WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterial adhesion

  1. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  2. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  3. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  4. Bacterial adhesion and biofilms on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor Roger Garrett; Manmohan Bhakoo; Zhibing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in industry and in the domicile,and much research has been done for deeper understanding of the processes involved.A generic biological model of bacterial adhesion and population growth called the bacterial biofilm growth cycle,has been described and modified many times.The biofilm growth cycle encompasses bacterial adhesion at all levels,starting with the initial physical attraction of bacteria to a substrate,and ending with the eventual liberation of cell dusters from the biofilm matrix.When describing bacterial adhesion one is simply describing one or more stages of biofilm development,neglecting the fact that the population may not reach maturity.This article provides an overview of bacterial adhesion.cites examples of how bac-terial adhesion affects industry and summarises methods and instrumentation used to improve our understanding of the adhesive prop-erties of bacteria.

  5. Bacterial adhesion of porphyromonas gingivalis on provisional fixed prosthetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zortuk

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion : The quantity of bacterial adhesion and surface roughness differed among the assessed provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. The light-polymerized provisional material Revotek LC had rougher surface and more bacterial adhesion compared with the others.

  6. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Maria Tereza; Nascimento, Antônio Galvão; Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    2008-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified), Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation. PMID:24031246

  7. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    . Staphylococci adhere stronger on fresh glass than on hydrophilic glass, while the weaker adhesion by P. fluorescens was similar on both types of glass. These results confirmed the importance of surface hydrophobicity in bacterial adhesion. This study has demonstrated that single-cell force spectroscopy allows...... be considered. We have developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface by approaching a tipless AFM...... on the adhesion force, we explored the bond formation and adhesive strength of four different bacterial strains towards three abiotic substrates with variable hydrophobicity and surface roughness. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time...

  8. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Norde, W.; Meil, H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F-prev) and to detach adhering bacteria (F-det) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the fol

  9. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the f

  10. Application of Sub-Micrometer Vibrations to Mitigate Bacterial Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will R. Paces

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As a prominent concern regarding implantable devices, eliminating the threat of opportunistic bacterial infection represents a significant benefit to both patient health and device function. Current treatment options focus on chemical approaches to negate bacterial adhesion, however, these methods are in some ways limited. The scope of this study was to assess the efficacy of a novel means of modulating bacterial adhesion through the application of vibrations using magnetoelastic materials. Magnetoelastic materials possess unique magnetostrictive property that can convert a magnetic field stimulus into a mechanical deformation. In vitro experiments demonstrated that vibrational loads generated by the magnetoelastic materials significantly reduced the number of adherent bacteria on samples exposed to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus suspensions. These experiments demonstrate that vibrational loads from magnetoelastic materials can be used as a post-deployment activated means to deter bacterial adhesion and device infection.

  11. Bacterial contamination of cucumber fruit through adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Laura D; Fleming, Henry P; Breidt, Frederick

    2002-12-01

    In this study, the adhesion of bacteria to fresh cucumber surfaces in aqueous suspension was shown to be dependent on time of incubation, inoculum species and concentration, and temperature. The adhesion of bacteria to the fruit in wash water was less extensive at lower temperatures and shorter exposure times. Various species of bacteria were adsorbed to cucumber surfaces in the following relative order: Salmonella Typhimurium > Staphylococcus aureus > Lactobacillus plantarum > Listeria monocytogenes. Cells were adsorbed at all temperatures tested (5, 15, 25, and 35 degrees C) at levels that depended on incubation time, but the numbers of cells adsorbed were larger at higher incubation temperatures. Levels of adhesion of bacteria to dewaxed fruit were higher for L. monocytogenes and lower for Salmonella Typhimurium, L. plantarum, and S. aureus than were levels of adhesion to waxed fruit.

  12. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  13. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra, E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Calzada México-Xochimilco No. 289, Col. Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical–chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO{sub 2} > ZrO{sub 2}) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO{sub 2}, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • Amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings were deposited. • The atomic ordering influences the coatings surface charge and nano-topography. • The atomic ordering modifies the bacterial adhesion for the same surface chemistry. • S. aureus adhesion was lower on a-TiO{sub 2} and a-ZrO{sub 2} than on their c-oxide counterpart. • E. coli adhesion on a-TiO{sub 2} was lower than on the c-TiO{sub 2}.

  14. Deposition efficiency and reversibility of bacterial adhesion under flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, JM; vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1995-01-01

    The deposition efficiencies and reversibilities of bacterial adhesion (Staphylococcus epidermidis HBH2 169, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1, and Streptococcus thermophilus B) on different substratum surfaces under flow were determined using real-time in situ image analysis. For each combination of

  15. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: q.zhao@dundee.ac.uk; Liu, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Peng, N. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-31

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N{sup +}, O{sup +} and SiF{sub 3} {sup +}, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF{sub 3} {sup +}-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N{sup +}-implanted steel, O{sup +}-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  16. Curli mediate bacterial adhesion to fibronectin via tensile multiple bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Gruber, Hermann J.; Cui, Yidan; Traxler, Lukas; Siligan, Christine; Park, Sungsu; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Many enteric bacteria including pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains produce curli fibers that bind to host surfaces, leading to bacterial internalization into host cells. By using a nanomechanical force-sensing approach, we obtained real-time information about the distribution of molecular bonds involved in the adhesion of curliated bacteria to fibronectin. We found that curliated E. coli and fibronectin formed dense quantized and multiple specific bonds with high tensile strength, resulting in tight bacterial binding. Nanomechanical recognition measurements revealed that approximately 10 bonds were disrupted either sequentially or simultaneously under force load. Thus the curli formation of bacterial surfaces leads to multi-bond structural components of fibrous nature, which may explain the strong mechanical binding of curliated bacteria to host cells and unveil the functions of these proteins in bacterial internalization and invasion.

  17. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  18. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  19. Inhibition of Bacterial Adhesion by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs due to Escherichia coli is one of the most common diseases encountered in clinical practice. Most common recognised pathogenic factor in E.coli is adhesion. There is accumulating evidence that through subinhibitory concentrations (sub - MICs of many antibiotics do not kill bacteria, they are able to interfere with some important aspects of bacterial cell function. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted to investigate the effect of sub MICs (1/2-1/8 MIC of ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, gentamicin, ampicillin and co - trimoxazole on E. coli adhesiveness to human vaginal epithelial cells using three strains ATCC 25922, MTCC 729 and U 105. Results: The 1/2 MIC of all the antibiotics tested produced the greatest inhibition of bacterial adhesion. Morphological changes were observed with ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and ampicillin at 1/2 MIC and to a lesser extent at 1/4 and 1/8 MIC. Co-trimoxazole caused the greatest suppression of adhesion at 1/2 MIC of E. coli strain MTCC 729 when compared with the controls, followed by ceftazidime. Conclusion: These results suggest that co - trimoxazole is the most effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  20. Combinatorial approach for fabrication of coatings to control bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedron, S; Peinado, C; Catalina, F; Bosch, P; Anseth, K S; Abrusci, C

    2012-01-01

    Due to the high importance of bacterial infections in medical devices there is an increasing interest in the design of anti-fouling coatings. The application of substrates with controlled chemical gradients to prevent microbial adhesion is presented. We describe here the co-polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate with a hyperbranched multimethacrylate (H30MA) using a chemical gradient generator; and the resulting films were characterized with respect to their ability to serve as coating for biomedical devices. The photo-polymerized materials present special surface properties due to the hyperbranched structure of H30MA and phase separation at specific concentrations in the PEGDM matrix. This approach affords the investigation of cell response to a large range of different chemistries on a single sample. Two bacterial strains commonly associated with surgical site infections, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been cultured on these substrates to study their attachment behaviour. These gradient-coated samples demonstrate less bacterial adhesion at higher concentrations of H30MA, and the adhesion is substantially affected by the extent of surface phase segregation.

  1. Candidate Targets for New Anti-Virulence Drugs: Selected Cases of Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Kvist, Malin;

    2007-01-01

    formation are highly attractive targets for new drugs. Specific adhesion provides bacteria with target selection and prevents removal by hydrodynamic flow forces. Bacterial adhesion is of paramount importance for bacterial pathogenesis. Adhesion is also the first step in biofilm formation. Biofilm formation...

  2. Lubricin: a novel means to decrease bacterial adhesion and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aninwene, George E; Abadian, Pegah N; Ravi, Vishnu; Taylor, Erik N; Hall, Douglas M; Mei, Amy; Jay, Gregory D; Goluch, Edgar D; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the ability of lubricin (LUB) to prevent bacterial attachment and proliferation on model tissue culture polystyrene surfaces. The findings from this study indicated that LUB was able to reduce the attachment and growth of Staphylococcus aureus on tissue culture polystyrene over the course of 24 h by approximately 13.9% compared to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-soaked control. LUB also increased S. aureus lag time (the period of time between the introduction of bacteria to a new environment and their exponential growth) by approximately 27% compared to a PBS-soaked control. This study also indicated that vitronectin (VTN), a protein homologous to LUB, reduced bacterial S. aureus adhesion and growth on tissue culture polystyrene by approximately 11% compared to a PBS-soaked control. VTN also increased the lag time of S. aureus by approximately 43%, compared to a PBS-soaked control. Bovine submaxillary mucin was studied because there are similarities between it and the center mucin-like domain of LUB. Results showed that the reduction of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis proliferation on mucin coated surfaces was not as substantial as that seen with LUB. In summary, this study provided the first evidence that LUB reduced the initial adhesion and growth of both S. aureus and S. epidermidis on a model surface to suppress biofilm formation. These reductions in initial bacteria adhesion and proliferation can be beneficial for medical implants and, although requiring more study, can lead to drastically improved patient outcomes.

  3. Bovine milk osteopontin - Targeting bacterial adhesion for biofilm control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mathilde Frost; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning does usually not result in complete biofilm removal, due to the complex oral anatomy and the strong adhesion of the biofilm to the tooth. Therefore, different supportive measures are employed, most of which aim at the chemical eradication of bacteria...... in dental biofilms. As their bactericidal action impacts the entire oral microflora, agents that inhibit biofilm formation without killing bacteria, such as the bovine milk protein osteopontin, have gained increasing attention. Here, we investigate the adhesion of 8 bacterial species associated with dental...... caries to salivary-coated flow-cells in the presence or absence of osteopontin or the control protein caseinoglycomacropeptide (0.32 mM/L). After 1h of flow (9.45 mm/min) at 35 °C, adhering bacteria were quantified by digital image analysis in a total of 692 bright-field images. Experiments were...

  4. Bacterial adhesion to orthopaedic implant materials and a novel oxygen plasma modified PEEK surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochford, E. T. J.; Poulsson, A. H. C.; Salavarrieta Varela, J.; Lezuo, P.; Richards, R. G.; Moriarty, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in biomedical applications, information about bacterial adhesion to this biomaterial is limited. This study investigated Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to injection moulded and machined PEEK OPTIMA (R) using a custom

  5. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.;

    of the mechanisms of bacterial attachment. An alternative way to study the adhesion of single bacterial cells is to measure the adhesion between immobilized bacterial cells and coated AFM cantilevers. This strategy was used to investigate the adhesive properties of novel high density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG......) coatings on titanium. We investigate the ability of a high density poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) coating to resist bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from three clinically relevant bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermis. The high...

  6. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Niels P; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-10-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the following three hypotheses. 1. A strong hydrodynamic shear force to prevent adhesion relates to a strong hydrodynamic shear force to detach an adhering organism. 2. A weak hydrodynamic shear force to detach adhering bacteria implies that more bacteria will be stimulated to detach by passing an air-liquid interface (an air bubble) through the flow chamber. 3. DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) interactions determine the characteristic hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent adhesion and to detach adhering micro-organisms as well as the detachment induced by a passing air-liquid interface. F(prev) varied from 0.03 to 0.70 pN, while F(det) varied from 0.31 to over 19.64 pN, suggesting that after initial contact, strengthening of the bond occurs. Generally, it was more difficult to detach bacteria from DDS-coated glass than from hydrophilic glass, which was confirmed by air bubble detachment studies. Calculated attractive forces based on the DLVO theory (F(DLVO)) towards the secondary interaction minimum were higher on glass than on DDS-coated glass. In general, all three hypotheses had to be rejected, showing that it is important to distinguish between forces acting parallel (hydrodynamic shear) and perpendicular (DLVO, air-liquid interface passages) to the substratum surface.

  7. Oral bacterial adhesion forces to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction in orthodontic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Chen, Yangxi; de Vries, Joop; Ren, Yijin

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction represents a growing problem in orthodontics, because bacteria can adversely affect treatment by causing demineralization of the enamel surface around the brackets. It is important to know the forces with wh

  8. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  9. Influence of the nano-micro structure of the surface on bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Díaz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials failures are frequently associated to the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface. The aim of this work is to study the adhesion of non motile bacteria streptococci consortium and motile Pseudomonas fluorescens. Substrates with micro and nanopatterned topography were used. The influence of surface characteristics on bacterial adhesion was investigated using optical and epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Results showed an important influence of the substratum nature. On microrough surfaces, initial bacterial adhesion was less significant than on smooth surfaces. In contrast, nanopatterned samples showed more bacterial attachment than the smooth control. It was also noted a remarkable difference in morphology, orientation and distribution of bacteria between the smooth and the nanostructured substrate. The results show the important effect of substratum nature and topography on bacterial adhesion which depended on the relation between roughness characteristics dimensions and bacterial size.

  10. Bacterial adhesion onto nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes: effect of permeate flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semião, Andrea J C; Habimana, Olivier; Casey, Eoin

    2014-10-15

    The influence of permeate flux on bacterial adhesion to NF and RO membranes was examined using two model Pseudomonas species, namely Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida. To better understand the initial biofouling profile during NF/RO processes, deposition experiments were conducted in cross flow under permeate flux varying from 0.5 up to 120 L/(h m(2)), using six NF and RO membranes each having different surface properties. All experiments were performed at a Reynolds number of 579. Complementary adhesion experiments were performed using Pseudomonas cells grown to early-, mid- and late-exponential growth phases to evaluate the effect of bacterial cell surface properties during cell adhesion under permeate flux conditions. Results from this study show that initial bacterial adhesion is strongly dependent on the permeate flux conditions, where increased adhesion was obtained with increased permeate flux, until a maximum of 40% coverage was reached. Membrane surface properties or bacterial growth stages was further found to have little impact on bacterial adhesion to NF and RO membrane surfaces under the conditions tested. These results emphasise the importance of conducting adhesion and biofouling experiments under realistic permeate flux conditions, and raises questions about the efficacy of the methods for the evaluation of antifouling membranes in which bacterial adhesion is commonly assessed under zero-flux or low flux conditions, unrepresentative of full-scale NF/RO processes.

  11. Asymmetry and inequity in the inheritance of a bacterial adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Benjamin J.; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Dhamani, Numa; Todd, Ross; Waller, William; Wozniak, Daniel; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that forms biofilm infections in a wide variety of contexts. Biofilms initiate when bacteria attach to a surface, which triggers changes in gene expression leading to the biofilm phenotype. We have previously shown, for the P. aeruginosa lab strain PAO1, that the self-produced polymer Psl is the most dominant adhesive for attachment to the surface but that another self-produced polymer, Pel, controls the geometry of attachment of these rod-shaped bacteria—strains that make Psl but not Pel are permanently attached to the surface but adhere at only one end (tilting up off the surface), whereas wild-type bacteria that make both Psl and Pel are permanently attached and lie down flat with very little or no tilting (Cooley et al 2013 Soft Matter 9 3871-6). Here we show that the change in attachment geometry reflects a change in the distribution of Psl on the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria that make Psl and Pel have Psl evenly coating the surface, whereas bacteria that make only Psl have Psl concentrated at only one end. We show that Psl can act as an inheritable, epigenetic factor. Rod-shaped P. aeruginosa grows lengthwise and divides across the middle. We find that asymmetry in the distribution of Psl on a parent cell is reflected in asymmetry between siblings in their attachment to the surface. Thus, Pel not only promotes P. aeruginosa lying down flat on the surface, it also helps to homogenize the distribution of Psl within a bacterial population.

  12. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  13. Comparative detection of bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 cells with ELISA, radioactivity and plate count methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blay, Gwenaëlle; Fliss, Ismaïl; Lacroix, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    Different methods are used to study bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, which is an important step in pathogenic infection as well as in probiotic colonization of the intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to compare the ELISA-based method with more conventional plate count and radiolabeling methods for bacterial adhesion detection. An ELISA-based assay was optimized for the detection of Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli O157:H7, which are low and highly adherent bacteria, respectively. In agreement with previous investigations, a percentage of adhesion below 1% was obtained for B. longum with ELISA. However, high nonspecific background and low positive signals were measured due to the use of polyclonal antibodies and the low adhesion capacity with this strain. In contrast, the ELISA-based method developed for E. coli adhesion detected a high adhesion percentage (15%). For this bacterium the three methods tested gave similar results for the highest bacterial concentrations (6.8 Log CFU added bacteria/well). However, differences among methods increased with the addition of decreased bacterial concentration due to different detection thresholds (5.9, 5.6 and 2.9 Log CFU adherent bacteria/well for radioactivity, ELISA and plate count methods, respectively). The ELISA-based method was shown to be a good predictor for bacterial adhesion compared to the radiolabeling method when good quality specific antibodies were used. This technique is convenient and allows handling of numerous samples.

  14. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  15. Nanoscale Cell Wall Deformation Impacts Long-Range Bacterial Adhesion Forces on Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yun; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria occurs on virtually all natural and synthetic surfaces and is crucial for their survival. Once they are adhering, bacteria start growing and form a biofilm, in which they are protected against environmental attacks. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is mediated by a combination of

  16. Nanoscale cell wall deformation impacts long-range bacterial adhesion forces on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Harapanahalli, A.K.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria occurs on virtually all natural and synthetic surfaces and is crucial for their survival. Once they are adhering, bacteria start growing and form a biofilm, in which they are protected against environmental attacks. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is mediated by a combination of

  17. Silver-nanoparticle-coated biliary stent inhibits bacterial adhesion in bacterial cholangitis in swine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wen; Li-Mei Ma; Wei He; Xiao-Wei Tang; Yin Zhang; Xiang Wang; Li Liu; Zhi-Ning Fan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the major limitations of biliary stents is the stent occlusion, which is closely related to the over-growth of bacteria. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a novel silver-nanoparticle-coated polyurethane (Ag/PU) stent in bacterial cholangitis model in swine. METHODS: Ag/PU was designed by coating silver nanopar-ticles on polyurethane (PU) stent. Twenty-four healthy pigs with bacterial cholangitis using Ag/PU and PU stents were ran-domly divided into an Ag/PU stent group (n=12) and a PU stent group (n=12), respectively. The stents were inserted by standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory assay was performed for white blood cell (WBC) count, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at baseline time, 8 hours, 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after stent placements. The segment of bile duct containing the stent was examined histologically ex vivo. Implanted bili-ary stents were examined by a scan electron microscope. The amount of silver release was also measured in vitro. RESULTS: The number of inflammatory cells and level of ALT, IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly lower in the Ag/PU stent group than in the PU stent group. Hyperplasia of the mucosa was more severe in the PU stent group than in the Ag/PU stent group. In contrast to the biofilm of bacteria on the PU stent, fewer bacteria adhered to the Ag/PU stent. CONCLUSIONS: PU biliary stents modified with silver nanoparticles are able to alleviate the inflammation of pigs with bacterial cholangitis. Silver-nanoparticle-coated stents are resistant to bacterial adhesion.

  18. Physiochemical properties of Caulobacter crescentus holdfast: a localized bacterial adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ma, Xiang; Licata, Nicholas A; Neves, Bernardo R A; Setayeshgar, Sima; Brun, Yves V; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-09-12

    To colonize surfaces, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus employs a polar polysaccharide, the holdfast, located at the end of a thin, long stalk protruding from the cell body. Unlike many other bacteria which adhere through an extended extracellular polymeric network, the holdfast footprint area is tens of thousands times smaller than that of the total bacterium cross-sectional surface, making for some very demanding adhesion requirements. At present, the mechanism of holdfast adhesion remains poorly understood. We explore it here along three lines of investigation: (a) the impact of environmental conditions on holdfast binding affinity, (b) adhesion kinetics by dynamic force spectroscopy, and (c) kinetic modeling of the attachment process to interpret the observed time-dependence of the adhesion force at short and long time scales. A picture emerged in which discrete molecular units called adhesins are responsible for initial holdfast adhesion, by acting in a cooperative manner.

  19. Bovine milk osteopontin - Targeting bacterial adhesion for biofilm control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mathilde Frost; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Schlafer, Sebastian

    performed in technical and biological duplicates. Bifidobacterium dentium, Rothia dentocariosa and Streptococcus mutans did not adhere to the flow cell, irrespective of the presence of osteopontin. Osteopontin reduced the adhesion of Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Lactobacillus paracasei...

  20. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Jens; Emge, Philippe; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Vogel, Viola

    2013-12-01

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length.

  1. Impact of wall shear stress on initial bacterial adhesion in rotating annular reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Thibaut; Morin, Emilie; Habouzit, Frédéric; Bernet, Nicolas; Escudié, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bacterial adhesion under different wall shear stresses in turbulent flow and using a diverse bacterial consortium. A better understanding of the mechanisms governing microbial adhesion can be useful in diverse domains such as industrial processes, medical fields or environmental biotechnologies. The impact of wall shear stress-four values ranging from 0.09 to 7.3 Pa on polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-was carried out in rotating annular reactors to evaluate the adhesion in terms of morphological and microbiological structures. A diverse inoculum consisting of activated sludge was used. Epifluorescence microscopy was used to quantitatively and qualitatively characterize the adhesion. Attached bacterial communities were assessed by molecular fingerprinting profiles (CE-SSCP). It has been demonstrated that wall shear stress had a strong impact on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the bacterial adhesion. ANOVA tests also demonstrated the significant impact of wall shear stress on all three tested morphological parameters (surface coverage, number of objects and size of objects) (p-values < 2.10-16). High wall shear stresses increased the quantity of attached bacteria but also altered their spatial distribution on the substratum surface. As the shear increased, aggregates or clusters appeared and their size grew when increasing the shears. Concerning the microbiological composition, the adhered bacterial communities changed gradually with the applied shear.

  2. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  3. Initial bacterial adhesion on resin, titanium and zirconia in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byung-Chul; Jung, Gil-Yong; Kim, Dae-Joon; Han, Jung-Suk

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the adhesion of initial colonizer, Streptococcus sanguis, on resin, titanium and zirconia under the same surface polishing condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS Specimens were prepared from Z-250, cp-Ti and 3Y-TZP and polished with 1 µm diamond paste. After coating with saliva, each specimen was incubated with Streptococcus sanguis. Scanning electron microscope, crystal violet staining and measurement of fluorescence intensity resulting fro...

  4. Surface physicochemistry and ionic strength affects eDNA's role in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viduthalai R Regina

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent eDNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired adhesion of cells to glass surfaces, but the adhesive properties of S. xylosus were regained within 30 minutes if DNase was not continuously present, implying a continuous release of eDNA in the culture. Removal of eDNA lowered the adhesion of S. xylosus to all surfaces chemistries tested, but not at all ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength. The adhesive properties of eDNA in mediating initial adhesion of S. xylosus is thus highly versatile, but also dependent on the physicochemical properties of the surface and ionic strength of the surrounding medium.

  5. Bacterial adhesion forces with substratum surfaces and the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muszanska, L.H.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Chen, Y.; Heuvel, van den E.R.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms causing biomaterial-associated infection resist antibiotic treatment and usually necessitate the replacement of infected implants. Here we relate bacterial adhesion forces and the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms on uncoated and polymer brush-coated silicone rubber. Nine strains of Sta

  6. Bacterial Adhesion Forces with Substratum Surfaces and the Susceptibility of Biofilms to Antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muszanska, Agnieszka K.; Nejadnik, M. Reza; Chen, Yun; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms causing biomaterial-associated infection resist antibiotic treatment and usually necessitate the replacement of infected implants. Here we relate bacterial adhesion forces and the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms on uncoated and polymer brush-coated silicone rubber. Nine strains of Sta

  7. Covalent Attachment of Poly(ethylene glycol) to Surfaces, Critical for Reducing Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kingshott, Peter; Wei, Jiang; Bagge, Dorthe

    2003-01-01

    on both substrates, as judged by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Also, ToF-SIMS imaging showed that both substrates were chemically uniform after each surface modification step. Thus, the two surfaces differ only in the mode of attachment...... of PEI to the substrate. In bacterial adhesion experiments, the optimal SS-PEG surface was not capable of reducing the number of adherent Pseudomonas sp. when compared to the controls. However, the PET-PEG surface reduced the level of adhesion by between 2 and 4 orders of magnitude for up to 5 h. ToF-SIMS...... analysis showed that both PEG surfaces adsorbed low but comparable levels of proteinaceous growth medium components (tryptic soy broth), as indicated by the addition of unique amino acid fragment ions in the spectra, most likely small peptides. Thus, bacterial adhesion was strongly dependent on the PEG...

  8. Microcoupon Assay Of Adhesion And Growth Of Bacterial Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Koenig, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Microbiological assay technique facilitates determination of some characteristics of sessile bacteria like those that attach to and coat interior walls of water-purification systems. Biofilms cause sickness and interfere with purification process. Technique enables direct measurement of rate of attachment of bacterial cells, their metabolism, and effects of chemicals on them. Used to quantify effects of both bactericides and growth-stimulating agents and in place of older standard plate-count and tube-dilution techniques.

  9. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  10. Bacterial monitoring with adhesive sheet in the international space station-"Kibo", the Japanese experiment module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Hieda, Hatsuki; Ishihara, Rie; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological monitoring is important to assure microbiological safety, especially in long-duration space habitation. We have been continuously monitoring the abundance and diversity of bacteria in the International Space Station (ISS)-"Kibo" module to accumulate knowledge on microbes in the ISS. In this study, we used a new sampling device, a microbe-collecting adhesive sheet developed in our laboratory. This adhesive sheet has high operability, needs no water for sampling, and is easy to transport and store. We first validated the adhesive sheet as a sampling device to be used in a space habitat with regard to the stability of the bacterial number on the sheet during prolonged storage of up to 12 months. Bacterial abundance on the surfaces in Kibo was then determined and was lower than on the surfaces in our laboratory (10(5) cells [cm(2)](-1)), except for the return air grill, and the bacteria detected in Kibo were human skin microflora. From these aspects of microbial abundance and their phylogenetic affiliation, we concluded that Kibo has been microbiologically well maintained; however, microbial abundance may increase with the prolonged stay of astronauts. To ensure crew safety and understand bacterial dynamics in space habitation environments, continuous bacterial monitoring in Kibo is required.

  11. Bacterial Adhesion of Streptococcus suis to Host Cells and Its Inhibition by Carbohydrate Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauli Haataja

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a Gram-positive bacterium, which causes sepsis and meningitis in pigs and humans. This review examines the role of known S. suis virulence factors in adhesion and S. suis carbohydrate-based adhesion mechanisms, as well as the inhibition of S. suis adhesion by anti-adhesion compounds in in vitro assays. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of S. suis have been identified, and these studies have shown that many strains recognize Galα1-4Gal-containing oligosaccharides present in host glycolipids. In the era of increasing antibiotic resistance, new means to treat infections are needed. Since microbial adhesion to carbohydrates is important to establish disease, compounds blocking adhesion could be an alternative to antibiotics. The use of oligosaccharides as drugs is generally hampered by their relatively low affinity (micromolar to compete with multivalent binding to host receptors. However, screening of a library of chemically modified Galα1-4Gal derivatives has identified compounds that inhibit S. suis adhesion in nanomolar range. Also, design of multivalent Galα1-4Gal-containing dendrimers has resulted in a significant increase of the inhibitory potency of the disaccharide. The S. suis adhesin binding to Galα1-4Gal-oligosaccharides, Streptococcal adhesin P (SadP, was recently identified. It has a Galα1-4Gal-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal LPNTG-motif for cell wall anchoring. The carbohydrate-binding domain has no homology to E. coli P fimbrial adhesin, which suggests that these Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial adhesins recognizing the same receptor have evolved by convergent evolution. SadP adhesin may represent a promising target for the design of anti-adhesion ligands for the prevention and treatment of S. suis infections.

  12. Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces of variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Iversen, Anders

    adhesion. Sol-gel technology and the recent availability of organic modified silicas have lead to development of hybrid organic/inorganic glass ceramic coatings with specialised surface properties. In this study we investigate bacterial adhesion and the subsequent biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS......) and compare it to two nanostructured sol-gel coatings with variable hydrophobicity. Test surfaces were characterised with respect to surface roughness by atomic force microscopy, surface hydrophobicity by contact angle (CA) measurements, protein adsorption by quartz crystal microbalance analyses....... The bacterial communities were identified by clone libraries and fluorescence in situ hybridization. We initially compared surfaces of relatively similar hydrophobicity (CA=60-79º) but different roughness. The roughness (Ra) was 300nm for SS type 2B, 6nm for electro polished SS, and 0.2 nm for sol-gel...

  13. Surface Treatments and Functional Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement and Bacterial Adhesion Reduction in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mandracci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of dental implants is a key process in the production of these medical devices, and especially titanium implants used in the dental practice are commonly subjected to surface modification processes before their clinical use. A wide range of treatments, such as sand blasting, acid etching, plasma etching, plasma spray deposition, sputtering deposition and cathodic arc deposition, have been studied over the years in order to improve the performance of dental implants. Improving or accelerating the osseointegration process is usually the main goal of these surface processes, but the improvement of biocompatibility and the prevention of bacterial adhesion are also of considerable importance. In this review, we report on the research of the recent years in the field of surface treatments and coatings deposition for the improvement of dental implants performance, with a main focus on the osseointegration acceleration, the reduction of bacterial adhesion and the improvement of biocompatibility.

  14. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Costa de Medeiros Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA. Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=10 according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing, NF (Nealon technique and finishing, NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing, MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing, and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing. For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6±3.05; MP, 5.36±2.08; NP, 4.96±1.93; MF, 7.36±2.45; and LP, 1.56±0.62 (CFU. The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23±0.15; MP, 0.52±0.05; NP, 0.60±0.08; MF, 2.69±0.12; and LP, 0.07±0.02 (μm. A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  15. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; Dantas, Talita Souza; Naves, Lucas Zago; das Neves, Flávio Domingues; da Mota, Adérito Soares

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing). For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6 ± 3.05; MP, 5.36 ± 2.08; NP, 4.96 ± 1.93; MF, 7.36 ± 2.45; and LP, 1.56 ± 0.62 (CFU). The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23 ± 0.15; MP, 0.52 ± 0.05; NP, 0.60 ± 0.08; MF, 2.69 ± 0.12; and LP, 0.07 ± 0.02 (μm). A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  16. Expression of Lewisb blood group antigen in Helicobacterpylori does not interfere with bacterial adhesion property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Yuan Zheng; Jiesong Hua; Han-Chung Ng; Khay-Guan Yeoh; Ho Bow

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The finding that some Helicobacterpyloristrains expressLewis b (Leb) blood group antigen casts a doubt on the roleof Leb of human gastric epithelium being a receptor for-H.pylori. The aim of this study was to determine if expressionof Leb in H. Pyloriinterferes with bacterial adhesion property.METHODS: Bacterial adhesion to immobilized Leb onmicrotitre plate was performed in 63-H. Pyloristrains obtainedfrom Singapore using in vitro adherence assay. Expression ofLewis blood group antigens was determined by ELISA assay.RESULTS: Among 63 H. Pyloristrains, 28 expressed Lebantigen. In vitro adhesion assay showed that 78.6 % (22/28) of Leb-positive and 74.3 % (26/35) of Leb-negative-H.pyloriisolates were positive for adhesion to immobilized Lebcoated on microtitre plate (P=0.772). In addition, blockingof H. Pylori Leb by prior incubation with anti-Leb monoclonalantibody did not alter thebinding of the bacteria to solid-phase coated Leb.CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that expressionof Leb in H. Pyloridoes not interfere with the bacterialadhesion property. This result supports the notion that Lebpresent on human gastric epithelial cells is capable of beinga receptor for H.pylori.

  17. Initial Bacterial Adhesion on Different Yttria-Stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia Implant Surfaces in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamprini Karygianni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to implant biomaterials constitutes a virulence factor leading to biofilm formation, infection and treatment failure. The aim of this study was to examine the initial bacterial adhesion on different implant materials in vitro. Four implant biomaterials were incubated with Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans for 2 h: 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal surface (B1a, B1a with zirconium oxide (ZrO2 coating (B2a, B1a with zirconia-based composite coating (B1b and B1a with zirconia-based composite and ZrO2 coatings (B2b. Bovine enamel slabs (BES served as control. The adherent microorganisms were quantified and visualized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM; DAPI and live/dead staining. The lowest bacterial count of E. faecalis was detected on BES and the highest on B1a. The fewest vital C. albicans strains (42.22% were detected on B2a surfaces, while most E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (approximately 80% were vital overall. Compared to BES; coated and uncoated zirconia substrata exhibited no anti-adhesive properties. Further improvement of the material surface characteristics is essential.

  18. Spatially controlled bacterial adhesion using surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsko, Peter; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Libera, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    We constructed surface-patterned hydrogels using low-energy focused electron beams to locally crosslink poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) thin films on silanized glass substrates. Derived from electron-beam lithography, this technique was used to create patterned hydrogels with well-defined spatial positions and degrees of swelling. We found that cells of the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis adhered to and grew on the silanized glass substrates. These cells did not, however, adhere to surfaces covered by high-swelling lightly crosslinked PEG hydrogels. This finding is consistent with the cell-repulsiveness generally attributed to PEGylated surfaces. In contrast, S. epidermidis cells did adhere to surfaces covered by low-swelling highly crosslinked hydrogels. By creating precise patterns of repulsive hydrogels combined with adhesive hydrogels or with exposed glass substrate, we were able to spatially control the adhesion of S. epidermidis. Significantly, adhesive areas small enough to trap single bacterial cells could be fabricated. The results suggest that the lateral confinement imposed by cell-repulsive hydrogels hindered the cell proliferation and development into larger bacterial colonies.

  19. Adhesión bacteriana a biomateriales Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ábalos

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available En términos generales, para la adhesión bacteriana, influyen cuatro elementos: Material, Microorganismos, antimicrobianos y mecanismos de defensa. La influencia del material es más importante en los estadios iniciales de la adhesión, pudiendo influir el mismo material, su rugosidad o su energía superficial., si es que existe una influencia del material en la adhesión bacteriana, esta reside en las caracteristicas de la película adquirida y en la especificidad de las proteinas adsorbidas salivares (receptores, que puedan ser condicionadas por la composición del material o por las características de superficie de este.In general terms, there are four elements which influence on bacterial adhesion: the material, the micro organisms, antimicrobials and defence mechanisms. The influence of the material is more relevant at the initial states of adhesion where the proper material, its roughness or its superficial energy can have some influence. If there is some influence of the material in the bacterial adhesion, it relies on the features of the acquired film and on the specificity of the adsorved salivary proteins (receptors, which can be influenced by the composition of the material or the characteristics of its surface.

  20. The adhesive and cohesive properties of a bacterial polysaccharide adhesin are modulated by a deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhe; Brown, Pamela J B; Elliott, Ellen N; Brun, Yves V

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial exopolysaccharide synthesis is a prevalent and indispensible activity in many biological processes, including surface adhesion and biofilm formation. In Caulobacter crescentus, surface attachment and subsequent biofilm growth depend on the ability to synthesize an adhesive polar polysaccharide known as the holdfast. In this work, we show that polar polysaccharide synthesis is a conserved phenomenon among Alphaproteobacterial species closely related to C. crescentus. Among them, mutagenesis of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum showed that disruption of the hfsH gene, which encodes a putative polysaccharide deacetylase, leads to accumulation of holdfast in the culture supernatant. Examination of the hfsH deletion mutant in C. crescentus revealed that this strain synthesizes holdfast; however, like the A. biprosthecum hfsH mutant, the holdfasts are shed into the medium and have decreased adhesiveness and cohesiveness. Site-directed mutagenesis at the predicted catalytic site of C. crescentus HfsH phenocopied the ΔhfsH mutant and abolished the esterase activity of HfsH. In contrast, overexpression of HfsH increased cell adherence without increasing holdfast synthesis. We conclude that the polysaccharide deacetylase activity of HfsH is required for the adhesive and cohesive properties of the holdfast, as well as for the anchoring of the holdfast to the cell envelope.

  1. Unraveling the Secrets of Bacterial Adhesion Organelles Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axner, Ove; Björnham, Oscar; Castelain, Mickaël; Koutris, Efstratios; Schedin, Staffan; Fällman, Erik; Andersson, Magnus

    Many types of bacterium express micrometer-long attachment organelles (so-called pili) whose role is to mediate adhesion to host tissue. Until recently, little was known about their function in the adhesion process. Force-measuring optical tweezers (FMOT) have since then been used to unravel the biomechanical properties of various types of pili, primarily those from uropathogenic E. coli, in particular their force-vs.-elongation response, but lately also some properties of the adhesin are situated at the distal end of the pilus. This knowledge provides an understanding of how piliated bacteria can sustain external shear forces caused by rinsing processes, e.g., urine flow. It has been found that many types of pilus exhibit unique and complex force-vs.-elongation responses. It has been conjectured that their dissimilar properties impose significant differences in their ability to sustain external forces and that different types of pilus therefore have dissimilar predisposition to withstand different types of rinsing conditions. An understanding of these properties is of high importance since it can serve as a basis for finding new means to combat bacterial adhesion, including that caused by antibiotic-resistance bacteria. This work presents a review of the current status of the assessment of biophysical properties of individual pili on single bacteria exposed to strain/stress, primarily by the FMOT technique. It also addresses, for the first time, how the elongation and retraction properties of the rod couple to the adhesive properties of the tip adhesin.

  2. Construction of force measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and investigations of biophysical properties of bacterial adhesion organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a technique in which microscopic-sized particles, including living cells and bacteria, can be non-intrusively trapped with high accuracy solely using focused light. The technique has therefore become a powerful tool in the field of biophysics. Optical tweezers thereby provide outstanding manipulation possibilities of cells as well as semi-transparent materials, both non-invasively and non-destructively, in biological systems. In addition, optical tweezers can measure minute forces (< 10-12 N), probe molecular interactions and their energy landscapes, and apply both static and dynamic forces in biological systems in a controlled manner. The assessment of intermolecular forces with force measuring optical tweezers, and thereby the biomechanical structure of biological objects, has therefore considerably facilitated our understanding of interactions and structures of biological systems. Adhesive bacterial organelles, so called pili, mediate adhesion to host cells and are therefore crucial...

  3. Inhibited Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Quaternized Chitosan-Loaded Titania Nanotubes with Various Diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-tao Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanotube-based local drug delivery is an attractive strategy for combating implant-associated infection. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the gentamicin-loaded nanotubes could dramatically inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on implant surfaces. Considering the overuse of antibiotics may lead to the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, we synthesized a new quaternized chitosan derivative (hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan, HACC with a 27% degree of substitution (DS; referred to as 27% HACC that had a strong antibacterial activity and simultaneously good biocompatibility with osteogenic cells. Titania nanotubes with various diameters (80, 120, 160, and 200 nm and 200 nm length were loaded with 2 mg of HACC using a lyophilization method and vacuum drying. Two standard strain, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (American Type Culture Collection 43300 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (American Type Culture Collection 35984, and two clinical isolates, S. aureus 376 and S. epidermidis 389, were selected to investigate the bacterial adhesion at 6 h and biofilm formation at 24, 48, and 72 h on the HACC-loaded nanotubes (NT-H using the spread plate method, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Smooth titanium (Smooth Ti was also investigated and compared. We found that NT-H could significantly inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on its surface compared with Smooth Ti, and the NT-H with 160 nm and 200 nm diameters had stronger antibacterial activity because of the extended HACC release time of NT-H with larger diameters. Therefore, NT-H can significantly improve the antibacterial ability of orthopedic implants and provide a promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infections.

  4. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio...

  5. Adhesion of different bacterial strains to low-temperature plasma treated biomedical PVC catheter surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi Rad, A; Ayhan, H; Kisa, U; Pişkin, E

    1998-01-01

    In this study, firstly five different bacteria (i.e. Coagulase positive and negative staphylococcus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) with their different strains were isolated and used. The contact angle, surface free energy, p-xylene adhesion, and zeta potential of these bacteria were in the range of 43-69 deg, 45.4-61.8 erg cm(-2), 2.3-80.3%, and from -650.2 to + 17.5 mV, respectively. Most of the bacteria were negatively charged. Attachment of these bacteria to PVC catheter and its DMAEMA- and AAc-plasma treated forms were investigated. Bacterial attachment to the hydrophobic PVC catheter was high. Both plasma treatments caused significant drops in bacterial attachment in most of the cases. The effects of AAc-plasma treatment was more significant.

  6. Calcium phosphate coating containing silver shows high antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity and inhibits bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Yoshiki, E-mail: andoy@jmmc.jp [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Miyamoto, Hiroshi [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Noda, Iwao; Sakurai, Nobuko [Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomonori [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Yonekura, Yutaka; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the serious complications of orthopedic implants. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, we developed a novel coating technology of calcium phosphate (CP) containing silver (Ag), designated Ag-CP coating, using a thermal spraying technique. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial efficacy and biological safety of this coating. In vitro antibacterial activity tests showed that the growths of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are completely suppressed on Ag-CP coating. In vitro bacterial adherence tests revealed that the number of adherent bacteria on the surface of this coating is significantly less (p < 0.02) than that on the surface of the CP coating. Moreover, the Ag-CP coating completely inhibits MRSA adhesion [<10 colony-forming units (CFU)] when 10{sup 2} CFU MRSA is inoculated. On the other hand, V79 Chinese hamster lung cells were found to grow on the Ag-CP coating as well as on the CP coating in a cytotoxicity test. These results indicate that the Ag-CP coating on the surface of orthopedic implants exhibits antibacterial activity and inhibits bacterial adhesion without cytotoxicity.

  7. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10(-18) J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  8. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10-18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  9. Adsorption of enterobactin to metal oxides and the role of siderophores in bacterial adhesion to metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upritchard, Hamish G; Yang, Jing; Bremer, Philip J; Lamont, Iain L; McQuillan, A James

    2011-09-01

    The potential contribution of chemical bonds formed between bacterial cells and metal surfaces during biofilm initiation has received little attention. Previous work has suggested that bacterial siderophores may play a role in bacterial adhesion to metals. It has now been shown using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy that enterobactin, a catecholate siderophore secreted by Escherichia coli, forms covalent bonds with particle films of titanium dioxide, boehmite (AlOOH), and chromium oxide-hydroxide which model the surfaces of metals of significance in medical and industrial settings. Adsorption of enterobactin to the metal oxides occurred through the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl moieties, with the trilactone macrocycle having little involvement. Vibrational modes of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl moiety of enterobactin, adsorbed to TiO(2), were assigned by comparing the observed IR spectra with those calculated by the density functional method. Comparison of the observed adsorbate IR spectrum with the calculated spectra of catecholate-type [H(2)NCOC(6)H(3)O(2)Ti(OH)(4)](2-) and salicylate-type [H(2)NCOC(6)H(3)O(2)HTi(OH)(4)](2-) surface complexes indicated that the catecholate type is dominant. Analysis of the spectra for enterobactin in solution and that adsorbed to TiO(2) revealed that the amide of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine group reorientates during coordination to surface Ti(IV) ions. Investigation into the pH dependence of enterobactin adsorption to TiO(2) surfaces showed that all 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl groups are involved. Infrared absorption bands attributed to adsorbed enterobactin were also strongly evident for E. coli cells attached to TiO(2) particle films. These studies give evidence of enterobactin-metal bond formation and further suggest the generality of siderophore involvement in bacterial biofilm initiation on metal surfaces.

  10. Stainless steel modified with poly(ethylene glycol) can prevent protein adsorption but not bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Jiang; Bagge, Dorthe; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    by the adsorption of branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) from water. Methoxy-terminated aldehyde-poly(ethylene glycol) (M-PEG-CHO) was then grafted onto the PEI layers using reductive amination at the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the PEG in order to optimize the graft density of the linear PEG chains......The surface of AISI 316 grade stainless steel (SS) was modified with a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (molecular weight 5000) with the aim of preventing protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. Model SS substrates were first modified to introduce a very high density of reactive amine groups....... The chemical composition and uniformity of the surfaces were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SSIMS) in the imaging mode. The effects of PEI concentration and different substrate pre-cleaning methods on the structure...

  11. The effect of dissolved organic carbon on bacterial adhesion to conditioning films adsorbed on glass from natural seawater collected during different seasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.P.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, H.C. van der

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of three marine bacterial strains, i.e. Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica with different cell surface hydrophobicities was measured on glass in a stagnation point flow chamber. Prior to bacterial adhesion, the glass surface was conditioned for 1 h

  12. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  13. Adhesion of bacterial pathogens to soil colloidal particles: influences of cell type, natural organic matter, and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Walker, Sharon L; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2014-04-15

    Bacterial adhesion to granular soil particles is well studied; however, pathogen interactions with naturally occurring colloidal particles (organic matter (NOM), and solution chemistry. Specifically, batch adhesion experiments were conducted using NOM-present, NOM-stripped soil colloids, Streptococcus suis SC05 and Escherichia coli WH09 over a wide range of solution pH (4.0-9.0) and ionic strength (IS, 1-100 mM KCl). Cell characterization techniques, Freundlich isotherm, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (sphere-sphere model) were utilized to quantitatively determine the interactions between cells and colloids. The adhesion coefficients (Kf) of S. suis SC05 to NOM-present and NOM-stripped soil colloids were significantly higher than E. coli WH09, respectively. Similarly, Kf values of S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 adhesion to NOM-stripped soil colloids were greater than those colloids with NOM-present, respectively, suggesting NOM inhibits bacterial adhesion. Cell adhesion to soil colloids declined with increasing pH and enhanced with rising IS (1-50 mM). Interaction energy calculations indicate these adhesion trends can be explained by DLVO-type forces, with S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 being weakly adhered in shallow secondary energy minima via polymer bridging and charge heterogeneity. S. suis SC05 adhesion decreased at higher IS 100 mM, which is attributed to the change of hydrophobic effect and steric repulsion resulted from the greater presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on S. suis SC05 surface as compared to E. coli WH09. Hence, pathogen adhesion to the colloidal material is determined by a combination of DLVO, charge heterogeneity, hydrophobic and polymer interactions as a function of solution chemistry.

  14. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating: Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P.F.; Currie, E.P.K.; Thies, J.C.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  15. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating : Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P. F.; Currie, E. P. K.; Thies, J. C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  16. Quantifying adhesion of acidophilic bioleaching bacteria to silica and pyrite by atomic force microscopy with a bacterial probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengxue; Taran, Elena; Mahler, Stephen; Nguyen, Tuan A H; Nguyen, Anh V

    2014-03-01

    The adhesion of acidophilic bacteria to mineral surfaces is an important phenomenon in bioleaching processes. In this study, functionalized colloidal probes covered by bioleaching bacterial cells (Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans) were developed and used to sense specific adhesion forces to a silica surface and a pyrite surface in various solutions. Experimentally, recorded retraction curves of A. thiooxidans revealed sawtooth features that were in good agreement with the wormlike chain model, while that of L. ferrooxidans exhibited stair-step separation. The magnitudes of adhesion forces and snap-off distances were strongly influenced by the ionic strength and pH. Macroscopic surface properties including hydrophobicity and surface potential for bacterial cells and substrata were measured by a sessile drop method and microelectrophoresis. The ATR-FTIR spectra indicated the presence of different types of biopolymers on two strains of bacteria.

  17. The Effect of Polyterpenol Thin Film Surfaces on Bacterial Viability and Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanometer scale surface topography of a solid substrate is known to influence the extent of bacterial attachment and their subsequent proliferation to form biofilms. As an extension of our previous work on the development of a novel organic polymer coating for the prevention of growth of medically significant bacteria on three-dimensional solid surfaces, this study examines the effect of surface coating on the adhesion and proliferation tendencies of Staphylococcus aureus and compares to those previously investigated tendencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on similar coatings. Radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to coat the surface of the substrate with thin film of terpinen-4-ol, a constituent of tea-tree oil known to inhibit the growth of a broad range of bacteria. The presence of the coating decreased the substrate surface roughness from approximately 2.1 nm to 0.4 nm. Similar to P. aeruginosa, S. aureus presented notably different patterns of attachment in response to the presence of the surface film, where the amount of attachment, extracellular polymeric substance production, and cell proliferation on the coated surface was found to be greatly reduced compared to that obtained on the unmodified surface. This work suggests that the antimicrobial and antifouling coating used in this study could be effectively integrated into medical and other clinically relevant devices to prevent bacterial growth and to minimize bacteria-associated adverse host responses.

  18. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  19. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of TiZrN-coated 316L SS for bioimplants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gobi Saravanan Kaliaraj; Vinita Vishwakarma; Ananthakumar Ramadoss; D Ramachandran; Arul Maximus Rabel

    2015-08-01

    TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering technique. Cubic phase of TiZrN with uniform surface morphology was observed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were examined in order to evaluate the coating’s compatibility for ideal implant. Results revealed that TiZrN coatings exhibited less bacterial attachment against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria, negligible platelets activation and superior corrosion resistance than the uncoated 316L SS.

  20. Suppression effects of dental glass-ceramics with polarization-induced highly dense surface charges against bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Kosuke; Koizumi, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Okura, Toshinori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nagai, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and antibacterial ability capacity of surface-improved dental glass-ceramics by an electrical polarization process. Commercially available dental glass-ceramic materials were electrically polarized to induce surface charges in a direct current field by heating. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystal structure, and surface free energy (SFE) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and water droplet methods, respectively. The antibacterial capacity was assessed by a bacterial adhesion test using Streptococcus mutans. Although the surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystal structure were not affected by electrical polarization, the polar component and total SFE were enhanced. After 24 h incubation at 37ºC, bacterial adhesion to the polarized samples was inhibited. The electrical polarization method may confer antibacterial properties on prosthetic devices, such as porcelain fused to metal crowns or all ceramic restorations, without any additional bactericidal agents.

  1. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria, E-mail: maria.godoy.gallardo@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Guillem-Marti, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.guillem.marti@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sevilla, Pablo, E-mail: psevilla@euss.es [Department of Mechanics, Escola Universitària Salesiana de Sarrià (EUSS), C/ Passeig de Sant Bosco, 42, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Manero, José M., E-mail: jose.maria.manero@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Francisco J., E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  2. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  3. Non-invasive SFG spectroscopy: a tool to reveal the conformational change of grafted chains due to bacterial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulard, Emilie; Dubost, Henri; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Zheng, Wanquan; Herry, Jean-Marie; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-No"lle; Briandet, Romain; Bourguignon, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    In many fields such as biomedical or food industry, surface colonization by micro-organisms leads to biofilms formation that are tridimentional biostructures highly resistant to the action of antimicrobials, by mechanisms still unclear. In order to deepen our understanding of the initial interaction of bacteria cells with a solid surface, we analyze by in situ vibrational Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy the effect of the adhesion of hydrophilic Lactoccocus lactis bacteria and its hydrophobic mutants in distilled water on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecanethiol (ODT) on a gold film. When a homogeneous bacterial monolayer is deposited on this ordered surface, SFG spectrum of the ODT SAM shows significant intensity changes from that in air or in water. Its modelling as a function of conformation allows to distinguish optical effects due to the water solution surrounding bacteria from conformational changes of the ODT SAM due to the presence of the bacteria cells. Futhermore, bacterial adhesion induces different measurable effects on the ODT SAM conformation, depending on the hydrophobic / hydrophilic character of the bacterial surface. Such a result deserves to be taken into account for the design of new materials with improved properties or to control biofilm formation.

  4. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  5. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  6. Surface physicochemistry and ionic strength affects eDNA's role in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Modrzynski, Jakub Jan;

    2014-01-01

    DNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised...... ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength...... with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired...

  7. Adsorption behavior of human plasma fibronectin on hydrophobic and hydrophilic Ti6Al4V substrata and its influence on bacterial adhesion and detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A; Gónzalez-Martín, M Luisa; Bruque, José M; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M

    2013-05-01

    Biomaterial implant-associated infections, a common cause of medical devices' failure, are initiated by bacterial adhesion to an adsorbed protein layer on the implant material surface. In this study, the influence of protein surface orientation on bacterial adhesion has been examined using three clinically relevant bacterial strains known to express specific binding sites for human plasma fibronectin (HFN). HFN was allowed to adsorb on hydrophobic Ti6Al4V and physically modified hydrophilic Ti6Al4V substrata. Ellipsometric data reveal that the characteristics of the adsorbed protein layers primary depend on solid surface tension and the initial protein concentration in solution. In particular, HFN molecules adopt a more extended conformation on hydrophobic than hydrophilic surfaces, an effect that is more pronounced at low than at high initial protein concentrations. Moreover, the extended conformation of the protein molecules on these surfaces likely facilitates the exposure of specific sites for adhesion, resulting in the higher bacterial-cell attachment observed regardless of the strain considered. Contact angle measurements and the analysis of the number of remaining adhering cells after being subjected to external forces further suggest that both specific and nonspecific (hydrophobic) interactions play an important role on bacterial attachment. This study is the first one to evaluate the influence of surface hydrophobicity on protein adsorption and its subsequent effect on bacterial adhesion using a material whose hydrophobicity was not modified using chemical treatments that potentially led to surface properties changes other than hydrophobicity.

  8. Phospholipase D promotes Arcanobacterium haemolyticum adhesion via lipid raft remodeling and host cell death following bacterial invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlson Petteri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is an emerging bacterial pathogen, causing pharyngitis and more invasive infections. This organism expresses an unusual phospholipase D (PLD, which we propose promotes bacterial pathogenesis through its action on host cell membranes. The pld gene is found on a genomic region of reduced %G + C, suggesting recent horizontal acquisition. Results Recombinant PLD rearranged HeLa cell lipid rafts in a dose-dependent manner and this was inhibited by cholesterol sequestration. PLD also promoted host cell adhesion, as a pld mutant had a 60.3% reduction in its ability to adhere to HeLa cells as compared to the wild type. Conversely, the pld mutant appeared to invade HeLa cells approximately two-fold more efficiently as the wild type. This finding was attributable to a significant loss of host cell viability following secretion of PLD from intracellular bacteria. As determined by viability assay, only 15.6% and 82.3% of HeLa cells remained viable following invasion by the wild type or pld mutant, respectively, as compared to untreated HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopy of HeLa cells inoculated with A. haemolyticum strains revealed that the pld mutant was contained within intracellular vacuoles, as compared to the wild type, which escaped the vacuole. Wild type-infected HeLa cells also displayed the hallmarks of necrosis. Similarly inoculated HeLa cells displayed no signs of apoptosis, as measured by induction of caspase 3/7, 8 or 9 activities. Conclusions These data indicate that PLD enhances bacterial adhesion and promotes host cell necrosis following invasion, and therefore, may be important in the disease pathogenesis of A. haemolyticum infections.

  9. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-29

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated.

  10. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin.

  11. Lysozyme immobilization onto PVC catheters grafted with NVCL and HEMA for reduction of bacterial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Zempoalteca, Yesica; Díaz-Gómez, Luis; Meléndez-Ortiz, H. Iván; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Bucio, Emilio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to functionalize poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) urinary catheters with grafted copolymers that can improve the biocompatibility and serve as binding points of lysozyme. PVC catheters were modified by grafting a mixture of N-vinylcaprolactam (NVCL) and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) applying a gamma-ray pre-irradiation method. The effect of absorbed dose, monomer concentration, temperature, and reaction time on the grafting percentage was evaluated. The grafted catheters were characterized regarding surface composition (FTIR-ATR spectroscopy), thermal properties (DSC and TGA) and swelling in aqueous medium. Lysozyme was directly coupled onto PVC-g-(NVCL/HEMA) previously activated using carbonyldiimidazole. Antimicrobial lytic activity of the modified catheters over time was tested against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Lysozyme diminished the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus onto the functionalized catheters, which may be suitable to prevent biofilm formation.

  12. Prolonging the duration of preventing bacterial adhesion of nanosilver-containing polymer films through hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bing; Liu, Tao; Yin, Yansheng

    2012-12-11

    A superhydrophobic coating composed of silver nanoparticles was developed on copper from fluorinated multilayered polyelectrolyte films to examine its performance in preventing microbial adhesion. Antibacterial and antibiofouling experiments for this novel coating were conducted with SRB. From the disk diffusion tests (for 48 h), it was found that, compared to the traditional coating composed of nanosilver, this novel coating significantly improved antibacterial performance and long-term effectiveness. The oxidation states of the immobilized silver in polyelectrolyte multilayer films were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the stability of the immobilized silver was evaluated through a leaching test. It was found that if silver was exposed to aqueous environments some ionic silver species would be produced and released. The ion release kinetics showed that the duration of sustained release of antibacterial Ag ions from the novel coatings was prolonged, which was why they had more long-term antibacterial performance.

  13. Parabolic Flight Evaluation of Bacterial Adhesion on Multiple Antimicrobial Surface Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a test method and the evaluation of the effectiveness of antimicrobial technologies in reduced gravity based on parabolic flight experiments. Microbial growth is a common occurrence on fully immersed wetted surfaces in spacecraft environmental control and life support systems despite the use of chemical and/or physical \\disinfection. Many materials and surface treatments with antimicrobial properties are commercially available but none have been vetted for spaceflight applications. Herein a test method is explained that included ground and reduced gravity parabolic flight experiments with a standard microorganism recovered from spacecraft, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, added at a concentration of 1 x 10(exp 5) cells per milliliter (mL) onto challenge material coupon surfaces. Several experimental materials were observed to slightly reduce microbial attachment in reduced gravity flight experiments, but none were capable of eliminating all challenge bacteria. Lunar gravity had an increased antimicrobial effect in 28 out of 36 test coupons compared to microgravity when provided otherwise identical conditions for growth, suggesting trace .amounts of gravity may be required for maximum antimicrobial performance. Bacterial cells exposed to variable gravity had more than twice as ,much intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) when compared to control cells exposed only to Earth gravity due to a short duration response to environmental stress. An ATP luminescence assay was the method most amenable to development of an in-flight microbial monitoring assay

  14. Preparation of Polyester-Based Metal-Cross Linked Polymeric Composites as Novel Materials Resistant to Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem O. Taha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms constitute an extremely resistant form of bacterial colonization with dire health and economical implications. Towards achieving polymeric composites capable of resisting bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, we prepared five 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate-based polyesters employing five different diol monomers. The resulting polyesters were complexed with copper (II or silver (I. The new polymers were characterized by proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, inherent viscosity, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The corresponding metal complexes were characterized by differential scanning calorimery and infrared spectroscopy. The amounts of complexed copper and silver were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Finally, the resulting composites were tested for their antibacterial potential and were found to effectively resist bacterial attachment and growth.

  15. Fabrication of Functional Wrinkled Interfaces from Polymer Blends: Role of the Surface Functionality on the Bacterial Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Palacios-Cuesta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation of nano-microstructured surfaces is a current challenge in polymer science. The fabrication of such surfaces has been accomplished mainly following two different alternatives i.e., by adapting techniques, such as molding (embossing or nano/microimprinting, or by developing novel techniques including laser ablation, soft lithography or laser scanning. Surface instabilities have been recently highlighted as a promising alternative to induce surface features. In particular, wrinkles have been extensively explored for this purpose. Herein, we describe the preparation of wrinkled interfaces by confining a photosensitive monomeric mixture composed of monofunctional monomer and a crosslinking agent within a substrate and a cover. The wrinkle characteristics can be controlled by the monomer mixture and the experimental conditions employed for the photopolymerization. More interestingly, incorporation within the material of a functional copolymer allowed us to vary the surface chemical composition while maintaining the surface structure. For that purpose we incorporated either a fluorinated copolymer that enhanced the surface hydrophobicity of the wrinkled interface or an acrylic acid containing copolymer that increased the hydrophilicity of the wrinkled surface. Finally, the role of the hydrophobicity on the bacterial surface adhesion will be tested by using Staphylococcus aureus.

  16. Influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymer on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on stainless steel: modulation by surface hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Rouxhet, Paul G; Chudziak, Dorota; Telegdi, Judit; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the adhesion of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, a typical aerobic marine microorganism, on stainless steel (SS) substrate. More particularly, the potential effect on adhesion of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer is investigated. Bacterial attachment experiments were carried out using a modified parallel plate flow chamber, allowing different surface treatments to be compared in a single experiment. The amount of adhering bacteria was determined via DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface chemical composition of SS and hydrophobized SS before and after PEO-PPO-PEO adsorption. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, was investigated to test the resistance of PEO-PPO-PEO layers to protein adsorption. The results show that BSA adsorption and Pseudomonas 2021 adhesion are significantly reduced on hydrophobized SS conditioned with PEO-PPO-PEO. Although PEO-PPO-PEO is also found to adsorb on SS, it does not prevent BSA adsorption nor bacterial adhesion, which is attributed to different PEO-PPO-PEO adlayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The obtained results open the way to a new strategy to reduce biofouling on metal oxide surfaces using PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer.

  17. Investigating the BSA protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion of Al-alloy surfaces after creating a hierarchical (micro/nano) superhydrophobic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzam, Parisa; Razmjou, Amir; Golabi, Mohsen; Shokri, Dariush; Landarani-Isfahani, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on metals such as aluminum (Al) alloys lead to serious issues in biomedical and industrial fields from both an economical and health perspective. Here, we showed that a careful manipulation of Al surface characteristics via a facile two-steps superhydrophobic modification can provide not only biocompatibility and an ability to control protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, but also address the issue of apparent long-term toxicity of Al-alloys. To find out the roles of surface characteristics, surface modification and protein adsorption on microbial adhesion and biofilm formation, the surfaces were systematically characterized by SEM, EDX, XPS, AFM, FTIR, water contact angle (WCA) goniometry, surface free energy (SFE) measurement, MTT, Bradford, Lowry and microtiter plate assays and also flow-cytometry and potentiostat analyses. Results showed that WCA and SFE changed from 70° to 163° and 36.3 to 0.13 mN m(-1) , respectively. The stable and durable modification led to a substantial reduction in static/dynamic BSA adsorption. The effect of such a treatment on the biofilm formation was analyzed by using three different bacteria of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The microtiter plate assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that the modification not only could substantially reduce the bacterial adhesion but this biofouling resistance is independent of bacterium type. An excellent cell viability after exposure of HeLa cells to waters incubated with the modified samples was observed. Finally, the corrosion rate reduced sharply from 856.6 to 0.119 MPY after superhydrophobic modifications, which is an excellent stable corrosion inhibition property. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2220-2233, 2016.

  18. Comparison of bacterial adhesion to dental materials of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jie; Wang, Chuanyong; Li, Yifei; Zhao, Zhihe; Mei, Li

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bacterial adhesion to denture materials of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adhesion forces of living Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans to PET and PMMA were directly measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid. Streptococcal biofilms formed on the two material surfaces were investigated and compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and colony-forming units (CFU) counting. Surface roughness and hydrophobicity of PET and PMMA were also measured. The results showed that PET surfaces were significantly smoother and more hydrophilic than PMMA surfaces both with and without a salivary film (p SCANNING 38:665-670, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dual effects and mechanism of TiO2 nanotube arrays in reducing bacterial colonization and enhancing C3H10T1/2 cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Z

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhaoxiang Peng,1,2,* Jiahua Ni,3,* Kang Zheng,2 Yandong Shen,2 Xiaoqing Wang,1 Guo He,3 Sungho Jin,4 Tingting Tang1 1Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopaedic Implants, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ningbo Medical Treatment Center Lihuili Hospital, Ningbo, People's Republic of China; 3State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Competition occurs between the osteoblasts in regional microenvironments and pathogens introduced during surgery, on the surface of bone implants, such as joint prostheses. The aim of this study was to modulate bacterial and osteoblast adhesion on implant surfaces by using a nanotube array. Titanium oxide (TiO2 nanotube arrays, 30 nm or 80 nm in diameter, were prepared by a two-step anodization on titanium substrates. Mechanically polished and acid-etched titanium samples were also prepared to serve as control groups. The standard strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, American Type Culture Collection [ATCC]35984 and mouse C3H10T1/2 cell lines with osteogenic potential were used to evaluate the different responses to the nanotube arrays, in bacteria and eukaryotic cells. We found that the initial adhesion and colonization of S. epidermidis on the surface of the TiO2 nanotube arrays were significantly reduced and that the adhesion of C3H10T1/2 cells on the surface of the TiO2 nanotube arrays was significantly enhanced when compared with the control samples. Based on a surface analysis of all four groups, we observed increased surface roughness, decreased water contact angles, and an enhanced

  20. SiO2-nanocomposite film coating of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks improves surface hardness and reduces susceptibility to bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonwanon, Pranithida; Hirose, Nanako; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Kitagawa, Ranna; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Srikhirin, Toemsak; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-01-31

    Composite resin blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications have recently become available. However, CAD/CAM composite resins have lower wear resistance and accumulate more plaque than CAD/CAM ceramic materials. We assessed the effects of SiO2-nanocomposite film coating of four types of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks: Cerasmart, Katana Avencia block, Lava Ultimate, and Block HC on surface hardness and bacterial attachment. All composite blocks with coating demonstrated significantly greater Vickers hardness, reduced surface roughness, and greater hydrophobicity than those without coating. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to the coated specimens was significantly less than those for the uncoated specimens. These reduced levels of bacterial adherence on the coated surface were still evident after treatment with saliva. Surface modification by SiO2-nanocomposite film coating has potential to improve wear resistance and susceptibility to plaque accumulation of CAD/CAM composite resin restorations.

  1. The influence of nanostructured features on bacterial adhesion and bone cell functions on severely shot peened 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherifard, Sara; Hickey, Daniel J; de Luca, Alba C; Malheiro, Vera N; Markaki, Athina E; Guagliano, Mario; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Substrate grain structure and topography play major roles in mediating cell and bacteria activities. Severe plastic deformation techniques, known as efficient metal-forming and grain refining processes, provide the treated material with novel mechanical properties and can be adopted to modify nanoscale surface characteristics, possibly affecting interactions with the biological environment. This in vitro study evaluates the capability of severe shot peening, based on severe plastic deformation, to modulate the interactions of nanocrystallized metallic biomaterials with cells and bacteria. The treated 316L stainless steel surfaces were first investigated in terms of surface topography, grain size, hardness, wettability and residual stresses. The effects of the induced surface modifications were then separately studied in terms of cell morphology, adhesion and proliferation of primary human osteoblasts (bone forming cells) as well as the adhesion of multiple bacteria strains, specifically Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli. The results indicated a significant enhancement in surface work hardening and compressive residual stresses, maintenance of osteoblast adhesion and proliferation as well as a remarkable decrease in the adhesion and growth of gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) compared to non-treated and conventionally shot peened samples. Impressively, the decrease in bacteria adhesion and growth was achieved without the use of antibiotics, for which bacteria can develop a resistance towards anyway. By slightly grinding the surface of severe shot peened samples to remove differences in nanoscale surface roughness, the effects of varying substrate grain size were separated from those of varying surface roughness. The expression of vinculin focal adhesions from osteoblasts was found to be singularly and inversely related to grain size, whereas the attachment of gram

  2. Anti-adhesion activity of two biosurfactants produced by Bacillus spp. prevents biofilm formation of human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivardo, F; Turner, R J; Allegrone, G; Ceri, H; Martinotti, M G

    2009-06-01

    In this work, two biosurfactant-producing strains, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis, have been characterized. Both strains were able to grow at high salinity conditions and produce biosurfactants up to 10% NaCl. Both extracted-enriched biosurfactants showed good surface tension reduction of water, from 72 to 26-30 mN/m, low critical micelle concentration, and high resistance to pH and salinity. The potential of the two lipopeptide biosurfactants at inhibiting biofilm adhesion of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated by using the MBEC device. The two biosurfactants showed interesting specific anti-adhesion activity being able to inhibit selectively biofilm formation of two pathogenic strains. In particular, Escherichia coli CFT073 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 biofilm formation was decreased of 97% and 90%, respectively. The V9T14 biosurfactant active on the Gram-negative strain was ineffective against the Gram-positive and the opposite for the V19T21. This activity was observed either by coating the polystyrene surface or by adding the biosurfactant to the inoculum. Two fractions from each purified biosurfactant, obtained by flash chromatography, fractions (I) and (II), showed that fraction (II), belonging to fengycin-like family, was responsible for the anti-adhesion activity against biofilm of both strains.

  3. Pulpal responses to bacterial contamination following dentin bridging beneath hard-setting calcium hydroxide and self-etching adhesive resin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the pulp healing to bacterial contamination beneath a hard-setting calcium hydroxide (DY: Dycal, L.D. Caulk Co.) and a self-etching adhesive resin (2V: Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray Medical Inc.) following dentin bridge formation. Class V cavities were prepared on 30 monkey teeth, and the pulps were exposed with a carbide bur through the cavity floor. Each exposed pulp was capped with either DY or 2V. The cavities were restored with a hybrid resin composite. The resin composite was removed at 180 days after capping, and then cavities were left open to the oral environment for 2 weeks to obtain bacteria contamination DY (BDY) and 2V (B2V; n = 10). A non-bacterial-contaminated group capped with DY was used as control. After bacterial challenges, inflammatory cell infiltration, incidence and differentiation of dentin bridges were evaluated histologically. There were significant differences in the presence of inflammatory cell infiltration among all groups (P < 0.05). No moderate or severe inflammatory reaction was found in Group DY. Group BDY showed moderate or severe inflammatory cell infiltration in 50%, and showed four necrotic specimens. Although no statistically significant difference was found in the formation and differentiation of dentin bridges among all groups, tunnel defects in dentin bridges were detected in 70% (DY), 80% (BDY), and 50% (B2V). Group B2V showed a significantly lower presence of inflammatory cell infiltration than Group BDY (P < 0.05). Bonding agent is supposed to seal the exposure site, and the remaining bonding agent on the cavities was effective as the barrier in the dentin bridges after bacterial challenges.

  4. CXCL1 can be regulated by IL-6 and promotes granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries during bacterial toxin exposure and encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Monica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocytes generally exert protective roles in the central nervous system (CNS, but recent studies suggest that they can be detrimental in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the most common model of multiple sclerosis. While the cytokines and adhesion molecules involved in granulocyte adhesion to the brain vasculature have started to be elucidated, the required chemokines remain undetermined. Methods CXCR2 ligand expression was examined in the CNS of mice suffering from EAE or exposed to bacterial toxins by quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. CXCL1 expression was analyzed in IL-6-treated endothelial cell cultures by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Granulocytes were counted in the brain vasculature after treatment with a neutralizing anti-CXCL1 antibody using stereological techniques. Results CXCL1 was the most highly expressed ligand of the granulocyte receptor CXCR2 in the CNS of mice subjected to EAE or infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or pertussis toxin (PTX, the latter being commonly used to induce EAE. IL-6 upregulated CXCL1 expression in brain endothelial cells by acting transcriptionally and mediated the stimulatory effect of PTX on CXCL1 expression. The anti-CXCL1 antibody reduced granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries in the three conditions under study. Importantly, it attenuated EAE severity when given daily for a week during the effector phase of the disease. Conclusions This study identifies CXCL1 not only as a key regulator of granulocyte recruitment into the CNS, but also as a new potential target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  5. Efficiency of surface modified Ti coated with copper nanoparticles to control marine bacterial adhesion under laboratory simulated conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHOKKALINGAM PRIYA; GANESSIN ARAVIND; WILSON RICHARD THILAGARAJ

    2016-04-01

    Titanium (Ti) used as condenser material in nuclear power plants encounter severe biofouling in marine environment which in turn affects the efficiency of the metal. To reduce the biofouling by marine microorganisms, surface modification of the Ti was carried out by anodization process to obtain nanotubes (TiO$_2$-NTs). The electrolyte solution containing 1% of ammonium fluoride resulted in uniform growth of TiO$_2$-NTs. TiO$_2$-NTs were furthercoated with chemically synthesized copper nanoparticles (NT-CuNP) using 3-amino propyl triethoxy silane as a coupling agent. NT-CuNP was characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energydispersivespectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The stability of the coating was determined by the amount of Cu$^+$ ions released into the surrounding using AAS. The microbial adhesion on the surface of Ti, TiO$_2$-NTs and NT-CuNPcoupons were evaluated by sea water exposure studies using total viable count method and also characterized by FE-SEM for any morphological changes. The NT-CuNP coupons show a 60% reduction in microbial adhesion whencompared to control Ti coupons.

  6. Bacterial adhesion to suture material in a contaminated wound model: Comparison of monofilament, braided, and barbed sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhom, Jonas; Bloes, Dominik A; Peschel, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulf Krister

    2016-05-21

    Contaminated suture material plays an important role in the physiopathology of surgical site infections. Recently, suture material has been developed characterized by barbs projecting from a monofilament base. Claimed advantages for barbed sutures are a shortened wound closure time and reduced maximum wound tension. It has also been suggested that these sutures would be advantageous microbiologically. The aim of this study was to test the microbiological characteristics of the barbed Quill in comparison to the monofilament Ethilon II and the braided sutures Vicryl and triclosan-coated Vicryl Plus. In our study, sutures were cultivated on color-change agar with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the halo size was measured. In a second study arm with longer cultivation bacterial growth was followed by antibiotic treatment. Ethilon II and Quill showed good comparable results, whereas large halos were found around Vicryl. Vicryl Plus results depended on triclosan sensitivity. After longer bacterial cultivation and antibiotic treatment, halos were up to 3.6 times smaller on Quill than on Vicryl (P <.001), but 1.4 times larger than on Ethilon II (P <.001) regarding S. aureus. Confocal microscopy analysis showed bacterial colonization between the braided filaments on Vicryl and beneath the barbs on Quill. From a microbiological perspective, barbed sutures can be recommended in aseptic surgery, but should only be used carefully in septic surgery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil Adesão de bactérias desnutridas por nitrogênio a solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Borges

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified, Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204-1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204-1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation.Um dos principais fatores limitantes da biorremediação in situ de solos subterrâneos, baseada na bioaumentação, é o transporte dos microrganismos selecionados até o local contaminado. A caracterização das respostas fisiológicas dos microrganismos introduzidos no subsolo a condições de escassez nutricional, notadamente a avaliação de características que afetam a adesão celular ao solo, é fundamental para se prever o sucesso da bioaumentação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o efeito da desnutrição em meio com escassez de nitrogênio sobre a hidrofobicidade celular e a

  8. Inhibition of bacterial adhesion and salmonella infection in BALB/c mice by sialyloligosaccharides and their derivatives from chicken egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Sakanaka, Senji; Sasaki, Ken; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Noda, Tetsuji; Amano, Fumio

    2002-06-05

    The effects of an egg-yolk-derived sialyloligosaccharide (YDS), asialo-YDS, and a sialylglycopeptide of YDS (SGP) on bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and on Salmonella infection in BALB/c mice were examined. YDS, its derivative asialo-YDS, and SGP strongly inhibited the binding of Salmonella enteritidis but not E. coli K-88 to a human epithelial cell line, Caco-2. In a Salmonella infection experiment using BALB/c mice, oral administration of these reagents effectively prevented the bacteria from proliferating in spleen, as well as preventing lethality. An experiment using radioactive SGP orally administered to mice revealed that the compound was absorbed from the intestine into blood and eliminated via urine within 8 h. However, these reagents did not influence the production of TNF-alpha or NO. in culture macrophages. The results suggest that they inhibit Salmonella infection not by activating macrophages but by inhibiting the entry of bacteria through the gut, suggesting that YDS and its derivatives are useful for preventing Salmonella infection when ingested continuously.

  9. Bacterial adhesion to titanium-oxy-nitride (TiNOX) coatings with different resistivities : a novel approach for the development of biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerner, RJ; Butterworth, LA; Mayer, [No Value; Dasbach, R; Busscher, HJ

    2002-01-01

    In this study the quantitative adhesion of a strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to and the ease of removal from different TiNOX coatings was investigated by means of a parallel plate flow chamber and in situ image analysis. Quality of adhesion was d

  10. Bacterial endotoxin enhances colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion through TLR-4 and NF-kappaB-dependent activation of the urokinase plasminogen activator system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2009-05-19

    Perioperative exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with accelerated metastatic colorectal tumour growth. LPS directly affects cells through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and the transcription factor NF-kappaB. The urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) system is intimately implicated in tumour cell extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions fundamental to tumour progression. Thus we sought to determine if LPS directly induces accelerated tumour cell ECM adhesion and invasion through activation of the u-PA system and to elucidate the cellular pathways involved. Human colorectal tumour cell lines were stimulated with LPS. u-PA concentration, u-PA activity, active u-PA, surface urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and TLR-4 expression were assessed by ELISA, colorimetric assay, western blot analysis and flow cytometry respectively. In vitro tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion were analysed by vitronectin adhesion assay and ECM invasion chambers. u-PA and u-PAR function was inhibited with anti u-PA antibodies or the selective u-PA inhibitors amiloride or WXC-340, TLR-4 by TLR-4-blocking antibodies and NF-kappaB by the selective NF-kappaB inhibitor SN-50. LPS upregulates u-PA and u-PAR in a dose-dependent manner, enhancing in vitro tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion by >40% (P<0.01). These effects were ameliorated by u-PA and u-PAR inhibition. LPS activates NF-kappaB through TLR-4. TLR-4 and NF-kappaB inhibition ameliorated LPS-enhanced u-PA and u-PAR expression, tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion. LPS promotes tumour cell ECM adhesion and invasion through activation of the u-PA system in a TLR-4- and NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  11. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  12. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to rewrit...

  13. Influence of bacterial exopolymers on cell adhesion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris on high alloyed steel: Corrosion inhibition by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, R.; Wei, L.; Fuerbeth, W. [Karl-Winnacker-Institut, DECHEMA e.V., Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, 60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Grooters, M.; Kuklinski, A. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Biofilm Centre, Geibelstrasse 41, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were studied with regard to their potential application as inhibitors of biocorrosion. EPS that have been isolated from biofilms of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were adsorbed on samples of high alloyed steel (type 1.4301) at different temperatures. The samples were exposed to SRB containing solution and afterwards analysed by fluorescence microscopy (FM). The results show that the EPS form an incomplete layer and lead to a smaller amount of cell adhesion when compared to pure surfaces. The results are discussed with regard to the application of EPS for the prevention of biofilm formation. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. 人工瓣膜材料细菌黏附与细菌生长的关系%Relationship between bacterial adhesion to prosthetic valve materials and bacterial growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄云超; 杨凯云; 雷玉洁; 赵光强; 李晓明; 高佳

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Studies have demonstrated that prosthetic valve endocarditis is primarily caused by bacteria adhering on the surface of the materials.Thus,the relationship of prosthetic valve materials with bacteria adhesion and growth is an important subject.OBJECTIVE:To explore the influence of prosthetic valve materials on bacteria growth through observing the relationship of bacteria adhesion on prosthetic valve materials and bacteria growth.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Repetitive measurement was performed at the Department of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery,Third Hospital of Kunming Medical College from January to March 2001.MATERIALS:Terylene(Dacron)was purchased from Man-made Blood Vessel Laboratory of Suzhou Weaves Belt Factory;polytetrafluoroethylene was provided by Teflon-GoreTexW.L.Gore & Associates,Inc.Arizona,USA;pyrolytic carbon was provided by Department of Biological Material of Sichuan Union University;staphylococcus anreus,Escherichia coli,staphylococcus epidermidis,and Pseudomonas aerugmosa were prepared by our laboratory.METHODS:The growth curve of staphylococcus aureus,staphylococcus epidermidis,Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on dacron,pyrolytic carbon and pelytetrafluoroethylene were quantitatively determined respectively by plate counting and gamma.ray counting of 125 Ⅰ radiolabeled bacteria in vitro.Bacteria growing normally served as control.All bacteria were cultured for 30 hours,and bacteria concentration was determined every 2 hours.In addition,the adhesive capacities of foMr kinds of bacteria on dacron,pyrolytic carbon and polytetrafluoroethylene were detected Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on dacron,pyrolytic carbon and polytetrafluoroethytene.RESULTS:There were no significant differences in adhesive capacities of each bacterium on dacron,pyrolytic carbon and polytetrafluoroethylene at the same time point(P>0.05).The differences in growth curve of four kinds of bacteria on prosthetic valve materials were not remarkable

  15. The change of bacterial adhesion during deposition nitrogen-diamond like carbon coating on pure titanium%渗氮类金刚石薄膜应用于纯钛后的细菌黏附变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹路; 肖云

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the change of bacterial adhesion on pure titanium coated with nitrogen-diamond like carbon (N-DLC) films and to guide the clinical application. Methods N-DLC was deposited on titanium using ion plating machine, TiN film, anodic oxide film and non-deposition were used as control, then made specimens adhering on the surface of resin denture base for 6 months. The adhesion of Saccharomyces albicans on the titanium surface was observed using scanning electron microscope, and the roughness was tested by roughness detector. Results The number of Saccharomyces albicans adhering on diamond-like carbon film was significantly less than on the other groups (P<0.05), and the growth of bacterial cell was inhibited and in a poor state. The largest number of adhesion and cell strains grew well on anodic oxide film group and non-deposition control group. The change of surface roughness of N-DLC film was less than other group (P<0.05). Conclusion Pure titanium coated with N-DLC film reduced the adhesion of Saccharomyces albicans after clinical application, thereby reduced the risk of denture stomatitis.%目的 观察纯钛试件应用等离子镀膜法镀制纳米渗氮类金刚石(N-DLC)薄膜后的细菌黏附变化,以期对临床应用有所指导.方法 采用等离子镀膜机,在纯钛试件表面沉积N -DLC薄膜、TiN薄膜、阳极氧化膜以及空白对照,然后将其黏附于树脂基托表面,实际使用6个月后,扫描电子显微镜观察白色假丝酵母菌黏附试件情况;粗糙度检测仪对比检测试件粗糙度变化.结果 白色假丝酵母菌在N-DLC膜表面附着数量比其他组试件明显少(P<0.05),且菌体生长不良,处于抑制状态;阳极氧化膜和空白对照试件表面黏附菌量最多,且菌体生长旺盛.N-DLC膜表面粗糙度在戴用前后变化最小(P<0.05).结论 纯钛表面镀制N-DLC膜在口腔实际应用过程中可以明显降低白色假丝酵母菌的黏

  16. Bacterial adhesion of zirconia ceramics versus nickel chromium alloy as oral materials%氧化锆陶瓷与镍铬合金口腔材料的细菌黏附性对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩月红; 成之远; 王明德

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental and clinical experiences show that the surface roughness of dental restoration materials directly affects bacterial adhesion; in addition, the material composition and physicochemical properties are also important influencing factors. OBJECTIVE: To compare the bacterial adhesion of zirconia ceramics and nickel chromium al oy as oral materials. METHODS: Zirconia ceramics and nickel chromium al oy were respectively cut into 10 pieces of 3. 0 cm ×3.0 cm×0. 2 cm plate specimens. For each material, five pieces were subjected to surface polishing treatment, and the other five pieces were glazed. Surface roughness value of specimens was detected. Experimental strains of Streptococcus mutans was cultured on the specimen surface at 37 ℃ for 48 hours, and the amount of bacteria adhering to the specimen surface was detected. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Surface roughness of four groups of specimens showed no difference. The amount of bacteria that adhered to the polishing specimens of zirconia ceramics was significantly lower than that of nickel chromium al oy (P < 0.05), but no difference was found in the amount of bacteria adhering to the glazing specimens of nickel-chromium al oy and zirconia ceramics. These findings indicate that zirconia ceramics has better ability to inhibit bacterial adhesion than nickel-chromium al oy, especial y after glazing.%背景:实验及临床经验表明,修复材料表面的粗糙度直接影响细菌的黏附性,除此之外,材料组成及本身理化性质也是重要影响因素。目的:对比氧化锆陶瓷与镍铬合金口腔材料的细菌黏附性。方法:将氧化锆陶瓷、镍铬合金分别制成3.0 cm ×3.0 cm ×0.2 cm 的板片,每种材料各10片。两种材料各选取其中5片进行抛光处理,另5片进行上釉处理,检测4组试件的粗糙度。将变形链球菌浮液滴加于4组材料表面,37℃厌氧培养48 h,检测各组细菌黏附数量。结果与结论:4

  17. Bifunctional coating based on carboxymethyl chitosan with stable conjugated alkaline phosphatase for inhibiting bacterial adhesion and promoting osteogenic differentiation on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Kang, En-Tang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was covalently immobilized on carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS)-coated polydopamine (PDA)-functionalized Ti to achieve a bifunctional surface. Our results showed ∼89% reduction in Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on this surface compared to that on pristine Ti. The ALP-modified Ti supported cell proliferation, and significantly enhanced cellular ALP activity and calcium deposition of osteoblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). The extent of enhancement in the functions of these cells is dependent on the surface density of immobilized ALP. The substrate prepared using an ALP solution of 50 μg/cm2 resulted in 44%, 54% and 129% increase in calcium deposited by osteoblasts, hMSCs and hADSCs, respectively, compared to those cultured on pristine Ti. The ALP-modified substrates also promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs and hADSCs by up-regulating gene expressions of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), osterix (OSX), and osteocalcin (OC) in the two types of stem cells. The surface-immobilized ALP was stable after being subjected to 1 h immersion in 70% ethanol and autoclaving at 121 °C for 20 min. However, the enzymatic bioactivity of the surface-immobilized ALP was reduced by about 50% after these substrates were immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or PBS containing lysozyme for 14 days.

  18. 纯钛和镍铬合金口腔材料细菌粘附性能比较%Comparison of bacterial adhesion between pure titanium and nichrome as dental material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁蓬

    2016-01-01

    目的:探究与分析纯钛和镍铬合金口腔材料细菌粘附性能。方法选取纯钛和镍铬合金两种牙科常用修复材料,分别制备成3.0 cm×2.0 cm×2.0 cm的板片试件,每组5片。对两组的试件表面均给予抛光处理,确保试件的表面无明显差异。实验菌株选用变形的链球菌,将其悬浮放置于试件的表面上,于37℃的环境中进行培养,共培养48h,后对粘附在材料表面的细菌再次进行洗脱、培养与菌落计数,后对试验结果进行统计分析。结果纯钛较镍铬合金相比表面粗糙度较高,细菌总量较低,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论纯钛相比于镍铬合金具有更好的抗细菌粘附性,值得推广与应用。%ObjectiveTo investigate and compare bacterial adhesion between pure titanium and nichrome as dental material.MethodsPure titanium and nichrome were made into 3.0 cm×2.0 cm×2.0 cm plates, and each group contained 5 plates. Polishing was made in both groups to ensure no obvious difference. Streptococcus mutans, as experimental strain, were placed on suspension over plate and taken in culture for 48 h under 37℃. Statistical analysis was made on experimental outcomes after elution, culture and colony count. ResultsPure titanium showed higher surface roughness and lower total bacteria amount than nichrome, and their difference had statistical significance (P<0.05).ConclusionPure titanium provides better bacterial adhesion than nichrome, and it is worth promoting and applying.

  19. Influence of Klebsiella pneumoniae CRP protein on bacterial adhesion and virulence in vitro%肺炎克雷伯菌转录调控子CRP对菌株粘附能力及细胞活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭斌; 白群华; 罗美; 杨世亚; 薛健; 周锡鹏; 李迎丽; 邱景富

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the adhesion and cell virulence of Klebsiella pneumonia wild type (WT) strain,complemented strain c-Δcrp (cAMP receptor protein) and mutant strain Δcrp,in order to investigate crp gene on the adhesion and cell toxicity of Klebsiella pneumonia.Methods After infection of A549 cells by Klebsiella pneumonia WT strain,c-Δcrp strain and Δcrp strain,the cells were lysed and the bacteria were quantified by plating appropriate dilutions on Luria-Bertani agar plates.LDH release was detected to estimate cell activity.Infection time and MOI were optimized.Results The adhesion ability of Klebsiella pneumonia WT (logCFU =5.145) and c-Δcrp strain (logCFU =4.915) was higher than that of Δcrp strain (logCFU =4.122) (P =0.004).The optimal conditions to determinate the LDH release included infected cells incubation for 8 h at 37 ℃,the developing time for 10 min in dark,and 1:10 dilution of the supernatant for test.The virulence of WT strain (70.69%) was significantly higher than that of Δcrp strain (19.54%) (P=0.001).Conclusion Knocking-out of crp gene causes obvious decrease of cellular toxicity and adhesion,comparing with the WT strain and c-Δcrp strain.Klebsiella pneumonia CRP protein positively regulates bacterial virulence and adhesion.%目的 分析肺炎克雷伯菌临床分离株WT(wild type)、回补株(c-Δcrp)和突变株(Δcrp)对人肺癌上皮细胞A549细胞的粘附能力及细胞活性的影响.方法 肺炎克雷伯菌WT株、c-Δcrp株和Δcrp株感染人肺癌上皮细胞A549,经裂解液裂解后平板计数计算粘附的菌量.LDH释放法检测细菌对细胞的毒性,优化感染时间和感染指数.结果 WT株及c-Δcrp株粘附的菌量分别为logCFU=5.145和logCFU=4.915,均高于Δcrp株(logCFU=4.122),差异有统计学意义(F=8.366,P=0.004).以MOI=1 000(细菌∶细胞=1000)的菌量感染靶细胞,37℃孵育8h,加底物液避光显色10 min,离心所得上清稀释10倍进行测定为最佳反应条件.WT

  20. Anti-adhesive properties of fish tropomyosins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Bernbom, Nete; Gram, Lone;

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We have recently found that preconditioning of stainless steel surfaces with an aqueous fish muscle extract can significantly impede bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the primary components associated with this bacteria-repelling effect. Methods...... to the formation of a proteinaceous conditioning film composed primarily of fish tropomyosins. These fibrous proteins formed a considerable anti-adhesive conditioning layer on and reduced bacterial adhesion to several different materials including polystyrene, vinyl plastic, stainless steel and glass. The protein...... the importance of substratum's physiochemical properties and exposure time with regards to protein adsorption/elution efficiency and subsequent bacterial adhesion. Significance and Impact of the Study: Fish tropomyosin-coatings could potentially offer a nontoxic and relatively inexpensive measure of reducing...

  1. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-06-01

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  2. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  3. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria...

  4. Adhesion and cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  5. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  6. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  7. Adhesive interactions between medically important yeasts and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millsap, KW; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Yeasts are being increasingly identified as important organisms in human infections. Adhesive interactions between yeasts and bacteria may contribute to yeast retention al body sites. Methods for studying adhesive interactions between bacterial strains are well known, and range from simple macroscop

  8. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  9. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  10. Adhesion of Escherichia coli under flow conditions reveals potential novel effects of FimH mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feenstra, T.; Schmidt Thøgersen, Mariane; Wieser, E.

    2017-01-01

    H mutations on bacterial adhesion using a novel adhesion assay, which models the physiological flow conditions bacteria are exposed to. We introduced 12 different point mutations in the mannose binding pocket of FimH in an E. coli strain expressing type 1 fimbriae only (MSC95-FimH). We compared the bacterial...... mutations abrogated adhesion. We demonstrated that FimH residues E50 and T53 are crucial for adhesion under flow conditions. The coating of endothelial cells on biochips and modelling of physiological flow conditions enabled us to identify FimH residues crucial for adhesion. These results provide novel...

  11. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  12. Adhesion of streptococcus rattus and streptococcus mutans to metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branting, C.; Linder, L.E.; Sund, M.-L.; Oden, A.; Wiatr-Adamczak, E.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of Streptococcus rattus BHT and Streptococcus mutans IB to metal specimens of amalgam, silver, tin and copper was studied using (6-/sup 3/H) thymidine labeled cells. In the standard assay the metal specimens were suspended by a nylon thread in an adhesion solution containing a chemically defined bacterial growth medium (FMC), sucrose, and radiolabeled bacteria. Maximum amounts of adhering bacteria were obtained after about 100 min of incubation. Saturation of the metal specimens with bacteria was not observed. Both strains also adhered in the absence of sucrose, indicating that glucan formation was not necessary for adhesion. However, in the presence of glucose, adhesion was only 26-45% of that observed in the presence of equimolar sucrose. Sucrose-dependent stimulation of adhesion seemed to be due to increased cell-to-cell adhesion capacity. Isolated radiolabeled water-insoluble and water-soluble polysaccharides produced from sucrose by S. rattus BHT were not adsorbed to the metal surfaces.

  13. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  14. Understanding adhesive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Michael

    2010-03-01

    This review paper firstly provides an outline of the development of resin-based adhesives. A simple classification method is described based on whether an acid etching agent requiring a washing and drying step is used. These systems are called etch and rinse systems. The other adhesives that do not have the washing and drying steps are referred to as self-etching adhesives. The advantages and disadvantages of these groups of adhesives are discussed. Methods of adhering to the tooth surface are provided, especially where the resin-based adhesive reliability is difficult to control.

  15. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interfac...

  16. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  17. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  18. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  19. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  20. More automation, more adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Jens-Peter

    2012-07-01

    Although aluminium has become established as an absorber plate material, it is still seldom used for piping. Moreover, adhesive processes are becoming increasingly important in collector production. (orig.)

  1. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia, Titanium Alloy and some other Restorative Materials: “An in-vitro Study”

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzatollah Jalalian; Shahbaz Naser Mostofi; Elnaz Shafiee; Amin Nourizadeh; Reihaneh Aghajani Nargesi; Sarah Ayremlou

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bacterial adhesion on restorative materials may lead to gingival inflammation and secondary caries. Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the adhesion of streptococcus mutans to zirconia, Feldespatic porcelain, titanium alloy and Indirect composite resin In-vitro. The effect of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion was also studied. Materials and Methods: 10 specimens (5mm diameter, 1mm thickness) of each material, Zirconia, Indirect composite resi...

  2. A simple technique to assess bacterial attachment to metal surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    . Therefore, a simple spectrophotometric method was developed to evaluate bacterial adhesion to metal surface. The method was calibrated using a bacterium Vibrio sp. and aluminium as a model organism and substratum, respectively. The method involves staining...

  3. A simple method to assess bacterial attachment to surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    The crystal violet microplate adhension assay was modified to evaluate bacterial adhesion to metal and non-metal surfaces. Both viable cell count and the absorbance of the crystal violet stained cells attached to aluminium increased over the period...

  4. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  5. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  6. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  7. Bond-Strengthening in Staphylococcal Adhesion to Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent bacterial adhesion forces of four strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were investigated. Initial adhesion forces differed significantly between the two surfaces and hovered around -0.4 nN. No unambiguous effect of substratum surface hydrophobi

  8. Adhesion of pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus to the gill mucus of Pseudosciaena crocea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; YAN Qingpi; MA Shen; ZHUANG Zhixia; WANG Xiaoru

    2007-01-01

    Adhesion of Vibrio alginolyticus to the gill mucus of Pseudosciaena crocea has been investigated using [methyl-3H]thymidine as isotope tracer. The results showed that: the adhesive quantity of V. alginolyticus increased with bacterial concentrations and reached equilibrium after incubated for 180 min; the higher adhesive quantity was obtained at 15~30 ℃ and sourish conditions; adhesion of V. alginolyticus could not achieved without Na+, and Ca2+ played an auxiliary role in the bacterial adhesion; adhesion of V. alginolyticus was inhibited remarkably by starvation, heat treatment and periodic acid treatment; all of the eight kinds of carbohydrates investigated enhanced the adhesion of V. alginolyticus to the gill mucus of P. crocea, among them, glucose, mannose, fructose and maltose showed the specially enhanced adhesion. The results indicated that V. alginolyticus could adhere to the gill mucus of P. crocea facilely in seawater, and this bacterial adhesion was influenced by environmental factors and closely related to superficial carbohydrate structures and some heat-sensitive structures.

  9. Streptococcus sanguinis adhesion on titanium rough surfaces: effect of shot-blasting particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana G; Juárez, A; Engel, E; Gil, F J

    2011-08-01

    Dental implant failure is commonly associated to dental plaque formation. This problem starts with bacterial colonization on implant surface upon implantation. Early colonizers (such as Streptococcus sanguinis) play a key role on that process, because they attach directly to the surface and facilitate adhesion of later colonizers. Surface treatments have been focused to improve osseointegration, where shot-blasting is one of the most used. However the effects on bacterial adhesion on that sort of surfaces have not been elucidated at all. A methodological procedure to test bacterial adherence to titanium shot-blasted surfaces (alumina and silicon carbide) by quantifying bacterial detached cells per area unit, was performed. In parallel, the surface properties of samples (i.e., roughness and surface energy), were analyzed in order to assess the relationship between surface treatment and bacterial adhesion. Rather than roughness, surface energy correlated to physicochemical properties of shot-blasted particles appears as critical factors for S. sanguinis adherence to titanium surfaces.

  10. Influence of Surface Roughness of Stainless steel on Microbial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, D.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gram, L.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation is of growing interest in the food processing industry where bacteria can survive on surfaces and resist cleaning and disinfection. The condition of the surfaces (eg lack of cracks) and their general roughness is assumed to be important for the hygienic st...

  11. Effect of Superhydrophobic Surface of Titanium on Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifu Tang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the systemic antibiotics prophylaxis, orthopedic implants still remain highly susceptible to bacterial adhesion and resulting in device-associated infection. Surface modification is an effective way to decrease bacterial adhesion. In this study, we prepared surfaces with different wettability on titanium surface based on TiO2 nanotube to examine the effect of bacterial adhesion. Firstly, titanium plates were calcined to form hydrophilic TiO2 nanotube films of anatase phase. Subsequently, the nanotube films and inoxidized titaniums were treated with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyl-triethoxysilane (PTES, forming superhydrophobic and hydrophobic surfaces. Observed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the different surfaces have different characteristics. Staphylococcus aureus (SA adhesion on different surfaces was evaluated. Our experiment results show that the superhydrophobic surface has contact angles of water greater than 150∘ and also shows high resistance to bacterial contamination. It is indicated that superhydrophobic surface may be a factor to reduce device-associated infection and could be used in clinical practice.

  12. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  13. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  14. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia, Titanium Alloy and some other Restorative Materials: “An in-vitro Study”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzatollah Jalalian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacterial adhesion on restorative materials may lead to gingival inflammation and secondary caries. Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the adhesion of streptococcus mutans to zirconia, Feldespatic porcelain, titanium alloy and Indirect composite resin In-vitro. The effect of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion was also studied. Materials and Methods: 10 specimens (5mm diameter, 1mm thickness of each material, Zirconia, Indirect composite resin, Titanium alloy and Feldespatic porcelain were fabricated. Enamel was used as reference. Specimens were covered with artificial saliva and bacterial suspension (109 CFU/mL. Bacterial adhesion was determined using scanning electron microscope and culturing the specimens in blood agar. Data were analyzed with One way ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc test for roughness and Kruskal-wallis test for adhesion values. Results: The highest bacterial adhesion was recorded for composite specimens and the lowest was seen in Ziconia group (p<0.5. The mean value of adhesion for zirconia, feldespatic peocelain, Titanium alloy and indirect composite were 28±6.32, 40.80±8.40, 75±4.47 and 386±13.75, respectively. The differences between zirconia and titanium alloy and also zirconia and indirect composite and porcelain and indirect composite were statistically significant (p<0.5. Conclusion: Zirconia showed the lowest bacterial adhesion in comparison to other tested materials and Enamel. The difference between zirconia and titanium alloy and also zirconia and indirect composite was statistically significant (p<0.5. No correlation was found between surface roughness and bacterial adhesion.   Keywords: Bacterial adhesions; Streptococcus mutans; Dental caries

  15. The 'Swiss cheese' instability of bacterial biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Hongchul; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel pattern that results in bacterial biofilms as a result of the competition between hydrodynamic forces and adhesion forces. After the passage of an air plug, the break up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a Swiss cheese pattern of holes is left in the residual biofilm.

  16. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial gastroenteritis is present when bacteria cause an infection of the stomach and intestines ... has not been treated Many different types of bacteria can cause ... Campylobacter jejuni E coli Salmonella Shigella Staphylococcus ...

  17. The influence of ionic strength on the adhesive bond stiffness of oral streptococci possessing different surface appendages as probed using AFM and QCM-D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsson, Adam L. J.; Arun, Narasimhan; Kanger, Johannes S.; Busscher, Henk J.; Ivanov, Ivan E.; Camesano, Terri A.; Chen, Yun; Johannsmann, Diethelm; van der Mei, Henny C.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to surfaces poses threats to human-health, not always associated with adhering organisms, but often with their detachment causing contamination elsewhere. Bacterial adhesion mechanisms may not be valid for their detachment, known to proceed according to a visco-elastic mechanism.

  18. EFFECT OF IATROGENIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS EPIDERMIDIS INTERCELLAR ADHESION OPERON ON FORMATION OF BACTERIAL BIOFILM ON SURFACE OF POLYVINYL CHLORIDE%医源性表皮葡萄球菌胞间黏附素基因操纵子在聚氯乙烯材料表面细菌生物膜形成中的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶联华; 黄云超; 许赓; 杨达宽; 刘馨; 周友全; 郭凤丽

    2011-01-01

    Objective The intercellular adhesion (ica) gene of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) is a key factor to bacterial aggregation, to analysis the genotype of iatrogenic SE and to explore the effect of iatrogenic SE ica operon on the formation of bacterial biofilm on the surface of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Methods Fifty-six clinical isolates of iatrogenic SE were selected, and PCR and gene sequencing were used to detect the genes related with bacterial biofilm formation. The genes contained 16S rRNA, autolysin (atlE), fibrinogen binding protein (fbe), and icaADB. The bacteria suspension of 1 × 105 cfu/mL iatrogenic SE was prepared; according to the test results of target genes, the PVC material and the genotype of icaADB+, atlE+,fbe+ strains were co-cultivated as the ica positive group; the PVC material and the genotype of icaADB, atlE+, fbe+ strains were co-cultivated as the ica negative group. The thickness of biofilm and bacterial community quantity unit area on PVC materials were measured by confocal laser scanning microscope, and the surface structure of biofilm formation was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 hours. Results The positive rate of 16S rRNA of iatrogenic SE strains was 100% (56/56). The genotype of icaADB+, atlE+, and fbe+ strains accounted for 57.1% (32/56). The genotype of icaADB, atlE+,and fbe+ strains accounted for 37.5% (21/56). The sequencing results showed that the product sequences of 16S rRNA, atlE, fbe,and icaADB were consistent with those in GenBank. With time, no significant bacterial biofilm formed on the surface of PVC in ica operon negative group. But in ica operon positive group, the number of bacterial community was gradually increased, and the volume of bacterial biofilms was gradually increased on the surface of PVC. At 24 hours, mature bacterial biofilm structure formed, and at 30 hours, the volume of bacterial biofilms was tending towards stability. The thickness of biofilm (F=6 714

  19. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  20. Adhesion mechanisms of Vibrio fluvialis to skin mucus of Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢庆枇; 赵敏慧; 王晓露; 邹文政; 陈昌生

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fluvialis incubated in trypticase soy broth(TSB)showed stronger adhesion to the skin mucus of Epinephelus awoara than V.fluvialis grown on trypticase soy agar(TSA),and this bacterial adhesion was assessed in terms of saturation kinetics.Treating bacteria with antibody against O-antigens resulted in significantly reduced bacterial adhesion.In the early growth stage,the adhering bacteria numbers increased with incubation time,peaked at 24 h,and then dropped sharply.Prior heat treatment of the mucus at ...

  1. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  2. Regulation of cell adhesion strength by peripheral focal adhesion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D

    2011-12-21

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength.

  3. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  4. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  5. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  6. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structur...

  7. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  8. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  9. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  10. Biological adhesion of Parthenocissus tricuspidata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Tianxian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parthenocissus tricuspidata is a climbing plant of the grape family. It can climb with its adhesive discs on different substrates such as stone mountains, roadside stone banks, exterior walls of buildings, thereby withstanding strong winds and storms without detachment. The details about the adhesion process of Parthenocissus tricuspidata are not yet entirely understood. We studied the component-structure-property relationship of the adhesive discs in detail and propose a twostage model to describe the biological adhesion: (i structural contact and (ii adhesive action. These two stages and their variations play an important role for the attaching of the adhesive disc to different structural surfaces. We believe that in Parthenocissus tricuspidata different mechanisms work together to allow the adhesive disc to climb on various vertical substrates and reveal strong adhesive properties.

  11. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  12. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  13. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahata, Hajime

    2004-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Holstein cattle is an autosomal recessive congenital disease characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, delayed wound healing and stunted growth, and is also associated with persistent marked neutrophilia. The molecular basis of BLAD is a single point mutation (adenine to guanine) at position 383 of the CD18 gene, which caused an aspartic acid to glycine substitution at amino acid 128 (D128G) in the adhesion molecule CD18. Neutrophils from BLAD cattle have impaired expression of the beta2 integrin (CD11a,b,c/CD18) of the leukocyte adhesion molecule. Abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence dependent functions of leukocytes have been fully characterized. Cattle affected with BLAD have severe ulcers on oral mucous membranes, severe periodontitis, loss of teeth, chronic pneumonia and recurrent or chronic diarrhea. Affected cattle die at an early age due to the infectious complications. Holstein bulls, including carrier sires that had a mutant BLAD gene in heterozygote were controlled from dairy cattle for a decade. The control of BLAD in Holstein cattle by publishing the genotypes and avoiding the mating between BLAD carriers was found to be successful. This paper provides an overview of the genetic disease BLAD with reference to the disease in Holstein cattle.

  14. The influence of biosurfactants released by S-mitis BMS on the adhesion of pioneer strains and cariogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoogmoed, CG; Van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    The influence of Streptococcus mitis BMS biosurfactants on the adhesion of eight pioneer and four cariogenic oral bacterial strains was, for a first screening, examined in a microtiter plate assay. The adhesion to pellicle-coated wells of three cariogenic strains was inhibited >70% by the biosurfact

  15. Methods to study microbial adhesion on abiotic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Meireles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are a matrix of cells and exopolymeric substances attached to a wet and solid surface and are commonly associated to several problems, such as biofouling and corrosion in industries and infectious diseases in urinary catheters and prosthesis. However, these cells may have several benefits in distinct applications, such as wastewater treatment processes, microbial fuel cells for energy production and biosensors. As microbial adhesion is a key step on biofilm formation, it is very important to understand and characterize microbial adhesion to a surface. This study presents an overview of predictive and experimental methods used for the study of bacterial adhesion. Evaluation of surface physicochemical properties have a limited capacity in describing the complex adhesion process. Regarding the experimental methods, there is no standard method or platform available for the study of microbial adhesion and a wide variety of methods, such as colony forming units counting and microscopy techniques, can be applied for quantification and characterization of the adhesion process.

  16. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists.

  17. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  18. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  19. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  20. Blocking of bacterial biofilm formation by a fish protein coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation on inert surfaces is a significant health and economic problem in a wide range of environmental, industrial, and medical areas. Bacterial adhesion is generally a prerequisite for this colonization process and, thus, represents an attractive target for the development...... of biofilm-preventive measures. We have previously found that the preconditioning of several different inert materials with an aqueous fish muscle extract, composed primarily of fish muscle alpha-tropomyosin, significantly discourages bacterial attachment and adhesion to these surfaces. Here......, this proteinaceous coating is characterized with regards to its biofilm-reducing properties by using a range of urinary tract infectious isolates with various pathogenic and adhesive properties. The antiadhesive coating significantly reduced or delayed biofilm formation by all these isolates under every condition...

  1. Bovicin HC5 and nisin reduce Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to polystyrene and change the hydrophobicity profile and Gibbs free energy of adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Martins, Mayra Carla de Freitas; Nogueira, Guilherme Bicalho; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2014-11-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often multidrug-resistant that not only causes a variety of human diseases, but also is able to survive on biotic and abiotic surfaces through biofilm communities. The best way to inhibit biofilm establishment is to prevent cell adhesion. In the present study, subinhibitory concentrations of the bacteriocins bovicin HC5 and nisin were tested for their capability to interfere with the adhesion of S. aureus to polystyrene. Subinhibitory dosages of the bacteriocins reduced cell adhesion and this occurred probably due to changes in the hydrophobicity of the bacterial cell and polystyrene surfaces. After treatment with bovicin HC5 and nisin, the surfaces became more hydrophilic and the free energy of adhesion (∆G(adhesion)) between bacteria and the polystyrene surface was unfavorable. The transcriptional level of selected genes was assessed by RT-qPCR approach, revealing that the bacteriocins affected the expression of some important biofilm associated genes (icaD, fnbA, and clfB) and rnaIII, which is involved in the quorum sensing mechanism. The conditioning of food-contact surfaces with bacteriocins can be an innovative and powerful strategy to prevent biofilms in the food industry. The results are relevant for food safety as they indicate that bovicin HC5 and nisin can inhibit bacterial adhesion and consequent biofilm establishment, since cell adhesion precedes biofilm formation.

  2. Bacillus cereus Certhrax ADP-ribosylates vinculin to disrupt focal adhesion complexes and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nathan C; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2014-04-11

    Bacillus cereus is often associated with mild to moderate gastroenteritis; however, some recent isolates cause inhalational anthrax-like diseases and death. These potential emerging human pathogens express multiple virulence factors. B. cereus strain G9241 expresses anthrax toxin, several polysaccharide capsules, and the novel ADP-ribosyltransferase, Certhrax. In this study, we show that Certhrax ADP-ribosylates Arg-433 of vinculin, a protein that coordinates actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix interactions. ADP-ribosylation of vinculin disrupted focal adhesion complexes and redistributed vinculin to the cytoplasm. Exogenous vinculin rescued these phenotypes. This provides a mechanism for strain G9241 to breach host barrier defenses and promote bacterial growth and spread. Certhrax is the first bacterial toxin to add a post-translational modification to vinculin to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Adhesion of food-borne bacteria to stainless steel is reduced by food conditioning films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yin; Jorgensen, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Preconditioning of stainless steel with aqueous cod muscle extract significantly impedes subsequent bacterial adhesion most likely due to repelling effects of fish tropomyosin. The purpose of this study was to determine if other food conditioning films decrease or enhance bacterial adhesion...... to stainless steel. Attachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2 to stainless steel coated with water-soluble coatings of animal origin was significantly reduced as compared with noncoated stainless steel or stainless steel coated with laboratory substrate or extracts of plant origin. Coating with animal extracts...... also decreases adhesion of other food-relevant bacteria. The manipulation of adhesion was not attributable to growth inhibitory effects. Chemical analysis revealed that the stainless steels were covered by homogenous layers of adsorbed proteins. The presence of tropomyocin was indicated by appearance...

  4. Primary role of electron work function for evaluation of nanostructured titania implant surface against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda-Cepa, M; Syrek, K; Brzychczy-Wloch, M; Sulka, G D; Kotarba, A

    2016-09-01

    The electron work function as an essential descriptor for the evaluation of metal implant surfaces against bacterial infection is identified for the first time. Its validity is demonstrated on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to nanostructured titania surfaces. The established correlation: work function-bacteria adhesion is of general importance since it can be used for direct evaluation of any electrically conductive implant surfaces.

  5. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    cleaving of a single chunk of graphite. For both cases, parallel and serial exfoliation, it is investigated how many generations of cleavages are needed. An approximate model with the probability distribution expressed as a simple closed form is presented and compared with the simulations.......Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  6. [Adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafiţanu, E; Matei, I; Mungiu, O C; Pavelescu, M; Mîndreci, I; Apostol, I; Ionescu, G

    1989-01-01

    The adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms aimed to local action release the drug substance in view of a dermatological, traumatological, antirheumatic, cosmetic action. Two such preparations were obtained and their stability, consistency and pH were determined. The "in vitro" tests of their bioavailability revealed the dynamics of calcium ions release according to the associations of each preparation. The bioavailability determined by evaluating the pharmacological response demonstrated the antiinflammatory action obtained by the association of calcium ions with the components extracted from poplar muds. The therapeutical efficiency of the studied preparations has proved in the treatment of some sport injuries.

  7. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  8. Adhesion properties of gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ginel; Peattie, Anne; Daniels, Roxanne; Full, Robert; Kenny, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Millions of keratin hairs on gecko feet, called setae, act as a spectacular dry adhesive. Each seta branches into hundreds of smaller fibers that terminate in spatula-shaped ends. Morphological differences between the setae from different gecko species are suspected to affect both single-seta and whole-animal adhesion properties. Single-seta adhesive force measurements made using a MEMS piezoresistive cantilever capable of two-axis measurements are presented.

  9. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  10. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  11. Pressure sensitive adhesives from renewable resources

    OpenAIRE

    Maaßen, Wiebke

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) represent an important segment of the adhesives market. In this work, novel insights into the adhesive performance of bio-based pressure sensitive adhesives are presented. Three different homopolymers based on fatty acids derived from native vegetable oils as renewable feedstock were characterized in terms of their mechanical and adhesive properties.

  12. Adhesion of smooth and rough phenotypes of Flavobacterium psychrophilum to polystyrene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högfors-Rönnholm, E; Norrgård, J; Wiklund, T

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic smooth cells of the fish pathogenic bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum have previously been reported to be more adhesive to polystyrene surfaces than corresponding rough cells. In this study, the adhesion ability of smooth and rough cells of F. psychrophilum to polystyrene surfaces was investigated in detail with a crystal violet staining method. By treating both polystyrene surfaces with fish mucus and carbohydrates and the bacterial cells with carbohydrates, the involvement of lectins in the adhesion process was investigated. Smooth cells showed significantly higher adhesion ability to untreated polystyrene surfaces compared with corresponding rough cells and increasing water hardness had an inhibitory effect on the adhesion. Treatment of polystyrene surfaces with D-glucose, D-galactose and fish mucus increased the adhesion ability of smooth cells to polystyrene. Furthermore, treatment of the smooth cells with D-glucose, D-galactose and sialic acid decreased the adhesion ability of the cells, indicating that the adhesion is likely mediated by complementary lectins on the surface of the cells. Sodium (meta)periodate treatment of smooth cells also decreased the adhesion ability to polystyrene, suggesting that the lectins, such as the dominating sialic acid-binding lectin, are probably localized in the extracellular polysaccharides surrounding the cells.

  13. Stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by surface wrinkling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (approximately 10.8 N/cm(2)) and shear adhesion (approximately 14.7 N/cm(2)) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of approximately 3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of approximately 0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  14. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  15. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  17. Cytochemical Differences in Bacterial Glycocalyx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hannig, Matthias; Pelz, Klaus; Stoiber, Walter

    2005-02-01

    To examine new cytochemical aspects of the bacterial adhesion, a strain 41452/01 of the oral commensal Streptococcus sanguis and a wild strain of Staphylococcus aureus were grown with and without sucrose supplementation for 6 days. Osmiumtetraoxyde (OsO4), uranyl acetate (UA), ruthenium red (RR), cupromeronic blue (CB) staining with critical electrolytic concentrations (CECs), and the tannic acid-metal salt technique (TAMST) were applied for electron microscopy. Cytochemically, only RR-positive fimbriae in S. sanguis were visualized. By contrast, some types of fimbriae staining were observed in S. aureus glycocalyx: RR-positive, OsO4-positive, tannophilic and CB-positive with ceasing point at 0.3 M MgCl2. The CB staining with CEC, used for the first time for visualization of glycoproteins of bacterial glycocalyx, also reveals intacellular CB-positive substances-probably the monomeric molecules, that is, subunits forming the fimbriae via extracellular assembly. Thus, glycosylated components of the biofilm matrix can be reliably related to single cells. The visualization of intracellular components by CB with CEC enables clear distinction between S. aureus and other bacteria, which do not produce CB-positive substances. The small quantities of tannophilic substances found in S. aureus makes the use of TAMST for the same purpose difficult. The present work protocol enables, for the first time, a partial cytochemical differentiation of the bacterial glycocalyx.

  18. Cleaning properties of dry adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.; P.; DíAZ; TéLLEZ; D.; SAMEOTO; C.; MENON

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study into the cleaning properties of synthetic dry adhesives. We have manufactured the adhesive micro-fibres through a low-cost, high yield fabrication method using Sylgard 184 Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the structural material. We deliberately contaminated the adhesive samples with different sized particles in the micro and macro scales and tested different cleaning methods for their efficacy with respect to each particle size. We investigated different cleaning methods, which included the use of wax moulding, vibration and pressure sensitive adhesives. For adhesion testing we used a custom system with a linear stage and a force sensor indenting a hemispherical probe into the adhesive surface and measuring the pull-off force. To characterize the cleaning efficacy we visually inspected each sample in a microscope and weighed the samples with a microgram-accuracy analytical balance. Results showed that the moulding method induced adhesion recovery in a greater percentage than the other cleaning methods and even helped with the recovery of collapsed posts in some cases. On the other hand pressure sensitive adhesives seem to have the upper hand with regards to certain particle sizes that can potentially pose problems with the moulding method.

  19. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  20. Relevance of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in H pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natália R Costa; Nuno Mendes; Nuno T Marcos; Celso A Reis; Thomas Caffrey; Michael A Hollingsworth; Filipe Santos-Silva

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the influence of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) variability on H pylori adhesion to gastric cells.METHODS:Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based adhesion assays were performed to measure the adhesion of different H pylori strains (HP26695 and HPTx30a) to gastric carcinoma cell lines (GP202 and MKN45) and GP202 clones expressing recombinant MUC1 with different VNTR lengths.RESULTS:Evaluation of adhesion results shows that H pylori pathogenic strain HP26695 has a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to all the cell lines and clones tested,when compared to the non-pathogenic strain HPTx30a.Bacteria showed a significantly higher (P<0.05)adhesion to the GP202 cell line,when compared to the MKN45 cell line.Furthermore,both strains showed a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to GP202 clones with larger MUC1 VNTR domains.CONCLUSION:This work shows that MUC1 mucin variability conditions H pylori binding to gastric cells.The extent of bacterial adhesion depends on the size of the MUC1 VNTR domain.The adhesion is further dependent on bacterial pathogenicity and the gastric cell line.MUC1 mucin variability may contribute to determine H pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa.

  1. Improved adhesive properties of recombinant bifidobacteria expressing the Bifidobacterium bifidum-specific lipoprotein BopA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleinser Marita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bifidobacteria belong to one of the predominant bacterial groups in the intestinal microbiota of infants and adults. Several beneficial effects on the health status of their human hosts have been demonstrated making bifidobacteria interesting candidates for probiotic applications. Adhesion of probiotics to the intestinal epithelium is discussed as a prerequisite for colonisation of and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract. Results In the present study, 15 different strains of bifidobacteria were tested for adhesion. B. bifidum was identified as the species showing highest adhesion to all tested intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines. Adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs was strongly reduced after treatment of bacteria with pronase. These results strongly indicate that a proteinaceous cell surface component mediates adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. In silico analysis of the currently accessible Bifidobacterium genomes identified bopA encoding a lipoprotein as a B. bifidum-specific gene previously shown to function as an adhesin of B. bifidum MIMBb75. The in silico results were confirmed by Southern Blot analysis. Furthermore, Northern Blot analysis demonstrated that bopA is expressed in all B. bifidum strains tested under conditions used to cultivate bacteria for adhesion assays. The BopA gene was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography as a C-terminal His6-fusion. Purified BopA had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. Moreover, bopA was successfully expressed in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum/infantis E18. Strains overexpressing bopA showed enhanced adhesion to IECs, clearly demonstrating a role of BopA in adhesion of B. bifidum strains. Conclusions BopA was identified as a B. bifidum-specific protein involved in adhesion to IECs. Bifidobacterium strains expressing bopA show enhanced adhesion. Our results represent the first report on recombinant

  2. Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000687.htm Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... to back after you use the bathroom. Preventing Bacterial Vaginosis You can help prevent bacterial vaginosis by: Not ...

  3. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  4. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  5. Effect of enamel morphology on nanoscale adhesion forces of streptococcal bacteria : An AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanyong; Zhao, Yongqi; Zheng, Sainan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jinglin; Tang, Yi; Jiang, Li; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We explore the influence of enamel surface morphology on nanoscale bacterial adhesion forces. Three dimensional morphology characteristics of enamel slices, which were treated with phosphoric acid (for 0 s, 5 s, 10 s, 20 s, and 30 s), were acquired. Adhesion forces of three initial colonizers (Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Streptococcus mitis) and two cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) with etched enamel surfaces were determined. Comparison of the forces was made by using bacterial probe method under atomic force microscope (AFM) in adhesion buffer. The results showed that enamel morphology was significantly altered by etching treatment. The roughness, peak-to-valley height, and valley-to-valley width of the depth profile, surface area, and volume increased linearly with acid exposure time, and reached the maximum at 30s, respectively. The adhesion forces of different strains increased accordingly with etching time. Adhesion forces of S. oralis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. sobrinus reached the maximum values of 0.81 nN, 0.84 nN, 0.73 nN, and 0.64 nN with enamel treated for 20s, respectively, whereas that of S. sanguinis at 10s (1.28nN), and dropped on coarser enamel surfaces. In conclusion, enamel micro-scale morphology may significantly alter the direct adhesion forces of bacteria. And there may be a threshold roughness for bacterial adhesion on enamel surface.

  6. Enthalpy of interaction between coaggregating and non-coaggregating oral bacterials pairs - a microcalorimetric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postollec, F.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and coaggregation are involved in the development of oral biofilms, called dental plaque. Although various techniques have already been used to study different aspects of these bacterial interactions, microcalorimetry has not yet been applied. This paper describes how isothermal r

  7. Enthalpy of interaction between coaggregating and non-coaggregating oral bacterial pairs - a microcalorimetric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postollec, F; Norde, W; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and coaggregation are involved in the development of oral biofilms, called dental plaque. Although various techniques have already been used to study different aspects of these bacterial interactions, microcalorimetry has not yet been applied. This paper describes how isothermal r

  8. Comparative study of the bacterial adhesion and oral hygiene of magnetic appliance with two different kinds of materials%两种不同材质的磁力矫治器表面细菌粘附及卫生情况的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱房勇; 陈玉华; 邹建明; 高宇峰; 许艳华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the bacterial adhesion and oral hygiene of magnetic appliance with the thermoplastic materials and polymethyl methacrylate plastics,in order to provide reference for clinics.Methods Eighteen patients with crossbite were selected and divided into polymethyl methacrylate plastics group(group A)and thermoplastic materials (group B),with 9 cases in each group.The two groups were observed with the indexes as follows:colony counting,peculiar smell,pigmentation,soft scale.Results Before treatment,there was no significant difference in colony counting between the two groups (P > 0.05).After treatment for 6 months and 1 years,there were significant differences in colony counting,peculiar smell and pigmentation between the two groups (P < 0.05),and increased with time.Conclusions The thermoplastic materials are superior to polymethyl methacrylate plastics in oral hygiene.But to achieve good hygiene effect,it is important to have oral health,healthy eating behaviors,maintenance and cleaning appliance.%目的 对热压膜材料和自凝塑料这两种不同材质的磁力矫治器表面细菌粘附及矫治器的卫生情况进行临床对比研究,为临床使用热压膜材料提供依据.方法 早期反(牙合)畸形患者18例随机分为两组,每组9例.A组戴用自凝塑料制作的磁力矫治器,B组戴用热压膜材料为主制作的磁力矫治器.对矫治器表面细菌附着情况,矫治器异味、色素沉着、软垢的效果进行研究.结果 A、B两组茵落计数在矫治前比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).在矫治后6个月及1年后A组茵落计数、异味、色素沉着情况明显大于B组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).A、B两组茵落计数、异味、色素沉着情况随着矫治时间的增加而增加,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 热压膜材料的卫生情况明显好于聚甲基丙烯酸甲酯,建议临床使用热压膜材料代替.但要达到良好的卫生效果,采取正确的

  9. Material- and feature-dependent effects on cell adhesion to micro injection moulded medical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ying; Habimana, Olivier; Flood, Peter; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Rodriguez, Brian J; Zhang, Nan; Casey, Eoin; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Two polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), containing a range of nano- to micron- roughness surfaces (Ra 0.01, 0.1, 0.4, 1.0, 2.0, 3.2 and 5.0μm) were fabricated using electrical discharge machining (EDM) and replicated using micro injection moulding (μIM). Polymer samples were characterized using optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water surface contact angle. Cell adhesion tests were carried out using bacterial Pseudomonas fluorescens and mammalian Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells to determine the effect of surface hydrophobicity, surface roughness and stiffness. It is found that there are features which gave insignificant differences (feature-dependent effect) in cell adhesion, albeit a significant difference in the physicochemical properties (material-dependent effect) of substrata. In bacterial cell adhesion, the strongest feature-dependence is found at Ra 0.4μm surfaces, with material-dependent effects strongest at Ra 0.01μm. Ra 0.1μm surfaces exhibited strongest feature-dependent effects and Ra 5.0μm has strongest material-dependent effects on mammalian cell adhesion. Bacterial cell adhesion is found to be favourable to hydrophobic surfaces (COC), with the lowest adhesion at Ra 0.4μm for both materials. Mammalian cell adhesion is lowest in Ra 0.1μm and highest in Ra 1.0μm, and generally favours hydrophilic surfaces (PMMA). These findings can be used as a basis for developing medical implants or microfluidic devices using micro injection moulding for diagnostic purposes, by tuning the cell adhesion on different areas containing different surface roughnesses on the diagnostic microfluidic devices or medical implants.

  10. [Use of plastic adhesive drapes during surgery may increase the risk of surgical site infections. A survey of a Cochrane review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Niels; Kolmos, Hans Jørn J

    2009-10-05

    In theory, the products act as a barrier, which hinders the spreading of bacteria from the deeper skin layers and hair follicles to the incision. On the other hand, the use of plastic adhesive drapes may promote bacterial overgrowth due to a >greenhouse effectplastic adhesive drapes reduces the surgical site infection rate and some evidence that they increase infection rates in clean operations. Consequently, their use should be abandoned. Further studies are warranted to determine the effect of other adhesive products currently used.

  11. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  12. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  14. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  15. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  16. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  17. [Topography and mechanisms of adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria in the human kidney and renal pelvis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierbuchen, M; Peters, G; Ortmann, M; Pulverer, G; Fischer, R

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of bacterial carbohydrate recognition proteins (bacterial lectins) and endogenous carbohydrate binding proteins (endogenous lectins) of human urothelium as well as kidney tubulus epithelium was analyzed with respect to the adhesion of urotoxogenic Escherichia coli bacteria. Using biotinylated neoglycoproteins, we demonstrated a wide spectrum of endogenous lectins with Galactose-, Mannose-, Fucose-, N-Acetylgalactosamine-, and N-Acetylglucosamine binding activities in the urothelium. In the kidney the distal nephron and especially the medullar collecting ducts exhibited a similar spectrum of endogenous carbohydrate binding activities as detected for the urothelium. Adhesion- as well as inhibition-experiments with selective blocking of either bacterial lectins or endogenous lectins of the target cells by different carbohydrates both reduced the bacterial adhesion. However, maximal inhibition of bacterial adhesion was achieved by simultanous blocking of microbial and target cell lectins with mannose or mannan. From these results it is reasonable to conclude that specific adhesion which may result in an organotropism (urotropism) of E. coli infection is due to a dual recognition mechanism which is accomplished by the combined interaction of the bachterial and host cell lectins with the corresponding carbohydrates of E. coli and that of the target cells respectively. Further studies showed that normal human serum possesses natural antiadhesins which are represented by the glycan parts of the serum-glycoproteins.

  18. Adhesion of Asaia bogorensis to Glass and Polystyrene in the Presence of Cranberry Juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolak, Hubert; Kregiel, Dorota; Czyzowska, Agata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adhesion abilities of the acetic acid bacterium Asaia bogorensis to glass and polystyrene in the presence of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) juice. The strain of A. bogorensis used was isolated from spoiled commercial fruit-flavored drinking water. The cranberry juice was analyzed for polyphenols, organic acids, and carbohydrates using high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. The adhesive abilities of bacterial cells in culture medium supplemented with cranberry juice were determined using luminometry and microscopy. The viability of adhered and planktonic bacterial cells was determined by the plate count method, and the relative adhesion coefficient was calculated. This strain of A. bogorensis was characterized by strong adhesion properties that were dependent upon the type of surface. The highest level of cell adhesion was found on the polystyrene. However, in the presence of 10% cranberry juice, attachment of bacterial cells was three times lower. Chemical analysis of juice revealed the presence of sugars, organic acids, and anthocyanins, which were identified as galactosides, glucosides, and arabinosides of cyanidin and peonidin. A-type proanthocyanidins responsible for the antiadhesion properties of V. macrocarpon also were detected.

  19. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam;

    2006-01-01

    -matrix interaction, as well as collagen type II expression in the cartilage graft after two weeks of in vitro cultivation. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) treated chondrocytes showed increased adhesion to collagen types I and II, fibronectin, and fibrinogen. Attachment to these investigated proteins......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...... significantly enhanced cell proliferation. Matrix design in cartilage engineering must meet the biological demands of amplified cells, because adhesion of chondrocytes depends on their differentiation status and is regulated by bFGF....

  20. Adhesion Transition of Flexible Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur; Lauga, Eric

    2009-03-01

    As forays into fabrication and self-assembly venture to increasingly small length scales, the role of adhesion events between material elements of the system must be closely scrutinized. This area of study is typically dominated by investigations into capillary adhesion, but relatively recent interest in carbon nanotubes and biomimetic devices have spurred interest in intermolecular forces as another source of micro- and nano-scale adhesion. We present here a far-field model for ``dry'' adhesion. We consider a small number N of flexible beams interacting with each other via a typical Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, and describe the behavior of the system as the ratio of bending rigidity to beam-beam attraction is reduced. Applications ranging from fibrillar systems to the comparatively stiff carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  1. Antibacterial properties of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive: Does the polymerization reaction play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To ascertain if the polymerization reaction also contributes additionally to the antibacterial effects of two commonly used cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives. Materials and Methods: Fresh liquid ethyl-cyanoacrylate (EC and N-butyl-cyanoacrylate (BC adhesives were applied onto 6-mm sterile filter paper discs. In the first group, the adhesive-soaked discs were immediately placed onto confluent monolayer cultures of bacteria, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed while in culture. In the second group, the adhesive-soaked disc was allowed to first polymerize prior to being placed onto the bacterial cultures. Four types of bacteria were studied: Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Escherichia coli , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Immediately after the discs were applied, the cultures were incubated at 35° C for 24 h. Bacterial inhibitory halos were measured in the cultures at the end of the incubation period. Results: For EC, exposure of the bacteria to the cyanoacrylate polymerization reaction increased the bacterial inhibitory halos in Streptococcus pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. For BC, it increased the bacterial inhibitory halos in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae . No inhibitory halos were observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bactericidal effect was higher in actively polymerizing EC, compared to previously polymerized EC in Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli ; however, no such differences were observed for BC. Conclusions: The polymerization reaction may also be an important factor in the antibacterial properties of EC and BC.

  2. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius adhesion to fibronectin films are oppositely influenced by ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces is mediated by an interplay of specific and nonspecific interactions. Although nonspecific interactions are ubiquitously present, little is known about the physicochemical mechanisms of specific interactions. The aim of this paper is to determine the inf

  3. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion of Escherichia coli LF82 in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are reported to inhabit the gut mucosa in Crohn's disease (CD), however, little is known about the importance of host factors for the interplay between AIEC and the human gut. To examine if differences in bacterial adhesion patterns are disease associated...

  4. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  5. Decrease of Staphylococcal adhesion on surgical stainless steel after Si ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A. [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Calzado-Martín, Alicia [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Multigner, Marta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Broncano, Luis Labajos-; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M. [Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); González-Carrasco, José Luis [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Si ion implantation of AISI 316LVM medical grade alloy might reduce bacterial adhesion and colonization. • Si ion implantation does not impair the attachment, viability and matrix maturation of human mesenchymal stem cells. • Nano-topography and surface chemistry changes account for the Si ion implantation induced effects. - Abstract: 316LVM austenitic stainless steel is often the material of choice on temporal musculoskeletal implants and surgical tools as it combines good mechanical properties and acceptable corrosion resistance to the physiologic media, being additionally relatively inexpensive. This study has aimed at improving the resistance to bacterial colonization of this surgical stainless steel, without compromising its biocompatibility and resistance. To achieve this aim, the effect of Si ion implantation on 316LVM has been studied. First, the effect of the ion implantation parameters (50 keV; fluence: 2.5–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}; angle of incidence: 45–90°) has been assessed in terms of depth profiling of chemical composition by XPS and nano-topography evaluation by AFM. The in vitro biocompatibility of the alloy has been evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus on these surfaces has been assessed. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on Si implanted 316LVM is dependent on the implantation conditions as well as the features of the bacterial strains, offering a promising implantable biomaterial in terms of biocompatibility, mechanical properties and resistance to bacterial colonization. The effects of surface composition and nano-topography on bacterial adhesion, directly related to ion implantation conditions, are also discussed.

  6. Laser surface modification and adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a unique overview on laser techniques and applications for the purpose of improving adhesion by altering surface chemistry and topography/morphology of the substrate. It details laser surface modification techniques for a wide range of industrially relevant materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites) with the aim to improve and enhance their adhesion to other materials. The joining of different materials is of critical importance in the fabrication of many and varied products.

  7. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  8. Self-etching adhesives increase collagenolytic activity in radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Raquel

    2006-09-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) release from crown dentin and their activation results in degradation of hybrid layers created by dentin adhesives. This study tested the hypothesis that instrumented intraradicular dentin possesses latent collagenolytic activity that is activated by mild self-etching adhesives. Root dentin shavings were produced from 50 cleaned and shaped, saline-irrigated root canals using Gates Glidden drills and rinsed with sodium azide to prevent bacterial growth. Dried dentin powder aliquots were treated with two clinically-relevant MMP inhibitors, 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes and 17% EDTA for 1 minute. Additional dentin powder was mixed with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V or Clearfil Tri-S Bond for 1 minute followed by extracting the adhesives with acetone. Dentin powder was also treated with 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes before or after adhesive application. Collagenolytic activities of the nine groups were assayed with a fluorometer in 96-well plates, by recording the changes in fluorescence before and after addition of fluorescein-labeled type I collagen. Epoxy resin-embedded powders were examined with TEM for the extent of demineralization. Instrumented, mineralized intraradicular dentin possessed low but detectable collagenolytic activity that was inhibited by chlorhexidine (p dentin powder and activated latent MMPs, with 14- to 15-fold increases in collagenolytic activities (p MMPs without denaturing these enzymes, and may adversely affect the longevity of bonded root canal fillings and posts.

  9. Characterization and Streptococcus mutans adhesion on air polishing dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kazuhiro; Oda, Hirotake; Inatomi, Michitomo; Sato, Soh

    2014-07-01

    Air polishing is known as an effective and time saving tooth cleaning method. However, this method increased surface roughness and bacterial adhesion on dentin surface. The aim of this study was to characterize and examine Streptococcus mutans adhesion on dentin surface after air polishing as compared to the conventional method. The dentin blocks (4 × 4 × 1 mm) were polished by a rubber cup with polishing material (Polishing) and air-polished by 25 μm glycine (G25), 65 μm glycine (G65), and 65 μm sodium bicarbonate (NHC65) microparticles. Surface roughness (Ra) was measured by a laser electron microscope. The amount of adhered S. mutans was quantified using a resazurin reduction assay (alamarBlue(®)). The Ra of G25 and G65 was significantly (p Polishing. However, there was no significant difference in S. mutans adhesion among Polishing, G25, and G65, while NHC65 showed significantly (p polishing using glycine microparticles conditioned S. mutans adhesion on dentin surface in a similar fashion than the conventional method, and less than air polishing using sodium bicarbonate microparticles.

  10. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the...

  11. Adhesion of Pathogenic Bacteria to Food Contact Surfaces: Influence of pH of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akier Assanta Mafu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion of Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Staphylococcus aureus to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces in cultures with different pHs (6, 7, and 8 was studied. The results indicated that the type of material had no effect on the attachment capacity of microorganisms, while environmental pH influenced the adhesion of A. hydrophila, E. coli, and S. aureus to both solid substrates. The attachment of S. Enteritidis (P>.05 was not affected by the type of substrate or the culture pH, whereas E. coli displayed the weakest affinity for both polystyrene and glass surfaces. No correlation was established between the physicochemical properties of the materials, or the bacterial and the rate of bacterial adhesion, except for S. aureus. Photomicrographs have shown that surfaces were contaminated by small clusters of S. Enteritidis while S. aureus invaded the food contact surfaces in the form of small chains or cell aggregates.

  12. Effect of resin infiltration on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Soley; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Atalay, Mustafa Altay; Özcan, Suat; Demirbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kansad; Percin, Duygu; Ozer, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of resin infiltration and sealant type on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions. Artificial enamel lesions were produced on the surfaces of 120 enamel specimens, which were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B (n=60 per group). Each group was further divided into four subgroups (n=15 per subgroup) according to sealant type: Group I-Demineralized enamel (control); Group II-Enamel Pro Varnish; Group III-ExciTE F; and Group IV-Icon. In Group A, hardness and surface roughness were evaluated; in Group B, bacterial adhesion was evaluated. Icon application resulted in significantly lower surface roughness and higher hardness than the other subgroups in Group A. In Group B, Enamel Pro Varnish resulted in lowest bacterial adhesion, followed by Icon. This study showed that resin infiltration of enamel lesions could arrest lesion progress.

  13. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  14. Impact of Acquired Pellicle Modification on Adhesion of Early Colonizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaib, Zeinab; Rakmathulina, Ekaterina; Lussi, Adrian; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    New preventive approaches against dental erosion caused by acidic drinks and beverages include fortification of beverages with natural polymers. We have shown that the mixture of casein and mucin significantly improved the erosion-inhibiting properties of the human pellicle layer. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pellicle modification by casein, mucin and a casein-mucin mixture on the adhesion of early bacterial colonizers. Test specimens of human tooth enamel were prepared, covered with saliva and coated with 0.5% aqueous (aq.) casein, 0.27% aq. mucin or with 0.5% aq. casein-0.27% aq. mucin, after which the adhesion of Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces odontolyticus was measured after incubation for 30 min and 2 h. log10 colony-forming units were compared by nonparametric tests. All three bacterial strains adhered in higher number to pellicle-coated enamel than to native enamel. The protein modifications of pellicle all decreased the counts of adhering bacteria up to 0.34 log10/mm2, the most efficient being the casein-mucin mixture. In addition to the recently shown erosion-reducing effect by casein-mucin, modification of the pellicle may inhibit bacterial adherence compared to untreated human pellicle.

  15. Force analysis of bacterial transmission from contact lens cases to corneas, with the contact lens as the intermediary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wen-wen; Hooymans, Johanna MM; de Vries, Jacob; van der Mei, Henderina; Busscher, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. To determine the probability of transmission of a Staphylococcus aureus strain from a contact lens case, to the contact lens (CL) surfaces, to the cornea, on the basis of bacterial adhesion forces measured by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). METHODS. Adhesion forces between S. aureus st

  16. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  17. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  18. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (Michigan); (NIH); (Michigan-Med)

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  19. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to glass surfaces measured by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; de Freitas, Patricia Scandiucci; Dan Daniels, A U; Meyer, Jürg

    2008-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of the oral biofilm, called dental plaque. Plaque is the cause of caries, periodontal diseases, and periimplantitis. Investigations of dental plaque, including bacterial adhesion, employ various in vivo and in vitro models using microscopic methods. Microcalorimetry offers another direct approach. The model organism Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the first colonizers adhering to the saliva-coated human tooth surfaces or dental materials within minutes after tooth cleaning. TAM III thermostats, equipped with microcalorimeters, were used for isothermal microcalorimetric (IMC) measurements of heat production as a function of time, expressed by power-time (p-t) curves. Continuous measurements of heat production of growing S. sanguinis cells showed their overall metabolic activity and were highly reproducible. For the adhesion experiments the bacteria were allowed to adhere to different amounts of glass beads. Growing S. sanguinis cells produced a characteristic p-t curve with a maximum of 500 microW at 4.5 h when reaching 10(9) cells ml(-1). The same number of stationary S. sanguinis cells, suspended in PBS produced only approximately 30 microW at 0.5 h due to adhesion. But the amount of heat increased with available glass surface area, indicating that a portion of the heat of adhesion was measured. Similar results were obtained with stationary S. sanguinis cells suspended in human saliva. This study shows that microcalorimetric evaluation of initial bacterial adhesion is indeed possible and may become a rapid, reproducible screening method to study adhesion of different bacteria to different dental materials or to modified surfaces.

  20. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  1. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Juan, E-mail: doctorxue@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China) and Stomatological Hospital, Urumqi, Xinjiang (China); Ding Gang [Department of Stomatology, Yidu Central Hospital, Weifang, Shandong (China); Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Li Jinlu; Yang Shenhui; Fang Bisong [Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun Hongchen, E-mail: hcsun@jlu.edu.cn [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China); Zhou Yanmin, E-mail: zhouym62@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China)

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  2. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  3. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  4. Assessing the impact of modifications neoprene adhesives amine-containing compounds the mechanisms to improve adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    KABLOV V.F.; KEYBAL N.A.; S. N. Bondarenko; RUDENKO K.U.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for an increase in the adhesion parameters of neopren-based adhesive compositions modified with adhesion promoters on the basis of epoxy compounds and aniline derivatives are studied.

  5. Osteomyelitis in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Ardalan, Maryam; H.Rafati, Ali;

    2010-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) is a rare, inherited immunodeficiency that affects one per million people yearly and usually presents with recurrent, indolent bacterial infections of the skin, mouth, and respiratory tract and impaired pus formation and wound healing. A 13-year-old gi......(10.60%). A plain radiography of the left leg revealed osteomyelitis. It is highly suggested that patients diagnosed mild to moderate LAD-1 with recurrent skin infection and simultaneous weak response to conventional therapy undergo (BMT) marrow transplant to prohibit subsequent life...

  6. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Michael J; Steen, Paul H

    2010-02-23

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials.

  7. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  8. Adhesion of Escherichia coli on to a series of poly(methacrylates) differing in charge and hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkes, G; Feijen, J; Dankert, J

    1991-11-01

    The adhesion of three Escherichia coli strains on to six poly(methacrylates) differing in hydrophobicity and surface charge was measured as a function of time under laminar flow conditions. Polymers used were poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and copolymers of MMA or HEMA with either 15% methacrylic acid (MAA) or 15% trimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-HCl salt (TMAEMA-Cl). Bacterial and polymer surfaces were characterized by means of water contact angles and zeta potentials. Both the sessile drop contact angles and the zeta potentials of the bacterial surfaces were significantly different. No significant differences in the sessile drop contact angles of the polymer surfaces were observed. Using the Wilhelmy plate technique large contact angle hysteresis was observed for the different polymer surfaces. Surfaces of copolymers with MAA had more negative zeta potentials than those of the corresponding homopolymers. Surfaces of copolymers with TMAEMA-Cl had positive zeta potentials. The highest numbers of adherent bacteria were found on materials with positive zeta potentials, irrespective of the bacterial strain used. Bacterial adhesion on to copolymers with MAA was less than on to the corresponding homopolymers. Bacterial equilibrium adhesion values correlate with the zeta potentials of the polymer surfaces (r greater than 0.85). On substrates with less negative zeta potentials high numbers of adhered bacteria were observed. Additionally, the equilibrium bacterial adhesion values could be related with receding contact angles of polymer surfaces with negative zeta potentials (r greater than 0.86). High equilibrium adhesion values were obtained for polymers with high contact angles. No correlation between the zeta potentials and contact angles of the bacteria with the adhesion values was found.

  9. Under-water adhesion of rigid spheres on soft, charged surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion in a liquid medium is fundamentally important for understanding a myriad of physiological and technological issues such as nanoparticle or bacteria uptake by cells, attachment of viruses on bacterial surfaces, adhesion of a bacteria on a preformed biofilm, biofouling of ships and marine vehicles, and many more. In this paper, we provide a theory to analyze the under-water adhesion of a rigid spherical particle on a soft, charged surface, which is represented as a layer of grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). Our model is based on calculating and minimizing the free energy, appropriately modified to account for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. The central result of our paper is that the presence of surface charge typically enhances the adhesion, indicated by a larger negative value of the equilibrium free energy and larger value of the equilibrium depth of indentation. Such a behavior can be explained by noting that the lowering of EDL electrostatic energy due to adhesion better balances the increase in elastic energy caused by the adhesion-induced deformation. We anticipate that our theory will provide the hitherto unknown basis of quantifying the effect of surface charge in under-liquid adhesion, which is central to the vast number of phenomena involving charged bio-systems, like cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  10. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling in focal adhesions decreases cell motility and proliferation.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    It has been proposed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates focal adhesion formation through tyrosine phosphorylation during cell adhesion. We investigated the role of FAK in focal adhesion structure and function. Loading cells with a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein (GST-Cterm) containing the FAK focal adhesion targeting sequence, but not the kinase domain, decreased the association of endogenous FAK with focal adhesions. This displacement of endogenous FAK in both BALB/c 3T3 ...

  11. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme onto woven and knitted crimped polyethylene terephthalate grafts to minimize the adhesion of broad spectrum pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Meslmani, Bassam M., E-mail: almeslmanib@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Mahmoud, Gihan F., E-mail: mahmoudg@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Helwan University, Ain Helwan, 11795 Cairo (Egypt); Leichtweiß, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Leichtweiss@phys.Chemie.uni-giessen.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Strehlow, Boris, E-mail: strehlo4@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Sommer, Frank O., E-mail: sommerf@med.uni-marburg.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, Marburg University, Hans Meerwein Str 2, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Lohoff, Michael D., E-mail: lohoff@med.uni-marburg.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, Marburg University, Hans Meerwein Str 2, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Bakowsky, Udo, E-mail: ubakowsky@aol.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Marburg University, Ketzerbach 63, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Graft-associated infections entirely determine the short-term patency of polyethylene terephthalate PET cardiovascular graft. We attempted to enzymatically inhibit the initial bacterial adhesion to PET grafts using lysozyme. Lysozyme was covalently immobilized onto woven and knitted forms of crimped PET grafts by the end-point method. Our figures of merit revealed lysozyme immobilization yield of 15.7 μg/cm{sup 2}, as determined by the Bradford assay. The activity of immobilized lysozyme on woven and knitted PET manifested 58.4% and 55.87% using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells, respectively. Noteworthy, the adhesion of vein catheter-isolated Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased by 6- to 8-folds and of Staphylococcus aureus by 11- to 12-folds, while the Gram-negative Escherichia coli showed only a decrease by 3- to 4-folds. The anti-adhesion efficiency was specific for bacterial cells and no significant effect was observed on adhesion and growth of L929 cells. In conclusion, immobilization of lysozyme onto PET grafts can inhibit the graft-associated infection. - Highlights: • Lysozyme was covalently immobilized on crimped polyethylene terephthalate (PET). • The activity of immobilized lysozyme was meaningfully reduced. • The maintained activity significantly declined the adhesion of Gram-positive stains. • The enzymatic anti-adhesion efficiency reported lesser extent against Gram-negative. • The anti-bacterial activity displayed no significant effect on cells compatibility.

  12. Cell adhesion in embryo morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vanessa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-02-01

    Visualizing and analyzing shape changes at various scales, ranging from single molecules to whole organisms, are essential for understanding complex morphogenetic processes, such as early embryonic development. Embryo morphogenesis relies on the interplay between different tissues, the properties of which are again determined by the interaction between their constituent cells. Cell interactions, on the other hand, are controlled by various molecules, such as signaling and adhesion molecules, which in order to exert their functions need to be spatiotemporally organized within and between the interacting cells. In this review, we will focus on the role of cell adhesion functioning at different scales to organize cell, tissue and embryo morphogenesis. We will specifically ask how the subcellular distribution of adhesion molecules controls the formation of cell-cell contacts, how cell-cell contacts determine tissue shape, and how tissue interactions regulate embryo morphogenesis.

  13. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da Hye

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250) discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness) were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control). In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP). The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9). Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p 0.05) or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001) bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo. PMID:28194363

  14. Biofilm-Forming Staphylococcus epidermidis Expressing Vancomycin Resistance Early after Adhesion to a Metal Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Sakimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated biofilm formation and time of vancomycin (VCM resistance expression after adhesion to a metal surface in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis with a VCM MIC of 1 μg/mL was used. The bacteria were made to adhere to a stainless steel washer and treated with VCM at different times and concentrations. VCM was administered 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after adhesion. The amount of biofilm formed was evaluated based on the biofilm coverage rates (BCRs before and after VCM administration, bacterial viability in biofilm was visually observed using the fluorescence staining method, and the viable bacterial count in biofilm was measured. The VCM concentration required to decrease BCR significantly compared with that of VCM-untreated bacteria was 4 μg/mL, even in the 0 hr group. In the 4 and 8 hr groups, VCM could not inhibit biofilm growth even at 1,024 μg/mL. In the 8 hr group, viable bacteria remained in biofilm at a count of 104 CFU even at a high VCM concentration (1,024 μg/mL. It was suggested that biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expresses resistance to VCM early after adhesion to a metal surface. Resistance increased over time after adhesion as the biofilm formed, and strong resistance was expressed 4–8 hours after adhesion.

  15. Interplay between surface properties of standard, vitamin E blended and oxidised ultra high molecular weight polyethylene used in total joint replacement and adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banche, G; Allizond, V; Bracco, P; Bistolfi, A; Boffano, M; Cimino, A; Brach del Prever, E M; Cuffini, A M

    2014-04-01

    We have assessed the different adhesive properties of some of the most common bacteria associated with periprosthetic joint infection on various types of ultra high molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE). Quantitative in vitro analysis of the adhesion of biofilm producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to physically and chemically characterised standard UHMWPE (PE), vitamin E blended UHMWPE (VE-PE) and oxidised UHMWPE (OX-PE) was performed using a sonication protocol. A significant decreased bacterial adhesion was registered for both strains on VE-PE, in comparison with that observed on PE, within 48 hours of observation (S. aureus p = 0.024 and E. coli p = 0.008). Since Vitamin E reduces bacterial adhesive ability, VE-stabilised UHMWPE could be valuable in joint replacement by presenting excellent mechanical properties, while reducing bacterial adhesiveness.

  16. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  17. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    surface. The amine reacts with the sticky, isocyanate putty to form a tough polyurea. The catalyzed isocyanates likewise bond with alcohols, amines, acids...the metal bristles and displaces the gel to make way for the adhesive. The entire system will be sealed in disposable packaging for safe storage and

  18. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik); C.C. Wauters; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp; J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a hist

  19. Creep behaviour of flexible adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straalen, IJ.J. van; Botter, E.; Berg, A. van den; Beers, P. van

    2004-01-01

    Since flexible adhesives are used more and more in structural applications, designers should have a better understanding of its behaviour under various conditions as ultimate load, fatigue load, long-term load and environmental conditions. This paper focuses on long-term load conditions and its effe

  20. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  1. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  2. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  3. Inhibition of adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria to uroepithelial cells by extracts from cranberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermel, Gwennola; Georgeault, Sylvie; Inisan, Claude; Besnard, Matthieu

    2012-02-01

    Cranberry extract has been reported as a therapeutic agent, mainly in urinary tract infections due to its anti-adhesive capacity. In order to compare the effects of proanthocyanidin (procyanidin) (PAC)-standardized cranberry extracts and commercial PAC A2, we first investigated the presence of genes encoding known adhesins on 13 strains of uropathogenic strains coming from patients with cystisis. After this characterization, the anti-adhesive effects of PAC A2 were assayed on selected uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains before testing cranberry extracts. Before checking inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion to cells, we showed that neither PAC A2 or three cranberry extracts (A, B, and C) specifically inhibited the growth and did not supply any potential nutrient to E. coli strains, including the unrelated control strain. PAC A2 exhibited an inhibitory effect on the adhesion of two selected uropathogenic strains of E. coli. This work also showed that a preliminary exposure of bacteria to PAC A2 significantly reduced the adhesion. This phenomenon has been also observed with a lesser impact when uroepithelial cells were pretreated with PAC A2. Moreover, the assays were more robust when bacteria were in fast growing conditions (exponential phase): the adhesion to uroepithelial cells was greater. Significant reduction of adhesion to urepithelial cells was observed: around 80% of inhibition of adhesion with the cranberry extracts at equivalent PAC concentration of 50 μg/mL. The effects of the different assayed extracts were not obviously different except for extract B, which inhibited approximately 55% of adhesion at an equivalent PAC concentration of 5 μg/mL.

  4. Imaging of lactic acid bacteria with AFM-elasticity and adhesion maps and their relationship to biological and structural data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaer-Zammaretti, Prisca; Ubbink, Job

    2003-10-15

    The adhesion of lactic acid bacteria to the intestinal epithelium is one of the most important factors determining probiotic ability of a bacterial strain. Studying bacterial adhesion requires knowledge of the structure and properties of the bacterial surface, which can be studied by atomic force microscopy under native conditions. The observation of the surface topography of bacteria from the species Lactobacillus crispatus, L. helveticus and L. johnsonii shows major differences between bacteria having a crystalline-like protein layer as part of the cell wall and those without such layers. Force volume images calculated into elasticity and adhesion force maps of different bacterial strains show that L. crispatus and L. helveticus have a surface with a homogeneous stiffness with no adhesion events. This is most likely caused by the S-layer, which completely covers the surface of the bacteria. We infer that the absence of adhesion peaks is caused by the semi-crystalline character of such protein layers, in agreement with the results obtained from electron microscopy. Analysis of a number of L. johnsonii strains shows that these bacteria have surface properties which strongly differ from the L. crispatus and L. helveticus strains. For L. johnsonii DMS20533 and L. johnsonii ATCC33200 high adhesion forces are observed, which can be related to a surface rich in polysaccharides. L. johnsonii ATCC332 has lower adhesion forces compared to the other two and, furthermore, the surface topography shows depressions. We suppose that this strain has a surface pattern consisting of crystalline-like proteins alternating with polysaccharide-rich domains. The wide variety in surface properties of lactobacilli could well have wide-ranging implications for food processing and for health benefits.

  5. Ileal adhesion of virulent E. coli LF82 is not enhanced in Crohn’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke S.; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2011-01-01

    of CD has been further strengthened from the evidence that the ileum in CD harbors an abnormally high number of E. coli species. S16 2010 IBD Abstracts The aim of this study was to examine the adhesion of the AIEC reference strain, LF82, to tissue samples from ileum and colon in CD and healthy controls...... and employed for investigation of the bacterial adherence to human intestinal specimens. LF82 adhered to intestinal biopsies in both CD and controls. Enhanced adhesion was, however, not observed in the ileum as compared to the colon in CD, which was in contradiction to controls that had a significantly higher...

  6. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  7. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  8. Self-Adjustable Adhesion of Polyampholyte Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Chanchal Kumar; Guo, Hong Lei; Sun, Tao Lin; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Masakazu; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-02

    Developing nonspecific, fast, and strong adhesives that can glue hydrogels and biotissues substantially promotes the application of hydrogels as biomaterials. Inspired by the ubiquitous adhesiveness of bacteria, it is reported that neutral polyampholyte hydrogels, through their self-adjustable surface, can show rapid, strong, and reversible adhesion to charged hydrogels and biological tissues through the Coulombic interaction.

  9. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  10. Bacterial biofilms investigated by atomic force microscopy and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan

    thesis, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrochemistry have been applied to investigate three pathogenic medically important bacterial biofilms, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (cystic fibrosis pneumonia), Staphylococcus epidermidis (contamination of surgical catheters and indwelling equipment...... attachment on the surface. High-resolution AFM imaging showed no detectable differences among the four strains. Adhesion maps using hydrophobically modified tips compared with bare hydrophilic silicon nitride tips also showed small differences only. This indicates that hydrophobic effects are not the primary...

  11. Photochemical tissue bonding with chitosan adhesive films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piller Sabine C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Methods Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ~0.1 wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (λ = 532 nm, Fluence~110 J/cm2, spot size~0.5 cm. A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine with adhesion strength of 15 ± 2 kPa, (n = 31. The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5 ± 0.1 (n = 8 kPa when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26°C to 32°C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. Conclusion A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  12. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  13. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  14. Nanocapillary Adhesion between Parallel Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study capillary adhesion from a nanometer scale liquid bridge between two parallel flat solid surfaces. The capillary force, Fcap, and the meniscus shape of the bridge are computed as the separation between the solid surfaces, h, is varied. Macroscopic theory predicts the meniscus shape and the contribution of liquid/vapor interfacial tension to Fcap quite accurately for separations as small as two or three molecular diameters (1-2 nm). However, the total capillary force differs in sign and magnitude from macroscopic theory for h ≲ 5 nm (8-10 diameters) because of molecular layering that is not included in macroscopic theory. For these small separations, the pressure tensor in the fluid becomes anisotropic. The components in the plane of the surface vary smoothly and are consistent with theory based on the macroscopic surface tension. Capillary adhesion is affected by only the perpendicular component, which has strong oscillations as the molecular layering changes.

  15. Compomers: adhesion and setting reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Desi; Grobler, Sias R

    2003-02-01

    The term compomer is misleading as it suggests a combination of glass-ionomer and composite technology. This has led to confusion as to its clinical uses as well as the way it bonds to tooth structure. However, the properties and adhesion of compomers to tooth structure suggest a closer link to composites than to glass-ionomers. The clinical significance of this is that compomers lack direct chemical adhesion to any tooth structure and therefore needs to be bonded to tooth structure similar to composites via a separate bonding agent. Their closeness to composites however, does not make them composite substitutes or replacements. Dentists should strictly follow instructions by the manufacturers because failure of materials can mostly be blamed on the clinician rather than on the material.

  16. Interfacial electrokinetic characteristics before and after bioleaching microorganism adhesion to pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; CHEN Hong; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    Zeta potentials of pyrite and Acidithiobacillusferrooxidans cultured by sulfur in different levels of ionic strength and pH values were measured by Coulter Delsa 440SX zeta potential determinator. Meanwhile, the effects of bacterial adhesion and bacterial concentration on zeta potential of pyrite after adsorption were investigated. The results show that with the increase of ionic strength,zeta potentials of pyrite decrease in the range of pH 2.5-10.5 and the isoelectric point(IEP) of mineral shifts to the left. It is also found that the specific adsorption on pyrite of chloride ion can affect zeta potentials of pyrite sharply. As bacterial adsorption occurs,IEP of pyrite shifts towards that of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans; as bacterial concentration is increscent, this tendency is even larger and more obvious. Finally, a reasonable explanation for above-mentioned experimental phenomena was given by electrical double layer model and surface ionization model.

  17. Peritonitis - spontaneous bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP); Ascites - peritonitis; Cirrhosis - peritonitis ... who are on peritoneal dialysis for kidney failure. Peritonitis may have other causes . These include infection from ...

  18. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  19. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    the cement proteins of M. rosa were separated using reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and previously unidentified protein named 20 kDa M. rosa cement protein (Mrcp-20k) was found [67]. Its primary structure was revealed by cloning... to be an effective method of combating fouling. Barnacle adhesion strength was used to screen seventy-seven polydimethylsiloxane elastomeric coatings for fouling-release properties. Optimum fouling- release performance was dependent on the interaction of fluid type...

  20. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    manufacturing operations are more efficient , discarding less expired film. Commercial and military aircraft repair operations at Boeing experience very similar...successfully encapsulated at concentrations greater than 50 wt% within four N N = CC Infoscitex Corporation Shelf Stable Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 8...affects the composition of the encapsulant , which in turn affects the ability of the encapsulant to wet the core phase, the barrier properties of the

  1. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  2. Prevention of intra-abdominal abscesses and adhesions using a hyaluronic acid solution in a rat peritonitis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, MMPJ; Meis, JFGM; Postma, VA; van Goor, Harry

    1999-01-01

    Hypothesis: Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bioresorbable membrane and 0.4% HA solution reduce intraabdominal adhesion and abscess formation in a rat peritonitis model. Design: Randomized laboratory experiment. Setting: A university hospital. Interventions: In 72 male Wistar rats, a bacterial peritonitis

  3. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  4. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  5. Effect of a Novel Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylate Polymer (QAMP on Adhesion and Antibacterial Properties of Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine M. Pupo

    2014-05-01

    control for all evaluated bacterial strains. The use of QAMP in an adhesive system demonstrated effective bond strength, a suitable degree of conversion, and adequate antibacterial effects against oral bacteria, and may be useful as a new approach to provide long-lasting results for dental adhesives.

  6. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  7. Handbook of Adhesion, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, D. E.

    2005-06-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require. This second edition includes many new articles covering developments which have risen in prominence in the intervening years, such as scanning probe techniques, the surface forces apparatus and the relation between adhesion and fractal surfaces. Advances in understanding polymer - polymer interdiffusion are reflected in articles drawing out the implications for adhesive bonding. In addition, articles derived from the earlier edition have been revised and updated where needed. Throughout the book there is a renewed emphasis on environmental implications of the use of adhesives and sealants. The scope of the Handbook, which features nearly 250 articles from over 60 authors, includes the background science - physics, chemistry and material science - and engineering, and also aspects of adhesion relevant to the use of adhesives, including topics such as: Sealants and mastics Paints and coatings Printing and composite materials Welding and autohesion Engineering design The Handbook of Adhesion is intended for scientists and engineers in both academia and industry, requiring an understanding of the various facets of adhesion.

  8. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  9. Effect of hydrophobicity on the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to stainless steel and polypropylene

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Joana; Teixeira, P.; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2004-01-01

    The retention of bacteria on food processing surfaces increases the risk of cross-contamination of these microorganisms in food. Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen of significant concern in the food industry. This bacteria occurs widely in the environment and has been isolated from a range of sources including vegetables, processed foods, silage and soil (Cox et al., 1989). It is well known that initial bacterial adhesion to a surface is determinant to surface co...

  10. Escherichia coli adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility on biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, L C; Silva, L N; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to test materials typically used in the construction of medical devices regarding their influence in the initial adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility of Escherichia coli biofilms. Adhesion and biofilm development was monitored in 12-well microtiter plates containing coupons of different biomedical materials--silicone (SIL), stainless steel (SS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)--and glass (GLA) as control. The susceptibility of biofilms to ciprofloxacin and ampicillin was assessed, and the antibiotic effect in cell morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface hydrophobicity of the bacterial strain and materials was also evaluated from contact angle measurements. Surface hydrophobicity was related with initial E. coli adhesion and subsequent biofilm development. Hydrophobic materials, such as SIL, SS, and PVC, showed higher bacterial colonization than the hydrophilic GLA. Silicone was the surface with the greatest number of adhered cells and the biofilms formed on this material were also less susceptible to both antibiotics. It was found that different antibiotics induced different levels of elongation on E. coli sessile cells. Results revealed that, by affecting the initial adhesion, the surface properties of a given material can modulate biofilm buildup and interfere with the outcome of antimicrobial therapy. These findings raise the possibility of fine-tuning surface properties as a strategy to reach higher therapeutic efficacy.

  11. In Vitro Properties of Orthodontic Adhesives with Fluoride or Amorphous Calcium Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Ka Wai Chow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of orthodontic adhesives with fluoride or amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP in reducing bacterial adhesion and enamel demineralization. Forty human premolars each sectioned buccolingually into three parts were bracketed with control resin (Transbond XT or adhesives containing ACP (Aegis Ortho or fluoride (QuickCure. Artificial lesions induced by pH cycling were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometry (XPS and polarized light microscopy (PLM. After 28 days, Aegis Ortho demonstrated the lowest calcium and phosphorous content by XPS analysis. After 42 days, reductions in lesion depth areas were 23.6% for Quick Cure and 20.3% for Aegis Ortho (P<0.05. In the presence of 1% sucrose, adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Aegis Ortho and Quick Cure was reduced by 41.8% and 37.7% (P<0.05 as compared to Transbond XT. Composites containing ACP or fluoride reduced bacterial adherence and lesion formation as compared to a composite without ACP or fluoride.

  12. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina Burd, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, ...

  13. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  14. A batch fabricated biomimetic dry adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northen, Michael T.; Turner, Kimberly L.

    2005-08-01

    The fine hair adhesive system found in nature is capable of reversibly adhering to just about any surface. This dry adhesive, best demonstrated in the pad of the gecko, makes use of a multilevel conformal structure to greatly increase inelastic surface contact, enhancing short range interactions and producing significant amounts of attractive forces. Recent work has attempted to reproduce and test the terminal submicrometre 'hairs' of the system. Here we report the first batch fabricated multi-scale conformal system to mimic nature's dry adhesive. The approach makes use of massively parallel MEMS processing technology to produce 20-150 µm platforms, supported by single slender pillars, and coated with ~2 µm long, ~200 nm diameter, organic looking polymer nanorods, or 'organorods'. To characterize the structures a new mesoscale nanoindenter adhesion test technique has been developed. Experiments indicate significantly improved adhesion with the multiscale system. Additional processing caused a hydrophilic to hydrophobic transformation of the surface and testing indicated further improvement in adhesion.

  15. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  16. The Rheological Property of Potato Starch Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to use potato starch in the production of environmentally sound adhesives. ‘Three-formaldehyde glue’ pollutes the environment and harms to human health strongly, which widely used for wood-based panels preparation. Environment-friendly potato starch adhesives were prepared using method of oxidation-gelatinization, insteading of the three formaldehyde glue. The effects of the quality ratio of starch and water, temperature and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of the adhesive were studied. The rheological eigenvalue of apparent viscosity was studied through nonlinear regression. The results showed that the apparent viscosity of potato starch adhesives decreased with the increasing of temperature; the apparent viscosity decreased slowly with the increasing of rotor speed; the phenomenon of shear thinning appeared within potato starch adhesives which was pseudo-plastic fluids. Potato starch adhesives with characteristics of non-toxic, no smell and pollution could be applied in interior and upscale packaging.

  17. Adhesion of E. coli Bacteria Cells to Prosthodontic Alloys Surfaces Modified by TiO2 Sol-Gel Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Banaszek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the degree of bacteria E. coli adhesion to modified surfaces of the chosen prosthodontic alloys was presented. The study was carried out on Co-Cr (Wironit, Ni-Cr (Fantocer, and Fe-Cr-Ni (Magnum AN alloys. Bare substrate as a control and titanium dioxide coated samples were used. The samples were placed for 24 hours in bacterial culture medium. After incubation period, a number of bacterial cells were evaluated by scanning electron microscope. The study revealed that modification of the alloy surfaces by titanium dioxide coating significantly decreases the amount of bacteria adhering to the surfaces and that additionally bare metal alloy substrates have a different degree of susceptibility to bacterial adhesion.

  18. Adhesive bowel obstruction? Not always

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittapalli D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old man presented acutely with features of post-surgical adhesive small bowel obstruction. Following an unsuccessful trial of conservative management, computed tomography (CT of the abdomen was performed. This revealed a mass in the ileocaecal region, for which he underwent a subsequent right hemicolectomy. Histology revealed diffuse B-cell Non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma of the terminal ileum. Confounding obstructive lesion of the intestine in patients with a history of previous laparotomy is extremely uncommon. Early high resolution imaging may predict diagnosis and consolidate clinical management plans.

  19. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  20. Impact of sub-inhibitory antibiotics on fibronectin-mediated host cell adhesion and invasion by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasigade Jean

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a well-armed pathogen prevalent in severe infections such as endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Fibronectin-binding proteins A and B, encoded by fnbA/B, are major pathogenesis determinants in these infections through their involvement in S. aureus adhesion to and invasion of host cells. Sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs of antibiotics, frequently occurring in vivo because of impaired drug diffusion at the infection site, can alter S. aureus phenotype. We therefore investigated their impact on S. aureus fibronectin-mediated adhesiveness and invasiveness. Methods After in vitro challenge of S. aureus 8325-4 and clinical isolates with sub-MICs of major anti-staphylococcal agents, we explored fnbA/B transcription levels, bacterial adhesiveness to immobilised human fibronectin and human osteoblasts in culture, and bacterial invasion of human osteoblasts. Results Oxacillin, moxifloxacin and linezolid led to the development of a hyper-adhesive phenotype in the fibronectin adhesion assay that was consistent with an increase in fnbA/B transcription. Conversely, rifampin treatment decreased fibronectin binding in all strains tested without affecting fnbA/B transcription. Gentamicin and vancomycin had no impact on fibronectin binding or fnbA/B transcription levels. Only oxacillin-treated S. aureus displayed a significantly increased adhesion to cultured osteoblasts, but its invasiveness did not differ from that of untreated controls. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that several antibiotics at sub-MICs modulate fibronectin binding in S. aureus in a drug-specific fashion. However, hyper- and hypo- adhesive phenotypes observed in controlled in vitro conditions were not fully confirmed in whole cell infection assays. The relevance of adhesion modulation during in vivo infections is thus still uncertain and requires further investigations.

  1. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  2. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marot, L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: laurent.marot@unibas.ch; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H. [Laboratoire Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, Pole STIC-SPI-Math 61 rue Albert Camus, Universite de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 - Mulhouse Cedex (France); Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-09-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength.

  3. Antibacterial Activity and Bonding Ability of an Orthodontic Adhesive Containing the Antibacterial Monomer 2-Methacryloxylethyl Hexadecyl Methyl Ammonium Bromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fan; Dong, Yan; Yu, Hao-han; Lin, Ping-ting; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Xiang; Liu, Yan; Xia, Yu-ning; Huang, Li; Chen, Ji-hua

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible white spot lesion (WSL) occurs in up to 50% of patients during orthodontic treatment. Therefore, orthodontic adhesives need to be able to inhibit or reduce bacterial growth in order to prevent or minimize WSL. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin-based orthodontic adhesive containing the antibacterial monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl hexadecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-HB). MAE-HB was added at three concentrations (1, 3, and 5 wt%) to a commercial orthodontic adhesive Transbond XT, while the blank control comprised unmodified Transbond XT. Their antibacterial effects on Streptococcus mutans were investigated after 0 and 180 days of aging. The SBS of metal brackets bonded to the buccal enamel surface of human premolars was assessed. Compared with the blank control, the MAE-HB-incorporated adhesive exhibited a significant contact inhibitory effect on the growth of S. mutans (P < 0.05), even after 180 days of aging. SBS and adhesive remnant index values revealed that the bonding ability of the experimental adhesive was not significantly adversely affected by the incorporation of MAE-HB at any of the three concentrations. Therefore, orthodontic adhesives with strong and long-lasting bacteriostatic properties can be created through the incorporation of MAE-HB without negatively influencing bonding ability. PMID:28169312

  4. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  5. Dynamic interplay between adhesion surfaces in carcinomas:Cell-cell and cell-matrix crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvonne E Smith; Sri HariKrishna Vellanki; Ann M Hopkins

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and communication between adhesion sites involve mechanisms which are required for cellular functions during normal development and homeostasis; however these cellular functions and mechanisms are often deregulated in cancer. Aberrant signaling at cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites often involves downstream mediators including Rho GTPases and tyrosine kinases. This review discusses these molecules as putative mediators of cellular crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to their attractiveness as therapeutic targets in cancer. Interestingly, inter-junctional crosstalk mechanisms are frequently typified by the way in which bacterial and viral pathogens opportunistically infect or intoxicate mammalian cells. This review therefore also discusses the concept of learning from pathogen-host interaction studies to better understand coordinated communication between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to highlighting the potential therapeutic usefulness of exploiting pathogens or their products to tap into inter-junctional crosstalk. Taken together, we feel that increased knowledge around mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion site crosstalk and consequently a greater understanding of their therapeutic targeting offers a unique opportunity to contribute to the emerging molecular revolution in cancer biology.

  6. Soluble plantain fibre blocks adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Carol L; Keita, Asa V; Parsons, Bryony N; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Knight, Paul; Winstanley, Craig; O' Kennedy, Niamh; Söderholm, Johan D; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Campbell, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fibres may have prebiotic effects mediated by promotion of beneficial bacteria. This study explores the possibility that soluble plant fibre may also improve health by inhibiting epithelial adhesion and translocation by pathogenic bacteria. We have focussed on soluble non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) from plantain bananas (Musa spp.) which previous studies showed to be particularly effective at blocking Escherichia coli epithelial adherence. In vitro and ex vivo studies assessed the ability of plantain NSP to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion and invasion of various bacterial pathogens, and to inhibit their translocation through microfold (M)-cells and human Peyer's patches mounted in Ussing chambers. Plantain NSP showed dose-related inhibition of epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation by a range of pathogens. At 5mg/ml, a concentration readily achievable in the gut lumen, plantain NSP inhibited adhesion to Caco2 cells by Salmonella Typhimurium (85.0 ± 8.2%, PPlantain NSP also inhibited invasion of Caco2 cells by S. Typhimurium (80.2 ± 9.7%) and Sh. sonnei (46.7 ± 13.4%); PPlantain NSP, 5mg/ml, also inhibited translocation of S. Typhimurium and Sh. sonnei across M-cells by 73.3 ± 5.2% and 46.4 ± 7.7% respectively (Pplantain NSP (Pplantain fibre can block epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens. This represents an important novel mechanism by which soluble dietary fibres can promote intestinal health and prevent infective diarrhoea.

  7. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  8. Identification and adhesion profile of Lactobacillus spp. strains isolated from poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Ticiana Silva; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio; Donato, Tais Cremasco; Milbradt, Elisane Lenita; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2014-01-01

    In the aviculture industry, the use of Lactobacillus spp. as a probiotic has been shown to be frequent and satisfactory, both in improving bird production indexes and in protecting intestine against colonization by pathogenic bacteria. Adhesion is an important characteristic in selecting Lactobacillus probiotic strains since it impedes its immediate elimination to enable its beneficial action in the host. This study aimed to isolate, identify and characterize the in vitro and in vivo adhesion of Lactobacillus strains isolated from birds. The Lactobacillus spp. was identified by PCR and sequencing and the strains and its adhesion evaluated in vitro via BMM cell matrix and in vivo by inoculation in one-day-old birds. Duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum were collected one, four, 12 and 24 h after inoculation. The findings demonstrate greater adhesion of strains in the cecum and an important correlation between in vitro and in vivo results. It was concluded that BMM utilization represents an important technique for triage of Lactobacillus for subsequent in vivo evaluation, which was shown to be efficient in identifying bacterial adhesion to the enteric tract.

  9. Increased Mesenchymal Stem Cell Response and Decreased Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion on Titania Nanotubes without Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Lai, Yingzhen; Wu, Dong; Huang, Wenxiu; Huang, Sijia; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants with enhanced biocompatibility and antibacterial property are highly desirable and characterized by improved success rates. In this study, titania nanotubes (TNTs) with various tube diameters were fabricated on Ti surfaces through electrochemical anodization at 10, 30, and 60 V (denoted as NT10, NT30, and NT60, resp.). Ti was also investigated and used as a control. NT10 with a diameter of 30 nm could promote the adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) without noticeable differentiation. NT30 with a diameter of 100 nm could support the adhesion and proliferation of BMSCs and induce osteogenesis. NT60 with a diameter of 200 nm demonstrated the best ability to promote cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation; however, it clearly impaired cell adhesion and proliferation. As the tube diameter increased, bacterial adhesion on the TNTs decreased and reached the lowest value on NT60. Therefore, NT30 without pharmaceuticals could be used to increase mesenchymal stem cell response and decrease Staphylococcus aureus adhesion and thus should be further studied for improving the efficacy of Ti-based orthopedic implants. PMID:26640782

  10. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms.

  11. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  12. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  13. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  14. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  15. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  16. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  17. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  18. Pooled human immunoglobulins reduce adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelstra, K A; van der Mei, H C; Gottenbos, B; Grainger, D W; van Horn, J R; Busscher, H J

    2000-08-01

    The influence of pooled polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) interactions with both bacteria and model substrates in altering Pseudomonas aeruginosa surface adhesion is reported. Opsonization of this pathogen by polyclonal human IgG and preadsorption of IgG to glass surfaces both effectively reduce initial deposition rates and surface growth of P. aeruginosa IFO3455 from dilute nutrient broth in a parallel plate flow chamber. Polyclonal IgG depleted of P. aeruginosa-specific antibodies reduces the initial deposition rate or surface growth to levels intermediate between exposed and nonexposed IgG conditions. Bacterial surface properties are changed in the presence of opsonizing IgG. Plateau contact angle analysis via sessile drop technique shows a drop in P. aeruginosa surface hydrophobicity after IgG exposure consistent with a more hydrophilic IgG surface coat. Zeta potential values for opsonized versus nonopsonized bacteria exhibit little change. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements provide surface compositional evidence for IgG attachment to bacterial surfaces. Surface elemental ratios attributed to IgG protein signals versus those attributed primarily to bacterial polysaccharide surface or lipid membrane change with IgG opsonization. Direct evidence for antibody-modified P. aeruginosa surface properties correlates both with reduction of bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces under flow in nutrient medium reported and previous reports of IgG efficacy against P. aeruginosa motility in vitro and infection in vivo.

  19. Photocatalytic inactivation of biofilms on bioactive dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanling; Strømme, Maria; Melhus, Asa; Engqvist, Håkan; Welch, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are the most prevalent mode of microbial life in nature and are 10-1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic bacteria. Persistent biofilm growth associated at the margin of a dental restoration often leads to secondary caries, which remains a challenge in restorative dentistry. In this work, we present the first in vitro evaluation of on-demand photocatalytic inactivation of biofilm on a novel dental adhesive containing TiO2 nanoparticles. Streptococcus mutans biofilm was cultured on this photocatalytic surface for 16 h before photocatalytic treatment with ultraviolet-A (UV-A) light. UV-A doses ranging from 3 to 43 J/cm(2) were applied to the surface and the resulting viability of biofilms was evaluated with a metabolic activity assay incorporating phenol red that provided a quantitative measure of the reduction in viability due to the photocatalytic treatments. We show that an UV-A irradiation dose of 8.4 J/cm(2) leads to one order of magnitude reduction in the number of biofilm bacteria on the surface of the dental adhesives while as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude reduction in the corresponding number can be achieved with a dose of 43 J/cm(2). This material maintains its functional properties as an adhesive in restorative dentistry while offering the possibility of a novel dental procedure in the treatment or prevention of bacterial infections via on-demand UV-A irradiation. Similar materials could be developed for the treatment of additional indications such as peri-implantits.

  20. Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli adhesion tendencies towards photolithographically modified nanosmooth poly (tert-butyl methacrylate polymer surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Ivanova

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Elena P Ivanova1, Natasa Mitik-Dineva1, Radu C Mocanasu1, Sarah Murphy1, James Wang2, Grant van Riessen3, Russell J Crawford11Faculty Life and Social Sciences; 2IRIS, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia; 3Centre for Materials and Surface Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: This study reports the adhesion behavior of two bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli, to the photoresistant poly(tert-butyl methacrylate (P(tBMA polymer surface. The data has demonstrated that ultraviolet irradiation of P(tBMA was able to provide control over bacterial adhesion tendencies. Following photolithography, several of the surface characteristics of P(tBMA were found to be altered. Atomic force microscopy analysis indicated that photolithographically modified P(tBMA (henceforth termed ‘modified polymer’ appeared as a ‘nanosmooth’ surface with an average surface roughness of 1.6 nm. Although confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis clearly demonstrated that V. fischeri and E. coli presented largely different patterns of attachment in order to adhere to the same surfaces, both species exhibited a greater adhesion propensity towards the ‘nanosmooth’ surface. The adhesion of both species to the modified polymer surface appeared to be facilitated by an elevated production of extracellular polymeric substances when in contact with the substrate.Keywords: poly(tert-butylmethacrylate polymeric surfaces, surface nanotopography, bacterial attachment, extracellular polymeric substances

  1. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel...

  2. Consequences and complications of peritoneal adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, H. van

    2007-01-01

    Consequences and complications of postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation not including small bowel obstruction and secondary infertility are substantial but are under-exposed in the literature. Inadvertent enterotomy during reopening of the abdomen or subsequent adhesion dissection is a fea

  3. Adhesive loose packings of small dry particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwei; Li, Shuiqing; Baule, Adrian; Makse, Hernán A.

    We explore adhesive loose packings of dry small spherical particles of micrometer size using 3D discrete-element simulations with adhesive contact mechanics. A dimensionless adhesion parameter ($Ad$) successfully combines the effects of particle velocities, sizes and the work of adhesion, identifying a universal regime of adhesive packings for $Ad>1$. The structural properties of the packings in this regime are well described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function that includes correlations between bulk and contact spheres. Our theoretical and numerical results predict: (i) An equation of state for adhesive loose packings that appears as a continuation from the frictionless random close packing (RCP) point in the jamming phase diagram; (ii) The existence of a maximal loose packing point at the coordination number $Z=2$ and packing fraction $\\phi=1/2^{3}$. Our results highlight that adhesion leads to a universal packing regime at packing fractions much smaller than the random loose packing, which can be described within a statistical mechanical framework. We present a general phase diagram of jammed matter comprising frictionless, frictional, adhesive as well as non-spherical particles, providing a classification of packings in terms of their continuation from the spherical frictionless RCP.

  4. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Willy Arung1; Michel Meurisse; Olivier Detry

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

  5. Image analysis of blood platelets adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krízová, P; Rysavá, J; Vanícková, M; Cieslar, P; Dyr, J E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of blood platelets is one of the major events in haemostatic and thrombotic processes. We studied adhesion of blood platelets on fibrinogen and fibrin dimer sorbed on solid support material (glass, polystyrene). Adhesion was carried on under static and dynamic conditions and measured as percentage of the surface covered with platelets. Within a range of platelet counts in normal and in thrombocytopenic blood we observed a very significant decrease in platelet adhesion on fibrin dimer with bounded active thrombin with decreasing platelet count. Our results show the imperative use of platelet poor blood preparations as control samples in experiments with thrombocytopenic blood. Experiments carried on adhesive surfaces sorbed on polystyrene showed lower relative inaccuracy than on glass. Markedly different behaviour of platelets adhered on the same adhesive surface, which differed only in support material (glass or polystyrene) suggest that adhesion and mainly spreading of platelets depends on physical quality of the surface. While on polystyrene there were no significant differences between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen, adhesion measured on glass support material markedly differed between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen. We compared two methods of thresholding in image analysis of adhered platelets. Results obtained by image analysis of spreaded platelets showed higher relative inaccuracy than results obtained by image analysis of platelets centres and aggregates.

  6. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities.

  7. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention compa

  8. Recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis is not an uncommon disease, usually having a monophasic course. We studied an atypical patient with recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis nine years after intrathecal anesthesia and the first attack of the disease. Also noteworthy was the favorable evolution after surgery.

  9. Synthesis of melamine-glucose resin adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Shuanhu; ZHANG; Lei

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a novel melamine-glucose adhesive that is similar to urea-formaldehyde adhesive is reported in this paper. The conditions of synthesis, such as the initial pH, the quantity of catalyst, the temperature of reaction, the percentage of each reactant and the time of reaction, were optimized by using the orthogonal experimental method.

  10. Tuneable adhesion through novel binder technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, M.E.L.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Ingenhut, B.; Timmer, K.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Bots, T.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Fischer, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversible crosslinking mechanism enabling bonding and debonding of adhesives and coatings based on Diels-Alder chemistry is described. The Diels-Alder compounds form a covalently crosslinked network at low temperatures that break at elevated temperatures. As a result, the adhesive exhibits good s

  11. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms of th...

  12. Switchable adhesion by chemical functionality and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamperman, M.M.G.; Synytska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in adhesion technology over the last few decades has led to widespread replacement of mechanical fasteners with adhesive bonds. Despite the advances, it remains challenging to produce materials that are sticky on demand. In this feature article we highlight recent efforts to develop reversi

  13. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  14. Predicting Failure Initiation in Structural Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Elastoplástico de Adhesivos – Modeling, characterization and simulation of the elastoplastic behavior of adhesives. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales...adhesive and a 1018 steel”. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales. Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C. May 2012.  Abstract: In the

  15. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  16. Adhesion Potential of Intestinal Microbes Predicted by Physico-Chemical Characterization Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas de Wouters

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to epithelial surfaces affects retention time in the human gastro-intestinal tract and therefore significantly contributes to interactions between bacteria and their hosts. Bacterial adhesion among other factors is strongly influenced by physico-chemical factors. The accurate quantification of these physico-chemical factors in adhesion is however limited by the available measuring techniques. We evaluated surface charge, interfacial rheology and tensiometry (interfacial tension as novel approaches to quantify these interactions and evaluated their biological significance via an adhesion assay using intestinal epithelial surface molecules (IESM for a set of model organisms present in the human gastrointestinal tract. Strain pairs of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 with its sortase knockout mutant Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus GG with Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T were used with Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 as control organism. Intra-species comparison revealed significantly higher abilities for Lb. plantarum WCSF1 and Lb. rhamnosus GG vs. Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T to dynamically increase interfacial elasticity (10-2 vs. 10-3 Pa*m and reduce interfacial tension (32 vs. 38 mN/m. This further correlated for Lb. plantarum WCSF1 and Lb. rhamnosus GG vs. Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T with the decrease of relative hydrophobicity (80-85% vs. 57-63%, Zeta potential (-2.9 to -4.5 mV vs. -8.0 to -13.8 mV and higher relative adhesion capacity to IESM (3.0-5.0 vs 1.5-2.2. Highest adhesion to the IESM collagen I and fibronectin was found for Lb. plantarum WCFS1 (5.0 and E. faecalis JH2-2 (4.2 whereas Lb. rhamnosus GG showed highest adhesion to type II mucus (3.8. Significantly reduced adhesion (2 fold to the tested IESM was observed for Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T corresponding with lower relative hydrophobicity, Zeta potential and abilities to modify interfacial elasticity

  17. Adhesion of microchannel-based complementary surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun K; Bai, Ying; Nadermann, Nichole; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2012-03-06

    We show that highly enhanced and selective adhesion can be achieved between surfaces patterned with complementary microchannel structures. An elastic material, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), was used to fabricate such surfaces by molding into a silicon master with microchannel profiles patterned by photolithography. We carried out adhesion tests on both complementary and mismatched microchannel/micropillar surfaces. Adhesion, as measured by the energy release rate required to propagate an interfacial crack, can be enhanced by up to 40 times by complementary interfaces, compared to a flat control, and slightly enhanced for some special noncomplementary samples, despite the nearly negligible adhesion for other mismatched surfaces. For each complementary surface, we observe defects in the form of visible striations, where pillars fail to insert fully into the channels. The adhesion between complementary microchannel surfaces is enhanced by a combination of a crack-trapping mechanism and friction between a pillar and channel and is attenuated by the presence of defects.

  18. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  19. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  20. Multibody simulation of adhesion pili

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursiere, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymers force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include both the effects of unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and the results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under action of external forces and provide new perspective of th...

  1. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  2. Adhesive polypeptides of Staphylococcus aureus identified using a novel secretion library technique in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Liisa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial adhesive proteins, called adhesins, are frequently the decisive factor in initiation of a bacterial infection. Characterization of such molecules is crucial for the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis, design of vaccines and development of antibacterial drugs. Because adhesins are frequently difficult to express, their characterization has often been hampered. Alternative expression methods developed for the analysis of adhesins, e.g. surface display techniques, suffer from various drawbacks and reports on high-level extracellular secretion of heterologous proteins in Gram-negative bacteria are scarce. These expression techniques are currently a field of active research. The purpose of the current study was to construct a convenient, new technique for identification of unknown bacterial adhesive polypeptides directly from the growth medium of the Escherichia coli host and to identify novel proteinaceous adhesins of the model organism Staphylococcus aureus. Results Randomly fragmented chromosomal DNA of S. aureus was cloned into a unique restriction site of our expression vector, which facilitates secretion of foreign FLAG-tagged polypeptides into the growth medium of E. coli ΔfliCΔfliD, to generate a library of 1663 clones expressing FLAG-tagged polypeptides. Sequence and bioinformatics analyses showed that in our example, the library covered approximately 32% of the S. aureus proteome. Polypeptides from the growth medium of the library clones were screened for binding to a selection of S. aureus target molecules and adhesive fragments of known staphylococcal adhesins (e.g coagulase and fibronectin-binding protein A as well as polypeptides of novel function (e.g. a universal stress protein and phosphoribosylamino-imidazole carboxylase ATPase subunit were detected. The results were further validated using purified His-tagged recombinant proteins of the corresponding fragments in enzyme-linked immunoassay and

  3. Gangliosides regulate tumor cell adhesion to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Tamara; Jabbar, Adnan A; Wen, Fei-Qui; Patel, Dharmesh A; Valentino, Leonard A

    2003-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins is critical for migration and invasion. The factors that regulate tumor cell adhesion are poorly characterized. Gangliosides promote platelet adhesion and may also play a role in the adhesion of other cell types. We hypothesized that pharmacological depletion of membrane gangliosides from adherent cells would abrogate adhesion to collagen and promote migration and invasion. To test these hypotheses, LA-N1 neuroblastoma cells, which avidly adhere to collagen and are rich with membrane gangliosides (43.69 nmol/10(8) cells), were cultured in the presence of D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol-HCl. Endogenous gangliosides were reduced by 98% (0.76 nmol/10(8) cells) and adhesion to collagen decreased by 67%. There were no changes in cell morphology, viability, proliferation rate or apoptosis. Pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells in conditioned medium from control cells restored adhesion to collagen (0.45 +/- 0.002), comparable to that of control cells (0.49 +/- 0.035). Similarly, pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells with purified GD2 completely restored adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner. When LA-N1 cells were cultured with retinoic acid, a biological response modifier known to increase endogenous gangliosides, adhesion to collagen increased. Next, we questioned whether changes in adhesion would be reflected as changes in migration and invasion. Cells depleted of endogenous cellular gangliosides migrated more than control cells. Finally, control cells replete with their endogenous gangliosides demonstrated less invasive potential than control cells. The data demonstrate that endogenous tumor gangliosides increase neuroblastoma cell adhesion to collagen and reduce migration and invasion in vitro.

  4. Impairment of the bacterial biofilm stability by triclosan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen V Lubarsky

    Full Text Available The accumulation of the widely-used antibacterial and antifungal compound triclosan (TCS in freshwaters raises concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style of microorganisms in aquatic systems. However, investigations to-date rarely go beyond effects at the cellular, physiological or morphological level. The present paper focuses on bacterial biofilms addressing the possible chemical impairment of their functionality, while also examining their substratum stabilization potential as one example of an important ecosystem service. The development of a bacterial assemblage of natural composition--isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK--on non-cohesive glass beads (<63 µm and exposed to a range of triclosan concentrations (control, 2-100 µg L(-1 was monitored over time by Magnetic Particle Induction (MagPI. In parallel, bacterial cell numbers, division rate, community composition (DGGE and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances: carbohydrates and proteins secretion were determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development was increasingly inhibited by increasing TCS levels. The surface binding capacity (MagPI of the assemblages was positively correlated to the microbial secreted EPS matrix. The EPS concentrations and composition (quantity and quality were closely linked to bacterial growth, which was affected by enhanced TCS exposure. Furthermore, TCS induced significant changes in bacterial community composition as well as a significant decrease in bacterial diversity. The impairment of the stabilization potential of bacterial biofilm under even low, environmentally relevant TCS levels is of concern since the resistance of sediments to erosive forces has large implications for the dynamics of sediments and associated pollutant dispersal. In addition, the surface adhesive capacity of the biofilm acts as a sensitive measure of

  5. MECHANISMS OF BACTERIAL POLYHOSTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova Yu.A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the review data about factors of pathogenicity of the bacteria, capable to amaze both animals, and a plant are collected. Such properties of microorganisms as adhesion, secretion of some enzymes, mobility, a phenomenon of cooperative sensitivity - play an essential role at defeat of different organisms. They are used for many universal offensive strategy overcoming protection of an organism, irrespective of its evolutionary origin. Studying of these mechanisms, will allow to provide new approaches to monitoring illnesses.

  6. The bacterial lipocalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  7. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  8. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  9. Capillary adhesion forces between flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, Camille; Protière, Suzie

    2016-11-01

    We consider the capillary adhesion produced by a drop placed between two elastic fibers. We measure the force exerted by the drop as we vary the inter-fiber distance, and report two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. The weak adhesion is characterized by a force that increases linearly with the liquid length. With flexible fibers, the force exerted by the drop can induce deformation and rapid collapse, or zipping, of the fibers. This zipping results in a sudden increase of the wetted length and a force that departs from the linear evolution. As the inter-fiber distance is subsequently increased, the liquid length decreases while the fibers deformation increases, and the force actually reaches a plateau, i.e. remains constant until unzipping, or detachment of the fibers occurs. We measure the value of this plateau, i.e. the maximal adhesion force, as we vary the drop volume and the fibers elasticity. We also show that flexibility extends capillary adhesion to inter-fiber distances impossible to reach with rigid fibers, while keeping a constant pull-out force characteristic of the elastocapillary coupling.

  10. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  11. Role of Adhesion Molecules in Eosinophil Activation: A Comparative Study on the Effect of Adhesion Molecules on Eosinophil Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    Conclusions: The regulation of adhesion molecules, by not only preventing eosinophil adhesion but also eosinophil activation, may be a potential target in the treatment of allergic inflammatory disorders.

  12. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  13. Silver nanoparticle-doped zirconia capillaries for enhanced bacterial filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Julia; Köser, Jan; Lindner, Patrick; Lüder, Christian; Beutel, Sascha; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-03-01

    Membrane clogging and biofilm formation are the most serious problems during water filtration. Silver nanoparticle (Agnano) coatings on filtration membranes can prevent bacterial adhesion and the initiation of biofilm formation. In this study, Agnano are immobilized via direct reduction on porous zirconia capillary membranes to generate a nanocomposite material combining the advantages of ceramics being chemically, thermally and mechanically stable with nanosilver, an efficient broadband bactericide for water decontamination. The filtration of bacterial suspensions of the fecal contaminant Escherichia coli reveals highly efficient bacterial retention capacities of the capillaries of 8 log reduction values, fulfilling the requirements on safe drinking water according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Maximum bacterial loading capacities of the capillary membranes are determined to be 3×10(9)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface until back flushing is recommendable. The immobilized Agnano remain accessible and exhibit strong bactericidal properties by killing retained bacteria up to maximum bacterial loads of 6×10(8)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface and the regenerated membranes regain filtration efficiencies of 95-100%. Silver release is moderate as only 0.8% of the initial silver loading is leached during a three-day filtration experiment leading to average silver contaminant levels of 100μg/L.

  14. Hyperzincemia from ingestion of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature that documents the serious adverse systemic effects of prolonged, excessive zinc ingestion from the overuse of denture adhesives. This condition causes elevation of serum zinc levels that result in depression of serum copper. The low serum copper levels cause bone marrow depression and widespread sensory and motor neuropathies. Epidemiologic studies revealed the source of excessive zinc intake to be from overuse of denture adhesives. Denture patients must be advised of the risks of prolonged overuse of denture adhesives.

  15. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  16. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash...... deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  17. Plasmid Mediated Resistance to Cephalosporin and Adhesion Properties in E.Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Oufrid

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between biofilm formation, surface characteristics and the presence of plasmid conferring resistance to cephalosporin Methodology: The plasmid of resistance of Salmonella 3349 was purified and transferred by electroporation to the E. coli DH10B originally incompetent to form biofilm. The physico-chemical surface properties of the three bacteria (E. coli DH10B, Salmonella 3349 and its isogenic transformant 3519EC1 were estimated and compared by the Microbial Adhesion to Solvents test (MAST and angle contact measurement. Cellular densities of bacteria adhered to stainless supports were examined with a scanning electron microscope. Results: The physicochemical properties of bacterial cell surface demonstrated that E.coli DH10B strain was hydrophilic, electron donating and weakly electron accepting than Salmonella 3349 and its transformant 3519EC1 strains. Moreover, there was a weak correlation between the acid-base properties determined by the Microbial Adhesion to Solvents test and angle contact measurement. Analysis of microscopical images of bacterial adhesion indicated that E.coli 3519EC1 and Salmonella 3349 adhered to the stainless surface, whereas the E.coli DH10B does not adhere. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the presences of the plasmid of resistance modify the microbial surface properties and biofilm formation.

  18. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  19. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  20. Controllable and switchable capillary adhesion mechanism for bio-adhesive pads: Effect of micro patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XiangJun; LIU Yuan; LIU YongHe; AHMED S.I.-U.

    2009-01-01

    Some insects and animals, such as bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs, realize their efficient adhesion mechanism to glass surface, wall and ceiling by injecting a wetting liquid thin film into the pad-substrate contact area. Their ability to control adhesion (attaching or detaching from a surface) is in many cases connected to the contact geometry and surface patterns of their attachment pads. This paper focuses on the dependence of the capillary adhesion (wet adhesion) on the micro patterns of the bio-adhesive pads. The objective is to reveal the possible mechanism for a bio-adhesive pad to control capillary force through adjusting its micro-scale surface pattern and topography. A capillary adhesion force model is built up taking account of the combined role of micro-dimple geometry as well as the wetting behavior of the confined liquid thin film. Calculated results of the apparent contact angle on the regularly micro-dimpled surfaces are compared with and in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Simulation of the capillary adhesion force reveals that it is controllable in a large mag-nitude by adjusting a dimensionless surface pattern parameter k defined as a/(a+b), where a is the dia-meter of micro dimple, and (a+b) is the side length of one pattern cell. When adjusting the parameter k more than 0.75, the capillary adhesion force could be switchable from attractive to repulsive. This effect of micro patterns on the interfacial capillary force is proved to be dominant when the pad-substrate clearance decreases to the nano/micrometer scale. These results indicate that a controllable and switchable capillary adhesive mechanism might be utilized by a living insect or animal to realize its stable adhesion and quick releasing movement through adjusting the micro-pattern topography of its bio-adhesive pad.

  1. Adhesion between Polydimethylsiloxane Layers by Crosslinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion between two surfaces may be strongly improved by chemical crosslinking of the interfaces. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used polymer that has received considerable attention due to its unique properties, such as relatively low price, biocompatibility, flexibility, high thermal...

  2. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yuqing; Lin Yi; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Yanwu; Wei Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective The high energy ion bombardment technique is applied to enhancing the adhesion of the tetrahedral amorphous carbon (TAC) films deposited by the filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). Methods The abrasion method, scratch method, heating and shaking method as well as boiling salt solution method is used to test the adhesion of the TAC films on various material substrates. Results The test results show that the adhesion is increased as the ion bombardment energy increases. However, if the bombardment energy were over the corresponding optimum value, the adhesion would be enhanced very slowly for the harder material substrates and drops quickly, for the softer ones. Conclusion The optimum values of the ion bombardment energy are larger for the harder materials than that for the softer ones.

  3. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  4. Adhesive dentistry: 2013 and into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, David S; Deliperi, Simone

    2013-10-01

    With the recent founding of the International Academy for Adhesive Dentistry (IAAD), scientific research, commercially available products, and clinically proven protocols will be brought together with the dental profession.

  5. Inhibition of adhesion of yeasts and bacteria by poly(ethylene oxide-)brushes on glass in a parallel plate flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, A.M.; Kaper, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-brushes are generally recognized as protein-repellent surfaces, and although a role in discouraging microbial adhesion has been established for some strains and species, no study exists on the effects of PEO-brushes on a large variety of bacterial and yeast strains. In thi

  6. A comparative study on adhesion and recovery of potential probiotic strains of Lactobacillus spp. by in vitro assay and analysis of human colon biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadejda Nikolajevna; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Pærregaard, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion of the new Lactobacillus isolates, L. casei D12, L. casei Q85, L. casei Z11 and L. plantarum Q47, to the porcine intestinal cell line IPEC-J2 was investigated and compared to the recovery of the same bacterial strains from colon biopsies and faeces obtained from human intervention studies...

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Mechanosensitivity in Focal Adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Physical environment guides tissue regeneration and morphology in both health and disease. In the past three decades, several experiments illustrated that mechanical cues are captured and transduced to biochemical signals in the cellular level (mechanotransduction) mediated by cell adhesion. Cells adhere to their microenvironment through large protein assemblies known as focal adhesions that directly couple intra- and extra-cellular matrices and play a critical role in many vital cell functio...

  8. Th17 Cell Induction by Adhesion of Microbes to Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Ando, Minoru; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nagano, Yuji; Narushima, Seiko; Suda, Wataru; Imaoka, Akemi; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nagamori, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eiji; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Hara, Taeko; Kado, Shoichi; Jinnohara, Toshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Shin-Ichiro; Tokoro, Shunji; Mori, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yurika; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Camp, J Gray; Hattori, Masahira; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal Th17 cells are induced and accumulate in response to colonization with a subgroup of intestinal microbes such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) and certain extracellular pathogens. Here, we show that adhesion of microbes to intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) is a critical cue for Th17 induction. Upon monocolonization of germ-free mice or rats with SFB indigenous to mice (M-SFB) or rats (R-SFB), M-SFB and R-SFB showed host-specific adhesion to small intestinal ECs, accompanied by host-specific induction of Th17 cells. Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia coli O157 triggered similar Th17 responses, whereas adhesion-defective mutants of these microbes failed to do so. Moreover, a mixture of 20 bacterial strains, which were selected and isolated from fecal samples of a patient with ulcerative colitis on the basis of their ability to cause a robust induction of Th17 cells in the mouse colon, also exhibited EC-adhesive characteristics.

  9. Screening of immunomodulatory and adhesive Lactobacillus with antagonistic activities against Salmonella from fermented vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junchang; Liu, Pilong; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to select strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) by their in vitro adhesive and immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics. In this study, 16 randomly selected LAB strains from fermented vegetables (sauerkraut, bean and cabbage) were first screened for their tolerance to acid, bile salts, pepsin and pancreatin, bacterial inhibitory activities and abilities to adherence to Caco-2 cells. Then, 4 strains with the highest adhesion abilities were selected for further studies of their immunomodulatory properties and inhibitory effects against Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro. The results showed that these 16 LAB strains effectively survived in simulated gastrointestinal condition and inhibited growth of six tested pathogens. Lactobacillus rhamnosus P1, Lactobacillus plantarum P2, Lactobacillus rhamnosus P3 and Lactobacillus casei P4 had the highest abilities to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, L. plantarum P2 strain showed higher abilities to induce expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 by splenic monocytes and strongly inhibited the adhesion and invasion of S. enteritidis ATCC13076 to Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that Lactobacillus strains P2 could be used as a probiotic candidate in food against Salmonella infection.

  10. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  11. Elimination of the reactivation process in the adhesion of chlorinated SBS rubber with polychloroprene adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination treatment of a thermoplastic styrene-butadiene-styrene rubber (SBS with a 3 wt% solution of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCI in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK introduces chlorinated and oxidized moieties on the rubber surface which increase its surface energy and produces surface microroughness. Consequently adhesion properties, evaluated by T-peel strength measurements in chlorinated SBS/solvent based-polyurethane adhesive/leather joints, are enhanced. In this study, two solvent-based polychloroprene adhesives (PCP0 and PCP30R have been considered as an alternative to the commonly used solvent-based polyurethane adhesive (PU. A thermoreactive phenolic resin was added to one of the polychloroprene adhesive formulations (PCP30R. This tackifier resin favors chlorination of the adhesive and reinforces the interface between the chlorinated adhesive and the chlorinated rubber surface. Besides, PCP30R adhesive does not need adhesive reactivation and considerable high T-peel strength value (5.7±0.3 kN/m was obtained. Elimination of the reactivation process implies a considerable improvement of the manufacturing process in the footwear industry.

  12. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  13. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives....

  14. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External prosthesis adhesive. 878.3750 Section 878.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... adhesive. (a) Identification. An external prosthesis adhesive is a silicone-type adhesive intended to...

  15. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  16. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  17. Preparation and Properties of Cornstarch Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to use cornstarch in the production of environmentally sound adhesives. ‘Three-formaldehyde glue’ pollutes the environment and harms to human health strongly, which widely used for wood-based panels preparation. Environment-friendly cornstarch adhesives were prepared using method of oxidation-gelatinization, insteading of the three formaldehyde glue. The effects of the quality ratio of starch and water, temperature and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of the adhesive were studied. The rheological eigenvalue of apparent viscosity was studied through nonlinear regression. The results showed that the apparent viscosity of cornstarch adhesives increased and then decreased with the increasing of temperature and the maximum value was obtained at 10oC; the apparent viscosity decreased slowly with the increasing of rotor speed; the phenomenon of shear thinning appeared wither cornstarch adhesives which was pseudo-plastic fluids. Cornstarch adhesives with characteristics of non-toxic, no smell and pollution could be applied in interior and upscale packaging.

  18. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  19. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  20. The dentinal surface: its influence on dentinal adhesion. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D; Cobb, C M; Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Robinson, S J

    1991-12-01

    Three categories of dentinal adhesive are proposed: category I includes adhesives with shear bond strength values between 5 and 7 MPa; category II includes dentinal adhesives with shear bond strengths between 8 and 14 MPa; and category III includes adhesives with shear bond strength values up to 20 MPa. In part I of this article, photomicrographs of the dentinal smear layer and three category I first-generation dentin-adhesive interfaces are presented. The photomicrographs show that the wetting and penetration of the first-generation dentinal adhesives were not adequate to produce high shear bond strengths. When the category I adhesives were tested for shear bond strength, failures occurred at the interface or in the resin adhesive. Future articles will explain wetting and adhesive performance of category II and III adhesives.

  1. Application of the Blister Test in Study of Epoxy Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xiong; Ingegerd Annergren

    2000-01-01

    Shaft-loaded blister test technique is used as an effective quantitative tool to measure adhesion strength. Investigation on conductive adhesive was done by modified blister test. It is found that shaftloaded blister test can be a good solution for the debonding of thin film adhesion. The intrinsic stable interface debonding process has been proved an attractive alternative to the conventional adhesion measurement techniques. In our study, epoxy matrix adhesive was studied using blister test technique in comparison with the traditional test-lap shear test. Adhesion strength was studied as a function of surface treatment and the metallization of substrate. It was found that surface conditions of substrate have significant impact on adhesion behaviour. The oxidation of surface is responsible for the poor adhesion. Activating chemical treatment and Plasma cleaning on substrate surface has been found to be a way of dreamatically improving adhesion strength of electronic conductive adhesive.

  2. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome: report on the first case in Chile and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vásquez-De Kartzow

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Adhesion molecule deficiency type 1 is a rare disease that should be suspected in any patient whose umbilical cord presents delay in falling off, and who presents recurrent severe infections. Early diagnostic suspicion and early treatment improve the prognosis. CASE REPORT: The case of a four-month-old boy with recurrent hospitalizations because of severe bronchopneumonia and several episodes of acute otitis media with non-purulent drainage of mucus and positive bacterial cultures is presented. His medical history included neonatal sepsis and delayed umbilical cord detachment. Laboratory studies showed marked leukocytosis with predominance of neutrophils and decreased CD11b and CD18. These were all compatible with a diagnosis of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I [LAD type 1].

  3. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    The successful use of many security papers, foils and films depends on the technology of chemical fastening systems -- especially pressure sensitive adhesives. These are adhesives activated not by heat or by the evaporation of water or some other solvent, but simply by the act of application -- by pressure. These adhesives provide the means whereby laminations, substrates and seals are made effective. In addition to their physical properties these adhesives are often required to possess optical properties to allow the security materials to be visibly active and indeed the adhesive system may itself contribute as a carrier for a variety of security materials. Recent advances in adhesives chemistry have made it possible to achieve virtually all the required physical performance characteristics combined with a choice of optical properties ranging from total opacity to invisibility and including controlled translucency and tinting. The implications for security printing and packaging are important. Opacity is easy to achieve, for example by loading the adhesive with aluminum powder, by the selection of totally opaque materials like metallized film or by various printing processes. But achieving transparency is a different matter, and transparency is mandatory for applications involving the protection of documents, photographs, etc. with a clear film over-laminate. Obvious examples would be for passports, visas and other personal identification. But some security devices may themselves require protection; for example holograms or embossings. And transparency in the test laboratory is not enough. The Australian driving licence is stuck to the windshield, so the transparency of the adhesive must be sustained over long periods without deterioration due to prolonged u/v exposure, climatic conditions or aging. The commercial label market has helped to push the technology forward. There is a strong demand for the 'no-label look' for packaging of clear plastic and glass

  4. Adhesion of Escherichia coli on to a series of poly(methacrylates) differing in charge and hydrophobicity

    OpenAIRE

    Harkes, G; Feijen, J.; DANKERT, J

    1991-01-01

    The adhesion of three Escherichia coli strains on to six poly(methacrylates) differing in hydrophobicity and surface charge was measured as a function of time under laminar flow conditions. Polymers used were poly(methy) methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(hydroxyethy) methacrylate) (PHEMA) and copolymers of MMA or HEMA with either 15% methacrylic acid (MAA) or 15% trimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-HCl salt (TMAEMA-CI). Bacterial and polymer surfaces were characterized by means of water contact angles ...

  5. Adhesion to tooth structure mediated by contemporary bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangel, Ivan; Ellis, Thomas H; Sacher, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Given the enormity of the field of adhesion and the number of commercial products available, the discipline of modern adhesive dentistry can be daunting with respect to materials and techniques. This article organizes contemporary bonding practice and materials around an understanding of the fundamentals of adhesion to tooth structure. In providing this context, adhesive development, bonding systems, and their appropriate use are better understood. The end result is the better practice of adhesive dentistry.

  6. Bacillus cereus Adhesion to Simulated Intestinal Mucus Is Determined by Its Growth on Mucin, Rather Than Intestinal Environmental Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilia, Varvara; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Rajkovic, Andreja; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria to intestinal mucus, the protective layer of the gastrointestinal epithelium, is often considered a virulence factor. The ability of food-poisoning Bacillus cereus strains to attach to mucus and the factors affecting this interaction have not yet been investigated. Therefore, the role of adhesion in pathogenesis of B. cereus still remains unknown. In the present study, an in vitro assay based on mucin agar was used to simulate adhesion of B. cereus to mucus. Bacterial-associated factors (e.g., strain specificity and microbial competition) known to influence adhesion to different surfaces and a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., pH and oxygen) encountered in the gastrointestinal tract were investigated. The effect of these parameters on B. cereus NVH 0500/00 mucin adhesion was generally limited even in the presence of microbial competition. This suggests that B. cereus NVH 0500/00 is a versatile pathogen. Inoculation of 4 to 5 log colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter. B. cereus NVH 0500/00 resulted in 5-6 log CFU/mL mucin-associated bacteria after a short incubation period. This indicates that this pathogenic strain could grow in the presence of mucin agar. This growth may potentially mask the effect of the studied conditions. Yet, extensive attachment of B. cereus to mucin is not necessarily a prerequisite for virulence, because other pathogenic strains do not adhere with the same efficiency to mucin. Nevertheless, adhesion may contribute to the disease by providing close contact to nutrient sources, such as mucin, which would not only result in bacterial proliferation, but also in disruption of the protective host mucus surface.

  7. Black Currant (Ribes nigrum L.) and Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) Fruit Juices Inhibit Adhesion of Asaia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity of high-polyphenolic black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) juices against bacterial strains Asaia lannensis and Asaia bogorensis isolated as spoilage of commercial soft drinks. The composition of fruit juices was evaluated using chromatographic techniques HPLC and LC-MS. The adhesion to glass, polystyrene, and polyethylene terephthalate in two different culture media was evaluated by luminometry and the plate count method. The major anthocyanins in the V. myrtillus were petunidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-glucoside, while in R. nigrum delphinidin-3-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside were detected. The LC-MS analysis showed presence of anthocyanins (delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, and malvidin derivatives), phenolic acids (chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids), flavonols (quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-rutinoside), and flavanols (procyanidin B2 and procyanidin type A2). Additionally, in the bilberry juice A type procyanidin trimer was detected. The adhesion of Asaia spp. cells depended on the type of medium, carbon sources, and the type of abiotic surfaces. We noted that the adhesion was significantly stronger in minimal medium containing sucrose. The addition of bilberry and black currant juices notably reduced bacterial growth as well as cell adhesion to polyethylene terephthalate surfaces. PMID:27747228

  8. Black Currant (Ribes nigrum L. and Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L. Fruit Juices Inhibit Adhesion of Asaia spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Antolak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity of high-polyphenolic black currant (Ribes nigrum L. and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L. juices against bacterial strains Asaia lannensis and Asaia bogorensis isolated as spoilage of commercial soft drinks. The composition of fruit juices was evaluated using chromatographic techniques HPLC and LC-MS. The adhesion to glass, polystyrene, and polyethylene terephthalate in two different culture media was evaluated by luminometry and the plate count method. The major anthocyanins in the V. myrtillus were petunidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-glucoside, while in R. nigrum delphinidin-3-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside were detected. The LC-MS analysis showed presence of anthocyanins (delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, and malvidin derivatives, phenolic acids (chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids, flavonols (quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-rutinoside, and flavanols (procyanidin B2 and procyanidin type A2. Additionally, in the bilberry juice A type procyanidin trimer was detected. The adhesion of Asaia spp. cells depended on the type of medium, carbon sources, and the type of abiotic surfaces. We noted that the adhesion was significantly stronger in minimal medium containing sucrose. The addition of bilberry and black currant juices notably reduced bacterial growth as well as cell adhesion to polyethylene terephthalate surfaces.

  9. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  10. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO. BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism is developed to simplify the bacterial optimization, which is spread over the whole optimization process. However, the other behaviors such as elimination, reproduction, and migration are implemented only when the given conditions are satisfied. Two types of interactive communication schemas: individuals exchange schema and group exchange schema are designed to improve the optimization efficiency. In the simulation studies, a set of 12 benchmark functions belonging to three classes (unimodal, multimodal, and rotated problems are performed, and the performances of the proposed algorithms are compared with five recent evolutionary algorithms to demonstrate the superiority of BCO.

  11. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  12. On the determining role of network structure titania in silicone against bacterial colonization: Mechanism and disruption of biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based biomedical devices are prone to microbial adhesion, which is the primary cause of concern in the functioning of the artificial device. Silicone exhibiting long-term and effective antibacterial ability is highly desirable to prevent implant related infections. In this regard, nanophase titania was incorporated in silicone as an integral part of the silicone network structure through cross-link mechanism, with the objective to reduce bacterial adhesion to a minimum. The bacterial adhesion was studied using crystal violet assay, while the mechanism of inhibition of biofilm formation was studied via electron microscopy. The incorporation of nanophase titania in silicone dramatically reduced the viability of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and the capability to adhere on the surface of hybrid silicone by ∼ 93% in relation to stand alone silicone. The conclusion of dramatic reduction in the viability of S. aureus is corroborated by different experimental approaches including biofilm inhibition assay, zone of inhibition, and through a novel experiment that involved incubation of biofilm with titania nanoparticles. It is proposed that the mechanism of disruption of bacterial film in the presence of titania involves puncturing of the bacterial cell membrane. - Highlights: • Network structure titania in silicone imparts antimicrobial activity. • Ability to microbial adhesion is significantly reduced. • Antimicrobial mechanism involves rupture of biofilm.

  13. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  14. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Al Amri Saleh

    1995-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is an infection of the ascitic fluid without obvious intra-abdominal source of sepsis; usually complicates advanced liver disease. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial: low ascitic protein-content, which reflects defi-cient ascitic fluid complement and hence, reduced opsonic activity is thought to be the most important pathogenic factor. Frequent and prolonged bacteremia has been considered as another pertinent cause of SBP. This disease is...

  15. Modelling bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A central problem in understanding bacterial speciation is how clusters of closely related strains emerge and persist in the face of recombination. We use a neutral Fisher–Wright model in which genotypes, defined by the alleles at 140 house-keeping loci, change in each generation by mutation or recombination, and examine conditions in which an initially uniform population gives rise to resolved clusters. Where recombination occurs at equal frequency between all members of the population, we o...

  16. Differential role of eDNA, proteins, and polysaccharides in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion by three Staphylococcus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Rikke Louise; Okshevsky, Mira Ursula; Zeng, Guanghong

    on abiotic surfaces. We quantified initial adhesion, cell aggregation, and single-cell adhesion forces of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence and absence of DNase, dispersin, or subtilisin, which cleave extracellular DNA, polysaccharides and proteins...... valuable for designing new approaches to biofilm prevention. In this study, we combine microfluidic flow-cell studies with single-cell analyses to understand how polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins contribute individually and in concert to mediate bacterial adhesion and aggregation...... eDNA and proteins are the most important adhesins for initiating S. aureus biofilms. S. epidermidis was strongly affected by all enzyme treatments, which in addition to impairing adhesion to glass, also prevented the formation of aggregates and streamers observed abundantly in control samples. One...

  17. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  18. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control.

  19. Adhesion and biocides inactivation of Salmonella on stainless steel and polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cesar Tondo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion of Salmonella (S. strains to stainless steel and polyethylene and their inactivation by biocides used in food industry was investigated. Coupons of stainless steel and polyethylene were immersed in bacterial suspensions of S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, and S. Bredeney during 15, 30, and 60 minutes, and submitted to different concentrations of peracetic acid (PAA, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, and quaternary ammonium (Quat sanitizers. Hydrophobicity of the surfaces was evaluated by contact angle measurements using the sessile drop method and bacterial adhesion was accompanied through bacterial counts and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results indicated that the three serovars of Salmonella presented similar adhesion to both materials (5.0 to 6.5 log cfu cm-2. The time of exposure did not influence the counts of adhered cells on both surfaces, however SEM revealed larger clusters of S. Enteritidis on both materials, not found for the other serovars. S. Enteritidis presented lower sessile drop angle on polyethylene, indicating hydrophilic properties of this material. The biocides were not able to inactivate all the microorganisms adhered on both surfaces. At least 1 log cfu cm-2 of all serovars tested remained viable after the exposure to different biocide concentrations. In general, higher counts of survivors were observed on polyethylene disinfected with different concentrations of biocides. S. Bredeney e S. Typhimurium were more resistant than S. Enteritidis to PAA, whilst S. Enteritidis presented smaller reduction rates to NaOCl. This last biocide was able to reduce Salmonella counts in approximately 3.0 to 4.0 log cm-2. When adhered to polyethylene, the serovars S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis were more resistant to Quat than S. Bredeney in all concentrations tested, and the numbers of S. Enteritidis remained almost unaltered. On stainless steel disinfected by Quat, S. Bredeney presented higher numbers of survivors.

  20. Chemical modification of polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer in inhibiting adhesion of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Mizerska, Urszula; Fortuniak, Witold; Chojnowski, Julian; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-07-01

    Disease-causing bacteria of the genus Aeromonas are able to adhere to pipe materials, colonizing the surfaces and forming biofilms in water distribution systems. The aim of our research was to study how the modification of materials used commonly in the water industry can reduce bacterial cell attachment. Polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer surfaces were activated and modified with reactive organo-silanes by coupling or co-crosslinking silanes with the native material. Both the native and modified surfaces were tested using the bacterial strain Aeromonas hydrophila, which was isolated from the Polish water distribution system. The surface tension of both the native and modified surfaces was measured. To determine cell viability and bacterial adhesion two methods were used, namely plate count and luminometry. Results were expressed in colony-forming units (c.f.u.) and in relative light units (RLU) per cm(2). Almost all the chemically modified surfaces exhibited higher anti-adhesive and anti-microbial properties in comparison to the native surfaces. Among the modifying agents examined, poly[dimethylsiloxane-co-(N,N-dimethyl-N-n-octylammoniopropyl chloride) methylsiloxane)] terminated with hydroxydimethylsilyl groups (20 %) in silicone elastomer gave the most desirable results. The surface tension of this modifier, was comparable to the non-polar native surface. However, almost half of this value was due to the result of polar forces. In this case, in an adhesion analysis, only 1 RLU cm(-2) and less than 1 c.f.u. cm(-2) were noted. For the native gumosil, the results were 9,375 RLU cm(-2) and 2.5 × 10(8) c.f.u. cm(-2), respectively. The antibacterial activity of active organo-silanes was associated only with the carrier surface because no antibacterial compounds were detected in liquid culture media, in concentrations that were able to inhibit cell growth.

  1. Targeting Focal Adhesion Assembly by Ethoxyfagaronine Prevents Lymphoblastic Cell Adhesion to Fibronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ouchani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leukemic cell adhesion to proteins of the bone marrow microenvironment provides signals which control morphology, motility and cell survival. We described herein the ability of ethoxyfagaronine (etxfag, a soluble synthetic derivative of fagaronine, to prevent leukemic cell adhesion to fibronectin peptide (FN/V.

  2. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  3. Enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces produced by mild self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) released by adhesive procedures may degrade collagen in the hybrid layer and so compromise the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, endogenous enzymatic degradation was evaluated for several simplified self-etch adhesives. In addition, primers were modified by adding two MMP inhibitors: chlorhexidine, a commonly used disinfectant, but also a non-specific MMP inhibitor; and SB-3CT, a specific inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography of fresh human dentin powder was used to identify the enzymes released by the adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to assess the mechanical properties of resin-dentin interfaces over time. In none of the experimental groups treated with the mild self-etch adhesives was MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 identified. Also, no difference in the μTBS was measured for the inhibitor-modified and the control inhibitor-free adhesives after 6 months of water storage. It is concluded that in contrast to etch-and-rinse adhesives, the involvement of endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the bond-degradation process is minimal for mild self-etch adhesives.

  4. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a weigh

  5. New impact specimen for adhesives: optimization of high-speed-loaded adhesive joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, A.A.; Guyt, C.B.; Vlot, A.

    1998-01-01

    A new kind of joint specimen has been developed to load the adhesive in pure shear on impact. The specimen is tested with three adhesives at five layer thicknesses, and at three test speeds. From these tests it can be concluded that the rod-ring specimen is suitable for use in impact tests at high s

  6. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  7. Adhesion Molecules Associated with Female Genital Tract Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Qualai

    Full Text Available Efforts to develop vaccines that can elicit mucosal immune responses in the female genital tract against sexually transmitted infections have been hampered by an inability to measure immune responses in these tissues. The differential expression of adhesion molecules is known to confer site-dependent homing of circulating effector T cells to mucosal tissues. Specific homing molecules have been defined that can be measured in blood as surrogate markers of local immunity (e.g. α4β7 for gut. Here we analyzed the expression pattern of adhesion molecules by circulating effector T cells following mucosal infection of the female genital tract in mice and during a symptomatic episode of vaginosis in women. While CCR2, CCR5, CXCR6 and CD11c were preferentially expressed in a mouse model of Chlamydia infection, only CCR5 and CD11c were clearly expressed by effector T cells during bacterial vaginosis in women. Other homing molecules previously suggested as required for homing to the genital mucosa such as α4β1 and α4β7 were also differentially expressed in these patients. However, CD11c expression, an integrin chain rarely analyzed in the context of T cell immunity, was the most consistently elevated in all activated effector CD8+ T cell subsets analyzed. This molecule was also induced after systemic infection in mice, suggesting that CD11c is not exclusive of genital tract infection. Still, its increase in response to genital tract disorders may represent a novel surrogate marker of mucosal immunity in women, and warrants further exploration for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  8. Liquefaction of bamboo,preparation of liquefied bamboo adhesives,and properties of the adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Shenyuan; Ma Lingfei; Li Wenzhu; Cheng Shuna

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the liquefaction of bamboo in phenol,which involved the effects of weight ratios of phenol to bamboo,amount of catalyst,temperature,etc.The study showed that liquefaction could be accomplished with a phenol to bamboo weight ratio of 2-1:1,a 5% catalyst of HCI or BF3,and a temperature of 1150C.Liquefied bamboo formaldehyde (BLF) resin adhesive for exterior use could be obtained with a phenol to formaldehyde molar ratio of 1:1.6-2.0.The curing behavior of BLF resin adhesive,studied by TG-DSC and IR analyses,showed that BLF resin adhesives had a lower curing temperature than PF adhesives but had the same characteristic trough in IR spectra as PF adhesives.

  9. The effect of polyethylene glycol adhesion barrier (Spray Gel) on preventing peritoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasiran, F; Eryilmaz, R; Isik, A; Okan, I; Somay, A; Sahin, M

    2015-01-01

    The prominent cells in the late phase of wound healing during proliferation and matrix deposition are fibroblasts. Foreign materials in the operation site like prosthesis prolong the inflammation and induce fibroblast proliferation (8). 3 different prostheses used in this study induced chronic inflammation and fibrosis and provided an effective repair. Dense and thick adhesions due to fibrosis also induced strong adhesions to omentum and small intestine if only polypropylene mesh used for hernia repair. However, there was no difference between SprayGel treated polypropylene mesh and Sepramesh when compared for fibrosis. It also prevents the intraabdominal adhesion formation. It is nontoxic, sticky adherent, non- immigrant and easy to use both in open and laparoscopic surgeries. This experimental study revealed that polyethyleneglycol applied polypropylene mesh accomplishes hernia repair with significantly less adhesion formation than polypropylene mesh alone while securing a remarkable economy than adhesion barrier coated dual meshes (Tab. 6, Fig. 7, Ref. 23). Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  10. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  11. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  12. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  13. 细菌与生物材料黏附特性的相关研究%Related Research on the Relevance between Adhesion Characteristics of Bacteria and Bio-Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞斐; 黄迅悟

    2015-01-01

    细菌黏附是一个复杂过程,受多种因素影响。随着医学生物材料应用增多,感染发病率也明显增高,如何防治生物材料相关感染是临床急需解决的问题。因此,研究细菌与生物材料黏附对于探讨生物材料植入机体引起的感染具有重要意义。本综述简单介绍了生物材料中有关细菌黏附机制,着重分析了细菌黏附影响因素,以及细菌自身特性、宿主因素对细菌黏附的影响,并在总结细菌黏附研究中所存在问题的基础上,对未来研究的发展趋势提出展望。%Bacterial adhesion is a complex process affected by many factors. With the increasing application of medical bio-materials, the incidence of infections signiifcantly increases. How to prevent the relevant infection caused by biomaterials has become an urgent clinical problem. Therefore, the study on the adhesion of bacterial and biomaterials plays an important role in discussion on the infection caused by the biological material implantation. This review brielfy introduced the biological materials related to bacterial adhesion mechanism, analyzed the bacterial adhesion factors, as well as their characteristics, host factors on bacterial adhesion of bacteria. And it also put forward the outlook of the future research trends based on summarization of the problems of bacterial adhesion.

  14. Engineering bioinspired bacteria-adhesive clay nanoparticles with a membrane-disruptive property for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuan; Hu, Xiurong; Yao, Qi; Hu, Qida; Amini, Shahrouz; Miserez, Ali; Tang, Guping

    2016-09-28

    We present a bioinspired design strategy to engineer bacteria-targeting and membrane-disruptive nanoparticles for the effective antibiotic therapy of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Antibacterial nanoparticles were self-assembled from highly exfoliated montmorillonite (eMMT) and cationic linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI) via electrostatic interactions. eMMT functions as a bioinspired 'sticky' building block for anchoring antibacterial nanoparticles onto the bacterial cell surface via bacteria-secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), whereas membrane-disruptive lPEI is able to efficiently lyse the bacterial outer membrane to allow topical transmembrane delivery of antibiotics into the intracellular cytoplasm. As a result, eMMT-lPEI nanoparticles intercalated with the antibiotic metronidazole (MTZ) not only efficiently target bacteria via EPS-mediated adhesion and kill bacteria in vitro, but also can effectively remain in the stomach where H. pylori reside, thereby serving as an efficient drug carrier for the direct on-site release of MTZ into the bacterial cytoplasm. Importantly, MTZ-intercalated eMMT-lPEI nanoparticles were able to efficiently eradicate H. pylori in vivo and to significantly improve H. pylori-associated gastric ulcers and the inflammatory response in a mouse model, and also showed superior therapeutic efficacy as compared to standard triple therapy. Our findings reveal that bacterial adhesion plays a critical role in promoting efficient antimicrobial delivery and also represent an original bioinspired targeting strategy via specific EPS-mediated adsorption. The bacteria-adhesive eMMT-lPEI nanoparticles with membrane-disruptive ability may constitute a promising drug carrier system for the efficacious targeted delivery of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections.

  15. ROLE OF ADHESIVES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad bashir Khan et al

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS also commonly known as “patches” are dosage forms designed to deliver a therapeutically effective amount of drug across a patient’s skin. The therapeutic performance of a transdermal delivery system (TDS can be affected by the quality of contact between the patch and the skin. The adhesion of the TDS to the skin is obtained by using pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs, which are defined as adhesives capable of bonding to surfaces with the application of light pressure. This article provides an overview of types of transdermal, the anatomical considerations and role of adhesion, the possible adhesion failure modes and how adhesion can be measured. Several in vitro techniques have been used to monitor adhesive performance such as peel adhesion, tack and shear strength. This article provides a frame work for further discussion and scientific work to improve transdermal adhesive performance.

  16. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand.

  17. Streptococcal collagen-like surface protein 1 promotes adhesion to the respiratory epithelial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Cherng-Shyang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collagen-like surface proteins Scl1 and Scl2 on Streptococcus pyogenes contain contiguous Gly-X-X triplet amino acid motifs, the characteristic structure of human collagen. Although the potential role of Scl1 in adhesion has been studied, the conclusions may be affected by the use of different S. pyogenes strains and their carriages of various adhesins. To explore the bona fide nature of Scl1 in adherence to human epithelial cells without the potential interference of other streptococcal surface factors, we constructed a scl1 isogenic mutant from the Scl2-defective S. pyogenes strain and a Scl1-expressed Escherichia coli. Results Loss of Scl1 in a Scl2-defective S. pyogenes strain dramatically decreased the adhesion of bacteria to HEp-2 human epithelial cells. Expression of Scl1 on the surface of the heterologous bacteria E. coli significantly increased adhesion to HEp-2. The increase in adhesion was nullified when Scl1-expressed E. coli was pre-incubated with proteases or antibodies against recombinant Scl1 (rScl1 protein. Treatment of HEp-2 cells with rScl protein or pronase drastically reduced the binding capability of Scl1-expressed E. coli. These findings suggest that the adhesion is mediated through Scl1 on bacterial surface and protein receptor(s on epithelial cells. Further blocking of potential integrins revealed significant contributions of α2 and β1 integrins in Scl1-mediated binding to epithelial cells. Conclusions Together, these results underscore the importance of Scl1 in the virulence of S. pyogenes and implicate Scl1 as an adhesin during pathogenesis of streptococcal infection.

  18. Competition of Lactobacillus paracasei with Salmonella enterica for Adhesion to Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Jankowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition of commensal and probiotic bacteria with pathogens for adhesion and colonization is one of the important protective mechanisms of gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we examined the ability of Lactobacillus paracasei to inhibit the adhesion of pathogenic Salmonella enterica to human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were grown for 6 or 21 days to obtain nondifferentiated or well-differentiated cells, respectively. In adhesion experiments, bacteria were added to the cells for 2 or 4 hours. The number of attached bacteria was expressed as colony-forming units (CFUs, Caco-2 cells were counted in hematocytometer. Both bacterial strains used adhered better to well-differentiated than to nondifferentiated Caco-2 cells, however, the amount of Salmonella adhered to Caco-2 after 2 hours of contact was 12-fold higher in comparison to . paracasei and almost 27-fold higher after 4 hours of contact. Two types of experiments were done: coincubation (both bacteria were added to Caco-2 cells simultaneously, and preincubation (. paracasei was incubated with Caco-2 cells first, and then . enterica was added. In coincubation experiment, the presence of . paracasei decreased . enterica adhesion by 4-fold and in preincubation experiment even 7-fold. Generally, Lactobacillus spent culture supernatants (SCSs acted weaker as inhibitors of Salmonella adhesion in comparison to the whole . paracasei culture in coincubation experiment. In conclusion, the displacement of pathogens by lactic acid bacteria and its secretions showed here depends on the time of bacteria-epithelial cell contact, and also on the stage of Caco-2 differentiation.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  20. Genomics and X-ray microanalysis indicate that Ca2+ and thiols mediate the aggregation and adhesion of Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of the genome sequence of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis, is accelerating important investigations concerning its pathogenicity. Plant vessel occlusion is critical for symptom development. The objective of the present study was to search for information that would help to explain the adhesion of X. fastidiosa cells to the xylem. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion may occur without the fastidium gum, an exopolysaccharide produced by X. fastidiosa, and X-ray microanalysis demonstrated the presence of elemental sulfur both in cells grown in vitro and in cells found inside plant vessels, indicating that the sulfur signal is generated by the pathogen surface. Calcium and magnesium peaks were detected in association with sulfur in occluded vessels. We propose an explanation for the adhesion and aggregation process. Thiol groups, maintained by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, could be active on the surface of the bacteria and appear to promote cell-cell aggregation by forming disulfide bonds with thiol groups on the surface of adjacent cells. The enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase has been shown to be an auxiliary component in the adhesiveness of some human pathogens. The negative charge conferred by the ionized thiol group could of itself constitute a mechanism of adhesion by allowing the formation of divalent cation bridges between the negatively charged bacteria and predominantly negatively charged xylem walls.

  1. An extract of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs 7630) inhibits in situ adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittschier, N; Faller, G; Hensel, A

    2007-04-01

    Root extract from Pelargonium sidoides DC is used therapeutically as antimicrobial agent against infections of the respiratory system. In order to elucidate possible modes of actions we investigated the influence of P. sidoides root extract on microbial adhesion with Helicobacter pylori as model microorganism, a germ with a strong adherence to human stomach tissue. In an in-situ anti-adhesion assay intact human stomach tissue from patient resectates was incubated with fluorescent-labelled bacteria. Epithelial adhesion occurred in untreated samples and was quantified by fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of the bacteria with Pelargonium extract showed good anti-adhesive activity. The antiadhesive effect was clearly dose-dependent in a range from 0.001 to 10 mg/ml. Within agar diffusion-test the extract had no direct cytotoxicity against H. pylori. The results show that the root extract from Pelargonium sidoides is a potent anti-adhesive agent against H. pylori and could therefore be a useful choice to avoid the first step of a bacterial infection.

  2. Bacterial cellulose and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin membranes for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuyu; Qiu, Liying; Cui, Jing; Wei, Qufu

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin (BC-Vac) membranes were successfully produced in large scale. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinum. BC-Vac membranes were prepared by immersing BC in vaccarin solution. The surface morphologies of BC and BC-Vac membranes were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscopy (AFM). The images showed that BC-Vac exhibited the characteristic 3D nanofibrillar network of BC matrix but there was adhesion between fibers. The mechanical properties of BC and BC-Vac membranes were evaluated and the results indicated that the adding of drug vaccarin into the BC membranes increased the malleability indicated by the increment in elongation at break compared with BC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was conducted to confirm the incorporation of vaccarin in BC-Vac and investigate the hydroxyl interactions between BC and drug vaccarin. Cell viability and cell attachment studies demonstrated that BC and BC-Vac membranes had no cytotoxicity and could be a good carrier for cell growth. The wound healing performance was examined in vivo by rat skin models. Histological observations revealed that wounds treated with BC-Vac epithelialized and regenerated faster than treated with BC. Therefore, BC-Vac was considered as a potential candidate for wound dressing materials.

  3. Adhesion molecules in experimental phacoanaphylactic endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, G O; Lee, S; Mulligan, M S; Wolter, J R; Smith, C W; Ward, P A; Marak, G E

    1992-11-01

    Intraocular accumulation of inflammatory neutrophils is an important feature of experimental phacoanaphylactic endophthalmitis (EPE). Increasing evidence suggests that localization of neutrophils to the site of inflammation requires the participation of neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecules. These studies were undertaken to determine if blocking of adhesion molecules on neutrophils (CD18) or endothelium (ELAM-1) could attenuate EPE in Lewis rats. Treatment of experimental animals with anti-CD18 or anti-ELAM-1 significantly suppressed intraocular neutrophil accumulation, retinal hemorrhage, and vasculitis, and attenuated retinal edema formation by 48% and 70%, respectively. These observations demonstrate that antibodies directed against adhesion molecules on the neutrophil (CD18) or the vascular endothelial cell (ELAM-1) exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, resulting in a striking amelioration of injury in EPE in rats.

  4. Posterior adhesive composite resin: a historic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusayama, T

    1990-11-01

    Since development of the BIS-GMA composite resin, there have been many innovations to improve the physical properties for posterior use. Subsequent development of a caries detector and chemically adhesive composite resin has further revolutionally raised the value of composite resin restoration, replacing the traditional restorative system of mechanical approach by the new system of biological approach. In this system only the infected irreversibly deteriorated insensitive tissue, stainable with the caries detector, is removed painlessly. The cavity is immediately filled with the composite resin with no further tissue reduction for retention or resistance form or extension for prevention. Both enamel and dentin walls are etched by a single etchant without lining. The chemical adhesion to the cavity margin and wall minimizes the marginal failure in size and prevalence and prevents secondary caries penetration along the wall. The chemically adhesive composite resin is thus a useful restorative material much kinder to teeth than amalgam.

  5. Reliability Analysis of Adhesive Bonded Scarf Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Lund, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    A probabilistic model for the reliability analysis of adhesive bonded scarfed lap joints subjected to static loading is developed. It is representative for the main laminate in a wind turbine blade subjected to flapwise bending. The structural analysis is based on a three dimensional (3D) finite...... the FEA model, and a sensitivity analysis on the influence of various geometrical parameters and material properties on the maximum stress is conducted. Because the yield behavior of many polymeric structural adhesives is dependent on both deviatoric and hydrostatic stress components, different ratios...... of the compressive to tensile adhesive yield stresses in the failure criterion are considered. It is shown that the chosen failure criterion, the scarf angle and the load are significant for the assessment of the probability of failure....

  6. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces.

  7. On-Demand Removal of Bacterial Biofilms via Shape Memory Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Lee, Sang Won; Buffington, Shelby Lois; Henderson, James H; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-08-24

    Bacterial biofilms are a major cause of chronic infections and biofouling; however, effective removal of established biofilms remains challenging. Here we report a new strategy for biofilm control using biocompatible shape memory polymers with defined surface topography. These surfaces can both prevent bacterial adhesion and remove established biofilms upon rapid shape change with moderate increase of temperature, thereby offering more prolonged antifouling properties. We demonstrate that this strategy can achieve a total reduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by 99.9% compared to the static flat control. It was also found effective against biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and an uropathogenic strain of Escherichia coli.

  8. Human dental pulp stem cell behavior using natural nanotolith/bacterial cellulose scaffolds for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyveira, Gabriel Molina; Acasigua, Gerson Arisoly Xavier; Costa, Ligia Maria Manzine; Scher, Cristiane Regina; Xavier Filho, Lauro; Pranke, Patricia Helena Lucas; Basmaji, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Adhesion and Viability study with human dental pulp stem cell using natural nanotolith/bacterial cellulose scaffolds for regenerative medicine are presented at first time in this work. Nanotolith, are osteoinductors, i.e., they stimulate bone regeneration, enabling higher cells migration for bone tissue regeneration formation. This is mainly because nanotoliths are rich minerals present in the internal ear of bony fish. In addition, are part of a system which acts as a depth sensor and balance, acting as a sound vibrations detector and considered essential for the bone mineralization process, as in hydroxiapatites. Nanotoliths influence in bacterial cellulose was analyzed using transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results shows that fermentation process and nanotoliths agglomeration decrease initial human dental pulp stem cell adhesion however tested bionanocomposite behavior has cell viability increase over time.

  9. Study on Modification of Octyl-α-Cyanoacrylate Medical Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective:In order that the adhesive character could be improved to modify the octyl-α-cyanoacrylate(OCA) medical adhesive.Methods:Suitable modifiers involving polycaprolactone(PCL),dibutyl phthalate (DBP),dioctyl phthalate(DOP) and poly octyl methacrylat(POMA) have been chosen to modify the OCA adhesive,then tensile shear strength and adhesive strength are tested to evaluate the bond character of adhesives.Results:The PCL group's tensile shear strength and adhesive strength in normal temperature are descen...

  10. Surface tension driven shaping of adhesive microfluidic channel walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janting, Jakob; Storm, Elisabeth K.; Geschke, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of making microfluidic channels with different wall geometries using adjacent lines of dispensed adhesive between substrates has been studied. Important parameters for the geometry have been identified to be: surface tension (adhesive / substrates), adhesive viscosity / thixotropy......, line height and distance, and temperature. Focus of the work has been on predicting the equilibrium geometries with FEM simulations using as input measured adhesive wetting angles, different adhesive line distances and height. The studied substrates are glass microscope slides, PEEK and PMMA....... The studied adhesives are DYMAX 9-20318-F, 3070, 9001 version 3.5, and Sylgard 184 PDMS....

  11. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  12. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  13. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Amri Saleh

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP is an infection of the ascitic fluid without obvious intra-abdominal source of sepsis; usually complicates advanced liver disease. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial: low ascitic protein-content, which reflects defi-cient ascitic fluid complement and hence, reduced opsonic activity is thought to be the most important pathogenic factor. Frequent and prolonged bacteremia has been considered as another pertinent cause of SBP. This disease is associated with high mortality and recurrence. Therefore, orompt recognition and institution of therapy and plan of prophylaxis is vital.

  14. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  15. Coatings against corrosion and microbial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegdi, J.; Szabo, T.; Al-Taher, F.; Pfeifer, E.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A. [Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59/67 (Hungary)

    2010-12-15

    A systematic study on anti-corrosion and anti-fouling effect of hydrophobic Langmuir-Blodgett and self-assembled molecular layers deposited on metal surfaces, as well as anti-microbial adhesion properties of coatings with biocide is presented. Both types of efficiencies produced by LB films are enhanced by Fe{sup 3+} ions built in the molecular film. The quaternary ammonium type biocide embedded into the cross-linked gelatin decreased significantly the microbial adhesion, the biofilm formation. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Contact radius of stamps in reversible adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A mechanics model is developed for the contact radius of stamps with pyramid tips in transfer printing.This is important to the realization of reversible control of adhesion,which has many important applications,such as climbing robots,medical tapes,and transfer printing of electronics.The contact radius is shown to scale linearly with the work of adhesion between the stamp and the contacting surface,and inversely with the plane-strain modulus of the stamp. It also depends on the cone angle and tip radiu...

  17. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  18. Requirement for development of dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Alan Boyde and his colleagues first described smear layers-covered dental hard tissues. Later, David Eick and his group examined smear layer-covered dentin and showed how acid-labile are smear layers. A superior bond strength has come to be provided for the resin-dentin interface in the current dental adhesive systems as a result that the acid-etching treatment for the enamel/dentin was examined to remove smear layers. Moreover, latest adhesive systems which gave top priority to convenience i...

  19. Adhesion of PBO Fiber in Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The high mechanical and thermal performance of poly p-phenylene- 2, 6-benzobisoxazole ( PBO ) fiber provides great potential applications as reinforcement fibers for composites. A composite of PBO fiber and epoxy resin has excellent electrical insulation properties, therefore, it is considered to be the best choice for the reinforcement in high magnetic field coils for pulsed magnetic fields up to 100 T.However, poor adhesion between PBO fiber and matrix is found because of the chemically inactive and/or relatively smooth surface of the reinforcement fiber preventing efficient chemical bonding in the interface, which is a challenging issue to improve mechanical properties. Here, we report the surface modification of PBO fibers by ultraviolet (UV)irradiation, O2 and NH3 plasma, as well as acidic treatments. The interfacial adhesion strength values of all the treatments show the similar level as determined for aramid fibers by pull-out tests, a significant impact on fibermatrix-adhesion was not achieved. The surface free energy and roughness are increased for both sized and extracted fibers after plasma treatments together with maleic anhydride grafting. The sized fiber shows marginal improvement in adhesion strength and no change in fiber tensile strength because of the barrier effect of the finish.For the extracted fiber, different surface treatments either show no apparent effect or cause reduction in adhesion strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography analysis of the fracture surfaces proved adhesive failure at the fiber surface. The fiber surface roughness is increased and more surface flaws are induced, which could result in coarse interface structures when the treated fiber surface has no adequate wetting and functional groups. The adhesion failure is further confirmed by similar adhesion strength and compression shear strength values when the fiber was embedded in various epoxy resins with different temperature behavior. The tensile strength of fiber

  20. Economic Impact of the Use of an Absorbable Adhesion Barrier in Preventing Adhesions Following Open Gynecologic Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanjoy; Carlton, Rashad; Weisberg, Martin; Clark, Ryan; Migliaccio-Walle, Kristen; Chapa, Hector

    2015-01-01

    We used an economic model to assess the impact of using the GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier for reducing the incidence of postoperative adhesions in open surgical gynecologic procedures. Caesarean section surgery, hysterectomy, myomectomy, ovarian surgery, tubal surgery, and endometriosis surgery were modeled with and without the use of GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier. Incremental GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier material costs, medical costs arising from complications, and adhesion-related readmissions were considered. GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier use was assumed in 75% of all procedures. The economic impact was reported during a 3-year period from a United States hospital perspective. Assuming 100 gynecologic surgeries of each type and an average of one GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier sheet per surgery, a net savings of $540,823 with GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier during 3 years is estimated. In addition, GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier use resulted in 62 fewer cases of patients developing adhesions. Although the use of GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier added $137,250 in material costs, this was completely offset by the reduction in length of stay ($178,766 savings), fewer adhesion-related readmissions ($458,220 savings), and operating room cost ($41,078 savings). Adoption of the GYNECARE INTERCEED absorbable adhesion barrier for appropriate gynecologic surgeries would likely result in significant savings for hospitals, driven primarily by clinical patient benefits in terms of decreased length of stay and adhesion-related readmissions.

  1. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  2. Strong adhesion and friction coupling in hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays for dry adhesive applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2012-04-01

    The adhesion and friction coupling of hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays was investigated with a hierarchical multiscale modeling approach. At device level, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays with laterally distributed segments on top were analyzed via finite element methods to determine the macroscopic adhesion and friction force coupling. At the nanoscale, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to explore the origin of the adhesion enhancement due to the existence of the laterally distributed CNTs. The results show interfacial adhesion force is drastically promoted by interfacial friction force when a single lateral CNT is being peeled from an amorphous carbon substrate. By fitting with experiments, we find that under shearing loadings the maximum interfacial adhesion force is increased by a factor of ~5, compared to that under normal loadings. Pre-existing surface asperities of the substrate have proven to be the source of generating large interfacial friction, which in turn results in an enhanced adhesion. The critical peeling angles derived from the continuum and nano- levels are comparable to those of geckos and other synthetic adhesives. Our analysis indicates that the adhesion enhancement factor of the hierarchically structured VA-CNT arrays could be further increased by uniformly orienting the laterally distributed CNTs on top. Most importantly, a significant buckling of the lateral CNT at peeling front is captured on the molecular level, which provides a basis for the fundamental understanding of local deformation, and failure mechanisms of nanofibrillar structures. This work gives an insight into the durability issues that prevent the success of artificial dry adhesives.

  3. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Leaf Extract on Staphylococcal Adhesion and Invasion in Bovine Udder Epidermal Tissue Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auemphon Mordmuang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bovine mastitis is one of the most important infectious diseases in dairy herds, and staphylococci are the most important etiologic agents of this disease. Antibiotics and chemical agents used in livestock for prevention and cure of the disease can accumulate in milk and give rise to food safety concerns. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract was studied as an alternative approach to reduce the bacterial infections. The ethanolic extract of this plant demonstrated antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values as low as 16–64 μg/mL against staphylococcal isolates. In addition, the extract had an effect on the bacterial cell surface properties by increasing its hydrophobicity in a concentration dependent manner. To further extend the antibacterial efficacy, silver nanoparticles synthesized with the extract, a pure rhodomyrtone, and liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone were applied and their inhibitory effects on bacterial adhesion and invasion were determined by ex vivo study in a bovine udder epidermal tissue model. These agents exerted remarkable antibacterial activity against staphylococci and decreased the adhesion of the bacterial cells to the tissues. These results supported that R. tomentosa ethanolic extract could be applied as an alternative agent for bovine udder care in dairy farms.

  4. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Leaf Extract on Staphylococcal Adhesion and Invasion in Bovine Udder Epidermal Tissue Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordmuang, Auemphon; Shankar, Shiv; Chethanond, Usa; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-10-15

    Bovine mastitis is one of the most important infectious diseases in dairy herds, and staphylococci are the most important etiologic agents of this disease. Antibiotics and chemical agents used in livestock for prevention and cure of the disease can accumulate in milk and give rise to food safety concerns. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract was studied as an alternative approach to reduce the bacterial infections. The ethanolic extract of this plant demonstrated antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 16-64 μg/mL against staphylococcal isolates. In addition, the extract had an effect on the bacterial cell surface properties by increasing its hydrophobicity in a concentration dependent manner. To further extend the antibacterial efficacy, silver nanoparticles synthesized with the extract, a pure rhodomyrtone, and liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone were applied and their inhibitory effects on bacterial adhesion and invasion were determined by ex vivo study in a bovine udder epidermal tissue model. These agents exerted remarkable antibacterial activity against staphylococci and decreased the adhesion of the bacterial cells to the tissues. These results supported that R. tomentosa ethanolic extract could be applied as an alternative agent for bovine udder care in dairy farms.

  5. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF ADHESIVE PROPERTIES OF LACTOBACILLUS - CLINICAL ISOLATES AND COMPONENTS OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavryk G.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli detected in all biotopes of digestive tract, starting from the mouth and ending with the colon, is the dominant flora of vaginal biotope. Their adhesiveness to epithelial cells leads to survive in conditions of microorganism biotopes and to form biofilm, thus mediating passive antagonism against conditionally pathogenic bacteria. Colonization resistance provides a set of mechanisms that provide individual anatomical stability and normal microflora. It is experimentally confirmed that lactobacilli provide biotopes colonization resistance of the human body due to competitive inhibition and coagregation of allochthonous microorganisms. It is important to consider the fact that probiotics should not compete with autochthonous microflora, which is always more physiological for each individual than most valuable exogenous bacteria, even with the greatest potential beneficial properties. The probiotic activity should be directed to the main target bacterial therapy, which is to restore physiological ecological community. The aim of research was to compare the adhesive properties of lactobacilli - clinical isolates of probiotic preparations and ingredients to the buccal epithelium cells and erythrocytes 0 (1 of the blood group system AB0 person. Materials and methods. The object of the research were clinical strains of Lactobacillus spp. selected from the mouth, intestines, vagina healthy people. At the the species identification of lactic acid bacteria were taken into account morphological and cultural properties, aerotolerance. The carbohydrate profile was determined using the test system API-50SN L (Bio-Merieux, lack of catalase activity. The ability of allocated bacteria to adhesion were observed in erythrocytes 0 (1 blood and buccal epithelium cells by human Brilis VI and oth. For comparison were used probiotic strains L. rlantarum 8PA3, L.acidophilus KS 400, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938. The effectiveness of adhesion was assessed

  7. Anti-Adhesive Activities of Flavan-3-ols and Proanthocyanidins in the Interaction of Group A-Streptococci and Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Janecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells is a key step in infections, allowing subsequent colonization, invasion and internalization of pathogens into tissues. Anti-adhesive agents are therefore potential prophylactic tools against bacterial infections. The range of anti-adhesive compounds is largely confined to carbohydrate analogues. Tannins are generously recognized as potent antimicrobials, but little data exist on their anti-adherence potency. Using a model for mucosal pathogenesis with labeled group A-streptococci (GAS and human laryngeal HEp-2 cells, a series of flavan-3-ols (epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate and highly purified and chemically characterized proanthocyanidin samples including procyanidins based on epicatechin, catechin or ‘mixed’ constituent flavanyl units, prodelphinidins made up of (epigallocatechin monomeric unts as well as oligomers possessing A-type units in their molecules was evaluated for anti-adhesive effects. Reduced microbial adherence was observed exclusively for prodelphinidins, suggesting that pyrogallol-type elements, i.e., (epigallocatechin units are important structural features. This is the first report on structure-activity relationships regarding the anti-adhesive potency of proanthocyanidins. In addition, the structures of the first chemically defined proanthocyanidins from Pelargonium sidoides are disclosed.

  8. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  9. Biochemical composition of the marine conditioning film: Implications for bacterial adhesion

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Bhosle, N.B.

    significant positive correlation with CFCHO. Conversely, SS-10 (r = 70.69) showed a significant negative correlation with CFCHO. Backward multiple linear regression analysis indicated that CFCHO were the most predictive component of the conditioning film...

  10. Adhesion of vaginal microorganisms to epithelial cells and its association with Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Joana Isabel Reis

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado integrado em Engenharia Biomédica (área de especialização em Engenharia Clínica) A vaginose bacteriana (VB) é um distúrbio da flora vaginal normal e um importante problema de saúde pública em mulheres de idade reprodutiva. A VB é caracterizada pela substituição de lactobacilos vaginais por microrganismos, predominantemente, anaeróbios. Desconhecendo-se a etiologia da VB, duas hipóteses tentam explicar esta condição: a hipótese polimicrobiana, que infere...

  11. Bacterial Adhesion to Diamond-like Carbon as Compared to Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soininen, Antti; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Konttinen, Yrjo T.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are suitable candidates for application on biomedical devices and implants, due to their high hardness, low friction, high wear and corrosion resistance, chemical inertness, smoothness, and tissue and blood compatibility. However, most s

  12. Influence of a chitosan on oral bacterial adhesion and growth in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; Engels, Eefje; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, mechanical plaque control without chemical support is insufficient to prevent oral diseases, and an ongoing quest exists for new antimicrobials for use in oral healthcare. Chitosans are polycationic, naturally occurring antimicrobials that are rapidly finding their way into oral healthcar

  13. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  14. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Characterization of Structural Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    neat resin properties 20. ABSTRACT (Cainlnuo OR revaWco aide II necessay amd identify br blck number) Measurements of the nonlinear viscoelastic...which is utilized. 17. Key Words and Document Analysis. l7a. Descriptors Adhesives, nonlinear viscoelasticity, FM-73 and FM-300 neat resin properties 17b

  15. Discovery of low mucus adhesion surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2013-02-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous, and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge. Here, using a high throughput platform with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1h static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 h. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g mol⁻¹ to 1100 g mol⁻¹, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R²=0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized Hansen solubility parameter plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces.

  16. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  17. Adhesion to enamel, dentin, metal, and porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanca, J

    1994-01-01

    Adhesion has an inseparable association with cosmetic dentistry. The ability to bond well to tooth structure has allowed the placement of countless porcelain veneers and many ceramic inlays and onlays. Improved materials and techniques have offered clinicians the ability to place these restorations with skill and reliability. The past year has seen many developments and additions to the armamentarium of the cosmetic dentist. The compiled data have been placed in different sections to facilitate the learning process. Review of the following material will familiarize the clinician with the current state of the art in the adhesive aspect of cosmetic dentistry. The ability to employ adhesive techniques has revolutionized the practice of dentistry. Clinicians have at their command materials that allow the placement of thin pieces of ceramic onto tooth structure without shattering, the routine placement of composite materials into posterior teeth, the diminishing reliance on liners and bases, and lessened postoperative discomfort with the use of dentin bonding systems. It is, as previously noted, useful to separate the analyses of adhesion to each of the substrates. Advances continue to be made in each of these areas that although not necessarily facilitating treatment ease, improve the reliability of the procedure. This review attempts to highlight the significant literature of the previous year.

  18. Increased chondrocyte adhesion on nanotubular anodized titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kevin; Yao, Chang; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated increased osteoblast (bone-forming cells) functions (including adhesion, synthesis of intracellular collagen, alkaline phosphatase activity, and deposition of calcium-containing minerals) on titanium anodized to possess nanometer features compared with their unanodized counterparts. Such titanium materials were anodized to possess novel nanotubes also capable of drug delivery. Since titanium has not only experienced wide spread commercial use in orthopedic but also in cartilage applications, the objective of the present in vitro study was for the first time to investigate chondrocyte (cartilage synthesizing cells) functions on titanium anodized to possess nanotubes. For this purpose, titanium was anodized in dilute hydrofluoric acid at 20 V for 20 min. Results showed increased chondrocyte adhesion on anodized titanium with nanotube structures compared with unanodized titanium. Importantly, the present study also provided evidence why. Since material characterization studies revealed significantly greater nanometer roughness and similar chemistry as well as crystallinity between nanotubular anodized and unanodized titanium, the results of the present study highlight the importance of the nanometer roughness provided by anodized nanotubes on titanium for enhancing chondrocyte adhesion. In this manner, the results of the present in vitro study indicated that anodization might be a promising quick and inexpensive method to modify the surface of titanium-based implants to induce better chondrocyte adhesion for cartilage applications.

  19. Cell adhesion signalling in acute renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) remains a severe clinical problem with high mortality. Little progress has been made over the past two decades in preventing renal injury or reducing mortality. This thesis describes the research to investigate cell adhesion alterations during the pathopysiology of both isc

  20. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...

  1. Focal adhesions and assessment of cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; Klein, CL; Wagner, M; Kirkpatrick, CJ

    1999-01-01

    Focal adhesions are highly ordered assemblies of transmembrane receptors, extracellular matrix proteins, and a large number of cytoplasmic proteins, including structural proteins, as well as tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates. They are now accepted as a prime component of signal tr

  2. Guest editorial, special issue on biobased adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article is a preface for a special issue that showcases significant developments on adhesives made with biorenewable materials, such as agricultural crops (soybean, corn), plant extractives (bark, tannins), and marine sources (mussels). This collection of pioneering studies and reviews on bioba...

  3. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  4. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1 page)

  5. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centrefor Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1/2 page)

  6. Strong, reversible underwater adhesion via gecko-inspired hydrophobic fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltannia, Babak; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-12-24

    Strong, reversible underwater adhesion using gecko-inspired surfaces is achievable through the use of a hydrophobic structural material and does not require surface modification or suction cup effects for this adhesion to be effective. Increased surface energy can aid in dry adhesion in an air environment but strongly degrades wet adhesion via reduction of interfacial energy underwater. A direct comparison of structurally identical but chemically different mushroom shaped fibers shows that strong, reversible adhesion, even in a fully wetted, stable state, is feasible underwater if the structural material of the fibers is hydrophobic and the mating surface is not strongly hydrophilic. The exact adhesion strength will be a function of the underwater interfacial energy between surfaces and the specific failure modes of individual fibers. This underwater adhesion has been calculated to be potentially greater than the dry adhesion for specific combinations of hydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Miller, David C.

    2016-06-16

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  8. The evolution of adhesiveness as a social adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Thomas; Doulcier, Guilhem; De Monte, Silvia

    2015-11-27

    Cellular adhesion is a key ingredient to sustain collective functions of microbial aggregates. Here, we investigate the evolutionary origins of adhesion and the emergence of groups of genealogically unrelated cells with a game-theoretical model. The considered adhesiveness trait is costly, continuous and affects both group formation and group-derived benefits. The formalism of adaptive dynamics reveals two evolutionary stable strategies, at each extreme on the axis of adhesiveness. We show that cohesive groups can evolve by small mutational steps, provided the population is already endowed with a minimum adhesiveness level. Assortment between more adhesive types, and in particular differential propensities to leave a fraction of individuals ungrouped at the end of the aggregation process, can compensate for the cost of increased adhesiveness. We also discuss the change in the social nature of more adhesive mutations along evolutionary trajectories, and find that altruism arises before directly beneficial behavior, despite being the most challenging form of cooperation.

  9. The effects of current dentinal adhesives on the dentinal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Eick, J D

    1994-12-01

    The effects of the dentinal surface treatments from six currently available commercial dentinal adhesives are presented. The adhesives are All-Bond 2, etched and unetched, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multipurpose, Tenure Solution, and Adhesive By Choice. Unerupted third molar human teeth were sectioned and treated with the appropriate adhesive according to the manufacturer's directions. After the teeth were treated, they were processed for observation by scanning electron microscopy. Scanning-electron microscopic photomicrographs were made of each step in the process to show the effects of the constituents, including the adhesives, on the dentinal surface. For All-Bond 2, unetched, the smear layer was not removed before the primer and the adhesive were applied. The primer for Prisma Universal Bond 3 altered the smear layer by reacting with it but did not produce a large demineralized zone in the dentin. All the other adhesives did remove the smear layer before the tooth was treated with the primer and adhesive.

  10. [Osteosynthesis of mandible by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalyan, G; Zalyan, G

    2006-12-01

    The author presents the method of mandibular fractures treatment--osteosynthesis by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste. The use of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste accelerates the incarnation of wound and prevents the surgical complications.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in the fabrication and adhesion testing of biomimetic dry adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2010-10-01

    In the past two years, there have been a large number of publications on the topic of biomimetic dry adhesives from modeling, fabrication and testing perspectives. We review and compare the most recent advances in fabrication and testing of these materials. While there is increased convergence and consensus as to what makes a good dry adhesive, the fabrication of these materials is still challenging, particularly for anisotropic or hierarchal designs. Although qualitative comparisons between different adhesive designs can be made, quantifying the exact performance and rating each design is significantly hampered by the lack of standardized testing methods. Manufacturing dry adhesives, which can reliably adhere to rough surfaces, show directional and self-cleaning behavior and are relatively simple to manufacture, is still very challenging—great strides by multiple research groups have however made these goals appear achievable within the next few years.

  12. Adhesive small bowel adhesions obstruction: Evolutions in diagnosis, management and prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fausto Catena; Salomone Di Saverio; Federico Coccolini; Luca Ansaloni; Belinda De Simone; Massimo Sartelli; Harry Van Goor

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions following abdominal surgery represent a major unsolved problem. They are the first cause of small bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation, water-soluble contrast followthrough and computed tomography scan. For patients presenting no signs of strangulation, peritonitis or severe intestinal impairment there is good evidence to support non-operative management. Open surgery is the preferred method for the surgical treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction, in case of suspected strangulation or after failed conservative management, but laparoscopy is gaining widespread acceptance especially in selected group of patients. "Good" surgical technique and anti-adhesive barriers are the main current concepts of adhesion prevention. We discuss current knowledge in modern diagnosis and evolving strategies for management and prevention that are leading to stratified care for patients.

  13. Bioresorbable adhesion barrier for reducing the severity of postoperative cardiac adhesions: Focus on REPEL-CV®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Haensig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Martin Haensig, Friedrich Wilhelm Mohr, Ardawan Julian RastanDepartment of Cardiac Surgery, Heart Center, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, GermanyAbstract: Treatment of a number of congenital heart defects often necessitates staged surgical intervention. In addition, substantial improvements in postoperative cardiac care and more liberal use of biological valve substitutes have resulted in many adult patients surviving to become potential candidates for reoperations to repair or replace valves or to undergo additional revascularization procedures. In all these scenarios, surgeons are confronted with cardiac adhesions, leading to an increased surgical risk. Thus, bioresorbable adhesion barriers had become of increasing interest because they are easy to use, and safe and effective. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which REPEL-CV® prevents adhesive processes, as well as the development, design, and materials used, and also summarizes efficacy studies, clinical data, safety, and current role in therapy.Keywords: adhesion prevention, bioresorbable copolymer, cardiac reoperation

  14. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Michael

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m. This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body.

  15. Clinical Challenges on Adhesive Dentistry on its 60th Anniversary

    OpenAIRE

    Sartori MS, PhD, Neimar

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry allowed restoring lost tooth structures using Minimally Invasive direct or indirect bonded restorations. Adhesive systems and bonding techniques have been constantly evolving since the introduction of Sevriton Cavity Seal, in 1940 by Oskar Hagger. As we celebrate the 60th anniversary of adhesive dentistry in 2015 the future of the Minimally Invasive Adhesive Dentistry is more promising than ever. A better understanding of long-term resin-dentin bonds interaction is guiding ...

  16. Properties of Nano SiO2 Modified PVF Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN He-sheng; SUN Zhen-ya; XUE Li-hui

    2004-01-01

    Some properties of nano SiO2 modified PVF adhesive were studied. The experimental results show that nano SiO2 can improve the properties of PVF adhesive very well. Meanwhile the modification mechanism of nano SiO2 to PVF adhesive and the applications of this adhesive in paper-plastic composite, concrete and fireproof paint were discussed by using IR and XRD determination.

  17. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres...

  18. Inhibition of adhesion of S-fimbriated Escherichia coli to epithelial cells by meconium feces of breast fed and formula fed newborns - mucins are the major inhibitor component

    OpenAIRE

    Schroten, H; Lethen, A.; Hanisch, F.; Plogmann, R; Hacker, Jörg; Nobis-Bosch, R; Wahn, V

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the ability of meconium, feces from human milk-fed (HMF) newborns, and feces from formula-fed (FF) newborns to inhibit adhesion of S-fimbriated E. coli to human buccal epithelial cells. S-fimbriae are a common property of E.·coli strains causing sepsis and meningitis in neonates. Meconium had the highest content of neuraminic acid and the strongest inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion. HMF also exerted high inhibitory activity while FF was markedly less active: To achieve i...

  19. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay.

  20. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-06-29

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility.

  1. Cell Adhesion Modification of Streptococcus viridians in the Presence of Xylitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmacher, Jason; Vidakovich, Blair; Giangrande, Michael; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-10-01

    There is scientific documentation that those who chew gum sweetened by the sugar alcohol xylitol report a dramatically lower incident of both dental caries and otitis media compared to those who chew conventional gum sweetened by sucrose. An explanation contends that xylitol interferes with the ability of Streptococcus viridian (SV) to form biofilms which is a necessary precursor to the bacteria's ability to damage human tissues. We have used atomic force microscopy to study the cell wall/fimbria properties at the nanonewton level in both the presence and absence of xylitol. The first set of measurements used varying concentrations of xylitol incorporated within the incubation medium. The second used non-xylitol grown bacteria, the xylitol was added externally at various concentrations. Our study suggests that growing SV with xylitol reduces their ability to adhere together. Additionally, externally added xylitol showed grouping of cell adhesion to a relatively narrow nanonewton spread that is concentration dependent. Measurement of the adhesion properties of the bacterial cell wall have found that there is a dramatic increase in the cell wall's firmness which simultaneously accompanied a decrease in its ability to support adhesion, even at very low concentrations of xylitol.

  2. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  3. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed.

  4. The talin head domain reinforces integrin-mediated adhesion by promoting adhesion complex stability and clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Ellis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development.

  5. Enhancing the Adhesive Strength of a Plywood Adhesive Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra B. Adhikari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current production of wood composites relies mostly on formaldehyde-based adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF and phenol formaldehyde (PF resins. As these resins are produced from non-renewable resources, and there are some ongoing issues with possible health hazard due to formaldehyde emission from such products, the purpose of this research was to develop a formaldehyde-free plywood adhesive utilizing waste protein as a renewable feedstock. The feedstock for this work was specified risk material (SRM, which is currently being disposed of either by incineration or by landfilling. In this report, we describe a technology for utilization of SRM for the development of an environmentally friendly plywood adhesive. SRM was thermally hydrolyzed using a Canadian government-approved protocol, and the peptides were recovered from the hydrolyzate. The recovered peptides were chemically crosslinked with polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE resin to develop an adhesive system for bonding of plywood specimens. The effects of crosslinking time, peptides/crosslinking agent ratio, and temperature of hot pressing of plywood specimens on the strength of formulated adhesives were investigated. Formulations containing as much as 78% (wt/wt peptides met the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials specifications of minimum dry and soaked shear strength requirement for UF resin type adhesives. Under the optimum conditions tested, the peptides–PAE resin-based formulations resulted in plywood specimens having comparable dry as well as soaked shear strength to that of commercial PF resin.

  6. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  7. Rheology and adhesion of poly(acrylic acid)/laponite nanocomposite hydrogels as biocompatible adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Muxian; Li, Li; Sun, Yimin; Xu, Jun; Guo, Xuhong; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2014-02-18

    Biocompatible nanocomposite hydrogels (NC gels) consisting of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and nanosized clay (Laponite) were successfully synthesized by in situ free-radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) in aqueous solutions of Laponite. The obtained NC gels were uniform and transparent. Their viscosity, storage modulus G', and loss modulus G″ increased significantly upon increasing the content of Laponite and the dose of AA, while exhibiting a maximum with increasing the neutralization degree of AA. They showed tunable adhesion by changing the dose of Laponite and monomer as well as the neutralization degree of AA, as determined by 180° peel strength measurement. The maximal adhesion was shown when reaching a balance between cohesion and fluidity. A homemade Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) instrument was employed to study the surface adhesion behavior of the NC gels. The combination of peel strength, rheology, and JKR measurements offers the opportunity of insight into the mechanism of adhesion of hydrogels. The NC gels with tunable adhesion should be ideal candidates for dental adhesive, wound dressing, and tissue engineering.

  8. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  9. Photopolymerizable phosphate acrylates as comonomers in dental adhesives with or without triclosan monomer units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melinte, Violeta [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Buruiana, Tinca, E-mail: tbur@icmpp.ro [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Aldea, Horia [Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, Iasi (Romania); Matiut, Simona [Praxis Medical Investigations, 33 Independence, 700102 Iasi (Romania); Silion, Mihaela; Buruiana, Emil C. [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate diacrylates (CO-DAP, TMP-DAP) based on castor oil or trimethylolpropane were synthesized and evaluated in dental adhesive formulations in comparison with 3-acryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate phosphate (AMP-P). In an attempt to promote antibacterial activity, another photopolymerizable monomer (TCS-UMA) containing 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol moiety (triclosan) was prepared and incorporated in adhesive resins. Each of these monomers had a molecular structure confirmed by spectral methods. The photopolymerization rates for monomers (0.063–0.088 s{sup −1}) were lower than those determined in the monomer combinations (0.116–0.158 s{sup −1}) incorporating phosphate diacrylate (11 wt.%), BisGMA (33 wt.%), TEGDMA (10 wt.%), UDMA (10 wt.%) and HEMA (15 wt.%), the degree of conversion varying between 63.4 and 74.5%. The formed copolymers showed high values for water sorption (18.65–57.02 μg/mm{sup 3}) and water solubility (3.51–13.38 μg/mm{sup 3}), and the contact angle was dependent on the presence of CO-DAP (θ{sub F1}: 66.67°), TMP-DAP (θ{sub F2}: 55.05°) or AMP-P (θ{sub F3}: 52.90°) in the photocrosslinked specimens compared to the sample without phosphate monomer (θ{sub F4}: 82.14°). The scanning electron microscopy image of the dentin–resin composite interface after applying our F1 formulation (pH: 4.1) and its light-curing for 20 s supports the evidence of the formation of the hybrid layer with the tooth structure created by self-etching approach, with no gaps or cracks in the adhesive. A comparative analysis of the adhesion achieved with commercial adhesive systems (Single Bond Universal, C-Bond) rather indicates similarities than differences between them. The addition of triclosan methacrylate (1 wt.%) into the formulation inhibited the bacterial growth of the Streptococcus mutans and Escherichia coli in the direct contact area due to the covalently linked antibacterial monomer. - Highlights: • Synthesis of

  10. Soluble adhesion molecules in human cancers: sources and fates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, J.W.J. van; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Ruiter, D.J.; Swart, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules endow tumor cells with the necessary cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. As such, adhesion molecules are involved in cell signalling, proliferation and tumor growth. Rearrangements in the adhesion repertoire allow tumor cells to migrate, invade and form metastases. Be

  11. Fabrication and characterization of hierarchical nanostructured smart adhesion surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungoo; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-04-15

    The mechanics of fibrillar adhesive surfaces of biological systems such as a Lotus leaf and a gecko are widely studied due to their unique surface properties. The Lotus leaf is a model for superhydrophobic surfaces, self-cleaning properties, and low adhesion. Gecko feet have high adhesion due to the high micro/nanofibrillar hierarchical structures. A nanostructured surface may exhibit low adhesion or high adhesion depending upon fibrillar density, and it presents the possibility of realizing eco-friendly surface structures with desirable adhesion. The current research, for the first time uses a patterning technique to fabricate smart adhesion surfaces: single- and two-level hierarchical synthetic adhesive structure surfaces with various fibrillar densities and diameters that allows the observation of either the Lotus or gecko adhesion effects. Contact angles of the fabricated structured samples were measured to characterize their wettability, and contamination experiments were performed to study for self-cleaning ability. A conventional and a glass ball attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip were used to obtain the adhesive forces via force-distance curves to study scale effect. A further increase of the adhesive forces on the samples was achieved by applying an adhesive to the surfaces.

  12. Anisotropic Adhesion Properties of Triangular-Tip-Shaped Micropillars

    KAUST Repository

    Kwak, Moon Kyu

    2011-06-01

    Directional dry adhesive microstructures consisting of high-density triangular-tip-shaped micropillars are described. The wide-tip structures allow for unique directional shear adhesion properties with respect to the peeling direction, along with relatively high normal adhesion. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Spontaneous and cytokine induced basophil adhesion evaluated by microtiter assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Sha; Poulsen, Lars K; Reimert, Claus Michael

    2002-01-01

    by the histamine content of the adhering basophils. The spontaneous adhesion to fibronectin was higher than to laminin and collagen type I. Both spontaneous adhesion to fibronectin and interleukin-3 (IL-3), interleukin-5 (IL-5), granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced adhesion to BSA...

  14. Soy and cottonseed protein blends as wood adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an environmentally friendlier alternative to adhesives from petroleum feedstock, soy proteins are currently being formulated as wood adhesives. Cottonseed proteins have also been found to provide good adhesive properties. In at least some cases, cottonseed proteins appear to form greater shear ...

  15. A study of the antimicrobial properties of impression tray adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, D A

    1993-01-01

    Three impression tray adhesives were tested for their antimicrobial actions on three bacteria strains used for disinfectant studies. The colony forming unit (CFU) counts from plating the adhesive-exposed bacteria showed a significant reduction in number compared with the CFU of the controls. Statistical analyses confirmed the significant reduction (p impression tray adhesives can help prevent cross contamination.

  16. Improved stress prediction in adhesive bonded optical components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugd, J. de; Voert, M.J.A. te; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.; Tabak, E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in optomechanical structures for bonding optical components to their mounts. The main advantage of using adhesives is the excellent strength to weight ratio. Adhesive bonding is seen as a desirable joining technique as it allows for greater flexibility in design. A disadvan

  17. 7 CFR 2902.16 - Adhesive and mastic removers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adhesive and mastic removers. 2902.16 Section 2902.16... Items § 2902.16 Adhesive and mastic removers. (a) Definition. Solvent products formulated for use in removing asbestos, carpet, and tile mastics as well as adhesive materials, including glue, tape, and...

  18. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  19. Propolis can potentialise the anti-adhesion activity of proanthocyanidins on uropathogenic Escherichia coli in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavigne Jean-Philippe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli, the main bacteria found in recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI, is now frequently resistant to several currently used antibiotic treatments making new solutions essential. In this study, we evaluated the association propolis and proanthocyanidins type A to reduce bacterial anti-adhesion activity of E. coli on urothelial cells. Results This first double-blind, randomized, cross-over human trial included 5 volunteers that followed 6 different regimens with or without variable doses of cranberry and propolis with a washout period of at least 1 week between each regimen. Urine samples were collected at 0 h, 4-6 h, 12 h and 24 h after cranberry plus propolis or placebo capsule consumption. In vivo urinary bacterial anti-adhesion activity was assessed with a bioassay (a human T24 epithelial cell-line assay and an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model. HPLC-PDA-MS was used to detect propolis and cranberry compounds in urine. Bioassays indicated significant bacterial anti-adhesion activity in urine collected from volunteers who had consumed cranberry plus propolis powder compared to placebo (p E. coli strain presented a reduced ability to kill C. elegans after their growth in urine samples of patients who took cranberry plus propolis capsules. HPLC confirmed that propolis is excreted in urine. Conclusions This study presents an alternative to prevent recurrent UTI. Administration of PACs plus propolis once daily offers some protection against bacterial adhesion, bacterial multiplication and virulence in the urinary tract, representing an interesting new strategy to prevent recurrent UTI.

  20. Studying bacterial hydrophobicity and biofilm formation at liquid-liquid interfaces through interfacial rheology and pendant drop tensiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühs, P A; Böcker, L; Inglis, R F; Fischer, P

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial adsorption to interfaces is a key factor in biofilm formation. One major limitation to understanding biofilm formation and development is the accurate measurement of bacterial cell adhesion to hydrophobic interfaces. With this study, bacterial attachment and biofilm growth over time at water-oil interface was monitored through interfacial rheology and tensiometry. Five model bacteria (Pseudomonas putida KT2442, Pseudomonas putida W2, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis) were allowed to adsorb at the water-oil interface either in their non-growing or growing state. We found that we were able to observe the initial kinetics of bacterial attachment and the transient biofilm formation at the water-oil interface through interfacial rheology and tensiometry. Electrophoretic mobility measurements and bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) tests were performed to characterize the selected bacteria. To validate interfacial rheology and tensiometry measurements, we monitored biofilm formation utilizing both confocal laser scanning microscopy and light microscopy. Using this combination of techniques, we were able to observe the elasticity and tension development over time, from the first bacterial attachment up to biofilm formation.