and histological score was recovered in DSS-induced IBD mice when pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan. The recruitment of macrophages and the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A/F, were markedly decreased in the colon of β-(1,3)-glucan-pretreated mice. β-(1,3)-Glucan induced the recovery of Tregs in terms of their frequency in DSS-induced IBD mice. Intriguingly, β-(1,3)-glucan reversed the functional defects of NK cells and excessive IgA production in DSS-induced IBD mice.We conclude that bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevented the progression of DSS-induced IBD by recovering the reduction of Tregs, functional defect of NK cells and excessive IgA production. PMID:25092569

  10. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S; Mariuzza, R A; Karjalainen, K

    2001-01-01

    the SEC3 variants correlated with enhanced binding without any optimum in the binding range covered by native TCR ligands. Comparable studies using anti-TCR antibodies of known affinity confirmed these observations. By comparing the biological potency of the two sets of ligands, we found a significant...... correlation between ligand affinity and ligand potency indicating that it is the density of receptor-ligand complexes in the T cell contact area that determines TCR signaling strength....

  11. In vitro behaviors of rat mesenchymal stem cells on bacterial celluloses with different moduli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compressive moduli of bacteria-synthesized cellulose (BC) were altered by two drying techniques: ambient-air drying and freeze drying. While no significant differences in dry weight were found, their cross-sectional structures and thickness varied greatly. Freeze dried BCs had loose cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 4.7 mm, whereas air dried BCs had more compacted cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 0.1 mm. The compressive moduli of the rehydrated freeze dried and rehydrated air dried BCs were measured to be 21.06 ± 0.22 kPa and 90.09 ± 21.07 kPa, respectively. When rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were seeded on these BCs, they maintained a round morphology in the first 3 days of cultivation. More spread-out morphology and considerable proliferation on freeze dried BCs were observed in 7 days, but not on air-dried BCs. The cells were further grown for 3 weeks in the absence and presence of differentiation agents. Without using any differentiation agents, no detectable differentiation was noticed for rMSCs further cultivated on both types of BC. With differentiation inducing agents, chondrogenic differentiation, visualized by histological staining, was observed in some area of the rehydrated freeze dried BCs; while osteogenic differentiation was noticed on the stiffer rehydrated air dried BCs. - Graphical abstract: In the presence of induction agents, rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) preferentially differentiated into osteocytes on stiffer air dried BC films. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose (BC) sheets with different moduli generated by drying differently • Air-dried BC exhibited a modulus similar to that of bone. • Freeze-dried BC showed a modulus in the range of that of muscle. • Air-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into osteocytes. • Freeze-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into chondrocytes

  12. In vitro behaviors of rat mesenchymal stem cells on bacterial celluloses with different moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taokaew, Siriporn [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States); Phisalaphong, Muenduen [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Zhang Newby, Bi-min, E-mail: bimin@uakron.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Compressive moduli of bacteria-synthesized cellulose (BC) were altered by two drying techniques: ambient-air drying and freeze drying. While no significant differences in dry weight were found, their cross-sectional structures and thickness varied greatly. Freeze dried BCs had loose cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 4.7 mm, whereas air dried BCs had more compacted cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 0.1 mm. The compressive moduli of the rehydrated freeze dried and rehydrated air dried BCs were measured to be 21.06 ± 0.22 kPa and 90.09 ± 21.07 kPa, respectively. When rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were seeded on these BCs, they maintained a round morphology in the first 3 days of cultivation. More spread-out morphology and considerable proliferation on freeze dried BCs were observed in 7 days, but not on air-dried BCs. The cells were further grown for 3 weeks in the absence and presence of differentiation agents. Without using any differentiation agents, no detectable differentiation was noticed for rMSCs further cultivated on both types of BC. With differentiation inducing agents, chondrogenic differentiation, visualized by histological staining, was observed in some area of the rehydrated freeze dried BCs; while osteogenic differentiation was noticed on the stiffer rehydrated air dried BCs. - Graphical abstract: In the presence of induction agents, rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) preferentially differentiated into osteocytes on stiffer air dried BC films. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose (BC) sheets with different moduli generated by drying differently • Air-dried BC exhibited a modulus similar to that of bone. • Freeze-dried BC showed a modulus in the range of that of muscle. • Air-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into osteocytes. • Freeze-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into chondrocytes.

  13. Studies on penetration of antibiotic in bacterial cells in space conditions (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Cytos 2 experiment was performed aboard Salyut 7 in order to test the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria cultivated in vitro in space. An increase of the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) in the inflight cultures (i.e., an increase of the antibiotic resistance) was observed. Complementary studies of the ultrastructure showed a thickening of the cell envelope. In order to confirm the results of the Cytos 2 experiment, we performed the ANTIBIO experiment during the D1 mission to try to differentiate, by means of the 1 g centrifuge in the Biorack, between the biological effects of cosmic rays and those caused by microgravity conditions. The originality of this experiment was in the fact that it was designed to test the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria cultivated in vitro during the orbital phase of the flight. The results show an increase in resistance to Colistin in in-flight bacteria. The MIC is practically double in the in-flight cultures. A cell count of living bacteria in the cultures containing the different Colistin concentrations showed a significant difference between the cultures developed during space flight and the ground based cultures. The comparison between the 1 g and 0 g in-flight cultures show similar behavior for the two sets. Nevertheless, a small difference between the two sets of ground based control cultures was noted. The cultures developed on the ground centrifuge (1.4 g) present a slight decrease in comparison with the cultures developed in the static rack (1 g). In order to approach the mechanisms of the increase of antibiotic resistance on bacteria cultivated in vitro in space, we have proposed the study on penetration of antibiotics in bacterial cells in space conditions. This experiment was selected for the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission.

  14. Efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization for bacterial cell identification in temporary river sediments with contrasting water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Pizzetti, Ilaria; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2007-09-01

    We studied the efficiency of two hybridization techniques for the analysis of benthic bacterial community composition under varying sediment water content. Microcosms were set up with sediments from four European temporary rivers. Wet sediments were dried, and dry sediments were artificially rewetted. The percentage of bacterial cells detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with fluorescently monolabeled probes (FISH) significantly increased from dry to wet sediments, showing a positive correlation with the community activity measured via incorporation of (3)H leucine. FISH and signal amplification by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) could significantly better detect cells with low activity in dried sediments. Through the application of an optimized cell permeabilization protocol, the percentage of hybridized cells by CARD-FISH showed comparable values in dry and wet conditions. This approach was unrelated to (3)H leucine incorporation rates. Moreover, the optimized protocol allowed a significantly better visualization of Gram-positive Actinobacteria in the studied samples. CARD-FISH is, therefore, proposed as an effective technique to compare bacterial communities residing in sediments with contrasting water content, irrespective of differences in the activity state of target cells. Considering the increasing frequencies of flood and drought cycles in European temporary rivers, our approach may help to better understand the dynamics of microbial communities in such systems. PMID:17452089

  15. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place. PMID:26427477

  16. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  17. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  18. Flexible PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells with integrated grating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Liu, Yinghui; Madsen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    spectra of the active layer. This optimized solar cell structure leads to an enhanced absorption in the active layer and thus improved short-circuit currents and power conversion efficiencies in the fabricated devices. Fabrication of the solar cells on thin polyimide substrates which are compatible......We report on development of flexible PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells with integrated diffraction gratings on the bottom electrodes. The presented results address PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells in an inverted geometry, which contains implemented grating structures whose pitch is tuned to match the absorption...

  19. Cell wall integrity signaling and innate immunity in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nühse, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    All plant pathogens and parasites have had to develop strategies to overcome cell walls in order to access the host’s cytoplasm. As a mechanically strong, multi-layered composite exoskeleton, the cell wall not only enables plants to grow tall but also protects them from such attacks. Many plant pathogens employ an arsenal of cell wall degrading enzymes, and it has long been thought that the detection of breaches in wall integrity contributes to the induction of defense. Cell wall fragments ar...

  20. A novel functional T cell hybridoma recognizes macrophage cell death induced by bacteria: a possible role for innate lymphocytes in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Koichi

    2006-06-15

    We have established a novel TCRalphabeta (TCRVbeta6)(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cell hybridoma designated B6HO3. When the B6HO3 cells were cocultured with bacterial-infected J774 macrophage-like cells, IFN-gamma production by B6HO3 cells was triggered through direct cell-cell contact with dying J774 cells infected with Listeria monocytogenes (LM), Shigella flexneri, or Salmonella typhimurium that expressed the type III secretion system, but not with intact J774 cells infected with heat-killed LM, nonhemolytic lysteriolysin O-deficient (Hly(-)) LM, plasmid-cured Shigella, or stationary-phase Salmonella. However, the triggering of B6HO3 cells for IFN-gamma production involved neither dying hepatoma cells infected with LM nor dying J774 cells caused by gliotoxin treatment or freeze thawing. Cycloheximide and Abs to H-2K(d), H-2D(d), Ia(d), CD1d, TCRVbeta6, and IL-12 did not inhibit the contact-dependent IFN-gamma response, indicating that this IFN-gamma response did not require de novo protein synthesis in bacterial-infected J774 cells and was TCR and IL-12 independent. Thus, in an as yet undefined way, B6HO3 hybridoma recognizes a specialized form of macrophage cell death resulting from bacterial infection and consequently produces IFN-gamma. Moreover, contact-dependent interaction of minor subsets of splenic alphabeta T cells, including NKT cells with dying LM-infected J774 and bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) cells, proved to provide an IFN-gamma-productive stimulus for these minor T cell populations, to which the parental T cell of the B6HO3 hybridoma appeared to belong. Unexpectedly, subsets of gammadelta T and NK cells similarly responded to dying LM-infected macrophage cells. These results propose that innate lymphocytes may possess a recognition system sensing macrophage cell "danger" resulting from bacterial infection. PMID:16751404

  1. Integration of Antenna Array with Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cell

    OpenAIRE

    O'Conchubhair, Oisin; McEvoy, Patrick; Ammann, Max

    2015-01-01

    The integration of a low-profile antenna array with a multicrystalline silicon solar cell capable of powering a low-power wireless sensor at 2.45 GHz is reported. Lattice bus bars on the cell are exploited to minimize antenna shadows from low-profile antennas and transmission lines for a higher output power. The dual inverted-F array improves gain, and beam switching enables the array to sweep a wider coverage angle with larger beamwidths compared to other solar integrated antennas.

  2. An ethanol biosensor based on a bacterial cell-immobilized eggshell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Ming Wen; Shao Min Shuang; Chuan Dong; Martin M.F. Choi

    2012-01-01

    An ethanol biosensor was fabricated based on a Methylobacterium organophilium-immobilized eggshell membrane and an oxygen (O2) electrode.A linear response for ethanol was obtained in the range of 0.050-7.5 mmol/L with a detection limit of 0.025 mmol/L (S/N =3) and a R.S.D.of 2.1%.The response time was less than 100 s at room temperature and ambient pressure.The optimal loading of bacterial cells on the biosensor membrane is 40 mg (wet weight).The optimal working conditions for the microbial biosensor are pH 7.0 phosphate buffer (50 mmol/L) at 20-25 ℃.The interference test,operational and storage stability of the biosensor are studied in detail.Finally,the biosensor is applied to determine the ethanol contents in various alcohol samples and the results are comparable to that obtained by gas chromatographic method and the results are satisfactory.Our proposed biosensor provides a convenient,simple and reliable method to determine ethanol content in alcoholic drinks.

  3. Volumetric measurements of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substance glycoconjugates in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, C; Horn, H; Hempel, D C; Neu, T R

    2004-12-01

    In this study an enrichment culture developed from activated sludge was used to investigate the architecture of fully hydrated multispecies biofilms. The assessment of biofilm structure and volume was carried out using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Bacterial cell distribution was determined with the nucleic acid-specific stain SYTO 60, whereas glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were stained with the Alexa-488-labeled lectin of Aleuria aurantia. Digital image analysis was employed for visualization and quantification of three-dimensional CLSM data sets. The specific volumes of the polymeric and cellular biofilm constituents were quantified. In addition, gravimetric measurements were done to determine dry mass and thickness of the biofilms. The data recorded by the CLSM technique and the gravimetric data were then compared. It was shown that the biofilm thicknesses determined with both methods agree well for slow-growing heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic biofilms. In addition, for slow-growing biofilms, the volumes and masses calculated from CLSM and the biomass calculated from gravimetric measurements were also comparable. For fast-growing heterotrophic biofilms cultivated with high glucose concentrations the data sets fit to a lesser degree, but still showed the same common trend. Compared with traditional gravimetric measurements, CLSM allowed differential recording of multiple biofilm parameters with subsequent three-dimensional visualization and quantification. The quantitative three-dimensional results recorded by CLSM are an important basis for understanding, controlling, exploiting, and modeling of biofilms. PMID:15470707

  4. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: • Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. • Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. • LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC

  5. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.fiedler@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Salamon, Achim; Adam, Stefanie; Herzmann, Nicole [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Taubenheim, Jan [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: • Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. • Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. • LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  6. N-acetylcysteine and the human serum components that inhibit bacterial invasion of gingival epithelial cells prevent experimental periodontitis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Jehan; Baek, Keum Jin; Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yong Cheol; Choi, Youngnim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported that human serum significantly reduces the invasion of various oral bacterial species into gingival epithelial cells in vitro. The aims of the present study were to characterize the serum component(s) responsible for the inhibition of bacterial invasion of epithelial cells and to examine their effect on periodontitis induced in mice. Methods Immortalized human gingival epithelial (HOK-16B) cells were infected with various 5- (and 6-) carboxy-fluorescein diacetat...

  7. Cell adhesion strength from cortical tension - an integration of concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2015-10-15

    Morphogenetic mechanisms such as cell movement or tissue separation depend on cell attachment and detachment processes, which involve adhesion receptors as well as the cortical cytoskeleton. The interplay between the two components is of stunning complexity. Most strikingly, the binding energy of adhesion molecules is usually too small for substantial cell-cell attachment, pointing to a main deficit in our present understanding of adhesion. In this Opinion article, I integrate recent findings and conceptual advances in the field into a coherent framework for cell adhesion. I argue that active cortical tension is best viewed as an integral part of adhesion, and propose on this basis a non-arbitrary measure of adhesion strength - the tissue surface tension of cell aggregates. This concept of adhesion integrates heterogeneous molecular inputs into a single mechanical property and simplifies the analysis of attachment-detachment processes. It draws attention to the enormous variation of adhesion strengths among tissues, whose origin and function is little understood. PMID:26471994

  8. The metabolic enzyme ManA reveals a link between cell wall integrity and chromosome morphology.

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Elbaz; Sigal Ben-Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary The bacterial cell is resistant to extremes of osmotic pressure and protected against mechanical damages by the existence of a rigid outer shell defined as the cell wall. The strength of the cell wall is achieved by the presence of long glycan strands cross-linked by peptide side bridges. The cell wall is a dynamic structure continuously being synthesized and modified to allow for cell growth and division. Damaging the cell wall leads to abnormal cellular morphologies and cell ...

  9. Integrating Wind And Solar With Hydrogen Producing Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.

    2007-01-01

    The often proposed solution for the fluctuating wind energy supply is the conversion of the surplus of wind energy into hydrogen by means of electrolysis. In this paper a patented alternative is proposed consisting of the integration of wind turbines with internal reforming fuel-cells, capable of co

  10. Phenotypic T Cell Exhaustion in a Murine Model of Bacterial Infection in the Setting of Pre-Existing Malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Rohit; Wagener, Maylene; Breed, Elise R.; Liang, Zhe; Yoseph, Benyam P.; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L.

    2014-01-01

    While much of cancer immunology research has focused on anti-tumor immunity both systemically and within the tumor microenvironment, little is known about the impact of pre-existing malignancy on pathogen-specific immune responses. Here, we sought to characterize the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response following a bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice with established subcutaneous pancreatic adenocarcinomas were infected with Listeria monocytogen...

  11. Effect of bacterial lectin on acceleration of fat cell lipolysis at in vitro diode laser treatment using encapsulated ICG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, Irina Yu.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Portnov, Sergey A.; Svenskaya, Yuliya I.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Ponomareva, Elena G.; Nikitina, Valentina E.

    2012-03-01

    The influence of bacterial lectin on photochemically induced fat cell lipolysis was studied. Resulting capsules were tested for ICG absorption by optical spectra measurements. To separate released and encapsulated ICG supernatant was removed and capsules were redispered in pure deionized water. Supernatant and capsule suspension spectra were measured separately. It was also found that pretreatment of tissue by lectin leads to acceleration of lipolysis at photochemical treatment. The data obtained can be used to enhance efficiency of photochemical therapy.

  12. Radioprotection of mice by the bacterial extract Broncho-VaxonR: haemopoietic stem cells and survival enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretreatment of mice with 50-1000 μg of the bacterial extract Broncho-VaxomR (BV, free of endotoxin) before sublethal irradiation induced an increase in the number of endogenous haemopoietic stem cells (E-CFU). The degree of radioprotection was dependent on both the time of administration and the dose of BV. An optimal E-CFU survival was observed when 500 μg of BV was administered i.p. 24h before irradiation. (author)

  13. CD4+ T Cells and Toll-Like Receptors Recognize Salmonella Antigens Expressed in Bacterial Surface Organelles

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Molly A.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Barrett, Sara L. Rassoulian; Smith, Kelly D.; Lara, J. Cano; Aderem, Alan; Cookson, Brad T.

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of immunity to infection is revealed from the characteristics of microbial ligands recognized by host immune responses. Murine infection with the intracellular bacterium Salmonella generates CD4+ T cells that specifically recognize Salmonella proteins expressed in bacterial surface organelles such as flagella and membrane vesicles. These natural Salmonella antigens are also ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or avidly associated with TLR ligands such as lipopolysacc...

  14. Identification of multiple physicochemical and structural properties associated with soluble expression of eukaryotic proteins in cell-free bacterial extracts

    OpenAIRE

    AlexanderA.Tokmakov

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial extracts are widely used to synthesize recombinant proteins. Vast data volumes have been accumulated in cell-free expression databases, covering a whole range of existing proteins. It makes possible comprehensive bioinformatics analysis and identification of multiple features associated with protein solubility and aggregation. In the present paper, an approach to identify the multiple physicochemical and structural properties of amino acid sequences associated with soluble expressio...

  15. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  16. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  17. Cell-to-Cell Propagation of the Bacterial Toxin CNF1 via Extracellular Vesicles: Potential Impact on the Therapeutic Use of the Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Fabbri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs, either constitutively or in a regulated manner, which represent an important mode of intercellular communication. EVs serve as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids and RNA. Furthermore, certain bacterial protein toxins, or possibly their derived messages, can be transferred cell to cell via EVs. We have herein demonstrated that eukaryotic EVs represent an additional route of cell-to-cell propagation for the Escherichia coli protein toxin cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1. Our results prove that EVs from CNF1 pre-infected epithelial cells can induce cytoskeleton changes, Rac1 and NF-κB activation comparable to that triggered by CNF1. The observation that the toxin is detectable inside EVs derived from CNF1-intoxicated cells strongly supports the hypothesis that extracellular vesicles can offer to the toxin a novel route to travel from cell to cell. Since anthrax and tetanus toxins have also been reported to engage in the same process, we can hypothesize that EVs represent a common mechanism exploited by bacterial toxins to enhance their pathogenicity.

  18. Prophylaxis with levofloxacin: impact on bacterial susceptibility and epidemiology in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Amaral Alonso Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of resistance has been demonstrated in cancer treatment centers where prophylaxis with fluoroquinolone is used. Objective: Considering the importance of epidemiological monitoring as a strategy in choosing protocols involving antibiotics, this study aimed to evaluate the emergence of quinolone resistance and changes in the local epidemiology in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant service. Methods: For this study, 60 positive cultures before the prophylactic use of levofloxacin (period A: 2007-2008 and 118 cultures after starting the use of prophylactic levofloxacin (period B: 2010-2011 were evaluated. Results: Resistance increased for all the different types of bacteria isolated (from 46.0% to 76.5%; p-value = 0.0002. Among Gram-negative bacteria, resistance increased from 21.4% to 60.7% (p-value = 0.0163 and among Gram-positive bacteria, it increased from 55.6% to 82.9% (p-value = 0.0025. The use of levofloxacin increased from 19.44 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days in period A to 166.64 in period B. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics remained unchanged. Considering bacteria associated with infection, 72 and 76 were isolated in periods A and B, respectively. There was a reduction in the rate of Gramnegative bacteria in cultures associated with infection (3.81 vs. 2.00 cultures/1,000 patientdays; p-value = 0.008. Conclusion: The study of prophylaxis with levofloxacin demonstrated that there was a decrease in infections by Gram-negative bacteria; however, bacterial resistance increased, even though the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics remained unchanged. Constant monitoring of local epidemiology combined with research on clinical outcomes is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of prophylaxis.

  19. Bacterioplankton Production in Humic Lake Örträsket in Relation to Input of Bacterial Cells and Input of Allochthonous Organic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström; Jansson

    2000-02-01

    In order to compare riverine bacteria input with lake water bacterial production and grazing loss with output loss, a bacterial cell budget was constructed for humic Lake Örträsket in northern Sweden. The riverine input of bacterial cells in 1997 represented 29% of the number of bacterial cells produced within the layer of the lake affected by inlet water. A large share of the in situ lake bacterial production was consumed by grazers, mainly flagellates, which stresses the importance of bacteria as energy mobilizers for the pelagic food web in the lake. The bacterial production in Lake Örträsket, which is almost entirely dependent on humic material as an energy source, was clearly stimulated by high flow episodes which brought high amounts of little degraded material into the lake. During base flow condition the bacterial production in the inlet rivers was high, which led to an input of more degraded material to the lake. This material did not stimulate the lake bacterial production. Internal factors that determined the utilization of the allochthonous DOC in the lake were the retention time and the exposure to light and high temperatures. Thus, the potential for in situ production of bacteria in Lake Örträsket was to a large extent a function of how precipitation and runoff conditions affected terrestrial losses and river transport of humic material. PMID:10833223

  20. Conjugated gold nanoparticles as a tool for probing the bacterial cell envelope: The case of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Justin P; Cornejo, Jose A; Sumner, James J; Schuler, Andrew J; Atanassov, Plamen; Ista, Linnea K

    2016-03-01

    The bacterial cell envelope forms the interface between the interior of the cell and the outer world and is, thus, the means of communication with the environment. In particular, the outer cell surface mediates the adhesion of bacteria to the surface, the first step in biofilm formation. While a number of ligand-based interactions are known for the attachment process in commensal organisms and, as a result, opportunistic pathogens, the process of nonspecific attachment is thought to be mediated by colloidal, physiochemical, interactions. It is becoming clear, however, that colloidal models ignore the heterogeneity of the bacterial surface, and that the so-called nonspecific attachment may be mediated by specific regions of the cell surface, whether or not the relevant interaction is ligand-mediate. The authors introduce surface functionalized gold nanoparticles to probe the surface chemistry of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as it relates to surface attachment to ω-substituted alkanethiolates self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). A linear relationship between the attachment of S. oneidensis to SAM modified planar substrates and the number of similarly modified nanoparticles attached to the bacterial surfaces was demonstrated. In addition, the authors demonstrate that carboxylic acid-terminated nanoparticles attach preferentially to the subpolar region of the S. oneidensis and obliteration of that binding preference corresponds in loss of attachment to carboxylic acid terminated SAMs. Moreover, this region corresponds to suspected functional regions of the S. oneidensis surface. Because this method can be employed over large numbers of cells, this method is expected to be generally applicable for understanding cell surface organization across populations. PMID:26746161

  1. Short-term variability in bacterial abundance, cell properties, and incorporation of leucine and thymidine in subarctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaartokallio, H.; Søgaard, D.H.; Norman, L.;

    2013-01-01

    cell population properties (by flow cytometry) in subarctic sea ice in SW Greenland. Short-term temporal variability was moderate, and steep environmental gradients, typical for sea ice, were the main drivers of the variability in bacterial cell properties and activity. Low nucleic acid (LNA) bacteria...... brightly fluorescing intracellular inclusions after Nile Blue A staining. High Leu saturating concentrations coupled with the occurrence of PHA-producing organisms further highlight the similarity of sea ice internal habitats to biofilm-like systems rather than to open-water systems....

  2. Pili Binding to Asialo-GM1 on Epithelial Cells Can Mediate Cytotoxicity or Bacterial Internalization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Comolli, James C; Waite, Leslie L.; Keith E Mostov; Joanne N. Engel

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili and the glycosphingolipid asialo-GM1 (aGM1) can mediate bacterial adherence to epithelial cells, but the steps subsequent to this adherence have not been elucidated. To investigate the result of the interaction of pili and aGM1, we used polarized epithelial monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in culture, which contained little detectable aGM1 on their apical surface but were able to incorporate exogenous aGM1. Compared to...

  3. Self-organization in bacterial swarming: lessons from myxobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When colonizing surfaces, many bacteria are able to self-organize into an actively expanding biofilm, in which millions of cells move smoothly and orderly at high densities. This phenomenon is known as bacterial swarming. Despite the apparent resemblance to patterns seen in liquid crystals, the dynamics of bacterial swarming cannot be explained by theories derived from equilibrium statistical mechanics. To understand how bacteria swarm, a central question is how order emerges in dense and initially disorganized populations of bacterial cells. Here we briefly review recent efforts, with integrated computational and experimental approaches, in addressing this question

  4. Effect of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Contamination on Gutta Percha- versus Resilon-Induced Human Monocyte Cell Line Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Hadjati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic effects of obturation materials were tested in presence and absence of endotoxin on human monocytes in vitro.Human monocytes from THP-1 cell line were cultured. Three millimeters from the tip of each Resilon and gutta percha points were cut and directly placed at the bottom of the culture wells. Cultured cells were exposed to gutta percha (groups G1 and G2 and Resilon (R1 and R2. Ten μg/ml bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS was added to the culture wells in groups G1 and R1. Positive control included the bacterial LPS without the root canal filling material and the negative control contained the cells in culture medium only. Viability of cells was tested in all groups after 24, 48, and 72 hours using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay for at least 3 times to obtain reproducible results. Optical density values were read and the data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post hoc statistical test.The results showed that cells in G2 had the lowest rate of viability at 24 hours, but the lowest rate of viable cells was recorded in G1 at 48 and 72 hours. The effect of LPS treatment was not statistically significant. Resilon groups showed cell viability values higher than those of gutta percha groups, although statistically non-significant (P=0.105. Cell viability values were lower in gutta percha than Resilon groups when LPS-treated and LPS-untreated groups were compared independently at each time point.It could be concluded that none of the tested root canal filling materials had toxic effects on cultured human monocyte cells whether in presence or absence of LPS contamination.

  5. Integrating fuel cell power systems into building physical plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, J. [KCI Technologies, Inc., Hunt Valley, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the integration of fuel cell power plants and absorption chillers to cogenerate chilled water or hot water/steam for all weather air conditioning as one possible approach to building system applications. Absorption chillers utilize thermal energy in an absorption based cycle to chill water. It is feasible to use waste heat from fuel cells to provide hydronic heating and cooling. Performance regimes will vary as a function of the supply and quality of waste heat. Respective performance characteristics of fuel cells, absorption chillers and air conditioning systems will define relationships between thermal and electrical load capacities for the combined systems. Specifically, this paper develops thermodynamic relationships between bulk electrical power and cooling/heating capacities for combined fuel cell and absorption chiller system in building applications.

  6. Functional integration of human neural precursor cells in mouse cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wen Zhou

    Full Text Available This study investigates the electrophysiological properties and functional integration of different phenotypes of transplanted human neural precursor cells (hNPCs in immunodeficient NSG mice. Postnatal day 2 mice received unilateral injections of 100,000 GFP+ hNPCs into the right parietal cortex. Eight weeks after transplantation, 1.21% of transplanted hNPCs survived. In these hNPCs, parvalbumin (PV-, calretinin (CR-, somatostatin (SS-positive inhibitory interneurons and excitatory pyramidal neurons were confirmed electrophysiologically and histologically. All GFP+ hNPCs were immunoreactive with anti-human specific nuclear protein. The proportions of PV-, CR-, and SS-positive cells among GFP+ cells were 35.5%, 15.7%, and 17.1%, respectively; around 15% of GFP+ cells were identified as pyramidal neurons. Those electrophysiologically and histological identified GFP+ hNPCs were shown to fire action potentials with the appropriate firing patterns for different classes of neurons and to display spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs. The amplitude, frequency and kinetic properties of sEPSCs and sIPSCs in different types of hNPCs were comparable to host cells of the same type. In conclusion, GFP+ hNPCs produce neurons that are competent to integrate functionally into host neocortical neuronal networks. This provides promising data on the potential for hNPCs to serve as therapeutic agents in neurological diseases with abnormal neuronal circuitry such as epilepsy.

  7. Integration of Antennas and Solar Cells for Autonomous Communication Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Roo Ons, Maria Jose, (Thesis)

    2010-01-01

    Solar energy is becoming an attractive alternative for powering autonomous communication systems. These devices often involve the use of separate photovoltaics and antennas, which demand a compromise in the utilization of the limited space available. This thesis deals with the design, analysis, fabrication and validation of different techniques for the integration of antennas and solar cells in a single multifunctional device. Four different photovoltaic technologies are considered within thi...

  8. In situ deposition of platinum nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes and evaluation of PEM fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ deposition of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes (BC) for a fuel cell application was studied. The platinum/bacterial cellulose (Pt/BC) membranes under different experimental conditions were characterized by using SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffractometry) and TG (thermo-gravimetric analysis) techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic platinum nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-4 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. TG curves revealed these Pt/BC composite materials had the high thermal stability. The electrosorption of hydrogen was investigated by CV (cyclic voltammetry). It was found that Pt/BC catalysts have high electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen oxidation reaction. The single cell performance of Pt/BC was tested at 20 deg. C, 30 deg. C, and 40 deg. C under non-humidified conditions. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as membrane in fuel cell field [B.R. Evans, H.M. O'Neill, V.P. Malyvanh, I. Lee, J. Woodward, Biosens. Bioelectron. 18 (2003) 917].

  9. In situ deposition of platinum nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes and evaluation of PEM fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jiazhi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nan Jing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun Dongping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nan Jing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)], E-mail: dongpingsun@163.com; Li Jun; Yang Xujie; Yu Junwei; Hao Qingli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nan Jing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Liu Wenming [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu Jianguo [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: jianguoliu@nju.edu.cn; Zou Zhigang; Gu Jun [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-11-01

    In situ deposition of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes (BC) for a fuel cell application was studied. The platinum/bacterial cellulose (Pt/BC) membranes under different experimental conditions were characterized by using SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffractometry) and TG (thermo-gravimetric analysis) techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic platinum nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-4 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. TG curves revealed these Pt/BC composite materials had the high thermal stability. The electrosorption of hydrogen was investigated by CV (cyclic voltammetry). It was found that Pt/BC catalysts have high electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen oxidation reaction. The single cell performance of Pt/BC was tested at 20 deg. C, 30 deg. C, and 40 deg. C under non-humidified conditions. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as membrane in fuel cell field [B.R. Evans, H.M. O'Neill, V.P. Malyvanh, I. Lee, J. Woodward, Biosens. Bioelectron. 18 (2003) 917].

  10. Possible implication of bacterial infection in acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo eFuji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. In the pathogenesis of acute GVHD, it has been established that donor-derived T cells activated in the recipient play a major role in GVHD in initiation and maintenance within an inflammatory cascade. To reduce the risk of GVHD, intensification of GVHD prophylaxis like T cell depletion is effective, but it inevitably increases the risk of infectious diseases and abrogates beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effects. Although various cytokines are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GVHD, GVHD initiation is such a complex process that cannot be prevented by means of single inflammatory cytokine inhibition. Thus, efficient methods to control the whole inflammatory milieu both on cellular and humoral view are needed. In this context, infectious diseases can theoretically contribute to an elevation of inflammatory cytokines after allogeneic HSCT and activation of various subtypes of immune effector cells, which might in summary lead to an aggravation of acute GVHD. The appropriate treatments or prophylaxis of bacterial infection during the early phase after allogeneic HSCT might be beneficial to reduce not only infectious-related but also GVHD-related mortality. Here, we aim to review the literature addressing the interactions of bacterial infections and GVHD after allogeneic HSCT.

  11. Integration of selective breeding and vaccination to improve disease resistance in aquaculture: Application to control bacterial cold water disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a frequent cause of elevated mortality in rainbow trout and the development of effective control strategies is a priority within the U.S. A goal of the NCCCWA breeding program is to produce germplasm with superior growth and survival following exposure to infe...

  12. Natural Killer Cells and Helicobacter pylori Infection: Bacterial Antigens and Interleukin-12 Act Synergistically To Induce Gamma Interferon Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Cheol H.; Lundgren, Anna; Azem, Josef; Sjöling, Åsa; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B. Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to induce a local immune response, which is characterized by activation of lymphocytes and the production of IFN-γ in the stomach mucosa. Since not only T cells, but also natural killer (NK) cells, are potent producers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), we investigated whether NK cells play a role in the immune response to H. pylori infection. Our results showed that NK cells were present in both the gastric and duodenal mucosae but that H. pylori infection did not affect the infiltration of NK cells into the gastrointestinal area. Furthermore, we could show that NK cells could be activated directly by H. pylori antigens, as H. pylori bacteria, as well as lysate from H. pylori, induced the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells. NK cells were also activated without direct contact when separated from the bacteria by an epithelial cell layer, indicating that the activation of NK cells by H. pylori can also occur in vivo, in the infected stomach mucosa. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ by NK cells was greatly enhanced when a small amount of interleukin-12 (IL-12) was added, and this synergistic effect was associated with increased expression of the IL-12 receptor β2. It was further evident that bacterial lysate alone was sufficient to induce the activation of cytotoxicity-related molecules. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NK cells are present in the gastroduodenal mucosa of humans and that NK cells produce high levels of IFN-γ when stimulated with a combination of H. pylori antigen and IL-12. We propose that NK cells play an active role in the local immune response to H. pylori infection. PMID:15731046

  13. Fuel and control for an integrated fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OS/IES (On-Site Integrated Energy System) comprises a phosphoric acid fuel cell driven total energy package that produces electrical energy in the form of AC power (when the DC voltage from the fuel cell is inverted), and heat energy in the form of hot water. The fuel cell prefers a fuel high in hydrogen therefore it becomes necessary to convert as much of the fuel, i.e. natural or pipeline gas into hydrogen as possible using a fuel reformer. Fuel reforming is an endothermic process and in this case waste energy in the form of ''spent'' fuel from the fuel cell is used to supply heat to the reformer. Fuel cell waste heat is also used to raise the steam used in the reforming process. The OS/IES fuel processing system comprises five interrelated subsystems. Each subsystem is controlled independently through a microprocessor but a change in any subsystem function could have an effect on the operation of any or several other subsystems. Thus the controller receives a signal indicating electrical demand and proceeds to balance the subsystems as well as the fuel and air flow to each of the fuel cells. The controller also responds to a number of alarm signals and is capable of starting and stopping the complete OS/IES. It is assisted by a tie to the utility line which can dispense electrical energy for startup or instantaneous load following and accept excess generated power in case of load loss. In this paper we review fuel cell operation and requirements, the components and interactions that make up the reformer system, and the microprocessor control required to integrate the OS/IES

  14. The deletion of bacterial dynamin and flotillin genes results in pleiotrophic effects on cell division, cell growth and in cell shape maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dempwolff Felix

    2012-12-01

    the cell membrane, where they assemble even in the absence of any bacterial cofactor.

  15. Degradation of lucerne stem cell walls by five rumen bacterial species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.; Weimer, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    The rumen bacterial strains Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens H17c, Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, Lachnospira multiparus 40, Ruminococcus albus 7 and R. flavefaciens FD-1 were compared individually and as a five-species mixture with a rumen inoculum for their ability to degrade lucerne (Medicago sativa L.)

  16. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities on volumetric and planar anodes in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vargas, Ignacio T.

    2013-05-29

    Pyrosequencing was used to characterize bacterial communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells across a volumetric (graphite fiber brush) and a planar (carbon cloth) anode, where different physical and chemical gradients would be expected associated with the distance between anode location and the air cathode. As expected, the stable operational voltage and the coulombic efficiency (CE) were higher for the volumetric anode than the planar anode (0.57V and CE=22% vs. 0.51V and CE=12%). The genus Geobacter was the only known exoelectrogen among the observed dominant groups, comprising 57±4% of recovered sequences for the brush and 27±5% for the carbon-cloth anode. While the bacterial communities differed between the two anode materials, results showed that Geobacter spp. and other dominant bacterial groups were homogenously distributed across both planar and volumetric anodes. This lends support to previous community analysis interpretations based on a single biofilm sampling location in these systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery

  18. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. PMID:27155139

  19. Biointerface by Cell Growth on Graphene Oxide Doped Bacterial Cellulose/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuntao; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Chunlin; Xu, Yunhua; Yang, Jiazhi; Liu, Jian; Sun, Dongping

    2016-04-27

    Highly biocompatible advanced materials with excellent electroactivity are increasingly meaningful to biointerfaces and the development of biomedicine. Herein, bacterial cellulose/poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)/graphene oxide (BC/PEDOT/GO) composite nanofibers were synthesized through the in situ interfacial polymerization of PEDOT with the doping of GO. The abundant free carboxyl and hydroxy groups offer the BC/PEDOT/GO film active functional groups for surface modification. We demonstrate the use of this composite nanofiber for the electrical stimulation of PC12 neural cells as this resultant nanofiber scaffold could closely mimic the structure of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) with a promoting cell orientation and differentiation after electrical stimulation of PC12 cells. It is expected that this biocompatible BC/PEDOT/GO material will find potential applications in biological and regenerative medicine. PMID:27054801

  20. Bacterial single-cell activities along the nutrient availability gradient in a canyon-shaped reservoir: a seasonal study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horňák, Karel; Jezbera, Jan; Šimek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2010), s. 215-225. ISSN 0948-3055. [Congress of the International Limnological Society /31./. Kapské Město, 15.08.2010-20.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/08/0015; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/10/1534 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : reservoir * bacterial activity * leucine and glucose incorporation * HNA and LNA cells Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.089, year: 2010

  1. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  2. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D 15N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly α-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins

  3. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeon, Young Ho

    2008-11-14

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D (15)N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly alpha-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins. PMID:18789898

  4. Pectin and Xyloglucan Influence the Attachment of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes to Bacterial Cellulose-Derived Plant Cell Wall Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle S F; Rahman, Sadequr; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Minimally processed fresh produce has been implicated as a major source of foodborne microbial pathogens globally. These pathogens must attach to the produce in order to be transmitted. Cut surfaces of produce that expose cell walls are particularly vulnerable. Little is known about the roles that different structural components (cellulose, pectin, and xyloglucan) of plant cell walls play in the attachment of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Using bacterial cellulose-derived plant cell wall models, we showed that the presence of pectin alone or xyloglucan alone affected the attachment of three Salmonella enterica strains (Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 13076, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Salmonella enterica subsp. indica M4) and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644. In addition, we showed that this effect was modulated in the presence of both polysaccharides. Assays using pairwise combinations of S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644 showed that bacterial attachment to all plant cell wall models was dependent on the characteristics of the individual bacterial strains and was not directly proportional to the initial concentration of the bacterial inoculum. This work showed that bacterial attachment was not determined directly by the plant cell wall model or bacterial physicochemical properties. We suggest that attachment of the Salmonella strains may be influenced by the effects of these polysaccharides on physical and structural properties of the plant cell wall model. Our findings improve the understanding of how Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes attach to plant cell walls, which may facilitate the development of better ways to prevent the attachment of these pathogens to such surfaces. PMID:26567310

  5. Using CORBA to integrate manufacturing cells to a virtual enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancerella, Carmen M.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    It is critical in today's enterprises that manufacturing facilities are not isolated from design, planning, and other business activities and that information flows easily and bidirectionally between these activities. It is also important and cost-effective that COTS software, databases, and corporate legacy codes are well integrated in the information architecture. Further, much of the information generated during manufacturing must be dynamically accessible to engineering and business operations both in a restricted corporate intranet and on the internet. The software integration strategy in the Sandia Agile Manufacturing Testbed supports these enterprise requirements. We are developing a CORBA-based distributed object software system for manufacturing. Each physical machining device is a CORBA object and exports a common IDL interface to allow for rapid and dynamic insertion, deletion, and upgrading within the manufacturing cell. Cell management CORBA components access manufacturing devices without knowledge of any device-specific implementation. To support information flow from design to planning data is accessible to machinists on the shop floor. CORBA allows manufacturing components to be easily accessible to the enterprise. Dynamic clients can be created using web browsers and portable Java GUI's. A CORBA-OLE adapter allows integration to PC desktop applications. Other commercial software can access CORBA network objects in the information architecture through vendor API's.

  6. A channel connecting the mother cell and forespore during bacterial endospore formation

    OpenAIRE

    Meisner, Jeffrey; Xin WANG; Serrano, Monica; Henriques, Adriano O.; Moran, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    At an early stage during Bacillus subtilis endospore development the bacterium divides asymmetrically to produce two daughter cells. The smaller cell (forespore) differentiates into the endospore, while the larger cell (mother cell) becomes a terminally differentiated cell that nurtures the developing forespore. During development the mother cell engulfs the forespore to produce a protoplast, surrounded by two bilayer membranes, which separate it from the cytoplasm of the mother cell. The act...

  7. Biosorption of metal ions by attached bacterial cells in a packed-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a simple method for the immobilization of a biosorbent. An adherent Bacillus sp. strain has been grown attached to an inert support material. This strain had the capacity to bind uranium, copper, cadmium and zinc. The desorption of these metals was quantitative at pH-values lower than 2. To study the attachment of the bacterial biomass, a laboratory-scale packed-bed bioreactor with an appropriate aeration system was developed. The colonization of the support was fast and efficient. In batch culture conditions, the biomass accumulation reached a cuasi-stationary phase after 12 h. Under optimal conditions, the attached biomass comprised around 80% of the total biomass present in the bioreactor. After the colonization phase, the packed-bed bioreactor was continuously operated to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The biosorption capacity of the attached biomass was similar to that of the free bacterial suspension

  8. Comparative study of HOCl-inflicted damage to bacterial DNA ex vivo and within cells

    OpenAIRE

    Suquet, Christine; Warren, Jeffrey J.; Seth, Nimulrith; Hurst, James K.

    2009-01-01

    The prospects for using bacterial DNA as an intrinsic probe for HOCl and secondary oxidants/chlorinating agents associated with it has been evaluated using both in vitro and in vivo studies. Single-strand and double-strand breaks occurred in bare plasmid DNA that had been exposed to high levels of HOCl, although these reactions were very inefficient compared to polynucleotide chain cleavage caused by the OH•-generating reagent, peroxynitrite. Plasmid nicking was not increased when intact Esch...

  9. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht A.; Rafrafi Y.; Sablayrolles C.; Bertron A.; Kassim C.; Alquier M.; Erable B.

    2013-01-01

    International audience Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.). Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 < pH < 11). The screening of a range of anaerobic denitrifying bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bac...

  10. The Salmonella enterica virulence : Its role in bacterial adaption to mammalian and protozoan cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tezcan-Merdol, Dilek

    2004-01-01

    Salmonellae are Gram-negative enteric bacteria and facultative intracellular pathogens responsible for a diversity of illnesses in a wide range of hosts, including man. Many serovars of Salmonella enterica harbor a plasmid that enhances bacterial virulence in infection models, and that seems to promote extraintestinal infection in man. Consequently, the plasmid has been referred to as the"virulence plasmid". The virulence plasmid varies in its constitution among different se...

  11. Commensal bacterial internalization by epithelial cells: An alternative portal for gut leakiness

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Co-existing paracellular and transcellular barrier defect in intestinal epithelium was documented in inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and intestinal obstruction. Mechanisms regarding tight junction disruption have been extensively studied; however, limited progress has been made in research on bacterial transcytosis. Densely packed brush border (BB), with cholesterol-based lipid rafts in the intermicrovillous membrane invagination, serves as an ultrastructural barrier to prevent di...

  12. Respiratory Viruses Augment the Adhesion of Bacterial Pathogens to Respiratory Epithelium in a Viral Species- and Cell Type-Dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Rodriguez, Carina A.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Wang, Yan; Webby, Richard J; Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections often complicate respiratory viral infections, but the mechanisms whereby viruses predispose to bacterial disease are not completely understood. We determined the effects of infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV-3), and influenza virus on the abilities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells and how these viruses alter the expression of known recept...

  13. Eugenol alters the integrity of cell membrane and acts against the nosocomial pathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, K Pandima; Sakthivel, R; Nisha, S Arif; Suganthy, N; Pandian, S Karutha

    2013-03-01

    Eugenol, a member of the phenylpropanoids class of chemical compounds, is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf. The antibacterial activity of eugenol and its mechanism of bactericidal action against Proteus mirabilis were evaluated. Treatment with eugenol at their minimum inhibitory concentration [0.125 % (v/v)] and minimum bactericidal concentration [0.25 % (v/v)] reduced the viability and resulted in complete inhibition of P. mirabilis. A strong bactericidal effect on P. mirabilis was also evident, as eugenol inactivated the bacterial population within 30 min exposure. Chemo-attractant property and the observance of highest antibacterial activity at alkaline pH suggest that eugenol can work more effectively when given in vivo. Eugenol inhibits the virulence factors produced by P. mirabilis as observed by swimming motility, swarming behavior and urease activity. It interacts with cellular membrane of P. mirabilis and makes it highly permeable, forming nonspecific pores on plasma membrane, which in turn directs the release of 260 nm absorbing materials and uptake of more crystal violet from the medium into the cells. SDS-polyacrylamide gel, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis further proves the disruptive action of eugenol on the plasma membrane of P. mirabilis. The findings reveal that eugenol shows an excellent bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis by altering the integrity of cell membrane. PMID:23444040

  14. Human Langerhans cells control Th cells via programmed death-ligand 1 in response to bacterial stimuli and nickel-induced contact allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hitzler

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs are suspected to initiate inflammatory immune responses to contact allergens and pathogenic bacteria. In chronic infectious diseases, programmed death ligand (PD-L 1 exhibits both inhibitory and costimulatory functions on T cell-mediated activation and tolerance. Here, we investigated the effects of contact allergens and bacterial stimuli on PD-L1 expression in LCs and the effects of altered PD-L1 expression on cytokine release of subsequently cocultured T cells. Monocyte-derived LCs (MoLCs, LCs, and skin sections of patients suffering from allergic contact dermatitis were challenged with nickel and then analyzed for PD-L1 expression by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. In blocking experiments, we found that the release of Th cell specific cytokines was dependent on both stimulation of LCs and inhibition of PD-L1-PD-1 interactions. Stimulation with peptidoglycan (PGN or lipopolysaccharide (LPS and blockage of PD-L1 with a specific antibody triggered the release of high levels of IL-17, IL-22, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in CD4(+T cells. If nickel was used as a stimulus, blockage of PD-L1 led to high amounts of TNF-α and IL-22. A closer look revealed PD-L1-dependent upregulation of IL-17 secretion in FACS-sorted CCR6(+/CCR4(+ T memory cells. In the presence of anti-PD-L1, PGN induced secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 in total CCR6(+ cells, while nickel triggered secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 exclusively in CCR6(+/CCR4(+ cells. Our findings suggest that PD-L1 on LCs plays a crucial role in type IV allergic reactions and in response to bacterial stimuli by controlling the nature of inflammatory Th cell responses.

  15. Effects of inoculation sources on the enrichment and performance of anode bacterial consortia in sensor typed microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Tran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells are a recently emerging technology that promises a number of applications in energy recovery, environmental treatment and monitoring. In this study, we investigated the effect of inoculating sources on the enrichment of electrochemically active bacterial consortia in sensor-typed microbial fuel cells (MFCs. Several MFCs were constructed, operated with modified artificial wastewater and inoculated with different microbial sources from natural soil, natural mud, activated sludge, wastewater and a mixture of those sources. After enrichment, the MFCs inoculated with the natural soil source generated higher and more stable currents (0.53±0.03 mA, in comparisons with the MFCs inoculated with the other sources. The results from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE showed that there were significant changes in bacterial composition from the original inocula to the enriched consortia. Even more interestingly, Pseudomonas sp. was found dominant in the natural soil source and also in the corresponding enriched consortium. The interactions between Pseudomonas sp. and other species in such a community are probably the key for the effective and stable performance of the MFCs.

  16. Life-cycle analysis of product integrated polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; García-Valverde, Rafael; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    , switch and a white light emitting semiconductor diode. The polymer solar cell employed in this prototype presents a power conversion efficiency in the range of 2 to 3% yielding energy payback times (EPBT) in the range of 1.3–2 years. Based on this it is worthwhile to undertake a life-cycle study......A life cycle analysis (LCA) on a product integrated polymer solar module is carried out in this study. These assessments are well-known to be useful in developmental stages of a product in order to identify the bottlenecks for the up-scaling in its production phase for several aspects spanning from...... economics through design to functionality. An LCA study was performed to quantify the energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity use in the manufacture of a light-weight lamp based on a plastic foil, a lithium-polymer battery, a polymer solar cell, printed circuitry, blocking diode...

  17. Synthetic circuits integrating logic and memory in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuti, Piro; Yazbek, John; Lu, Timothy K

    2013-05-01

    Logic and memory are essential functions of circuits that generate complex, state-dependent responses. Here we describe a strategy for efficiently assembling synthetic genetic circuits that use recombinases to implement Boolean logic functions with stable DNA-encoded memory of events. Application of this strategy allowed us to create all 16 two-input Boolean logic functions in living Escherichia coli cells without requiring cascades comprising multiple logic gates. We demonstrate long-term maintenance of memory for at least 90 cell generations and the ability to interrogate the states of these synthetic devices with fluorescent reporters and PCR. Using this approach we created two-bit digital-to-analog converters, which should be useful in biotechnology applications for encoding multiple stable gene expression outputs using transient inputs of inducers. We envision that this integrated logic and memory system will enable the implementation of complex cellular state machines, behaviors and pathways for therapeutic, diagnostic and basic science applications. PMID:23396014

  18. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline;

    2007-01-01

    -kappaB activation and cytokine secretion in vitro. Thus, DMBT1 may play an important role in the first line of mucosal defense conferring immune exclusion of bacterial cell wall components. Dysregulated intestinal DMBT1 expression due to mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 gene may be part of the complex pathophysiology......Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...

  19. Life cycle assessment of roof integrated solar cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research protocol, applied in this report, is designed for use within the energy R and D-context: it provides a framework for finding bottlenecks and opportunities for (new) energy technologies in the context of (energy) resource scarcity and environmental issues. Finding and analyzing these bottlenecks and opportunities is a major objective of this study. A derived objective of this study is to gain experience in using the LCA-framework and the research protocol described earlier, and to evaluate the usefulness of these instruments in helping to find and analyze bottlenecks and opportunities in energy technologies. Photovoltaic solar cell systems (PV systems) are comprised of solar cell modules and a Balance-of-System (BOS): a support structure and power conditioning equipment. In this LCA amorphous silicon cells (a-Si) are considered. For the Netherlands roof-integrated, grid-connected systems are assumed to be the major application of PV in the future. Two cases will be studied. In case 1 a system of 30 m2 of modules which are connected to the grid via a single inverter are studied. The modules are comprised of a-Si cells and have a conversion efficiency of 10%. Integration into the roof is done with aluminium profiles. In case 2 a system of 30 m2 a-Si cell modules integrated in the roof with plastic 'tiles' is studied. The modules have an efficiency of 15% and connection to the grid is more or less centralized: 25 systems share an inverter which is connected to the grid. The goal and scope of the LCA and the functional unit are described in chapter 2. In chapter 3 the process tree and descriptions of the distinguished processes are given and the inventory table is drawn up. In chapter 4 the impact assessment is dealt with, followed by a discussion of improvement options in chapter 5. Conclusions and recommendations are given in the chapters 6 and 7 only regarding the environmental aspects. 9 figs., 13 tabs., 4 appendices, 13 refs

  20. Scheduling of Power System Cells Integrating Stochastic Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy supply and climate change are nowadays two of the most outstanding problems which societies have to cope with under a context of increasing energy needs. Public awareness of these problems is driving political willingness to take actions for tackling them in a swift and efficient manner. Such actions mainly focus in increasing energy efficiency, in decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, and in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In this context, power systems are undergoing important changes in the way they are planned and managed. On the one hand, vertically integrated structures are being replaced by market structures in which power systems are un-bundled. On the other, power systems that once relied on large power generation facilities are witnessing the end of these facilities' life-cycle and, consequently, their decommissioning. The role of distributed energy resources such as wind and solar power generators is becoming increasingly important in this context. However, the large-scale integration of such type of generation presents many challenges due, for instance, to the uncertainty associated to the variability of their production. Nevertheless, advanced forecasting tools may be combined with more controllable elements such as energy storage devices, gas turbines, and controllable loads to form systems that aim to reduce the impacts that may be caused by these uncertainties. This thesis addresses the management under market conditions of these types of systems that act like independent societies and which are herewith named power system cells. From the available literature, a unified view of power system scheduling problems is also proposed as a first step for managing sets of power system cells in a multi-cell management framework. Then, methodologies for performing the optimal day-ahead scheduling of single power system cells are proposed, discussed and evaluated under both a deterministic and a stochastic framework that directly integrates the

  1. An integral parametrization of the bacterial growth curve experimental demonstration with E. coli C{sub 6}00 bacteria; Parametrizacion integrada de la curva de crecimiento bacteriano. Comprobacion experimental para E. coli C{sub 6}00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces, F.; Vidania, R. de

    1984-07-01

    In this work an integral parametrization of the bacterial growth curve is presented. The values of the parameters are obtained by fitting to the experimental data. Those parameters, with allow to describe the growth in its different phases, are the followings: slopes of the curve in its three parts and the time which divides the last two phases of the bacterial growth. The experimental data are bacterial densities measured by optical methods. The bacteria used was the E. coli C{sub 6}00. (Author)

  2. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  3. Bacterial glycobiology: rhamnose-containing cell wall polysaccharides in Gram-positive bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Mistou, Michel-Yves; Sutcliffe, Iain; van Sorge, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the Gram-positive cell wall is typically described as containing peptidoglycan, proteins and essential secondary cell wall structures called teichoic acids, which comprise approximately half of the cell wall mass. The cell walls of many species within the genera Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Lactococcus contain large amounts of the sugar rhamnose, which is incorporated in cell wall-anchored polysaccharides (CWP) that possibly function as homologues of well-studied wall te...

  4. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative antibody-producing cell responses to lipopolysaccharide in cell walls of the bacterial form and in membranes of the protoplast L-form of Proteus mirabilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Karch, H; Nixdorff, K

    1980-01-01

    Membranes of the stable protoplast L-form of Proteus mirabilis strain VI were highly immunogenic carriers of lipopolysaccharide when compared with the immune responses to lipopolysaccharide contained in cell walls of the bacterial form of this organism.

  5. Bacterial cell wall preservation during organic matter diagenesis in sediments off Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Niggemann, Jutta; Jørgensen, Bo Barker;

    evaluated from the percentage of carbon and nitrogen present as amino acid carbon and nitrogen, the ratio between protein precursors and their non-protein degradation products, compositional changes in the amino acid spectra and the percentage of carbon and nitrogen present as amino sugar carbon and...... nitrogen. The study clearly demonstrated a strong bacterial imprint in organic matter during early diagenesis. Hence, the key players in organic matter mineralization became an increasingly import component of refractory organic matter with ongoing degradation. Session #:053 Date: 01-27-09 Time: 11...

  6. Identification of novel bacterial histidine biosynthesis inhibitors using docking, ensemble rescoring, and whole-cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Signe Teuber; Liu, J.; Estiu, G.;

    2010-01-01

    . aureus histidine biosynthesis pathway, which is predicted to be essential for bacterial biomass productions. Virtual screening of a library of similar to 10(6) compounds identified 49 potential inhibitors of three enzymes of this pathway. Eighteen representative compounds were directly tested on three S....... aureus-and two Escherichia coli strains in standard disk inhibition assays. Thirteen compounds are inhibitors of some or all of the S. aureus strains, while 14 compounds weakly inhibit growth in one or both E. coli strains. The high hit rate obtained from a fast virtual screen demonstrates the...

  7. Bacterial mitosis: partitioning protein ParA oscillates in spiral-shaped structures and positions plasmids at mid-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2004-01-01

    with a single plasmid focus, the focus located preferentially at mid-cell. In cells with two foci, these located at quarter-cell positions. In the absence of ParB and parC1/parC2, ParA-GFP formed stationary helices extending from one end of the nucleoid to the other. In the presence of ParB and parC1/parC2, ParA-GFP......The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes oscillating ATPase ParA, DNA binding protein ParB and two cis-acting DNA regions to which ParB binds (parC1 and parC2). Three independent techniques were used to investigate the subcellular localization of plasmids carrying par2. In cells...... oscillated in spiral-shaped structures. Amino acid substitutions in ParA simultaneously abolished ParA spiral formation, oscillation and either plasmid localization or plasmid separation at mid-cell. Therefore, our results suggest that ParA spirals position plasmids at the middle of the bacterial nucleoid...

  8. Profiling of bacterial cells and cell-surface proteins of plant-associated bacteria by standard analytical techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, Dana; Horká, Marie; Šalplachta, Jiří; Kubesová, Anna; Vykydalová, Marie; Kahle, Vladislav

    Latvia: Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis, 2011 - (Kažoka, H.). s. 94 [Nordic Separation Science Society Conference /6./. 24.09.2011-27.09.2011, Riga] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00310701; GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : bacterial profiling * Rhizobium * MALDI-TOF MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://www.nosss.eu

  9. Integration of a laterally acquired gene into a cell network important for growth in a strain of Vibrio rotiferianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labbate Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT is a major contributor to bacterial evolution and up to 25% of a bacterium's genome may have been acquired by this process over evolutionary periods of time. Successful LGT requires both the physical transfer of DNA and its successful incorporation into the host cell. One system that contributes to this latter step by site-specific recombination is the integron. Integrons are found in many diverse bacterial Genera and is a genetic system ubiquitous in vibrios that captures mobile DNA at a dedicated site. The presence of integron-associated genes, contained within units of mobile DNA called gene cassettes makes up a substantial component of the vibrio genome (1-3%. Little is known about the role of this system since the vast majority of genes in vibrio arrays are highly novel and functions cannot be ascribed. It is generally regarded that strain-specific mobile genes cannot be readily integrated into the cellular machinery since any perturbation of core metabolism is likely to result in a loss of fitness. Results In this study, at least one mobile gene contained within the Vibrio rotiferianus strain DAT722, but lacking close relatives elsewhere, is shown to greatly reduce host fitness when deleted and tested in growth assays. The precise role of the mobile gene product is unknown but impacts on the regulation of outermembrane porins. This demonstrates that strain specific laterally acquired mobile DNA can be integrated rapidly into bacterial networks such that it becomes advantageous for survival and adaptation in changing environments. Conclusions Mobile genes that are highly strain specific are generally believed to act in isolation. This is because perturbation of existing cell machinery by the acquisition of a new gene by LGT is highly likely to lower fitness. In contrast, we show here that at least one mobile gene, apparently unique to a strain, encodes a product that has integrated into central

  10. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A. (Notre)

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  11. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.). Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 < pH <11). The screening of a range of anaerobic denitrifying bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours) and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions. (authors)

  12. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.. Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  13. Bacterial Wall Components such as Lipothecoid Acid, Peptidoglycan, Liposaccharide and Lipid A Stimulate Cell Proliferation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya, Jaime H.; Neopikhanov, Vadim; Söderman, Charlotte; Uribe, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicate that the microflora contains mitogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Our aim is to examine whether cell wall components of both Gram-negative and positive bacteria influence cell proliferation in small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. A human colonic epithelial cell line from adenocarcinoma (IEC-6) and a nontransformed small intestinal cell line from germ-free rats (LS-123) were incubated with (a) lipothecoid acid from Streptococcus faecalis at 1.56–50 ...

  14. Moxifloxacin in Preventing Bacterial Infections in Patients Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  15. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    these networks. In view of the integrative nature of living systems, it is not surprising that stress-induced genes, generally believed to primarily function in cell survival pathways, inhibit or even promote cell death pathways at multiple levels to ensure homeostasis at cell and/or organism level. The heat shock genes obviously do much more than merely help cells survive stress.

  16. Differential survival of solitary and aggregated bacterial cells promotes aggregate formation on leaf surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The survival of individual Pseudomonas syringae cells was determined on bean leaf surfaces maintained under humid conditions or periodically exposed to desiccation stress. Cells of P. syringae strain B728a harboring a GFP marker gene were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy, either directly in situ or after recovery from leaves, and dead cells were identified as those that were stained with propidium iodide in such populations. Under moist, conducive conditions on plants, the proportion of total live cells was always high, irrespective of their aggregated state. In contrast, the proportion of the total cells that remained alive on leaves that were periodically exposed to desiccation stress decreased through time and was only ≈15% after 5 days. However, the fraction of cells in large aggregates that were alive on such plants in both condition was much higher than more solitary cells. Immediately after inoculation, cells were randomly distributed over the leaf surface and no aggregates were observed. However, a very aggregated pattern of colonization was apparent within 7 days, and >90% of the living cells were located in aggregates of 100 cells or more. Our results strongly suggest that, although conducive conditions favor aggregate formation, such cells are much more capable of tolerating environmental stresses, and the preferential survival of cells in aggregates promotes a highly clustered spatial distribution of bacteria on leaf surfaces. PMID:14665692

  17. Single-cell level based approach to investigate bacterial metabolism during batch industrial fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Eriksen, Niels T.;

    Escherichia coli fermentations have been studied for decades, but most results are based on average measurements of the whole populations of cells, whilst averaged data can mask the distribution of activities at the sub-population or single-cell level. A population of genetically identical cells ...

  18. Variations of both bacterial community and extracellular polymers: the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from biofloc to aerobic granule sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Yu, Xin; Wei, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from aerobic biofloc (ABF) and granular sludge (AGS), in this study, as the first time the hydrophilic and hydrophobic bacterial communities were analyzed independently. Meanwhile, the effect of extracellular polymers (EPS) on the cell hydrophobicity is also studied. Few Bacteroidetes were detected (1.35% in ABF and 3.84% in AGS) in hydrophilic bacteria, whereas they are abundant in the hydrophobic cells (47.8% and 43% for ABF and AGS, respectively). The main species of Bacteroidetes changed from class Sphingobacteria to Flavobacteria in AGS. On the other hand, EPS is directly responsible to cell hydrophobicity. For AGS, cell hydrophobicity was sharply decreased after EPS extraction. Both quantity and property of the extracellular protein are related to hydrophobicity. Our results showed the variation of cell hydrophobicity was resulted from variations of both bacterial population and EPS. PMID:21482465

  19. Omics, epidemiology and integrated approach for the coexistence with bacterial canker of kiwifruit, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Scortichini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial canker of kiwifruit, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, is a destructive disease found in all major areas of production of green-fleshed (Actinidia deliciosa and yellow-fleshed (A. chinensis kiwifruit of the world (i.e, Europe, China, New Zealand and Chile. A series of studies and field trials concerning epidemiology, agronomical techniques, new bactericides effectiveness as well as molecular typing analysis, genomic and proteomic, allowed us to elucidate the cycle of disease of the pathogen, to dissect its main genomic features, to point out the plant proteins involved in resistance/tolerance to the bacterium, to modify some basic agronomical techniques and to propose new compounds that currently, at least in the province of Latina and Rome, Italy, allow the farmers to coexist with the pathogen by reaching the full yield and quality of the crop as before the appearance of the disease.

  20. Modeling watershed-scale solute transport using an integrated, process-based hydrologic model with applications to bacterial fate and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jie; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2015-10-01

    Distributed hydrologic models that simulate fate and transport processes at sub-daily timescales are useful tools for estimating pollutant loads exported from watersheds to lakes and oceans downstream. There has been considerable interest in the application of integrated process-based hydrologic models in recent years. While the models have been applied to address questions of water quantity and to better understand linkages between hydrology and land surface processes, routine applications of these models to address water quality issues are currently limited. In this paper, we first describe a general process-based watershed-scale solute transport modeling framework, based on an operator splitting strategy and a Lagrangian particle transport method combined with dispersion and reactions. The transport and the hydrologic modules are tightly coupled and the interactions among different hydrologic components are explicitly modeled. We test transport modules using data from plot-scale experiments and available analytical solutions for different hydrologic domains. The numerical solutions are also compared with an analytical solution for groundwater transit times with interactions between surface and subsurface flows. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the model to simulate bacterial fate and transport in the Red Cedar River watershed in Michigan and test hypotheses about sources and transport pathways. The watershed bacterial fate and transport model is expected to be useful for making near real-time predictions at marine and freshwater beaches.

  1. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  2. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H; Seth Childers, W; Blair, Jimmy A; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  3. Synchrony in human, mouse and bacterial cell cultures--a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen; Romero, Ana; Eward, K. Leigh

    2003-01-01

    Growth characteristics of synchronous human MOLT-4, human U-937 and mouse L1210 cultures produced with a new minimally-disturbing technology were compared to each other and to synchronous Escherichia coli B/r. Based on measurements of cell concentrations during synchronous growth, synchrony persisted in similar fashion for all cells. Cell size and DNA distributions in the mammalian cultures also progressed synchronously and reproducibly for multiple cell cycles. The results demonstrate that unambiguous multi-cycle synchrony, critical for verifying the absence of significant growth imbalances induced by the synchronization procedure, is feasible with these cell lines, and possibly others.

  4. Integrative analysis of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Katherine C; Calzone, Laurence; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Cross, Frederick R; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J

    2004-08-01

    The adaptive responses of a living cell to internal and external signals are controlled by networks of proteins whose interactions are so complex that the functional integration of the network cannot be comprehended by intuitive reasoning alone. Mathematical modeling, based on biochemical rate equations, provides a rigorous and reliable tool for unraveling the complexities of molecular regulatory networks. The budding yeast cell cycle is a challenging test case for this approach, because the control system is known in exquisite detail and its function is constrained by the phenotypic properties of >100 genetically engineered strains. We show that a mathematical model built on a consensus picture of this control system is largely successful in explaining the phenotypes of mutants described so far. A few inconsistencies between the model and experiments indicate aspects of the mechanism that require revision. In addition, the model allows one to frame and critique hypotheses about how the division cycle is regulated in wild-type and mutant cells, to predict the phenotypes of new mutant combinations, and to estimate the effective values of biochemical rate constants that are difficult to measure directly in vivo. PMID:15169868

  5. Procalcitonin neutralizes bacterial LPS and reduces LPS-induced cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matera Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Procalcitonin (PCT is a polypeptide with several cationic aminoacids in its chemical structure and it is a well known marker of sepsis. It is now emerging that PCT might exhibit some anti-inflammatory effects. The present study, based on the evaluation of the in vitro interaction between PCT and bacterial lipopolisaccharide (LPS, reports new data supporting the interesting and potentially useful anti-inflammatory activity of PCT. Results PCT significantly decreased (p Salmonella typhimurium (rough chemotype and Escherichia coli (smooth chemotype. Subsequently, the in vitro effects of PCT on LPS-induced cytokine release were studied in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. When LPS was pre-incubated for 30 minutes with different concentrations of PCT, the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα by PBMC decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 hours for IL-10 and 4 hours for TNFα. The release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 exhibited a drastic reduction at 4 hours for all the PCT concentrations assessed, whereas such decrease was concentration-dependent after 24 hours. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the capability of PCT to directly neutralize bacterial LPS, thus leading to a reduction of its major inflammatory mediators.

  6. Lung CD8+ T cells in COPD have increased expression of bacterial TLRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Christine M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs on T cells can modulate their responses, however, the extent and significance of TLR expression by lung T cells, NK cells, or NKT cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is unknown. Methods Lung tissue collected from clinically-indicated resections (n = 34 was used either: (a to compare the expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR2/1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6 and TLR9 on lung CD8+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, NK cells and NKT cells from smokers with or without COPD; or (b to isolate CD8+ T cells for culture with anti-CD3ε without or with various TLR ligands. We measured protein expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-13, perforin, granzyme A, granzyme B, soluble FasL, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CCL11, and CXCL9 in supernatants. Results All the lung subsets analyzed demonstrated low levels of specific TLR expression, but the percentage of CD8+ T cells expressing TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR2/1 was significantly increased in COPD subjects relative to those without COPD. In contrast, from the same subjects, only TLR2/1 and TLR2 on lung CD4+ T cells and CD8+ NKT cells, respectively, showed a significant increase in COPD and there was no difference in TLR expression on lung CD56+ NK cells. Production of the Tc1 cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α by lung CD8+ T cells were significantly increased via co-stimulation by Pam3CSK4, a specific TLR2/1 ligand, but not by other agonists. Furthermore, this increase in cytokine production was specific to lung CD8+ T cells from patients with COPD as compared to lung CD8+ T cells from smokers without COPD. Conclusions These data suggest that as lung function worsens in COPD, the auto-aggressive behavior of lung CD8+ T cells could increase in response to microbial TLR ligands, specifically ligands against TLR2/1.

  7. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  8. Dispersed cells represent a distinct stage in the transition from bacterial biofilm to planktonic lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong;

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria assume distinct lifestyles during the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Increased levels of the intracellular messenger c-di-GMP determine the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth, while a reduction causes biofilm dispersal. It is generally assumed that cells dispersed from...... biofilms immediately go into the planktonic growth phase. Here we use single-nucleotide resolution transcriptomic analysis to show that the physiology of dispersed cells from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is highly different from those of planktonic and biofilm cells. In dispersed cells, the expression...... of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY and RsmZ is downregulated, whereas secretion genes are induced. Dispersed cells are highly virulent against macrophages and Caenorhabditis elegans compared with planktonic cells. In addition, they are highly sensitive towards iron stress, and the combination of a...

  9. IFMIF target and test cell - Towards design integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International-Fusion-Material-Irradiation-Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator driven neutron source for irradiation tests of candidate fusion reactor materials. Two 40 MeV deuterium beams of 125 mA each will hit a flowing liquid lithium jet target, producing high energy neutrons up to 55 MeV at a rate of about 1x1017s-1. Those neutrons will penetrate the target back wall made of a thin Eurofer plate. In the attached High Flux Test Module (HFTM), a testing volume of 0.5 litres filled by qualified small scale specimens will be irradiated at displacement rates of 20-50 dpa/fpy in structural materials. The HFTM will also provide helium and hydrogen production to dpa ratios that reflect within the uncertainties the values expected in a DEMO fusion reactor. The Medium Flux Test Module (MFTM) comprises devices for in situ creep-fatigue and tritium release experiments, as well as tungsten spectral shifter or reflector plates. Farther down-stream the low flux region will provide irradiation tubes for additional material irradiation at lower fluence levels. The objective of the present paper is to present the progress achieved in the design integration of the Target and Test Cell of IFMIF. First, work is reported on collecting and harmonizing the CAD designs provided by various international groups involved in the IFMIF Target and Test Cell development. Second, further efforts devoted to the general nuclear layout of the Target and Test Cell are described, taking into account nuclear calculations of responses such as the nuclear heating, the activation inventories, and dose rates based on most advanced nuclear data and calculational procedures. Finally, results of an extensive study are presented on the cooling capabilities of the Target and Test Cell by natural convection. (author)

  10. Bacterial DNA activates cell mediated immune response and nitric oxide overproduction in peritoneal macrophages from patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    OpenAIRE

    Francés, R; Muñoz, C.; Zapater, P; Uceda, F; Gascón, I; Pascual, S.; Pérez-Mateo, M; J. Such

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Translocation of intestinal bacteria to ascitic fluid is probably the first step in the development of episodes of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis. We have recently reported the detection of bacterial DNA in blood and ascitic fluid from patients with advanced cirrhosis, what we consider as molecular evidence of bacterial translocation. Several studies have shown the immunogenic role of bacterial DNA in vitro, and we hypothesised that the prese...

  11. Changes of lipid domains in Bacillus subtilis cells with disrupted cell wall peptidoglycan

    OpenAIRE

    Muchová, Katarína; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Barák, Imrich

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall is responsible for cell integrity and the maintenance of cell shape in bacteria. The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall consists of a thick peptidoglycan layer located on the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane. Bacterial cell membranes, like eukaryotic cell membranes, are known to contain domains of specific lipid and protein composition. Recently, using the membrane-binding fluorescent dye FM4-64, helix-like lipid structures extending along the long axis of the cell and consist...

  12. Microfluidic-Based Droplet and Cell Manipulations Using Artificial Bacterial Flagella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ding

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we assess the functionality of magnetic helical microswimmers as basic tools for the manipulation of soft materials, including microdroplets and single cells. Their ability to perform a range of unit operations is evaluated and the operational challenges associated with their use are established. In addition, we also report on interactions observed between the head of such helical swimmers and the boundaries of droplets and cells and discuss the possibilities of assembling an artificial swimming microorganism or a motorized cell.

  13. Tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors block invasin-promoted bacterial uptake by epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenshine, I.; Duronio, V; Finlay, B B

    1992-01-01

    The ability to enter into (invade) mammalian cells is an essential virulence determinant of many pathogenic bacteria and intracellular parasites. These organisms are internalized by host cells upon attachment to their surface. However, the mechanisms used by intracellular parasites to induce internalization into host cells have not been defined. We found that the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine blocks invasion by some pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ...

  14. Inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium Invasion by Host Cell Expression of Secreted Bacterial Invasion Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Steve A.; Jones, Bradley D.

    1998-01-01

    Pathogenic Salmonella species initiate infection of a host by inducing their own uptake into intestinal epithelial cells. An invasive phenotype is conferred to this pathogen by a number of proteins that are components of a type III secretion system. During the invasion process, the bacteria utilize this secretion system to release proteins that enter the host cell and apparently interact with unknown host cell components that induce alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. To investigate the ro...

  15. Bacterial cellulose-polyaniline nano-biocomposite: A porous media hydrogel bioanode enhancing the performance of microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkour, Mehrdad; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Mashkour, Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are one of the possible renewable energy supplies which microorganisms play an active role in bio-oxidize reactions of a substrate such as glucose. Electrode materials and surface modifications are highly effective tools in enhancing MFCs' Performance. In this study, new composite anodes are fabricated. Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used as continuous phase and polyaniline (PANI) as dispersed one which is synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization on BC's fibers. With hydrogel nature of BC as a novel feature and polyaniline conductivity there meet the favorable conditions to obtain an active microbial biofilm on anode surface. Maximum power density of 117.76 mW/m2 in current density of 617 mA/m2 is achieved for BC/PANI anode. The amounts demonstrate a considerable enhancement compared with graphite plate (1 mW/m2 and 10 mA/m2).

  16. Intra-Species Bacterial Quorum Sensing Studied at Single Cell Level in a Double Droplet Trapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm T. S. Huck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the intra-species bacterial quorum sensing at the single cell level using a double droplet trapping system. Escherichia coli transformed to express the quorum sensing receptor protein, LasR, were encapsulated in microdroplets that were positioned adjacent to microdroplets containing the autoinducer, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL. Functional activation of the LasR protein by diffusion of the OdDHL across the droplet interface was measured by monitoring the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP from a LasR-dependent promoter. A threshold concentration of OdDHL was found to induce production of quorum-sensing associated GFP by E. coli. Additionally, we demonstrated that LasR-dependent activation of GFP expression was also initiated when the adjacent droplets contained single E. coli transformed with the OdDHL synthase gene, LasI, representing a simple quorum sensing circuit between two droplets.

  17. Enhanced production of murine interferon gamma by T cells generated in response to bacterial infection

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Spleen cell cultures derived from animals infected 6 d earlier with Listeria monocytogenes produced 10-20-fold more murine interferon gamma (MuIFN gamma) than spleen cells from nonimmune mice in response to stimulation with T cell mitogens. A striking temporal association was found between the enhanced synthesis of MuIFN gamma and the development of anti-Listeria immunity in that both the potential for increased MuIFN gamma production and the generation of Listeria-protective T cells develope...

  18. Differentiation of early germ cells from human skin-derived stem cells without exogenous gene integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Ma, Hua-Gang; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Li-Lan; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Lan; Dyce, Paul; Li, Julang; Shi, Qing-Hua; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Infertility has long been a difficult issue for many couples. The successful differentiation of germ cells and live progeny from pluripotent stem cells brings new hope to the couples suffering with infertility. Here we successfully isolated human fetus skin-derived stem cells (hfSDSCs) from fetus skin tissue and demonstrated that hfSDSCs can be differentiated into early human germ cell-like cells (hGCLCs). These cells express human germ cell markers DAZL and VASA. Moreover, these pluripotent stem cell-derived hGCLCs are free of exogenous gene integration. When hfSDSCs were differentiated in porcine follicle fluid (PFF) conditioned media, which has been shown to promote the differentiation of mouse and porcine SDSCs into oocyte-like cells (OLCs), we observed some vesicular structures formed from hfSDSCs. Moreover, when hfSDSCs were cultured with specific conditioned media, we observed punctate and elongated SCP3 staining foci, indicating the initiation of meiosis. Ploidy analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that a small percentage of putative 1N populations formed from hfSDSCs when compared with positive controls. In conclusion, our data here, for the first time, demonstrated that hfSDSCs possess the differentiation potential into germ lines, and they may differentiate both male and female hGCLCs in vitro under appropriate conditions. PMID:26347377

  19. Cellular and molecular remodelling of a host cell for vertical transmission of bacterial symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Shan, Hong-Wei; Isermann, Philipp; Huang, Jia-Hsin; Lammerding, Jan; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Douglas, Angela E.

    2016-01-01

    Various insects require intracellular bacteria that are restricted to specialized cells (bacteriocytes) and are transmitted vertically via the female ovary, but the transmission mechanisms are obscure. We hypothesized that, in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, where intact bacteriocytes (and not isolated bacteria) are transferred to oocytes, the transmission mechanism would be evident as cellular and molecular differences between the nymph (pre-adult) and adult bacteriocytes. We demonstrate dramatic remodelling of bacteriocytes at the developmental transition from nymph to adulthood. This transition involves the loss of cell–cell adhesion, high division rates to constant cell size and onset of cell mobility, enabling the bacteriocytes to crawl to the ovaries. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeleton reorganization and changes in gene expression: genes functioning in cell–cell adhesion display reduced expression and genes involved in cell division, cell motility and endocytosis/exocytosis have elevated expression in adult bacteriocytes, relative to nymph bacteriocytes. This study demonstrates, for the first time, how developmentally orchestrated remodelling of gene expression and correlated changes in cell behaviour underpin the capacity of bacteriocytes to mediate the vertical transmission and persistence of the symbiotic bacteria on which the insect host depends. PMID:27358364

  20. A Stochastic Single-Molecule Event Triggers Phenotype Switching of a Bacterial Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sunney; Choi, Paul; Cai, Long

    2009-03-01

    By monitoring fluorescently labeled lactose permease with single-molecule sensitivity, we investigated the molecular mechanism of how an Escherichia coli cell with the lac operon switches from one phenotype to another. At intermediate inducer concentrations, a population of genetically identical cells exhibits two phenotypes: induced cells with highly fluorescent membranes and uninduced cells with a small number of membrane-bound permeases. We found that this basal-level expression results from partial dissociation of the tetrameric lactose repressor from one of its operators on looped DNA. In contrast, infrequent events of complete dissociation of the repressor from DNA result in large bursts of permease expression that trigger induction of the lac operon. Hence, a stochastic single-molecule event determines a cell's phenotype.

  1. Mutual regulation causes co-entrainment between a synthetic oscillator and the bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dies, Marta; Galera-Laporta, Leticia; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2016-04-18

    The correct functioning of cells requires the orchestration of multiple cellular processes, many of which are inherently dynamical. The conditions under which these dynamical processes entrain each other remain unclear. Here we use synthetic biology to address this question in the case of concurrent cellular oscillations. Specifically, we study at the single-cell level the interaction between the cell division cycle and a robust synthetic gene oscillator in Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that cell division is able to partially entrain the synthetic oscillations under normal growth conditions, by driving the periodic replication of the genes involved in the oscillator. Coupling the synthetic oscillations back into the cell cycle via the expression of a key regulator of chromosome replication increases the synchronization between the two periodic processes. A simple computational model allows us to confirm this effect. PMID:26674636

  2. CD8(+) T cells specific to a single Yersinia pseudotuberculosis epitope restrict bacterial replication in the liver but fail to provide sterilizing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiqian; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Blanchette, Krystle; Crimmins, Gregory; Bergman, Molly A; Isberg, Ralph R; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells use contact-dependent cytolysis of target cells to protect the host against intracellular pathogens. We have previously shown that CD8(+) T cells and perforin are required to protect against the extracellular pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we establish an experimental system where CD8(+) T cells specific to a single model antigen are the only memory response present at time of challenge. Using mice immunized with a vaccine strain of Listeria monocytogenes that expresses secreted ovalbumin (Lm-OVA), we show that OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide limited protection against challenge with virulent OVA(+)Y. pseudotuberculosis. Perforin expression by OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells was required, as Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-deficient mice showed higher bacterial burden as compared to Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-sufficient mice. Surprisingly, antigen-specific T cell protection waned over time, as Lm-OVA-immune mice eventually succumbed to Yersinia infection. Kinetic analysis of infection in mice with and without OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed that bacterial numbers increased sharply in OVA-naïve mice until death, while OVA-immune mice held bacterial burden to a lower level throughout the duration of illness until death. Clonal analysis of bacterial populations in OVA-naïve and OVA-immune mice at distinct time points revealed equivalent and severe bottle-neck effects for bacteria in both sets of mice immediately after intravenous challenge, demonstrating a dominant role for other aspects of the immune system regardless of CD8(+) T cell status. These studies indicate that CD8(+) T cells against a single antigen can restrict Y. pseudotuberculosis colonization in a perforin-dependent manner, but ultimately are insufficient in their ability to provide sterilizing immunity and protect against death. PMID:27268148

  3. Dynamic properties of high structural integrity auxetic open cell foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, F.; Ciffo, L. G.; Yates, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    This paper illustrates various dynamic characteristics of open cell compliant polyurethane foam with auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) behaviour. The foam is obtained from off-the-shelf open cell polyurethane grey foam with a manufacturing process based on mechanical deformation on a mould in a temperature-controlled oven. The Poisson's ratio is measured with an image processing technique based on edge detection with wavelet methods. Foam samples have been tested in a viscoelastic analyser tensile test machine to determine the Young's modulus and loss factor for small dynamic strains. The same samples have also been tested in an acoustic impedance tube to measure acoustic absorption and specific acoustic resistance and reactance with a transmissibility technique. Another set of tests has been set up on a cam plastometer machine for constant strain rate dynamic crushing analysis. All the tests have been carried out on auxetic and normal foam samples to provide a comparison between the two types of cellular solids. The results from the experimental tests are discussed and interpreted using microstructure models for cellular materials existing in the literature. The negative Poisson's ratio foam presented in this paper shows an overall superiority regarding damping and acoustic properties compared to the original conventional foam. Its dynamic crushing performance is also significantly superior to the normal foam, suggesting a possible use in structural integrity compliant elements.

  4. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M; Meier, Elizabeth L; Casey Huang, Kerwyn; Goley, Erin D

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL; however, cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wild type. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment. PMID:26099469

  5. Laboratory studies with cloud-derived Bacterial Cells acting as Ice Nuclei in the Immersion and Deposition Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehm, C.; Chou, C.; Amato, P.; Attard, E.; Delort, A.-M.; Morris, C.; Kiselev, A.; Stetzer, O.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play an important role in cloud microphysics. Aerosols of biological origin are a subgroup, and some of them are able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei and thus influence cloud life cycles and the climate. Some bacteria species have been found to act as ice nuclei at relatively high temperatures up to -2 degree Celsius and are therefore of particular importance as "high temperature" ice nuclei. Recently, ice nucleation experiments with bacterial cells from different sources were performed at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. At the AIDA facility, microphysical cloud processes can be simulated and investigated in laboratory at realistic atmospheric cloud conditions. Different ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria strains were isolated from cloud water, glacier melt water and phyllosphere and examined in AIDA experiments. The living cells were suspended in nanopure or artificial cloud water and injected into the cloud chamber through a dispersion nozzle. The injected droplets evaporated in the chamber and the bacterial cells were transformed into the aerosol phase. After the spraying, the cloud formation was started by expansion cooling. Experiments were performed in the temperature range from -2 down to -20 degree Celsius. Detailed measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of the aerosol particles as well as of the droplets and ice particles were carried out during the AIDA experiments. A minor fraction of the bacteria cells was observed to act as ice nuclei in the immersion nucleation mode at higher temperatures as well as in the deposition nucleation mode at lower temperatures. The ice activity started at -6 degree Celsius. The most efficient INA bacteria species were Pseudomonas syringae 32b74 and Pseudomonas fluorescens Antarctica1. The ice active number fraction with respect to the cells varied from 0,01 to 0,1, and it does not change at different

  6. ADP-ribosylation is involved in the integration of foreign DNA into the mammalian cell genome.

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh, F.; Panayotou, G N; Bowler, L. D.; Hardas, B D; Broom, T; Walther, C; Shall, S

    1988-01-01

    The most commonly used DNA transfection method, which employs the calcium phosphate co-precipitation of the donor DNA, involves several discrete steps (1,2). These include the uptake of the donor DNA by the recipient cells, the transport of the DNA to the nucleus, transient expression prior to integration into the host cell genome, concatenation and integration of the transfected DNA into the host cell genome and finally the stable expression of the integrated genes (2,3). Both the concatenat...

  7. Microfluidic Approaches to Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hee-Deung Park; Junghyun Kim; Seok Chung

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms—aggregations of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substrates (EPS)—are an important subject of research in the fields of biology and medical science. Under aquatic conditions, bacterial cells form biofilms as a mechanism for improving survival and dispersion. In this review, we discuss bacterial biofilm development as a structurally and dynamically complex biological system and propose microfluidic approaches for the study of bacterial biofilms. Biofilms develop t...

  8. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymer, B.; Schleifer, K.H.; Read, S.; Zabriskie, J.B.; Krause, R.M.

    1976-07-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten /sup 125/I-L-Ala-..gamma..-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten 125I-L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  10. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquier, M.; Kassim, C.; Bertron, A.; Rafrafi, Y.; Sablayrolles, C.; Albrecht, A.; Erable, B.

    2013-07-01

    Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.). Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  11. In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy of Hydrated Early Stages of Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Various Surfaces in a Flow Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Palmer, Truis; Lin, Sicheng; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Leng, Tianyang; Pustam, Amanda; Yang, Jin; Graham, Lori L; Wyeth, Russell C; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Pink, David

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms are precursors to biofouling by other microorganisms. Understanding their initiation may allow us to design better ways to inhibit them, and thus to inhibit subsequent biofouling. In this study, the ability of confocal Raman microscopy to follow the initiation of biofouling by a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021 (NCIMB 2021), in a flow cell, using optical and confocal Raman microscopy, was investigated. The base of the flow cell comprised a cover glass. The cell was inoculated and the bacteria attached to, and grew on, the cover glass. Bright field images and Raman spectra were collected directly from the hydrated biofilms over several days. Although macroscopically the laser had no effect on the biofilm, within the first 24 h cells migrated away from the position of the laser beam. In the absence of flow, a buildup of extracellular substances occurred at the base of the biofilm. When different coatings were applied to cover glasses before they were assembled into the flow cells, the growth rate, structure, and composition of the resulting biofilm was affected. In particular, the ratio of Resonance Raman peaks from cytochrome c (CC) in the extracellular polymeric substances, to the Raman phenylalanine (Phe) peak from protein in the bacteria, depended on both the nature of the surface and the age of the biofilm. The ratios were highest for 24 h colonies on a hydrophobic surface. Absorption of a surfactant with an ethyleneoxy chain into the hydrophobic coating created a surface similar to that given with a simple PEG coating, where bacteria grew in colonies away from the surface rather than along the surface, and CC:Phe ratios were initially low but increased at least fivefold in the first 48 h. PMID:26903564

  12. Inactivation, DNA double strand break induction and their rejoining in bacterial cells irradiated with heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, M.; Zimmermann, H.; Schmitz, C.

    1994-01-01

    Besides inactivation one of the major interests in our experiments is to study the primary damage in the DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after heavy ion irradiation. These damages lead not only to cell death but also under repair activities to mutations. In further experiments we have investigated the inactivation with two different strains of Deinococcus radiodurans (R1, Rec 30) and the induction of DSB as well as the rejoining of DSB in stationary cells of E. coli (strain B/r) irradiated with radiations of different quality. In the latter case irradiations were done so that the cell survival was roughly at the same level. We measured the DSB using the pulse field gelelectrophoresis which allows to separate between intact (circular) and damaged (linear) DNA. The irradiated cells were transferred to NB medium and incubated for different times to allow rejoining.

  13. Correction of coagulopathy associated with non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) by surgical debulking in a case of ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Benjamin B; Black, Jonathan D; Vilardo, Nicole; Schwartz, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    •Ovarian cancer, particularly clear cell carcinoma, creates a hypercoagulable state.•This state can predispose to non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE).•NBTE can embolize and cause widespread arterial infarction.•NBTE is sometimes associated with a treatment refractory disseminated coagulopathy.•Surgical removal of the primary mass can sometimes reverse the coagulopathy. PMID:27354993

  14. Mammalian cell entry genes in Streptomyces may provide clues to the evolution of bacterial virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Laura C.; Seipke, Ryan F; Pilar Prieto; Joost Willemse; van Wezel, Gilles P; Hutchings, Matthew I; Hoskisson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of virulence is key to appreciating the role specific loci play in pathogenicity. Streptomyces species are generally non-pathogenic soil saprophytes, yet within their genome we can find homologues of virulence loci. One example of this is the mammalian cell entry (mce) locus, which has been characterised in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To investigate the role in Streptomyces we deleted the mce locus and studied its impact on cell survival, morphology and interaction...

  15. Anchors away: contribution of a glycolipid anchor to bacterial invasion of host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Miriam J.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of infections, including meningitis. The molecular events underlying its pathogenesis are poorly understood. A study in this issue of the JCI reports that the GBS invasion-associated gene (iagA) contributes to meningeal infection and virulence by facilitating invasion of the cells that compose the blood-brain barrier and of other host cells. The mechanism involved most likely relates to the gene product’s role in synthesis of a glycolipid anch...

  16. SIMSISH technique does not alter the apparent isotopic composition of bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Chapleur

    Full Text Available In order to identify the function of uncultured microorganisms in their environment, the SIMSISH method, combining in situ hybridization (ISH and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS imaging, has been proposed to determine the quantitative uptake of specific labelled substrates by uncultured microbes at the single cell level. This technique requires the hybridization of rRNA targeted halogenated DNA probes on fixed and permeabilized microorganisms. Exogenous atoms are introduced into cells and endogenous atoms removed during the experimental procedures. Consequently differences between the original and the apparent isotopic composition of cells may occur. In the present study, the influence of the experimental procedures of SIMSISH on the isotopic composition of carbon in E. coli cells was evaluated with nanoSIMS and compared to elemental analyser-isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (EA-IRMS measurements. Our results show that fixation and hybridization have a very limited, reproducible and homogeneous influence on the isotopic composition of cells. Thereby, the SIMSISH procedure minimizes the contamination of the sample by exogenous atoms, thus providing a means to detect the phylogenetic identity and to measure precisely the carbon isotopic composition at the single cell level. This technique was successfully applied to a complex sample with double bromine - iodine labelling targeting a large group of bacteria and a specific archaea to evaluate their specific (13C uptake during labelled methanol anaerobic degradation.

  17. Whole genome amplification and de novo assembly of single bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Rodrigue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single-cell genome sequencing has the potential to allow the in-depth exploration of the vast genetic diversity found in uncultured microbes. We used the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus as a model system for addressing important challenges facing high-throughput whole genome amplification (WGA and complete genome sequencing of individual cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe a pipeline that enables single-cell WGA on hundreds of cells at a time while virtually eliminating non-target DNA from the reactions. We further developed a post-amplification normalization procedure that mitigates extreme variations in sequencing coverage associated with multiple displacement amplification (MDA, and demonstrated that the procedure increased sequencing efficiency and facilitated genome assembly. We report genome recovery as high as 99.6% with reference-guided assembly, and 95% with de novo assembly starting from a single cell. We also analyzed the impact of chimera formation during MDA on de novo assembly, and discuss strategies to minimize the presence of incorrectly joined regions in contigs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The methods describe in this paper will be useful for sequencing genomes of individual cells from a variety of samples.

  18. BIOSORPTION OF TEXTILE DYE USING IMMOBILIZED BACTERIAL (PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND FUNGAL (PHANEROCHATE CHRYSOSPORIUM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Saravanan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater containing dyes presents a serious problem due to its high toxicity which leads to creating enormous environmental pollution and ecological hazards. Therefore the removal of the high stable dyes from the textile effluents is of major importance. The purpose of this study is to remove the reactive dye Procion Blue 2G from textile dye solution by biosorption process using immobilized cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Phanerochate chrysosporium. It was found that maximum dye uptake is 1.648 mg g-1 of bead for P. aeruginosa and it is 1.242 mg g-1 of bead for P. chrysosporium. Both the results are derived from higher initial dye concentration (100 mg L-1 and high cell concentration (in terms of volume of inoculum 20 mL and at low mass of biosorbent (5 g of bead. Comparatively better results are produced by the beads having the cells of P. aeruginosa than P. chrysosporium. Further, due to the cell immobilization, both the cell beads can be utilized repeatedly in continuous reactors by selecting suitable eluent in industrial scale with the advantage of avoiding wash out of cells.

  19. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  20. Measurement of the copy number of the master quorum-sensing regulator of a bacterial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Wang, Yufang; Tu, Kimberly C; Long, Tao; Mehta, Pankaj; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L; Ong, N P

    2010-05-19

    Quorum-sensing is the mechanism by which bacteria communicate and synchronize group behaviors. Quantitative information on parameters such as the copy number of particular quorum-sensing proteins should contribute strongly to understanding how the quorum-sensing network functions. Here, we show that the copy number of the master regulator protein LuxR in Vibrio harveyi can be determined in vivo by exploiting small-number fluctuations of the protein distribution when cells undergo division. When a cell divides, both its volume and LuxR protein copy number, N, are partitioned with slight asymmetries. We measured the distribution functions describing the partitioning of the protein fluorescence and the cell volume. The fluorescence distribution is found to narrow systematically as the LuxR population increases, whereas the volume partitioning is unchanged. Analyzing these changes statistically, we determined that N = 80-135 dimers at low cell density and 575 dimers at high cell density. In addition, we measured the static distribution of LuxR over a large (3000) clonal population. Combining the static and time-lapse experiments, we determine the magnitude of the Fano factor of the distribution. This technique has broad applicability as a general in vivo technique for measuring protein copy number and burst size. PMID:20441767

  1. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL). TNF-α might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-κB and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed

  2. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  3. Metabolic potentiation of the radiosensitization of hypoxic bacterial cells afforded by nitroaromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prolonged preirradiation incubation of nitroaromatic radiosensitizers with Escherichia coli cells has been found to increase the degree of radiosensitization of the cells in anoxia. Studies with E. coli strains which differ in their nitroreductase activity indicate that the increase in sensitization arises from the action of metabolites produced by the nitroreductase system of the cell. The metabolites alone appear to decrease the extrapolation number of irradiated hypoxic cells and when combined with the parent compound give a biphasic survival curve. The combination of misonidazole (1 mmole dm-3) and its metabolites (1 mmole dm-3) gave initial and final enhancement ratios of 2.4 and 1.4, respectively. The final enhancement ratio is that expected for 1 mmole dm-3 misonidazole alone, whereas the initial enhancement ratio indicates that the metabolites potentiate the action of misonidaxole. The preirradiation incubation effect is removed by dithiothreitol at concentrations which do not affect the radiosensitization level of the nitroaromatic sensitizer. This result indicates that the active metabolite probably depletes a certain amount of the free-thiol compounds inside the cell which assist in the repair of radiation-induced damage

  4. Structural insights into inhibition of lipid I production in bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ben C; Mashalidis, Ellene H; Tanino, Tetsuya; Kim, Mijung; Matsuda, Akira; Hong, Jiyong; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-05-26

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is a serious threat to public health. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis is a well-established target for antibiotic development. MraY (phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase) catalyses the first and an essential membrane step of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. It is considered a very promising target for the development of new antibiotics, as many naturally occurring nucleoside inhibitors with antibacterial activity target this enzyme. However, antibiotics targeting MraY have not been developed for clinical use, mainly owing to a lack of structural insight into inhibition of this enzyme. Here we present the crystal structure of MraY from Aquifex aeolicus (MraYAA) in complex with its naturally occurring inhibitor, muraymycin D2 (MD2). We show that after binding MD2, MraYAA undergoes remarkably large conformational rearrangements near the active site, which lead to the formation of a nucleoside-binding pocket and a peptide-binding site. MD2 binds the nucleoside-binding pocket like a two-pronged plug inserting into a socket. Further interactions it makes in the adjacent peptide-binding site anchor MD2 to and enhance its affinity for MraYAA. Surprisingly, MD2 does not interact with three acidic residues or the Mg(2+) cofactor required for catalysis, suggesting that MD2 binds to MraYAA in a manner that overlaps with, but is distinct from, its natural substrate, UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. We have determined the principles of MD2 binding to MraYAA, including how it avoids the need for pyrophosphate and sugar moieties, which are essential features for substrate binding. The conformational plasticity of MraY could be the reason that it is the target of many structurally distinct inhibitors. These findings can inform the design of new inhibitors targeting MraY as well as its paralogues, WecA and TarO. PMID:27088606

  5. Characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells, open circuit and sealed-off reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Chehab, Noura A.

    2013-06-18

    A large percentage of organic fuel consumed in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is lost as a result of oxygen transfer through the cathode. In order to understand how this oxygen transfer affects the microbial community structure, reactors were operated in duplicate using three configurations: closed circuit (CC; with current generation), open circuit (OC; no current generation), and sealed off cathodes (SO; no current, with a solid plate placed across the cathode). Most (98 %) of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed during power production in the CC reactor (maximum of 640 ± 10 mW/m 2), with a low percent of substrate converted to current (coulombic efficiency of 26.5 ± 2.1 %). Sealing the cathode reduced COD removal to 7 %, but with an open cathode, there was nearly as much COD removal by the OC reactor (94.5 %) as the CC reactor. Oxygen transfer into the reactor substantially affected the composition of the microbial communities. Based on analysis of the biofilms using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, microbes most similar to Geobacter were predominant on the anodes in the CC MFC (72 % of sequences), but the most abundant bacteria were Azoarcus (42 to 47 %) in the OC reactor, and Dechloromonas (17 %) in the SO reactor. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were most predominant, with sequences most similar to Methanobacterium in the CC and SO reactor, and Methanocorpusculum in the OC reactors. These results show that oxygen leakage through the cathode substantially alters the bacterial anode communities, and that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominate despite high concentrations of acetate. The predominant methanogens in the CC reactor most closely resembled those in the SO reactor, demonstrating that oxygen leakage alters methanogenic as well as general bacterial communities. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. An integrated fluorescence activated cell sorter fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paié P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a fully integrated fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS, able to perform analysis at single cell level. This optofluidic device is obtained on a fused silica substrate with the use of femtosecond laser micromachining.

  7. Capsular Sialic Acid of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Binds to Swine Influenza Virus and Enhances Bacterial Interactions with Virus-Infected Tracheal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchao; Gagnon, Carl A.; Savard, Christian; Music, Nedzad; Srednik, Mariela; Segura, Mariela; Lachance, Claude; Bellehumeur, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an important swine bacterial pathogen, and it is also an emerging zoonotic agent. It is unknown how S. suis virulent strains, which are usually found in low quantities in pig tonsils, manage to cross the first host defense lines to initiate systemic disease. Influenza virus produces a contagious infection in pigs which is frequently complicated by bacterial coinfections, leading to significant economic impacts. In this study, the effect of a preceding swine influenza H1N1 virus (swH1N1) infection of swine tracheal epithelial cells (NTPr) on the ability of S. suis serotype 2 to adhere to, invade, and activate these cells was evaluated. Cells preinfected with swH1N1 showed bacterial adhesion and invasion levels that were increased more than 100-fold compared to those of normal cells. Inhibition studies confirmed that the capsular sialic acid moiety is responsible for the binding to virus-infected cell surfaces. Also, preincubation of S. suis with swH1N1 significantly increased bacterial adhesion to/invasion of epithelial cells, suggesting that S. suis also uses swH1N1 as a vehicle to invade epithelial cells when the two infections occur simultaneously. Influenza virus infection may facilitate the transient passage of S. suis at the respiratory tract to reach the bloodstream and cause bacteremia and septicemia. S. suis may also increase the local inflammation at the respiratory tract during influenza infection, as suggested by an exacerbated expression of proinflammatory mediators in coinfected cells. These results give new insight into the complex interactions between influenza virus and S. suis in a coinfection model. PMID:24082069

  8. Self-Elongation with Sequential Folding of a Filament of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryojiro; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Katori, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    Under hard-agar and nutrient-rich conditions, a cell of Bacillus subtilis grows as a single filament owing to the failure of cell separation after each growth and division cycle. The self-elongating filament of cells shows sequential folding processes, and multifold structures extend over an agar plate. We report that the growth process from the exponential phase to the stationary phase is well described by the time evolution of fractal dimensions of the filament configuration. We propose a method of characterizing filament configurations using a set of lengths of multifold parts of a filament. Systems of differential equations are introduced to describe the folding processes that create multifold structures in the early stage of the growth process. We show that the fitting of experimental data to the solutions of equations is excellent, and the parameters involved in our model systems are determined.

  9. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  10. A polymerization–depolymerization model for generation of contractile force during bacterial cell division

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplab Ghosh; Anirban Sain

    2008-08-01

    During the last phase of cell division in bacteria, a polymeric ring forms at the division site. The ring, made of intracellular proteins, anchors to the cell wall and starts to contract. That initiates a dividing septum to close in, like the shutter of a camera, eventually guillotining the cell into two daughters. All through, the ring remains at the leading edge of the septum and seems to power its closure. It is not understood why does the ring contract. We propose a theoretical model to explain this. It is worth mentioning that a similar contraction phenomenon occurs for the actin ring in eukaryotes, but there it is due to motor proteins, which however, are absent in bacteria.

  11. Towards identifying host cell-type specific response patterns to bacterial endosymbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavrilovic, Srdjan

    view, available techniques have relied heavily on whole organ analyses that disregard specificities of individual cell types. To address this issue we aimed to develop a technology for comparative global analysis of mature mRNA and small RNA populations at the cell type specific level in the model...... plant Lotus japonicus. A powerful approach referred to here as Defined Expression and RNA Affinity co-Purification (DERAP) was developed to study gene expression and small RNA populations in the host roots during early phases of signal exchange at the cell-type level. As a basis for DERAP analysis of......, namely epidermis with elongating root hairs, inner cortex, endodermis, phloem and xylem, were characterized in L. japonicus. In combination with tagged forms of a Ribosomal surface Protein (RP) and the viral small RNA binding protein P19, these promoters were introduced into L. japonicus ecotype Gifu...

  12. Pyrosequencing Reveals Bacterial Communities in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution System: An Integral Study of Bulk Water, Suspended Solids, Loose Deposits, and Pipe Wall Biofilm

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, G.

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  13. Expression of innate immune complement regulators on brain epithelial cells during human bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasque Philippe

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In meningitis, the cerebrospinal fluid contains high levels of innate immune molecules (e.g. complement which are essential to ward off the infectious challenge and to promote the infiltration of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes. However, epithelial cells of either the ependymal layer, one of the established niche for adult neural stem cells, or of the choroid plexus may be extremely vulnerable to bystander attack by cytotoxic and cytolytic complement components. Methods In this study, we assessed the capacity of brain epithelial cells to express membrane-bound complement regulators (ie, CD35, CD46, CD55 and CD59 in vitro and in situ by immunostaining of control and meningitis human brain tissue sections. Results Double immunofluorescence experiments for ependymal cell markers (GFAP, S100, ZO-1, E-cadherin and complement regulators indicated that the human ependymal cell line model was strongly positive for CD55, CD59 compared to weak stainings for CD46 and CD35. In tissues, we found that CD55 was weakly expressed in control choroid plexus and ependyma but was abundantly expressed in meningitis. Anti-CD59 stained both epithelia in apical location while increased CD59 staining was solely demonstrated in inflamed choroid plexus. CD46 and CD35 were not detected in control tissue sections. Conversely, in meningitis, the ependyma, subependyma and choroid plexus epithelia were strongly stained for CD46 and CD35. Conclusion This study delineates for the first time the capacity of brain ependymal and epithelial cells to respond to and possibly sustain the innate complement-mediated inflammatory insult.

  14. A GFP-based bacterial biosensor with chromosomally integrated sensing cassette for quantitative detection of Hg(II) in environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Himanshu Priyadarshi; Absar Alam; Gireesh-Babu P; Rekha Das; Pankaj Kishore; Shivendra Kumar; Aparna Chaudhari

    2012-01-01

    A mercury biosensor was constructed by integrating biosensor genetic elements into E.coli JM109 chromosome in a single copy number,using the attP/attB recombination mechanism of λ phage.The genetic elements used include a regulatory protein gene (merR) along with operator/promoter (O/P) derived from the mercury resistance operon from pDU1358 plasmid of Serratia marcescens.The expression of reporter gene gfp is also controlled by merR/O/P.Integration of the construct into the chromosome was done to increase the stability and precision of the biosensor.This biosensor could detect Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the concentration range of 100-1700 mnol/L,and manifest the result as the expression of GFP.The GFP expression was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) for each concentration of inducing Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the detection range,which reduces the chances of misinterpretation of results.A model using regression method was also derived for the quantification of the concentration of Hg(Ⅱ) in water samples.

  15. Purinergic Modulation of Interleukin-1β Release from Microglial Cells Stimulated with Bacterial Endotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Davide; Chiozzi, Paola; Falzoni, Simonetta; Hanau, Stefania; Di  Virgilio, Francesco

    1997-01-01

    Microglial cells express a peculiar plasma membrane receptor for extracellular ATP, named P2Z/P2X7 purinergic receptor, that triggers massive transmembrane ion fluxes and a reversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane to hydrophylic molecules of up to 900 dalton molecule weight and eventual cell death (Di Virgilio, F. 1995. Immunol. Today. 16:524–528). The physiological role of this newly cloned (Surprenant, A., F. Rassendren, E. Kawashima, R.A. North and G. Buell. 1996. Science (Wash. ...

  16. Engineered defective interfering RNAs of Sindbis virus express bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in avian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Levis, R; Huang, H.; Schlesinger, S

    1987-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the positive-strand RNA virus Sindbis virus and its defective interfering (DI) particles as vectors for introducing foreign genes into cells. In previous work we showed by deletion mapping of a cloned cDNA derived from one of the DI RNAs that only nucleotides at the 3' and 5' termini of the RNA are essential for the DI RNA to be amplified after it is transfected into cells in the presence of helper virus. As a first step in developing a vector we ...

  17. Modeling of induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli bacteria cells with defects in uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for excision repair system. The number of mismatches as results from translesion-synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. An effect of temporal modulation for amount of single-stranded DNA during post-replication repair is predicted. A comparison of repair system efficiency is conducted

  18. Identification of a Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA fragment associated with bacterial internalization into CHSE-cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulén, N P; Morales, P J; Aruti, D; Figueroa, J E; Concha, M I; Krauskopf, M; León, G

    1996-01-01

    We report here the isolation of a Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA sequence capable of transforming a non-invasive Escherichia coli strain into a microorganism able to enter the fish cell line, CHSE-214. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy techniques were used to assess the acquired invasive phenotype by HB101 E. coli cells, upon transformation with pPMV-189. This plasmid carries a 2282-bp R. salmoninarum DNA segment. The invasive phenotype is conserved upon deletion of approximately 1000 bp at the 3' end of the insert. The remaining segment contains an ORF region encoding a putative protein of about 30 kDa. PMID:8598275

  19. Bacterial autoinduction: looking outside the cell for new metabolic engineering targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLisa Matthew P

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent evidence has demonstrated that cell-to-cell signaling is a fundamental activity carried out by numerous microorganisms. A number of specialized processes are reported to be regulated by density-dependent signaling molecules including antibiotic production, bioluminescence, biofilm formation, genetic competence, sporulation, swarming motility and virulence. However, a more centralized role for quorum sensing is emerging where quorum signaling pathways overlap with stress and starvation circuits to regulate cellular adaptation to changing environmental conditions. The interplay of these phenomena is especially critical in the expression of recombinant proteins where elicitation of stress responses can dramatically impact cellular productivity.

  20. Insights into the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Human RNase6: Structural Determinants for Bacterial Cell Agglutination and Membrane Permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human Ribonuclease 6 is a secreted protein belonging to the ribonuclease A (RNaseA) superfamily, a vertebrate specific family suggested to arise with an ancestral host defense role. Tissue distribution analysis revealed its expression in innate cell types, showing abundance in monocytes and neutrophils. Recent evidence of induction of the protein expression by bacterial infection suggested an antipathogen function in vivo. In our laboratory, the antimicrobial properties of the protein have been evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive species and its mechanism of action was characterized using a membrane model. Interestingly, our results indicate that RNase6, as previously reported for RNase3, is able to specifically agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria as a main trait of its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, a side by side comparative analysis with the RN6(1-45) derived peptide highlights that the antimicrobial activity is mostly retained at the protein N-terminus. Further work by site directed mutagenesis and structural analysis has identified two residues involved in the protein antimicrobial action (Trp1 and Ile13) that are essential for the cell agglutination properties. This is the first structure-functional characterization of RNase6 antimicrobial properties, supporting its contribution to the infection focus clearance. PMID:27089320

  1. The role of host and microbial factors in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal bacteraemia arising from a single bacterial cell bottleneck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Gerlini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of bacteraemia after challenge with one million pneumococci of three isogenic variants was investigated. Sequential analyses of blood samples indicated that most episodes of bacteraemia were monoclonal events providing compelling evidence for a single bacterial cell bottleneck at the origin of invasive disease. With respect to host determinants, results identified novel properties of splenic macrophages and a role for neutrophils in early clearance of pneumococci. Concerning microbial factors, whole genome sequencing provided genetic evidence for the clonal origin of the bacteraemia and identified SNPs in distinct sub-units of F0/F1 ATPase in the majority of the ex vivo isolates. When compared to parental organisms of the inoculum, ex-vivo pneumococci with mutant alleles of the F0/F1 ATPase had acquired the capacity to grow at low pH at the cost of the capacity to grow at high pH. Although founded by a single cell, the genotypes of pneumococci in septicaemic mice indicate strong selective pressure for fitness, emphasising the within-host complexity of the pathogenesis of invasive disease.

  2. Recombination events during integration of transfected DNA into normal human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Murnane, J P; Yezzi, M J; Young, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of recombination responsible for random integration of transfected DNA into the genome of normal human cells have been investigated by analysis of plasmid-cell DNA junctions. Cell clones containing integrated plasmid sequences were selected by morphological transformation of primary human fibroblasts after transfection with a plasmid containing simian virus 40 sequences. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the plasmid-cell DNA junctions was performed on cloned DNA fragments contain...

  3. A bacterial signal peptidase enhances processing of a recombinant single chain antibody fragment in insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ailor, E; Pathmanathan, J; Jongbloed, JDH; Betenbaugh, MJ

    1999-01-01

    The production of an antibody single chain fragment (scFv) in insect cells was accompanied by the formation of an insoluble intracellular precursor even with the inclusion of the bee melittin signal peptide. The presence of the precursor polypeptide suggests a limitation in the processing of the sig

  4. In vitro expansion of human gastric epithelial stem cells and their responses to bacterial infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartfeld, Sina; Bayram, Tülay; van de Wetering, Marc; Huch, Meritxell; Begthel, Harry; Kujala, Pekka; Vries, Robert; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We previously established long-term, 3-dimensional culture of organoids from mouse tissues (intestine, stomach, pancreas, and liver) and human intestine and pancreas. Here we describe conditions required for long-term 3-dimensional culture of human gastric stem cells. The technolo

  5. EzrA: a spectrin-like scaffold in the bacterial cell division machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Cleverley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in identifying the components of the divisome, the assembly of proteins that undertakes the vital process of cell division in bacteria. However, how the highly interdependent processes on either side of the membrane are coordinated during division is a major unresolved question. How is the degradation and synthesis of the cell wall on the outside of the cell coordinated with cytokinesis and membrane fission, which are driven from the inside of the cell by the tubulin homologue FtsZ? A possible key mediator of such coordination is the membrane protein EzrA, as it interacts both with FtsZ and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs that synthesize peptidoglycan. Cleverley et al. [Nature Communications (2014 5, 5421] have recently solved the crystal structure of the cytoplasmic domain of B. subtilis EzrA, which points to an important scaffolding role for EzrA in the divisome. The structure resembles the eukaryotic, cytoskeletal spectrin proteins, which link actin filaments in the cytoskeleton and also connect the actin cytoskeleton to membrane-bound integrin proteins.

  6. An improved cell recovery method for iron oxidizing bacterial (IOB) enrichments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ran; Graf, Joerg; Smets, Barth F.

    2008-01-01

    Two cell recovery methods for IOB enrichments were evaluated for DNA extraction and further PCR-based 16S rRNA gene clone library creation. One was a published method consisting of heating plus oxalic acid treatment and the other one was a new method based on enzymatic agarose digestion (using β...

  7. Hydrogen, fuel cells and renewable energy integration in islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauen, A.; Hart, D. [E4tech Ltd., Lausanne (Switzerland)]|[Imperial College Centre for Energy Policy and Technology, (United Kingdom); Foradini, F.; Hart, D. [E4tech Ltd., Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    Remote areas such as islands rely on costly and highly polluting diesel and heavy fuel oil for their electricity supply. This paper explored the opportunities for exploiting economically and environmentally viable renewable energy sources, in particular hydrogen storage, on such islands. In particular, this study focused on addressing the challenge of matching energy supply with demand and with technical issues regarding weak grids that are hindered with high steady state voltage levels and voltage fluctuations. The main technical characteristics of integrated renewable energy and hydrogen systems were determined by modelling a case study for the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands). The paper referred to the challenges regarding the technical and economic viability of such systems and their contribution to the economic development of remote communities. It was noted that energy storage plays an important role in addressing supply and demand issues by offering a way to control voltage and using surplus electricity at times of low load. Electrical energy can be stored in the form of potential or chemical energy. New decentralized generation technologies have also played a role in improving the energy efficiency of renewable energy sources. The feasibility of using hydrogen for energy storage was examined with particular reference to fuel-cell based energy supply in isolated island communities. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Hydrogen, fuel cells and renewable energy integration in islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote areas such as islands rely on costly and highly polluting diesel and heavy fuel oil for their electricity supply. This paper explored the opportunities for exploiting economically and environmentally viable renewable energy sources, in particular hydrogen storage, on such islands. In particular, this study focused on addressing the challenge of matching energy supply with demand and with technical issues regarding weak grids that are hindered with high steady state voltage levels and voltage fluctuations. The main technical characteristics of integrated renewable energy and hydrogen systems were determined by modelling a case study for the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands). The paper referred to the challenges regarding the technical and economic viability of such systems and their contribution to the economic development of remote communities. It was noted that energy storage plays an important role in addressing supply and demand issues by offering a way to control voltage and using surplus electricity at times of low load. Electrical energy can be stored in the form of potential or chemical energy. New decentralized generation technologies have also played a role in improving the energy efficiency of renewable energy sources. The feasibility of using hydrogen for energy storage was examined with particular reference to fuel-cell based energy supply in isolated island communities. 4 refs., 5 figs

  9. Continuous desulfurization and bacterial community structure of an integrated bioreactor developed to treat SO2 from a gas stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Li, Lin; Ding, Wenjie; Zhang, Jingying; Liu, Junxin

    2015-11-01

    Sulfide dioxide (SO2) is often released during the combustion processes of fossil fuels. An integrated bioreactor with two sections, namely, a suspended zone (SZ) and immobilized zone (IZ), was applied to treat SO2 for 6months. Sampling ports were set in both sections to investigate the performance and microbial characteristics of the integrated bioreactor. SO2 was effectively removed by the synergistic effect of the SZ and IZ, and more than 85% removal efficiency was achieved at steady state. The average elimination capacity of SO2 in the bioreactor was 2.80g/(m(3)·hr) for the SZ and 1.50g/(m(3)·hr) for the IZ. Most SO2 was eliminated in the SZ. The liquid level of the SZ and the water content ratio of the packing material in the IZ affected SO2 removal efficiency. The SZ served a key function not only in SO2 elimination, but also in moisture maintenance for the IZ. The desired water content in IZ could be feasibly maintained without any additional pre-humidification facilities. Clone libraries of 16S rDNA directly amplified from the DNA of each sample were constructed and sequenced to analyze the community composition and diversity in the individual zones. The desulfurization bacteria dominated both zones. Paenibacillus sp. was present in both zones, whereas Ralstonia sp. existed only in the SZ. The transfer of SO2 to the SZ involved dissolution in the nutrient solution and biodegradation by the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. This work presents a potential biological treatment method for waste gases containing hydrophilic compounds. PMID:26574096

  10. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  11. Mineralization of bacterial cell mass on a photocatalytic surface in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole cells deposited on a titanium dioxide-coated surface have been oxidized in air to carbon dioxide via photocatalysis. This paper provides the first evidence that the organic matter in whole cells can be completely oxidized. Three experimental techniques were employed to monitor this reaction: scanning electron microscopy, 14C radioisotope labeling experiments establish that the carbon content of E. coli is oxidized to form carbon dioxide with substantial closure of the mass balance. The batch reactor experiments corroborate the mass balance and provide a preliminary indication of the rate of the oxidation reaction. These results provide evidence that a photocatalytic surface used for disinfection can also be self-cleaning in an air-solid system

  12. Pleural fluid soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 as a marker of bacterial infection: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hong-Ni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleural infection is a common clinical problem. Its successful treatment depends on rapid diagnosis and early initiation of antibiotics. The measurement of soluble triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1 level in pleural effusions has proven to be a valuable diagnostic tool for differentiating bacterial effusions from effusions of other etiologies. Herein, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the accuracy of pleural fluid sTREM-1 in the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Methods We searched Web of Knowledge and Medline from 1990 through March 2011 for studies reporting diagnostic accuracy data regarding the use of sTREM-1 in the diagnosis of bacterial pleural effusions. Pooled sensitivity and specificity and summary measures of accuracy and Q* were calculated. Results Overall, the sensitivity of sTREM-1was 78% (95% CI: 72%-83%; the specificity was 84% (95% CI: 80%-87%; the positive likelihood ratio was 6.0 (95% CI: 3.3-10.7; and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.12-0.40. The area under the SROC curve for sTREM-1 was 0.92. Statistical heterogeneity and inconsistency were found for sensitivity (p = 0.015, χ2 = 15.73, I2 = 61.9%, specificity (p = 0.000, χ2 = 29.90, I2 = 79.9%, positive likelihood ratio (p = 0.000, χ2 = 33.09, I2 = 81.9%, negative likelihood ratio (p = 0.008, χ2 = 17.25, I2 = 65.2%, and diagnostic odds ratio (p = 0.000, χ2 = 28.49, I2 = 78.9%. A meta-regression analysis performed showed that the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies score (p = 0.3245; RDOR, 4.34; 95% CI, 0.11 to 164.01, the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy score (p = 0.3331; RDOR, 1.70; 95% CI, 0.44 to 6.52, lack of blinding (p = 0.7439; RDOR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.01 to 33.80, and whether the studies were prospective or retrospective studies (p = 0.2068; RDOR, 7.44; 95% CI, 0.18 to 301.17 did not affect the test accuracy. A funnel plot for publication bias suggested a remarkable trend

  13. Pretreatment of Epithelial Cells with Rifaximin Alters Bacterial Attachment and Internalization Profiles▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Eric L.; Xue, Qiong; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Yi; Herbert L. DuPont

    2009-01-01

    Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed semisynthetic antibiotic derivative of rifampin licensed for use in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Rifaximin reduces the symptoms of enteric infection, often without pathogen eradication and with limited effects on intestinal flora. Epithelial cells (HEp-2 [laryngeal], HCT-8 [ileocecal], A549 [lung], and HeLa [cervical]) were pretreated with rifaximin (or control antibiotics) prior to the addition of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). EAEC adheren...

  14. Impact of Alkyl Polyglucosides Surfactant Lutensol GD 70 on Modification of Bacterial Cell Surface Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Smułek, Wojciech; Kaczorek, Ewa; Zgoła-Grzeskowiak, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Zefiryn

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl polyglucosides, due to their low toxicity and environmental compatibility, could be used in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds. In this study, the influence of Lutensol GD 70 on the cell hydrophobicity and zeta potential was measured. The particle size distribution and surfactant biodegradation were also investigated. Microbacterium sp. strain E19, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain 9, and the same strain cultivated in stress conditions were used in studies. Adding surfactant to the diese...

  15. Biosorption of heavy metal by thermotolerant polymerproducing bacterial cells and the bioflocculant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saithong Kaewchai

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Three strains of thermotolerant polymer-producing bacteria; Bacillus subtilis WD 90, Bacillus subtilis SM 29, and Enterobacter agglomerans SM 38 as well as their biofloculants were used to investigate on the adsorption of heavy metal, nickel and cadmium. The effects of pH and concentrations of heavy metal were investigated. The optimum pH for nickel and cadmium adsorption by the dried cells of E. agglomerans SM 38 were found to be 7.0 (25.5% removal and 8.0 (32% removal, respectively. For B. subtilis WD 90 and B. subtilis SM 29, the optimum pH at 8.0 exhibited the nickel removal of 27% and 25%, respectively, and cadmium removal of 28% and 28.5%, respectively. The heavy metal adsorption by the dried cells and wet cells of E. agglomerans SM 38 were slightly increased with increasing initial concentrations of nickel and cadmium up to 60 and 30 ppm, respectively. The bioflocculant of B. subtilis WD 90 and B. subtilis SM 29 showed the highest nickel removal of 90.7% and 87.0% respectively, while the cadmium removal was 90.9 and 91.4%, respectively. The optimum pH for adsorption of both nickel and cadmium by the bioflocculant of E. agglomerans SM 38 was 7.0 with the removal of 92.8 and 84.2%, respectively. The optimum nickel concentration for adsorption by the bioflocculant of E. agglomerans SM 38 was 10 ppm, with the removal of 92.5%, and rather stable up to 60 ppm. The optimum cadmium concentration for adsorption by the bioflocculant of B. subtilis SM 29 was 60 ppm at pH 8.0 with the removal of 85.7%. Therefore, the bioflocculant of the three isolates gave higher heavy metal adsorption than the cells.

  16. The percentage of living bacterial cells related to organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lasternas; S. Agustí

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g., sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis) involved in the transfer of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here, we show the percentage of living heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtro...

  17. Rapid CD4+ T-cell responses to bacterial flagellin require dendritic cell expression of Syk and CARD9

    OpenAIRE

    Atif, Shaikh M.; Lee, Seung-Joo; Li, Lin-Xi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Gorjestani, Sara; Lin, Xin; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can recognize microbial patterns and utilize adaptor molecules, such as-MyD88 or (TRIF TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β), to initiate downstream signaling that ultimately affects the initiation of adaptive immunity. In addition to this inflammatory role, TLR5 expression on dendritic cells can favor antigen presentation of flagellin peptides and thus increase the sensitivity of flagellin-specific T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Here, we exam...

  18. Design and construction of a whole cell bacterial 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 2-phenylacetic acid bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppe eDierckx

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAuxins are hormones that regulate plant growth and development. To accurately quantify the low levels of auxins present in plant and soil samples, sensitive detection methods are needed. In this study, the design and construction of two different whole cell auxin biosensors is illustrated. Both use the auxin responsive element HpaA as an input module and differ in output module. The first biosensor is combined with the gfp gene to produce a fluorescent biosensor. Whereas the second one is combined with the genes textit and phzS to produce a pyocyanin producing biosensor whose product can be measured electrochemically.section{Results} The fluorescent biosensor is able to detect 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA and 2-phenylacetic acid (PAA concentrations from 15 µM to 3 mM in a dose-responsive manner. The pyocyanin producing biosensor is able to detect 4-HPA concentrations from 1.9 µM to 15.625 µM and PAA concentrations from 15.625 µM to 125 µM, both in a dose-responsive manner.ConclusionsA fluorescent whole cell auxin biosensor and an electrochemical whole cell auxin biosensor have been constructed and tested. Both are able to detect 4-HPA and PAA concentrations that are environmentally relevant in respect to plant growth.

  19. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles S; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-11-11

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple (≈ 1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a simple physical principle governing these complex biological processes: a single temperature-dependent scale of cellular time governs the stochastic dynamics of growth and division in balanced growth conditions. PMID:25349411

  20. Laser capture microdissection of bacterial cells targeted by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Mølbak, Lars; Jensen, Tim Kåre;

    2005-01-01

    Direct cultivation-independent sequence retrieval of unidentified bacteria from histological tissue sections has been limited by the difficulty of selectively isolating specific bacteria from a complex environment. Here, a new DNA isolation approach is presented for prokaryotic cells. By this met...... within the tissue with molecular analysis of 16S rRNA gene or other genes of interest. This method is widely applicable for the identification of noncultivable bacteria and their gene pool from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples.......Direct cultivation-independent sequence retrieval of unidentified bacteria from histological tissue sections has been limited by the difficulty of selectively isolating specific bacteria from a complex environment. Here, a new DNA isolation approach is presented for prokaryotic cells. By this...... method, a potentially pathogenic strain of the genus Brachyspira from formalin-fixed human colonic biopsies were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 16S rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probe, followed by laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the targeted cells. Direct 16S r...

  1. Speciation and transformations of cobalt(II) in bacterial cells using emission (57Co) Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The 57Co emission variant of Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS), despite its solitary applications in biology owing to intrinsic methodological difficulties (Yu.D. Perfiliev, A.A. Kamnev, Moessbauer Effect Ref. and Data J., 30 (2007) 121-122; A.A. Kamnev, J. Mol. Struct., 744-747 (2005) 161-167), is highly sensitive and informative. The parameters of 57Co emission spectra provide chemical speciation data for the 57Co cation (chemical state, coordination environment and symmetry, etc.), as well as quantitative information on its distribution between different cation-binding sites in complicated biosystems (A.A. Kamnev, in 'Metal Ions in Biology and Medicine', Vol. 10, John Libbey Eurotext, Paris (2008), pp. 522-527). 57Co EMS can be successfully applied for monitoring 57Co2+ interactions with microbial cells, including its metabolic transformations (A.A. Kamnev et al., Anal. Chim. Acta, 573-574 (2006) 445-452). Comparative studies in rapidly frozen aqueous suspensions of live and dead cells of the ubiquitous phytostimulating soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense have shown similarities in the chemical species formed upon purely chemical interaction of 57Co2+ traces with dead cell biomass and those formed upon primary rapid steps (2 min) of 57Co2+ sorption by the surface of live cells. For live cells, however, the parameters of 57Co emission spectra were found to change within an hour, which reflected ongoing metabolic transformations of the cation. The data obtained are in good agreement with the recently discovered involvement of Co2+ in reactions with labile [Fe-S] clusters during their de novo biosynthesis or repair in E. coli (C. Ranquet et al., J. Biol. Chem., 282 (2007) 30442-30451), presenting the molecular basis for Co2+ toxicity, besides Co2+-induced oxidative stress. The results obtained show that 57Co EMS can provide unique information both for speciation bioanalysis and for the monitoring of radionuclide bioleaching and

  2. A novel receptor – ligand pathway for entry of Francisella tularensis in monocyte-like THP-1 cells: interaction between surface nucleolin and bacterial elongation factor Tu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbit Alain

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is one of the most infectious human bacterial pathogens. It is phagocytosed by immune cells, such as monocytes and macrophages. The precise mechanisms that initiate bacterial uptake have not yet been elucidated. Participation of C3, CR3, class A scavenger receptors and mannose receptor in bacterial uptake have been already reported. However, contribution of an additional, as-yet-unidentified receptor for F. tularensis internalization has been suggested. Results We show here that cell-surface expressed nucleolin is a receptor for Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and promotes LVS binding and infection of human monocyte-like THP-1 cells. The HB-19 pseudopeptide that binds specifically carboxy-terminal RGG domain of nucleolin inhibits LVS binding and infection of monocyte-like THP-1 cells. In a pull-down assay, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu, a GTP-binding protein involved in protein translation, usually found in cytoplasm, was recovered among LVS bacterial membrane proteins bound on RGG domain of nucleolin. A specific polyclonal murine antibody was raised against recombinant LVS EF-Tu. By fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments, we found that a fraction of EF-Tu could be detected at the bacterial surface. Anti-EF-Tu antibodies reduced LVS binding to monocyte-like THP-1 cells and impaired infection, even in absence of complement and complement receptors. Interaction between EF-Tu and nucleolin was illustrated by two different pull-down assays using recombinant EF-Tu proteins and either RGG domain of nucleolin or cell solubilized nucleolin. Discussion Altogether, our results demonstrate that the interaction between surface nucleolin and its bacterial ligand EF-Tu plays an important role in Francisella tularensis adhesion and entry process and may therefore facilitate invasion of host tissues. Since phagosomal escape and intra-cytosolic multiplication of

  3. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhu,1,* Huiliang Cao,2,* Shichong Qiao,1,* Manle Wang,2,3 Yingxin Gu,1 Huiwen Luo,1 Fanhao Meng,2 Xuanyong Liu,2 Hongchang Lai1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Implantology, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3School of Materials Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the

  4. Tandem Spinach Array for mRNA Imaging in Living Bacterial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jichuan Zhang; Jingyi Fei; Leslie, Benjamin J.; Kyu Young Han; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Taekjip Ha

    2015-01-01

    Live cell RNA imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent labels is an important tool for monitoring RNA activities. A recently reported RNA aptamer-fluorogen system, the Spinach, in which an RNA aptamer binds and induces the fluorescence of a GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) ligand, can be readily tagged to the RNA of interest. Although the aptamer–fluorogen system is sufficient for imaging highly abundant non-coding RNAs (tRNAs, rRNAs, etc.), it performs po...

  5. Small Tumor Virus Genomes Are Integrated near Nuclear Matrix Attachment Regions in Transformed Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shera, Katherine A.; Shera, Christopher A.; McDougall, James K

    2001-01-01

    More than 15% of human cancers have a viral etiology. In benign lesions induced by the small DNA tumor viruses, viral genomes are typically maintained extrachromosomally. Malignant progression is often associated with viral integration into host cell chromatin. To study the role of viral integration in tumorigenesis, we analyzed the positions of integrated viral genomes in tumors and tumor cell lines induced by the small oncogenic viruses, including the high-risk human papillomaviruses, hepat...

  6. Comparison of Integrators for Electromagnetic Particle in Cell Methods: Algorithms and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Geiser, Juergen; Riedel, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present different types of integrators for electro-magnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) methods. While the integrator is an important tool of the PIC methods, it is necessary to characterize the different conservation approaches of the integrators, e.g. symplecticity, energy- or charge-conservation. We discuss the different principles, e.g. composition, filtering, explicit and implicit ideas. While, particle in cell methods are well-studied, the combination between the different ...

  7. Double-Staining Method for Differentiation of Morphological Changes and Membrane Integrity of Campylobacter coli Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Jose L.; Mascellaro, Salvatore; Moreno, Yolanda; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Javier

    2002-01-01

    We developed a double-staining procedure involving NanoOrange dye (Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oreg.) and membrane integrity stains (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit; Molecular Probes) to show the morphological and membrane integrity changes of Campylobacter coli cells during growth. The conversion from a spiral to a coccoid morphology via intermediary forms and the membrane integrity changes of the C. coli cells can be detected with the double-staining procedure. Our data indicate that young or actively...

  8. RND type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of pseudomonas aeruginosa selects bacterial languages, 3-oxo-acyl-homoserine lactones, for cell-to-cell communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minagawa Shu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria release a wide variety of small molecules including cell-to-cell signaling compounds. Gram-negative bacteria use a variety of self-produced autoinducers such as acylated homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs as signal compounds for quorum sensing (QS within and between bacterial species. QS plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and in beneficial symbiosis by responding to acyl-HSLs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is considered that the selection of bacterial languages is necessary to regulate gene expression and thus it leads to the regulation of virulence and provides a growth advantage in several environments. In this study, we hypothesized that RND-type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of P. aeruginosa might function in the selection of acyl-HSLs, and we provide evidence to support this hypothesis. Results Loss of MexAB-OprM due to deletion of mexB caused increases in QS responses, as shown by the expression of gfp located downstream of the lasB promoter and LasB elastase activity, which is regulated by a LasR-3-oxo-C12-HSL complex. Either complementation with a plasmid containing wild-type mexB or the addition of a LasR-specific inhibitor, patulin, repressed these high responses to 3-oxo-acyl-HSLs. Furthermore, it was shown that the acyl-HSLs-dependent response of P. aeruginosa was affected by the inhibition of MexB transport activity and the mexB mutant. The P. aeruginosa MexAB-OprM deletion mutant showed a strong QS response to 3-oxo-C10-HSL produced by Vibrio anguillarum in a bacterial cross-talk experiment. Conclusion This work demonstrated that MexAB-OprM does not control the binding of LasR to 3-oxo-Cn-HSLs but rather accessibility of non-cognate acyl-HSLs to LasR in P. aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM not only influences multidrug resistance, but also selects acyl-HSLs and regulates QS in P. aeruginosa. The results demonstrate a new QS regulation mechanism via the efflux system MexAB-OprM in P

  9. Application of quartz tuning forks for detection of endotoxins and Gram-negative bacterial cells by monitoring of Limulus Amebocyte Lysate coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chałupniak, Andrzej; Waszczuk, Karol; Hałubek-Głuchowska, Katarzyna; Piasecki, Tomasz; Gotszalk, Teodor; Rybka, Jacek

    2014-08-15

    Endotoxins, pyrogens of bacterial origin, are a significant threat in many areas of life. Currently, the test most commonly used for endotoxin level determination is LAL (Limulus Amebocyte Lysate) assay. This paper presents application of commercially available low-frequency piezoelectric tuning forks (QTFs) for endotoxin detection. Measurement of the decrease in the QTF oscillation amplitude provides information about the viscosity changes, occurring in the tested sample upon addition of LAL. That method was used to determine the concentrations of endotoxins and bacterial cells (E. coli O157:H19). The relevance of the obtained results was confirmed using a commercially available colorimetric LAL assay. The constructed system can detect bacterial endotoxins in the range of 0.001-5EU/ml and bacterial cells in the range of 10(2)-10(7)CFU/ml. The presented technique requires very simple sample preparation and the sensor response is obtained using compact, portable readout electronics. The single test cost is low compared to commercial endotoxin assays and other novel systems based on micromechanical sensors. PMID:24632139

  10. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Induced by the Cell Wall Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascade and Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Scrimale, Thomas; DiDone, Louis; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is an extracellular structure that is dependent on secretory and membrane proteins for its construction. We investigated the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cell wall integrity and found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, to a lesser extent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways are required for proper cell wall construction. Null mutation of IRE1, double mutation of ERAD components (hrd1Δ and ubc7Δ) and ire1Δ, or expres...

  11. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The method of in situ hybridization using fluorescent labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH - fluorescence in situ hybridization) combines identification and quantification of groups of microorganisms at different phylogenetic levels, from domain to species. The FISH method enables to study the soil microbial community in situ, avoiding plating on nutrient media, and allows to identify and quantify living, metabolically active cells of Bacteria and Archaea. The full procedure consists of the following steps: desorption of the cells from the soil particles, fixation of cells, coating a fixed sample on the glass slide, hybridization with the specific probes and, finally, microscopic observation and cell counting. For the FISH analysis of Bacteria and Archaea, the paraformaldehyde-fixed samples were hybridized with Cy3-labeled Archaea-specific probe(Arc915) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled Bacteria-specific probe(EUB338). When a molecular probe is incorporated into a cell, it can hybridize solely with a complementary rRNA sequence. The hybridization can be visualized under the fluorescent microscope and counted. The application of FISH will be demonstrated by the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria depending on soil properties, depth and land use. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of Chernozem and Kastanozem with distinct land use. Quantification of metabolically active cells in virgin and arable Chernozem revealed that the abundance of Archaea in topsoil of virgin Chernozem was doubled as compared with arable soil, but it leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased an amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. In Kastanozem, a significant change in the abundance of metabolically active

  12. Extracellular secretion of Carocin S1 in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum occurs via the type III secretion system integral to the bacterial flagellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Duen-yau

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum is a phytopathogenic enterobacterium responsible for soft rot, a disease characterized by extensive maceration of the affected plant tissue. This species also produces two or more antibacterial substances called bacteriocins, which enhance its competitiveness against related rival species. However, the secretion mechanism for low-molecular-weight bacteriocin is still unknown. Results A mutant (flhC::Tn5 that did not secrete the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin (LMWB, Carocin S1, was generated by Tn5 insertional mutagenesis. Sequence analysis indicated that this insertion disrupted open reading frame 2 (ORF2 and ORF3 of this strain. Deletion and rescue experiments indicated that ORF2 and ORF3 were both required for extracellular LMWB secretion. The ORF2 and ORF3 sequences showed high homology with the flhD and flhC gene sequences of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atroseptica, Serratia marcescens, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Escherichia coli, indicating that they likely encoded key regulatory components of the type III flagella secretion system. Conclusion Thus, the extracellular export of Carocin S1 by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum appears to utilize the type III secretion system integral to bacterial flagella.

  13. Effectiveness of Apu Wood Plant (Pistia stratiotes L to Reduce the Bacterial in Leachate on Integrated Waste Treatment Plant of Toisapu, Ambon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairudin Rasako

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high population growth figures in the city of Ambon, contributed significantly impact on increasing production of waste and waste generated, both in large scale for industrial / factory, as well as domestic scale at the household level. Of the total waste and waste generated, estimated at nearly largely banished to the Final Disposal (TPA in the Integrated Waste Treatment Plant (IWTP Toisapu. One byproduct of the process is the accumulation of garbage leachate. Leachate contained in IWTP Toisapu already accommodated within a particular basin but there has been no effort or specific treatment for the reduction of pollutants contained therein. The use of water plants Wood Apu (Pistia stratiotes L can be applied as a natural control, because these plants have the ability to reduce the amount of chemical contaminants. This study was done to see how effective the water plant lettuce wood as a natural control in reducing the number of bacterial contaminants in the leachate IPST Toisapu. The research design is quasi-experimental research (quasi experiment. Samples tested were leachate originating from IPST Toisapu. The parameters measured were the levels of the numbers of E. coli, and coliform before and after the Apu wood plants.

  14. Rapid CD4+ T-cell responses to bacterial flagellin require dendritic cell expression of Syk and CARD9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Shaikh M; Lee, Seung-Joo; Li, Lin-Xi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Gorjestani, Sara; Lin, Xin; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can recognize microbial patterns and utilize adaptor molecules, such as-MyD88 or (TRIF TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β), to initiate downstream signaling that ultimately affects the initiation of adaptive immunity. In addition to this inflammatory role, TLR5 expression on dendritic cells can favor antigen presentation of flagellin peptides and thus increase the sensitivity of flagellin-specific T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Here, we examined the role of alternative signaling pathways that might regulate flagellin antigen presentation in addition to MyD88. These studies suggest a requirement for spleen tyrosine kinase, a noncanonical TLR-signaling adaptor molecule, and its downstream molecule CARD9 in regulating the sensitivity of flagellin-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Thus, a previously unappreciated signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating the dominance of flagellin-specific T-cell responses. PMID:25430631

  15. Avoiding acidic region streaking in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: Case study with two bacterial whole cell protein extracts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Roy; Umesh Varshney; Debnath Pal

    2014-09-01

    Acidic region streaking (ARS) is one of the lacunae in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) of bacterial proteome. This streaking is primarily caused by nucleic acid (NuA) contamination and poses major problem in the downstream processes like image analysis and protein identification. Although cleanup and nuclease digestion are practiced as remedial options, these strategies may incur loss in protein recovery and perform incomplete removal of NuA. As a result, ARS has remained a common observation across publications, including the recent ones. In this work, we demonstrate how ultrasound wave can be used to shear NuA in plain ice-cooled water, facilitating the elimination of ARS in the 2DE gels without the need for any additional sample cleanup tasks. In combination with a suitable buffer recipe, IEF program and frequent paper-wick changing approach, we are able to reproducibly demonstrate the production of clean 2DE gels with improved protein recovery and negligible or no ARS. We illustrate our procedure using whole cell protein extracts from two diverse organisms, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Our designed protocols are straightforward and expected to provide good 2DE gels without ARS, with comparable times and significantly lower cost.

  16. Perforin-2 Protects Host Cells and Mice by Restricting the Vacuole to Cytosol Transitioning of a Bacterial Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Ryan; Bahnan, Wael; Shrestha, Niraj; Boucher, Justin; Barreto, Marcella; Barrera, Carlos M; Dauer, Edward A; Freitag, Nancy E; Khan, Wasif N; Podack, Eckhard R; Schesser, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The host-encoded Perforin-2 (encoded by the macrophage-expressed gene 1,Mpeg1), which possesses a pore-forming MACPF domain, reduces the viability of bacterial pathogens that reside within membrane-bound compartments. Here, it is shown that Perforin-2 also restricts the proliferation of the intracytosolic pathogenListeria monocytogenes Within a few hours of systemic infection, the massive proliferation ofL. monocytogenesinPerforin-2(-/-)mice leads to a rapid appearance of acute disease symptoms. We go on to show in culturedPerforin-2(-/-)cells that the vacuole-to-cytosol transitioning ofL. monocytogenesis greatly accelerated. Unexpectedly, we found that inPerforin-2(-/-)macrophages,Listeria-containing vacuoles quickly (≤15 min) acidify, and that this was coincident with greater virulence gene expression, likely accounting for the more rapid translocation ofL. monocytogenesto its replicative niche in the cytosol. This hypothesis was supported by our finding that aL. monocytogenesstrain expressing virulence factors at a constitutively high level replicated equally well inPerforin-2(+/+)andPerforin-2(-/-)macrophages. Our findings suggest that the protective role of Perforin-2 against listeriosis is based on it limiting the intracellular replication of the pathogen. This cellular activity of Perforin-2 may derive from it regulating the acidification ofListeria-containing vacuoles, thereby depriving the pathogen of favorable intracellular conditions that promote its virulence gene activity. PMID:26831467

  17. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  18. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP+-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP+ involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection

  19. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  20. Endothelin receptor antagonists attenuate the inflammatory response of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells to bacterial endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Feldmann, Maria; Wahl, Chiara; Jungck, David; Behr, Jürgen; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial infections induce exacerbations in chronic lung diseases, e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), by enhancing airway inflammation. Exacerbations are frequently associated with right heart decompensation and accelerate disease progression. Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) might have therapeutic potential as pulmonary vasodilators and anti-inflammatory agents, but utility in exacerbations of chronic lung diseases is unknown. We hypothesized that cytokine releases induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major bacterial trigger of inflammation, are reduced by ERAs in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMCs). Ex vivo cultivated human PVSMCs were preincubated with the endothelin-A-receptor selective inhibitor ambrisentan, with the endothelin-B-receptor selective inhibitor BQ788 [sodium (2R)-2-{[(2S)-2-({[(2R,6S)-2,6-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl}amino)-4,4-dimethylpentanoyl][1-(methoxycarbonyl)-d-tryptophyl]amino}hexanoate], or with the dual blocker bosentan before stimulation with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (Re-LPS), or a mixture of long and short forms (M-LPS). Expression of cytokines and LPS receptors (TLR4, CD14) were analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). All LPS forms induced interleukin (IL)-6-, IL-8-, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release. Bosentan and BQ788 inhibited M-LPS-induced release of all cytokines and soluble CD14 (sCD14) but not TLR4 expression. Ambrisentan blocked M-LPS-induced IL-6 release but not IL-8, GM-CSF, or LPS receptors. IL-8 release induced by S-LPS, which requires CD14 to activate TLR4, was blocked by bosentan and BQ788. IL-8 release induced by Re-LPS, which does not require CD14 to activate TLR4, was insensitive to both bosentan and BQ788. In conclusion, PVSMCs contribute to inflammation in bacteria-induced exacerbations of chronic lung diseases. Inhibition of the endothelin

  1. Elemental profiling of single bacterial cells as a function of copper exposure and growth phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Yu

    Full Text Available The elemental composition of single cells of Nitrosomonas europaea 19718 was studied via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM as a function of inhibition by divalent copper (Cu(II and batch growth phase. Based on XFM, the intracellular Cu concentrations in exponential phase cultures of N. europaea exposed to Cu(II were statistically higher than in stationary phase cultures at the 95% confidence interval (α = 0.05. However, the impact of Cu inferred from specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR measurements at the two physiological states was statistically not dissimilar at the Cu(II doses tested, except at 1000 µM Cu(II, at which exponential phase cultures were significantly more inhibited. Furthermore, the elemental composition in uninhibited exponential and stationary phase N. europaea cultures was similar. Notably, the molar fractions of Cu and Fe, relative to other elements in N. europaea cultures were statistically higher than those recently reported in Pseudomonas fluorescens possibly owing to the preponderance of metal cofactor rich catalytic enzymes (such as ammonia monooxygenase and electron transport mechanisms in N. europaea.

  2. White blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, as predictors of hidden bacterial infections in febrile children 1-18 months of age without focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To study the relationship between White Blood Cell (WBC), Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) in febrile children 1-18 months of age as predictor of bacterial infection, so as to improve our predictability of bacterial infections in emergency room to decrease unnecessary admissions and antibiotic use. Methods: Retrospective review was performed on febrile patients 1-18 months of age that were admitted to hospital between August 2002 and March 2003 on the presumptive diagnosis of fever without focus, Complete septic work up was done for all patients according to local hospital protocol including Complete blood count (CBC), blood culture, urine culture, Chest X-Ray (CXR) and lumbar puncture, Patients who had history of antibiotics use within 48 hours of admission were excluded from the study, History, physical examination, laboratory and radiology data were reviewed. Data about the age, sex, temperature, presence or absence of focal bacterial infection, WBC, ANC, CXR report and body fluid culture results were collected and analyzed. Results: Thirty-four patients were reviewed in this study, Eight patients (23.5%) had bacterial infection: classified as group (2 patchy pneumonia, 3 Urinary tract infection (UTI), 2 meningitis, 1 Occult bacteremia (OB) and 26 patients (76.5%) had no evidence of bacterial infection, classified as group 2, No significant difference was found between the two groups in respect to age, sex, temperature and WBC P>0.05, while there was a significant difference between the two groups in respect to the ANC P = 0.02, also ANC had better sensitivity (78%) and specificity (89%) than WBC (sensitivity 77%, specificity 62%). Conclusion: ANC is a good predictive test for determining bacterial infection in young febrile children without focus, However there is need for other more reliable rapid cost effective measures in dealing with young febrile children at emergency department. (author)

  3. p-type MWT. Integrated Cell and Module Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tool, C.J.J.; Kossen, E.J.; Bennett, I.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    A major issue of concern in MWT (metal wrap-through) solar cells is the increased leakage current at reversed bias voltage through the vias compared. At ECN we have been working on reducing this leakage current to levels comparable to H-pattern cells. In this study we present the results of this work. We further show the benefit of a combined cell and module design for MWT solar cells. At the cell level, MWT production costs per wafer are comparable with H-pattern while the cell output increases. At the module level this design results in a further increase of the power output.

  4. p-Type MWT. Integrated cell and module technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tool, C.J.J.; Kossen, E.J.; Bennett, I.J.

    2013-10-15

    A major issue of concern in MWT solar cells is the increased leakage current at reversed bias voltage through the vias compared. At ECN we have been working on reducing this leakage current to levels comparable to H-pattern cells. In this study we present the results of this work. We further show the benefit of a combined cell and module design for MWT solar cells. At the cell level, MWT production costs per wafer are comparable with H-pattern while the cell output increases. At the module level this design results in a further increase of the power output.

  5. IFMIF target and test cell - design and integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) aims at the qualification of appropriate materials for a Demonstration Fusion Power Plant (DEMO) to a fluence of up to 150 dpa (displacement per atom) at a DEMO typical neutron spectrum. It comprises two accelerators each providing a deuteron beam with 125 mA and 40 MeV. The deuterons strike a lithium target and create via stripping reactions neutrons. The neutrons are mainly forward directed into the High-Flux-Test-Module (HFTM). The Medium Flux-Test-Modules (MFTM) and the Low-Flux-Test-Modules (LFTM) are arranged in beam direction behind. In the HFTM a damage rate in steel of more than 20 dpa/fpy (displacement per atome per full power year) will be provide in a volume of 0.5 litre. The neutron spectrum is prone to produce helium and tritium in steel like in the first wall of a DEMO reactor. The Medium- Flux-Test-Modules are designed for creep fatigues in situ and tritium release test. The test modules are cooled with helium. The target is a lithium jet with a free surface towards the deuteron beams. The jet follows a concave curved so called back wall. Centrifugal forces increase the static pressure, which prevents lithium boiling at the beam tube pressure and the power release of 10 MW due to the deuteron beams. The target and Test Cell (TTC) houses the target and the test modules as well as the lithium supply tubes and a quench tank into which the lithium splashes after the target. The lithium containing components have a temperature of 250 to 350 C. Nuclear reactions mainly in beam direction contribute to heat releases in TTC components. The TTC is filled with a noble gas with almost atmospheric pressure. Natural convection transfers heat to the walls but also mitigates temperature peaks. The Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) has developed or validated tools for: - The extended Monte Carlo Code McDeLicious for calculations of the neutron source term, dpa rates in the material specimens, activation

  6. A Serine-Threonine Kinase (StkP Regulates Expression of the Pneumococcal Pilus and Modulates Bacterial Adherence to Human Epithelial and Endothelial Cells In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny A Herbert

    Full Text Available The pneumococcal serine threonine protein kinase (StkP acts as a global regulator in the pneumococcus. Bacterial mutants deficient in StkP are less virulent in animal models of infection. The gene for this regulator is located adjacent to the gene for its cognate phosphatase in the pneumococcal genome. The phosphatase dephosphorylates proteins phosphorylated by StkP and has been shown to regulate a number of key pneumococcal virulence factors and to modulate adherence to eukaryotic cells. The role of StkP in adherence of pneumococci to human cells has not previously been reported. In this study we show StkP represses the pneumococcal pilus, a virulence factor known to be important for bacterial adhesion. In a serotype 4 strain regulation of the pilus by StkP modulates adherence to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung epithelial cells. This suggests that the pneumococcal pilus may play a role in adherence during infections such as meningitis and pneumonia. We show that regulation of the pilus occurs at the population level as StkP alters the number of pili-positive cells within a single culture. As far as we are aware this is the first gene identified outside of the pilus islet that regulates the biphasic expression of the pilus. These findings suggest StkPs role in cell division may be linked to regulation of expression of a cell surface adhesin.

  7. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Balchik, Sara M.; Fridrickson, Jim; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles ads...

  8. Estimation of Bacterial Cell Numbers in Humic Acid-Rich Salt Marsh Sediments with Probes Directed to 16S Ribosomal DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Mcdonald, John H.; Devereux, Richard; Smith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membrane-bound nucleic acids by using seven group-specific DNA oligonucleotide probes complementary to 16S rRNA coding regions. These included a general eubacterial probe and probes encompassing most members of the gram-ne...

  9. Production of High-Titer Epstein-Barr Virus Recombinants Derived from Akata Cells by Using a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome System

    OpenAIRE

    Kanda, Teru; Yajima, Misako; Ahsan, Nazmul; Tanaka, Mika; Takada, Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    An Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome in Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell line Akata was cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector. The BAC clone, designated AK-BAC, was rapidly and precisely modified by means of efficient homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. This system was used to produce recombinant EBVs with transgenes. An expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted into AK-BAC, and the resultant BAC clone, AK-BAC-GFP, was transfected into Aka...

  10. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F A van 't Wout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA. Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR. Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host.

  11. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, Jan; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR). Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR) which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host. PMID:26083346

  12. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

  13. Conditioning the cochlea to facilitate survival and integration of exogenous cells into the auditory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Ho; Wilson, Kevin F; Ueda, Yoshihisa; Tung Wong, Hiu; Beyer, Lisa A; Swiderski, Donald L; Dolan, David F; Raphael, Yehoash

    2014-04-01

    The mammalian auditory epithelium (AE) cannot replace supporting cells and hair cells once they are lost. Therefore, sensorineural hearing loss associated with missing cells is permanent. This inability to regenerate critical cell types makes the AE a potential target for cell replacement therapies such as stem cell transplantation. Inserting stem cells into the AE of deaf ears is a complicated task due to the hostile, high potassium environment of the scala media in the cochlea, and the robust junctional complexes between cells in the AE that resist stem cell integration. Here, we evaluate whether temporarily reducing potassium levels in the scala media and disrupting the junctions in the AE make the cochlear environment more receptive and facilitate survival and integration of transplanted cells. We used sodium caprate to transiently disrupt the AE junctions, replaced endolymph with perilymph, and blocked stria vascularis pumps with furosemide. We determined that these three steps facilitated survival of HeLa cells in the scala media for at least 7 days and that some of the implanted cells formed a junctional contact with native AE cells. The data suggest that manipulation of the cochlear environment facilitates survival and integration of exogenously transplanted HeLa cells in the scala media. PMID:24394296

  14. Integration of AI-2 Based Cell-Cell Signaling with Metabolic Cues in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arindam; Herren, Christopher D.; Patel, Isha R.; Coleman, Adam; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2016-01-01

    The quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is generated as a byproduct of activated methyl cycle by the action of LuxS in Escherichia coli. AI-2 is synthesized, released and later internalized in a cell-density dependent manner. Here, by mutational analysis of the genes, uvrY and csrA, we describe a regulatory circuit of accumulation and uptake of AI-2. We constructed a single-copy chromosomal luxS-lacZ fusion in a luxS + merodiploid strain and evaluated its relative expression in uvrY and csrA mutants. At the entry of stationary phase, the expression of the fusion and AI-2 accumulation was positively regulated by uvrY and negatively regulated by csrA respectively. A deletion of csrA altered message stability of the luxS transcript and CsrA protein exhibited weak binding to 5’ luxS regulatory region. DNA protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed direct interaction of UvrY with the luxS promoter. Additionally, reduced expression of the fusion in hfq deletion mutant suggested involvement of small RNA interactions in luxS regulation. In contrast, the expression of lsrA operon involved in AI-2 uptake, is negatively regulated by uvrY and positively by csrA in a cell-density dependent manner. The dual role of csrA in AI-2 synthesis and uptake suggested a regulatory crosstalk of cell signaling with carbon regulation in Escherichia coli. We found that the cAMP-CRP mediated catabolite repression of luxS expression was uvrY dependent. This study suggests that luxS expression is complex and regulated at the level of transcription and translation. The multifactorial regulation supports the notion that cell-cell communication requires interaction and integration of multiple metabolic signals. PMID:27362507

  15. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  16. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Tales Lyra Oliveira; Návylla Candeia-Medeiros; Polliane M. Cavalcante-Araújo; Igor Santana Melo; Elaine Fávaro-Pípi; Luciana Alves Fátima; Antônio Augusto Rocha; Luiz Ricardo Goulart; Ubiratan Fabres Machado; Ruy R. Campos; Robinson Sabino-Silva

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-...

  17. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  18. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  19. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  20. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...