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Sample records for bacterial candidate division

  1. Host-associated bacterial taxa from Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, GN02, Synergistetes, SR1, TM7, and WPS-2 Phyla/candidate divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Camanocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: In addition to the well-known phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, Fusobacteria, Tenericutes, and Chylamydiae, the oral microbiomes of mammals contain species from the lesser-known phyla or candidate divisions, including Synergistetes, TM7, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, GN02, SR1, and WPS-2. The objectives of this study were to create phyla-selective 16S rDNA PCR primer pairs, create selective 16S rDNA clone libraries, identify novel oral taxa, and update canine and human oral microbiome databases. Design: 16S rRNA gene sequences for members of the lesser-known phyla were downloaded from GenBank and Greengenes databases and aligned with sequences in our RNA databases. Primers with potential phylum level selectivity were designed heuristically with the goal of producing nearly full-length 16S rDNA amplicons. The specificity of primer pairs was examined by making clone libraries from PCR amplicons and determining phyla identity by BLASTN analysis. Results: Phylum-selective primer pairs were identified that allowed construction of clone libraries with 96–100% specificity for each of the lesser-known phyla. From these clone libraries, seven human and two canine novel oral taxa were identified and added to their respective taxonomic databases. For each phylum, genome sequences closest to human oral taxa were identified and added to the Human Oral Microbiome Database to facilitate metagenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic studies that involve tiling sequences to the most closely related taxon. While examining ribosomal operons in lesser-known phyla from single-cell genomes and metagenomes, we identified a novel rRNA operon order (23S-5S-16S in three SR1 genomes and the splitting of the 23S rRNA gene by an I-CeuI-like homing endonuclease in a WPS-2 genome. Conclusions: This study developed useful primer pairs for making phylum-selective 16S rRNA clone libraries. Phylum-specific libraries

  2. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  3. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)). PMID:21097641

  4. Axenic culture of a candidate division TM7 bacterium from the human oral cavity and biofilm interactions with other oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro, Valeria; Dutton, Lindsay C; Sprague, Susan V; Nobbs, Angela H; Ireland, Anthony J; Sandy, Jonathan R; Jepson, Mark A; Micaroni, Massimo; Splatt, Peter R; Dymock, David; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2014-10-01

    The diversity of bacterial species in the human oral cavity is well recognized, but a high proportion of them are presently uncultivable. Candidate division TM7 bacteria are almost always detected in metagenomic studies but have not yet been cultivated. In this paper, we identified candidate division TM7 bacterial phylotypes in mature plaque samples from around orthodontic bonds in subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Successive rounds of enrichment in laboratory media led to the isolation of a pure culture of one of these candidate division TM7 phylotypes. The bacteria formed filaments of 20 to 200 μm in length within agar plate colonies and in monospecies biofilms on salivary pellicle and exhibited some unusual morphological characteristics by transmission electron microscopy, including a trilaminated cell surface layer and dense cytoplasmic deposits. Proteomic analyses of cell wall protein extracts identified abundant polypeptides predicted from the TM7 partial genomic sequence. Pleiomorphic phenotypes were observed when the candidate division TM7 bacterium was grown in dual-species biofilms with representatives of six different oral bacterial genera. The TM7 bacterium formed long filaments in dual-species biofilm communities with Actinomyces oris or Fusobacterium nucleatum. However, the TM7 isolate grew as short rods or cocci in dual-species biofilms with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, or Streptococcus gordonii, forming notably robust biofilms with the latter two species. The ability to cultivate TM7 axenically should majorly advance understanding of the physiology, genetics, and virulence properties of this novel candidate division oral bacterium.

  5. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome.

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    Nigro, Lisa M; Hyde, Andrew S; MacGregor, Barbara J; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis - previously developed based on (14)C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  6. 3D super-resolution microscopy of bacterial division machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedyaykin, A. D.; Sabantsev, A. V.; Vishnyakov, I. E.; Morozova, N. E.; Polinovskaya, V. S.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is a promising tool for the field of microbiology, as bacteria sizes are comparable to the resolution limit of light microscopy. Bacterial division machinery and FtsZ protein in particular attract much attention of scientists who use different super-resolution microscopy techniques, but most of the available data on FtsZ structures was obtained using two-dimensional (2D) super-resolution microscopy. Using 3D single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM, namely dSTORM) to visualize FtsZ, we demonstrate that this approach allows more accurate interpretation of super-resolution images and provides new opportunities for the study of complex structures like bacterial divisome.

  7. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex. PMID:27668216

  8. Visualization of candidate division OP3 cocci in limonene-degrading methanogenic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Schauer, Regina; Probian, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    Members of candidate division OP3 were detected in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from methanogenic enrichment cultures that utilized limonene as a carbon and energy source. We developed probes for the visualization of OP3 cells. In situ hybridization experiments with newly designed OP3-specific...

  9. Phylogeography, salinity adaptations and metabolic potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria based on a partial single cell genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nigro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that has been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome (SAG of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source.

  10. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  11. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  12. On the chronology and topography of bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, M; Palacios, P; Dopazo, A; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Aldea, M

    1991-01-01

    Gene products that play a role in the formation of cell septum should be expected to be endowed with a set of specific properties. In principle, septal proteins should be located at the cell envelope. The expression of division genes should ensure the synthesis of septal proteins at levels commensurate with the needs of cell division at different rates of cell duplication. We have results indicating that some fts genes located within the 2.5-min cluster in the Escherichia coli chromosome conform to these predictions.

  13. Single-cell analysis reveals a novel uncultivated magnetotactic bacterium within the candidate division OP3.

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    Kolinko, Sebastian; Jogler, Christian; Katzmann, Emanuel; Wanner, Gerhard; Peplies, Jörg; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a diverse group of prokaryotes that orient along magnetic fields using membrane-coated magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) or greigite (Fe(3) S(4) ), the magnetosomes. Previous phylogenetic analysis of MTB has been limited to few cultivated species and most abundant members of natural populations, which were assigned to Proteobacteria and the Nitrospirae phyla. Here, we describe a single cell-based approach that allowed the targeted phylogenetic and ultrastructural analysis of the magnetotactic bacterium SKK-01, which was low abundant in sediments of Lake Chiemsee. Morphologically conspicuous single cells of SKK-01 were micromanipulated from magnetically collected multi-species MTB populations, which was followed by whole genome amplification and ultrastructural analysis of sorted cells. Besides intracellular sulphur inclusions, the large ovoid cells of SKK-01 harbour ∼175 bullet-shaped magnetosomes arranged in multiple chains that consist of magnetite as revealed by TEM and EDX analysis. Sequence analysis of 16 and 23S rRNA genes from amplified genomic DNA as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization assigned SKK-01 to the candidate division OP3, which so far lacks any cultivated representatives. SKK-01 represents the first morphotype that can be assigned to the OP3 group as well as the first magnetotactic member of the PVC superphylum. PMID:22003954

  14. Candidate Targets for New Anti-Virulence Drugs: Selected Cases of Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Kvist, Malin;

    2007-01-01

    formation are highly attractive targets for new drugs. Specific adhesion provides bacteria with target selection and prevents removal by hydrodynamic flow forces. Bacterial adhesion is of paramount importance for bacterial pathogenesis. Adhesion is also the first step in biofilm formation. Biofilm formation...... is particularly problematic in medical contexts because biofilm-associated bacteria are particularly hard to eradicate. Several promising candidate drugs that target bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are being developed. Some of these might be valuable weapons for fighting infectious diseases in the future......Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the rising frequency of strains that are resistant to many current antibiotics. New types of antibiotics are, therefore, urgently needed. Virulence factors or virulence-associated phenotypes such as adhesins and biofilm...

  15. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

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    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

  16. Structural and functional studies of MinD ATPase: implications for the molecular recognition of the bacterial cell division apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Ikuko; Oyama, Takuji; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2001-01-01

    Proper placement of the bacterial cell division site requires the site-specific inactivation of other potential division sites. In Escherichia coli, selection of the correct mid-cell site is mediated by the MinC, MinD and MinE proteins. To clarify the functional role of the bacterial cell division inhibitor MinD, which is a membrane-associated ATPase that works as an activator of MinC, we determined the crystal structure of a Pyrococcus furiosus MinD homologue complexed with a substrate analo...

  17. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  18. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of the bacteria diversity in surface and subsurface peat layers of a northern wetland, with focus on poorly studied phyla and candidate divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia M Serkebaeva

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands play a key role in the global carbon and water budget, but the bacterial diversity in these ecosystems remains poorly described. Here, we compared the bacterial community composition in the surface (0-5 cm depth and subsurface (45-50 cm peat layers of an acidic (pH 4.0 Sphagnum-dominated wetland, using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The denoised sequences (37,229 reads, average length ∼430 bp were affiliated with 27 bacterial phyla and corresponded to 1,269 operational taxonomic units (OTUs determined at 97% sequence identity. Abundant OTUs were affiliated with the Acidobacteria (35.5±2.4% and 39.2±1.2% of all classified sequences in surface and subsurface peat, respectively, Alphaproteobacteria (15.9±1.7% and 25.8±1.4%, Actinobacteria (9.5±2.0% and 10.7±0.5%, Verrucomicrobia (8.5±1.4% and 0.6±0.2%, Planctomycetes (5.8±0.4% and 9.7±0.6%, Deltaproteobacteria (7.1±0.4% and 4.4%±0.3%, and Gammaproteobacteria (6.6±0.4% and 2.1±0.1%. The taxonomic patterns of the abundant OTUs were uniform across all the subsamples taken from each peat layer. In contrast, the taxonomic patterns of rare OTUs were different from those of the abundant OTUs and varied greatly among subsamples, in both surface and subsurface peat. In addition to the bacterial taxa listed above, rare OTUs represented the following groups: Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydia, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Elusimicrobia, Fibrobacteres, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Spirochaetes, AD3, WS1, WS4, WS5, WYO, OD1, OP3, BRC1, TM6, TM7, WPS-2, and FCPU426. OTU richness was notably higher in the surface layer (882 OTUs than in the anoxic subsurface peat (483 OTUs, with only 96 OTUs common to both data sets. Most members of poorly studied phyla, such as the Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes and the candidate division TM6, showed a clear preference for growth in either oxic or anoxic conditions. Apparently, the bacterial communities in surface and

  19. Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in liver transplantation candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Manjushree; Chopra, Kapil B; Douglas, David D; Stewart, Rebecca A; Kusne, Shimon

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial infections are a serious complication of end-stage liver disease (ESLD) that occurs in 20% to 60% of patients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with ESLD who were identified by our microbiology laboratory as having Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia. Of 592 patients listed for transplantation between January 1998 and January 2006, 9 (1.5%) had 10 episodes of S salivarius bacteremia. Of 2 patients already receiving quinolone prophylaxis for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), 1 later presented with a second episode. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.2. Medians for age, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh score were 50 years, 17, and 10, respectively. Presenting symptoms and signs in 10 episodes of infection were ascites (in 8 episodes), elevated temperature (6), abdominal pain (5), and encephalopathy (4). Median laboratory values included: white blood cell count, 15.1 x 10(9)/L; creatinine, 0.9 mg/dL; albumin, 3.1 gm/dL; aspartate aminotransferase, 64 U/L; alanine aminotransferase, 52.5 U/L; ammonia, 67 mug/dL; and prothrombin time, 17.3 seconds. Ascitic fluid in patients with peritonitis showed a median white blood cell count of 466 cells/mm(3) (range, 250-12,822 cells/mm(3)), with 66% polymorphs, protein of 0.9 gm/dL, and albumin of 0.4 gm/dL. S salivarius may cause primary bacteremia and SBP in liver transplantation candidates despite quinolone prophylaxis. PMID:17969206

  20. First genomic insights into members of a candidate bacterial phylum responsible for wastewater bulking

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    Yuji Sekiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cells belonging to the candidate bacterial phylum KSB3 were previously identified as the causative agent of fatal filament overgrowth (bulking in a high-rate industrial anaerobic wastewater treatment bioreactor. Here, we obtained near complete genomes from two KSB3 populations in the bioreactor, including the dominant bulking filament, using differential coverage binning of metagenomic data. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted probes specific for the two populations confirmed that both are filamentous organisms. Genome-based metabolic reconstruction and microscopic observation of the KSB3 filaments in the presence of sugar gradients indicate that both filament types are Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic fermenters capable of non-flagellar based gliding motility, and have a strikingly large number of sensory and response regulator genes. We propose that the KSB3 filaments are highly sensitive to their surroundings and that cellular processes, including those causing bulking, are controlled by external stimuli. The obtained genomes lay the foundation for a more detailed understanding of environmental cues used by KSB3 filaments, which may lead to more robust treatment options to prevent bulking.

  1. Connecting the dots of the bacterial cell cycle: Coordinating chromosome replication and segregation with cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduk, Isabella V; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Proper division site selection is crucial for the survival of all organisms. What still eludes us is how bacteria position their division site with high precision, and in tight coordination with chromosome replication and segregation. Until recently, the general belief, at least in the model organisms Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was that spatial regulation of division comes about by the combined negative regulatory mechanisms of the Min system and nucleoid occlusion. However, as we review here, these two systems cannot be solely responsible for division site selection and we highlight additional regulatory mechanisms that are at play. In this review, we put forward evidence of how chromosome replication and segregation may have direct links with cell division in these bacteria and the benefit of recent advances in chromosome conformation capture techniques in providing important information about how these three processes mechanistically work together to achieve accurate generation of progenitor cells.

  2. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  3. A polymerization–depolymerization model for generation of contractile force during bacterial cell division

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplab Ghosh; Anirban Sain

    2008-08-01

    During the last phase of cell division in bacteria, a polymeric ring forms at the division site. The ring, made of intracellular proteins, anchors to the cell wall and starts to contract. That initiates a dividing septum to close in, like the shutter of a camera, eventually guillotining the cell into two daughters. All through, the ring remains at the leading edge of the septum and seems to power its closure. It is not understood why does the ring contract. We propose a theoretical model to explain this. It is worth mentioning that a similar contraction phenomenon occurs for the actin ring in eukaryotes, but there it is due to motor proteins, which however, are absent in bacteria.

  4. Construction of an Americn mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Nefedov, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    contigs (184 kb in average) were assembled. Knowing the complete sequences of these candidate genes will enable confirmation of the association with a phenotype and the finding of causative mutations for the targeted phenotypes.Additionally, 1577 BAC clones were end sequenced; 2505 BAC end sequences (80......BACKGROUND: Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. RESULTS: Here, we...... consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library...

  5. EzrA: a spectrin-like scaffold in the bacterial cell division machinery

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    Robert M Cleverley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in identifying the components of the divisome, the assembly of proteins that undertakes the vital process of cell division in bacteria. However, how the highly interdependent processes on either side of the membrane are coordinated during division is a major unresolved question. How is the degradation and synthesis of the cell wall on the outside of the cell coordinated with cytokinesis and membrane fission, which are driven from the inside of the cell by the tubulin homologue FtsZ? A possible key mediator of such coordination is the membrane protein EzrA, as it interacts both with FtsZ and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs that synthesize peptidoglycan. Cleverley et al. [Nature Communications (2014 5, 5421] have recently solved the crystal structure of the cytoplasmic domain of B. subtilis EzrA, which points to an important scaffolding role for EzrA in the divisome. The structure resembles the eukaryotic, cytoskeletal spectrin proteins, which link actin filaments in the cytoskeleton and also connect the actin cytoskeleton to membrane-bound integrin proteins.

  6. Asymmetric division and differential gene expression during a bacterial developmental program requires DivIVA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prahathees Eswaramoorthy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a developmental program in which a progenitor cell differentiates into two different cell types, the smaller of which eventually becomes a dormant cell called a spore. The process begins with an asymmetric cell division event, followed by the activation of a transcription factor, σF, specifically in the smaller cell. Here, we show that the structural protein DivIVA localizes to the polar septum during sporulation and is required for asymmetric division and the compartment-specific activation of σF. Both events are known to require a protein called SpoIIE, which also localizes to the polar septum. We show that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE and that DivIVA may anchor SpoIIE briefly to the assembling polar septum before SpoIIE is subsequently released into the forespore membrane and recaptured at the polar septum. Finally, using super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that DivIVA and SpoIIE ultimately display a biased localization on the side of the polar septum that faces the smaller compartment in which σF is activated.

  7. Structural Bacterial Molecules as Potential Candidates for an Evolution of the Classical Concept of Probiotics12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Michele; Vaira, Giuseppina; Calo, Girolamo; Papini, Francesco; Holton, John; Vaira, Dino

    2011-01-01

    A large number of experimental and clinical studies published in recent years have demonstrated the beneficial role of probiotic bacteria in the health of the host. However, because the different receptors of the innate immune system can recognize only specific bacterial molecular patterns, knowledge of the role played by individual probiotic molecular patterns is essential to move from the current confused era of live probiotic bacteria to the era of the pharmacobiotic strategies. This article reviews the current knowledge on the probiotic activities of bacterial structural molecules (nucleic acids and surface molecules), which represent the fundamental basis to set up experimental and clinical studies in this emerging field with very promising and potentially invaluable future prospects. PMID:22332079

  8. Secretome, surfome and immunome: emerging approaches for the discovery of new vaccine candidates against bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Pratistha; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Tomar, Rajesh Singh

    2016-09-01

    Functional genomics has made possible advanced structure-to-function investigation of pathogens and helped characterize virulence mechanisms. Proteomics has been become a tool for large-scale identification of proteins involved during invasion and infection by the pathogens. Bacterial surface and secreted proteins play key role in the interaction between the bacterial cell and the host environment. Thus exoproteome and surface proteome of a microorganism are hypothesized to contain components of effective vaccines. Surfome and exoproteome analysis strategy facilitates identification of novel vaccine antigen and overall helps in progress of discovery of vaccine. The study of the antibody response can advance how proteomics is used, because it investigates antibody-antigen interactions and also unravel the relationship of antibody responses to pathogen and host characteristics. System immunology integrating with proteome i.e. immunoproteomics is applicable to those infections that are having tendency of diverse antibody target recognition and thus accurately reflects progression of the infection. PMID:27465855

  9. Global metagenomic survey reveals a new bacterial candidate phylum in geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; Paez-Espino, David; Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter F; Hedlund, Brian P; Dekas, Anne E; Grasby, Stephen E; Brady, Allyson L; Dong, Hailiang; Briggs, Brandon R; Li, Wen-Jun; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Pati, Amrita; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Rubin, Edward M; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia N

    2016-01-27

    Analysis of the increasing wealth of metagenomic data collected from diverse environments can lead to the discovery of novel branches on the tree of life. Here we analyse 5.2 Tb of metagenomic data collected globally to discover a novel bacterial phylum ('Candidatus Kryptonia') found exclusively in high-temperature pH-neutral geothermal springs. This lineage had remained hidden as a taxonomic 'blind spot' because of mismatches in the primers commonly used for ribosomal gene surveys. Genome reconstruction from metagenomic data combined with single-cell genomics results in several high-quality genomes representing four genera from the new phylum. Metabolic reconstruction indicates a heterotrophic lifestyle with conspicuous nutritional deficiencies, suggesting the need for metabolic complementarity with other microbes. Co-occurrence patterns identifies a number of putative partners, including an uncultured Armatimonadetes lineage. The discovery of Kryptonia within previously studied geothermal springs underscores the importance of globally sampled metagenomic data in detection of microbial novelty, and highlights the extraordinary diversity of microbial life still awaiting discovery.

  10. Bacterial vaginosis (BV candidate bacteria: associations with BV and behavioural practices in sexually-experienced and inexperienced women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Fethers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years several new fastidious bacteria have been identified that display a high specificity for BV; however no previous studies have comprehensively assessed the behavioural risk associations of these bacterial vaginosis-candidate organisms (BV-COs. METHODS: We examined the associations between 8 key previously described BV-COs and BV status established by Nugent's score (NS. We also examined the sexual practices associated with each BV-CO. We incorporated 2 study populations: 193 from a sexually-inexperienced university population and 146 from a highly sexually-active clinic population. Detailed behavioural data was collected by questionnaire and vaginal smears were scored by the Nugent method. Stored samples were tested by quantitative PCR assays for the 8 BV-COs: Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Leptotrichia spp., Megasphaera type I, Sneathia spp., and the Clostridia-like bacteria BVAB1, BVAB2 and BVAB3. Associations between BV-COs and BV and behaviours were examined by univariate and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: On univariate analysis, all BV-COs were more common in BV compared to normal flora. However, only Megasphaera type I, BVAB2, A. vaginae and G. vaginalis were significantly independently associated with BV by multivariable analysis. Six of the eight BV-COs (Megasphaera type I, BVAB2, BVAB3, Sneathia, Leptotrichia and G. vaginalis were rare or absent in sexually-unexposed women, and demonstrated increasing odds of detection with increasing levels of sexual activity and/or numbers of lifetime sexual partners. Only G. vaginalis and A. vaginae were commonly detected in sexually-unexposed women. Megasphaera type I was independently associated with women-who-have-sex-with women (WSW and lifetime sexual partner numbers, while unprotected penile-vaginal-sex was associated with BVAB2 detection by multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Four of eight key BV-COs were significantly associated with BV after adjusting

  11. Structure of the bacterial cell division determinant GpsB and its interaction with penicillin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismondo, Jeanine; Cleverley, Robert M; Lane, Harriet V; Großhennig, Stephanie; Steglich, Anne; Möller, Lars; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Hain, Torsten; Lewis, Richard J; Halbedel, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Each bacterium has to co-ordinate its growth with division to ensure genetic stability of the population. Consequently, cell division and growth are tightly regulated phenomena, albeit different bacteria utilise one of several alternative regulatory mechanisms to maintain control. Here we consider GpsB, which is linked to cell growth and division in Gram-positive bacteria. ΔgpsB mutants of the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes show severe lysis, division and growth defects due to distortions of cell wall biosynthesis. Consistent with this premise, GpsB interacts both in vitro and in vivo with the major bi-functional penicillin-binding protein. We solved the crystal structure of GpsB and the interaction interfaces in both proteins are identified and validated. The inactivation of gpsB results in strongly attenuated virulence in animal experiments, comparable in degree to classical listerial virulence factor mutants. Therefore, GpsB is essential for in vitro and in vivo growth of a highly virulent food-borne pathogen, suggesting that GpsB could be a target for the future design of novel antibacterials. PMID:26575090

  12. Transcriptional responses of Italian ryegrass during interaction with Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis reveal novel candidate genes for bacterial wilt resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Asp, Torben; Widmer, Franko;

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis (Xtg) causes bacterial wilt, a severe disease of forage grasses such as Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). In order to gain a more detailed understanding of the genetic control of resistance mechanisms and to provide prerequisites for marker assisted...... selection, the partial transcriptomes of two Italian ryegrass genotypes, one resistant and one susceptible to bacterial wilt were compared at four time points after Xtg infection. A cDNA microarray developed from a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) expressed sequence tag set consisting of 9,990 unique...... genes was used for transcriptome analysis in Italian ryegrass. An average of 4,487 (45%) of the perennial ryegrass sequences spotted on the cDNA microarray were detected by cross-hybridisation to Italian ryegrass. Transcriptome analyses of the resistant versus the susceptible genotype revealed...

  13. LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL SCREENING FROM GASTROINTESTINAL DIGESTIVE TRACT OF NATIVE AND BROILER CHICKEN FOR PROBIOTIC CANDIDATE PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Damayanti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of his research was to obtain lactic acid bacteria (LAB from gastrointestinal digestive tract (GIT of chickens for probiotic candidate purposes. LAB was isolated from GIT of broiler and native chickens on selective medium (MRS+0.2% CaCO3. Screening method based on microbiological and biochemical characteristics, antibacterial properties, growth on various temperature, aeration, and agitation, antibiotic sensitivity, and viability on acid pH, gastric juice and bile salt. Thirty nine of LAB isolates was selected from native chicken and 18 isolates from broiler chicken. The selected LAB inhibited Escherichia coli FNCC 0091 growth and grown on 30, 39 and 45oC of temperature, aerobic, anaerobic and agitation conditions. Biochemical identification using API 50 CHL kit revealed that I72 from native chicken ileum as Lactobacillus salivarius and Db9 from broiler chicken duodenum as Pediococcus pentosaceus. All LAB were resistant to Erythromicin, Penicillin G and Streptomycin as tested antibiotics. Both of them have non significantly different of viability on acid pH (1, 2 and 3, gastric juice pH 2 and bile salt which were 91.78% for L. salivarius I72 and 94.48% for P. pentosaceus Db9 (P<0.05. Based on characteristics, both the selected LAB have potentiality as chicken probiotic candidates.

  14. s-triazine degrading bacterial isolate Arthrobacter sp. AK-YN10, a candidate for bioaugmentation of atrazine contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Bhardwaj, Pooja; Storck, Veronika; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Kapley, Atya

    2016-01-01

    The Arthrobacter sp. strain AK-YN10 is an s-triazine pesticide degrading bacterium isolated from a sugarcane field in Central India with history of repeated atrazine use. AK-YN10 was shown to degrade 99 % of atrazine in 30 h from media supplemented with 1000 mg L(-1) of the herbicide. Draft genome sequencing revealed similarity to pAO1, TC1, and TC2 catabolic plasmids of the Arthrobacter taxon. Plasmid profiling analyses revealed the presence of four catabolic plasmids. The trzN, atzB, and atzC atrazine-degrading genes were located on a plasmid of approximately 113 kb.The flagellar operon found in the AK-YN10 draft genome suggests motility, an interesting trait for a bioremediation agent, and was homologous to that of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus. The multiple s-triazines degradation property of this isolate makes it a good candidate for bioremediation of soils contaminated by s-triazine pesticides. PMID:26403923

  15. s-triazine degrading bacterial isolate Arthrobacter sp. AK-YN10, a candidate for bioaugmentation of atrazine contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Bhardwaj, Pooja; Storck, Veronika; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Kapley, Atya

    2016-01-01

    The Arthrobacter sp. strain AK-YN10 is an s-triazine pesticide degrading bacterium isolated from a sugarcane field in Central India with history of repeated atrazine use. AK-YN10 was shown to degrade 99 % of atrazine in 30 h from media supplemented with 1000 mg L(-1) of the herbicide. Draft genome sequencing revealed similarity to pAO1, TC1, and TC2 catabolic plasmids of the Arthrobacter taxon. Plasmid profiling analyses revealed the presence of four catabolic plasmids. The trzN, atzB, and atzC atrazine-degrading genes were located on a plasmid of approximately 113 kb.The flagellar operon found in the AK-YN10 draft genome suggests motility, an interesting trait for a bioremediation agent, and was homologous to that of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus. The multiple s-triazines degradation property of this isolate makes it a good candidate for bioremediation of soils contaminated by s-triazine pesticides.

  16. ftsZ gene and plastid division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Plastid is one of the most important cellular organelles, the normal division process of plastid is essential for the differentiation and development of plant cells. For a long time, morphological observations and genetic analyses to special mutants are the major research fields of plastid division, but the molecular mechanisms underlying plastid division are largely unknown. Because of the endosymbiotic origin, plastid division might have mechanisms in common with those involved in bacterial cell division. It has been proved that several prokaryotic cell division genes also participate in the plastid division. Recently, the mechanisms of prokaryotic cell division have been well documented, which provides a valuable paradigm for understanding the plastid division mechanisms. In plants, the functional analyses of ftsZ, a key gene involved both in bacteria and plastid division, have established the solid foundation for people to understand the plastid division in molecular level. In this paper we will make a review for the research history and progress of plastid division.

  17. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  18. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Jabari; Hana Gannoun; Eltaief Khelifi; Jean-Luc Cayol; Jean-Jacques Godon; Moktar Hamdi; Marie-Laure Fardeau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens), and msbl6 (candidate division) were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%,...

  19. EXPRESIÓN DE DOS GENES CANDIDATOS A RESISTENCIA CONTRA LA BACTERIOSIS VASCULAR EN YUCA Expression Of Two Resistance Gene Candidates Against Cassava Bacterial Blight In Cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELÍZABETH CONTRERAS NIETO

    Full Text Available La yuca (Manihot esculenta Crantz, Euphorbiaceae es el cuarto cultivo en importancia a nivel mundial como fuente de calorías para la población humana y cuya producción se ve afectada por la bacteriosis vascular, enfermedad ocasionada por Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam. La resistencia a enfermedades en plantas depende de la presencia de genes de resistencia (R, los cuales reconocen a los patógenos y simultáneamente permiten desencadenar la respuesta de defensa. A pesar de recientes esfuerzos encaminados a la identificación de genes R en yuca, aún no se ha logrado clonar el primer gen R en este cultivo. En el presente trabajo se estudió el perfil de expresión de dos Genes Candidatos a Resistencia (RGCs asociados a QTLs de defensa contra la bacteriosis vascular en yuca. A partir de la técnica transcripción reversa y reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (RT-PCR se evaluó la expresión de los genes RXam1 y RXam2 en tallos y hojas de las variedades resistentes SG107-35 y MBRA685 de yuca, después de ser inoculadas con la cepa CIO151 de Xam. Se observó que RXam1 es inducido a partir de los cinco días post-inoculación tanto en tallos como hojas de las dos variedades, mientras que RXam2 es expresado de manera constitutiva en la variedad MBRA685.Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz, Euphorbiaceae is the fourth food crop used as an important energy source for human population worldwide. Cassava Bacterial Blight (CBB is the most important disease of this crop. CBB is caused by the pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam. Plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to detect and respond to infection by pathogens. These mechanisms depend on the presence of resistance (R genes, which recognize proteins produced by pathogens. Although efforts have been conducted to identify R genes in cassava, the first R gene in this crop has not been cloned. The present work studied the expression profile of two resistance gene

  20. Modeling of the dynamic pole-to-pole oscillations of the min proteins in bacterial cell division: The effect of an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Modchang, C; Triampo, W; Ngamsaad, W; Nuttawut, N; Tang, I M; Lenbury, Y; Modchang, Charin; Kanthang, Paisan; Triampo, Wannapong; Ngamsaad, Waipot; Nuttawut, Narin; Lenbury, Yongwimol

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps in the developmental process of the bacteria cell at the cellular level is the determination of the middle of the cell and the proper placement of the septum, these being essential to the division of the cell. In E. coli, this step depends on the proteins MinC, MinD, and MinE. Exposure to a constant electric field may cause the bacteria cell division mechanism to change, resulting in an abnormal cytokinesis. To see the effects of an external field e.g., an electric or magnetic field on this process, we have solved a set of deterministic reaction diffusion equations, which incorporate the influence of an electric field. We have found some changes in the dynamics of the oscillations of the min proteins from pole to pole. The numerical results show some interesting effects, which are qualitatively in good agreement with some experimental results.

  1. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  2. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  3. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruolin Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1 patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2 patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01 at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%; a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%; positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the

  4. Comparative approach to capture bacterial diversity in coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Na, Hyunsoo; Kim, Ok-Sun; Yoon, Suk-hwan;

    2011-01-01

    described here. By directly comparing the sequences obtained from cultures with those from culture-independent work, we found that only 33% of the culture sequences were identical to those from clone libraries and pyrosequences. This study presents a detailed comparison of common molecular and cultivation...... to investigate the bacterial community structure of coastal seawater collected from the Yellow Sea, Korea. For culture-independent studies, we used the latest model pyrosequencer, Roche/454 Genome Sequencer FLX Titanium. Pyrosequencing captured a total of 52 phyla including 27 candidate divisions...... from the water column, whereas the traditional cloning approach captured only 15 phyla including 2 candidate divisions. In addition, of 878 genera retrieved, 92.1% of the sequences were unique to pyrosequencing. For culture-dependent analysis, plate culturing, plate washing, enrichment, and high...

  5. Transcriptomics of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in response to the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes reveals candidate fungal defense response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Mathioni

    Full Text Available Plants and animals have evolved a first line of defense response to pathogens called innate or basal immunity. While basal defenses in these organisms are well studied, there is almost a complete lack of understanding of such systems in fungal species, and more specifically, how they are able to detect and mount a defense response upon pathogen attack. Hence, the goal of the present study was to understand how fungi respond to biotic stress by assessing the transcriptional profile of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, when challenged with the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes. Based on microscopic observations of interactions between M. oryzae and wild-type L. enzymogenes strain C3, we selected early and intermediate stages represented by time-points of 3 and 9 hours post-inoculation, respectively, to evaluate the fungal transcriptome using RNA-seq. For comparative purposes, we also challenged the fungus with L. enzymogenes mutant strain DCA, previously demonstrated to be devoid of antifungal activity. A comparison of transcriptional data from fungal interactions with the wild-type bacterial strain C3 and the mutant strain DCA revealed 463 fungal genes that were down-regulated during attack by C3; of these genes, 100 were also found to be up-regulated during the interaction with DCA. Functional categorization of genes in this suite included those with roles in carbohydrate metabolism, cellular transport and stress response. One gene in this suite belongs to the CFEM-domain class of fungal proteins. Another CFEM class protein called PTH11 has been previously characterized, and we found that a deletion in this gene caused advanced lesion development by C3 compared to its growth on the wild-type fungus. We discuss the characterization of this suite of 100 genes with respect to their role in the fungal defense response.

  6. Organizing the bacterial chromosome for division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase

    2014-03-01

    The chromosome is highly organized in space in many bacteria, although the origin and function of this organization remain unclear. This organization is further complicated by the necessity for chromosome replication and segregation. Partitioning proteins of the ParABS system mediate chromosomal and plasmid segregation in a variety of bacteria. This segregation machinery includes a large ParB-DNA complex consisting of roughly 1000 ParB dimers, which localizes around one or a few centromere-like parS sites near the origin of replication. Despite the apparent simplicity of this segregation machinery as compared to eukaryotic segregations systems, puzzles remain: In particular, what is the nature of interactions among DNA-bound ParB proteins, and how do these determine the organizational and functional properties of the ParB-DNA partitioning complex? A crucial aspect of this question is whether ParB spreads along the DNA to form a filamentous protein-DNA complex with a 1D character, or rather assembles to form a 3D complex on the DNA. Furthermore, it remains unclear how the presence of only one or even a few parS sites can lead to robust formation and localization of such a large protein-DNA complex. We developed a simple model for interacting proteins on DNA, and found that a combination of 1D spreading bonds and a 3D bridging bond between ParB proteins constitutes the minimal model for condensation of a 3D ParB-DNA complex. These combined interactions provide an effective surface tension that prevents fragmentation of the ParB-DNA complex. Thus, ParB spreads to form multiple 1D domains on the DNA, connected in 3D by bridging interactions to assemble into a 3D ParB-DNA condensate. Importantly, this model accounts for recent experiments on ParB-induced gene-silencing and the effect of a DNA ``roadblock'' on ParB localization. Furthermore, our model provides a simple mechanism to explain how a single parS site is both necessary and sufficient for the formation and localization of the ParB-DNA complex.

  7. PERSONNEL DIVISION BECOMES HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    In the years to come, CERN faces big challenges in the planning and use of human resources. At this moment, Personnel (PE) Division is being reorganised to prepare for new tasks and priorities. In order to accentuate the purposes of the operation, the name of the division has been changed into Human Resources (HR) Division, with effect from 1st January 2000. Human Resources DivisionTel.73222

  8. Phylogenetic Diversity, Localization, and Cell Morphologies of Members of the Candidate Phylum TG3 and a Subphylum in the Phylum Fibrobacteres, Recently Discovered Bacterial Groups Dominant in Termite Guts▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Hattori, Satoshi; Inoue, Tetsushi; Noda, Satoko; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2006-01-01

    Recently we discovered two novel, deeply branching lineages in the domain Bacteria from termite guts by PCR-based analyses of 16S rRNA (Y. Hongoh, P. Deevong, T. Inoue, S. Moriya, S. Trakulnaleamsai, M. Ohkuma, C. Vongkaluang, N. Noparatnaraporn, and T. Kudo, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:6590-6599, 2005). Here, we report on the specific detection of these bacteria, the candidate phylum TG3 (Termite Group 3) and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the guts of the wood-feeding termites Microcerotermes sp. and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Both bacterial groups were detected almost exclusively from the luminal fluid of the dilated portion in the hindgut. Each accounted for approximately 10% of the total prokaryotic cells, constituting the second-most dominant groups in the whole-gut microbiota. The detected cells of both groups were in undulate or vibroid forms and apparently resembled small spirochetes. The cell sizes were 0.2 to 0.4 by 1.3 to 6.0 μm and 0.2 to 0.3 by 1.3 to 4.9 μm in the TG3 and Fibrobacteres, respectively. Using PCR screenings with specific primers, we found that both groups are distributed among various termites. The obtained clones formed monophyletic clusters that were delineated by the host genus rather than by the geographic distance, implying a robust association between these bacteria and host termites. TG3 clones were also obtained from a cockroach gut, lake sediment, rice paddy soil, and deep-sea sediments. Our results suggest that the TG3 and Fibrobacteres bacteria are autochthonous gut symbionts of various termites and that the TG3 members are also widely distributed among various other environments. PMID:17021231

  9. Phylogenetic diversity, localization, and cell morphologies of members of the candidate phylum TG3 and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, recently discovered bacterial groups dominant in termite guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Hattori, Satoshi; Inoue, Tetsushi; Noda, Satoko; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2006-10-01

    Recently we discovered two novel, deeply branching lineages in the domain Bacteria from termite guts by PCR-based analyses of 16S rRNA (Y. Hongoh, P. Deevong, T. Inoue, S. Moriya, S. Trakulnaleamsai, M. Ohkuma, C. Vongkaluang, N. Noparatnaraporn, and T. Kudo, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:6590-6599, 2005). Here, we report on the specific detection of these bacteria, the candidate phylum TG3 (Termite Group 3) and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the guts of the wood-feeding termites Microcerotermes sp. and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Both bacterial groups were detected almost exclusively from the luminal fluid of the dilated portion in the hindgut. Each accounted for approximately 10% of the total prokaryotic cells, constituting the second-most dominant groups in the whole-gut microbiota. The detected cells of both groups were in undulate or vibroid forms and apparently resembled small spirochetes. The cell sizes were 0.2 to 0.4 by 1.3 to 6.0 microm and 0.2 to 0.3 by 1.3 to 4.9 microm in the TG3 and Fibrobacteres, respectively. Using PCR screenings with specific primers, we found that both groups are distributed among various termites. The obtained clones formed monophyletic clusters that were delineated by the host genus rather than by the geographic distance, implying a robust association between these bacteria and host termites. TG3 clones were also obtained from a cockroach gut, lake sediment, rice paddy soil, and deep-sea sediments. Our results suggest that the TG3 and Fibrobacteres bacteria are autochthonous gut symbionts of various termites and that the TG3 members are also widely distributed among various other environments.

  10. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  11. A putative greigite-type magnetosome gene cluster from the candidate phylum Latescibacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-04-01

    The intracellular biomineralization of magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) is strictly controlled by a group of conserved genes, termed magnetosome genes, which are organized as clusters (or islands) in MTB genomes. So far, all reported MTB are affiliated within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3. Here, we report the discovery of a putative magnetosome gene cluster structure from the draft genome of an uncultivated bacterium belonging to the candidate phylum Latescibacteria (formerly candidate division WS3) recently recovered by Rinke and colleagues, which contains 10 genes with homology to magnetosome mam genes of magnetotactic Proteobacteria and Nitrospirae. Moreover, these genes are phylogenetically closely related to greigite-type magnetosome genes that were only found from the Deltaproteobacteria MTB before, suggesting that the greigite genes may originate earlier than previously imagined. These findings indicate that some members of Latescibacteria may be capable of forming greigite magnetosomes, and thus may play previously unrecognized roles in environmental iron and sulfur cycles. The conserved genomic structure of magnetosome gene cluster in Latescibacteria phylum supports the hypothesis of horizontal transfer of these genes among distantly related bacterial groups in nature. PMID:25382584

  12. Novel coiled-coil cell division factor ZapB stimulates Z ring assembly and cell division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Galli, Elisa; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2008-01-01

    Formation of the Z ring is the first known event in bacterial cell division. However, it is not yet known how the assembly and contraction of the Z ring are regulated. Here, we identify a novel cell division factor ZapB in Escherichia coli that simultaneously stimulates Z ring assembly and cell...

  13. New methods to assess bacterial injury in water.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaske, S K; Dockins, W S; Schillinger, J. E.; McFeters, G A

    1980-01-01

    Two methods are described for measurement of bacterial injury in water. Laboratory time preceding cell division measured with slide cultures and spheroplast formation after lysozyme treatment were accurate and rapid measurements of bacterial damage.

  14. The Impact of Reclassification from Division II to DI-AA and from Division I-AA to I-A on NCAA Member Institutions from 1993 to 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieder, Laura L., Comp.; Fulks, Daniel L., Comp.

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II institutions seeking reclassification to Division I-AA and Division I-AA institutions moving to Division I-A. Yet, other schools that seem like natural candidates to reclassify have resisted. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the…

  15. Origin and evolution of the chloroplast division machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2005-10-01

    Chloroplasts were originally established in eukaryotes by the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium; they then spread through diversification of the eukaryotic hosts and subsequent engulfment of eukaryotic algae by previously nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes. The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of preexisting chloroplasts. Like their ancestors, chloroplasts use a bacterial division system based on the FtsZ ring and some associated factors, all of which are now encoded in the host nuclear genome. The majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and several new factors have been added by the eukaryotic host. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most likely added by the eukaryotic host, and a member of the dynamin family of proteins evolved to regulate chloroplast division. The identification of several additional proteins involved in the division process, along with data from diverse lineages of organisms, our current knowledge of mitochondrial division, and the mining of genomic sequence data have enabled us to begin to understand the universality and evolution of the division system. The principal features of the chloroplast division system thus far identified are conserved across several lineages, including those with secondary chloroplasts, and may reflect primeval features of mitochondrial division. PMID:16143878

  16. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts...... study alternative and richer models, such as externalities in cake cutting, simultaneous cake cutting, and envy-free cake cutting. The second part of the thesis tackles the fair allocation of multiple goods, divisible and indivisible. In the realm of divisible goods, we investigate the well known...

  17. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  18. Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms...

  19. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  20. Evolution of the chloroplast division machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo GAO; Fuli GAO

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic organelles derived from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria during evolution.Dramatic changes occurred during the process of the formation and evolution of chloroplasts,including the large-scale gene transfer from chloroplast to nucleus.However,there are still many essential characters remaining.For the chloroplast division machinery,FtsZ proteins,Ftn2,SulA and part of the division site positioning system- MinD and MinE are still conserved.New or at least partially new proteins,such as FtsZ family proteins FtsZl and ARC3,ARC6H,ARC5,PDV1,PDV2 and MCD1,were introduced for the division of chloroplasts during evolution.Some bacterial cell division proteins,such as FtsA,MreB,Ftn6,FtsW and Ftsl,probably lost their function or were gradually lost.Thus,the chloroplast division machinery is a dynamically evolving structure with both conservation and innovation.

  1. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  2. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities of the theoretical physics division for 1979 are described. Short summaries are given of specific research work in the following fields: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, elementary particles

  3. Biennial activity report of Metallurgy Division for 1989 and 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first divisional biennial report of the Metallurgy Division of Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, for the year 1989-1990, after formation of the Metallurgy Division in September 1988. Major areas of work in the Division relate to aqueous corrosion and localised corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and liquid metal corrosion, high temperature oxidation, thermodynamic studies, physical metallurgy studies for structure-property correlations and failure analyses. The principal materials of studies have been the austenitic stainless steels, the current materials of construction in the Fast Breeder Test Reactor and the candidate materials for the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor

  4. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C Goldfarb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum-level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e. glycine, sucrose are numerous (>500, phylogenetically-clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacterales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e. cellulose, lignin or tannin-protein are fewer (168 but more phylogenetically-dispersed, occurring across 8 phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  5. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  6. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth N Miranda

    Full Text Available Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1 to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2 determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3 to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1 established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1 were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads. The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7. The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes, was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had

  7. Theoretical Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables

  8. 07261 Summary -- Fair Division

    OpenAIRE

    Brams, Steven J.; Pruhs, Kirk

    2007-01-01

    The problem of fair division—dividing goods or "bads" (e.g., costs) among entities in an impartial and equitable way—is one of the most important problems that society faces. A Google search on the phrase "fair allocation" returns over 100K links, referring to the division of sports tickets, health resources, computer networking resources, voting power, intellectual property licenses, costs of environmental improvements, etc.

  9. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Encrypted integer division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    When processing signals in the encrypted domain, homomorphic encryption can be used to enable linear operations on encrypted data. Integer division of encrypted data however requires an additional protocol with the server and will be relatively expensive. We present new solutions for dividing encryp

  11. The Problem with Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Of the "big four", division is likely to regarded by many learners as "the odd one out", "the difficult one", "the one that is complicated", or "the scary one". It seems to have been that way "for ever", in the perception of many who have trodden the learning pathways through the world of number. But, does it have to be like this? Clearly the…

  12. Talking Division Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Lisa Storm

    introducing concerns of division that were at odds with daily life in the region. I argue that it was driven by motives that were somewhat extraneous to the cause of language priority, based as they were on concerns of expediency with regard to the most effective way to escape the power monopoly...

  13. Solid State Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces

  14. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  15. Molecular characterization of bacterial diversity in Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) rhizosphere soils from British Columbia forest soils differing in disturbance and geographic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Monica L; Radomski, Christopher C; McDermott, Joseph M; Davies, Julian; Axelrood, Paige E

    2002-12-01

    Rhizosphere bacteria from Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) seedlings were characterized from forest soils which differed in disturbance and geographic source. Soil disturbance treatments included whole-tree harvesting with and without heavy soil compaction and whole-tree harvesting with complete surface organic matter removal and heavy soil compaction from British Columbia (BC) Ministry of Forests Long-Term Soil Productivity installations in three biogeoclimatic subzones in central BC, Canada. Bacterial community members were characterized by DNA sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments following direct DNA isolation from soil, polymerase chain reaction amplification and cloning. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 85% of 709 16S rDNA clones were classified as alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group, Acidobacterium, Verrucomicrobia, and candidate divisions OP10 and TM6. Members of the Proteobacteria and Acidobacterium represented 55% and 19% of the clone library, respectively, whereas the remaining bacterial divisions each comprised less than 4% of the clone library. One hundred and six 16S rDNA clones could not be classified into known bacterial divisions. No significant differences were detected for soil disturbance treatment or site effects on the proportions of 16S rDNA clones affiliated with Proteobacteria and Acidobacterium. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that it was common for 16S rRNA gene fragments from different soil disturbance treatments and geographic locations to be closely related. PMID:19709294

  16. Rapid radiation in bacteria leads to a division of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wook; Levy, Stuart B; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    The division of labour is a central feature of the most sophisticated biological systems, including genomes, multicellular organisms and societies, which took millions of years to evolve. Here we show that a well-organized and robust division of labour can evolve in a matter of days. Mutants emerge within bacterial colonies and work with the parent strain to gain new territory. The two strains self-organize in space: one provides a wetting polymer at the colony edge, whereas the other sits behind and pushes them both along. The emergence of the interaction is repeatable, bidirectional and only requires a single mutation to alter production of the intracellular messenger, cyclic-di-GMP. Our work demonstrates the power of the division of labour to rapidly solve biological problems without the need for long-term evolution or derived sociality. We predict that the division of labour will evolve frequently in microbial populations, where rapid genetic diversification is common. PMID:26852925

  17. Impact of redox-stratification on the diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in sandy reef sediments in a microcosm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zheng; WANG Xin; Angelos K. HANNIDES; Francis J. SANSONE; WANG Guangyi

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between microbial communities and geochemical environments are important in marine microbial ecology and biogeochemistry.Although biogeochemical redox stratification has been well documented in marine sediments,its impact on microbial communities remains largely unknown.In this study,we applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library construction to investigate the diversity and stratification of bacterial communities in redox-stratified sandy reef sediments in a microcosm.A total of 88 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) were identified from 16S rRNA clone libraries constructed from sandy reef sediments in a laboratory microcosm.They were members of nine phyla and three candidate divisions,including Proteobacteria (Alpha-,Beta-,Gamma-,Delta-,and Epsilonproteobacteria),Actinobacteria,Acidobacteria,Bacteroidetes,Chloroflexi,Cyanobacteria,Firmicutes,Verrucomicrobia,Spirochaetes,and the candidate divisions WS3,SO31 and AO19.The vast majority of these phylotypes are related to clone sequences from other marine sediments,but OTUs of Epsilonproteobacteria and WS3 are reported for the first time from permeable marine sediments.Several other OTUs are potential new bacterial phylotypes because of their low similarity with reference sequences.Results from the 16S rRNA,gene clone sequence analyses suggested that bacterial communities exhibit clear stratification across large redox gradients in these sediments,with the highest diversity found in the anoxic layer (15-25 mm) and the least diversity in the suboxic layer (3-5 mm).Analysis of the nosZ,and amoA gene libraries also indicated the stratification of denitrifiers and nitrifiers,with their highest diversity being in the anoxic and oxic sediment layers,respectively.These results indicated that redox-stratification can affect the distribution of bacterial communities in sandy reef sediments.

  18. Impact of redox-stratification on the diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in sandy reef sediments in a microcosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng; Wang, Xin; Hannides, Angelos K.; Sansone, Francis J.; Wang, Guangyi

    2011-11-01

    Relationships between microbial communities and geochemical environments are important in marine microbial ecology and biogeochemistry. Although biogeochemical redox stratification has been well documented in marine sediments, its impact on microbial communities remains largely unknown. In this study, we applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library construction to investigate the diversity and stratification of bacterial communities in redox-stratified sandy reef sediments in a microcosm. A total of 88 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) were identified from 16S rRNA clone libraries constructed from sandy reef sediments in a laboratory microcosm. They were members of nine phyla and three candidate divisions, including Proteobacteria ( Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Spirochaetes, and the candidate divisions WS3, SO31 and AO19. The vast majority of these phylotypes are related to clone sequences from other marine sediments, but OTUs of Epsilonproteobacteria and WS3 are reported for the first time from permeable marine sediments. Several other OTUs are potential new bacterial phylotypes because of their low similarity with reference sequences. Results from the 16S rRNA, gene clone sequence analyses suggested that bacterial communities exhibit clear stratification across large redox gradients in these sediments, with the highest diversity found in the anoxic layer (15-25 mm) and the least diversity in the suboxic layer (3-5 mm). Analysis of the nosZ, and amoA gene libraries also indicated the stratification of denitrifiers and nitrifiers, with their highest diversity being in the anoxic and oxic sediment layers, respectively. These results indicated that redox-stratification can affect the distribution of bacterial communities in sandy reef sediments.

  19. 75 FR 16178 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Joint... Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE 4410-11-M...

  20. 77 FR 38831 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993... Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE P...

  1. Divisibility of characteristic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Borghesi, Simone

    2009-01-01

    We use homotopy theory to define certain rational coefficients characteristic numbers with integral values, depending on a given prime number q and positive integer t. We prove the first nontrivial degree formula and use it to show that existence of morphisms between algebraic varieties for which these numbers are not divisible by q give information on the degree of such morphisms or on zero cycles of the target variety.

  2. 3. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the period September 1980 - Aug 1981, the studies in theoretical physics divisions have been compiled under the following headings: in nuclear physics, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and intermediate energies; in particle physics, NN and NantiN interactions, dual topological unitarization, quark model and quantum chromodynamics, classical and quantum field theories, non linear integrable equations and topological preons and Grand unified theories. A list of publications, lectures and meetings is included

  3. Biorepositories- | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  4. Teaching "Candide": A Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Theodore E. D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two different approaches to teaching Voltaire's "Candide", one deriving meaning from the textual fabric or "inside" of the story and the other focusing on the author's "external" intent in writing the story, are presented and compared. (MSE)

  5. CAS Academic Divisions in 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1.Election of New Members In 2001, 56 scientists were elected new CAS members, including l0 in the Division of Mathematics & Physics, 10 in the Division of Chemistry, 12 in the Division of Biology, nine in the Division of Earth Sciences and 15 in the Division of Engineering Sciences.The average age of the new members is 60.4, and the youngest one is 38 years old. They are now working in nine provinces or municipalities, or governmental departments under the State Council, including 23 outstanding experts working for the CAS.

  6. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  7. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  8. THE SPRINGBOK SIXTH DIVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertzog Biermann

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Springbok Sixth Division was a mighty armoured force Of men whose ancestors made war in ships, on foot and horse They wrote a stirring chapter in Springbok Martial lore When they went to sunny Italy in Nineteen-Forty-Four.   They were in the Springbok First Team and their modest claim to fame Was their response to the clarion call: "Pay up and play the game!" Their duty they did nobly as their fathers did of old They proudly wore the Sixth Div flash of Springbok green and gold.

  9. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division. [For part…

  10. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  11. Primary and Presidential Candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at primary and presidential candidates in 2008 and 2012. Evidence suggests that voters are less influenced by candidates’ color, gender, or religious observation than previously. Conversely, markers of difference remain salient in the imaginations of pollsters and journalists...

  12. Accelerator Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  13. Novel Coiled-Coil Cell Division Factor ZapB Stimulates Z Ring Assembly and Cell Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Galli, Elizabeth; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2008-01-01

    Formation of the Z ring is the first known event in bacterial cell division. However, it is not yet known how the assembly and contraction of the Z ring is regulated. Here, we identify a novel cell division factor ZapB in Escherichia coli that simultaneously stimulates Z ring assembly and cell...... division. Deletion of zapB resulted in delayed cell division and the formation of ectopic Z rings and spirals whereas overexpression of ZapB resulted in nucleoid condensation and aberrant cell divisions. Localization of ZapB to the divisome depended on FtsZ but not FtsA, ZipA or FtsI and ZapB interacted...... exhibited a synthetic sick phenotype and aberrant cell divisions. The crystal structure showed that ZapB exists as a dimer that is 100% coiled-coil. In vitro, ZapB self-assembled into long filaments and bundles. These results raise the possibility that ZapB stimulates Z ring formation directly via its...

  14. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  15. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  16. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  17. 75 FR 70031 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open.... Brink, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE 4410-11-M...

  18. 78 FR 17431 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... January 2, 2013 (78 FR 117). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING...) of the Act on July 30, 2001 (66 FR 39336). The last notification was filed with the Department on... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  19. 77 FR 54611 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... on June 8, 2012 (77 FR 34067). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division... Section 6(b) of the Act on June 30, 2000 (65 FR 40693). The last notification was filed with the... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  20. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  1. Important projects of the Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter important projects of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. are presented. Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management has successfully carried out variety of significant projects. The most significant projects that were realised, are implemented and possible future projects are introduced in the following part of presentation.

  2. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics. In addition, this report describes work on accelerators, radiation damage, microwaves, and plasma diagnostics

  3. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2011-01-01

    Inversive meadows are commutative rings with a multiplicative identity element and a total multiplicative inverse operation satisfying 0−1=0. Divisive meadows are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation replaced by a division operation. We give finite equational specifications of

  4. Physics Division computer facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  5. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...... biogeochemical processes are carried exclusively by bacteria. * Bacteria play an important role in all types of habitats including some that cannot support eukaryotic life....

  6. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  7. Scientific Equipment Division - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: - designing of devices and equipment for experiments in physics, their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, there are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV; - maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; - participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and a AO plotter, what allows us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop can offer a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. It offers the following possibilities: - turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc-type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm; - milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm; - grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm; - drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm; - welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding; - soft and hard soldering; - mechanical works including precision engineering; - plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides; - painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fred drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop posses CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work-pieces up to 500 kg

  8. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  9. Physics division annual report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  10. Physics division annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission

  11. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included

  12. Differences in Bacterial Community Structure on Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria americana in a Freshwater Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon-Bradley, Nadine; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S.; Williams, Henry Neal

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition of the epiphytic bacterial community of an invasive aquatic plant (Hydrilla verticillata) and a native species (Vallisneria americana [eelgrass]) of the Wakulla Spring (Florida) was investigated, along with the water column bacterial composition, using clone libraries of the 16S rRNA genes. The bacterial clones from three clone libraries were classified into 182 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), most of which were affiliated with bacterial divisions commonly fou...

  13. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Kaman; J.P. Hays; H.P. Endtz; F.J. Bikker

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and po

  14. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  15. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  16. Bacterial community response to changes in a tri-trophic cascade during a whole-lake fish manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarenheimo, J; Aalto, S L; Syväranta, J; Devlin, S P; Tiirola, M; Jones, R I

    2016-03-01

    Microbial communities play a key role in biogeochemical processes by degrading organic material and recycling nutrients, but can also be important food sources for upper trophic levels. Trophic cascades might modify microbial communities either directly via grazing or indirectly by inducing changes.in other biotic or in abiotic factors (e.g., nutrients). We studied the effects of a tri-trophic cascade on microbial communities during a whole-lake manipulation in which European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were added to a naturally fishless lake divided experimentally into two basins. We measured environmental parameters (oxygen, temperature, and nutrients) and zooplankton biomass and studied the changes in the bacterial community using next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and cell counting. Introduction of fish reduced the biomass of zooplankton, mainly Daphnia, which partly altered the bacterial community composition and affected the bacterial cell abundances. However, the microbial community composition was mainly governed by stratification patterns and associated vertical oxygen concentration. Slowly growing green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobium) dominated the anoxic water layers together with bacteria of the candidate division ODI. We conclude that alterations in trophic interactions can affect microbial abundance, but that abiotic factors seem to be more significant controls of microbial community composition in sheltered boreal lakes. PMID:27197395

  17. Positioning of bacterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Armitage, Judith P

    2015-05-01

    For optimum growth, bacteria must adapt to their environment, and one way that many species do this is by moving towards favourable conditions. To do so requires mechanisms to both physically drive movement and provide directionality to this movement. The pathways that control this directionality comprise chemoreceptors, which, along with an adaptor protein (CheW) and kinase (CheA), form large hexagonal arrays. These arrays can be formed around transmembrane receptors, resulting in arrays embedded in the inner membrane, or they can comprise soluble receptors, forming arrays in the cytoplasm. Across bacterial species, chemoreceptor arrays (both transmembrane and soluble) are localised to a variety of positions within the cell; some species with multiple arrays demonstrate this variety within individual cells. In many cases, the positioning pattern of the arrays is linked to the need for segregation of arrays between daughter cells on division, ensuring the production of chemotactically competent progeny. Multiple mechanisms have evolved to drive this segregation, including stochastic self-assembly, cellular landmarks, and the utilisation of ParA homologues. The variety of mechanisms highlights the importance of chemotaxis to motile species.

  18. Building an academic colorectal division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltun, Walter A

    2014-06-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for a strategic process that will grow the division even more as well as provide benefits to the institution within which it resides. The fundamentals of core values, academic commitment, and shared success reinforced by receptive leadership are critical. Attention to culture, commitment, collaboration, control, cost, and compensation leads to a successful academic division of colon and rectal surgery. PMID:25067922

  19. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  20. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  1. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  2. Cell wall growth during elongation and division : one ring to bind them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cell division protein FtsZ in bacterial cell wall (CW) synthesis is believed to be restricted to localizing proteins involved in the synthesis of the septal wall. Elsewhere, compelling evidence is provided that in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsZ plays an additional role in CW synthesis

  3. Intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins on the cell division of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Norihito; Umeda, Akiko; Kadota, Yoshu; Kira, Mizuki; Okazaki, Ami; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori divides in the human stomach resulting in persistent infections and causing various disorders. Bacterial cell division is precisely coordinated by many molecules, including FtsZ and Min proteins. However, the role of Min proteins in H. pylori division is poorly understood. We investigated the functional characteristics of Min proteins in wild-type HPK5 and five HPK5-derivative mutants using morphological and genetic approaches. All mutants showed a filamentous shape. However, the bacterial cell growth and viability of three single-gene mutants (minC, minD, minE) were similar to that of the wild-type. The coccoid form number was lowest in the minE-disruptant, indicating that MinE contributes to the coccoid form conversion during the stationary phase. Immunofluorescence microscopic observations showed that FtsZ was dispersedly distributed throughout the bacterial cell irrespective of nucleoid position in only minD-disruptants, indicating that MinD is involved in the nucleoid occlusion system. A chase assay demonstrated that MinC loss suppressed FtsZ-degradation, indicating that FtsZ degrades in a MinC-dependent manner. Molecular interactions between FtsZ and Min proteins were confirmed by immunoprecipitation (IP)-western blotting (WB), suggesting the functional cooperation of these molecules during bacterial cell division. This study describes the intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins and provides new insights into H. pylori cell division.

  4. Nuclear Physics Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1983 progress report of the Nuclear Physics Division, UKAEA Harwell, is divided into four main topics. These are a) nuclear data and technology for nuclear power; b) nuclear studies; c) applications of nuclear and associated techniques, including ion beam techniques and moessbauer spectroscopy; and d) accelerator operation, maintenance and development. (U.K.)

  5. Nuclear Physics division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work undertaken by the Nuclear Physics Division of AERE, Harwell during 1980 is presented under the headings: (1) Nuclear Data and Technology for Nuclear Power. (2) Nuclear Studies. (3) Applications of Nuclear and Associated Techniques. (4) Accelerator Operation, Maintenance and Development. Reports, publications and conference papers presented during the period are given and members of staff listed. (U.K.)

  6. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Schubert, J.F.; Bowman, W.W.; Adams, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report.

  7. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  8. 76 FR 63659 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on February 2, 2005 (70 FR 5486). The last notification was filed with...) of the Act on July 20, 2011 (76 FR 43347). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993;...

  9. 78 FR 17430 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on April 4, 2003 (68 FR 16552). The last notification was filed with... Section 6(b) of the Act on March 23, 2012 (77 FR 17095). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  10. Manpower Division Looks at CETA

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Vocational Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Manpower Division at the American Vocational Association (AVA) convention in Houston was concerned about youth unemployment and about the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA)--its problems and possibilities. The panel discussion reported here reveals some differing perspectives and a general consensus--that to improve their role in…

  11. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2009-01-01

    An inversive meadow is a commutative ring with identity and a total multiplicative inverse operation whose value at 0 is 0. Previously, inversive meadows were shortly called meadows. In this paper, we introduce divisive meadows, which are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation r

  12. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report

  13. Electoral Systems and Candidate Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazan, Reuven Y.; Voerman, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    Electoral systems at the national level and candidate selection methods at the party level are connected, maybe not causally but they do influence each other. More precisely, the electoral system constrains and conditions the parties' menu of choices concerning candidate selection. Moreover, in ligh

  14. Physics division annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in 2000 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory and medium energy physics research, and accelerator research and development. As the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the nuclear science community create a new long range plan for the field in 2001, it is clear that the research of the Division is closely aligned with and continues to help define the national goals of our field. The NSAC 2001 Long Range Plan recommends as the highest priority for major new construction the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), a bold step forward for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The accelerator R and D in the Physics Division has made major contributions to almost all aspects of the RIA design concept and the community was convinced that this project is ready to move forward. 2000 saw the end of the first Gammasphere epoch at ATLAS, One hundred Gammasphere experiments were completed between January 1998 and March 2000, 60% of which used the Fragment Mass Analyzer to provide mass identification in the reaction. The experimental program at ATLAS then shifted to other important research avenues including proton radioactivity, mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap and measurements of high energy gamma-rays in nuclear reactions with the MSU/ORNL/Texas A and M BaF2 array. ATLAS provided 5460 beam-research hours for user experiments and maintained an operational reliability of 95%. Radioactive beams accounted for 7% of the beam time. ATLAS also provided a crucial test of a key RIA concept, the ability to accelerate multiple charge states in a superconducting heavy-ion linac. This new capability was immediately used to increase the performance for a scheduled experiment. The medium energy program continued to make strides in examining how the quark-gluon structure of

  15. Operational Characterization of Divisibility of Dynamical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joonwoo; Chruściński, Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we show the operational characterization to the divisibility of dynamical maps in terms of the distinguishability of quantum channels. It is proven that the distinguishability of any pair of quantum channels does not increase under divisible maps, in which the full hierarchy of divisibility is isomorphic to the structure of entanglement between system and environment. This shows that (i) channel distinguishability is the operational quantity signifying (detecting) divisibility (indivisibility) of dynamical maps and (ii) the decision problem for the divisibility of maps is as hard as the separability problem in entanglement theory. We also provide the information-theoretic characterization to the divisibility of maps with conditional min-entropy.

  16. Inhibiting bacterial toxins by channel blockage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2016-03-01

    Emergent rational drug design techniques explore individual properties of target biomolecules, small and macromolecule drug candidates, and the physical forces governing their interactions. In this minireview, we focus on the single-molecule biophysical studies of channel-forming bacterial toxins that suggest new approaches for their inhibition. We discuss several examples of blockage of bacterial pore-forming and AB-type toxins by the tailor-made compounds. In the concluding remarks, the most effective rationally designed pore-blocking antitoxins are compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of ion-selective channels of neurophysiology.

  17. Physiographic divisions of the conterminous U. S.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a polygon coverage of Physiographic Divisions in the conterminous United States. It was automated from Fenneman's 1:7,000,000-scale map, "Physical Divisions...

  18. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C [comp.

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  19. Cell division in apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Maria E; Striepen, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum are important human pathogens. These parasites and many of their apicomplexan relatives undergo a complex developmental process in the cells of their hosts, which includes genome replication, cell division and the assembly of new invasive stages. Apicomplexan cell cycle progression is both globally and locally regulated. Global regulation is carried out throughout the cytoplasm by diffusible factors that include cell cycle-specific kinases, cyclins and transcription factors. Local regulation acts on individual nuclei and daughter cells that are developing inside the mother cell. We propose that the centrosome is a master regulator that physically tethers cellular components and that provides spatial and temporal control of apicomplexan cell division.

  20. Division of solid state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a survey of the present research projects at the division of solid state physics, Inst. of Technology, Uppsala University. The projects fall within the fields of magnetism, i.e. spin glasses, ordered magnetic structures and itinerant electron magnetism, and optics, i.e. properties of crystalline and amorphous materials for selective transmission and absorption in connection with energy-related research. (author)

  1. Building an Academic Colorectal Division

    OpenAIRE

    Koltun, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for...

  2. Materials division facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of the Division at the Petten Establishment have the aims of characterising the properties of high temperature materials in industrial process environments and of understanding the structures involved in order to gain an insight into behavioural mechanisms. Metallic materials fall within the scope of the programme; the activities are, at present, almost entirely concerned with austenitic steels and nickel based alloys. Starting in 1984, advanced ceramic materials will be studied as well. The equipment available permits the study of mechanical properties in controlled gaseous environments, of the rates and mechanisms of corrosive reactions between materials and those environments, and of the surface and bulk structures by advanced physical techniques. Special preparation and treatment techniques are available. The Division has developed a Data Bank on high temperature alloys. It also operates an information Centre, the activities of which include the organisation of scientific meetings, the commissioning of ''state of the art'' studies on topics in the field of high temperature materials and their applications and the development of a inventory of current research activities in the field in Europe. This booklet is intended to present the facilities and services of the Division to the organizations which are interested in its programmes of work

  3. Take a Bite out of Fraction Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Rathouz, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Division of fractions is often considered the most mechanical and least understood topic in elementary school. Enacting fraction division tasks in meaningful ways requires that teachers know not only "how" fraction division works but also "why" it works. The authors have created materials to help preservice teachers develop that knowledge. To…

  4. 77 FR 40586 - Coastal Programs Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... request for comments in the Federal Register at 77 FR 12245 on the request of Lockheed Martin Corp. to... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Programs Division AGENCY: Coastal Programs Division... licenses. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kerry Kehoe, Coastal Programs Division (NORM/3), Office of...

  5. 7 CFR 29.16 - Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Division. 29.16 Section 29.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.16 Division. Tobacco Division, Agricultural Marketing Service,...

  6. Division of household tasks and financial management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonides, G.

    2011-01-01

    Both the standard economic model and bargaining theory make predictions about financial management and the division of household labor between household partners. Using a large Internet survey, we have tested several predictions about task divisions reported by Dutch household partners. The division

  7. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing

  8. Bacterial community composition in relation to bedrock type and macrobiota in soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytgat, Bjorn; Verleyen, Elie; Sweetlove, Maxime; D'hondt, Sofie; Clercx, Pia; Van Ranst, Eric; Peeters, Karolien; Roberts, Stephen; Namsaraev, Zorigto; Wilmotte, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Willems, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Antarctic soils are known to be oligotrophic and of having low buffering capacities. It is expected that this is particularly the case for inland high-altitude regions. We hypothesized that the bedrock type and the presence of macrobiota in these soils enforce a high selective pressure on their bacterial communities. To test this, we analyzed the bacterial community structure in 52 soil samples from the western Sør Rondane Mountains (Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica), using the Illumina MiSeq platform in combination with ARISA fingerprinting. The samples were taken along broad environmental gradients in an area covering nearly 1000 km(2) Ordination and variation partitioning analyses revealed that the total organic carbon content was the most significant variable in structuring the bacterial communities, followed by pH, electric conductivity, bedrock type and the moisture content, while spatial distance was of relatively minor importance. Acidobacteria (Chloracidobacteria) and Actinobacteria (Actinomycetales) dominated gneiss derived mineral soil samples, while Proteobacteria (Sphingomonadaceae), Cyanobacteria, Armatimonadetes and candidate division FBP-dominated soil samples with a high total organic carbon content that were mainly situated on granite derived bedrock. PMID:27402710

  9. A decade of Radiometallurgy Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main thrust of the Research and Development (R and D) activities of the Radiometallurgy Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is on (1) R and D work and production of plutonium bearing nuclear fuels, (2) Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of fuels and structural materials, and (3) failure analysis of power reactor components. The main activities and achievements of the Division during the decade beginning from April 1978 are highlighted and the new thrust areas oriented towards installing a series of 235 MWe and 500 MWe PHWR units and prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) of 500 MWe capacity during the next 15 years are described in brief. The major achievements during last ten years are: (1) development and irradiation testing of mixed uranium plutonium oxide (MOX), as an alternative fuel for boiling water reactors at Tarapur, (2) setting up of a 10 tons/year pilot plant for fabrication of oxide fuels and technical support for setting up such plants, (3) development and production of plutonium rich, advanced mixed uranium plutonium monocarbide driver fuel for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor comm issioned at Kalpakkam, (4) development and fabrication of Al-233U plate fuel elements for KAMINI reactor, (5) PIE of fuel elements from Indian reactors in operation, (6) failure analysis of reactor components, and (7) in-pile performance analysis of power reactor structural materials. A list of publications during 1978-88 by the scientists of the Division is given at the end. The publications are listed under the headings: (1) fuels, (2) non-destructive evaluation, (3) engineering development, (4) welding development, (5) characterization and property evaluation, and (6) post irradiation examination. The entire text is illustrated with a number of diagrams and photographs - many of them coloured . (M.G.B.)

  10. Physics division annual report - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R and D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design

  11. A DNA damage checkpoint in Caulobacter crescentus inhibits cell division through a direct interaction with FtsW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Hopkins, Alexander C; Laub, Michael T

    2011-06-15

    Following DNA damage, cells typically delay cell cycle progression and inhibit cell division until their chromosomes have been repaired. The bacterial checkpoint systems responsible for these DNA damage responses are incompletely understood. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus responds to DNA damage by coordinately inducing an SOS regulon and inhibiting the master regulator CtrA. Included in the SOS regulon is sidA (SOS-induced inhibitor of cell division A), a membrane protein of only 29 amino acids that helps to delay cell division following DNA damage, but is dispensable in undamaged cells. SidA is sufficient, when overproduced, to block cell division. However, unlike many other regulators of bacterial cell division, SidA does not directly disrupt the assembly or stability of the cytokinetic ring protein FtsZ, nor does it affect the recruitment of other components of the cell division machinery. Instead, we provide evidence that SidA inhibits division by binding directly to FtsW to prevent the final constriction of the cytokinetic ring.

  12. 76 FR 4896 - Call for Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION: Notice... Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) is currently seeking candidates (candidates must...

  13. Progress report : Technical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work carried out in the Technical Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, is reported. Some of the achievements are: (1) fabrication of mass spectrometers for heavy water analysis and lithium 6/7 isotope ratio measurement, (2) fabrication of electronic components for mass spectrometers, (3) growing of sodium iodide crystals for radiation detectors, (4) development of sandwich detectors comprising of NaI(Tl) and CaI(Na), (5) fabrication of mass spectrometer type leak detectors and (6) fabrication of the high vacuum components of the vacuum system of the variable energy cyclotron based at Calcutta. (M.G.B.)

  14. Universal Protein Distributions in a Model of Cell Growth and Division

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Osmanovic, Dino; Rabin, Yitzhak; Salman, Hanna; Stein, D L

    2015-01-01

    Protein distributions measured under a broad set of conditions in bacteria and yeast exhibit a universal skewed shape, with variances depending quadratically on means. For bacteria these properties are reproduced by protein accumulation and division dynamics across generations. We present a stochastic growth-and-division model with feedback which captures these observed properties. The limiting copy number distribution is calculated exactly, and a single parameter is found to determine the distribution shape and the variance-to-mean relation. Estimating this parameter from bacterial temporal data reproduces the measured universal distribution shape with high accuracy, and leads to predictions for future experiments.

  15. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...

  16. Bacterial diversity of siliciclastic sediments in a Thalassia testudinum meadow and the implications for Lucinisca nassula chemosymbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-García, Angela M.; Engel, Annette Summers

    2012-10-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) meadows along the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico coasts, and recognition that microbial activities are critical to plant growth and health, the bacterial diversity of these habitats has been poorly studied. Based on comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences from sediments in a T. testudinum meadow, 25 major taxonomic groups (excluding candidate divisions) were retrieved, including Alpha- Delta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes. The distribution of bacterial groups was linked to a strongly hypoxic and sulfidic redox gradient. The diversity is potentially novel because phylogenetic affinities of sediment sequences compared to contextually annotated environmental clones from different habitats or to cultured representatives indicated approximately 41% were more closely related to each other than to sequences retrieved from these other habitats. Of all the relationships, very few (2.4%) were to cultured organisms, but 27% were to environmental clones retrieved from shallow marine shelf and coastal sediments or from mangroves, estuarine, or wetland sediments. Rare sequences were closely related to endosymbiont groups of Lucinisca nassula (Lucinidea: Bivalvia) hosts collected from the same meadow, which may indicate that the sediment is a potential reservoir for free-living symbionts. This study provides insight into the ecological and evolutionary relationships of the Thalassia-lucinid-bacteria system in tropical to sub-tropical regions.

  17. Increasing complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria contain cytoskeletal elements involved in major cellular processes including DNA segregation and cell morphogenesis and division. Distant bacterial homologues of tubulin (FtsZ) and actin (MreB and ParM) not only resemble their eukaryotic counterparts structurally but also show similar...... functional characteristics, assembling into filamentous structures in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopic imaging have revealed that FtsZ and MreB form highly dynamic helical structures that encircle the cells along the inside of the cell membrane. With the discovery...

  18. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  19. Empathy Development in Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Using a grounded theory research design, the author examined 180 reflective essays of teacher candidates who participated in a "Learning Process Project," in which they were asked to synthesize and document their discoveries about the learning process over the course of a completely new learning experience as naive learners. This study explored…

  20. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/. PMID:27131783

  1. Candidate Prediction Models and Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik;

    2005-01-01

    This document lists candidate prediction models for Work Package 3 (WP3) of the PSO-project called ``Intelligent wind power prediction systems'' (FU4101). The main focus is on the models transforming numerical weather predictions into predictions of power production. The document also outlines the...

  2. Candidate cave entrances on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents newly discovered candidate cave entrances into Martian near-surface lava tubes, volcano-tectonic fracture systems, and pit craters and describes their characteristics and exploration possibilities. These candidates are all collapse features that occur either intermittently along laterally continuous trench-like depressions or in the floors of sheer-walled atypical pit craters. As viewed from orbit, locations of most candidates are visibly consistent with known terrestrial features such as tube-fed lava flows, volcano-tectonic fractures, and pit craters, each of which forms by mechanisms that can produce caves. Although we cannot determine subsurface extents of the Martian features discussed here, some may continue unimpeded for many kilometers if terrestrial examples are indeed analogous. The features presented here were identified in images acquired by the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System visible-wavelength camera, and by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Select candidates have since been targeted by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. Martian caves are promising potential sites for future human habitation and astrobiology investigations; understanding their characteristics is critical for long-term mission planning and for developing the necessary exploration technologies.

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  4. FtsZ does not initiate membrane constriction at the onset of division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Daniel O; Skoglund, Ulf; Söderström, Bill

    2016-09-09

    The source of constriction required for division of a bacterial cell remains enigmatic. FtsZ is widely believed to be a key player, because in vitro experiments indicate that it can deform liposomes when membrane tethered. However in vivo evidence for such a role has remained elusive as it has been challenging to distinguish the contribution of FtsZ from that of peptidoglycan-ingrowth. To differentiate between these two possibilities we studied the early stages of division in Escherichia coli, when FtsZ is present at the division site but peptidoglycan synthesizing enzymes such as FtsI and FtsN are not. Our approach was to use correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM) to monitor the localization of fluorescently labeled FtsZ, FtsI or FtsN correlated with the septal ultra-structural geometry in the same cell. We noted that the presence of FtsZ at the division septum is not sufficient to deform membranes. This observation suggests that, although FtsZ can provide a constrictive force, the force is not substantial at the onset of division. Conversely, the presence of FtsN always correlated with membrane invagination, indicating that allosteric activation of peptidoglycan ingrowth is the trigger for constriction of the cell envelope during cell division in E. coli.

  5. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  6. The 1988 Leti Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the CEA's LETI Division (Division of Electronics, Technology and Instrumentation, France) is presented. The missions of LETI Division involve military and nuclear applications of electronics and fundamental research. The research programs developed in 1988 are the following: materials and components, non-volatile silicon memories, silicon-over-insulator, integrated circuits technologies, common experimental laboratory (opened to the European community), mass memories, photodetectors, micron sensors and flat screens

  7. The division of labour under uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Wadeson, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in the division of labour are a significant feature of modern developments in work organisation. It has been recognised that a reduced division of labour can have the advantages of job enrichment and lower coordination costs. In this paper it is shown how advantages from a lesser division of labour can stem from the flow of work between different sets of resources where the work rates of individual production stages are subject to uncertainties. Both process and project-based work ...

  8. Physics division annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in 252No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of 16N beta-decay to determine the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were trapped in an atom trap for the

  9. Division Algebras and Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Baez, John C

    2011-01-01

    Quantum theory may be formulated using Hilbert spaces over any of the three associative normed division algebras: the real numbers, the complex numbers and the quaternions. Indeed, these three choices appear naturally in a number of axiomatic approaches. However, there are internal problems with real or quaternionic quantum theory. Here we argue that these problems can be resolved if we treat real, complex and quaternionic quantum theory as part of a unified structure. Dyson called this structure the "three-fold way". It is perhaps easiest to see it in the study of irreducible unitary representations of groups on complex Hilbert spaces. These representations come in three kinds: those that are not isomorphic to their own dual (the truly "complex" representations), those that are self-dual thanks to a symmetric bilinear pairing (which are "real", in that they are the complexifications of representations on real Hilbert spaces), and those that are self-dual thanks to an antisymmetric bilinear pairing (which are...

  10. Physics division annual report 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium

  11. Major Programs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations, research networks, investigator-initiated grants, postdoctoral training, and specialized resources across the United States. |

  12. Power Efficient Division and Square Root Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Although division and square root are not frequent operations, most processors implement them in hardware to not compromise the overall performance. Two classes of algorithms implement division or square root: digit-recurrence and multiplicative (e.g., Newton-Raphson) algorithms. Previous work...... shows that division and square root units based on the digit-recurrence algorithm offer the best tradeoff delay-area-power. Moreover, the two operations can be combined in a single unit. Here, we present a radix-16 combined division and square root unit obtained by overlapping two radix-4 stages...

  13. Automatic detection of cell divisions (mitosis) in live-imaging microscopy images using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, Anat; Gefen, Amit; Benayahu, Dafna; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    We propose a semi-automated pipeline for the detection of possible cell divisions in live-imaging microscopy and the classification of these mitosis candidates using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). We use time-lapse images of NIH3T3 scratch assay cultures, extract patches around bright candidate regions that then undergo segmentation and binarization, followed by a classification of the binary patches into either containing or not containing cell division. The classification is performed by training a Convolutional Neural Network on a specially constructed database. We show strong results of AUC = 0.91 and F-score = 0.89, competitive with state-of-the-art methods in this field.

  14. 49 CFR 177.841 - Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... occur. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.841, see the List of CFR Sections... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. 177.841... PUBLIC HIGHWAY Loading and Unloading § 177.841 Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. (See also §...

  15. IAEA Director General candidates announced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The IAEA today confirms receipt of the nomination of five candidates for Director General of the IAEA. Nominations of the following individuals have been received by the Chairperson of the IAEA Board of Governors, Ms. Taous Feroukhi: Mr. Jean-Pol Poncelet of Belgium; Mr. Yukiya Amano of Japan; Mr. Ernest Petric of Slovenia; Mr. Abdul Samad Minty of South Africa; and Mr. Luis Echavarri of Spain. The five candidates were nominated in line with a process approved by the Board in October 2008. IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei's term of office expires on 30 November 2009. He has served as Director General since 1997 and has stated that he is not available for a fourth term of office. (IAEA)

  16. Enthalpy screen of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2016-11-15

    The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the binding affinity of drug candidates have been acknowledged to be important determinants of the quality of a drug molecule. These quantities, usually summarized in the thermodynamic signature, provide a rapid assessment of the forces that drive the binding of a ligand. Having access to the thermodynamic signature in the early stages of the drug discovery process will provide critical information towards the selection of the best drug candidates for development. In this paper, the Enthalpy Screen technique is presented. The enthalpy screen allows fast and accurate determination of the binding enthalpy for hundreds of ligands. As such, it appears to be ideally suited to aid in the ranking of the hundreds of hits that are usually identified after standard high throughput screening.

  17. Leishmaniasis: vaccine candidates and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawana; Sundar, Shyam

    2012-06-01

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite and a causative agent of the various clinical forms of leishmaniasis. High cost, resistance and toxic side effects of traditional drugs entail identification and development of therapeutic alternatives. The sound understanding of parasite biology is key for identifying novel drug targets, that can induce the cell mediated immunity (mainly CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-gamma mediated responses) polarized towards a Th1 response. These aspects are important in designing a new vaccine along with the consideration of the candidates with respect to their ability to raise memory response in order to improve the vaccine performance. This review is an effort to identify molecules according to their homology with the host and their ability to be used as potent vaccine candidates.

  18. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  19. Physics Division annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  20. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne

  1. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  2. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year's Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE's core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE)

  3. Friday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    TimeAgenda8:00 am - 8:10 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research GroupDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCI8:10 am - 8:40 amClinical Trials Statistical Concepts for Non-Statisticians |

  4. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1977 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. It is arranged alphabetically by author and includes a cross-reference by subject indicating the areas of research interest of the Earth Sciences Division

  5. Introduction to JPL's Mechanical Systems Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kendra

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Mechanical Systems Division. It reviews the projects, both past and current that the engineers of this division have worked on. It also reviews the work environment as an exciting place for the entry level engineer.

  6. On Durkheim's Explanation of Division of Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueschemeyer, Dietrich

    1982-01-01

    In De la Division du Travail Social, Durkheim's causal explanation for secular increases in the division of labor and the differentiation of social structure is flawed. His metatheoretical concerns expressed in the critique of utilitarian social theory flawed his contributions to a causal explanation of social differentiation. (Author/AM)

  7. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  8. Nicely semiramified division algebras over Henselian fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mounirh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structure of nicely semiramified valued division algebras. We prove that any defectless finite-dimensional central division algebra over a Henselian field E with an inertial maximal subfield and a totally ramified maximal subfield (not necessarily of radical type (resp., split by inertial and totally ramified field extensions of E is nicely semiramified.

  9. Division Unit for Binary Integer Decimals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, Tomas; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present a radix-10 division unit that is based on the digit-recurrence algorithm and implements binary encodings (binary integer decimal or BID) for significands. Recent decimal division designs are all based on the binary coded decimal (BCD) encoding. We adapt the radix-10 digit...

  10. Research Networks Map | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States.  Five Major Programs' sites are shown on this map. | The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States.

  11. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report : 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Radiochemistry Division during 1992 are briefly described in the form of individual summaries grouped under the headings: 1) Nuclear Chemistry, 2) Actinide Chemistry, 3) Spectroscopy, and 4) Instrumentation. A list of publications numbering 95 by the scientific staff of the Division is also included in the report. (author). 35 figs., 56 tabs

  12. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1997 are presented

  13. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  14. Spiking Neural P Systems with Neuron Division and Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiyu; Wang, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Spiking neural P systems are a new candidate in spiking neural network models. By using neuron division and budding, such systems can generate/produce exponential working space in linear computational steps, thus provide a way to solve computational hard problems in feasible (linear or polynomial) time with a “time-space trade-off” strategy. In this work, a new mechanism called neuron dissolution is introduced, by which redundant neurons produced during the computation can be removed. As applications, uniform solutions to two NP-hard problems: SAT problem and Subset Sum problem are constructed in linear time, working in a deterministic way. The neuron dissolution strategy is used to eliminate invalid solutions, and all answers to these two problems are encoded as indices of output neurons. Our results improve the one obtained in Science China Information Sciences, 2011, 1596-1607 by Pan et al. PMID:27627104

  15. Improved orthogonal frequency division multiplexing communications through advanced coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Jeffrey; Patti, John

    2005-08-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a communications technique that transmits a signal over multiple, evenly spaced, discrete frequency bands. OFDM offers some advantages over traditional, single-carrier modulation techniques, such as increased immunity to inter-symbol interference. For this reason OFDM is an attractive candidate for sensor network application; it has already been included in several standards, including Digital Audio Broadcast (DAB); digital television standards in Europe, Japan and Australia; asymmetric digital subscriber line (ASDL); and wireless local area networks (WLAN), specifically IEEE 802.11a. Many of these applications currently make use of a standard convolutional code with Viterbi decoding to perform forward error correction (FEC). Replacing such convolutional codes with advanced coding techniques using iterative decoding, such as Turbo codes, can substantially improve the performance of the OFDM communications link. This paper demonstrates such improvements using the 802.11a wireless LAN standard.

  16. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  17. Physics Division research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollen, G. Y.; Schappert, G. T.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses its following topics: Recent Weapons-Physics Experiments on the Pegasus II Pulsed Power Facility; Operation of a Large-Scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation Experiment; Production of Charm and Beauty Mesons at Fermilab Sudbury Neutrino Observatory; P-Division's Essential Role in the Redirected Inertial Confinement Fusion Program; Trident Target Physics Program; Comparative Studies of Brain Activation with Magnetocephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Cellular Communication, Interaction of G-Proteins, and Single-Photon Detection; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Oxygen-doped La2CuO(4+delta) Thermoacoustic Engines; A Shipborne Raman Water-Vapor Lidar for the Central Pacific Experiment; Angara-5 Pinch Temperature Verification with Time-resolved Spectroscopy; Russian Collaborations on Megagauss Magnetic Fields and Pulsed-Power Applications; Studies of Energy Coupling from Underground Explosions; Trapping and Cooling Large Numbers of Antiprotons: A First Step Toward the Measurement of Gravity on Antimatter; and Nuclear-Energy Production Without a Long-Term High-Level Waste Stream.

  18. EDH 'Millionaire' in PS Division

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Christmas cheer! Left to right: Gerard Lobeau receives a bottle of Champagne from Derek Mathieson and Jurgen De Jonghe in recognition of EDH's millionth document. At 14:33 on Monday 3 December a technician in PS division, Gerard Lobeau, unwittingly became part of an important event in the life of CERN's Electronic Document Handling system (EDH). While ordering some pieces of aluminum for one of the PS's 10Mhz RF cavities, he created EDH document number 1,000,000. To celebrate the event Derek Mathieson (EDH Project Leader) and Jurgen De Jonghe (Original EDH Project Leader) presented Mr Lobeau with a bottle of champagne. As with 93% of material requests, Mr Lobeau's order was delivered within 24 hours. 'I usually never win anything' said Mr Lobeau as he accepted his prize, 'I initially though there may have been a problem with EDH when the document number had so many zeros in it, and was then surprised to get a phone call from you a few minutes later.' The EDH team had been monitoring the EDH document number ...

  19. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  20. Bacterial communities in termite fungus combs are comprised of consistent gut deposits and contributions from the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Saria; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Poulsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites (subfamily Macrotermitinae) mix plant forage with asexual spores of their plant-degrading fungal symbiont Termitomyces in their guts and deposit this blend in fungus comb structures, within which the plant matter is degraded. As Termitomyces grows, it produces nodules with asexual spores, which the termites feed on. Since all comb material passes through termite guts, it is inevitable that gut bacteria are also deposited in the comb, but it has remained unknown which bacteria are deposited and whether distinct comb bacterial communities are sustained. Using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we explored the bacterial community compositions of 33 fungus comb samples from four termite species (three genera) collected at four South African geographic locations in 2011 and 2013. We identified 33 bacterial phyla, with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Candidate division TM7 jointly accounting for 92 % of the reads. Analyses of gut microbiotas from 25 of the 33 colonies showed that dominant fungus comb taxa originate from the termite gut. While gut communities were consistent between 2011 and 2013, comb community compositions shifted over time. These shifts did not appear to be due to changes in the taxa present, but rather due to differences in the relative abundances of primarily gut-derived bacteria within fungus combs. This indicates that fungus comb microbiotas are largely termite species-specific due to major contributions from gut deposits and also that environment affects which gut bacteria dominate comb communities at a given point in time. PMID:26518432

  1. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity associated with swine sludge from an anaerobic treatment lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Pereira, Zelina L; Sanz, José L; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2012-11-01

    Over the last decades, the demand for pork products has increased significantly, along with concern about suitable waste management. Anaerobic-lagoon fermentation for swine-sludge stabilization is a good strategy, although little is known about the microbial communities in the lagoons. Here, we employed a cloning- and sequencing-based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize and quantify the prokaryotic community composition in a swine-waste-sludge anaerobic lagoon (SAL). DNA sequence analysis revealed that the SAL library harbored 15 bacterial phyla: Bacteroidetes, Cloroflexi, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus, Synergystetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Chlorobi, Fibrobacteres, Verrucomicrobia and candidates division OP5, OP8, WWE1, KSB1, WS6. The SAL library was generally dominated by carbohydrate-oxidizing bacteria. The archaeal sequences were related to the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota phyla. Crenarchaeota predominated in the library, demonstrating that it is not restricted to high-temperature environments, being also responsible for ammonium oxidation in the anaerobic lagoon. Euryarchaeota sequences were associated with the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the number of bacterial cells was at least three orders of magnitude higher than the number of archaeal cells in the SAL. The identified prokaryotic diversity was ecologically significant, particularly the archaeal community of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, which was responsible for methane production in the anaerobic lagoon. This study provided insight into the archaeal involvement in the overall oxidation of organic matter and the production of methane. Therefore, the treatment of swine waste in the sludge anaerobic lagoon could represent a potential inoculum for the start-up of municipal solid-waste digesters. PMID:22828793

  2. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year....

  3. Towards understanding the molecular basis of bacterial DNA segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria ensure the fidelity of genetic inheritance by the coordinated control of chromosome segregation and cell division. Here, we review the molecules and mechanisms that govern the correct subcellular positioning and rapid separation of newly replicated chromosomes and plasmids towards the cell...... poles and, significantly, the emergence of mitotic-like machineries capable of segregating plasmid DNA. We further describe surprising similarities between proteins involved in DNA partitioning (ParA/ParB) and control of cell division (MinD/MinE), suggesting a mechanism for intracellular positioning...... common to the two processes. Finally, we discuss the role that the bacterial cytoskeleton plays in DNA partitioning and the missing link between prokaryotes and eukaryotes that is bacterial mechano-chemical motor proteins. Udgivelsesdato: Mar 29...

  4. Bacterial Community Composition in Lake Tanganyika: Vertical and Horizontal Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    De Wever, Aaike; Muylaert, Koenraad; Van der Gucht, Katleen; Pirlot, Samuel; Cocquyt, Christine; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Vyverman, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Vertical and latitudinal differences in bacterial community composition (BCC) in Lake Tanganyika were studied during the dry season of 2002 by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified 16S RNA fragments. Dominant bands were sequenced and identified as members of the Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, green nonsulfur bacteria, and Firmicutes divisions and the Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria subdivisions. The BCC in the lake displayed both vertical and l...

  5. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  6. Division of Scientific Equipment - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: * designs of devices and equipment for experiments in physics; their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, these are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV;* maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; * participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and an A0 plotter, which allow us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop offers a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. They include: * turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm, * milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm, * grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm, * drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm, * welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding, * soft and hard soldering, * mechanical works including precision engineering, * plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides, * painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fired drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop is equipped with the CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work pieces up to 500 kg. The machine

  7. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  8. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

    1980-04-30

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division.

  9. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future

  10. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division

  11. Introduction into Calculus over Division Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Kleyn, Aleks

    2008-01-01

    Based on twin representations of division ring in an Abelian group I consider $D$\\Hyph vector spaces over division ring. Morphism of $D$\\Hyph vector spaces is linear map of $D$\\Hyph vector spaces. I consider derivative of function $f$ of continuous division ring as linear map the most close to function $f$. I explore expansion of map into Taylor series and method to find solution of differential equation. The norm in $D$\\Hyph vector space allows considering of continuous mapping of $D$\\Hyph v...

  12. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  13. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  14. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  15. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, N. (ed.)

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  16. 11 CFR 100.154 - Candidate debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Expenditures § 100.154 Candidate debates. Funds used to defray costs incurred in staging candidate debates in accordance with the provisions of 11 CFR 110.13 and 114.4(f) are not expenditures. ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate debates. 100.154 Section...

  17. 11 CFR 100.92 - Candidate debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Contributions § 100.92 Candidate debates. Funds provided to defray costs incurred in staging candidate debates in accordance with the provisions of 11 CFR 110.13 and 114.4(f) are not contributions. ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate debates. 100.92 Section...

  18. Bacterial Sphingomyelinases and Phospholipases as Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Naylor, Claire; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flieger, Antje

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are a heterogeneous group of esterases which are usually surface associated or secreted by a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These enzymes hydrolyze sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids, respectively, generating products identical to the ones produced by eukaryotic enzymes which play crucial roles in distinct physiological processes, including membrane dynamics, cellular signaling, migration, growth, and death. Several bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are essential for virulence of extracellular, facultative, or obligate intracellular pathogens, as these enzymes contribute to phagosomal escape or phagosomal maturation avoidance, favoring tissue colonization, infection establishment and progression, or immune response evasion. This work presents a classification proposal for bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases that considers not only their enzymatic activities but also their structural aspects. An overview of the main physiopathological activities is provided for each enzyme type, as are examples in which inactivation of a sphingomyelinase- or a phospholipase-encoding gene impairs the virulence of a pathogen. The identification of sphingomyelinases and phospholipases important for bacterial pathogenesis and the development of inhibitors for these enzymes could generate candidate vaccines and therapeutic agents, which will diminish the impacts of the associated human and animal diseases. PMID:27307578

  19. Doxorubicin inhibits E. coli division by interacting at a novel site in FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pragnya; Taviti, Ashoka Chary; Satpati, Suresh; Kar, Mitali Madhusmita; Dixit, Anshuman; Beuria, Tushar Kant

    2015-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance has become a major health concern in recent times. It is therefore essential to identify novel antibacterial targets as well as discover and develop new antibacterial agents. FtsZ, a highly conserved bacterial protein, is responsible for the initiation of cell division in bacteria. The functions of FtsZ inside cells are tightly regulated and any perturbation in its functions leads to inhibition of bacterial division. Recent reports indicate that small molecules targeting the functions of FtsZ may be used as leads to develop new antibacterial agents. To identify small molecules targeting FtsZ and inhibiting bacterial division, we screened a U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug library of 800 molecules using an independent computational, biochemical and microbial approach. From this screen, we identified doxorubicin, an anthracycline molecule that inhibits Escherichia coli division and forms filamentous cells. A fluorescence-binding assay shows that doxorubicin interacts strongly with FtsZ. A detailed biochemical analysis demonstrated that doxorubicin inhibits FtsZ assembly and its GTPase activity through binding to a site other than the GTP-binding site. Furthermore, using molecular docking, we identified a probable doxorubicin-binding site in FtsZ. A number of single amino acid mutations at the identified binding site in FtsZ resulted in a severalfold decrease in the affinity of FtsZ for doxorubicin, indicating the importance of this site for doxorubicin interaction. The present study suggests the presence of a novel binding site in FtsZ that interacts with the small molecules and can be targeted for the screening and development of new antibacterial agents.

  20. Doxorubicin inhibits E. coli division by interacting at a novel site in FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pragnya; Taviti, Ashoka Chary; Satpati, Suresh; Kar, Mitali Madhusmita; Dixit, Anshuman; Beuria, Tushar Kant

    2015-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance has become a major health concern in recent times. It is therefore essential to identify novel antibacterial targets as well as discover and develop new antibacterial agents. FtsZ, a highly conserved bacterial protein, is responsible for the initiation of cell division in bacteria. The functions of FtsZ inside cells are tightly regulated and any perturbation in its functions leads to inhibition of bacterial division. Recent reports indicate that small molecules targeting the functions of FtsZ may be used as leads to develop new antibacterial agents. To identify small molecules targeting FtsZ and inhibiting bacterial division, we screened a U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug library of 800 molecules using an independent computational, biochemical and microbial approach. From this screen, we identified doxorubicin, an anthracycline molecule that inhibits Escherichia coli division and forms filamentous cells. A fluorescence-binding assay shows that doxorubicin interacts strongly with FtsZ. A detailed biochemical analysis demonstrated that doxorubicin inhibits FtsZ assembly and its GTPase activity through binding to a site other than the GTP-binding site. Furthermore, using molecular docking, we identified a probable doxorubicin-binding site in FtsZ. A number of single amino acid mutations at the identified binding site in FtsZ resulted in a severalfold decrease in the affinity of FtsZ for doxorubicin, indicating the importance of this site for doxorubicin interaction. The present study suggests the presence of a novel binding site in FtsZ that interacts with the small molecules and can be targeted for the screening and development of new antibacterial agents. PMID:26285656

  1. Succession of bacterial community along with the removal of heavy crude oil pollutants by multiple biostimulation treatments in the Yellow River Delta, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sulin Yu; Shuguang Li; Yueqin Tang; Xiaolei Wu

    2011-01-01

    Multiple biostimulation treatments were applied to enhance the removal of heavy crude oil pollutants in the saline soil of Yellow River Delta.Changes of the soil bacterial community were monitored using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analyses.The 140-day microcosm experiments showed that low C:N.:P ratio,high availability of surfactant and addition of bulking agent significantly enhanced the performance,leading to the highest total petroleum hydrocarbon removal.Meanwhile,the bacterial community was remarkably changed by the multiple biostimulation treatments,with the Deltaproteobacteria,Firmicutes,Actinobacteria,Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes being inhibited and the Alpha- and Beta-proteobacteria and some unknown Gammaproteobacteria bacteria being enriched.In addition,different hydrocarbon-degraders came to power in the following turn.At the first stage,the Alcanivorax-related Gammaproteobacteria bacteria dominated in the biostimulated soil and contributed mainly to the biodegradation of easily degradable portion of the heavy crude oil.Then the bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria,followed by bacteria belonging to Candidate division ODI,became the dominant oil-degraders to degrade the remaining recalcitrant constituents of the heavy crude oil.

  2. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences)

  3. DNR Division of Enforcement Officer Patrol Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme shows the DNR Division of Enforcement Office Patrol Areas as of January 1, 2003. Patrol areas were defined and verified by Patrol Officers during the...

  4. Civil Remedies Division Administrative Law Judge Decisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Decisions issued by Administrative Law Judges of the Departmental Appeals Board's Civil Remedies Division concerning fraud and abuse determinations by the Office of...

  5. Environmental Research Division's Data Access Program (ERDDAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ERDDAP (the Environmental Research Division's Data Access Program) is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of scientific...

  6. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences

  7. Overlapped frequency-time division multiplexing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hui; LI Dao-ben

    2009-01-01

    A technique named overlapped frequency-time division multiplexing (OVFTDM)) is proposed in this article. The technique is derived from Nyquist system and frequency-time division multiplexing system. When the signals are compactly overlapped without the orthogonality in time domain, the technique is named overlapped time division multiplexing (OVTDM), whereas when signals are compactly overlapped without the orthogonality in frequency domain, the technique is called overlapped frequency division multiplexing (OVFDM). To further improve spectral efficiency, the OVFTDM in which signals are overlapped both in frequency domain and in time domain is explored. OVFTDM does not depend on orthogonality whatever in time domain or in frequency domain like Nyquist system or OFDM system, but on the convolutional constraint relationship among signals. Therefore, not only the spectral efficiency but also the reliability is improved. The simulations verify the validity of this theory.

  8. About DCP | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) is the primary unit of the National Cancer Institute devoted to cancer prevention research. DCP provides funding and administrative support to clinical and laboratory researchers, community and multidisciplinary teams, and collaborative scientific networks. |

  9. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures

  10. Closed Basin Division, Colorado : Definite Plan Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan for the Closed Basin Division project is intended to provide stage development of the project features. Project background, plan of development, economic...

  11. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  12. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  14. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations

  15. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  16. Nuclear Physics Division annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers the research and development activities of the Nuclear Physics Division for the period January to December 1992. These research and development activities are reported under the headings: 1) Experiments, 2) Theory, 3) Applications, 4) Instrumentation, and 5) The Pelletron Accelerator. At the end a list of publications by the staff scientists of the Division is given. Colloquia and seminars held during the year are also listed. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  17. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1978 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are compiled. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For any given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor. A topical index at the end provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division

  18. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taasevigen, D.K.; Henry, A.L.; Madsen, S.K.

    1979-03-30

    Abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1978 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are compiled. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For any given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor. A topical index at the end provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division.

  19. Stationary infinitely divisible processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.

    Several recent strands of work has led to the consideration of various types of continuous time stationary and infinitely divisible processes. A review of these types, with some new results, is presented.......Several recent strands of work has led to the consideration of various types of continuous time stationary and infinitely divisible processes. A review of these types, with some new results, is presented....

  20. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report : 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Radiochemistry Division during 1991 are briefly described under the headings: (i) Nuclear chemistry, (ii) Actinide chemistry, and (iii) Spectroscopy. In the field of nuclear chemistry, the main emphasis has been on the studies of fission process induced by reactor neutrons and light and heavy ions on actinides and low Z (Zc superconductors. A list of publications by the scientific staff of the Division is given at the end. (author). 31 figs., 49 tabs

  1. On K sub 2 of division algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Xue Jun; Qin Hou Rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, it is proved that if F is a global field or a local field, then every element of K sub 2 D is generated by symbols of form left brace a, b right brace with an element of F*, b is an element of D*, where D is a central division algebra over F. The tame kernel and wild kernel of central division algebra over F are expressed explicitly.

  2. Budget Setting Strategies for the Company's Divisions

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, M; Brekelmans, R.C.M.; De Waegenaere, A.M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the issue of budget setting to the divisions of a company. The approach is quantitative in nature both in the formulation of the requirements for the set-budgets, as related to different general managerial objectives of interest, and in the modelling of the inherent uncertainties in the divisions' revenues. Solutions are provided for specific cases and conclusions are drawn on different aspects of this issue based on analytical and numerical analysis of the results. From ...

  3. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  4. Activity Report of Reactor Physics Division - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Reactor Physics Division of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam during 1997 are reported. The activities are arranged under the headings: nuclear data processing and validation, PFBR and KAMINI core physics, FBTR core physics, radioactivity and shielding and safety analysis. A list of publications of the Division and seminars delivered are included at the end of the report

  5. Divisibility properties for C*-algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robert, Leonel; Rørdam, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    We consider three notions of divisibility in the Cuntz semigroup of a C*-algebra, and show how they reflect properties of the C*-algebra. We develop methods to construct (simple and non-simple) C*-algebras with specific divisibility behaviour. As a byproduct of our investigations, we show that...... there exists a sequence (An) of simple unital infinite dimensional C*-algebras such that the product ∏n=1∞ An has a character....

  6. Division-Alebra/Poncare-Conjecture correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, J A

    2013-01-01

    We briefly describe the importance of division algebras and Poincar\\'e conjecture in both mathematical and physical scenarios. Mathematically, we argue that using the torsion concept one can combine the formalisms of division algebras and Poincar\\'e conjecture. Physically, we show that both formalisms may be the underlying mathematical tools in special relativity and cosmology. Moreover, we explore the possibility that by using the concept of n-qubit system, such conjecture may allow generalization the Hopf maps.

  7. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author

  8. Candidate worldviews for design theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    2008-01-01

    Our growing body of design theory risks being infected by more inconsistency than is justifiable by genuine disagreement among design theorists. Taking my cue from C. S. Peirce, who argued that theory inevitably rests on basic metaphysical assumptions that theorists ought to be critically aware of......, I demonstrate how ‘insidious inconsistency’ may infect design theory if we ignore his admonition. As a possible remedy, I propose a method by which the philosophy of design may develop sound metaphysical foundations (‘worldviews’) for design theory – and generate philosophical insights into design...... at the same time. Examples are given of how the first steps of the method may be carried out and a number of candidate worldviews are outlined and briefly discussed. In its own way, each worldview answers certain fundamental questions about the nature of design. These include the ontological question of what...

  9. Energy Technology Division research summary 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the U.S. Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into eight sections, four with concentrations in the materials area and four in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officer, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. This Overview highlights some major ET research areas. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear reactors (LWRs) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) remains a significant area of interest for the Division. We currently have programs on environmentally assisted cracking, steam generator integrity, and the integrity of high-burnup fuel during loss-of-coolant accidents. The bulk of the NRC research work is carried out by three ET sections: Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials; Irradiation Performance; and Sensors, Instrumentation, and Nondestructive Evaluation

  10. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation...

  11. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1 Fatima A Jomha,2 Ahmed H Alhammadi3 1Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon; 3Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. Keywords: bacteria, infection, risk, virus

  12. Division of Information Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Division of Information Technology continued its service-oriented activities in 2009. Our main duty was day-to-day support to all units in the Institute in IT related matters. One of our tasks was the acquiring, configuration and delivery of new computer equipment to our users. We automated the standard software installation task and decreased the delivery time for new and fully reconfigured computers to end users. We prepared the technical specifications for several bid and we verified thai the received bids complied with the specification. In addition to regular purchasing of computer equipment we supported the special software -related needs of EU projects. We purchased new licenses for: Computer Simulation Technology Studio Suite, Pulsar Physics General Particle Tracerm. Altium Designer. Autodesk Inventor. Autodesk AutoCAD Electrical, Altera Quartus II. Lahey/Fujitsu Fortran Professional. Code Gear Delphi, Steema Software TeeChart Pro, ANSYS Academic Research, Math Works Matlab, Keil PK51 Professional Developer's Kit, Corel Corporation CorelDraw Graphics Suite, Abbyy FineReader Professional, Adobe Acrobat Professional. We also renewed and increased the number of licenses for Microsoft and GFI products. We implemented a full high definition video conferencing system based on equipment from Lifesize. One-video conferencing terminal is placed in Swierk. another, enabling 4-way conferences, is located in Warsaw. This equipment is mainly used for teleconferences between our Institute and our partners in DESY and CERN. By the implementation of such a system we significantly improved the exchange of information and saved on travel costs. In addition the rooms housing the video conferencing systems were equipped with professional data projectors. We continued the modernization of the Local Area Network infrastructure. The first main achievement was a full replacement of cables and active network devices in the building where the Departments of Plasma

  13. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  14. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  15. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  16. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  17. Polar flagellar biosynthesis and a regulator of flagellar number influence spatial parameters of cell division in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Balaban

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and numerical regulation of flagellar biosynthesis results in different flagellation patterns specific for each bacterial species. Campylobacter jejuni produces amphitrichous (bipolar flagella to result in a single flagellum at both poles. These flagella confer swimming motility and a distinctive darting motility necessary for infection of humans to cause diarrheal disease and animals to promote commensalism. In addition to flagellation, symmetrical cell division is spatially regulated so that the divisome forms near the cellular midpoint. We have identified an unprecedented system for spatially regulating cell division in C. jejuni composed by FlhG, a regulator of flagellar number in polar flagellates, and components of amphitrichous flagella. Similar to its role in other polarly-flagellated bacteria, we found that FlhG regulates flagellar biosynthesis to limit poles of C. jejuni to one flagellum. Furthermore, we discovered that FlhG negatively influences the ability of FtsZ to initiate cell division. Through analysis of specific flagellar mutants, we discovered that components of the motor and switch complex of amphitrichous flagella are required with FlhG to specifically inhibit division at poles. Without FlhG or specific motor and switch complex proteins, cell division occurs more often at polar regions to form minicells. Our findings suggest a new understanding for the biological requirement of the amphitrichous flagellation pattern in bacteria that extend beyond motility, virulence, and colonization. We propose that amphitrichous bacteria such as Campylobacter species advantageously exploit placement of flagella at both poles to spatially regulate an FlhG-dependent mechanism to inhibit polar cell division, thereby encouraging symmetrical cell division to generate the greatest number of viable offspring. Furthermore, we found that other polarly-flagellated bacteria produce FlhG proteins that influence cell division, suggesting that

  18. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  19. 2002 Chemical Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory; Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services; and Dosimetry and Radioprotection services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by

  20. The History of Metals and Ceramics Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The division was formed in 1946 at the suggestion of Dr. Eugene P. Wigner to attack the problem of the distortion of graphite in the early reactors due to exposure to reactor neutrons, and the consequent radiation damage. It was called the Metallurgy Division and assembled the metallurgical and solid state physics activities of the time which were not directly related to nuclear weapons production. William A. Johnson, a Westinghouse employee, was named Division Director in 1946. In 1949 he was replaced by John H Frye Jr. when the Division consisted of 45 people. He was director during most of what is called the Reactor Project Years until 1973 and his retirement. During this period the Division evolved into three organizational areas: basic research, applied research in nuclear reactor materials, and reactor programs directly related to a specific reactor(s) being designed or built. The Division (Metals and Ceramics) consisted of 204 staff members in 1973 when James R. Weir, Jr., became Director. This was the period of the oil embargo, the formation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by combining the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) with the Office of Coal Research, and subsequent formation of the Department of Energy (DOE). The diversification process continued when James O. Stiegler became Director in 1984, partially as a result of the pressure of legislation encouraging the national laboratories to work with U.S. industries on their problems. During that time the Division staff grew from 265 to 330. Douglas F. Craig became Director in 1992.

  1. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P...

  2. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par...

  3. 7 CFR 2.34 - Director, National Appeals Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Director, National Appeals Division. 2.34 Section 2.34... Heads § 2.34 Director, National Appeals Division. The Director, National Appeals Division, under the... officers and other employees as are necessary for the administration of the activities of the Division....

  4. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  5. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  6. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division.

  7. Fuel Chemistry Division: progress report for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel Chemistry Division was formed in May 1985 to give a larger emphasis on the research and development in chemistry of the nuclear fuel cycle. The areas of research in Fuel Chemistry Division are fuel development and its chemical quality control, understanding of the fuel behaviour and post irradiation examinations, chemistry of reprocessing and waste management processes as also the basic aspects of actinide and relevant fission product elements. This report summarises the work by the staff of the Division during 1985 and also some work from the previous periods which was not reported in the progress reports of the Radiochemistry Division. The work related to the FBTR fuel was one of the highlights during this period. In the area of process chemistry useful work has been carried out for processing of plutonium bearing solutions. In the area of mass spectrometry, the determination of trace constituents by spark source mass spectrometry has been a major area of research. Significant progress has also been made in the use of alpha spectromet ry techniques for the determination of plutonium in dissolver solution and other samples. The technology of plutonium utilisation is quite complex and the Division would continue to look into the chemical aspects of this technology and provide the necessary base for future developments in this area. (author)

  8. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2)

  9. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  10. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Mandell, Mercedes Susan; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Zimmerman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Ca...

  11. Newly identified YSO candidates towards LDN 1188

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton , G.; Verebélyi, E.; Kiss, Cs.; Smidla, J.

    2013-11-01

    We present an analysis of young stellar object (YSO) candidates towards the LDN 1188 molecular cloud. The YSO candidates were selected from the WISE all-sky catalogue, based on a statistical method. We found 601 candidates in the region, and classified them as Class I, Flat, and Class II YSOs. Groups were identified and described with the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) method. Previously identified molecular cores show evidence of ongoing star formation at different stages throughout the cloud complex.

  12. On-chip multiplexing conversion between wavelength division multiplexing-polarization division multiplexing and wavelength division multiplexing-mode division multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mengyuan; Yu, Yu; Zou, Jinghui; Yang, Weili; Zhang, Xinliang

    2014-02-15

    A compact silicon-on-insulator device used for conversions between polarization division multiplexing (PDM) and mode division multiplexing (MDM) signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated by utilizing a structure combining the improved two-dimensional grating coupler and two-mode multiplexer. The detailed design of the proposed device is presented and the results show the extinction ratio of 16 and 20 dB for X- and Y-pol input, respectively. The processing of 40  Gb/s signal is achieved within the C-band with good performance. The proposed converter is capable of handling multiple wavelengths in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks, enabling the conversions between WDM-PDM and WDM-MDM, which is promising to further increase the throughput at the network interface. PMID:24562199

  13. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R&D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1996 are presented.

  14. Organization structure. Main activities of the Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter the organization structure as well as main activities of the Division for radiation safety, NPP decommissioning and radioactive waste management are presented. This Division of the VUJE, a.s. consists of the following sections and departments: Section for economic and technical services; Section for radiation protection of employees; Department for management of emergency situations and risk assessment; Department for implementation of nuclear power facilities decommissioning and RAW management; Department for personnel and environmental dosimetry; Department for preparation of NPP decommissioning; Department for RAW treatment technologies; Department for chemical regimes and physico-chemical analyses; Department for management of nuclear power facilities decommissioning and RAW management. Main activities of this Division are presented.

  15. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Division : annual report (for) 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account of the various activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1985 is presented. The main function of the Division is to provide chemical analysis support to India's atomic energy programme. In addition, the Division also offers its analytical services, mostly for measurement of concentrations at trace levels to Indian industries and other research organization in the country. A list of these determinations is given. The report also describes the research and development (R and D) activities - both completed and in progress, in the form of individual summaries. During the year an ultra trace analytical laboratory for analysis of critical samples without contamination was set up using indigenous material and technology. Publications and training activities of the staff, training of the staff from other institution, guidance by the staff for post-graduate degree and invited talks by the staff are listed in the appendices at the end of the report. (M.G.B.)

  17. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  18. A function of DivIVA in Listeria monocytogenes division site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaval, Karan Gautam; Rismondo, Jeanine; Halbedel, Sven

    2014-11-01

    The cell division protein DivIVA influences protein transport via the accessory SecA2 secretion route in Listeria monocytogenes. In contrast, DivIVA from the closely related bacterium Bacillus subtilis contributes to division site selection via the MinCDJ system. However, no classical min phenotype, i.e. filamentation and minicell production was observed with a listerial ΔdivIVA mutant. This has prompted the speculation that division site selection is DivIVA-independent in L. monocytogenes. We addressed this question with genetic, cytological and bacterial two-hybrid experiments and the data obtained correct this view. DivIVA not only binds to MinJ but also directly interacts with MinD. Experiments with fluorescently tagged proteins showed that localization of MinC and MinD was clearly DivIVA-dependent, whereas localization of MinJ was not. An impact of DivIVA on cell division was confirmed by careful comparisons of cell size distributions of divIVA and secA2 mutants. Gene deletion studies and epistasis experiments consistently reinforced these findings, and also revealed that MinJ must have a DivIVA-independent function. The frequency of minicell formation is low in L. monocytogenes min mutants. However, since listerial minicells might be useful as carriers for the introduction of therapeutic compounds into eukaryotic cells, we present a strategy how minicell frequency can be increased.

  19. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    events by monitoring the brightness of a very large number of stars over extended time intervals. During the past years, it has also included a search for periodic, very shallow "dips" in the brightness of stars, caused by the regular transit of small orbiting objects (small stars, brown dwarfs [2] or Jupiter-size planets). The OGLE team has since announced 177 "planetary transit candidates" from their survey of several hundred thousand stars in three southern sky fields, one in the direction of the Galactic Centre, another within the Carina constellation and the third within the Centaurus/Musca constellations. The nature of the transiting object can however only be established by subsequent radial-velocity observations of the parent star. The size of the velocity variations (the amplitude) is directly related to the mass of the companion object and therefore allows discrimination between stars and planets as the cause of the observed brightness "dip". A Bonanza of Low-Mass Stars An international team of astronomers [3] has made use of the 8.2-m VLT Kueyen telescope for this work. Profiting from the multiplex capacity of the FLAMES/UVES facility that permits to obtain high-resolution spectra of up to 8 objects simultaneously, they have looked at 60 OGLE transit candidate stars, measuring their radial velocities with an accuracy of about 50 m/s [4]. This ambitious programme has so far resulted in the discovery of five new transiting exoplanets (see, e.g., ESO PR 11/04 for the announcement of two of those). Most of the other transit candidates identified by OGLE have turned out to be eclipsing binaries, that is, in most cases common, small and low-mass stars passing in front of a solar-like star. This additional wealth of data on small and light stars is a real bonanza for the astronomers. Constraining the Relation Between Mass and Radius Low-mass stars are exceptionally interesting objects, also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with

  20. The bacterial lipocalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  1. Chemical Technology Division Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base through developing industrial technology and transferring that technology to industry. The Chemical Technology Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by ANL's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to ANL and other organizations. The Division is multi-disciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia, urban planning, and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. In this annual report we present an overview of the technical programs together with representative highlights. The report is not intended to be comprehensive or encyclopedic, but to serve as an indication of the condition

  2. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Division during 1989 are briefly described in the form of individual summaries arranged under the headings: (1)Nuclear chemistry, (2)Actinide chemistry, and (3)Spectroscopy. In the field of nuclear chemistry, main emphasis is on studies in fission chemistry. R and D work in actinide chemistry area is oriented towards study of solvent extraction behaviour of actinide ions from aqueous solutions. The spectroscpoic studies are mainly concerned with EPR investigations. A list of publications by the scientist of the division is given at the end. (author). 22 figs., 39 tabs

  3. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information

  4. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S. (comps.)

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  5. Nuclear Physics Division: annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of the research and development activities carried out by the Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period January 1991 to December 1991 is presented. These R and D activities are reported under the headings : 1) Accelerator Facilities, 2) Research Activities, and 3) Instrumentation. At the end, a list of publications by the staff scientists of the Division is given. The list includes papers published in journals, papers presented at conferences, symposia etc., and technical reports. (author). figs., tabs

  6. Division XII: Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samus, N. N.; Yamaoka, H.; Gilmore, A. C.; Aksnes, K.; Green, D. W. E.; Marsden, B. G.; Nakano, S.; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Sphar, T.; Ticha, J.; Williams, G.

    2015-08-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during the Beijing General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Friday, August 24, 2012. The meeting was attended by five C6 members (N. N. Samus; D. W. E. Green; S. Nakano; J. Ticha; and H. Yamaoka). Also present was Prof. F. Genova as a representative of the IAU Division B. She told the audience about the current restructuring of IAU Commissions and Divisions and consequences for the future of C6.

  7. On-chip mode division multiplexing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Frellsen, Louise Floor; Guan, Xiaowei;

    2016-01-01

    Space division multiplexing (SDM) is currently widely investigated in order to provide enhanced capacity thanks to the utilization of space as a new degree of multiplexing freedom in both optical fiber communication and on-chip interconnects. Basic components allowing the processing of spatial...... using one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal silicon waveguides. We furthermore use the fabricated devices to demonstrate on-chip point-to-point mode division multiplexing transmission, and all-optical signal processing by mode-selective wavelength conversion. Finally, we report an efficient silicon...

  8. Chemistry Division: progress report (1983-84)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the seventh progress report of the Chemistry Division covering the two years 1983 and 1984. The main emphasis of the Division continues to be on basic research though spin offs in high technology areas are closely pursued. Laboratory facilities have been considerably augmented during this period. Besides the design and fabrication of a crossed molecular beam chemiluminescence apparatus, a 80 MHz FTNMR and a 5nsec. excimer laser kinetic spectrometer were acquired; a 5nsec. pulsed electron accelerator would be installed in 1985. The research and development projects taken up during the VI Five Year Plan have achieved considerable progress. Only brief accounts of investigations are presented in the report. (author)

  9. Activity report of Reactor Physics Division - 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the progress of activities carried out during the year 1988 in Reactor Physics Division in the form of brief summaries. The topics are organised under the following subject categories:(1) nuclear data evaluation , processing and validation, (2) core physics and analysis, (3) reactor kinetics and safety analysis, (4) noise analysis and (5) radiation transport and shielding. List of publications by the members of the Division and the Reactor Physics Seminars held during the year 1988, is included at the end of report. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  10. Office space bacterial abundance and diversity in three metropolitan areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissi M Hewitt

    Full Text Available People in developed countries spend approximately 90% of their lives indoors, yet we know little about the source and diversity of microbes in built environments. In this study, we combined culture-based cell counting and multiplexed pyrosequencing of environmental ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequences to investigate office space bacterial diversity in three metropolitan areas. Five surfaces common to all offices were sampled using sterile double-tipped swabs, one tip for culturing and one for DNA extraction, in 30 different offices per city (90 offices, 450 total samples. 16S rRNA gene sequences were PCR amplified using bar-coded "universal" bacterial primers from 54 of the surfaces (18 per city and pooled for pyrosequencing. A three-factorial Analysis of Variance (ANOVA found significant differences in viable bacterial abundance between offices inhabited by men or women, among the various surface types, and among cities. Multiplex pyrosequencing identified more than 500 bacterial genera from 20 different bacterial divisions. The most abundant of these genera tended to be common inhabitants of human skin, nasal, oral or intestinal cavities. Other commonly occurring genera appeared to have environmental origins (e.g., soils. There were no significant differences in the bacterial diversity between offices inhabited by men or women or among surfaces, but the bacterial community diversity of the Tucson samples was clearly distinguishable from that of New York and San Francisco, which were indistinguishable. Overall, our comprehensive molecular analysis of office building microbial diversity shows the potential of these methods for studying patterns and origins of indoor bacterial contamination. "[H]umans move through a sea of microbial life that is seldom perceived except in the context of potential disease and decay." - Feazel et al. (2009.

  11. Impairment of the bacterial biofilm stability by triclosan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen V Lubarsky

    Full Text Available The accumulation of the widely-used antibacterial and antifungal compound triclosan (TCS in freshwaters raises concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style of microorganisms in aquatic systems. However, investigations to-date rarely go beyond effects at the cellular, physiological or morphological level. The present paper focuses on bacterial biofilms addressing the possible chemical impairment of their functionality, while also examining their substratum stabilization potential as one example of an important ecosystem service. The development of a bacterial assemblage of natural composition--isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK--on non-cohesive glass beads (<63 µm and exposed to a range of triclosan concentrations (control, 2-100 µg L(-1 was monitored over time by Magnetic Particle Induction (MagPI. In parallel, bacterial cell numbers, division rate, community composition (DGGE and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances: carbohydrates and proteins secretion were determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development was increasingly inhibited by increasing TCS levels. The surface binding capacity (MagPI of the assemblages was positively correlated to the microbial secreted EPS matrix. The EPS concentrations and composition (quantity and quality were closely linked to bacterial growth, which was affected by enhanced TCS exposure. Furthermore, TCS induced significant changes in bacterial community composition as well as a significant decrease in bacterial diversity. The impairment of the stabilization potential of bacterial biofilm under even low, environmentally relevant TCS levels is of concern since the resistance of sediments to erosive forces has large implications for the dynamics of sediments and associated pollutant dispersal. In addition, the surface adhesive capacity of the biofilm acts as a sensitive measure of

  12. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  13. Insights into nucleotide recognition by cell division protein FtsZ from a mant-GTP competition assay and molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Schaffner-Barbero; R. Gil-Redondo; L.B. Ruiz-Avila; S. Huecas; T. Läppchen; T. den Blaauwen; J.F. Diaz; A. Morreale; J.M. Andreu

    2010-01-01

    Essential cell division protein FtsZ forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring and is a target for new antibiotics. FtsZ monomers bind GTP and assemble into filaments. Hydrolysis to GDP at the association interface between monomers leads to filament disassembly. We have developed a homogeneous competitio

  14. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  15. Special Education Teacher Candidate Assessment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Zach; McHatton, Patricia Alvarez; Shealey, Monika Williams

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation has been under intense scrutiny in recent years. In order for preparation of special education teacher candidates to remain viable, candidate assessment practices must apply practices identified in the extant literature base, while special education teacher education researchers must extend this base with rigorous efforts to…

  16. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... also cover or carry candidate debates in accordance with 11 CFR part 100, subparts B and C and part 100... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political...

  17. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division's Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments

  18. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  19. Division Heads and Role Strain Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William M.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a study of the extent to which ambiguous and conflicting circumstances contribute to role strain perceptions among community college division heads. Clarifies how working conditions and personal attributes affect job expectations. Finds experience, age, outlook, and job satisfaction to be strong influential factors. (DMM)

  20. Asymmetric cell division: a persistent issue?

    OpenAIRE

    Aakre, Christopher D.; Laub, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity within a clonal population of cells can increase survival in the face of environmental stress. In a recent issue of Science, Aldridge et al. (2012) demonstrate that cell division in mycobacteria is asymmetric, producing daughter cells that differ in size, growth rate, and susceptibility to antibiotics.

  1. Protocol Information Office | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIO Instructions and ToolsFind instructions, forms, and templates for the management of all types of Division of Cancer Prevention clinical trials.Clinical Trials Reference MaterialsModel clinical agreements, human subject protection and informed consent models, gender and minority inclusion information, and monitoring policy and guidelines. |

  2. Ontario Hydro Research Division annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Division of Ontario Hydro conducts research in the fields of chemistry, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, and operations. Much of the research has a bearing on the safe, environmentally benign operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear power plants. Particular emphasis has been placed on nuclear plant component aging and plant life assurance

  3. Cell Division in the Light of Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-09-26

    Theoretical modeling is central to elucidating underlying principles of emergent properties of complex systems. In cell and developmental biology, the last 15 years have witnessed a convergence of empirical and modeling approaches for fresh perspectives. The role of cell division in coordinating size, shape, and fate in particular illustrates the ever-growing impact of modeling.

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors

  5. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  6. Flexible frontiers for text division into rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan L. Lacrămă

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an original solution for flexible hand-written text division into rows. Unlike the standard procedure, the proposed method avoids the isolated characters extensions amputation and reduces the recognition error rate in the final stage.

  7. Active Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT01950403 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Trial NCT02237183 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Trial NCT01382082 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT02273362 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Trial NCT02112188 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Trial NCT01824836 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT01968798 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Trial NCT01849250 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Trial NCT02116530 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  20. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a... it to the supervisor for his consideration. The right is reserved for the supervisor to cancel...

  1. Annalisa Gnoleba, MSA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrs. Annalisa Gnoleba is the Public Health Analyst for the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute. In this position, Mrs. Gnoleba serves as the analyst for developing and formulating short and long range public health program goals, objectives and policies. |

  2. Nutritional Science Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals

  4. Analysis of Chemical Technology Division waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a summary of the sources, quantities, and characteristics of the wastes generated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major contributors of hazardous, mixed, and radioactive wastes in the CTD as of the writing of this document were the Chemical Development Section, the Isotopes Section, and the Process Development Section. The objectives of this report are to identify the sources and the summarize the quantities and characteristics of hazardous, mixed, gaseous, and solid and liquid radioactive wastes that are generated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This study was performed in support of the CTD waste-reduction program -- the goals of which are to reduce both the volume and hazard level of the waste generated by the division. Prior to the initiation of any specific waste-reduction projects, an understanding of the overall waste-generation system of CTD must be developed. Therefore, the general approach taken in this study is that of an overall CTD waste-systems analysis, which is a detailed presentation of the generation points and general characteristics of each waste stream in CTD. The goal of this analysis is to identify the primary waste generators in the division and determine the most beneficial areas to initiate waste-reduction projects. 4 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs

  5. An electrostatic model for biological cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Faraggi, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    Probably the most fundamental processes for biological systems is their ability to create themselves through the use of cell division and cell differentiation. In this work a simple physical model is proposed for biological cell division. The model consists of a positive ionic gradient across the cell membrane, and concentration of charge at the nodes of the spindle and on the chromosomes. A simple calculation, based on Coulomb's Law, shows that under such circumstances a chromosome will tend to break up to its constituent chromatids and that the chromatids will be separated by a distance that is an order of thirty percent of the distance between the spindle nodes. Further repulsion between the nodes will tend to stretch the cell and eventually break the cell membrane between the separated chromatids, leading to cell division. The importance of this work is in continuing the understanding of the electromagnetic basis of cell division and providing it with an analytical model. A central implication of this and...

  6. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975. [LASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, P.A.

    1976-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures. (auth)

  7. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  9. 2014 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. 2015 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. 2013 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. 2016 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Ultrasociality and the sexual divisions of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Pamela; Caporael, Linnda R

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasociality thesis proposes that the same "mechanistic evolutionary forces" may be at work in the evolution of insect eusociality and human ultrasociality in relation to agriculture. Wide variation in the reproductive division of labor among differing highly social phyla points to a resemblance of outcomes arising from very different selective environments and possibly different forces. PMID:27561830

  14. Kara Smigel Croker | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara Smigel Croker is the Communications Manager for the National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Prevention. She coordinates and supports all aspects of communication, including media contacts, writing and editing of reports and responses, divisional websites, and social media. |

  15. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e+e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC

  16. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  17. Which multivariate gamma distributions are infinitely divisible?

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardoff, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    We define a multivariate gamma distribution on [math] by its Laplace transform [math] , [math] where ¶ [math] ¶ Under [math] , we establish necessary and sufficient conditions on the coefficients of [math] such that the above function is the Laplace transform of some probability distribution, for all [math] thus characterizing all infinitely divisible multivariate gamma distributions on [math

  18. Keypad Geometry and Divisibility of Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Frances; Keynes, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors show how students can form familiar geometric figures on the calculator keypad and generate numbers that are all divisible by a common number. Students are intrigued by the results and want to know "why it works". The activities can be presented and students given an extended amount of time to think about them. As…

  19. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells gro

  20. News Archives | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report for 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work carried by the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar year 1977 in the areas of reactor chemistry, actinide chemistry, process chemistry of neptunium and plutonium-239, radioanalytical chemistry and nuclear chemistry has been reported. (M.G.B.)

  2. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  3. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water

  4. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  5. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  6. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  7. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  8. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  9. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  10. Bacterial phylogeny structures soil resistomes across habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Patel, Sanket; Gibson, Molly K.; Lauber, Christian L.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-05-01

    Ancient and diverse antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have previously been identified from soil, including genes identical to those in human pathogens. Despite the apparent overlap between soil and clinical resistomes, factors influencing ARG composition in soil and their movement between genomes and habitats remain largely unknown. General metagenome functions often correlate with the underlying structure of bacterial communities. However, ARGs are proposed to be highly mobile, prompting speculation that resistomes may not correlate with phylogenetic signatures or ecological divisions. To investigate these relationships, we performed functional metagenomic selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from 18 agricultural and grassland soils. The 2,895 ARGs we discovered were mostly new, and represent all major resistance mechanisms. We demonstrate that distinct soil types harbour distinct resistomes, and that the addition of nitrogen fertilizer strongly influenced soil ARG content. Resistome composition also correlated with microbial phylogenetic and taxonomic structure, both across and within soil types. Consistent with this strong correlation, mobility elements (genes responsible for horizontal gene transfer between bacteria such as transposases and integrases) syntenic with ARGs were rare in soil by comparison with sequenced pathogens, suggesting that ARGs may not transfer between soil bacteria as readily as is observed between human pathogens. Together, our results indicate that bacterial community composition is the primary determinant of soil ARG content, challenging previous hypotheses that horizontal gene transfer effectively decouples resistomes from phylogeny.

  11. Bacterial Growth Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Mette

    acid starvation. Our next task was to explore the mechanism behind the starvation-induced downregulation of tRNA, and the obvious candidates as RelA, SpoT, and the E.coli toxin-anti toxin system (TA) were tested with no effect. Interestingly, the lifetime of tRNA was prolonged in an isogenic Δhfq after...

  12. 2003 Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of six divisions within the Engineering Research Directorate at Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, to promote national security, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training in chemistry; physics; materials science; and electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineering. They are specialists in electrochemistry, ceramics, metallurgy, catalysis, materials characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, repository science, and the nuclear fuel cycle. Our staff have experience working in and collaborating with university, industry and government research and development laboratories throughout the world. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy, national security, and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial organizations for advice and contributions to problem solving in areas that intersect present and past Division programs and activities. Currently, we are engaged in the development of several technologies of

  13. Year four pupils' understanding of division of whole numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Faridah Mohamed; Pa, Nik Azis Nik

    2014-07-01

    Based on the theory of radical constructivism, this study investigated Year Four pupils' understandings of division by identifying their schemes of the division of whole numbers and how they used them in solving related problematic situations. Data incorporating both verbal and non-verbal behaviors were gathered from seven pupils based on the five clinical interview sessions involving imagining division, representing division, describing process and product of division, interpreting division statement, and solving division problem tasks. Four schemes that were identified are partitioning scheme, measuring scheme, repeated subtraction scheme, and inverse of multiplication scheme. Findings revealed that the measuring scheme was the dominant scheme for the division of whole numbers and the pupils only used the repeated and the inverse of multiplication schemes when they were asked to relate the subtraction or multiplication process with the division process. Further, the pupils were observed to use the long division algorithm in some situations, but there were indications that they used them with little understandings. It is suggested that more remains to be learnt about the nature of pupils' understanding of the division of whole numbers and how schemes of the division of whole numbers are formed and modified. Also, in order to provide appropriate guidance, mathematics teachers need to have some knowledge about pupils' available schemes of the division of whole numbers, no matter how primitive they might seem to the teachers.

  14. Risk of waitlist mortality in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and bacterial cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David S; Camp, Amanda; Martinez-Camacho, Alvaro; Forman, Lisa; Fortune, Brett; Reddy, K Rajender

    2013-03-01

    Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are at increased risk for bacterial cholangitis because of biliary strictures and bile stasis. A subset of PSC patients suffer from repeated episodes of bacterial cholangitis, which can lead to frequent hospitalizations and impaired quality of life. Although waitlist candidates with PSC and bacterial cholangitis frequently receive exception points and/or are referred for living donor transplantation, the impact of bacterial cholangitis on waitlist mortality is unknown. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all adult waitlist candidates with PSC who were listed for initial transplantation between February 27, 2002 and June 1, 2012 at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Colorado-Denver. During this period, 171 PSC patients were waitlisted for initial transplantation. Before waitlisting, 38.6% (66/171) of the patients had a history of bacterial cholangitis, whereas 28.0% (44/157) of the patients with at least 1 Model for End-Stage Liver Disease update experienced cholangitis on the waitlist. During follow-up, 30 patients (17.5%) were removed from the waitlist for death or clinical deterioration, with 46.7% (14/30) developing cholangiocarcinoma. Overall, 12 of the 82 waitlist candidates (14.6%) who ever had an episode of cholangitis were removed for death or clinical deterioration, whereas 18 of the 89 candidates (20.2%) without cholangitis were removed (P = 0.34 for a comparison of the 2 groups). No patients were removed because of bacterial cholangitis. In multivariate competing-risk models, a history of bacterial cholangitis was not associated with an increased risk of waitlist removal for death or clinical deterioration (subhazard ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.65-0.70, P PSC and bacterial cholangitis do not have an increased risk of waitlist mortality. The data call into question the systematic granting of exception points or referral for living donor transplantation due to a

  15. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  16. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature super-conductors. The Division's wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial

  17. Engineering Research Division publication report, calendar year 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E.K.; Livingston, P.L.; Rae, D.C. (eds.)

    1980-06-01

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has issued an internal report listing all formal publications produced by the Division during the calendar year. Abstracts of 1980 reports are presented.

  18. DNR Division of Parks and Trails District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data shows the DNR Division of Parks and Trails District Boundaries as of May 2010. The boundaries were created by the Division Leadership Team. Boundaries are...

  19. Engineering Research Division publication report, calendar year 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has issued an internal report listing all formal publications produced by the Division during the calendar year. Abstracts of 1980 reports are presented

  20. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information i

  1. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  2. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P;

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24...... of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published...... on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why...

  3. Towards Treating Chemistry Teacher Candidates as Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis

    2008-05-01

    This research inquiry investigates the factors influencing chemistry teacher candidates’ development during their extended practica in the second and final year of an After-Degree Bachelor of Education at a university in central Canada. A variety of data sources are used to identify the risk and protective factors impeding and contributing to the achievement of their chemistry pedagogical aspirations. Two theoretical frameworks, both having their origins in the pioneering work of Kurt Lewin, are used to conceptualize how a complex amalgam of personal attribute and environmental factors and the interplay among these factors influence teacher candidate developmental trajectories. The tenets of both Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model and Learning Environment research provide insights into how the factors influencing teacher candidate development can be understood and systematically documented to provide a template for reflective consideration of the practicum experience for both teacher candidates and those involved in fostering the development of chemistry teacher candidates.

  4. Radiochemistry Division: annual progress report: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of Research and Development (R and D) activities during the year 1987 are reported in the form of summaries, which are presented under the headings (1) Actinide Chemistry, (2) Nuclear Chemistry, and (3) Spectroscopy. Microwave absorption studies of the high Tsub(c) oxide superconductor YBa2Cu3Osub(7-x) using electron paramagnetic resonance techniques are the new feature during the report year. Radioanalytical services and radiation sources in the form of electrodeposited sources or standard soluti ons were also given to the other Divisions, other units of the Department of Atomic Energy, and other organisations in the country. A list of papers by the members of the Division published in various journals and presented at various symposia, conferences etc. is given at the end of the report. (M.G.B.). refs., 51 tabs., 33 figs

  5. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  6. Radiochemistry Division annual progress report for 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress report of the Radiochemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, presents the research and development work carried out during 1982 in the form of individual summaries arranged under the headings: reactor fuel chemistry, heavy element chemistry, radioanalytical chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Some of the highlights of the R and D activities are: (1) optimisation of the chemical parameters for the preparation of UO2 microspheres by internal gelation method, (2) synergetic extraction studies of various actinides from aqueous solutions, (3) development of methods of determination of uranium, 241Am and 239Pu, (4) fission studies of 232Th, 236U, 252Cf and 229Th, (5) determination of half-life of 241Pu by various methods. A list of publications of the members of the Division published during 1982 is also given. (M.G.B.)

  7. Activity report of Reactor Physics Division - 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of activities carried out during the year 1987 in Reactor Physics Division are highlighted in this report in the form of brief summaries. These are organised under the following subject categories: (1) Nuclear Data Evaluation, Processing and Validation, (2) Core Physics, Analysis and FBTR Studies, (3) Reactor Kinetics and Safety Analysis, (4) Noise Analysis, (5) Radiation Transport, Shielding and Statistical Physics. Finally, a list of publications made by the members of the Division and the Reactor Physics Seminars held during 1987, is included at the end of the report. The large number of internal reports prepared on the PFBR and FBTR projects indicates the relatively larger amount of work carried out for these projects during 1987. (author)

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R ampersand D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1996 are presented

  9. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  10. Bacterial chemoreceptors and chemoeffectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuangyu; Lai, Luhua

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria use chemotaxis signaling pathways to sense environmental changes. Escherichia coli chemotaxis system represents an ideal model that illustrates fundamental principles of biological signaling processes. Chemoreceptors are crucial signaling proteins that mediate taxis toward a wide range of chemoeffectors. Recently, in deep study of the biochemical and structural features of chemoreceptors, the organization of higher-order clusters in native cells, and the signal transduction mechanisms related to the on-off signal output provides us with general insights to understand how chemotaxis performs high sensitivity, precise adaptation, signal amplification, and wide dynamic range. Along with the increasing knowledge, bacterial chemoreceptors can be engineered to sense novel chemoeffectors, which has extensive applications in therapeutics and industry. Here we mainly review recent advances in the E. coli chemotaxis system involving structure and organization of chemoreceptors, discovery, design, and characterization of chemoeffectors, and signal recognition and transduction mechanisms. Possible strategies for changing the specificity of bacterial chemoreceptors to sense novel chemoeffectors are also discussed.

  11. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO. BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism is developed to simplify the bacterial optimization, which is spread over the whole optimization process. However, the other behaviors such as elimination, reproduction, and migration are implemented only when the given conditions are satisfied. Two types of interactive communication schemas: individuals exchange schema and group exchange schema are designed to improve the optimization efficiency. In the simulation studies, a set of 12 benchmark functions belonging to three classes (unimodal, multimodal, and rotated problems are performed, and the performances of the proposed algorithms are compared with five recent evolutionary algorithms to demonstrate the superiority of BCO.

  12. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  13. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya Kumar Charaka; Kruti P Mehta; H S Misra

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the `Min’ proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  14. Ethnic Divisions and Production in Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Hjort, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A body of literature suggests that ethnic heterogeneity limits economic growth. This paper provides microeconometric evidence on the direct effect of ethnic divisions on productivity. In team production at a plant in Kenya, an upstream worker supplies and distributes flowers to two downstream workers who assemble them into bunches. The plant uses an essentially random rotation process to assign workers to positions, leading to three types of teams: (a) ethnically homogeneous teams, and teams ...

  15. Vacuole Partitioning during Meiotic Division in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Roeder, A D; Shaw, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the partitioning of the yeast vacuole during meiotic division. In pulse-chase experiments, vacuoles labeled with the lumenal ade2 fluorophore or the membrane-specific dye FM 4-64 were not inherited by haploid spores. Instead, these fluorescent markers were excluded from spores and trapped between the spore cell walls and the ascus. Serial optical sections using a confocal microscope confirmed that spores did not inherit detectable amounts of fluorescently labeled vacuoles. Mo...

  16. Women of the Solar Physics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    2007-05-01

    In 1970, when the Solar Physics Division was established, the invitation to become a founding member of the Division was extended by the Organizing Committee to a group of 61 solar scientists of which 4 were women (6.6%). At the first SPD meeting in Huntsville AL (1970), 11% of the papers were given by women. Near that time (1973), women accounted for 8% of all AAS members. The representation of women in the SPD has more than doubled in percentage since the first years. Currently, women comprise about 15.5% of SPD members which, however, is less than the percentage in the AAS general membership (18%) in March 2007. In the 37 years that the SPD has existed, women have frequently held the office of Treasurer and Secretary of the Division and made notable contributions. Elske V.P. Smith was elected the first Treasurer of the SPD and that began a long tradition. Women appear to be considered exceptionally trustworthy since they have been reelected and occupied the position of Treasurer for 75% of the available terms. The Office of SPD Secretary has seen a woman for 13% of the terms. Yet women are practically absent among those in the top leadership positions and in the lists of prize winners of the SPD. Among the 21 SPD Chairs, only 1 woman, Judith T. Karpen, has held that office. The Hale Prize has been awarded 19 times in almost 3 decades, and all of the awardees have been men. Several aspects of the participation of women and their contributions to the Solar Physics Division of the AAS will be reviewed, and compared to that of the AAS and astronomy in general.

  17. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    Summaries of the highlights of programs in the Earth Sciences Division are presented under four headings; Geosciences, Geothermal Energy Development, Nuclear Waste Isolation, and Marine Sciences. Utilizing both basic and applied research in a wide spectrum of topics, these programs are providing results that will be of value in helping to secure the nation's energy future. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  18. Energy and Environment Division annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, J.A. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Research activities of this Division are reported under nine separate programs, namely: Energy Analysis; Solar Energy; Energy-Efficient Buildings; Chemical Process Research and Development; Environmental Research; Atmospheric Aerosol Research; Oil Shale Research; Instrumentation Development; and Combustion Research. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the nine programs, each of which contained several individual research summaries, with responsible researchers listed. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), and five will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  19. Claim games for estate division problems

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, H.J.M.; Schröder, M.J.W.; Vermeulen, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the estate division problem from a non-cooperative perspective. The integer claim game initiated by O'Neill (1982) and extended by Atlamaz et al. (2011) is generalized by considering different sharing rules to divide every interval among the claimants. For problems with an estate larger than half of the total entitlements, we show that every sharing rule satisfying four fairly general axioms yields the same set of Nash equilibrium profiles and corresponding payoffs. Every...

  20. Analytical Chemistry Division: annual report (for) 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research and Development (R and D) activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1986 are reported in the form of individual summaries. Analytical consultancies to outside organisations are also described in brief. Information regarding number of samples analysed, publications, invited talks, award of research degrees, training imparted to scientists from R and D organisations in the country and abroad etc. is given in the appendices at the end of the report. (M.G.B.)

  1. Linear groups over a locally linear division ring

    CERN Document Server

    Hai, Bui Xuan; Deo, Trinh Thanh

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, in the first we give definitions of some classes of division rings which strictly contain the class of centrally finite division rings. One of our main purpose is to construct non-trivial examples of rings of new defined classes. Further, we study linear groups over division rings of these classes. Our new obtained results generalize precedent results for centrally finite division rings.

  2. Do People 'Like' Candidates on Facebook?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    The online popularity of a few exceptional candidates has led many to suggest that social media have given politicians powerful ways of communicating directly with voters. In this paper, we examine whether this is happening on a significant scale and show, based on analysis of 224 candidates....... We therefore suggest that the political implications of social media are generally better understood in terms of facilitating indirect communication and institutional change than in terms of direct communication....

  3. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    OpenAIRE

    Shiril Paskalis; Anandina Irmagita

    2013-01-01

    Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture pla...

  4. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  5. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  6. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Niu; Hong Wang

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO). BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism i...

  7. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  9. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  10. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  11. Progress report [of] Technical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of the Technical Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, over the last few years are reported. This division is engaged in developing various technologies supporting the development of nuclear technology. The various fields in which development is actively being carried out are : (i) vacuum technology, (ii) mass spectrometry, (iii) crystal technology, (iv) cryogenics, and (v) magnet technology. For surface studies, the field emission microscope and the Auger electron spectrometer and other types of spectrometers have been devised and perfected. Electromagnets of requisite strength to be used in MHD programme and NMR instruments are being fabricated. Various crystals such as NaI(Tl), Ge, Fluorides, etc. required as windows and prisms in X and gamma-ray spectroscopy, have been grown. In the cryogenics field, expansion engines required for air liquefaction plants, vacuum insulated dewars, helium gas thermometers etc. have been constructed. In addition to the above, the Division provides consultancy and training to personnel from various institutions and laboratories. Equipment and systems perfected are transferred to commercial organizations for regular production. (A.K.)

  12. Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Engineering (CEN) Division's activities during 1980 are presented. In this period, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) rechargeable lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and other applications; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) energy-efficient industrial electrochemical processes; (4) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (5) coal technology, mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO2 sorbent of limestone; (6) heat- and seed-recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (7) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (8) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (9) fuel cycle technology - management of nuclear wastes, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; and (10) magnetic fusion research - systems analysis and engineering experimentation, materials research, and neutron dosimetry and damage analysis. The CEN Division also has a basic energy sciences program, which includes experimental and theoretical research on (1) the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and methanol homologation, (2) the thermodynamic properties of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials, (3) significant mechanisms for the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrogen-bearing aerosols, (4) processes occurring at electrodes and in electrolytes, and (5) the physical properties of salt vapors. In addition, the Division operated the Central Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

  13. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  14. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1985 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (3) corrosion-protective coatings for high-strength steel; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) nuclear technology related to waste management, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and proof of breeding in a light water breeder reactor; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL

  15. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  16. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Applied physics Division

    1999-07-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program.

  17. Kinetics of cell division in epidermal maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Allon M; Jones, Philip H; Simons, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    The rules governing cell division and differentiation are central to understanding the mechanisms of development, aging and cancer. By utilising inducible genetic labelling, recent studies have shown that the clonal population in transgenic mouse epidermis can be tracked in vivo. Drawing on these results, we explain how clonal fate data may be used to infer the rules of cell division and differentiation underlying the maintenance of adult murine tail-skin. We show that the rates of cell division and differentiation may be evaluated by considering the long-time and short-time clone fate data, and that the data is consistent with cells dividing independently rather than synchronously. Motivated by these findings, we consider a mechanism for cancer onset based closely on the model for normal adult skin. By analysing the expected changes to clonal fate in cancer emerging from a simple two-stage mutation, we propose that clonal fate data may provide a novel method for studying the earliest stages of the disease.

  18. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division's research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth's crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required

  19. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  20. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes Susan Mandell; JoAnn Lindenfeld; Mei-Yung Tsou; Michael Zimmerman

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Cardiomyopathy also occurs in greater frequency. While all patients with advanced cardiac disease have defects in cardiac performance, a larger than expected number of patients have classical findings of dilated, restrictive and hypertropic cardiomyopathy. This may explain why up to 56% of patients suffer from hypoxemia due to pulmonary edema following transplant surgery. There is considerable controversy on how to screen transplant candidates for the presence of heart disease. Questions focus upon, which patients should be screened and what tests should be used. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common tests used to identify ischemic heart disease. We also review the physiological consequences of cardiomyopathy in transplant candidates and explore the specific syndrome of "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy".

  1. Reactor Engineering Division Material for World Wide Web Pages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the home page of the Reactor Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory. This WWW site describes the activities of the Division, an introduction to its wide variety of programs and samples of the results of research by people in the division

  2. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation. PMID:23248201

  3. 25 CFR 11.800 - Jurisdiction of appellate division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Jurisdiction of appellate division. 11.800 Section 11.800... LAW AND ORDER CODE Appellate Proceedings § 11.800 Jurisdiction of appellate division. The jurisdiction of the appellate division shall extend to all appeals from final orders and judgments of the...

  4. 32 CFR 516.36 - Referral to Litigation Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Referral to Litigation Division. 516.36 Section... Property Claims Assertion of Other Claims § 516.36 Referral to Litigation Division. (a) General. The... channels to Litigation Division with a litigation report. (See § 516.23 of this part). (b)...

  5. 28 CFR 3.2 - Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (See also 28 CFR 0.55(i).) (28 U.S.C. 509 and 510) ... Division. 3.2 Section 3.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GAMBLING DEVICES § 3.2 Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division. The Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division, is authorized...

  6. Divisibility and Multiplicative Structure of Natural Numbers: Preservice Teachers' Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazkis, Rina; Campbell, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Elementary number theory is investigated with the main focus on the concept of divisibility and its relation to division, multiplication, prime and composite numbers, factorization, divisibility rules, and prime decomposition. Preservice teachers' responses indicated dispositions toward procedural attachments even when conceptual understanding was…

  7. On subgroups in division rings of type $2$

    CERN Document Server

    Hai, Bui Xuan; Bien, Mai Hoang

    2010-01-01

    Let $D$ be a division ring with the center $F$. We say that $D$ is a {\\em division ring of type $2$} if for every two elements $x, y\\in D,$ the division subring $F(x, y)$ is a finite dimensional vector space over $F$. In this paper we investigate multiplicative subgroups in such a ring.

  8. Reconciling Divisions in the Field of Authentic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold: first, to identify and address three central divisions in the field of authentic education that introduce ambiguity and at times inconsistencies within the field of authentic education. These divisions concern a) the relationship between autonomy and authenticity; b) the division between the two basic attitudes…

  9. Hepatitis B Prevalance in Young Adult Men Commando Candidates Applying for a Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duran Tok

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Our country is in the median endemicity belt in terms of hepatitis B virus infection. This study was performed in the commando candidates who came from all over Turkey to a military division/brigade, between January 2007 and December 2009, 20.681 commando candidates were checked for HBsAg positivity and these data were investigated retrospectively. In our study, hepatitis B virus carriage among young men as the Turkey\\s average was 3.3%. This data was lower than those reported previously. We attribute this positive trend to the dissemination of immunization programs, the increase of births in the hospitals rather than home delivery, and the widespread use of HBsAg screening tests before marriage [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 197-200

  10. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  11. Bacterial population structure of the jute-retting environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Tulika K; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2008-08-01

    Jute is one of the most versatile bast fibers obtained through the process of retting, which is a result of decomposition of stalks by the indigenous microflora. However, bacterial communities associated with the retting of jute are not well characterized. To investigate the presence of microorganisms during the process of jute retting, full-cycle rRNA approach was followed, and two 16S rRNA gene libraries, from jute-retting locations of Krishnanagar and Barrackpore, were constructed. Phylotypes affiliating to seven bacterial divisions were identified in both libraries. The bulk of clones came from Proteobacteria ( approximately 37, 41%) and a comparatively smaller proportion of clones from the divisions-Firmicutes ( approximately 11, 12%), Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group (CFB; approximately 9, 7%), Verrucomicrobia ( approximately 6, 5%), Acidobacteria ( approximately 4, 5%), Chlorobiales ( approximately 5, 5%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 4, 2%) were identified. Percent coverage value and diversity estimations of phylotype richness, Shannon-Weiner index, and evenness confirmed the diverse nature of both the libraries. Evaluation of the retting waters by whole cell rRNA-targeted flourescent in situ hybridization, as detected by domain- and group-specific probes, we observed a considerable dominance of the beta-Proteobacteria (25.9%) along with the CFB group (24.4%). In addition, 32 bacterial species were isolated on culture media from the two retting environments and identified by 16S rDNA analysis, confirming the presence of phyla, Proteobacteria ( approximately 47%), Firmicutes ( approximately 22%), CFB group ( approximately 19%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 13%) in the retting niche. Thus, our study presents the first quantification of the dominant and diverse bacterial phylotypes in the retting ponds, which will further help in improving the retting efficiency, and hence the fiber quality. PMID:18097714

  12. A systematic, functional genomics, and reverse vaccinology approach to the identification of vaccine candidates in the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz-Olivier, Christine; van Zyl, Willem; Stutzer, Christian

    2012-06-01

    In the post-genomic era, reverse vaccinology is proving promising in the development of vaccines against bacterial and viral diseases, with limited application in ectoparasite vaccine design. In this study, we present a systematic approach using a combination of functional genomics (DNA microarrays) techniques and a pipeline incorporating in silico prediction of subcellular localization and protective antigenicity using VaxiJen for the identification of novel anti-tick vaccine candidates. A total of 791 candidates were identified using this approach, of which 176 are membrane-associated and 86 secreted soluble proteins. A preliminary analysis on the antigenicity of selected membrane proteins using anti-gut antisera yielded candidates with an IgG binding capacity greater than previously identified epitopes of Bm86. Subsequent vaccination trials using recombinant proteins will not only validate this approach, but will also improve subsequent reverse vaccinology approaches for the identification of novel anti-tick vaccine candidates. PMID:22521592

  13. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. N-person envy-free chore division

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Elisha

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the classical cake-cutting problem (how to fairly divide a desirable object), "chore division" is the problem of how to divide an undesirable object. We develop the first explicit algorithm for envy-free chore division among N people, a counterpart to the N-person envy-free cake-division solution of Brams-Taylor (1995). This is accomplished by exploiting a notion of "irrevocable advantage" for chores. We discuss the differences between cake-cutting and chore division and additional problems encountered in chore division.

  15. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  16. Flexible metabolic pathway construction using modular and divisible selection gene regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Myling-Petersen, Nils; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-09-01

    Genetic selections are important to biological engineering. Although selectable traits are limited, currently each trait only permits simultaneous introduction of a single DNA fragment. Complex pathway and strain construction however depends on rapid, combinatorial introduction of many genes that encode putative pathway candidates and homologs. To triple the utility of existing selection genes, we have developed divisible selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, independent DNA fragments can be introduced and selected for simultaneously using a set of split hybrid transcription factors composed of parts from Escherichia coli LexA and Herpes simplex VP16 to regulate one single selectable phenotype of choice. Only when co-expressed, these split hybrid transcription factors promote transcription of a selection gene, causing tight selection of transformants containing all desired DNA fragments. Upon transformation, 94% of the selected colonies resulted strictly from transforming all three modules based on ARS/CEN plasmids. Similarly when used for chromosome integration, 95% of the transformants contained all three modules. The divisible selection system acts dominantly and thus expands selection gene utility from one to three without any genomic pre-modifications of the strain. We demonstrate the approach by introducing the fungal rubrofusarin polyketide pathway at a gene load of 11 kb distributed on three different plasmids, using a single selection trait and one yeast transformation step. By tripling the utility of existing selection genes, the employment of divisible selection improves flexibility and freedom in the strain engineering process.

  17. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations

  18. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  19. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R. [eds.] [comps.] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  20. Kinetics of Suicide of Bacterial Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a number of assumptions, formulas are presented for the survival of hypothetical bacterial cultures under self-irradiation by incorporated tritium in the chromosomal material. The formulas average over different classes of cells in the balanced growing populations taking into account the increased rate of inactivation of cells with more DNA, and that nuclear division causes the number of independent chromosomes to increase. The partial multinuclearity tends to make the logarithmic survival curves concave downward, but heterogeneity in amount of DNA in the chromosomes does the opposite. Details of how the resultant effects compensate for various patterns of DNA replication and how the target numbers and final slope are given. If DNA synthesis takes only a small fraction of the total cycle, the survival curves are the well-known one or two target curves and intermediate forms depending on the point in the cell cycle that the synthesis takes place. If synthesis takes almost all of the cell cycle as is the case for enteric bacteria growing in glucose minimal medium, the apparent target numbers are lower and are, in fact, unity if nuclear division is midway in the cell cycle. This is consistent with the experimental results in studies of survival, and in cytological and other studies of the nuclear replication cycle. The effect of gaps in DNA synthesis at various parts of the cell cycle are given and their relevance to various biological systems is discussed. The apparent target number is lowest if synthesis takes place at the end of the cell cycle than if it takes place earlier. Means are provided so that the sensitivity of the resting genome can be calculated from the results of measurements of balanced growing populations. (author)

  1. How Mimas cleared the Cassini Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyelles, Benoit; Baillie, Kevin; Lainey, Valery; Charnoz, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    Recent measurements of the dissipation of Saturn (Lainey et al. 2016, Icarus, in press) combined with a theoretical study by Fuller et al. (2016, MNRAS) require to revisit the energy dissipation models in planetary systems and the way it affects their satellite system. In addition, the measurements of the large librations of Mimas (Tajeddine et al. 2014, Science) could point to a global ocean underneath the surface of the satellite. These results allowed us to refine the scenarios of the opening of the Cassini Division that we initially presented at the DPS 2012. Assuming a dissipation that is consistent with these latest results, we propose scenarios of combined evolutions of Mimas and the main rings of Saturn, that explain the current size and location of the Division, the excess of density in the outer B ring, a past episode of intense heating of Mimas required to create a global ocean, and its current eccentricity. For that, we show that a past resonance with Tethys increased the eccentricity of Mimas up to 0.2, possibly triggering the melting of Mimas and an episode of inward migration, which created the Cassini Division: the 2:1 resonance between Mimas and the rings pushed the ring material inner to accumulate in the B ring. Once its eccentricity is damped, Mimas resumes its outward migration, leading to a trapping into the current vertical resonance with Tethys. These results are supported by numerical simulations, in which Mimas is driven by the tides, and the rings are simulated with the 1-D hydrodynamical code Hydrorings (Charnoz et al., 2010, Nature). This study has been partially supported by the International Space Sciences Institute in Bern, Switzerland.

  2. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Divisions's activities during 1988 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries (mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide, sodium/metal chloride, and sodium/sulfur); (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous chemical water; (6) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing /sup 99/Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 53 figs., 16 tabs

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  5. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  6. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K. [ed.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  9. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs

  10. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO2 recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs

  11. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The open-quotes early implementationclose quotes phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large γ-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive 21Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium

  12. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

  13. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute)

  14. Division G Commission 35: Stellar Constitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongi, Marco; Lattanzio, John C.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Dominguez, Inma; Isern, Jordi; Karakas, Amanda; Leitherer, Claus; Marconi, Marcella; Shaviv, Giora; van Loon, Jacco

    2016-04-01

    Commission 35 (C35), ``Stellar Constitution'', consists of members of the International Astronomical Union whose research spans many aspects of theoretical and observational stellar physics and it is mainly focused on the comprehension of the properties of stars, stellar populations and galaxies. The number of members of C35 increased progressively over the last ten years and currently C35 comprises about 400 members. C35 was part of Division IV (Stars) until 2014 and then became part of Division G (Stars and Stellar Physics), after the main IAU reorganisation in 2015. Four Working Groups have been created over the years under Division IV, initially, and Division G later: WG on Active B Stars, WG on Massive Stars, WG on Abundances in Red Giant and WG on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars. In the last decade the Commission had 4 presidents, Wojciech Dziembowski (2003-2006), Francesca D'Antona (2006-2009), Corinne Charbonnel (2009-2012) and Marco Limongi (2012-2015), who were assisted by an Organizing Committee (OC), usually composed of about 10 members, all of them elected by the C35 members and holding their positions for three years. The C35 webpage (http://iau-c35.stsci.edu) has been designed and continuously maintained by Claus Leitherer from the Space Telescope Institute, who deserves our special thanks. In addition to the various general information on the Commission structure and activities, it contains links to various resources, of interest for the members, such as stellar models, evolutionary tracks and isochrones, synthetic stellar populations, stellar yields and input physics (equation of state, nuclear cross sections, opacity tables), provided by various groups. The main activity of the C35 OC is that of evaluating, ranking and eventually supporting the proposals for IAU sponsored meetings. In the last decade the Commission has supported several meetings focused on topics more or less relevant to C35. Since the primary aim of this document is to

  15. Wavelength division multiplexing a practical engineering guide

    CERN Document Server

    Grobe, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this book, Optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is approached from a strictly practical and application-oriented point of view. Based on the characteristics and constraints of modern fiber-optic components, transport systems and fibers, the text provides relevant rules of thumb and practical hints for technology selection, WDM system and link dimensioning, and also for network-related aspects such as wavelength assignment and resilience mechanisms. Actual 10/40 Gb/s WDM systems are considered, and a preview of the upcoming 100 Gb/s systems and technologies for even higher bit rate

  16. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States

  17. Service activities of chemical analysis division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress of the Division during the year of 1988 was described on the service activities for various R and D projects carrying out in the Institute, for the fuel fabrication and conversion plant, and for the post-irradiation examination facility. Relevant analytical methodologies developed for the chemical analysis of an irradiated fuel, safeguards chemical analysis, and pool water monitoring were included such as chromatographic separation of lanthanides, polarographic determination of dissolved oxygen in water, and automation on potentiometric titration of uranium. Some of the laboratory manuals revised were also included in this progress report. (Author)

  18. On Secure Two-Party Integer Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Ning, Chao; Toft, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of secure integer division: given two Paillier encryptions of ℓ-bit values n and d, determine an encryption of $\\lfloor \\frac{n}{d}\\rfloor$ without leaking any information about n or d. We propose two new protocols solving this problem. The first requires $\\ensuremath......{\\mathcal{O}}(\\ell)$ arithmetic operations on encrypted values (secure addition and multiplication) in $\\ensuremath{\\mathcal{O}}(1)$ rounds. This is the most efficient constant-rounds solution to date. The second protocol requires only $\\ensuremath{\\mathcal{O}} \\left( (\\log^2 \\ell)(\\kappa + \\operatorname{loglog} \\ell) \\right...

  19. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute).

  20. An automated image analysis framework for segmentation and division plane detection of single live Staphylococcus aureus cells which can operate at millisecond sampling time scales using bespoke Slimfield microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M; Foster, Simon; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, giving rise to antimicrobial resistance in cell strains such as Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Here we report an image analysis framework for automated detection and image segmentation of cells in S. aureus cell clusters, and explicit identification of their cell division planes. We use a new combination of several existing analytical tools of image analysis to detect cellular and subcellular morphological features relevant to cell division from millisecond time scale sampled images of live pathogens at a detection precision of single molecules. We demonstrate this approach using a fluorescent reporter GFP fused to the protein EzrA that localises to a mid-cell plane during division and is involved in regulation of cell size and division. This image analysis framework presents a valuable platform from which to study candidate new antimicrobials which target the cell division machinery, but may also have more general application in detecting morphological...

  1. From In silico Protein Epitope Density Prediction to Testing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Vaccine Candidates in a Murine Model of Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Daniel; Ross, Brittany N; Kalita, Anjana; Kalita, Mridul; Hatcher, Christopher L; Muruato, Laura A; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide and is a common serotype linked to hemorrhagic colitis and an important cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Treatment of EHEC O157:H7 infections is complicated, as antibiotics can exacerbate Shiga toxin (Stx) production and lead to more severe symptoms including HUS. To date, no vaccines have been approved for human use, exposing a void in both treatment and prevention of EHEC O157:H7 infections. Previously, our lab has shown success in identifying novel vaccine candidates via bio- and immunoinformatics approaches, which are capable of reducing bacterial colonization in an in vivo model of intestinal colonization. In this study, we further characterized 17 of the identified vaccine candidates at the bioinformatics level and evaluated the protective capacity of the top three candidates when administered as DNA vaccines in our murine model of EHEC O157:H7 colonization. Based on further immunoinformatic predictions, these vaccine candidates were expected to induce neutralizing antibodies in a Th2-skewed immunological response. Immunization of BALB/c mice with two of these candidates resulted in reduced bacterial colonization following EHEC O157:H7 challenge. Additionally, immune sera was shown to prevent bacterial adhesion in vitro to Caco-2 cells. Together, this study provides further validation of our immunoinformatic analyses and identifies promising vaccine candidates against EHEC O157:H7. PMID:27625996

  2. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  3. Cattle Candidate Genes for Meat Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Bláhová, Alice

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compile a summary of the most important candidate genes for meat production. The studied genes were: GH, GHR, MSTN, MyoD family, leptin, IGF, TG5, SCD, DGAT and STAT5A. Growth hormone (GH) is involved in physiological processes of growth and metabolism. Growth hormone receptor (GHR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for meat production in cattle. Myostatin is a significant marker. It affects the amount of muscle, reduces marbling and elevate meat tendern...

  4. Issue-Advocacy versus Candidate Advertising: Effects on Candidate Preferences and Democratic Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Michael; Holbert, R. Lance; Szabo, Erin Alison; Kaminski, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    Examines the influence of soft-money-sponsored issue-advocacy advertising in U.S. House and Senate campaigns, comparing its effects against candidate-sponsored positive advertising and contrast advertising on viewers' candidate preferences and on their attitude that reflect democratic values. Reveals no main effects for advertising approach on…

  5. SepG coordinates sporulation-specific cell division and nucleoid organization in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Claessen, Dennis; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly complex process that requires tight coordination between septum formation and chromosome replication and segregation. In bacteria that divide by binary fission a single septum is formed at mid-cell, a process that is coordinated by the conserved cell division scaffold protein FtsZ. In contrast, during sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes, up to a hundred rings of FtsZ (Z rings) are produced almost simultaneously, dividing the multinucleoid aerial hyphae into long chains of unigenomic spores. This involves the active recruitment of FtsZ by the SsgB protein, and at the same time requires sophisticated systems to regulate chromosome dynamics. Here, we show that SepG is required for the onset of sporulation and acts by ensuring that SsgB is localized to future septum sites. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging suggests direct interaction between SepG and SsgB. The beta-lactamase reporter system showed that SepG is a transmembrane protein with its central domain oriented towards the cytoplasm. Without SepG, SsgB fails to localize properly, consistent with a crucial role for SepG in the membrane localization of the SsgB-FtsZ complex. While SsgB remains associated with FtsZ, SepG re-localizes to the (pre)spore periphery. Expanded doughnut-shaped nucleoids are formed in sepG null mutants, suggesting that SepG is required for nucleoid compaction. Taken together, our work shows that SepG, encoded by one of the last genes in the conserved dcw cluster of cell division and cell-wall-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria whose function was still largely unresolved,coordinates septum synthesis and chromosome organization in Streptomyces. PMID:27053678

  6. Divisome and segrosome components of Deinococcus radiodurans interact through cell division regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Ganesh K; Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes many of the known components of divisome as well as four sets of genome partitioning proteins, ParA and ParB on its multipartite genome. Interdependent regulation of cell division and genome segregation is not understood. In vivo interactions of D. radiodurans' sdivisome, segrosome and other cell division regulatory proteins expressed on multicopy plasmids were studied in Escherichia coli using a bacterial two-hybrid system and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation with the proteins made in E. coli. Many of these showed interactions both with the self and with other proteins. For example, DrFtsA, DrFtsZ, DrMinD, DrMinC, DrDivIVA and all four ParB proteins individually formed at least homodimers, while DrFtsA interacted with DrFtsZ, DrFtsW, DrFtsE, DrFtsK and DrMinD. DrMinD also showed interaction with DrFtsW, DrFtsE and DrMinC. Interestingly, septum site determining protein, DrDivIVA showed interactions with secondary genome ParAs as well as ParB1, ParB3 and ParB4 while DrMinC interacted with ParB1 and ParB3. PprA, a pleiotropic protein recently implicated in cell division regulation, neither interacted with divisome proteins nor ParBs but interacted at different levels with all four ParAs. These results suggest the formation of independent multiprotein complexes of 'DrFts' proteins, segrosome proteins and cell division regulatory proteins, and these complexes could interact with each other through DrMinC and DrDivIVA, and PprA in D. radiodurans.

  7. SepG coordinates sporulation-specific cell division and nucleoid organization in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Claessen, Dennis; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly complex process that requires tight coordination between septum formation and chromosome replication and segregation. In bacteria that divide by binary fission a single septum is formed at mid-cell, a process that is coordinated by the conserved cell division scaffold protein FtsZ. In contrast, during sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes, up to a hundred rings of FtsZ (Z rings) are produced almost simultaneously, dividing the multinucleoid aerial hyphae into long chains of unigenomic spores. This involves the active recruitment of FtsZ by the SsgB protein, and at the same time requires sophisticated systems to regulate chromosome dynamics. Here, we show that SepG is required for the onset of sporulation and acts by ensuring that SsgB is localized to future septum sites. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging suggests direct interaction between SepG and SsgB. The beta-lactamase reporter system showed that SepG is a transmembrane protein with its central domain oriented towards the cytoplasm. Without SepG, SsgB fails to localize properly, consistent with a crucial role for SepG in the membrane localization of the SsgB-FtsZ complex. While SsgB remains associated with FtsZ, SepG re-localizes to the (pre)spore periphery. Expanded doughnut-shaped nucleoids are formed in sepG null mutants, suggesting that SepG is required for nucleoid compaction. Taken together, our work shows that SepG, encoded by one of the last genes in the conserved dcw cluster of cell division and cell-wall-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria whose function was still largely unresolved,coordinates septum synthesis and chromosome organization in Streptomyces.

  8. Spectroscopy Division: progress report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises the work done by members of the Spectroscopy Division both within BARC as well as in scientific institutions elsewhere during the calendar year 1990. Main areas of research activity include atomic spectroscopy for hyperfine structure and isotope shift determination, theoretical and experimental studies of diatomic molecules, infrared and Raman spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules, design and fabrication of beam line optics for INDUS-I synchrotron radiation source, beam foil spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy of various atomic and molecular systems. Major experimental facilities that have been utilised include a fourier transform spectrometer, an excimer laser pumped dye-laser and a continous wave argon-ion laser. The report also includes the spectroscopic analytical service rendered for various DAE units and describes briefly some new analytical facilities like laser enhanced ionization in flames and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy using pulsed lasers which are being set up. The above activites were reported by members of the Spectroscopy Division via invited lectures, papers presented in various national and international conferences and publication in scientific journals. Details of these are given at the end of the report. (author). figs., tabs

  9. Effects of Polyhydroxybutyrate Production on Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathleen; Rahman, Asif; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering can be utilized to aide the advancement of improved long-term space flight. The potential to use synthetic biology as a platform to biomanufacture desired equipment on demand using the three dimensional (3D) printer on the International Space Station (ISS) gives long-term NASA missions the flexibility to produce materials as needed on site. Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are biodegradable, have properties similar to plastics, and can be produced in Escherichia coli using genetic engineering. Using PHBs during space flight could assist mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications, particularly through 3D printing. It is well documented that during PHB production E. coli cells can become significantly elongated. The elongation of cells reduces the ability of the cells to divide and thus to produce PHB. I aim to better understand cell division during PHB production, through the design, building, and testing of synthetic biological circuits, and identify how to potentially increase yields of PHB with FtsZ overexpression, the gene responsible for cell division. Ultimately, an increase in the yield will allow more products to be created using the 3D printer on the ISS and beyond, thus aiding astronauts in their missions.

  10. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  11. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  12. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  13. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum - from gamma rays to radio wavelengths - as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions - WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  14. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  15. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  16. Progress report: 1996 Radiation Safety Systems Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of Radiation Safety Systems Division include (i) development of specialised monitoring systems and radiation safety information network, (ii) radiation hazards control at the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the radioisotope programmes at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and for the accelerators programme at BARC and Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The systems on which development and upgradation work was carried out during the year included aerial gamma spectrometer, automated environment monitor using railway network, radioisotope package monitor and air monitors for tritium and alpha active aerosols. Other R and D efforts at the division included assessment of risk for radiation exposures and evaluation of ICRP 60 recommendations in the Indian context, shielding evaluation and dosimetry for the new upcoming accelerator facilities and solid state nuclear track detector techniques for neutron measurements. The expertise of the divisional members was provided for 36 safety committees of BARC and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Twenty three publications were brought out during the year 1996. (author)

  17. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  18. The Commingled Division of Visual Attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuechuan Sun

    Full Text Available Many critical activities require visual attention to be distributed simultaneously among distinct tasks where the attended foci are not spatially separated. In our two experiments, participants performed a large number of trials where both a primary task (enumeration of spots and a secondary task (reporting the presence/absence or identity of a distinctive shape required the division of visual attention. The spots and the shape were commingled spatially and the shape appeared unpredictably on a relatively small fraction of the trials. The secondary task stimulus (the shape was reported in inverse proportion to the attentional load imposed by the primary task (enumeration of spots. When the shape did appear, performance on the primary task (enumeration suffered relative to when the shape was absent; both speed and accuracy were compromised. When the secondary task required identification in addition to detection, reaction times increased by about 200 percent. These results are broadly compatible with biased competition models of perceptual processing. An important area of application, where the commingled division of visual attention is required, is the augmented reality head-up display (AR-HUD. This innovation has the potential to make operating vehicles safer but our data suggest that there are significant concerns regarding driver distraction.

  19. Evaluation of Tablets Divisibility in Pharmacoeconomic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Yemsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Divisibility and dose homogeneity in scored tablets which form a part of the drugs those are in tablet forms in Turkey and have an extensive implementation area in drug therapy have a high importance for patient compliance and safety. In this study, it is aimed to evaluate Turkey%u2019s pharmaceutical market about cost differences of dividing scored tablets which has different unit quantities of the same active substance. Material and Method: In Turkey%u2019s pharmaceutical market, to detect cost differences of dividing scored tablets which has different unit quantities of the same active substance, All Drug%u2019s Price List that has been published on Turkish Medicine and Medical Devices Agency%u2019s web site is evaluated by using cost-minimization analysis method. Results: It is determined that the use of scored tablets make a price advantage of about 70%. Discussion: In conclusion, on package leaflets and outer packaging information those are prepared for the use of patients, the warning %u201CDon%u2019t divide, crack or swallow the tablets unless otherwise recommended by your doctor.%u201D should be stated and it is considered that it would be useful if the patient is informed about divisibility by the pharmacist.

  20. Premature centromere division and other centromeric misbehavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, P.H. [Christchurch School of Medicine (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Premature centromere division was initially described for the X chromosome. In an otherwise typical metaphase cell, one chromosome showed no primary constriction and appeared to have no centromere. G-banding analysis indicated that this apparent acentric fragment was an entire X chromosome. Because its centromere was divided when the centromeres of all other chromosomes of the metaphase cell were entire, the condition was described as premature centromere division (PCD). The importance of PCD lies in its being a mechanism on non-disjunction, as was indicated by the strong association of X chromosome aneuploidy with PCD,X. We can infer that the affected chromosome failed to take part in the normal distribution of chromosomes at mitoses. The centromere, it its widest sense, is generally believed to have a role in the correct orientation of chromosomes at the metaphase plate and the distribution of chromatids to the spindle poles. The failure of these functions implies a major centromeric dysfunction. What do we know of this complex region of the chromosome that might help us understand its dysfunction?

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support

  2. The architecture of the Cassini division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, M.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R.N.; Brown, R.H.; French, R.G.; Marouf, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Division in Saturn's rings contains a series of eight named gaps, three of which contain dense ringlets. Observations of stellar occultations by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft have yielded 40 accurate and precise measurements of the radial position of the edges of all of these gaps and ringlets. These data reveal suggestive patterns in the shapes of many of the gap edges: the outer edges of the five gaps without ringlets are circular to within 1 km, while the inner edges of six of the gaps are eccentric, with apsidal precession rates consistent with those expected for eccentric orbits near each edge. Intriguingly, the pattern speeds of these eccentric inner gap edges, together with that of the eccentric Huygens Ringlet, form a series with a characteristic spacing of 006 day-1. The two gaps with non-eccentric inner edges lie near first-order inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs) with moons. One such edge is close to the 5:4 ILR with Prometheus, and the radial excursions of this edge do appear to have an m = 5 component aligned with that moon. The other resonantly confined edge is the outer edge of the B ring, which lies near the 2:1 Mimas ILR. Detailed investigation of the B-ring-edge data confirm the presence of an m = 2 perturbation on the B-ring edge, but also show that during the course of the Cassini Mission, this pattern has drifted backward relative to Mimas. Comparisons with earlier occultation measurements going back to Voyager suggest the possibility that the m = 2 pattern is actually librating relative to Mimas with a libration frequency L 006 day-1 (or possibly 012 day -1). In addition to the m = 2 pattern, the B-ring edge also has an m = 1 component that rotates around the planet at a rate close to the expected apsidal precession rate (?? ?? ?? B ??? 5.??06 day -1). Thus, the pattern speeds of the eccentric edges in the Cassini Division can be generated from various combinations of the pattern speeds

  3. Towards Treating Chemistry Teacher Candidates as Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis

    2008-01-01

    This research inquiry investigates the factors influencing chemistry teacher candidates' development during their extended practica in the second and final year of an After-Degree Bachelor of Education at a university in central Canada. A variety of data sources are used to identify the risk and protective factors impeding and contributing to the…

  4. Spectroscopy of Hyades L dwarf candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Lodieu, N; Bejar, V J S

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic follow-up of L dwarf candidates identified in the Hyades cluster by Hogan et al. (2008). We obtained low-resolution optical spectroscopy with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the Gran Telescopio de Canarias for all 12 L dwarf candidates as well as new J-band imaging for a subsample of eight to confirm their proper motion. We also present mid-infrared photometry from the Wise Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for the Hyades L and T dwarf candidates and estimate their spectroscopic distances, effective temperatures, and masses. We confirm the cool nature of several L dwarf candidates and confirm astrometrically their membership, bridging the gap between the coolest M dwarfs and the two T dwarfs previously reported in the Hyades cluster. These members represent valuable spectral templates at an age of 625 Myr and slightly super solar metallicity (Fe/H=+0.13). We update the Hyades mass function across the hydrogen-burning limit and in the substel...

  5. 76 FR 36130 - Call for Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION: Request for... Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB or the Board) with the requested materials in response to...

  6. 11 CFR 9003.2 - Candidate certifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... excess of the aggregate payments to which they will be entitled under 11 CFR part 9004. (2) That no... funds under 11 CFR 9003.2(c)(3) shall not count against such candidate's $50,000 expenditure limitation... expenditures in excess of the limitations of 11 CFR 110.8(a), the Commission may seek civil penalties under...

  7. Emotional Intelligence and Beginning Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Madeline; Espinoza, Sue

    2007-01-01

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Texas will need over 82,000 new teachers by 2008. Many teachers are leaving the profession within 5 years of being employed. Closing a revolving door, teacher preparation programs are discussing this phenomenon. One hundred sixty beginning teacher candidates were surveyed using the Emotional Skills…

  8. Fuzzy Treatment of Candidate Outliers in Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo E. D'Errico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robustness against the possible occurrence of outlying observations is critical to the performance of a measurement process. Open questions relevant to statistical testing for candidate outliers are reviewed. A novel fuzzy logic approach is developed and exemplified in a metrology context. A simulation procedure is presented and discussed by comparing fuzzy versus probabilistic models.

  9. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  10. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  11. The Responsibility Education of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toremen, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to take the views and suggestions of academicians working at the faculty of education on what can be done about teacher candidates' responsibility education. This study was designed on the basis of qualitative research approach and purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected by unstructured interview method…

  12. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiril Paskalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture plate, and also an erythematous area on palatum durum above the upper full denture. The patient was suspected to have candidal leukoplakia on the lingual part of the mandible and denture stomatitis on the palate area. The treatment consisted of nystatin oral suspension, chlorhexidine solution, multivitamins, along with denture replacement and oral health education. The entire lesion resolved within 2 months therapy. Candidal infection treatment on denture patient needs not only medication or denture replacement, but also patient compliance to achieve maximal result.

  13. FAME's Search for Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K.

    FAME is a five year survey mission to observe the positions, proper motions, and parallaxes of 40,000,000 stars down to 15th magnitude with accuracies of 50 microarcseconds at 9th magnitude. In addition to producing an astrometric and photometric catalog unparalleled for its accuracy and size, the survey will provide significant astrophysics results and search for extrasolar planet candidates.

  14. Secondary Teacher Candidates' Lesson Planning Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, Christina; Zhang, Shaoan

    2016-01-01

    Teacher candidates (TCs) use clinical experiences to enact concepts taught in their university courses; therefore field experiences may be the most important component of teacher preparation (Hammerness et al., 2005). TCs require support and guidance as they learn to adapt curriculum materials for effective use in the classroom (Davis, 2006). They…

  15. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Rietman; J.-P. Sommeijer; C.N. Levelt; J.A. Heimel; A.B. Brussaard; J.G.G. Borst; Y. Elgersma; N. Galjart; G.T. van der Horst; C.M. Pennartz; A.B. Smit; B.M. Spruijt; M. Verhage; C.I. de Zeeuw

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated

  16. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing ...

  17. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis

  18. Social Justice Perceptions of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, Muhammed

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to determine the social justice perceptions of teacher candidates being trained in an education faculty. For this purpose, national and international literature was reviewed by the researcher and a 32-item questionnaire was developed and implemented on 237 senior year education faculty students. Data from the questionnaires were…

  19. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liset Rietman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify new candidate genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity. To this aim, we combined previously obtained data from recombinant inbred BXD strains on ocular dominance (OD plasticity and gene expression levels in the neocortex. We validated our approach using a list of genes which alter OD plasticity when inactivated. The expression levels of one fifth of these genes correlated with the amount of OD plasticity. Moreover, the two genes with the highest relative inter-strain differences were among the correlated genes. This suggests that correlation between gene expression levels and OD plasticity is indeed likely to point to genes with a causal role in modulating or generating plasticity in the visual cortex. After this validation on known plasticity genes, we identified new candidate genes by a multi-step approach. First, a list was compiled of all genes of which the expression level in BXD strains correlate with the amount of OD plasticity. To narrow this list to the more promising candidates, we took its cross-section with a list of genes co-regulated with the sensitive period for OD plasticity and a list of genes associated with pathways implicated in OD plasticity. This analysis resulted in a list of 32 candidate genes. The list contained unproven, but not surprising, candidates, such as the genes for IGF-1, NCAM1, NOGO-A, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A receptor, acetylcholine esterase and the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This was indicative of the viability of our approach, but more interesting were the novel candidate genes: Akap7, Akt1, Camk2d, Cckbr, Cd44, Crim1, Ctdsp2, Dnajc5, Gnai1, Itpka, Mapk8, Nbea, Nfatc3, Nlk, Npy5r, Phf21a, Phip, Ppm1l, Ppp1r1b, Rbbp4, Slc1a3, Slit2, Socs2, Spock3, St8sia1, Zfp207. The possible role of some of these candidates is discussed in the article.

  20. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  1. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits...... and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...

  2. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated...

  3. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Marine; Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Chemaly, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria's main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for this purpose. However, despite many studies, there is currently no vaccine available on the market to reduce the intestinal Campylobacter load in chickens. It is essential to identify and characterize new vaccine antigens. This study applied the reverse vaccinology approach to detect new vaccine candidates. The main criteria used to select immune proteins were localization, antigenicity, and number of B-epitopes. Fourteen proteins were identified as potential vaccine antigens. In vitro and in vivo experiments now need to be performed to validate the immune and protective power of these newly identified antigens. PMID:27413761

  4. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Marine; Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Hirchaud, Edouard; Parra, Alberto; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria's main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for this purpose. However, despite many studies, there is currently no vaccine available on the market to reduce the intestinal Campylobacter load in chickens. It is essential to identify and characterize new vaccine antigens. This study applied the reverse vaccinology approach to detect new vaccine candidates. The main criteria used to select immune proteins were localization, antigenicity, and number of B-epitopes. Fourteen proteins were identified as potential vaccine antigens. In vitro and in vivo experiments now need to be performed to validate the immune and protective power of these newly identified antigens. PMID:27413761

  5. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Meunier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria’s main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for this purpose. However, despite many studies, there is currently no vaccine available on the market to reduce the intestinal Campylobacter load in chickens. It is essential to identify and characterize new vaccine antigens. This study applied the reverse vaccinology approach to detect new vaccine candidates. The main criteria used to select immune proteins were localization, antigenicity, and number of B-epitopes. Fourteen proteins were identified as potential vaccine antigens. In vitro and in vivo experiments now need to be performed to validate the immune and protective power of these newly identified antigens.

  6. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Onset of cell division in maize germination: action of auxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed germination implies metabolic reactivation, synthesis of macromolecules and onset of cell division. During maize germination, meristematic tissues of embryos re-initiate cell division asynchronically. Since auxins are known to stimulate cell division, they asked how auxins might regulate cell cycle re-initiation. Embryonic tissues were incubated with and without auxins. A pulse of either 3H-thymidine or 32P-ortophosphate was given to the tissues. Mitotic indexes were determined and % of labeled mitotic cells recorded. Results indicated that meristematic cells re-initiate cell division either from G1 or G2 phases. Auxin stimulated differentially the cell division process of these cells. 32P incorporation into cytoplasmic or nucleic histones was measured. Auxins stimulated this incorporation. Active turnover of histone phosphorylation occurred simultaneously to the cell division process. It is suggested that auxins might regulate the cell cycle by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of histones

  9. 22 CFR 11.8 - Travel expenses of candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel expenses of candidates. 11.8 Section 11... Travel expenses of candidates. The travel and other personal expenses of candidates incurred in... Department may issue round-trip invitational travel orders to bring candidates to Washington at...

  10. 32 CFR 901.6 - Candidate fitness test requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Candidate fitness test requirement. 901.6... Requirements § 901.6 Candidate fitness test requirement. Before being offered an appointment, candidates must take a Candidate Fitness Test (CFT) which consists of exercises designed to measure muscular...

  11. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Jens; Emge, Philippe; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Vogel, Viola

    2013-12-01

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length.

  12. Safety and Health Division achievements during 40 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During her speech, presenter outlined several issues regarding on establishment of Safety and Health Division since 40 years. This division contain of 3 sub unit; Physical Safety Group, Medical Physic Group and Non-ionizing Radiation group (NIR). The objectives of this division to implement R and D activities and services regarding safety and radiological health also non-radiological to ensure public safety, environment and asset suit with obligations established by authorities, IAEA standards and regulations.(author)

  13. Photochemically driven redox chemistry induces protocell membrane pearling and division

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ting F.; Adamala, Katarzyna; Zhang, Na; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the evolution of complex biochemical machinery, the growth and division of simple primitive cells (protocells) must have been driven by environmental factors. We have previously demonstrated two pathways for fatty acid vesicle growth in which initially spherical vesicles grow into long filamentous vesicles; division is then mediated by fluid shear forces. Here we describe a different pathway for division that is independent of external mechanical forces. We show that the illumination...

  14. Comprehensive Review on Divisible Load Theory: Concepts, Strategies, and Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsollah Ghanbari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is extensive literature concerning the divisible load theory. The divisible load theory is mainly applied for scheduling in the area of distributed computing. It is based on the fact that the load can be divided into some arbitrarily independent parts, in which each part can be processed independently by a processor. This paper reviews the literature concerning the divisible load theory, while focusing on the details of the basic concepts, approaches, strategies, typologies, and open problems.

  15. DIVISION OF LABOUR AND TRANSACTION COSTS: AN INTRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    YEW-KWANG NG

    2005-01-01

    While the role of division of labour is very important, in itself its scope for promoting economic growth is limited. This scope is tremendously expanded when division of labour is compounded with that of capital accumulation and technical progress and the interaction/reinforcing effects between these three important sources and their interaction with growth itself. The pioneering work of Xiaokai Yang's contributions to the analysis of the division of labour and the evolution of economic orga...

  16. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  17. Joy Osborne, MS, MPA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy Osborne is the ARC Director for the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences. The ARC (Administrative Resource Center) provides services to DCP in the areas of budget, contracts, grants, human resources, travel, space and facilities, and other administrative areas. Joy came to NCI in 1992 as a Presidential Management Intern and has worked with many of the NCI Divisions in both intramural and extramural. |

  18. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  19. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  20. Candidate marketing takes the guessing game out of choosing employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Judith; Havel, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    Candidate marketing builds a foundation for relationships between employers and potential employees. Additionally, candidate marketing differentiates organizations in the marketplace. Organizations using candidate marketing to communicate the employer brand can expect a higher quality of candidates, and new employees are better prepared for the work environment and culture. Today, organizations can use a variety of integrated tools and techniques to communicate and build relationships with candidates. Candidate marketing demonstrates an organization's willingness towards transparency, and ability to invite open conversations between candidates and members of the organizations.