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Sample records for bacterial adaptor membrane

  1. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way.

  2. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    OpenAIRE

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel co...

  3. The AP-1A and AP-1B clathrin adaptor complexes define biochemically and functionally distinct membrane domains

    OpenAIRE

    Fölsch, Heike; Pypaert, Marc; Maday, Sandra; Pelletier, Laurence; Mellman, Ira

    2003-01-01

    Most epithelial cells contain two AP-1 clathrin adaptor complexes. AP-1A is ubiquitously expressed and involved in transport between the TGN and endosomes. AP-1B is expressed only in epithelia and mediates the polarized targeting of membrane proteins to the basolateral surface. Both AP-1 complexes are heterotetramers and differ only in their 50-kD μ1A or μ1B subunits. Here, we show that AP-1A and AP-1B, together with their respective cargoes, define physically and functionally distinct membra...

  4. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  5. Filtration properties of bacterial cellulose membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Janika

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose has the same molecular formula as cellulose from plant origin, but it is characterized by several unique properties including high purity, crystallinity and mechanical strength. These properties are dependent on parameters such as the bacterial strain used, the cultivation conditions and post-growth processing. The possibility to achieve bacterial cellulose membranes with different properties by varying these parameters could make bacterial cellulose an interesting materi...

  6. The clathrin adaptor complexes as a paradigm for membrane-associated allostery

    OpenAIRE

    Canagarajah, Bertram J.; Ren, Xuefeng; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hurley, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The clathrin-associated adaptor protein (AP) complexes AP-1 and AP-2 are two members of a family of heterotetrameric assemblies that connect transmembrane protein cargo to vesicular coats. Cargo binding by AP-1 is activated by the small GTPase Arf1, while AP-2 is activated by the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2. The structures of both AP-1 and AP-2 have been determined in their locked and unlocked conformations. The structures show how different activators use different mechanisms to trigger simil...

  7. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal g...

  8. LIME: a new membrane raft-associated adaptor protein involved in CD4 and CD8 coreceptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brdičková, Naděžda; Brdička, Tomáš; Angelisová, Pavla; Horváth, Ondřej; Špička, Jiří; Hilgert, Ivan; Pačes, Jan; Simeoni, L.; Kliche, S.; Merten, C.; Schraven, B.; Hořejší, Václav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 10 (2003), s. 1453-1462. ISSN 0022-1007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA MŠk LN00A026 Grant ostatní: Wellcome Trust(GB) J1116W24Z Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : immunology * T-lymphocyte * adaptor protein Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 15.302, year: 2003

  9. Hopanoids as functional analogues of cholesterol in bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, James P; Grosser, Daniel; Bradley, Alexander S; Lagny, Thibaut J; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Broda, Martyna; Simons, Kai

    2015-09-22

    The functionality of cellular membranes relies on the molecular order imparted by lipids. In eukaryotes, sterols such as cholesterol modulate membrane order, yet they are not typically found in prokaryotes. The structurally similar bacterial hopanoids exhibit similar ordering properties as sterols in vitro, but their exact physiological role in living bacteria is relatively uncharted. We present evidence that hopanoids interact with glycolipids in bacterial outer membranes to form a highly ordered bilayer in a manner analogous to the interaction of sterols with sphingolipids in eukaryotic plasma membranes. Furthermore, multidrug transport is impaired in a hopanoid-deficient mutant of the gram-negative Methylobacterium extorquens, which introduces a link between membrane order and an energy-dependent, membrane-associated function in prokaryotes. Thus, we reveal a convergence in the architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic membranes and implicate the biosynthetic pathways of hopanoids and other order-modulating lipids as potential targets to fight pathogenic multidrug resistance. PMID:26351677

  10. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides

  11. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baul, Upayan, E-mail: upayanb@imsc.res.in; Vemparala, Satyavani, E-mail: vani@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T. Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Kuroda, Kenichi, E-mail: kkuroda@umich.edu [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  12. A Molecularly Complete Planar Bacterial Outer Membrane Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Chih-Yun; Chen, Linxiao; Singh, Rohit R; DeLisa, Matthew P; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane (OM) is a barrier containing membrane proteins and liposaccharides that fulfill crucial functions for Gram-negative bacteria. With the advent of drug-resistant bacteria, it is necessary to understand the functional role of this membrane and its constituents to enable novel drug designs. Here we report a simple method to form an OM-like supported bilayer (OM-SB), which incorporates native lipids and membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria from outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). We characterize the formation of OM-SBs using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy. We show that the orientation of proteins in the OM-SB matches the native bacterial membrane, preserving the characteristic asymmetry of these membranes. As a demonstration of the utility of the OM-SB platform, we quantitatively measure antibiotic interactions between OM-SBs and polymyxin B, a cationic peptide used to treat Gram-negative infections. This data enriches understanding of the antibacterial mechanism of polymyxin B, including disruption kinetics and changes in membrane mechanical properties. Combining OM-SBs with microfluidics will enable higher throughput screening of antibiotics. With a broader view, we envision that a molecularly complete membrane-scaffold could be useful for cell-free applications employing engineered membrane proteins in bacterial membranes for myriad technological purposes. PMID:27600663

  13. In-vitro Degradation Behaviour of Irradiated Bacterial Cellulose Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Darwis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose membrane synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum in coconut water medium has potential application for Guided bone Regeneration. However, this membrane may not meet some application requirements due to its low biodegradation properties. In this paper, incorporation of gamma irradiation into the membrane is a developed strategy to increase its biodegradability properties. The in–vitro degradation study in synthetic body fluid (SBF of the irradiated membrane has been analyzed during periods of 6 months by means of weight loss, mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy observation compared to that the un-irradiated one. The result showed that weight loss of irradiated membrane with 25 kGy and 50 kGy and immersed in SBF solution for 6 months reached 18% and 25% respectively. While un-irradiated membrane did not give significant weight loss. Tensile strength of membranes decreases with increasing of irradiation dose and further decreases in tensile strength is observed when irradiated membrane was followed by immersion in SBF solution. Microscope electron image of cellulose membranes shows that un-irradiated bacterial cellulose membrane consists of dense ultrafine fibril network structures, while irradiation result in cleavage of fibrils network of cellulose. The fibrils network become loosely after irradiated membrane immersed in SBF solution due to released of small molecular weight carbohydrates formed during by irradiation from the structure

  14. In-vitro Degradation Behaviour of Irradiated Bacterial Cellulose Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cellulose membrane synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum in coconut water medium has potential application for Guided bone Regeneration. However, this membrane may not meet some application requirements due to its low biodegradation properties. In this paper, incorporation of gamma irradiation into the membrane is a developed strategy to increase its biodegradability properties. The in-vitro degradation study in synthetic body fluid (SBF) of the irradiated membrane has been analyzed during periods of 6 months by means of weight loss, mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy observation compared to that the un-irradiated one. The result showed that weight loss of irradiated membrane with 25 kGy and 50 kGy and immersed in SBF solution for 6 months reached 18% and 25% respectively. While un-irradiated membrane did not give significant weight loss. Tensile strength of membranes decreases with increasing of irradiation dose and further decreases in tensile strength is observed when irradiated membrane was followed by immersion in SBF solution. Microscope electron image of cellulose membranes shows that un-irradiated bacterial cellulose membrane consists of dense ultrafine fibril network structures, while irradiation result in cleavage of fibrils network of cellulose. The fibrils network become loosely after irradiated membrane immersed in SBF solution due to released of small molecular weight carbohydrates formed during by irradiation from the structure (author)

  15. Optically transparent membrane based on bacterial cellulose/polycaprolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Barud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optically transparent membranes from bacterial cellulose (BC/polycaprolactone (PCL have been prepared by impregnation of PCL acetone solution into dried BC membranes. UV-Vis measurements showed an increase on transparency in BC/PCL membrane when compared with pristine BC. The good transparency of the BC/PCL can be related to the presence of BC nanofibers associated with deposit of PCL nano-sized spherulites which are smaller than the wavelength of visible light and practically free of light scattering. XRD results show that cellulose type I structure is preserved inside the BC/PCL membrane, while the mechanical properties suggested indicated that PCL acts as a plasticizer for the BC membrane. The novel BC/PCL membrane could be used for preparation of fully biocompatible flexible display and biodegradable food packaging.

  16. Impact of bacterial endotoxin on the structure of DMPC membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Michael; Brauckmann, Stephan; Moegle-Hofacker, Franzeska; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; Hartmann, Matthias; de Groot, Herbert; Mayer, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are believed to have a toxic effect on human cell membranes. In this study, the influence of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli on the structure, the dynamics and the mechanical strength of phospholipid membranes are monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Model membranes are formed from 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and are either prepared as multilamellar bulk samples or multilamellar vesicles. Field gradient NMR data directly prove the rapid integration of LPS into DMPC membranes. Solid state NMR experiments primarily detect decreasing molecular order parameters with increasing LPS content. This is accompanied by a mechanical softening of the membrane bilayers as is shown by AFM indentation measurements. Altogether, the data prove that lipopolysaccharide molecules quickly insert into phospholipid bilayers, increase membrane fluctuation amplitudes and significantly weaken their mechanical stiffness. PMID:26071197

  17. Self-supported silver nanoparticles containing bacterial cellulose membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrated bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes obtained from cultures of Acetobacter xylinum were used in the preparation of silver nanoparticles containing cellulose membranes. In situ preparation of Ag nanoparticles was achieved from the hydrolytic decomposition of silver triethanolamine (TEA) complexes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic silver particles with mean diameter of 8 nm well adsorbed onto the BC fibriles

  18. Self-supported silver nanoparticles containing bacterial cellulose membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barud, Hernane S.; Barrios, Celina; Regiani, Thais; Marques, Rodrigo F.C. [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil); Verelst, Marc; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES, UPR No. 8011 - Universite Toulouse III, B.P. 94347, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Messaddeq, Younes [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil)], E-mail: sidney@iq.unesp.br

    2008-05-01

    Hydrated bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes obtained from cultures of Acetobacter xylinum were used in the preparation of silver nanoparticles containing cellulose membranes. In situ preparation of Ag nanoparticles was achieved from the hydrolytic decomposition of silver triethanolamine (TEA) complexes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic silver particles with mean diameter of 8 nm well adsorbed onto the BC fibriles.

  19. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Valerie A. Ferro; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A...

  20. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Reinaldo eAcevedo; Sonsire eFernandez; Caridad eZayas; Armando eAcosta; Maria Elena Sarmiento; Valerie A. Ferro; Einar eRosenqvist; Concepcion eCampa; Daniel eCardoso; Luis eGarcia; Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cu...

  1. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. PMID:26621472

  2. Mechanism of bacterial membrane poration by Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Mishra, Abhijit

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is a major health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), an important component of mammalian immune system, are thought to utilize non-specific interactions to target common features on the outer membranes of pathogens; hence development of resistance to such AMPs may be less pronounced. Most AMPs are amphiphilic and cationic in nature. Most AMPs form pores in the bacterial membranes causing them to lyse, however, the exact mechanism is unknown. Here, we study the AMP CHRG01 (KSSTRGRKSSRRKK), derived from human β defensin 3 (hBD3) with all Cysteine residues substituted with Serine. Circular Dichorism studies indicate that CHRG01 shows helicity and there is change in helicity as it interacts with the lipid membrane. The AMP was effective against different species of bacteria. Leakage of cellular components from bacterial cells observed by SEM and AFM indicates AMP action by pore formation. Confocal microscopy studies on giant vesicles incubated with AMP confirm poration. The effect of this AMP on model bacterial membranes is characterized using Small Angle X-ray scattering and Fluorescence spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism behind antimicrobial activity.

  3. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Sijbrandi, R.; Kol, M.A.; Swiezewska, E.; de Kruijff, B.; Breukink, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced b

  4. Cytosol- and clathrin-dependent stimulation of endocytosis in vitro by purified adaptors

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Using stage-specific assays for receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) into perforated A431 cells we show that purified adaptors stimulate coated pit assembly and ligand sequestration into deeply invaginated coated pits. Late events in endocytosis involving membrane fission and coated vesicle budding which lead to the internalization of Tfn are unaffected. AP2, plasma membrane adaptors, are active at physiological concentrations, whereas AP1, Golgi adaptors, are inactive. Adaptor-...

  5. The effect of bacterial cellulose membrane compared with collagen membrane on guided bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung In; An, Sung-Jun; Kang, Seong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effects of bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as a barrier membrane on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in comparison with those of the resorbable collagen membranes. MATERIALS AND METHODS BC membranes were fabricated using biomimetic technology. Surface properties were analyzed, Mechanical properties were measured, in vitro cell proliferation test were performed with NIH3T3 cells and in vivo study were performed with rat calvarial defect and histomorphometric analysis was done. The Mann-Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used (α<.05). RESULTS BC membrane showed significantly higher mechanical properties such as wet tensile strength than collagen membrane and represented a three-dimensional multilayered structure cross-linked by nano-fibers with 60 % porosity. In vitro study, cell adhesion and proliferation were observed on BC membrane. However, morphology of the cells was found to be less differentiated, and the cell proliferation rate was lower than those of the cells on collagen membrane. In vivo study, the grafted BC membrane did not induce inflammatory response, and maintained adequate space for bone regeneration. An amount of new bone formation in defect region loaded with BC membrane was significantly similar to that of collagen membrane application. CONCLUSION BC membrane has potential to be used as a barrier membrane, and efficacy of the membrane on GBR is comparable to that of collagen membrane. PMID:26816579

  6. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  7. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo eAcevedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA, serogroup W (dOMVW and serogroup X (dOMVX were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC, Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP, Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM and BCG (dOMVBCG. The immunogenicity of the OMV have been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice have shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-self neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  8. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients. PMID:26907692

  9. Antimicrobial Bacterial Cellulose-Silver Nanoparticles Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernane S. Barud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial bacterial cellulose-silver nanoparticles composite membranes have been obtained by “in situ” preparation of Ag nanoparticles from hydrolytic decomposition of silver nitrate solution using triethanolamine as reducing and complexing agent. The formation of silver nanoparticles was evidenced by the X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and absorption in the UV-Visible (350 nm to 600 nm. Thermal and mechanical properties together with swelling behavior for water were considered. TEA concentration was observed to be important in order to obtain only Ag particles and not a mixture of silver oxides. It was also observed to control particle size and amount of silver contents in bacterial cellulose. The composite membranes exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Electrically conductive bacterial cellulose composite membranes produced by the incorporation of graphite nanoplatelets in pristine bacterial cellulose membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs were utilized to improve the electrical conductivity of pristine bacterial cellulose (BC membranes. By physical and chemical methods, flake-shaped GNPs, weaving through the surface layer of web-like cellulose nanofibrils, were indeed fixed or trapped by the adjacent nanofibrils in the BC surface network, for comparison, rod-shaped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were homogeneously inserted into BC membrane through the pore structures and tunnels within the BC membrane. Strong physical and chemical interaction exists between the BC nanofibrils and the particles of GNP or MWCNT even after 15 h sonication. BC membrane with 8.7 wt% incorporated GNPs reached the maximum electrical conductivity of 4.5 S/cm, while 13.9 wt% MWCNT/BC composite membrane achieved the maximum electrical conductivity of 1.2 S/cm. Compared with one dimensional (1-D MWCNTs, as long as GNPs inserted into BC membranes, the 2-D reinforcement of GNPs was proven to be more effective in improving the electrical conductivity of BC membranes thus not only break the bottleneck of further improvement of the electrical conductivity of BC-based composite membranes but also broaden the applications of BC and GNPs.

  11. Membrane fatty acids as markers of bacterial antibiotic-producers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elhottová, Dana; Petrásek, Jiří; Krištůfek, Václav; Jágr, Michal; Chroňáková, Alica; Petříček, Miroslav

    Cairns : International Society for Microbial Ecology, 2008. [International Symposium on Microbial Ecology ISME 12. Microbial Diversity - Sustaining the Blue Planet /12./. 17.08.2008-22.08.2008, Cairns] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600660607; GA MŠk 2B06154 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : membrane fatty acids * bacterial antibiotic -producers * microorganisms Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Antimicrobial Bacterial Cellulose-Silver Nanoparticles Composite Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Barud, Hernane S.; Thaís Regiani; Rodrigo F. C. Marques; Wilton R. Lustri; Younes Messaddeq; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial bacterial cellulose-silver nanoparticles composite membranes have been obtained by “in situ” preparation of Ag nanoparticles from hydrolytic decomposition of silver nitrate solution using triethanolamine as reducing and complexing agent. The formation of silver nanoparticles was evidenced by the X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and absorption in the UV-Visible (350 nm to 600 nm). Thermal and mechanical properties toge...

  13. The fifth adaptor protein complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Hirst; Barlow, Lael D.; Gabriel Casey Francisco; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent manno...

  14. The Fifth Adaptor Protein Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Hirst, Jennifer; D. Barlow, Lael; Francisco, Gabriel Casey; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent manno...

  15. Bacterial cellulose and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin membranes for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuyu; Qiu, Liying; Cui, Jing; Wei, Qufu

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin (BC-Vac) membranes were successfully produced in large scale. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinum. BC-Vac membranes were prepared by immersing BC in vaccarin solution. The surface morphologies of BC and BC-Vac membranes were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscopy (AFM). The images showed that BC-Vac exhibited the characteristic 3D nanofibrillar network of BC matrix but there was adhesion between fibers. The mechanical properties of BC and BC-Vac membranes were evaluated and the results indicated that the adding of drug vaccarin into the BC membranes increased the malleability indicated by the increment in elongation at break compared with BC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was conducted to confirm the incorporation of vaccarin in BC-Vac and investigate the hydroxyl interactions between BC and drug vaccarin. Cell viability and cell attachment studies demonstrated that BC and BC-Vac membranes had no cytotoxicity and could be a good carrier for cell growth. The wound healing performance was examined in vivo by rat skin models. Histological observations revealed that wounds treated with BC-Vac epithelialized and regenerated faster than treated with BC. Therefore, BC-Vac was considered as a potential candidate for wound dressing materials. PMID:26652377

  16. PAG - a multipurpose transmembrane adaptor protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 41 (2014), s. 4881-4892. ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PAG * adaptor protein * membrane raft Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.459, year: 2014

  17. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  18. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  19. Adaptor protein complexes and intracellular transport

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The AP (adaptor protein) complexes are heterotetrameric protein complexes that mediate intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and secretory transport pathways. There are five different AP complexes: AP-1, AP-2 and AP-3 are clathrin-associated complexes; whereas AP-4 and AP-5 are not. These five AP complexes localize to different intracellular compartments and mediate membrane trafficking in distinct pathways. They recognize and concentrate cargo proteins into vesicular carriers th...

  20. Secretion of Bacterial Lipoproteins: Through the Cytoplasmic Membrane, the Periplasm and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Zückert, Wolfram R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., grampositive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep pro...

  1. Molecular target of synthetic antimicrobial oligomer in bacterial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Gordon, Vernita; Som, Abhigyan; Cronan, John; Tew, Gregory; Wong, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprises a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. It has been shown that natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic analogs have demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity via permeating bacterial membranes selectively. Synthetic antimicrobials with tunable structure and toxicological profiles are ideal for investigations of selectivity mechanisms. We investigate interactions and self-assembly using a prototypical family of antimicrobials based on phenylene ethynylene. Results from synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results and in vitro microbicidal assays on genetically modified `knock-out' bacteria will be presented.

  2. The fifth adaptor protein complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hirst

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptor protein (AP complexes sort cargo into vesicles for transport from one membrane compartment of the cell to another. Four distinct AP complexes have been identified, which are present in most eukaryotes. We report the existence of a fifth AP complex, AP-5. Tagged AP-5 localises to a late endosomal compartment in HeLa cells. AP-5 does not associate with clathrin and is insensitive to brefeldin A. Knocking down AP-5 subunits interferes with the trafficking of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and causes the cell to form swollen endosomal structures with emanating tubules. AP-5 subunits can be found in all five eukaryotic supergroups, but they have been co-ordinately lost in many organisms. Concatenated phylogenetic analysis provides robust resolution, for the first time, into the evolutionary order of emergence of the adaptor subunit families, showing AP-3 as the basal complex, followed by AP-5, AP-4, and AP-1 and AP-2. Thus, AP-5 is an evolutionarily ancient complex, which is involved in endosomal sorting, and which has links with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  3. The adaptor molecule CARD9 is essential for tuberculosis control

    OpenAIRE

    Dorhoi, Anca; Desel, Christiane; Yeremeev, Vladimir; Pradl, Lydia; Brinkmann, Volker; Mollenkopf, Hans J; Hanke, Karin; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Stefan H. E. Kaufmann

    2010-01-01

    The cross talk between host and pathogen starts with recognition of bacterial signatures through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which mobilize downstream signaling cascades. We investigated the role of the cytosolic adaptor caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) in tuberculosis. This adaptor was critical for full activation of innate immunity by converging signals downstream of multiple PRRs. Card9(-/-) mice succumbed early after aerosol infection, with higher mycobacteria...

  4. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhib...

  5. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species. PMID:21108068

  6. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial community change in biofilm formed on seawater reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In S; Lee, Jinwook; Kima, Sung-Jo; Yu, Hye-Weon; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    The change in bacterial community structure induced by bacterial competition and succession was investigated during seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) in order to elucidate a possible link between the bacterial consortium on SWRO membranes and biofouling. To date, there has been no definitive characterization of the microbial diversity in SWRO in terms of distinguishing time-dependent changes in the richness or abundance of bacterial species. For bacterial succession within biofilms on the membrane surface, SWRO using a cross-flow filtration membrane test unit was operated for 5 and 100h, respectively. As results of the pyrosequencing analysis, bacterial communities differed considerably among seawater and the 5 and 100 h samples. From a total of 33,876 pyrosequences (using a 95% sequence similarity), there were less than 1% of shared species, confirming the influence of the operational time factor and lack of similarity of these communities. During SWRO operation, the abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri BBSPN3 (GU594474) belonging to gamma-Proteobacteria suggest that biofouling of SWRO membrane might be driven by the dominant influence of a specific species. In addition, among the bacterial competition of five bacterial species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus sp., Rhodobacter sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Mycobacterium sp.) competing for bacterial colonization on the SWRO membrane surfaces, it was exhibited that Bacillus sp. was the most dominant. The dominant influences ofPseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. on biofouling during actual SWRO is decisive depending on higher removal efficiency of the seawater pretreatment. PMID:24600849

  7. Differential Association of the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF Family of Adaptor Proteins with the Raft- and the Non-Raft Brush Border Membrane Fractions of NHE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Sultan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Trafficking, brush border membrane (BBM retention, and signal-specific regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 is regulated by the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF family of PDZ-adaptor proteins, which enable the formation of multiprotein complexes. It is unclear, however, what determines signal specificity of these NHERFs. Thus, we studied the association of NHE3, NHERF1 (EBP50, NHERF2 (E3KARP, and NHERF3 (PDZK1 with lipid rafts in murine small intestinal BBM. Methods: Detergent resistant membranes (“lipid rafts” were isolated by floatation of Triton X-incubated small intestinal BBM from a variety of knockout mouse strains in an Optiprep step gradient. Acid-activated NHE3 activity was measured fluorometrically in BCECF-loaded microdissected villi, or by assessment of CO2/HCO3- mediated increase in fluid absorption in perfused jejunal loops of anethetized mice. Results: NHE3 was found to partially associate with lipid rafts in the native BBM, and NHE3 raft association had an impact on NHE3 transport activity and regulation in vivo. NHERF1, 2 and 3 were differentially distributed to rafts and non-rafts, with NHERF2 being most raft-associated and NHERF3 entirely non-raft associated. NHERF2 expression enhanced the localization of NHE3 to membrane rafts. The use of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mice, which have altered membrane lipid as well as lipid raft composition, allowed us to test the validity of the lipid raft concept in vivo. Conclusions: The differential association of the NHERFs with the raft-associated and the non-raft fraction of NHE3 in the brush border membrane is one component of the differential and signal-specific NHE3 regulation by the different NHERFs.

  8. Treatment of tympanic membrane perforation using bacterial cellulose: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fábio Coelho Alves Silveira; Flávia Cristina Morone Pinto; Sílvio da Silva Caldas Neto; Mariana de Carvalho Leal; Jéssica Cesário; José Lamartine de Andrade Aguiar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Promising treatments for tympanic membrane perforation closure have been studied. Therapies derived from tissue engineering probably eliminate the need for conventional surgery. Bacterial cellulose is presented as an alternative that is safe, biocompatible, and has low toxicity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect on healing of direct application of a bacterial cellulose graft on the tympanic membrane compared to the conventional approach with autologous fascia. ME...

  9. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial cellulose membranes used as transdermal drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is an effective energetic source for polymer surfaces modification in order to obtain transdermal systems with different controlled release properties. In this work, gamma rays have been applied to induce changes in bacterial cellulose membranes. Permeation of drug (tetracycline) was theoretically and experimentally investigated starting from the effect of γ-irradiation on membranes permeability. Release and permeation of drug from irradiated and non-irradiated membranes have been performed using a diffusion cell

  10. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial cellulose membranes used as transdermal drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Tache, Florin; Zaharescu, Traian; Grosu, Elena

    2007-12-01

    Ionizing radiation is an effective energetic source for polymer surfaces modification in order to obtain transdermal systems with different controlled release properties. In this work, gamma rays have been applied to induce changes in bacterial cellulose membranes. Permeation of drug (tetracycline) was theoretically and experimentally investigated starting from the effect of γ-irradiation on membranes permeability. Release and permeation of drug from irradiated and non-irradiated membranes have been performed using a diffusion cell.

  11. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial cellulose membranes used as transdermal drug delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta [Department of Chemical Engineering, ' Politehnica' University Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei, 060042 Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: astoica@mt.pub.ro; Stroescu, Marta; Tache, Florin [Department of Chemical Engineering, ' Politehnica' University Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Zaharescu, Traian [Advanced Research Institute for Electrical Engineering, 313 Splaiul Unirii, 030138 Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: zaharescut@icpe-ca.ro; Grosu, Elena [Department of Chemical Engineering, ' Politehnica' University Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei, 060042 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-12-15

    Ionizing radiation is an effective energetic source for polymer surfaces modification in order to obtain transdermal systems with different controlled release properties. In this work, gamma rays have been applied to induce changes in bacterial cellulose membranes. Permeation of drug (tetracycline) was theoretically and experimentally investigated starting from the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on membranes permeability. Release and permeation of drug from irradiated and non-irradiated membranes have been performed using a diffusion cell.

  12. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of li...

  13. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane. PMID:20419407

  14. Treatment of tympanic membrane perforation using bacterial cellulose: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Coelho Alves Silveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Promising treatments for tympanic membrane perforation closure have been studied. Therapies derived from tissue engineering probably eliminate the need for conventional surgery. Bacterial cellulose is presented as an alternative that is safe, biocompatible, and has low toxicity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect on healing of direct application of a bacterial cellulose graft on the tympanic membrane compared to the conventional approach with autologous fascia. METHODS: Randomized controlled trial. Forty patients with tympanic membrane perforations secondary to chronic otitis media were included, and were randomly assigned to an experimental group (20, treated with a bacterial cellulose graft (BC and control group (20, treated with autologous temporal fascia (fascia. We evaluated the surgical time, hospital stay, time of epithelialization and the rate of tympanic perforation closure. Hospital costs were compared. The statistical significance level accepted was established at p < 0.05. RESULTS: The closure of perforations was similar in both groups. The average operation time in the fascia group was 76.50 min versus 14.06 min bacterial cellulose in the group (p = 0.0001. The hospital cost by the Brazilian public health system was R$ 600.00 for the bacterial cellulose group, and R$ 7778.00 for the fascia group (p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Bacterial cellulose grafts promoted the closure of the tympanic membrane perforations, and were demonstrated to be innovative, effective, safe, minimally invasive, efficacious and to have a very low cost.

  15. Role of adaptor proteins in secretory granule biogenesis and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RichardEMains

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the regulated secretory pathway, secretory granules (SGs store peptide hormones that are released on demand. SGs are formed at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and must undergo a maturation process to become responsive to secretagogues. The production of mature SGs requires concentrating newly synthesized soluble content proteins in granules whose membranes contain the appropriate integral membrane proteins. The mechanisms underlying the sorting of soluble and integral membrane proteins destined for SGs from other proteins are not yet well understood. For soluble proteins, luminal pH and divalent metals can affect aggregation and interaction with surrounding membranes. The trafficking of granule membrane proteins can be controlled by both luminal and cytosolic factors. Cytosolic adaptor proteins, which recognize the cytosolic domains of proteins that span the SG membrane, have been shown to play essential roles in the assembly of functional SGs. Adaptor protein 1A (AP-1A is known to interact with specific motifs in its cargo proteins and with the clathrin heavy chain, contributing to the formation of a clathrin coat. AP-1A is present in patches on immature SG membranes, where it removes cargo and facilitates SG maturation. AP-1A recruitment to membranes can be modulated by PACS-1 (Phosphofurin Acidic Cluster Sorting protein 1, a cytosolic protein which interacts with both AP-1A and cargo that has been phosphorylated by casein kinase II. A cargo/PACS-1/AP-1A complex is necessary to drive the appropriate transport of several cargo proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. The GGA (Golgi-localized, -ear containing, ADP-ribosylation factor binding family of adaptor proteins serve a similar role. We review the functions of AP-1A, PACS-1 and GGAs in facilitating the retrieval of proteins from immature SGs and review examples of cargo proteins whose trafficking within the regulated secretory pathway is governed by adaptor proteins.

  16. Bacterial Cellulose Membranes Used as Artificial Substitutes for Dural Defection in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Xu; Xia Ma; Shiwen Chen; Meifeng Tao; Lutao Yuan; Yao Jing

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering...

  17. Loss of elongation factor P disrupts bacterial outer membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Hersch, Steven J; Roy, Hervé;

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is posttranslationally modified at a conserved lysyl residue by the coordinated action of two enzymes, PoxA and YjeK. We have previously established the importance of this modification in Salmonella stress resistance. Here we report that, like poxA and yjeK mutants......, Salmonella strains lacking EF-P display increased susceptibility to hypoosmotic conditions, antibiotics, and detergents and enhanced resistance to the compound S-nitrosoglutathione. The susceptibility phenotypes are largely explained by the enhanced membrane permeability of the efp mutant, which exhibits...... increased uptake of the hydrophobic dye 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Analysis of the membrane proteomes of wild-type and efp mutant Salmonella strains reveals few changes, including the prominent overexpression of a single porin, KdgM, in the efp mutant outer membrane. Removal of KdgM in the efp mutant...

  18. Effect of Electron-Beam Irradiation on Bacterial Cellulose Membranes Used as Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple methods are used to modify material surfaces. Radiation is an effective tool for polymer surfaces modification in order to obtain transdermal systems with different controlled release properties. Bacterial cellulose is a promising biomaterial synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum. It has a distinctive ultrafine reticulated structure that may become a perfect matrix as an optimal wound healing environment. In this work, high energy irradiation (γ rays from 137Cs) was applied to modify bacterial cellulose membranes. The effect of varying irradiation doses on membranes permeability was studied. Tetracycline was involved in the study of diffusivity as model drug. Release and permeation of drug from irradiated and non-irradiated membranes were done using a diffusion cell. The membrane permeability was determined using a psudo-steady state analysis based on Fick's law

  19. Controlled release and antibacterial activity of tetracycline hydrochloride-loaded bacterial cellulose composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Min, Huihua; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-07-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is widely used in biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared an antibiotic drug tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH)-loaded bacterial cellulose (BC) composite membranes, and evaluated the drug release, antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. The structure and morphology of the fabricated BC-TCH composite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The TCH release results show that the incorporation of BC matrix to load TCH is able to control the release. In vitro antibacterial assay demonstrate that the developed BC-TCH composites displayed excellent antibacterial activity solely associated with the loaded TCH drug. More importantly, the BC-TCH composite membranes display good biocompatibility. These characteristics of BC-TCH composite membranes indicate that they may successfully serve as wound dressings and other medical biomaterials. PMID:27106158

  20. Bacterial Subversion of Host Actin Dynamics at the Plasma Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Carabeo, Rey

    2011-01-01

    Invasion of non-phagocytic cells by a number of bacterial pathogens involves the subversion of the actin cytoskeletal remodelling machinery to produce actin-rich cell surface projections designed to engulf the bacteria. The signalling that occurs to induce these actin-rich structures has considerable overlap amongst a diverse group of bacteria. The molecular organisation within these structures act in concert to internalise the invading pathogen. This dynamic process could be subdivided into ...

  1. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  2. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  3. Flexible magnetic membranes based on bacterial cellulose and its evaluation as electromagnetic interference shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible magnetic membranes with high proportion of magnetite were successfully prepared by previous impregnation of the never dried bacterial cellulose pellicles with ferric chloride followed by reduction with sodium bisulfite and alkaline treatment for magnetite precipitation. Membranes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating magnetometer, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. Microwave properties of these membranes were investigated in the X-band (8.2 to 12.4 GHz). FEG-SEM micrographs show an effective coverage of the BC nanofibers by Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Membranes with up to 75% in weight of particles have been prepared after 60 min of reaction. Magnetite nanoparticles in the form of aggregates well adhered to the BC fibers were observed by SEM. The average crystal sizes of the magnetic particles were in the range of 10 ± 1 to 13 ± 1 nm (estimated by XRD). The magnetic particles in the BC pellicles presented superparamagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization in the range of 60 emu g−1 and coercive force around 15 Oe. These magnetic pellicles also displayed high electrical permittivity and a potential application as microwave absorber materials. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose/magnetite nanocomposites with high incorporation degree of nanoparticles. • Magnetite nanoparticles well adhered to the surface of bacterial cellulose nanofibers. • A saturation magnetization of the nanoparticles in the BC pellicles of about 60 emu g−1. • Flexible membranes with high super-paramagnetic characteristic

  4. Bactericidal activity of curcumin I is associated with damaging of bacterial membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Tyagi

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an important constituent of turmeric, is known for various biological activities, primarily due to its antioxidant mechanism. The present study focused on the antibacterial activity of curcumin I, a significant component of commercial curcumin, against four genera of bacteria, including those that are Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These represent prominent human pathogens, particularly in hospital settings. Our study shows the strong antibacterial potential of curcumin I against all the tested bacteria from Gram-positive as well as Gram-negative groups. The integrity of the bacterial membrane was checked using two differential permeabilization indicating fluorescent probes, namely, propidium iodide and calcein. Both the membrane permeabilization assays confirmed membrane leakage in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria on exposure to curcumin I. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were employed to confirm the membrane damages in bacterial cells on exposure to curcumin I. The present study confirms the broad-spectrum antibacterial nature of curcumin I, and its membrane damaging property. Findings from this study could provide impetus for further research on curcumin I regarding its antibiotic potential against rapidly emerging bacterial pathogens.

  5. Polyethylenimine coated bacterial cellulose nanofiber membrane and application as adsorbent and catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqiang; Lu, Xinkun; Ng, Pui Fai; Lee, Ka I; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H; Wu, Jian-yong

    2015-02-15

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofiber membranes were simply aminalized by a flush-coating and post-crosslinking method. Firstly, wet BC membranes were flushed through by an aqueous solution of polyethylenimine (PEI) and glycerol diglycidyl ether (GDE) under vacuum suction, then further heated up to 70 °C to crosslink the resultant coating on the surface of the nanofibers. The PEI coated bacterial cellulose (BC@PEI) nanofiber membrane presented excellent adsorption performance for Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) ions from aqueous solutions. Desorption of these ions was achieved using ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid treatment. This cycle of adsorption and desorption was repeated for several times with good remain adsorption performance (over 90%). Furthermore, the adsorbed Cu(2+) ions can be reduced to copper nanoparticles, and showed excellent catalytic performance for methylene blue reduction in aqueous solution. The catalytic performance can remained after several times of usage. PMID:25460686

  6. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition. PMID:23808339

  7. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors

  8. Bacterial cellulose membrane as flexible substrate for organic light emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes produced by gram-negative, acetic acid bacteria (Gluconacetobacter xylinus), were used as flexible substrates for the fabrication of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). In order to achieve the necessary conductive properties indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited onto the membrane at room temperature using radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering with an r.f. power of 30 W, at pressure of 8 mPa in Ar atmosphere without any subsequent thermal treatment. Visible light transmittance of about 40% was observed. Resistivity, mobility and carrier concentration of deposited ITO films were 4.90 x 10-4 Ohm cm, 8.08 cm2/V-s and - 1.5 x 1021 cm-3, respectively, comparable with commercial ITO substrates. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of devices based on BC membranes three OLEDs with different substrates were produced: a reference one with commercial ITO on glass, a second one with a SiO2 thin film interlayer between the BC membrane and the ITO layer and a third one just with ITO deposited directly on the BC membrane. The observed OLED luminance ratio was: 1; 0.5; 0.25 respectively, with 2400 cd/m2 as the value for the reference OLED. These preliminary results show clearly that the functionalized biopolymer, biodegradable, biocompatible bacterial cellulose membranes can be successfully used as substrate in flexible organic optoelectronic devices

  9. Affinities and in-plane stress forces between glycopeptide antibiotics and biomimetic bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisi Bi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis of interactions between antibiotics affecting bacterial cell wall biosynthesis and cellular membranes is important in rational drug design of new drugs to overcome resistance. However, a precise understanding of how bacteriostatic antibiotics effect action often neglects the effect of biophysical forces involved following antibiotic-receptor binding events. We have employed a combination of a label-free binding biosensor (surface plasmon resonance, SPR and a force biosensor (in-plane stress cantilever, together with model membrane systems to study the complex interplay between glycopeptide antibiotics, their cognate ligands and different model membranes. Bacterial cell wall precursor analogue N-α-Docosanoyl-ε-acetyl-Lys-d-Alanine-d-Alanine (doc-KAA was inserted into lipid layers comprised of zwitterionic or anionic lipids then exposed to either vancomycin or the membrane-anchored glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin. Binding affinities and kinetics of the antibiotics to these model membranes were influenced by electrostatic interactions with the different lipid backgrounds, in addition to ligand affinities. In addition, cantilever sensors coated with model membranes showed that planar surface stress changes were induced by glycopeptide antibiotics adsorption and caused compressive surface stress generation in a ligand-dependent manner.

  10. Bacterial cellulose membrane as flexible substrate for organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, C.; Vilani, C. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Calil, V.L. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); LOEM-Molecular Optoelectronic Laboratory-Physics Department-PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barud, H.S. [Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Quirino, W.G. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); COPPE-Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ribeiro, S.J.L. [Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Cremona, M. [CeDO-Organic Device Center, Dimat-Dimat, Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); LOEM-Molecular Optoelectronic Laboratory-Physics Department-PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br

    2008-12-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes produced by gram-negative, acetic acid bacteria (Gluconacetobacter xylinus), were used as flexible substrates for the fabrication of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). In order to achieve the necessary conductive properties indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited onto the membrane at room temperature using radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering with an r.f. power of 30 W, at pressure of 8 mPa in Ar atmosphere without any subsequent thermal treatment. Visible light transmittance of about 40% was observed. Resistivity, mobility and carrier concentration of deposited ITO films were 4.90 x 10{sup -4} Ohm cm, 8.08 cm{sup 2}/V-s and - 1.5 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}, respectively, comparable with commercial ITO substrates. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of devices based on BC membranes three OLEDs with different substrates were produced: a reference one with commercial ITO on glass, a second one with a SiO{sub 2} thin film interlayer between the BC membrane and the ITO layer and a third one just with ITO deposited directly on the BC membrane. The observed OLED luminance ratio was: 1; 0.5; 0.25 respectively, with 2400 cd/m{sup 2} as the value for the reference OLED. These preliminary results show clearly that the functionalized biopolymer, biodegradable, biocompatible bacterial cellulose membranes can be successfully used as substrate in flexible organic optoelectronic devices.

  11. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  12. Recombinant Expression Screening of P. aeruginosa Bacterial Inner Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Constance J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane proteins (TM proteins make up 25% of all proteins and play key roles in many diseases and normal physiological processes. However, much less is known about their structures and molecular mechanisms than for soluble proteins. Problems in expression, solubilization, purification, and crystallization cause bottlenecks in the characterization of TM proteins. This project addressed the need for improved methods for obtaining sufficient amounts of TM proteins for determining their structures and molecular mechanisms. Results Plasmid clones were obtained that encode eighty-seven transmembrane proteins with varying physical characteristics, for example, the number of predicted transmembrane helices, molecular weight, and grand average hydrophobicity (GRAVY. All the target proteins were from P. aeruginosa, a gram negative bacterial opportunistic pathogen that causes serious lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis. The relative expression levels of the transmembrane proteins were measured under several culture growth conditions. The use of E. coli strains, a T7 promoter, and a 6-histidine C-terminal affinity tag resulted in the expression of 61 out of 87 test proteins (70%. In this study, proteins with a higher grand average hydrophobicity and more transmembrane helices were expressed less well than less hydrophobic proteins with fewer transmembrane helices. Conclusions In this study, factors related to overall hydrophobicity and the number of predicted transmembrane helices correlated with the relative expression levels of the target proteins. Identifying physical characteristics that correlate with protein expression might aid in selecting the "low hanging fruit", or proteins that can be expressed to sufficient levels using an E. coli expression system. The use of other expression strategies or host species might be needed for sufficient levels of expression of transmembrane proteins with other physical

  13. In situ synthesis of silver chloride nanoparticles into bacterial cellulose membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Weili; Chen Shiyan; Li Xin; Shi Shuaike; Shen Wei; Zhang Xiang [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai, 201620 (China); Wang Huaping, E-mail: wanghp@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai, 201620 (China)

    2009-05-05

    In situ synthesis of silver chloride (AgCl) nanoparticles was carried out under ambient conditions in nanoporous bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as nanoreactors. The growth of the nanoparticles was readily obtained by alternating dipping of BC membranes in the solution of silver nitrate or sodium chloride followed by a rinse step. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated the existence of AgCl nanoparticles in the BC and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the AgCl nanoparticles well dispersed on the surface of BC and penetrated into the BC network. The AgCl nanoparticle-impregnated BC membranes exhibited high hydrophilic ability and strong antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive). The preparative procedure is facile and versatile, and provides a simple route to manufacturing of useful antimicrobial membranes, which would be a good alternative for antimicrobial wound dressing.

  14. In situ synthesis of silver chloride nanoparticles into bacterial cellulose membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ synthesis of silver chloride (AgCl) nanoparticles was carried out under ambient conditions in nanoporous bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as nanoreactors. The growth of the nanoparticles was readily obtained by alternating dipping of BC membranes in the solution of silver nitrate or sodium chloride followed by a rinse step. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated the existence of AgCl nanoparticles in the BC and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the AgCl nanoparticles well dispersed on the surface of BC and penetrated into the BC network. The AgCl nanoparticle-impregnated BC membranes exhibited high hydrophilic ability and strong antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive). The preparative procedure is facile and versatile, and provides a simple route to manufacturing of useful antimicrobial membranes, which would be a good alternative for antimicrobial wound dressing.

  15. Bacterial cellulose nanofibrous membrane as thermal stable separator for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fengjing; Yin, Lei; Yu, Qingchun; Zhong, Chunyan; Zhang, Junliang

    2015-04-01

    Thermal shrinkage is a severe problem for the conventional polyolefin separators. In this work, we report the excellent performance of bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibrous membranes as separators for lithium (Li) ion batteries. Properties of BC separator including morphology, ionic conductivity, electrochemical stability, thermal stability, mechanical strength and battery charge-discharge performance are characterized and compared to a commercial separator membrane (Celgard® 2325). Because of the unique fibrous and cross-linked three-dimensional network structure, BC separator shows excellent dimensional stability up to 180 °C, good ionic conductivity and competitive battery performance.

  16. Bacterial membrane activity of a-peptide/b-peptoid chimeras: Influence of amino acid composition and chain length on the activity against different bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M; Franzyk, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells and...... permeabilization of the bacterial cell envelope, and the outer membrane may act as a barrier in Gram-negative bacteria. The tolerance of S. marcescens to chimeras may be due to differences in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide layer also responsible for its resistance to polymyxin B....... subsequent killing is usually not tested. In this report, six α-peptide/β-peptoid chimeras were examined for the effect of amino acid/peptoid substitutions and chain length on the membrane perturbation and subsequent killing of food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. RESULTS: All six AMP analogues...

  17. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  18. Predominant membrane localization is an essential feature of the bacterial signal recognition particle receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graumann Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signal recognition particle (SRP receptor plays a vital role in co-translational protein targeting, because it connects the soluble SRP-ribosome-nascent chain complex (SRP-RNCs to the membrane bound Sec translocon. The eukaryotic SRP receptor (SR is a heterodimeric protein complex, consisting of two unrelated GTPases. The SRβ subunit is an integral membrane protein, which tethers the SRP-interacting SRα subunit permanently to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The prokaryotic SR lacks the SRβ subunit and consists of only the SRα homologue FtsY. Strikingly, although FtsY requires membrane contact for functionality, cell fractionation studies have localized FtsY predominantly to the cytosolic fraction of Escherichia coli. So far, the exact function of the soluble SR in E. coli is unknown, but it has been suggested that, in contrast to eukaryotes, the prokaryotic SR might bind SRP-RNCs already in the cytosol and only then initiates membrane targeting. Results In the current study we have determined the contribution of soluble FtsY to co-translational targeting in vitro and have re-analysed the localization of FtsY in vivo by fluorescence microscopy. Our data show that FtsY can bind to SRP-ribosome nascent chains (RNCs in the absence of membranes. However, these soluble FtsY-SRP-RNC complexes are not efficiently targeted to the membrane. In contrast, we observed effective targeting of SRP-RNCs to membrane-bond FtsY. These data show that soluble FtsY does not contribute significantly to cotranslational targeting in E. coli. In agreement with this observation, our in vivo analyses of FtsY localization in bacterial cells by fluorescence microscopy revealed that the vast majority of FtsY was localized to the inner membrane and that soluble FtsY constituted only a negligible species in vivo. Conclusion The exact function of the SRP receptor (SR in bacteria has so far been enigmatic. Our data show that the bacterial SR is

  19. Flexible magnetic membranes based on bacterial cellulose and its evaluation as electromagnetic interference shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, Jéssica A., E-mail: Jessica.amarins@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/ Instituto de Macromoléculas, Centro de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Soares, Bluma G., E-mail: bluma@ima.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/ Instituto de Macromoléculas, Centro de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barud, Hernane S.; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Flexible magnetic membranes with high proportion of magnetite were successfully prepared by previous impregnation of the never dried bacterial cellulose pellicles with ferric chloride followed by reduction with sodium bisulfite and alkaline treatment for magnetite precipitation. Membranes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating magnetometer, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. Microwave properties of these membranes were investigated in the X-band (8.2 to 12.4 GHz). FEG-SEM micrographs show an effective coverage of the BC nanofibers by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Membranes with up to 75% in weight of particles have been prepared after 60 min of reaction. Magnetite nanoparticles in the form of aggregates well adhered to the BC fibers were observed by SEM. The average crystal sizes of the magnetic particles were in the range of 10 ± 1 to 13 ± 1 nm (estimated by XRD). The magnetic particles in the BC pellicles presented superparamagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization in the range of 60 emu g{sup −1} and coercive force around 15 Oe. These magnetic pellicles also displayed high electrical permittivity and a potential application as microwave absorber materials. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose/magnetite nanocomposites with high incorporation degree of nanoparticles. • Magnetite nanoparticles well adhered to the surface of bacterial cellulose nanofibers. • A saturation magnetization of the nanoparticles in the BC pellicles of about 60 emu g{sup −1}. • Flexible membranes with high super-paramagnetic characteristic.

  20. Characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and bacterial communities in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor coupled with online ultrasound equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyong; Wen, Xianghua; Xu, Meilan; Huang, Xia

    2012-08-01

    Two parallel anaerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), integrated with or without ultrasound equipment for online membrane fouling control (US-AnMBR, or AnMBR) were established to digest waste activated sludge (WAS). The characteristics of bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and bacterial communities in the systems were investigated for further understanding of the membrane fouling mechanisms. Ultrasound was an effective method for reducing cake layer resistance. A relatively high amount of bound EPS were found in the cake layer, especially for the US-AnMBR, by responding to the external forces (i.e. cross flow and ultrasound). High-throughput pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were applied to analyze the bacterial diversity. Some bacterial populations contributing to membrane fouling were identified to accumulate in the cake layer, such as Peptococcaceae, Bacteroides and Syntrophobacterales. Since the ultrasounded retentate was recirculated back to the reactor, the bacterial community in the digested sludge was affected. PMID:22621809

  1. Pretreatment with alum or powdered activated carbon reduces bacterial predation-associated irreversible fouling of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ho; Dwidar, Mohammed; Kwon, Young-Nam; Mitchell, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the co-application of bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and either alum coagulation or powdered activated carbon adsorption to reduce fouling caused by Escherichia coli rich feed solutions in dead-end microfiltration tests. The flux increased when the samples were predated upon or treated with 100 ppm alum or PAC, but co-treatment with alum and predation gave the best flux results. The total membrane resistance caused by the predated sample was reduced six-fold when treated with 100 ppm PAC, from 11.8 to 1.98 × 10(11) m(-1), while irreversible fouling (Rp) was 2.7-fold lower. Treatment with 100 ppm alum reduced the total resistance 14.9-fold (11.8 to 0.79 × 10(11) m(-1)) while the Rp decreased 4.25-fold. SEM imaging confirmed this, with less obvious fouling of the membrane after the combined process. This study illustrates that the combination of bacterial predation and the subsequent removal of debris using coagulation or adsorption mitigates membrane biofouling and improves membrane performance. PMID:25410737

  2. Production of bacterial cellulose membranes in a modified airlift bioreactor by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Chi; Li, Meng-Hsun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a novel bioreactor for producing bacterial cellulose (BC) is proposed. Traditional BC production uses static culture conditions and produces a gelatinous membrane. The potential for using various types of bioreactor, including a stirred tank, conventional airlift, and modified airlift with a rectangular wire-mesh draft tube, in large-scale production has been investigated. The BC obtained from these bioreactors is fibrous or in pellet form. Our proposed airlift bioreactor produces a membrane-type BC from Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the water-holding capacity of which is greater than that of cellulose types produced using static cultivation methods. The Young's modulus of the product can be manipulated by varying the number of net plates in the modified airlift bioreactor. The BC membrane produced using the proposed bioreactor exhibits potential for practical application. PMID:25823854

  3. Membrane permeability alteration of some bacterial clinical isolates by selected antihistaminics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa A El-Nakeeb

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several antihistaminics possess antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. However, the exact mechanism of such activity was unclear. Hence, the aim of this study is to investigate their mechanism of antibacterial activity especially their effect upon the permeability of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. The effects of azelastine, cetirizine, cyproheptadine and diphenhydramine were studied using Gram-positive and Gram-negative multiresistant clinical isolates. Leakage of 260 and 280 nm UV-absorbing materials was detected upon treatment with the tested antihistaminics; indicative of membrane alteration. Using an artificial membrane model, cholesterol-free negatively-charged unilamellar liposomes, confirmed the effect of antihistaminics upon the membrane permeability both by showing an apparent membrane damage as observed microscopically and by detection of leakage of preloaded dye from the liposomes colorimatrically. Moreover, examination of the ultrastructure of cells treated with azelastine and cetirizine under the transmission electron microscope substantiated the detected abnormalities in the cell wall and membrane. Furthermore, the effect of pretreating certain isolates for both short and long periods with selected antihistaminics was followed by the viable count technique. Increased vulnerability towards further exposure to azelastine was observed in cells pretreated with azelastine for 2 days and those pretreated with azelastine or cetrizine for 30 days.

  4. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it's still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation. PMID:27615451

  5. Bacterial nanocellulose/Nafion composite membranes for low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gao-peng; Zhang, Jing; Qiao, Jin-li; Jiang, Yong-ming; Zarrin, Hadis; Chen, Zhongwei; Hong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Novel nanocomposite membranes aimed for both proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) are presented in this work. The membranes are based on blending bacterial nanocellulose pulp and Nafion (abbreviated as BxNy, where x and y indicates the mass ratio of bacterial cellulose to Nafion). The structure and properties of BxNy membranes are characterized by FTIR, SEM, TG, DMA and EIS, along with water uptake, swelling behavior and methanol permeability tests. It is found that the BxNy composite membranes with reinforced concrete-like structure show excellent mechanical and thermal stability regardless of annealing. The water uptake plus area and volume swelling ratios are all decreased compared to Nafion membranes. The proton conductivities of pristine and annealed B1N9 are 0.071 and 0.056 S cm-1, respectively, at 30 °C and 100% humidity. Specifically, annealed B1N1 exhibited the lowest methanol permeability of 7.21 × 10-7 cm2 s-1. Through the selectivity analysis, pristine and annealed B1N7 are selected to assemble the MEAs. The performances of annealed B1N7 in PEMFC and DMFC show the maximum power densities of 106 and 3.2 mW cm-2, respectively, which are much higher than those of pristine B1N7 at 25 °C. The performances of the pristine and annealed B1N7 reach a level as high as 21.1 and 20.4 mW cm-2 at 80 °C in DMFC, respectively.

  6. Structural Basis for Translocation of a Biofilm-supporting Exopolysaccharide across the Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Andole Pannuri, Archana; Ni, Dongchun; Zhou, Haizhen; Cao, Xiou; Lu, Xiaomei; Romeo, Tony; Huang, Yihua

    2016-05-01

    The partially de-N-acetylated poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (dPNAG) polymer serves as an intercellular biofilm adhesin that plays an essential role for the development and maintenance of integrity of biofilms of diverse bacterial species. Translocation of dPNAG across the bacterial outer membrane is mediated by a tetratricopeptide repeat-containing outer membrane protein, PgaA. To understand the molecular basis of dPNAG translocation, we determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of PgaA (residues 513-807). The structure reveals that PgaA forms a 16-strand transmembrane β-barrel, closed by four loops on the extracellular surface. Half of the interior surface of the barrel that lies parallel to the translocation pathway is electronegative, suggesting that the corresponding negatively charged residues may assist the secretion of the positively charged dPNAG polymer. In vivo complementation assays in a pgaA deletion bacterial strain showed that a cluster of negatively charged residues proximal to the periplasm is necessary for biofilm formation. Biochemical analyses further revealed that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain of PgaA binds directly to the N-deacetylase PgaB and is critical for biofilm formation. Our studies support a model in which the positively charged PgaB-bound dPNAG polymer is delivered to PgaA through the PgaA-PgaB interaction and is further targeted to the β-barrel lumen of PgaA potentially via a charge complementarity mechanism, thus priming the translocation of dPNAG across the bacterial outer membrane. PMID:26957546

  7. Bacterial Cellulose Membranes Used as Artificial Substitutes for Dural Defection in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals.

  8. Structure of a bacterial type III secretion system in contact with a host membrane in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nans, Andrea; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Saibil, Helen R.; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    Many bacterial pathogens of animals and plants use a conserved type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells to subvert host functions. Contact with host membranes is critical for T3SS activation, yet little is known about T3SS architecture in this state or the conformational changes that drive effector translocation. Here we use cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging to derive the intact structure of the primordial Chlamydia trachomatis T3SS in the presence and absence of host membrane contact. Comparison of the averaged structures demonstrates a marked compaction of the basal body (4 nm) occurs when the needle tip contacts the host cell membrane. This compaction is coupled to a stabilization of the cytosolic sorting platform-ATPase. Our findings reveal the first structure of a bacterial T3SS from a major human pathogen engaged with a eukaryotic host, and reveal striking `pump-action' conformational changes that underpin effector injection.

  9. The Motion of a Single Molecule, the Lambda-Receptor, in the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Grego, Sonia;

    2002-01-01

    constant of (1.5 +/- 1.0) x 10(-9) cm(2)/s and sits in a harmonic potential as if it were tethered by an elastic spring of spring constant of ~1.0 x 10(-2) pN/nm to the bacterial membrane. The purpose of the protein motion might be to facilitate transport of maltodextrins through the outer bacterial......Using optical tweezers and single particle tracking, we have revealed the motion of a single protein, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli bacteria. We genetically modified the lambda-receptor placing a biotin on an extracellular site of the receptor in vivo. The...... that allows extraction of the motion of the protein from measurements of the mobility of the bead-molecule complex; these results are equally applicable to analyze bead-protein complexes in other membrane systems. Within a domain of radius approximately 25 nm, the receptor diffuses with a diffusion...

  10. Changes in bacterial community structure in a full-scale membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kurumi; Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Takada, Kazuki; Hamada, Hiroshi; Sakai, Kousuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Yamashita, Kyoko; Tsuji, Koji; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; Ike, Michihiko

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated changes in the structure and metabolic capabilities of the bacterial community in a full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal wastewater. Microbial monitoring was also conducted for a parallel-running conventional activated sludge (CAS) process treating the same influent. The mixed-liquor suspended solid concentration in the MBR reached a steady-state on day 73 after the start-up. Then the MBR maintained higher rates of removal of organic compounds and nitrogen than the CAS process did. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the bacterial community structure in the MBR was similar to that in the CAS process at the start-up, but it became very different from that in the CAS process in the steady state. The bacterial community structure of the MBR continued to change dynamically even after 20 months of the steady-state operation, while that of the CAS process was maintained in a stable condition. By contrast, Biolog assay revealed that the carbon source utilization potential of the MBR resembled that of the CAS process as a whole, although it declined transiently. Overall, the results indicate that the bacterial community of the MBR has flexibility in terms of its phylogenetic structure and metabolic activity to maintain the high wastewater treatment capability. PMID:26811223

  11. Crystal structure of MraY, an essential membrane enzyme for bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ben C; Zhao, Jinshi; Gillespie, Robert A; Kwon, Do-Yeon; Guan, Ziqiang; Hong, Jiyong; Zhou, Pei; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2013-08-30

    MraY (phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes an essential step of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis: the transfer of the peptidoglycan precursor phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide to the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate. MraY has long been considered a promising target for the development of antibiotics, but the lack of a structure has hindered mechanistic understanding of this critical enzyme and the enzyme superfamily in general. The superfamily includes enzymes involved in bacterial lipopolysaccharide/teichoic acid formation and eukaryotic N-linked glycosylation, modifications that are central in many biological processes. We present the crystal structure of MraY from Aquifex aeolicus (MraYAA) at 3.3 Å resolution, which allows us to visualize the overall architecture, locate Mg(2+) within the active site, and provide a structural basis of catalysis for this class of enzyme. PMID:23990562

  12. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  13. Distribution and dynamics of OXPHOS complexes in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalon, Axel; Alberge, François

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is an essential process for most living organisms mostly sustained by protein complexes embedded in the cell membrane. In order to thrive, cells need to quickly respond to changes in the metabolic demand or in their environment. An overview of the strategies that can be employed by bacterial cells to adjust the OXPHOS outcome is provided. Regulation at the level of gene expression can only provide a means to adjust the OXPHOS outcome to long-term trends in the environment. In addition, the actual view is that bioenergetic membranes are highly compartmentalized structures. This review discusses what is known about the spatial organization of OXPHOS complexes and the timescales at which they occur. As exemplified with the commensal gut bacterium Escherichia coli, three levels of spatial organization are at play: supercomplexes, membrane microdomains and polar assemblies. This review provides a particular focus on whether dynamic spatial organization can fine-tune the OXPHOS through the definition of specialized functional membrane microdomains. Putative mechanisms responsible for spatio-temporal regulation of the OXPHOS complexes are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26545610

  14. Conformation of protein secreted across bacterial outer membranes: a study of enterotoxin translocation from Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The secretion of enterotoxin by Vibrio cholerae is punctuated by the transient entry of the toxin subunits into the periplasm. In this paper, the authors show that the subunits oligomerize into an assembled holotoxin within the periplasm prior to their secretion across the outer membrane. The rate of toxin assembly was studied by pulse-labeling cells with [35S]-methionine and then monitoring the turnover of radiolabeled subunits as they assembled within the periplasm. The subunits entered the periplasm as monomers and assembled into oligomers with a half-time of ≅ 1 min. Since assembly was a rapid event compared to the rate of toxin efflux from the periplasm, which had a half-time of ≅ 13 min, they conclude that all of the subunits that pass through the periplasm assemble before they traverse the outer membrane. The average concentration of subunit monomers and assembled holotoxin within the periplasm was calculated to be ≅ 20 and ≅ 260 μg/ml, respectively. This indicates that the periplasm is a suitably concentrated milieu where spontaneous toxin assembly can occur. These findings suggest that protein movement across bacterial outer membranes, in apparent contrast to export across other biological membranes, involves translocation of polypeptides that have already folded into tertiary and even quaternary conformations

  15. Reconstitution of nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 9.5 million people die each year due to infectious diseases caused by pathogens. Many species of pathogenic bacteria require nanomachines acting like a molecular pump that shuttle key disease-causing molecules (proteins) from inside bacteria cells to the outside surface, priming the bacteria for infections. How such proteins are assembled remains an important question in biology. If we can inhibit the nanomachines function in transporting specific violence factors, it would disable the disease process. Therefore it is crucial to understand how the proteins are transported through the nanomachines from the periplasm to the extracellular space. Measuring the activity of the component parts of membrane-embedded nanomachines in solution is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). We show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines.

  16. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Breukink, Eefjan

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated) proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues. PMID:27571111

  17. Flexible conductive polypyrrole nanocomposite membranes based on bacterial cellulose with amphiphobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lian; Han, Jinlu; Jiang, Zhenlin; Chen, Shiyan; Wang, Huaping

    2015-03-01

    Flexible conductive polypyrrole nanocomposite membranes based on bacterial cellulose (BC) with amphiphobicity have been successfully prepared through in situ chemical synthesis and then infiltrated with polysiloxane solution. The results suggested that polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles deposited on the surface of BC formed a continuous core-shell structure by taking along the BC template. After modification with polysiloxane, the surface characteristics of the conductive BC membranes changed from highly hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The AFM images revealed that the roughness of samples after polysiloxane treatment increased along with the increase of pyrrole concentration. The contact angles (CAs) data revealed that the highest water contact angle and highest oil contact angle are 160.3° and 136.7°, respectively. The conductivity of the amphiphobic membranes with excellent flexibility reached 0.32 S/cm and demonstrated a good electromagnetic shielding effectiveness with an SE of 15 dB which could be applied in electromagnetic shielding materials with self-cleaning properties. It opened a new field of potential applications of BC materials. PMID:25498630

  18. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Kozjak-Pavlovic

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m. Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m. The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection.

  19. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs, have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues.

  20. Enriched glucose and dextrin mannitol-based media modulates fibroblast behavior on bacterial cellulose membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) produced by Gluconacetobacter hansenii is a suitable biopolymer for biomedical applications. In order to modulate the properties of BC and expand its use as substrate for tissue engineering mainly in the form of biomembranes, glucose or dextrin were added into a BC fermentation mannitol-based medium (BCGl and BCDe, respectively) under static culture conditions. SEM images showed effects on fiber density and porosity on both sides of the BC membranes. Both enriched media decreased the BET surface area, water holding capacity, and rehydration rate. Fourier transform infrared (attenuated total reflectance mode) spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) analysis revealed no change in the chemical structure of BC. L929 fibroblast cells were seeded on all BC-based membranes and evaluated in aspects of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology. BCG1 membranes showed the highest biological performance and hold promise for the use in tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Glucose and dextrin were used to modify culture media for BC production. • Microarchitecture of BC was different depending on the enriching agent. • Fibroblasts adhered on the surface of BC modified microarchitectures. • Fibroblasts adhered on glucose modified BC exhibited healthy cell morphology

  1. Enriched glucose and dextrin mannitol-based media modulates fibroblast behavior on bacterial cellulose membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Taisa R.; Pértile, Renata A.N. [Integrated Technologies Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Food Engineering (Brazil); Rambo, Carlos R., E-mail: rambo@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900 (Brazil); Porto, Luismar M. [Integrated Technologies Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Food Engineering (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) produced by Gluconacetobacter hansenii is a suitable biopolymer for biomedical applications. In order to modulate the properties of BC and expand its use as substrate for tissue engineering mainly in the form of biomembranes, glucose or dextrin were added into a BC fermentation mannitol-based medium (BCGl and BCDe, respectively) under static culture conditions. SEM images showed effects on fiber density and porosity on both sides of the BC membranes. Both enriched media decreased the BET surface area, water holding capacity, and rehydration rate. Fourier transform infrared (attenuated total reflectance mode) spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) analysis revealed no change in the chemical structure of BC. L929 fibroblast cells were seeded on all BC-based membranes and evaluated in aspects of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology. BCG1 membranes showed the highest biological performance and hold promise for the use in tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Glucose and dextrin were used to modify culture media for BC production. • Microarchitecture of BC was different depending on the enriching agent. • Fibroblasts adhered on the surface of BC modified microarchitectures. • Fibroblasts adhered on glucose modified BC exhibited healthy cell morphology.

  2. Study on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells and fluidity changes in model bacterial membranes using optical microscopy techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Christine Shiang Yee

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis optical microscopy techniques are used to consider aspects of viral and bacterial infections. In part 1, the physical effects of cytomegalovirus on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells are studied; in part 2, the effects of an antimicrobial peptide on the fluidity of model bacterial membranes are studied. The optical microscopy techniques used to study the effects of murine-cytomegalovirus (mCMV) on lipid droplets in live NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells in real-time are...

  3. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane. PMID:27095709

  4. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a's targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  5. An ethanol biosensor based on a bacterial cell-immobilized eggshell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Ming Wen; Shao Min Shuang; Chuan Dong; Martin M.F. Choi

    2012-01-01

    An ethanol biosensor was fabricated based on a Methylobacterium organophilium-immobilized eggshell membrane and an oxygen (O2) electrode.A linear response for ethanol was obtained in the range of 0.050-7.5 mmol/L with a detection limit of 0.025 mmol/L (S/N =3) and a R.S.D.of 2.1%.The response time was less than 100 s at room temperature and ambient pressure.The optimal loading of bacterial cells on the biosensor membrane is 40 mg (wet weight).The optimal working conditions for the microbial biosensor are pH 7.0 phosphate buffer (50 mmol/L) at 20-25 ℃.The interference test,operational and storage stability of the biosensor are studied in detail.Finally,the biosensor is applied to determine the ethanol contents in various alcohol samples and the results are comparable to that obtained by gas chromatographic method and the results are satisfactory.Our proposed biosensor provides a convenient,simple and reliable method to determine ethanol content in alcoholic drinks.

  6. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  7. Clathrin and HA2 adaptors: effects of potassium depletion, hypertonic medium, and cytosol acidification

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The effects of methods known to perturb endocytosis from clathrin- coated pits on the localization of clathrin and HA2 adaptors in HEp-2 carcinoma cells have been studied by immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunogold microscopy, using internalization of transferrin as a functional assay. Potassium depletion, as well as incubation in hypertonic medium, remove membrane-associated clathrin lattices: flat clathrin lattices and coated pits from the plasma membrane, and clathrin-coated vesic...

  8. Protein secretion by hybrid bacterial ABC-transporters: specific functions of the membrane ATPase and the membrane fusion protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Binet, R; Wandersman, C

    1995-01-01

    The Erwinia chrysanthemi metalloprotease C and the Serratia marcescens haem acquisition protein HasA are both secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a C-terminal secretion signal and a specific ABC-transporter made up of three proteins: a membrane ATPase (the ABC-protein), a second inner membrane component belonging to the membrane fusion protein family and an outer membrane polypeptide. HasA and protease C transporters are homologous altho...

  9. Effect of Structure on the Interactions between Five Natural Antimicrobial Compounds and Phospholipids of Bacterial Cell Membrane on Model Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella W. Nowotarska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of the naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde, and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. The lipid monolayers consist of 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE, 1,2-dihexa- decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol (DPPG, and 1,1',2,2'-tetratetradecanoyl cardiolipin (cardiolipin. Surface pressure–area (π-A and surface potential–area (Δψ-A isotherms were measured to monitor changes in the thermodynamic and physical properties of the lipid monolayers. Results of the study indicated that the five compounds modified the three lipid monolayer structures by integrating into the monolayer, forming aggregates of antimicrobial –lipid complexes, reducing the packing effectiveness of the lipids, increasing the membrane fluidity, and altering the total dipole moment in the monolayer membrane model. The interactions of the five antimicrobial compounds with bacterial phospholipids depended on both the structure of the antimicrobials and the composition of the monolayers. The observed experimental results provide insight into the mechanism of the molecular interactions between naturally-occurring antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of the bacterial cell membrane that govern activities.

  10. Graphene oxide exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacterial phytopathogens and fungal conidia by intertwining and membrane perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juanni; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiuping; Shao, Feng; Yuan, Zhaodong; Han, Heyou

    2014-01-01

    To understand the interaction mechanism between graphene oxide (GO) and typical phytopathogens, a particular investigation was conducted about the antimicrobial activity of GO against two bacterial pathogens (P. syringae and X. campestris pv. undulosa) and two fungal pathogens (F. graminearum and F. oxysporum). The results showed that GO had a powerful effect on the reproduction of all four pathogens (killed nearly 90% of the bacteria and repressed 80% macroconidia germination along with partial cell swelling and lysis at 500 μg mL-1). A mutual mechanism is proposed in this work that GO intertwinds the bacteria and fungal spores with a wide range of aggregated graphene oxide sheets, resulting in the local perturbation of their cell membrane and inducing the decrease of the bacterial membrane potential and the leakage of electrolytes of fungal spores. It is likely that GO interacts with the pathogens by mechanically wrapping and locally damaging the cell membrane and finally causing cell lysis, which may be one of the major toxicity actions of GO against phytopathogens. The antibacterial mode proposed in this study suggests that the GO may possess antibacterial activity against more multi-resistant bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and provides useful information about the application of GO in resisting crop diseases.To understand the interaction mechanism between graphene oxide (GO) and typical phytopathogens, a particular investigation was conducted about the antimicrobial activity of GO against two bacterial pathogens (P. syringae and X. campestris pv. undulosa) and two fungal pathogens (F. graminearum and F. oxysporum). The results showed that GO had a powerful effect on the reproduction of all four pathogens (killed nearly 90% of the bacteria and repressed 80% macroconidia germination along with partial cell swelling and lysis at 500 μg mL-1). A mutual mechanism is proposed in this work that GO intertwinds the bacteria and fungal spores with a wide range

  11. Protecting enzymatic function through directed packaging into bacterial outer membrane vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Nathan J.; Turner, Kendrick B.; Medintz, Igor L.; Walper, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess innate machinery to transport extracellular cargo between cells as well as package virulence factors to infect host cells by secreting outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain small molecules, proteins, and genetic material. These robust proteoliposomes have evolved naturally to be resistant to degradation and provide a supportive environment to extend the activity of encapsulated cargo. In this study, we sought to exploit bacterial OMV formation to package and maintain the activity of an enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE), under challenging storage conditions encountered for real world applications. Here we show that OMV packaged PTE maintains activity over free PTE when subjected to elevated temperatures (>100-fold more activity after 14 days at 37 °C), iterative freeze-thaw cycles (3.4-fold post four-cycles), and lyophilization (43-fold). We also demonstrate how lyophilized OMV packaged PTE can be utilized as a cell free reagent for long term environmental remediation of pesticide/chemical warfare contaminated areas. PMID:27117743

  12. Control of tick infestations in cattle vaccinated with bacterial membranes containing surface-exposed tick protective antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazán, Consuelo; Moreno-Cantú, Orlando; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Galindo, Ruth C; Canales, Mario; Villar, Margarita; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines containing the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 antigens protect cattle against tick infestations. Tick subolesin (SUB), elongation factor 1a (EF1a) and ubiquitin (UBQ) are new candidate protective antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations. Previous studies showed that R. microplus BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the Anaplasma marginale major surface protein (MSP) 1a N-terminal region (BM95-MSP1a) for presentation on the Escherichia coli membrane were protective against R. microplus infestations in rabbits. In this study, we extended these results by expressing SUB-MSP1a, EF1a-MSP1a and UBQ-MSP1a fusion proteins on the E. coli membrane using this system and demonstrating that bacterial membranes containing the chimeric proteins BM95-MSP1a and SUB-MSP1a were protective (>60% vaccine efficacy) against experimental R. microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus infestations in cattle. This system provides a novel, simple and cost-effective approach for the production of tick protective antigens by surface display of antigenic protein chimera on the E. coli membrane and demonstrates the possibility of using recombinant bacterial membrane fractions in vaccine preparations to protect cattle against tick infestations. PMID:22085549

  13. Protective efficacy of bacterial membranes containing surface-exposed BM95 antigenic peptides for the control of cattle tick infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Mario; Labruna, Marcelo B; Soares, João F; Prudencio, Carlos R; de la Fuente, José

    2009-12-01

    The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that the recombinant chimeric protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region for presentation on the Escherichia coli membrane was protective against R. microplus infestations in rabbits. This system provides a novel and simple approach for the production of tick protective antigens by surface display of antigenic protein chimera on live E. coli and suggests the possibility of using recombinant bacterial membrane fractions for vaccination against cattle tick infestations. PMID:19835826

  14. Palmitoylated transmembrane adaptor proteins in leukocyte signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2014), s. 895-902. ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Leukocyte * Adaptor * Palmitoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.315, year: 2014

  15. Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities in a membrane bioreactor for the treatment of metal-working fluid wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Garbisu, Carlos; Martín, Iker; Etxebarria, Javier; Gutierrez-Mañero, F Javier; Lucas Garcia, Jose Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An extensive microbiological study has been carried out in a membrane bioreactor fed with activated sludge and metal-working fluids. Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities were studied with different approaches. Functional diversity of culturable bacterial communities was studied with different Biolog™ plates. Structure and dynamics of bacterial communities were studied in culturable and in non-culturable fractions using a 16S rRNA analysis. Among the culturable bacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were the predominant classes. However, changes in microbial community structure were detected over time. Culture-independent analysis showed that Betaproteobacteria was the most frequently detected class in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) community with Zoogloea and Acidovorax as dominant genera. Also, among non-culturable bacteria, a process of succession was observed. Longitudinal structural shifts observed were more marked for non-culturable than for culturable bacteria, pointing towards an important role in the MBR performance. Microbial community metabolic abilities assessed with Biolog™ Gram negative, Gram positive and anaerobic plates also showed differences over time for Shannon's diversity index, kinetics of average well colour development, and the intensely used substrates by bacterial community in each plate. PMID:26608762

  16. Amphiphilic block copolymers as flexible membrane materials generating structural and functional mimics of green bacterial antenna complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A M; Timlin, J A; Anthony, S M; Montaño, G A

    2016-08-11

    We describe the ability of a short-chain amphiphilic block copolymer to self-assemble to form an artificial supramolecular light-harvesting system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the 2.5 kDa, poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(butadiene) (PEO-b-PBD), exhibits sufficient morphological flexibility as a membrane material and enables generation of mimics of three-dimensional chlorosomes as well as supported membrane bilayers containing energy acceptors. This overall architecture replicates green bacterial light-harvesting function whereby these assemblies exhibit long-range order and three-dimensional morphology similar to native chlorosomes and are capable of energy transfer internally and to external acceptors, located in a supporting biomimetic polymer membrane. Unlike native green bacterial systems that use multiple lipids as a matrix to generate the appropriate environment for chlorosome assembly and function, the described system matrix is comprised entirely of a single polymer amphiphile. This work demonstrates the potential of short-chain amphiphilic block copolymers in generating self-assembled, bio-mimetic membrane architectures, and in doing so, generates scalable, spatial-energetic landscapes for photonic applications. Finally, the results presented provide evidence of minimal requirements to induce chlorosome-like organization and function. PMID:27481550

  17. Solid-state NMR Study of the YadA Membrane-Anchor Domain in the Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shakeel A; Nagaraj, Madhu; Chauhan, Nandini; Franks, Trent W; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Habeck, Michael; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Linke, Dirk; van Rossum, Barth-J

    2015-10-19

    MAS-NMR was used to study the structure and dynamics at ambient temperatures of the membrane-anchor domain of YadA (YadA-M) in a pellet of the outer membrane of E. coli in which it was expressed. YadA is an adhesin from the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica that is involved in interactions with the host cell, and it is a model protein for studying the autotransport process. Existing assignments were sucessfully transferred to a large part of the YadA-M protein in the E. coli lipid environment by using (13) C-(13) C DARR and PDSD spectra at different mixing times. The chemical shifts in most regions of YadA-M are unchanged relative to those in microcrystalline YadA-M preparations from which a structure has previously been solved, including the ASSA region that is proposed to be involved in transition-state hairpin formation for transport of the soluble domain. Comparisons of the dynamics between the microcrystalline and membrane-embedded samples indicate greater flexibility of the ASSA region in the outer-membrane preparation at physiological temperatures. This study will pave the way towards MAS-NMR structure determination of membrane proteins, and a better understanding of functionally important dynamic residues in native membrane environments. PMID:26332158

  18. Eggshell and Bacterial Cellulose Composite Membrane as Absorbent Material in Active Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ummartyotin, S.; Pisitsak, P.; Pechyen, C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose and eggshell composite was successfully developed. Eggshell was mixed with bacterial cellulose suspension and it was casted as a composite film. CaCO3 derived from eggshell was compared with its commercial availability. It can be noted that good dispersion of eggshell particle was prepared. Eggshell particle was irregular in shape with a variation in size. It existed in bacterial cellulose network. Characterization on composite was focused on thermal and mechanical propert...

  19. The influence of environmentally friendly pesticide - Eucalyptol - alone and in combination with terpinen-4-ol - on model bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Szydło, Karolina

    2016-10-01

    Eucalyptus oil is known from antimicrobial properties and due to natural origin and low toxicity it can be applied as a green pesticide. This plant extract is a mixture of compounds among which Eucalyptol prevails strongly over the number of minor components including terpinen-4-ol. However, antimicrobial effect of total extract is stronger than the effect of its major component. The mechanism of action of essential oils involves their incorporation into membrane of pathogenic cell. To investigate the effect of eucalyptus oil components on bacterial membrane in this work the influence of Eucalyptol on model lipid systems of various compositions was studied and then compared with the effect induced by the mixture of Eucalyptol and terpinen-4-ol. The analysis of the lipid monolayer properties modified by the presence of the essential oils evidenced that Eucalyptol reduces the lipids packing and decreases membrane rigidity, however, its influence is determined both by the concentration of this terpene and by the composition of lipid film. As indicated the results of calculation of the surface excess values Eucalyptol molecules tend to adsorb at the interface, however, at higher concentration in the subphase, the molecules undergo desorption at membrane-related surface pressure. By mixing of Eucalyptol and terpinen-4-ol stronger monolayer fluidization and destabilization can be achieved as well as stronger adsorption, even at higher surface pressures, occurs. However, these effects are also determined by the composition of model system. The collected data suggest that these compounds may act by penetrating bacterial membrane. Moreover, it can be proposed that although Eucalyptol is a major component of the Eucalyptus oil the antimicrobial effect of total extract is generated also by a minor component. This may explain stronger antimicrobial effect of Eucalyptus oil as compared to sole Eucalyptol confirmed in biological studies. PMID:27472454

  20. In situ deposition of platinum nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes and evaluation of PEM fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ deposition of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes (BC) for a fuel cell application was studied. The platinum/bacterial cellulose (Pt/BC) membranes under different experimental conditions were characterized by using SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffractometry) and TG (thermo-gravimetric analysis) techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic platinum nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-4 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. TG curves revealed these Pt/BC composite materials had the high thermal stability. The electrosorption of hydrogen was investigated by CV (cyclic voltammetry). It was found that Pt/BC catalysts have high electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen oxidation reaction. The single cell performance of Pt/BC was tested at 20 deg. C, 30 deg. C, and 40 deg. C under non-humidified conditions. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as membrane in fuel cell field [B.R. Evans, H.M. O'Neill, V.P. Malyvanh, I. Lee, J. Woodward, Biosens. Bioelectron. 18 (2003) 917].

  1. In situ deposition of platinum nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes and evaluation of PEM fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jiazhi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nan Jing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun Dongping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nan Jing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)], E-mail: dongpingsun@163.com; Li Jun; Yang Xujie; Yu Junwei; Hao Qingli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nan Jing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Liu Wenming [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu Jianguo [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: jianguoliu@nju.edu.cn; Zou Zhigang; Gu Jun [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-11-01

    In situ deposition of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose membranes (BC) for a fuel cell application was studied. The platinum/bacterial cellulose (Pt/BC) membranes under different experimental conditions were characterized by using SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffractometry) and TG (thermo-gravimetric analysis) techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic platinum nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-4 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. TG curves revealed these Pt/BC composite materials had the high thermal stability. The electrosorption of hydrogen was investigated by CV (cyclic voltammetry). It was found that Pt/BC catalysts have high electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen oxidation reaction. The single cell performance of Pt/BC was tested at 20 deg. C, 30 deg. C, and 40 deg. C under non-humidified conditions. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as membrane in fuel cell field [B.R. Evans, H.M. O'Neill, V.P. Malyvanh, I. Lee, J. Woodward, Biosens. Bioelectron. 18 (2003) 917].

  2. Immunological study of the outer membrane proteins of Vibrio harveyi: insights that link immunoprotectivity to interference with bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan-ping; Hu, Yong-hua; Sun, Bo-guang; Sun, Li

    2013-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a bacterial pathogen that affects marine vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we identified 13 outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from a pathogenic V. harveyi strain and analyzed their immunological properties. In vivo immunogenicity analysis showed that antibodies specific to recombinant proteins of the 13 OMPs were detected in the antiserum of V. harveyi-infected rat. When used as subunit vaccines to immunize Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), all OMPs were able to elicit specific serum antibody production in the vaccinated fish; however, only two OMPs (OMP173 and OMP214) induced high levels (>70%) of relative percent survival. Pre-incubation of V. harveyi with the antisera of protective OMPs significantly impaired bacterial infectivity against peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), whereas the antisera of non-protective OMPs had no apparent effect on infection. OMP173 antibodies could bind whole V. harveyi cells and exhibit bactericidal effect in a complement-dependent manner. Passive immunization showed that fish received OMP173 antiserum before being infected with V. harveyi exhibited significantly reduced mortality rate and lower bacterial loads in liver, spleen, and kidney. Finally, treatment of FG cells with OMP173 prior to V. harveyi infection protected the cells from bacterial invasion to a significant extent. Take together, these results indicate that two of the examined OMPs induce protective immunity through production of specific antibodies that block bacterial invasion, and that one OMP is likely to be involved in host cell interaction during the infection process. Thus, the immunoprotectivity of the OMPs is probably associated with functional participations of the OMPs in bacterial infection. PMID:23932987

  3. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl β-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure [35S]pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components

  4. Yeast Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins are but adaptor protein-1 is not required for cell-free transport of membrane proteins from the trans-Golgi network to the prevacuolar compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazeed, Mohamed E; Fuller, Robert S

    2008-11-01

    Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN-PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the beta subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Delta membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Delta mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  5. Yeast Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-Ribosylation Factor-binding Proteins Are but Adaptor Protein-1 Is Not Required for Cell-free Transport of Membrane Proteins from the Trans-Golgi Network to the Prevacuolar Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.

    2008-01-01

    Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN–PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the β subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Δ membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Δ mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  6. Guanidino groups greatly enhance the action of antimicrobial peptidomimetics against bacterial cytoplasmic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreev, Konstantin; Bianchi, Christopher; Laursen, Jonas Striegler;

    2014-01-01

    monolayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were used to model cytoplasmic membranes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, while lipopolysaccharide Kdo2-lipid A monolayers were mimicking the outer membrane of Gram-negative species. We report the results of the...

  7. Biodegradation of a biochar-modified waterborne polyacrylate membrane coating for controlled-release fertilizer and its effects on soil bacterial community profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijun; Du, Changwen; Li, Ting; Shen, Yazhen; Zeng, Yin; Du, Jie; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-06-01

    Biochar-modified polyacrylate-like polymers are promising waterborne polymer-based membrane coatings for controlled-release fertilizers. However, the effect of these membrane polymers on paddy soil is unknown. A soil incubation experiment was conducted using Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy to monitor the changes in the polymer-coated membranes in paddy soil, and Biolog EcoPlates and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were used to detect the effects of the membranes on soil bacterial community profiles. Compared to unmodified membranes, the biodegradation rate of the biochar-modified membrane was slower, and the membrane was more intact, which improved and guaranteed the controlled release of nutrients. Compared to the soil without membranes, the biochar-modified membranes, as well as unmodified ones, showed no significant impacts on the composition diversity of soil dominant bacterial community. The activity and functional diversity of soil culturable microbial community during the early stage of incubation were reduced by biochar-modified membranes due to the release of small amount of soluble organic materials but were both recovered in the 12(th) month of the incubation period. Therefore, the biochar-modified waterborne polyacrylate was environmentally friendly, demonstrating its potential both in the development of coated controlled-release fertilizers and in the utilization of crop residue. PMID:25567059

  8. A membrane-bound matrix-metalloproteinase from Nicotiana tabacum cv. BY-2 is induced by bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahner Verena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant matrix metalloproteinases (MMP are conserved proteolytic enzymes found in a wide range of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species. Acting on the plant extracellular matrix, they play crucial roles in many aspects of plant physiology including growth, development and the response to stresses such as pathogen attack. Results We have identified the first tobacco MMP, designated NtMMP1, and have isolated the corresponding cDNA sequence from the tobacco suspension cell line BY-2. The overall domain structure of NtMMP1 is similar to known MMP sequences, although certain features suggest it may be constitutively active rather than dependent on proteolytic processing. The protein appears to be expressed in two forms with different molecular masses, both of which are enzymatically active as determined by casein zymography. Exchanging the catalytic domain of NtMMP1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP facilitated subcellular localization by confocal laser scanning microscopy, showing the protein is normally inserted into the plasma membrane. The NtMMP1 gene is expressed constitutively at a low level but can be induced by exposure to bacterial pathogens. Conclusion Our biochemical analysis of NtMMP1 together with bioinformatic data on the primary sequence indicate that NtMMP1 is a constitutively-active protease. Given its induction in response to bacterial pathogens and its localization in the plasma membrane, we propose a role in pathogen defense at the cell periphery.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide density and structure govern the extent and distance of nanoparticle interaction with actual and model bacterial outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  10. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes. PMID:26528534

  11. Protein complexes in bacterial and yeast mitochondrial membranes differ in their sensitivity towards dissociation by SDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2008-12-01

    Previously, a 2D gel electrophoresis approach was developed for the Escherichia coli inner membrane, which detects membrane protein complexes that are stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at room temperature, and dissociate under the influence of trifluoroethanol [R. E. Spelbrink et al., J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005), 28742-8]. Here, the method was applied to the evolutionarily related mitochondrial inner membrane that was isolated from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, only very few proteins were found to be dissociated by trifluoroethanol of which Lpd1p, a component of multiple protein complexes localized in the mitochondrial matrix, is the most prominent. Usage of either milder or more stringent conditions did not yield any additional proteins that were released by fluorinated alcohols. This strongly suggests that membrane protein complexes in yeast are less stable in SDS solution than their E. coli counterparts, which might be due to the overall reduced hydrophobicity of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins. PMID:18817900

  12. Release of Free DNA by Membrane-Impaired Bacterial Aerosols Due to Aerosolization and Air Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen, Huajun; Han, Taewon; Fennell, Donna E.; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2013-01-01

    We report here that stress experienced by bacteria due to aerosolization and air sampling can result in severe membrane impairment, leading to the release of DNA as free molecules. Escherichia coli and Bacillus atrophaeus bacteria were aerosolized and then either collected directly into liquid or collected using other collection media and then transferred into liquid. The amount of DNA released was quantified as the cell membrane damage index (ID), i.e., the number of 16S rRNA gene copies in ...

  13. The role of lipids in membrane insertion and translocation of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Annemieke; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-11

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of membranes and maintain the membrane permeability barrier of cells and organelles. They provide not only the bilayer matrix in which the functional membrane proteins reside, but they also can play direct roles in many essential cellular processes. In this review, we give an overview of the lipid involvement in protein translocation across and insertion into the Escherichia coli inner membrane. We describe the key and general roles that lipids play in these processes in conjunction with the protein components involved. We focus on the Sec-mediated insertion of leader peptidase. We describe as well the more direct roles that lipids play in insertion of the small coat proteins Pf3 and M13. Finally, we focus on the role of lipids in membrane assembly of oligomeric membrane proteins, using the potassium channel KcsA as model protein. In all cases, the anionic lipids and lipids with small headgroups play important roles in either determining the efficiency of the insertion and assembly process or contributing to the directionality of the insertion process. PMID:15546660

  14. The effect of organic matter and oxygen on the degradation of bacterial membrane lipids in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Rodger; Fallon, Robert D.; Patton, John S.

    1986-05-01

    The biodegradation of purified radiolabelled membrane lipids from a methanogenic bacterium and a pseudomonad were investigated in mangrove, beach and high marsh marine sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effect of organic matter on the amount and rate of degradation was also examined by supplementing beach sediments with humic acids. In aerobic sediments, CO 2 was the major product of lipid degradation while under anaerobic conditions both CO 2 and CH 4 were major end products and the overall rates were reduced (up to 40%) relative to aerobic conditions. Total bacterial numbers increased during all incubations with the largest increases occurring in anaerobic sediments supplemented with humic acids. No lipid degradation occurred in aerobic or anaerobic sediments treated with formaldehyde or autoclaving. In low organic beach sediments, the ester-linked phospholipid of the pseudomonad was degraded much more rapidly than the diphytanyl glycerol diether of the methanogen with 69% of the phospholipid degraded in 96 hours versus only 4% of the methanogen lipid. Lipid degradation in both aerobic and anaerobic sediments was highly correlated to organic matter content with increasing amounts of organic matter inhibiting degradation. Long incubations (75 days) of the diphytanyl glycerol ether resulted in 51% degraded to CO 2 in low (0.5%) organic mangrove sediments while only 9% was mineralized in high (10.8%) organic marsh sediments. Physicochemical sorption of membrane lipids to the organic matrix is proposed as a mechanism which protects membrane lipids from microbial attack and degradation.

  15. Radiosensitization of hypoxic bacterial cells and animal tumours by membrane active drugs and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report deals with the results on phenothiazine derivatives such as promethazine (PMZ), trimeprazine (TMZ), trifluoperazine (TFP) and prochlorperazine (PCP) and their comparison with that of chlorpromazine (CPZ). Their efficiency in combination with hyperthermia, radiation and other anti-cancer drugs in treating murine tumors has also been presented herein. In addition, results on bacterial cells dealing with their mechanistic aspects are also included. (author). 57 refs., 27 figures, 13 tables

  16. Guanidino groups greatly enhance the action of antimicrobial peptidomimetics against bacterial cytoplasmic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, Konstantin; Bianchi, Christopher; Laursen, Jonas S.; Citterio, Linda; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Olsen, Christian A.; Gidalevitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides or their synthetic mimics are a promising class of potential new antibiotics. Herein we assess the effect of the type of cationic side chain (i.e., guanidino vs. amino groups) on the membrane perturbing mechanismof antimicrobial α-peptide–β-peptoid chimeras. Langmuirmonolayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoylsn- glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were used to model cytoplasmic membranes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria,while lipopolysaccharide Kdo2-lipid Amonolayersweremimicking the outer membrane of Gram-negative species.We report the results of themeasurements using an array of techniques, including high-resolution synchrotron surface X-ray scattering, epifluorescence microscopy, and in vitro antimicrobial activity to study the molecularmechanisms of peptidomimetic interaction with bacterialmembranes.We found guanidino group-containing chimeras to exhibit greater disruptive activity on DPPGmonolayers than the amino group-containing analogues. However, this effect was not observed for lipopolysaccharidemonolayerswhere the difference was negligible. Furthermore, the addition of the nitrobenzoxadiazole fluorophore did not reduce the insertion activity of these antimicrobials into both model membrane systems examined, which may be useful for future cellular localization studies.

  17. Isolation of Bacterial Strains Capable of Sulfamethoxazole Mineralization from an Acclimated Membrane Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bouju, H.; Ricken, B.; Beffa, T; Corvini, P. F.- X.; Kolvenbach, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we isolated five strains capable of degrading 14C-labeled sulfamethoxazole to 14CO2 from a membrane bioreactor acclimatized to sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, and diclofenac. Of these strains, two belonged to the phylum Actinobacteria, while three were members of the Proteobacteria.

  18. Genetic and Ultrastructural Analysis Reveals the Key Players and Initial Steps of Bacterial Magnetosome Membrane Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschdorf, Oliver; Forstner, Yvonne; Kolinko, Isabel; Uebe, René; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria contain well-ordered nanocrystals for magnetic navigation and have recently emerged as the most sophisticated model system to study the formation of membrane bounded organelles in prokaryotes. Magnetosome biosynthesis is thought to begin with the formation of a dedicated compartment, the magnetosome membrane (MM), in which the biosynthesis of a magnetic mineral is strictly controlled. While the biomineralization of magnetosomes and their subsequent assembly into linear chains recently have become increasingly well studied, the molecular mechanisms and early stages involved in MM formation remained poorly understood. In the Alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, approximately 30 genes were found to control magnetosome biosynthesis. By cryo-electron tomography of several key mutant strains we identified the gene complement controlling MM formation in this model organism. Whereas the putative magnetosomal iron transporter MamB was most crucial for the process and caused the most severe MM phenotype upon elimination, MamM, MamQ and MamL were also required for the formation of wild-type-like MMs. A subset of seven genes (mamLQBIEMO) combined within a synthetic operon was sufficient to restore the formation of intracellular membranes in the absence of other genes from the key mamAB operon. Tracking of de novo magnetosome membrane formation by genetic induction revealed that magnetosomes originate from unspecific cytoplasmic membrane locations before alignment into coherent chains. Our results indicate that no single factor alone is essential for MM formation, which instead is orchestrated by the cumulative action of several magnetosome proteins. PMID:27286560

  19. Comparison of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community structure in membrane-assisted bioreactors using PCR-DGGE and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziembińska, A; Ciesielski, S; Gnida, A; Zabczyńki, S; Surmacz-Górska, J; Miksch, K

    2012-08-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) communities in three membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were monitored for 2 months after an acclimation period in order to investigate the influence of sludge age and medium type on AOB changeability and its connection with nitrification effectiveness. One MBR with a sludge age of 4 days was fed with a synthetic medium, whereas the other two with sludge ages of 8 and 32 days were fed with landfill leachate. The research revealed that landfill leachate can be effectively treated in an MBR with a higher sludge age for longer periods of time and that this improvement in performance was correlated with an increase in AOB biodiversity. Interestingly, the medium type has a stronger influence on AOB biocenosis formation than the sludge age. PMID:22713978

  20. Cell-penetrating peptides mediated protein cross-membrane delivery and its use in bacterial vector vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jimei; Xu, Jinmei; Guan, Lingyu; Hu, Tianjian; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-07-01

    It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications. PMID:24746937

  1. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  2. Laccase immobilization on bacterial nanocellulose membranes: antimicrobial, kinetic and stability properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Liliana M. P.; Padrão, Jorge; Faria, Jorge; Silva, João P.; Silva, Carla J.; Dourado, Fernando; Zille, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This work studied the physical immobilization of a commercial laccase on bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) aiming to identify the laccase antibacterial properties suitable for wound dressings. Physico-chemical analysis demonstrates that the BNC structure is manly formed by pure crystalline I cellulose. The pH optimum and activation energy of free laccase depends on the substrate employed corresponding to pH 6, 7, 3 and 57, 22, 48 kJ mol1 for 2,6-dimethylphenol (DMP), catechol and 2,2 -azino-bis-(...

  3. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: Am779 is subdominant in the anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and p...

  4. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  5. Transmembrane adaptor proteins in the high-affinity IgE receptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Dráberová, Lubica

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, 11.1. (2012), s. 95. ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200520901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : IgE receptor * LAT/LAT1 * LAX * NTAL/Lab/LAT2 * PAG/Cbp * mast cells * plasma membrane * transmembrane adaptor proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes, are found among the poorly studied beta-, delta- and epsilon-proteobacteria. Among all bacterial phyla, only cyanobacteria appear to be true introverts, probably due to their capacity to conduct oxygenic photosynthesis, using a complex system of intracellular membranes. The census data, available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Complete_Genomes/SignalCensus.html, can be used to get an insight into metabolic and behavioral propensities of each given organism and improve prediction of the organism's properties based solely on its genome sequence.

  7. Yeast Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-Ribosylation Factor-binding Proteins Are but Adaptor Protein-1 Is Not Required for Cell-free Transport of Membrane Proteins from the Trans-Golgi Network to the Prevacuolar Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Fuller, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. T...

  8. Laccase immobilization on bacterial nanocellulose membranes: Antimicrobial, kinetic and stability properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Liliana M P; Padrão, Jorge; Faria, Jorge; Silva, João P; Silva, Carla J; Dourado, Fernando; Zille, Andrea

    2016-07-10

    This work studied the physical immobilization of a commercial laccase on bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) aiming to identify the laccase antibacterial properties suitable for wound dressings. Physico-chemical analysis demonstrates that the BNC structure is manly formed by pure crystalline Iα cellulose. The pH optimum and activation energy of free laccase depends on the substrate employed corresponding to pH 6, 7, 3 and 57, 22, 48kJmol(-1) for 2,6-dimethylphenol (DMP), catechol and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value for the immobilized laccase (0.77mM) was found to be almost double of that of the free enzyme (0.42mM). However, the specific activities of immobilized and free laccase are similar suggesting that the cage-like structure of BNC allows entrapped laccase to maintain some flexibility and favour substrate accessibility. The results clearly show the antimicrobial effect of laccase in Gram-positive (92%) and Gram-negative (26%) bacteria and cytotoxicity acceptable for wound dressing applications. PMID:27106145

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles triggered by human mucosal fluid and lysozyme can prime host tissue surfaces for bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Maria Emiliano Metruccio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to PBS controls (~100 fold. TEM and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (~4-fold, P < 0.01. Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

  10. Porous rod-like MgO complex membrane with good anti-bacterial activity directed by conjugated linolenic acid polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of infection in the tissue engineering substitutes is driving us to seek new coating materials. We previously found that conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) has well biocompatibility and excellent membrane-forming property. The objective of this study is to endow the anti-bacterial activity to CLnA membra ne by linking with MgO. The results showed that the CLnA polymer membrane can be loaded with porous rod-like MgO and such complex membrane showed anti-bacterial sensitivity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) even at the low concentration (0.15 μg/mm2). In the present study, the best zone of inhibition got to 18.2 ± 0.8 mm when the amount of MgO reach 2.42 ± 0.58 μg/mm2. It was deduced that the porous rod-like structure of MgO was directed by CLnA in its polymerization process. Such CLnA/MgO complex membrane can be helpful in the tissue engineering, medicine, food engineering, food preservation, etc. on the basis of its good anti-bacterial activity

  11. Porous rod-like MgO complex membrane with good anti-bacterial activity directed by conjugated linolenic acid polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua-Jie, E-mail: wanghuajie972001@163.com; Chen, Meng [Henan Normal University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Mi, Li-Wei, E-mail: mlwzzu@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Center for Advanced Materials Research (China); Shi, Li-Hua [Anyang 101 Education Center (China); Cao, Ying, E-mail: caoying1130@sina.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Center for Advanced Materials Research (China)

    2016-02-15

    The problem of infection in the tissue engineering substitutes is driving us to seek new coating materials. We previously found that conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) has well biocompatibility and excellent membrane-forming property. The objective of this study is to endow the anti-bacterial activity to CLnA membra ne by linking with MgO. The results showed that the CLnA polymer membrane can be loaded with porous rod-like MgO and such complex membrane showed anti-bacterial sensitivity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) even at the low concentration (0.15 μg/mm{sup 2}). In the present study, the best zone of inhibition got to 18.2 ± 0.8 mm when the amount of MgO reach 2.42 ± 0.58 μg/mm{sup 2}. It was deduced that the porous rod-like structure of MgO was directed by CLnA in its polymerization process. Such CLnA/MgO complex membrane can be helpful in the tissue engineering, medicine, food engineering, food preservation, etc. on the basis of its good anti-bacterial activity.

  12. Hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial tetraether membrane lipids as recorder of precipitation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterse, F.; Ernst, N.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown that the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs), membrane lipids of soil bacteria ubiquitously present in soils worldwide, reflects the climatic conditions of the source organism's living environment. Hence, their distribution in sedimentary archives can be, and has been used to reconstruct past changes in continental air temperature. Over the past decade, compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis (δD) of lipid biomarkers has been implemented as a method to track changes in the hydrological cycle. Since the hydrogen isotopic composition of a biomarker is related to the moisture source of its precursor organism, the δD-value of brGDGTs may reflect the hydroclimate experienced by soil microorganisms. In this study, we determine the distribution and hydrogen isotopic composition of brGDGTs in soils along an altitudinal gradient from the Cherrapunji plateau in Northeast India, known as 'the wettest place on earth', to test if brGDGTs, besides temperature, also record the precipitation signal of their living environment, and thus their suitability as proxy for past precipitation dynamics. Based on the 'amount' and 'altitude effects' on the precipitation δD in this monsoon area, the brGDGTs are expected to be δD-depleted on top of the plateau relative to in the valley. However, to render the brGDGTs amendable for gas chromatographic separation and determination of their isotopic composition, their ether bonds are generally cleaved with HI, during which the possibility of hydrogen exchange occurs, influencing the δD-value of the brGDGT-derived hydrocarbons. The Cherrapunji transect provides an excellent setting to test the occurrence and potential consequences of hydrogen exchange. The distribution of brGDGTs along the 1800m long altitude transect reflects the adiabatic cooling of air with altitude, indicating active membrane adaptation to environmental changes. Furthermore, comparison of brGDGT-δD with

  13. Paleoaltimetry proxies based on bacterial branched tetraether membrane lipids in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Xiao, Wenjie; Jia, Chengling; Xie, Shucheng

    2015-03-01

    The MBT/CBT (Methylation Index of Branched Tetraethers/Cyclisation ratio of Branched Tetraether) proxy, a terrestrial paleothermometer based on bacterial branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (bGDGTs), was employed to indicate altimetry; however, the mechanistic control on this proxy is still ambiguous. Here, we investigated the bGDGTs' distribution and associated environmental factors along an altitude transect of Mt. Shennongjia in China in order to determine the applicability of bGDGT-based proxies to altimetry reconstruction. The MBT index exhibits only a weak correlation with estimated mean annual air temperature (MATe, estimated according to the meteorological record and lapse rate) or altitude. Likewise, MBT shows weak or no relationship with temperature or altitude at four other mountains (Mts. Meghalaya, Jianfengling, Gongga, and Rungwe). It is notable that mean annual air temperature (MAT) or altitude estimated by the MBT/CBT proxy largely relies on CBT, rather than on MBT, which was generally acknowledged. The poor relationship between MBTand MATe for Mt. Shennongjia can be ascribed to the insensitive response of bGDGT-I to temperature. Our data from this mountain imply that care should be taken if the MBT/CBT proxy is employed as an indication of paleoaltimetry. We propose that the fractional abundance of bGDGTs may be a better paleoaltimeter than the MBT/CBT proxy, because specific bGDGT subsets that might show the most sensitive response to temperature can be preferentially selected using a statistical method and used to establish local calibration. This local calibration was applied to Mt. Shennongjia and apparently improves the accuracy of temperature and altimetry reconstruction. The differential response of bGDGTs to temperature among mountains suggests that local calibrations are needed to better constrain the altimetry.

  14. Robust properties of membrane-embedded connector channel of bacterial virus phi29 DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Peng; Haque, Farzin; Vonderheide, Anne P; Montemagno, Carlo; Guo, Peixuan

    2010-10-01

    Biological systems contain highly-ordered macromolecular structures with diverse functions, inspiring their utilization in nanotechnology. A motor allows linear dsDNA viruses to package their genome into a preformed procapsid. The central component of the motor is the portal connector that acts as a pathway for the translocation of dsDNA. The elegant design of the connector and its channel motivates its application as an artificial nanopore (Nature Nanotechnology, 4, 765-772). Herein, we demonstrate the robust characteristics of the connector of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor by single pore electrophysiological assays. The conductance of each pore is almost identical and is perfectly linear with respect to the applied voltage. Numerous transient current blockade events induced by dsDNA are consistent with the dimensions of the channel and dsDNA. Furthermore, the connector channel is stable under a wide range of experimental conditions including high salt and pH 2-12. The robust properties of the connector nanopore made it possible to develop a simple reproducible approach for connector quantification. The precise number of connectors in each sheet of the membrane was simply derived from the slopes of the plot of voltage against current. Such quantifications led to a reliable real time counting of DNA passing through the channel. The fingerprint of DNA translocation in this system has provided a new tool for future biophysical and physicochemical characterizations of DNA transportation, motion, and packaging. PMID:20523933

  15. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  16. Bacterial cellulose membrane produced by Acetobacter sp. A10 for burn wound dressing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Moon Hwa; Kim, Ji Eun; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Song, Sung Hwa; Son, Hong Joo; Kim, Hye Sung; Yun, Young Hyun; Jung, Young Jin; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2015-05-20

    Bacteria cellulose membranes (BCM) are used for wound dressings, bone grafts, tissue engineering, artificial vessels, and dental implants because of their high tensile strength, crystallinity and water holding ability. In this study, the effects of BCM application for 15 days on healing of burn wounds were investigated based on evaluation of skin regeneration and angiogenesis in burn injury skin of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. BCM showed a randomly organized fibrils network, 12.13 MPa tensile strength, 12.53% strain, 17.63% crystallinity, 90.2% gel fraction and 112.14 g × m(2)/h highest water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) although their swelling ratio was enhanced to 350% within 24h. In SD rats with burned skin, the skin severity score was lower in the BCM treated group than the gauze (GZ) group at all time points, while the epidermis and dermis thickness and number of blood vessels was greater in the BCM treated group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the number of infiltrated mast cells and in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) expression was observed in the BCM treated group at day 10 and 15. Moreover, a significant high level in collagen expression was observed in the BCM treated group at day 5 compared with GZ treated group, while low level was detected in the same group at day 10 and 15. However, the level of metabolic enzymes representing liver and kidney toxicity in the serum of BCM treated rats was maintained at levels consistent with GZ treated rats. Overall, BCM may accelerate the process of wound healing in burn injury skin of SD rats through regulation of angiogenesis and connective tissue formation as well as not induce any specific toxicity against the liver and kidney. PMID:25817683

  17. Insights into the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Human RNase6: Structural Determinants for Bacterial Cell Agglutination and Membrane Permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human Ribonuclease 6 is a secreted protein belonging to the ribonuclease A (RNaseA) superfamily, a vertebrate specific family suggested to arise with an ancestral host defense role. Tissue distribution analysis revealed its expression in innate cell types, showing abundance in monocytes and neutrophils. Recent evidence of induction of the protein expression by bacterial infection suggested an antipathogen function in vivo. In our laboratory, the antimicrobial properties of the protein have been evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive species and its mechanism of action was characterized using a membrane model. Interestingly, our results indicate that RNase6, as previously reported for RNase3, is able to specifically agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria as a main trait of its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, a side by side comparative analysis with the RN6(1-45) derived peptide highlights that the antimicrobial activity is mostly retained at the protein N-terminus. Further work by site directed mutagenesis and structural analysis has identified two residues involved in the protein antimicrobial action (Trp1 and Ile13) that are essential for the cell agglutination properties. This is the first structure-functional characterization of RNase6 antimicrobial properties, supporting its contribution to the infection focus clearance. PMID:27089320

  18. Comprehensive comparison of bacterial communities in a membrane-free bioelectrochemical system for removing different mononitrophenols from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinbai; Shen, Jinyou; Lou, Shuai; Mu, Yang; Wang, Ning; Han, Weiqing; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Lianjun

    2016-09-01

    Membrane-free bioelectrochemical systems (MFBESs) have been developed for the degradation of nitro-aromatic contaminants, but the microbial communities that are involved have not been comprehensively investigated. In this study, the microbial communities were evaluated and compared for treating different structures of nitrophenols (NPs), i.e., o-nitrophenol (ONP), m-nitrophenol (MNP) and p-nitrophenol (PNP), in the MFBES. The results demonstrated that NPs reduction in the MFBES decreased in efficiency in the following order: ONP>MNP>PNP. Illumina MiSeq sequencing results showed that richness and diversity of bacterial species in the anodic and cathodic communities decreased when fed different NPs. Though remarkable differences in community composition were found between anodic and cathodic biofilms in the MFBES, three core genera-Treponema, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter-were dominant in the anodic or cathodic biofilm, regardless of various NPs. Other functional genera in the anodic or cathodic biofilm were selectively enriched in the MFBES treating the three NPs with different structures. PMID:27289055

  19. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K+/H+ response characterized by specific plasma membrane K+ efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca2+ influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from 45Ca2+ uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K+/H+ response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca2+ influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La3+, Co2+, and Cd2+ but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K+/H+ response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca2+ influx is required for the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

  20. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative antibody-producing cell responses to lipopolysaccharide in cell walls of the bacterial form and in membranes of the protoplast L-form of Proteus mirabilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Karch, H; Nixdorff, K

    1980-01-01

    Membranes of the stable protoplast L-form of Proteus mirabilis strain VI were highly immunogenic carriers of lipopolysaccharide when compared with the immune responses to lipopolysaccharide contained in cell walls of the bacterial form of this organism.

  1. Optimized Adaptor Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Efficient Genomic Walking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng XU; Rui-Ying HU; Xiao-Yan DING

    2006-01-01

    Genomic walking is one of the most useful approaches in genome-related research. Three kinds of PCR-based methods are available for this purpose. However, none of them has been generally applied because they are either insensitive or inefficient. Here we present an efficient PCR protocol, an optimized adaptor PCR method for genomic walking. Using a combination of a touchdown PCR program and a special adaptor, the optimized adaptor PCR protocol achieves high sensitivity with low background noise. By applying this protocol, the insertion sites of a gene trap mouse line and two gene promoters from the incompletely sequenced Xenopus laevis genome were successfully identified with high efficiency. The general application of this protocol in genomic walking was promising.

  2. A comparison of bacterial populations in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes using membrane filtration or gravity sedimentation for solids-liquid separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric R; Monti, Alessandro; Mohn, William W

    2010-05-01

    In an earlier phase of this study, we compared the performances of pilot scale treatment systems operated in either a conventional enhanced biological phosphorus removal (CEBPR) mode, or a membrane enhanced biological phosphorus removal (MEBPR) mode. In the present investigation, we characterized the bacterial community populations in these processes during parallel operation with the same municipal wastewater feed. The objectives of the study were (1) to assess the similarity of the bacterial communities supported in the two systems over time, (2) to determine if distinct bacterial populations are associated with the MEBPR and CEBPR processes, and (3) to relate the dynamics of the community composition to changes in treatment process configuration and to treatment process performance. The characteristics of the bacterial populations were first investigated with ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, or RISA. To further understand the bacterial population dynamics, important RISA phylotypes were isolated and identified through 16S RNA gene sequencing. The parallel MEBPR and CEBPR systems developed bacterial communities that were distinct. The CEBPR community appeared to exhibit greater diversity, and this may have been the primary reason why the CEBPR treatment train demonstrated superior functional stability relative to the MEBPR counterpart. Moreover, the more diverse bacterial population apparent in the CEBPR system was observed to be more dynamic than that of the MEBPR process. Several RISA bands were found to be characteristic of either the membrane or conventional biological system. In particular, the MEBPR configuration appeared to be selective for the slow-growing organism Magnospira bakii and for the foam-associated Microthrix parvicella and Gordonia sp., while gravity separation led to the washout of M. parvicella. In both pilot trains, sequence analysis confirmed the presence of EBPR-related organisms such as Accumulibacter phosphatis. The survey of the

  3. The Clathrin Adaptor AP-1A Mediates Basolateral Polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Gravotta, Diego; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mattera, Rafael; Deborde, Sylvie; Banfelder, Jason R.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin and the epithelial-specific clathrin adaptor AP-1B mediate basolateral trafficking in epithelia. However, several epithelia lack AP-1B and mice knocked-out for AP-1B are viable, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms that control basolateral polarity. Here, we demonstrate a distinct role of the ubiquitous clathrin adaptor AP-1A in basolateral protein sorting. Knock-down of AP-1A causes missorting of basolateral proteins in MDCK cells but only after knock-down of AP-1B, sug...

  4. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  5. DMPD: The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15541655 The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Latour S, Veillette A. Se...min Immunol. 2004 Dec;16(6):409-19. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The SAP family of adaptors in immune ...regulation. PubmedID 15541655 Title The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Authors Latour S, Veill

  6. An Inner Membrane Protein (Imp) of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola Functions in Carbon Acquisition, EPS Production, Bacterial Motility and Virulence in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gong-you

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes bacterial leaf streak, a devastating disease in rice-growing regions worldwide. A Tn5-insertion mutant in Xoc_3248, encoding an inner membrane protein (Imp), showed reduced virulence in rice. To explore the potential function of this gene in virulence, a deletion mutant R∆imp was constructed in the wild-type RS105. The R∆imp mutant was signiifcantly impaired for bacterial virulence and growth in planta. The mutation in imp made the pathogen insufifciently utilize glucose, fructose, mannose or pyruvate as a sole carbon source, leading to less extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and reduced motility. The deifciencies noted for the mutant were restored to wild-type levels when imp was introduced in trans. Transcription of imp was signiifcantly declined when hrpG and hrpX was mutated and the expression of hrpG and hrpX was also signiifcantly declined when imp was deleted. Cell sublocalization in planta showed Imp membrane-binding feature. These results suggest that Imp is a virulence factor with roles in the catabolism of sugars, EPS production, and bacterial motility.

  7. Dual layer hollow fiber PVDF ultra-filtration membranes containing Ag nano-particle loaded zeolite with longer term anti-bacterial capacity in salt water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huyan; Xue, Lixin; Gao, Ailin; Zhou, Qingbo

    2016-01-01

    Dual layer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), antibacterial, hollow fiber, ultra-filtration composite membranes with antibacterial particles (silver (Ag) nano-particles loaded zeolite (Z-Ag)) in the outer layer were prepared with high water flux and desired pore sizes. The amounts of Ag(+) released from the composite membranes, freshly made and stored in water and salt solution, were measured. The result indicated that dual layer PVDF antibacterial hollow fiber containing Z-Ag (M-1-Ag) still possessed the ability of continuous release of Ag(+) even after exposure to water with high ionic content, showing a longer term resistance to bacterial adhesion and antibacterial activity than membrane doped with Z-Ag(+) (M-1). Results from an anti-adhesion and bacteria killing test with Escherichia coli supported that the antibacterial efficiency of dual hollow fiber PVDF membranes with Z-Ag was much higher than those with Z-Ag(+) after long time storage in water or exposure to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. This novel hollow fiber membrane may find applications in constructing sea water pretreatment devices with long term antifouling capability for the desalination processes. PMID:27148717

  8. A dimer of the Toll-like receptor 4 cytoplasmic domain provides a specific scaffold for the recruitment of signalling adaptor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Núñez Miguel

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a class I transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of immune system cells. TLR4 is activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharides derived from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and forms part of the innate immune response in mammals. Like other class 1 receptors, TLR4 is activated by ligand induced dimerization, and recent studies suggest that this causes concerted conformational changes in the receptor leading to self association of the cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR signalling domain. This homodimerization event is proposed to provide a new scaffold that is able to bind downstream signalling adaptor proteins. TLR4 uses two different sets of adaptors; TRAM and TRIF, and Mal and MyD88. These adaptor pairs couple two distinct signalling pathways leading to the activation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF-3 and nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB respectively. In this paper we have generated a structural model of the TLR4 TIR dimer and used molecular docking to probe for potential sites of interaction between the receptor homodimer and the adaptor molecules. Remarkably, both the Mal and TRAM adaptors are strongly predicted to bind at two symmetry-related sites at the homodimer interface. This model of TLR4 activation is supported by extensive functional studies involving site directed mutagenesis, inhibition by cell permeable peptides and stable protein phosphorylation of receptor and adaptor TIR domains. Our results also suggest a molecular mechanism for two recent findings, the caspase 1 dependence of Mal signalling and the protective effects conferred by the Mal polymorphism Ser180Leu.

  9. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  10. The Analysis of the Relationship between Pregnancy Bacterial and Non-bacterial Infection and Premature Rupture of Membranes%孕期细菌性及非细菌感染与胎膜早破的关系分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周敏; 瑞芬; 张碧琼

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between pregnancy bacterial and non-bacterial infection and premature rupture of membranes. Method:60 cases of maternal PROM from July 2012 to July 2013 in our hospital for treatment were selected as experimental group,60 normal maternal of inpatient expectant mothers were randomly selected at the same period in our hospital as control group.Two groups of maternal cervical and vaginal secretions cervical mycoplasma(UU),bacterial agenesis(BV),candida(VVC),chlamydia(CT) and amniotic membrane disease detection,while maternal pregnancy outcomes and postpartum infection were compared.Result:The proportion of maternal UU,BV,VVC and CT were significantly higher than those in control group(P<0.05), the rate of maternal chorioamnionitis and postpartum maternal infection in experimental group were higher than those in the control group(P<0.05),the newborns of death,premature birth,neonatal asphyxia were more than those in the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:The PROM with UU,CT,BV,VVC,closely relates to the amniotic membrane disease,so it needs screening for early pregnancy,maternal mid-screening,to take appropriate preventive measures to reduce the incidence of premature rupture of membranes,avoid maternal and newborn children adversely affected.Pregnancy diagnosis of bacterial and non-bacterial infections is great significance for premature rupture of membranes,it is worthy of promotion for clinical.%目的:探讨孕期细菌性及非细菌感染与胎膜早破的关系。方法:通过对2012年7月-2013年7月在笔者所在医院进行治疗的60例胎膜早破的产妇为试验组,随机选取同期在笔者所在医院进行住院待产60例正常产妇为对照组。对两组产妇的宫颈和阴道分泌物进行宫颈支原体(UU)、细菌性阴道病(BV)、假丝酵母菌(VVC)、衣原体(CT)及羊膜病检测,同时比较两组产妇的妊娠结局及产后感染情况。结果:试验组产妇的UU、BV、VVC

  11. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-04-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detail. However, it remained unclear how Lol factors interact with each other to conduct very efficient lipoprotein transfer in the periplasm where ATP is not available. To address this issue, a photo-reactive phenylalanine analogue, p-benzoyl-phenylalanine, was introduced at various positions of LolA and LolB, of which the overall structures are very similar and comprise an incomplete beta-barrel with a hydrophobic cavity inside. Cells expressing LolA or LolB derivatives containing the above analogue were irradiated with UV for in vivo photo-cross-linking. These analyses revealed a hot area in the same region of LolA and LolB, through which LolA and LolB interact with each other. This area is located at the entrance of the hydrophobic cavity. Moreover, this area in LolA is involved in the interaction with a membrane subunit, LolC, whereas no cross-linking occurs between LolA and the other membrane subunit, LolE, or ATP-binding subunit LolD, despite the structural similarity between LolC and LolE. The hydrophobic cavities of LolA and LolB were both found to bind lipoproteins inside. These results indicate that the transfer of lipoproteins through Lol proteins occurs in a mouth-to-mouth manner. PMID:19307584

  12. Biophysical studies of the interaction of squalamine and other cationic amphiphilic molecules with bacterial and eukaryotic membranes: importance of the distribution coefficient in membrane selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Salmi-Smail, Chanaz; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques; Maresca, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The interaction of squalamine (SQ) with eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes was studied and compared with the interaction of two other cationic amphipathic antimicrobials (CAAs), i.e. the antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) and the detergent hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Whole cell experiments showed that the three CAA have in common the ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide-containing membranes through a divalent cation sensitive process. Differences were found regarding their kinetics of membrane permeabilisation and their selectivity for bacteria, with a preferential permeabilisation of bacteria by PMB>SQ and no selectivity for CTAB. Experiments with lipid monolayers and bilayers showed that this selectivity did not correlate with a preferential interaction of the CAAs with lipids but rather relies on differences in their ability to penetrate lipid bilayers and to cause electrically active lesions. Incidentally, our results also suggest that the distribution coefficient of CAAs could be used to predict their selectivity for bacteria. PMID:19883637

  13. Action of Polymyxin B on Bacterial Membranes: Morphological Changes in the Cytoplasm and in the Outer Membrane of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Peter R. G.; Teuber, Michael

    1975-01-01

    Though the primary action of the cationic antibiotic polymyxin B is against the membrane of susceptible bacteria, severe morphological changes are detected in the cytoplasm. Using fluorescence microscopy and a mono-N-dansyl-polymyxin B derivative, we could demonstrate aggregations of the antibiotic with cellular material, possibly nucleic acids and/or ribosomes. These aggregations were only produced by minimum inhibitory or higher concentrations of the antibiotic as shown with Salmonella and Escherichia strains differing in their polymyxin susceptibility. The outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium revealed characteristic blebs when treated with polymyxin B. This was investigated by the gentle methods of spray-freezing and freeze-etching. The obtained electron micrographs suggest that the polymyxin-induced blebs are projections of the outer monolayer of the outer membrane. A possible mechanism of penetration of polymyxin B through the cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria is presented. Images PMID:169730

  14. Anti-hemolytic, hemagglutination inhibition and bacterial membrane disruptive properties of selected herbal extracts attenuate virulence of Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Expression of a multitude of virulence factors by multi-drug resistant microbial strains, e.g., Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria), is responsible for resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. Hemolysin production and induction of hemagglutination by bacterial surface receptors inflicts direct cytotoxicity by destroying host phagocytic and epithelial cells. We have previously reported that Berberis aristata, Camellia sinensis, Cyperus rotundus Holarrhena antidysenterica and Andrographis paniculata are promising herbal leads for targeting Carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli. These herbal leads were analyzed for their anti-hemolytic potential by employing spectrophotometric assay of hemoglobin liberation. Anti-hemagglutination potential of the extracts was assessed by employing qualitative assay of visible RBC aggregate formation. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) exhibited anti-hemolytic potential of 73.97 ± 0.03%, followed by Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) i.e., 68.32 ± 0.05%, Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) i.e., 60.26 ± 0.05% and Cyperus rotundus (PTRC-31811-A) i.e., 53.76 ± 0.03%. Comprehensive, visual analysis of hemagglutination inhibition revealed that only Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) and Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) exhibited anti-hemagglutination activity. However, Andrographis paniculata (PTRC-11611-A) exhibited none of the inhibitory activities. Furthermore, the pair wise correlation analysis of the tested activities with quantitative phytochemical descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid; flavonoids; polyphenols, and decreased content of saponins supported both the activities. Additionally, flow cytometry revealed that cell membrane structures of CRE were damaged by extracts of Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) and Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) at their respective Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations, thereby confirming noteworthy antibacterial

  15. The influence of temperature on the behaviour of mixed bacterial contamination of the shell membrane of the hen's egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, J; Board, R G

    1992-02-01

    The inner membrane of the air cell of hens' eggs was inoculated with Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus xylosus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. The first mentioned eventually dominated the contamination of the albumen of eggs stored at 4, 15, and 20 degrees C. The last mentioned did so in eggs stored at 37 degrees C. The interval between inoculation of the membrane and gross contamination of the albumen was markedly influenced by site of contamination relative to yolk movement. PMID:1547832

  16. The influence of temperature on the behaviour of mixed bacterial contamination of the shell membrane of the hen's egg.

    OpenAIRE

    Dolman, J.; Board, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The inner membrane of the air cell of hens' eggs was inoculated with Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus xylosus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. The first mentioned eventually dominated the contamination of the albumen of eggs stored at 4, 15, and 20 degrees C. The last mentioned did so in eggs stored at 37 degrees C. The interval between inoculation of the membrane and gross contamination of the albumen was markedly influenced by site of contamination rela...

  17. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis of residual bacterial species of fouled membranes after NaOCl cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ronald R; Hori, Tomoyuki; Inaba, Tomohiro; Matsuo, Kazuyuki; Habe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    Biofouling is one of the major problems during wastewater treatment using membrane bioreactors (MBRs). In this regard, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has been widely used to wash fouled membranes for maintenance and recovery purposes. Advanced chemical and biological characterization was conducted in this work to evaluate the performance of aqueous NaOCl solutions during washing of polyacrylonitrile membranes. Fouled membranes from MBR operations supplemented with artificial wastewater were washed with 0.1% and 0.5% aqueous NaOCl solutions for 5, 10 and 30 min. The changes in organics composition on the membrane surface were directly monitored by an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectrometer. In addition, high-throughput Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes was applied to detect any residual microorganisms. Results from ATR-FT-IR analysis indicated the complete disappearance of functional groups representing different fouling compounds after at least 30 min of treatment with 0.1% NaOCl. However, the biomolecular survey revealed the presence of residual bacteria even after 30 min of treatment with 0.5% NaOCl solution. Evaluation of microbial diversity of treated samples using Chao1, Shannon and Simpson reciprocal indices showed an increase in evenness while no significant decline in richness was observed. These implied that only the population of dominant species was mainly affected. The high-resolution phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of numerous operational taxonomic units (OTUs) whose close relatives exhibit halotolerance. Some OTUs related to thermophilic and acid-resistant strains were also identified. Finally, the taxonomic analysis of recycled membranes that were previously washed with NaOCl also showed the presence of numerous halotolerant-related OTUs in the early stage of fouling. This further suggested the possible contribution of such chemical tolerance on their survival against NaOCl washing, which in

  18. In Silico understanding of the cyclodextrin–phenanthrene hybrid assemblies in both aqueous medium and bacterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two hetero-assemblies, βCD1–Phe1, and βCD2–Phe1 were observed in water solution. • Distinct membrane-binding patterns for βCD, Phe, and their complexes were found. • Minor Phe trans-membrane energy barrier confirmed its membrane penetration ability. • Huge energy barriers for βCD-involved assemblies denied their membrane penetration. • Phe separation from βCD1–Phe1 was easier than that from βCD2–Phe1. - Abstract: The explicit-solvent molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and adaptive biased forces (ABF) methods were employed to systemically study the structural and thermodynamic nature of the β-cyclodextrin (βCD) monomer, phenanthrene (Phe) monomer, and their inclusion complexes in both the aqueous and membrane environments, aiming at clarifying the atomic-level mechanisms underlying in the CD-enhanced degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by bacteria. Simulations showed that βCD and Phe monomers could associate together to construct two distinctive assemblies, i.e, βCD1–Phe1 and βCD2–Phe1, respectively. The membrane-involved equilibrium simulations and the data of potential of mean forces (PMFs) further confirmed that Phe monomer was capable of penetrating through the membranes without confronting any large energy barrier, whereas, the single βCD and βCD-involved assemblies were unable to pass across the membranes. These observations clearly suggested that βCD only served as the carrier to enhance the bioavailability of Phe rather than the co-substrate in the Phe biodegradation process. The Phe-separation PMF profiles indicated that the maximum of the Phe uptake by bacteria would be achieved by the “optimal” βCD:Phe molar ratio, which facilitated the maximal formation of βCD1–Phe1 inclusion and the minimal construction of βCD2–Phe1 complex

  19. In Silico understanding of the cyclodextrin–phenanthrene hybrid assemblies in both aqueous medium and bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Baiping [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Gao, Huipeng; Cao, Yafeng [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China); Jia, Lingyun, E-mail: lyj81@dlut.edu.cn [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Two hetero-assemblies, βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1}, and βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1} were observed in water solution. • Distinct membrane-binding patterns for βCD, Phe, and their complexes were found. • Minor Phe trans-membrane energy barrier confirmed its membrane penetration ability. • Huge energy barriers for βCD-involved assemblies denied their membrane penetration. • Phe separation from βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1} was easier than that from βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1}. - Abstract: The explicit-solvent molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and adaptive biased forces (ABF) methods were employed to systemically study the structural and thermodynamic nature of the β-cyclodextrin (βCD) monomer, phenanthrene (Phe) monomer, and their inclusion complexes in both the aqueous and membrane environments, aiming at clarifying the atomic-level mechanisms underlying in the CD-enhanced degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by bacteria. Simulations showed that βCD and Phe monomers could associate together to construct two distinctive assemblies, i.e, βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1} and βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1}, respectively. The membrane-involved equilibrium simulations and the data of potential of mean forces (PMFs) further confirmed that Phe monomer was capable of penetrating through the membranes without confronting any large energy barrier, whereas, the single βCD and βCD-involved assemblies were unable to pass across the membranes. These observations clearly suggested that βCD only served as the carrier to enhance the bioavailability of Phe rather than the co-substrate in the Phe biodegradation process. The Phe-separation PMF profiles indicated that the maximum of the Phe uptake by bacteria would be achieved by the “optimal” βCD:Phe molar ratio, which facilitated the maximal formation of βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1} inclusion and the minimal construction of βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1} complex.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  1. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D 15N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly α-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins

  2. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeon, Young Ho

    2008-11-14

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D (15)N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly alpha-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins. PMID:18789898

  3. Ubiquitination of the bacterial inositol phosphatase, SopB, regulates its biological activity at the plasma membrane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knodler, Leigh A

    2009-11-01

    The Salmonella type III effector, SopB, is an inositol polyphosphate phosphatase that modulates host cell phospholipids at the plasma membrane and the nascent Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). Translocated SopB persists for many hours after infection and is ubiquitinated but the significance of this covalent modification has not been investigated. Here we identify by mass spectrometry six lysine residues of SopB that are mono-ubiquitinated. Substitution of these six lysine residues with arginine, SopB-K(6)R, almost completely eliminated SopB ubiquitination. We found that ubiquitination does not affect SopB stability or membrane association, or SopB-dependent events in SCV biogenesis. However, two spatially and temporally distinct events are dependent on ubiquitination, downregulation of SopB activity at the plasma membrane and prolonged retention of SopB on the SCV. Activation of the mammalian pro-survival kinase Akt\\/PKB, a downstream target of SopB, was intensified and prolonged after infection with the SopB-K(6)R mutant. At later times, fewer SCV were decorated with SopB-K(6)R compared with SopB. Instead SopB-K(6)R was present as discrete vesicles spread diffusely throughout the cell. Altogether, our data show that ubiquitination of SopB is not related to its intracellular stability but rather regulates its enzymatic activity at the plasma membrane and intracellular localization.

  4. In silico understanding of the cyclodextrin-phenanthrene hybrid assemblies in both aqueous medium and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiping; Gao, Huipeng; Cao, Yafeng; Jia, Lingyun

    2015-03-21

    The explicit-solvent molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and adaptive biased forces (ABF) methods were employed to systemically study the structural and thermodynamic nature of the β-cyclodextrin (βCD) monomer, phenanthrene (Phe) monomer, and their inclusion complexes in both the aqueous and membrane environments, aiming at clarifying the atomic-level mechanisms underlying in the CD-enhanced degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by bacteria. Simulations showed that βCD and Phe monomers could associate together to construct two distinctive assemblies, i.e, βCD1-Phe1 and βCD2-Phe1, respectively. The membrane-involved equilibrium simulations and the data of potential of mean forces (PMFs) further confirmed that Phe monomer was capable of penetrating through the membranes without confronting any large energy barrier, whereas, the single βCD and βCD-involved assemblies were unable to pass across the membranes. These observations clearly suggested that βCD only served as the carrier to enhance the bioavailability of Phe rather than the co-substrate in the Phe biodegradation process. The Phe-separation PMF profiles indicated that the maximum of the Phe uptake by bacteria would be achieved by the "optimal" βCD:Phe molar ratio, which facilitated the maximal formation of βCD1-Phe1 inclusion and the minimal construction of βCD2-Phe1 complex. PMID:25497028

  5. Analysis for the presence of determinants involved in the transport of mercury across bacterial membrane from polluted water bodies of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Choi, Inho; Ali, Arif; Haq, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul

    2016-01-01

    Mercury, which is ubiquitous and recalcitrant to biodegradation processes, threatens human health by escaping to the environment via various natural and anthropogenic activities. Non-biodegradability of mercury pollutants has necessitated the development and implementation of economic alternatives with promising potential to remove metals from the environment. Enhancement of microbial based remediation strategies through genetic engineering approaches provides one such alternative with a promising future. In this study, bacterial isolates inhabiting polluted sites were screened for tolerance to varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Following identification, several Pseudomonas and Klebsiella species were found to exhibit the highest tolerance to both organic and inorganic mercury. Screened bacterial isolates were examined for their genetic make-up in terms of the presence of genes (merP and merT) involved in the transport of mercury across the membrane either alone or in combination to deal with the toxic mercury. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the merP gene showed 86-99% homology, while the merT gene showed >98% homology with previously reported sequences. By exploring the genes involved in imparting metal resistance to bacteria, this study will serve to highlight the credentials that are particularly advantageous for their practical application to remediation of mercury from the environment. PMID:26887227

  6. Analysis for the presence of determinants involved in the transport of mercury across bacterial membrane from polluted water bodies of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Choi, Inho; Ali, Arif; Haq, Qazi Mohd. Rizwanul

    2016-01-01

    Mercury, which is ubiquitous and recalcitrant to biodegradation processes, threatens human health by escaping to the environment via various natural and anthropogenic activities. Non-biodegradability of mercury pollutants has necessitated the development and implementation of economic alternatives with promising potential to remove metals from the environment. Enhancement of microbial based remediation strategies through genetic engineering approaches provides one such alternative with a promising future. In this study, bacterial isolates inhabiting polluted sites were screened for tolerance to varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Following identification, several Pseudomonas and Klebsiella species were found to exhibit the highest tolerance to both organic and inorganic mercury. Screened bacterial isolates were examined for their genetic make-up in terms of the presence of genes (merP and merT) involved in the transport of mercury across the membrane either alone or in combination to deal with the toxic mercury. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the merP gene showed 86–99% homology, while the merT gene showed >98% homology with previously reported sequences. By exploring the genes involved in imparting metal resistance to bacteria, this study will serve to highlight the credentials that are particularly advantageous for their practical application to remediation of mercury from the environment. PMID:26887227

  7. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  8. The Role of the Clathrin Adaptor AP-1: Polarized Sorting and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fubito Nakatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The selective transport of proteins or lipids by vesicular transport is a fundamental process supporting cellular physiology. The budding process involves cargo sorting and vesicle formation at the donor membrane and constitutes an important process in vesicular transport. This process is particularly important for the polarized sorting in epithelial cells, in which the cargo molecules need to be selectively sorted and transported to two distinct destinations, the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Adaptor protein (AP-1, a member of the AP complex family, which includes the ubiquitously expressed AP-1A and the epithelium-specific AP-1B, regulates polarized sorting at the trans-Golgi network and/or at the recycling endosomes. A growing body of evidence, especially from studies using model organisms and animals, demonstrates that the AP-1-mediated polarized sorting supports the development and physiology of multi-cellular units as functional organs and tissues (e.g., cell fate determination, inflammation and gut immune homeostasis. Furthermore, a possible involvement of AP-1B in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and cancer, is now becoming evident. These data highlight the significant contribution of AP-1 complexes to the physiology of multicellular organisms, as master regulators of polarized sorting in epithelial cells.

  9. Environmental controls on the distribution of bacterial tetraether membrane lipids: constraints on the MBT-CBT paleothermometer

    OpenAIRE

    Peterse, F.

    2011-01-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are membrane lipids of soil bacteria that occur ubiquitously in soils, peats, and marine sediments. The structures of the branched GDGTs vary in the number of methyl groups (4 to 6) attached to the alkyl chains and can contain up to two cyclopentane moieties. An empirical study showed that their distribution in over 130 globally distributed soils is mainly controlled by mean annual air temperature (MAT) and soil pH, and can be expressed u...

  10. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  11. A Big-Five Personality Profile of the Adaptor and Innovator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang, Ng Aik; Rodrigues, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between two creative types (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience), in 164 teachers in Singapore. Adaptors were significantly more conscientious than innovators, while innovators were significantly more…

  12. Action of Polymyxin B on Bacterial Membranes: Phosphatidylglycerol- and Cardiolipin-Induced Susceptibility to Polymyxin B in Acholeplasma laidlawii B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, Michael; Bader, Johann

    1976-01-01

    To identify the polymyxin receptor molecules in the membranes of living microorganisms, fusion of intact Acholeplasma laidlawii B with lipid vesicles was investigated according to the procedure of Grant and McConnell (1973). The naturally polymyxin-resistant A. laidlawii B was treated with phospholipid vesicles prepared from purified phospholipids of the polymyxin-susceptible Salmonella typhimurium G30. A. laidlawii B absorbed between 15 and 45% of its own lipid content of the added tritium-labeled phospholipids without loss of viability. Association with the acidic components phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin produced a 10- to 30-fold increase in polymyxin susceptibility, which was not obtained with egg-phosphatidylcholine and mixed phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles. The polymyxin-sensitized cells bound 12 times more radioactive antibiotic than resistant cells. The phosphatidylglycerol-induced susceptibility was abolished by serum fraction V (Cohn) proteins. PMID:176930

  13. Silver nanoparticle/bacterial cellulose gel membranes for antibacterial wound dressing: investigation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has attracted increasing attention as a novel wound dressing material, but its antimicrobial activity, which is one of the critical skin-barrier functions in wound healing, is not sufficient for use in practical applications. To overcome such a deficiency, silver nanoparticles were generated and self-assembled on the surface of BC nanofibers, forming a stable and evenly distributed Ag nanoparticle coated BC nanofiber (AgNP-BC). The performance of AgNP-BC was systematically studied in terms of antibacterial activities, cytocompatibility and effects on wound healing. The results showed that AgNP-BC exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, AgNP-BC allowed attachment, and growth of rat fibroblasts with low cytotoxicity emerged. Based on these advantages, AgNP-BC samples were applied in a second-degree rat wound model. Wound flora showed a significant reduction during the healing. The fresh epidermal and dermis thicknesses with AgNP-BC samples were 111 and 855 µm respectively, higher than 74 and 619 µm for BC groups and 57 and 473 µm for untreated control wounds. The results demonstrated that AgNP-BC could reduce inflammation and promote scald wound healing. (paper)

  14. Adaptor protein complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for rerouting of class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Kimpler

    Full Text Available The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7 U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes.

  15. Crystal structure of the mammalian Grb2 adaptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, S; Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Arnoux, B; Becquart, J; Ducruix, A

    1995-04-14

    The mammalian growth factor receptor-binding protein Grb2 is an adaptor that mediates activation of guanine nucleotide exchange on Ras. Grb2 binds to the receptor through its SH2 domain and to the carboxyl-terminal domain of Son of sevenless through its two SH3 domains. It is thus a key element in the signal transduction pathway. The crystal structure of Grb2 was determined to 3.1 angstrom resolution. The asymmetric unit is composed of an embedded dimer. The interlaced junctions between the SH2 and SH3 domains bring the two adjacent faces of the SH3 domains in van der Waals contact but leave room for the binding of proline-rich peptides. PMID:7716522

  16. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Barker, Clive S; Kostyukova, Alla S; Samatey, Fadel A

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene) in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants. PMID:23874605

  17. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Meshcheryakov

    Full Text Available The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants.

  18. Identification of polyvalent protective immunogens from outer membrane proteins in Vibrio parahaemolyticus to protect fish against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Ye, Jin-Zhou; Han, Yi; Zeng, Li; Zhang, Jian-Ying; Li, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and economic way to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture. The development of effective vaccines, however, is still limited, especially for polyvalent vaccines, which are against multiple species. With this regard, identification of polyvalent protective immunogens, serving as polyvalent vaccines, became a key step in vaccine development. In the current study, 17 outer membrane proteins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus were identified as immunogens. Further, four of the 17 proteins including VP2309, VP0887, VPA0548 and VP1019 were characterized as efficiently protective immunogens against V. parahaemolyticus' infection through passive and active immunizations in zebrafish. Importantly, these four proteins showed cross-protective capability against infections by Aeromonas hydrophila or/and Pseudomonas fluorescens, which shared similar epitopes with V. parahaemolyticus in homology of these proteins. Further investigation showed that the expression level of the four protective immunogens elevated in response to fish plasma in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that the four protective immunogens are polyvalent vaccine candidates in aquaculture. PMID:27071519

  19. Outer membrane vesicles from Brucella abortus promote bacterial internalization by human monocytes and modulate their innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora N Pollak

    Full Text Available Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by some gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa and monocytes (THP-1, and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8 to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively. Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells.

  20. Gene synthesis, bacterial expression, and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies of the rat outer mitochondrial membrane cytochrome b5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, M; Barillas-Mury, C; Christensen, K A; Little, J W; Wells, M A; Walker, F A

    1992-12-01

    The gene coding for the water-soluble domain of the outer mitochondrial membrane cytochrome b5 (OM cytochrome b5) from rat liver has been synthetized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence was obtained by back-translating the known amino acid sequence [Lederer, F., Ghrir, R., Guiard, B., Cortial, S., & Ito, A. (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 132, 95-102]. The recombinant OM cytochrome b5 was characterized by UV-visible, EPR, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The UV-visible and EPR spectra of the OM cytochrome b5 are almost identical to the ones obtained from the overexpressed rat microsomal cytochrome b5 [Bodman, S. B. V., Schyler, M. A., Jollie, D. R., & Sligar, S. G. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 9443-9447]. The one-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the OM cytochrome b5 indicates that the rhombic perturbation of the ferric center is essentially identical to that in the microsomal beef, rabbit, chicken, and rat cytochromes b5. Two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy (NOESY) and one-dimensional NOE difference spectroscopy were used to assign the contact-shifted resonances that correspond to each of the two isomers that result from the rotation of the heme around its alpha-gamma-meso axis. The assignment of the resonances allowed the determination of the heme orientation ratio in the OM cytochrome b5, which was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.1. It is noteworthy that the two cytochromes b5 that have similar populations of the two heme isomers (large heme disorder) originate from the rat liver. PMID:1333795

  1. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane vesicle-associated proteolytic activity promotes bacterial invasion by mediating cleavage of intestinal epithelial cell E-cadherin and occludin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Abdi; Nasher, Fauzy; Jagatia, Heena; Gundogdu, Ozan; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wren, Brendan; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) play an important role in the pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni produces OMVs that trigger IL-8, IL-6, hBD-3 and TNF-α responses from T84 intestinal epithelial cells and are cytotoxic to Caco-2 IECs and Galleria mellonella larvae. Proteomic analysis of 11168H OMVs identified the presence of three proteases, HtrA, Cj0511 and Cj1365c. In this study, 11168H OMVs were shown to possess proteolytic activity that was reduced by pretreatment with specific serine protease inhibitors. OMVs isolated from 11168H htrA, Cj0511 or Cj1365c mutants possess significantly reduced proteolytic activity. 11168H OMVs are able to cleave both E-cadherin and occludin, but this cleavage is reduced with OMVs pretreated with serine protease inhibitors and also with OMVs isolated from htrA or Cj1365c mutants. Co-incubation of T84 monolayers with 11168H OMVs results in a visible reduction in both E-cadherin and occludin. The addition of 11168H OMVs to the co-culture of live 11168H bacteria with T84 cells results in enhanced levels of bacterial adhesion and invasion in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation of the cleavage of host cell structural proteins by C. jejuni OMVs should enhance our understanding of the interactions of this important pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26451973

  3. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wenchen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is distributed along the contour of the complex-shaped adaptor forging.

  4. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    OpenAIRE

    Xu Wenchen; Yang Chuan; Shaninst Debin; Xu Fuchang; Wang Guan; Guo Bin

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is di...

  5. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  6. VgrG C terminus confers the type VI effector transport specificity and is required for binding with PAAR and adaptor-effector complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondage, Devanand D; Lin, Jer-Sheng; Ma, Lay-Sun; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Erh-Min

    2016-07-01

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine used by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject effectors/toxins into eukaryotic hosts or prokaryotic competitors for survival and fitness. To date, our knowledge of the molecular determinants and mechanisms underlying the transport of these effectors remains limited. Here, we report that two T6SS encoded valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) paralogs in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 specifically control the secretion and interbacterial competition activity of the type VI DNase toxins Tde1 and Tde2. Deletion and domain-swapping analysis identified that the C-terminal extension of VgrG1 specifically confers Tde1 secretion and Tde1-dependent interbacterial competition activity in planta, and the C-terminal variable region of VgrG2 governs this specificity for Tde2. Functional studies of VgrG1 and VgrG2 variants with stepwise deletion of the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal 31 aa (C31) of VgrG1 and 8 aa (C8) of VgrG2 are the molecular determinants specifically required for delivery of each cognate Tde toxin. Further in-depth studies on Tde toxin delivery mechanisms revealed that VgrG1 interacts with the adaptor/chaperone-effector complex (Tap-1-Tde1) in the absence of proline-alanine-alanine-arginine (PAAR) and the VgrG1-PAAR complex forms independent of Tap-1 and Tde1. Importantly, we identified the regions involved in these interactions. Although the entire C31 segment is required for binding with the Tap-1-Tde1 complex, only the first 15 aa of this region are necessary for PAAR binding. These results suggest that the VgrG1 C terminus interacts sequentially or simultaneously with the Tap-1-Tde1 complex and PAAR to govern Tde1 translocation across bacterial membranes and delivery into target cells for antibacterial activity. PMID:27313214

  7. The Toll-Like receptor adaptor TRIF contributes to otitis media pathogenesis and recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Kwang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling is crucial for innate immune responses to infection. The involvement of TLRs in otitis media (OM, the most prevalent childhood disease in developed countries, has been implicated by studies in middle ear cell lines, by association studies of TLR-related gene polymorphisms, and by altered OM in mice bearing mutations in TLR genes. Activated TLRs signal via two alternative intracellular signaling molecules with differing effects; MyD88 (Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 inducing primarily interleukin expression and TRIF (Tir-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon β mediating type I interferon (IFN expression. We tested the hypothesis that TRIF and type I IFN signaling play a role in OM, using a murine model of OM induced by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi. The ME inflammatory response to NTHi was examined in wild-type (WT and TRIF-/- mice by qPCR, gene microarray, histopathology and bacterial culture. Results Expression of TRIF mRNA was only modesty enhanced during OM, but both type I IFN signalling genes and type I IFN-inducible genes were significantly up-regulated in WT mice. TRIF-deficient mice showed reduced but more persistent mucosal hyperplasia and less leukocyte infiltration into the ME in response to NTHi infection than did WT animals. Viable bacteria could be cultured from MEs of TRIF-/- mice for much longer in the course of disease than was the case for middle ears of WT mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that activation of TRIF/type I IFN responses is important in both the pathogenesis and resolution of NTHi-induced OM.

  8. Surfactant Protein A Enhances Constitutive Immune Functions of Clathrin Heavy Chain and Clathrin Adaptor Protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulakakis, Christina; Steinhäuser, Christine; Biedziak, Dominika; Freundt, Katja; Reiling, Norbert; Stamme, Cordula

    2016-07-01

    NF-κB transcription factors are key regulators of pulmonary inflammatory disorders and repair. Constitutive lung cell type- and microenvironment-specific NF-κB/inhibitor κBα (IκB-α) regulation, however, is poorly understood. Surfactant protein (SP)-A provides both a critical homeostatic and lung defense control, in part by immune instruction of alveolar macrophages (AMs) via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The central endocytic proteins, clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complex AP2, have pivotal alternative roles in cellular homeostasis that are endocytosis independent. Here, we dissect endocytic from alternative functions of CHC, the α-subunit of AP2, and dynamin in basal and SP-A-modified LPS signaling of macrophages. As revealed by pharmacological inhibition and RNA interference in primary AMs and RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, CHC and α-adaptin, but not dynamin, prevent IκB-α degradation and TNF-α release, independent of their canonical role in membrane trafficking. Kinetics studies employing confocal microscopy, Western analysis, and immunomagnetic sorting revealed that SP-A transiently enhances the basal protein expression of CHC and α-adaptin, depending on early activation of protein kinase CK2 (former casein kinase II) and Akt1 in primary AMs from rats, SP-A(+/+), and SP-A(-/-) mice, as well as in vivo when intratracheally administered to SP-A(+/+) mice. Constitutive immunomodulation by SP-A, but not SP-A-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α release, requires CHC, α-adaptin, and dynamin. Our data demonstrate that endocytic proteins constitutively restrict NF-κB activity in macrophages and provide evidence that SP-A enhances the immune regulatory capacity of these proteins, revealing a previously unknown pathway of microenvironment-specific NF-κB regulation in the lung. PMID:26771574

  9. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Zwiewka; Elena Feraru; Barbara M(o)ller; Inhwan Hwang; Mugurel I Feraru; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn; Dolf Weijers; Ji(n) Friml

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells.It involves regulation of cargo sorting,vesicle formation,trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels.Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals but their existence and function in plants have not been demonstrated.Here we report the identification of the protein-affected trafficking 4 (pat4) mutant defective in the putative δ subunit of the AP-3 complex.pat4 and pat2,a mutant isolated from the same GFP imaging-based forward genetic screen that lacks a functional putative AP-3 β,as well as dominant negative AP-3 μ transgenic lines display undistinguishable phenotypes characterized by largely normal morphology and development,but strong intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins in aberrant vacuolar structures.All mutants are defective in morphology and function of lytic and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) but show normal sorting of reserve proteins to PSVs.Immunoprecipitation experiments and genetic studies revealed tight functional and physical associations of putative AP-3 β and AP-3 δ subunits.Furthermore,both proteins are closely linked with putative AP-3 μ and σ subunits and several components of the clathrin and dynamin machineries.Taken together,these results demonstrate that AP complexes,similar to those in other eukaryotes,exist in plants,and that AP-3 plays a specific role in the regulation of biogenesis and function of vacuoles in plant cells.

  10. Origin of diderm (Gram-negative) bacteria: antibiotic selection pressure rather than endosymbiosis likely led to the evolution of bacterial cells with two membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Radhey S.

    2011-01-01

    The prokaryotic organisms can be divided into two main groups depending upon whether their cell envelopes contain one membrane (monoderms) or two membranes (diderms). It is important to understand how these and other variations that are observed in the cell envelopes of prokaryotic organisms have originated. In 2009, James Lake proposed that cells with two membranes (primarily Gram-negative bacteria) originated from an ancient endosymbiotic event involving an Actinobacteria and a Clostridia (...

  11. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvi, Denise T.B. de; Barud, Hernane S.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho. UNESP. Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Caiut, Jose Mauricio A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo. Departamento de Quimica - FFCLRP/USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  12. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  13. Transmembrane adaptor proteins in membrane microdomains: important regulators of immunoreceptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hořejší, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 29, 1-2 (2004), s. 43-49. ISSN 0165-2478 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : immunoreceptor * signalling Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.136, year: 2004

  14. Stepping motor adaptor actuator for a commercial uhv linear motion feedthrough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adaptor coupling has been developed that will allow the attachment of a standard stepping motor to a precision commercial (Varian) uhv linear motion feedthrough. The assembly, consisting of the motor, motor adaptor, limit switches, etc. is clamped to the feedthrough body which can be done under vacuum conditions if necessary. With a 500 step/rev. stepping motor the resolution is 1.27 μm per step. We presently use this assembly in a remote location for the precise positioning of a beam sensing monitor. 2 refs., 3 figs

  15. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor prote... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 recep

  16. Clinico-pathological Responses of Calves Associated with Infection of Pasteurella multocida Type B and the Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide and Outer Membrane Protein Immunogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faez Firdaus Jesse Abdullah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to investigate the Clinico-pathological responses of calves associated with the infections of Pasteurella multocida type B and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein immunogens. Alterations in the behavior of animals and pathological lesions observed following innate or experimental infections usually divulge extensive and detrimental changes in the clinical signs, organs and tissues of the animals afflicted with the disease. These alterations are imperative for Veterinary evaluation of herd health. Eight clinically healthy, non-pregnant and non-lactating Brangus cross heifers weighing 150±50 kg were used in the study. The heifers (n = 8 were divided into 4 groups of 2 calves per group. The control calves in group 1 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of sterile Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS. Calves in group 2 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of 1012 colony forming unit (cfu of wild-type P. multocida and calves in group 3 were inoculated intravenously with 10 mL of LPS broth extract. Calves in group 4 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of OMP broth extract. All animals were observed for 48 h for clinical signs, changes in behavior and mortality pattern, including the time of death. The results divulged significant differences in the Clinico-pathological alterations. Calves inoculated with whole cell P. multocida type B: 2 showed a significant (p<0.05 increased in rectal temperature. The affected calves showed significant severe dullness (p<0.000 and significant rumen hypomotility (p<0.000 was also exhibited. The calves showed signs of hypersalivation at 14 h. There is no significant difference (p = 0.240 in pulmonary oedema in the Calves of group 2 compared to control group 1. Calves of group 4 also showed no significant difference in pulmonary oedema (p = 0.612 compared to control group 1. Calves of group 3 showed significantly moderate pulmonary oedema (p<0.000. All the

  17. Roles of the Protruding Loop of Factor B Essential for the Localization of Lipoproteins (LolB) in the Anchoring of Bacterial Triacylated Proteins to the Outer Membrane*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  18. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  19. Mutations in the gene encoding the Sigma 2 subunit of the adaptor protein 1 complex, AP1S2, cause X-linked mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpey, Patrick S; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Avis, Tim; Barthorpe, Syd; Buck, Gemma; Butler, Adam; Cole, Jennifer; Dicks, Ed; Gray, Kristian; Halliday, Kelly; Harrison, Rachel; Hills, Katy; Hinton, Jonathon; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Mironenko, Tatiana; Perry, Janet; Raine, Keiran; Richardson, David; Shepherd, Rebecca; Small, Alexandra; Tofts, Calli; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Yates, Andy; Catford, Rachael; Butler, Julia; Mallya, Uma; Moon, Jenny; Luo, Ying; Dorkins, Huw; Thompson, Deborah; Easton, Douglas F; Wooster, Richard; Bobrow, Martin; Carpenter, Nancy; Simensen, Richard J; Schwartz, Charles E; Stevenson, Roger E; Turner, Gillian; Partington, Michael; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Raymond, F Lucy

    2006-12-01

    In a systematic sequencing screen of the coding exons of the X chromosome in 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), we identified two nonsense mutations and one consensus splice-site mutation in the AP1S2 gene on Xp22 in three families. Affected individuals in these families showed mild-to-profound mental retardation. Other features included hypotonia early in life and delay in walking. AP1S2 encodes an adaptin protein that constitutes part of the adaptor protein complex found at the cytoplasmic face of coated vesicles located at the Golgi complex. The complex mediates the recruitment of clathrin to the vesicle membrane. Aberrant endocytic processing through disruption of adaptor protein complexes is likely to result from the AP1S2 mutations identified in the three XLMR-affected families, and such defects may plausibly cause abnormal synaptic development and function. AP1S2 is the first reported XLMR gene that encodes a protein directly involved in the assembly of endocytic vesicles. PMID:17186471

  20. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  1. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O' Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  2. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. PMID:26944680

  3. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiewka, M.; Feraru, E.; Moller, B.K.; Hwang, I.; Feraru, M.I.; Kleine-Vehn, J.; Weijers, D.; Friml, J.

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells. It involves regulation of cargo sorting, vesicle formation, trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels. Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals

  4. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tedoldi, S.; Paterson, J.C.; Hansmann, M.-L.; Natkunam, Y.; Rüdiger, T.; Angelisová, Pavla; Du, M.Q.; Roberton, H.; Roncador, G.; Sanchez, L.; Pozzobon, M.; Masir, N.; Barry, R.; Pileri, S.; Mason, D.Y.; Marafioti, T.; Hořejší, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2006), s. 213-221. ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : transmembrane adaptors * PAG * LIME Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.370, year: 2006

  5. Measuring the Energetics of Membrane Protein Dimerization in Mammalian Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lirong; Novicky, Lawrence; Merzlyakov, Mikhail; Hristov, Tihomir; Hristova, Kalina

    2010-01-01

    Thus far, methods that give quantitative information about lateral interactions in membranes have been restricted peptides or simplified protein constructs studied in detergents, lipid vesicles or bacterial membranes. None of the available methods have been extended to complex or full length membrane proteins. Here we show how free energies of membrane protein dimerization can be measured in mammalian plasma membrane-derived vesicles. The measurements, performed in single vesicles, utilize th...

  6. A transgenic Drosophila model demonstrates that the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein functions as a eukaryotic Gab adaptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Botham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with a spectrum of diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA protein of H. pylori, which is translocated into host cells via a type IV secretion system, is a major risk factor for disease development. Experiments in gastric tissue culture cells have shown that once translocated, CagA activates the phosphatase SHP-2, which is a component of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK pathways whose over-activation is associated with cancer formation. Based on CagA's ability to activate SHP-2, it has been proposed that CagA functions as a prokaryotic mimic of the eukaryotic Grb2-associated binder (Gab adaptor protein, which normally activates SHP-2. We have developed a transgenic Drosophila model to test this hypothesis by investigating whether CagA can function in a well-characterized Gab-dependent process: the specification of photoreceptors cells in the Drosophila eye. We demonstrate that CagA expression is sufficient to rescue photoreceptor development in the absence of the Drosophila Gab homologue, Daughter of Sevenless (DOS. Furthermore, CagA's ability to promote photoreceptor development requires the SHP-2 phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW. These results provide the first demonstration that CagA functions as a Gab protein within the tissue of an organism and provide insight into CagA's oncogenic potential. Since many translocated bacterial proteins target highly conserved eukaryotic cellular processes, such as the RTK signaling pathway, the transgenic Drosophila model should be of general use for testing the in vivo function of bacterial effector proteins and for identifying the host genes through which they function.

  7. The adaptor molecule Nck localizes the WAVE complex to promote actin polymerization during CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pils

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CEACAM3 is a granulocyte receptor mediating the opsonin-independent recognition and phagocytosis of human-restricted CEACAM-binding bacteria. CEACAM3 function depends on an intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM-like sequence that is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src family kinases upon receptor engagement. The phosphorylated ITAM-like sequence triggers GTP-loading of Rac by directly associating with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF Vav. Rac stimulation in turn is critical for actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that generate lamellipodial protrusions and lead to bacterial uptake. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our present study we provide biochemical and microscopic evidence that the adaptor proteins Nck1 and Nck2, but not CrkL, Grb2 or SLP-76, bind to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. The association is phosphorylation-dependent and requires the Nck SH2 domain. Overexpression of the isolated Nck1 SH2 domain, RNAi-mediated knock-down of Nck1, or genetic deletion of Nck1 and Nck2 interfere with CEACAM3-mediated bacterial internalization and with the formation of lamellipodial protrusions. Nck is constitutively associated with WAVE2 and directs the actin nucleation promoting WAVE complex to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. In turn, dominant-negative WAVE2 as well as shRNA-mediated knock-down of WAVE2 or the WAVE-complex component Nap1 reduce internalization of bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide novel mechanistic insight into CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. We suggest that the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence is optimized to co-ordinate a minimal set of cellular factors needed to efficiently trigger actin-based lamellipodial protrusions and rapid pathogen engulfment.

  8. Insulin Receptor Substrate Adaptor Proteins Mediate Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Marc A.; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Oh, Annabell S.; Fagan, Dedra H.; Byron, Sara A.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Lee, Adrian V.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Fan, Cheng; Perou, Charles M.; Yee, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have not been developed with predictive biomarkers to identify tumors with receptor activation. We have previously shown that the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) adaptor proteins are necessary for linking IGF1R to downstream signaling pathways and the malignant phenotype in breast cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to identify gene expression profiles downstream of IGF1R and its two adaptor proteins. IRS-null breast cancer cells (T47D-YA) were engineered to express IRS-1 or IRS-2 alone and their ability to mediate IGF ligand-induced proliferation, motility, and gene expression determined. Global gene expression signatures reflecting IRS adaptor specific and primary vs. secondary ligand response were derived (Early IRS-1, Late IRS-1, Early IRS-2 and Late IRS-2) and functional pathway analysis examined. IRS isoforms mediated distinct gene expression profiles, functional pathways, and breast cancer subtype association. For example, IRS-1/2-induced TGFb2 expression and blockade of TGFb2 abrogated IGF-induced cell migration. In addition, the prognostic value of IRS proteins was significant in the luminal B breast tumor subtype. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that IRS adaptor signatures correlated with poor outcome as measured by recurrence-free and overall survival. Thus, IRS adaptor protein expression is required for IGF ligand responses in breast cancer cells. IRS-specific gene signatures represent accurate surrogates of IGF activity and could predict response to anti-IGF therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26991655

  9. Membrane protein structure determination: back to the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong; Ding, Yi; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables the structures of membrane proteins to be determined in the native-like environment of the phospholipid bilayer membrane. This chapter outlines the methods for membrane protein structural studies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy with samples of membrane proteins incorporated in proteoliposomes or planar lipid bilayers. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from OmpX and Ail, two bacterial outer membrane proteins that function in bacterial virulence. PMID:23975776

  10. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Immunology and Graduate Program in Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Limjindaporn, Thawornchai [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn [Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Mahidol University at Salaya Campus, Nakorn Pathom 73170 (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Division of Medical Molecular Biology and BIOTEC-Medical Biotechnology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. {yields} Adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. {yields} The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. {yields} AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. {yields} AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl{sup -}) and bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1

  11. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. → Adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. → The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. → AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. → AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl-) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney α-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl-/HCO3- exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H+) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1 trafficking of kidney α-intercalated cells.

  12. Proteins recruited by SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 adaptor identified by LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havrylov Serhiy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruk/CIN85 is a mammalian adaptor molecule with three SH3 domains. Using its SH3 domains Ruk/CIN85 can cluster multiple proteins and protein complexes, and, consequently, facilitates organisation of elaborate protein interaction networks with diverse regulatory roles. Previous research linked Ruk/CIN85 with the regulation of vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness. Despite the recent findings, precise molecular functions of Ruk/CIN85 in these processes remain largely elusive and further research is hampered by a lack of complete lists of its partner proteins. Results In the present study we employed a LC-MS/MS-based experimental pipeline to identify a considerable number (over 100 of proteins recruited by the SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 in vitro. Most of these identifications are novel Ruk/CIN85 interaction candidates. The identified proteins have diverse molecular architectures and can interact with other proteins, as well as with lipids and nucleic acids. Some of the identified proteins possess enzymatic activities. Functional profiling analyses and literature mining demonstrate that many of the proteins recruited by the SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 identified in this work were involved in the regulation of membranes and cytoskeletal structures necessary for vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness. Several groups of the proteins were also associated with few other cellular processes not previously related to Ruk/CIN85, most prominently with cell division. Conclusion Obtained data support the notion that Ruk/CIN85 regulates vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness through the assembly of multimeric protein complexes governing coordinated remodelling of membranes and underlying cytoskeletal structures, and imply its important roles in formation of coated vesicles and biogenesis of invadopodia. In addition, this study points to potential involvement of Ruk/CIN85 in other cellular

  13. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  14. ER Adaptor SCAP Translocates and Recruits IRF3 to Perinuclear Microsome Induced by Cytosolic Microbial DNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, also known as MITA, ERIS or MPYS induces the activation of TBK1 kinase and IRF3 transcription factor, upon sensing of microbial DNAs. How IRF3 is recruited onto the STING signalosome remains unknown. We report here that silencing of the ER adaptor SCAP markedly impairs the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by STING. Scap knockdown mice are more susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, SCAP translocates from ER, via Golgi, to perinuclear microsome in a STING-dependent manner. Mechanistically, the N-terminal transmembrane domain of SCAP interacts with STING, and the C-terminal cytosolic domain of SCAP binds to IRF3, thus recruiting IRF3 onto STING signalosome. Mis-localization of SCAP abolishes its antiviral function. Collectively, this study characterizes SCAP as an essential adaptor in the STING signaling pathway, uncovering a critical missing link in DNAs-triggered host antiviral responses.

  15. The interaction between the adaptor protein APS and Enigma is involved in actin organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Gonzalez, Teresa; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) is an adaptor protein phosphorylated by several tyrosine kinase receptors including the insulin receptor. To identify novel binding partners of APS, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening. We identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein...... that was previously shown to be associated with the actin cytoskeleton. In HEK 293 cells, Enigma interacted specifically with APS, but not with the APS-related protein SH2-B. This interaction required the NPTY motif of APS and the LIM domains of Enigma. In NIH-3T3 cells that express the insulin...... receptor, Enigma and APS were partially co-localised with F-actin in small ruffling structures. Insulin increased the complex formation between APS and Enigma and their co-localisation in large F-actin containing ruffles. While in NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells the co-expression of both Enigma and APS did not...

  16. PIP2: choreographer of actin-adaptor proteins in the HIV-1 dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Gordon-Alonso, Mónica; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role during the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 infection is affected by cellular proteins that influence the clustering of viral receptors or the subcortical actin cytoskeleton. Several of these actin-adaptor proteins are controlled by the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2), an important regulator of actin organization. PIP2 production is induced by HIV-1 attachment and facilitates viral infection. However, the importance of PIP2 in regulating cytoskeletal proteins and thus HIV-1 infection has been overlooked. This review examines recent reports describing the roles played by actin-adaptor proteins during HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells, highlighting the influence of the signaling lipid PIP2 in this process. PMID:24768560

  17. Autoinhibition of Mint1 adaptor protein regulates amyloid precursor protein binding and processing

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, Maria F.; Xu, Yibin; Dulubova, Irina; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Richardson, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rizo, Josep; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and regulate APP processing associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Mint regulation in APP binding and processing remain unclear. Biochemical, biophysical, and cellular experiments now show that the Mint1 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that binds to APP is intramolecularly inhibited by the adjacent C-terminal linker region. The crystal structure of a C-terminally extended Mint1 PT...

  18. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D.; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, pe...

  19. Chromatin Adaptor Brd4 Modulates E2 Transcription Activity and Protein Stability*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Brd4 is a chromatin adaptor containing tandem bromodomains binding to acetylated histone H3 and H4. Although Brd4 has been implicated in the transcriptional control of papillomavirus-encoded E2 protein, it is unclear how Brd4 regulates E2 function and whether the involvement of Brd4 in transactivation and transrepression is common to different types of E2 proteins. Using DNase I footprinting performed with in vitro reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin and...

  20. Biochemical and Structural Studies on the Adaptor Protein p130Cas

    OpenAIRE

    Nasertorabi, Fariborz

    2005-01-01

    Crk associated substrate (Cas) is an adaptor protein that becomes phosphorylated upon integrin signaling and influences regulation of cell processes such as migration, proliferation and survival. It consists of multiple domains and regions that can interact with several signaling proteins involved in different signaling pathways. Cas was first discovered as a highly phosphorylated protein in v-Src and v-Crk transformed cells, showing involvement of this protein in cell transformation High lev...

  1. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  2. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  3. Science Signaling Podcast for 12 July 2016: Adaptor proteins limit signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, H Steven; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Steven Wiley, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 12 July 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about how the abundance of adaptor proteins and feedback regulators affect the flow of information downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Information flows through a signaling pathway by sequential interactions between core components of the pathway, many of which have enzymatic activity. Adaptor proteins do not directly participate in relaying the signal and do not have enzymatic activity, but are important for signaling because they facilitate interactions between the core components. Using quantitative methods, Shi et al demonstrated that core components of the EGFR pathway were highly abundant in both normal cells and cancer cells. However, adaptor proteins were present in much lower abundance in both cell types, indicating that it is the abundance of these proteins that limit signaling downstream of EGFR. The authors also found that differences in EGFR signaling between different cell types likely resulted from the variable abundance of feedback regulators.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27405978

  4. Characterization of the latent membrane protein 1 signaling complex of Epstein-Barr virus in the membrane of mammalian cells with bimolecular fluorescence complementation

    OpenAIRE

    Everly David N; Emery Amanda; Talaty Pooja

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a novel technique to examine protein-protein interaction through the assembly of fluorescent proteins. In the present study, BiFC was used to study the assembly of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) signaling complex within the membrane of mammalian cells. LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization, localization to lipid rafts, and association of the cytoplasmic domain to adaptor proteins, such as the tum...

  5. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Ingar; Tribble, Gena D; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it a...

  6. Membrane tension is a key determinant of bud morphology in clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    CERN Document Server

    Hassinger, Julian E; Drubin, David G; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), clathrin and various adaptor proteins coat a patch of the plasma membrane, which is reshaped to form a budded vesicle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that elevated membrane tension can inhibit bud formation by a clathrin coat. In this study, we investigate the impact of membrane tension on the mechanics of membrane budding by simulating clathrin coats that either grow in area or progressively induce greater curvature. At low membrane tension, progressively increasing the area of a curvature-generating coat causes the membrane to smoothly evolve from a flat to budded morphology, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high membrane tensions. Interestingly, at physiologically relevant, intermediate membrane tensions, the shape evolution of the membrane undergoes a snapthrough instability in which increasing coat area causes the membrane to "snap" from an open, U-shaped bud to a closed, $\\Omega$-shaped bud. This instability is accompanied by a large energy...

  7. Dephosphorylation of the adaptor LAT and phospholipase C-γ by SHP-1 inhibits natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Omri; Fried, Sophia; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Joseph, Noah; Keizer, Danielle; Piterburg, Marina; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy cells and virally infected or transformed self-cells by tuning activating and inhibitory signals received through cell surface receptors. Inhibitory receptors inhibit NK cell function by recruiting and activating the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the plasma membrane. However, to date, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV1 is the only direct SHP-1 substrate identified in NK cells. We reveal that the adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) as well as phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and PLC-γ2 are SHP-1 substrates. Dephosphorylation of Tyr(132) in LAT by SHP-1 in NK cells abrogated the recruitment of PLC-γ1 and PLC-γ2 to the immunological synapse between the NK cell and a cancer cell target, which reduced NK cell degranulation and target cell killing. Furthermore, the ubiquitylation of LAT by the E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, which was induced by LAT phosphorylation, led to the degradation of LAT in response to the engagement of inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which abrogated NK cell cytotoxicity. Knockdown of the Cbl proteins blocked LAT ubiquitylation, which promoted NK cell function. Expression of a ubiquitylation-resistant mutant LAT blocked inhibitory receptor signaling, enabling cells to become activated. Together, these data identify previously uncharacterized SHP-1 substrates and inhibitory mechanisms that determine the response of NK cells. PMID:27221712

  8. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-06-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to its role in regulating APP transport and processing. LR11 is a type I transmembrane protein and belongs to a novel family of Vps10p receptors. Using a new expression vector, pMTTH (MBP-MCS1 (multiple cloning site)-Thrombin protease cleavage site-MCS2-TEV protease cleavage site-MCS3-His(6)), we successfully expressed, purified and reconstituted the LR11 transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic (CT) domains into bicelles and detergent micelles for NMR structural studies. This new construct allowed us to overcome several obstacles during sample preparation. MBP fused LR11TM and LR11TMCT proteins are preferably expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli membrane, making a refolding of the protein unnecessary. The C-terminal His-tag allows for easy separation of the target protein from the truncated products from the C-terminus, and provides a convenient route for screening detergents to produce high quality 2D (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra. Thrombin protease cleavage is compatible with most of the commonly used detergents, including a direct cleavage at the E. coli membrane surface. This new MBP construct may provide an effective route for the preparation of small proteins with TM domains. PMID:21320603

  9. Regulation and function of the CD3¿ DxxxLL motif: a binding site for adaptor protein-1 and adaptor protein-2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1997-01-01

    /CD3gamma chimeras; and in vitro by binding CD3gamma peptides to clathrin-coated vesicle adaptor proteins (APs). We find that the CD3gamma D127xxxLL131/132 sequence represents one united motif for binding of both AP-1 and AP-2, and that this motif functions as an active sorting motif in monomeric CD4...... and for AP binding in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence indicating that phosphorylation of CD3gamma S126 in the context of the complete TCR induces a conformational change that exposes the DxxxLL sequence for AP binding. Exposure of the DxxxLL motif causes an increase in the TCR internalization...

  10. Discs-Large and Strabismus are functionally linked to plasma membrane formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ok-Kyung; Frese, Kristopher K.; James, Jennifer S.; Chadda, Darshana; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Javier, Ronald T.; Cho, Kyung-Ok

    2003-01-01

    During early embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, extensive vesicle transport occurs to build cell boundaries for 6,000 nuclei. Here we show that this important process depends on a functional complex formed between the tumour suppressor and adaptor protein Discs-Large (Dlg)1 and the integral membrane protein Strabismus (Stbm)/Van Gogh (Vang)2,3. In support of this idea, embryos with mutations in either dlg or stbm displayed severe defects in plasma membrane formation. Conversely, overex...

  11. Molecular Structure, Function, and Dynamics of Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchhausen, Tom; Owen, David; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin is a molecular scaffold for vesicular uptake of cargo at the plasma membrane, where its assembly into cage-like lattices underlies the clathrin-coated pits of classical endocytosis. This review describes the structures of clathrin, major cargo adaptors, and other proteins that participate in forming a clathrin-coated pit, loading its contents, pinching off the membrane as a lattice-enclosed vesicle, and recycling the components. It integrates as much of the structural information as ...

  12. Characterization of a Nonclathrin Endocytic Pathway: Membrane Cargo and Lipid RequirementsD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Naslavsky, Naava; Weigert, Roberto; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2004-01-01

    Clathrin-independent endocytosis internalizes plasma membrane proteins that lack cytoplasmic sequences recognized by clathrin adaptor proteins. There is evidence for different clathrin-independent pathways but whether they share common features has not been systematically tested. Here, we examined whether CD59, an endogenous glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP), and major histocompatibility protein class I (MHCI), an endogenous, integral membrane protein, entered cells thro...

  13. Early observation of bacterial cellulose membrane for repair of dural defects in rabbits%细菌纤维素膜修复兔硬脑膜缺损的早期观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晨; 陈世文; 田恒力; 王敢; 郭衍; 袁陆涛

    2013-01-01

    right dural defects were repaired with bacteria cellulose membrane, the left dural defects were repaired with artificial dura matter, and the tissues on the repaired sites were collected on day 7, 14 and 21 after operation for determination of expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) , interleukin-6 ( IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) mRNA by RT-PCR. Results All rabbits survived without the presence of wound infection. On the patched side of group A, bacteria cellulose membrane evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion and visible inflammatory cells, fibrous connective tissues proliferated on the outer side of bacteria cellulose membrane, fibroblasts uniformly distributed in the inner side, and new blood vessels appeared. On the unpatched side of group A, the brain was directly connected with subcutaneous tissues. In group B, RT-PCR revealed that the expression of IL-1 β and IL-6 mRNA in bacteria cellulose membrane was significantly lower than that in artificial dura matter at each time point, while the expression of TNF-α mRNA of both sides was similar. Conclusion Bacterial cellulose membrane may avoid the adhesion to the brain tissues and has slighter early inflammatory response in repair of dural defects. Bacterial cellulose membrane may be used as the ideal substitute material for dura matter.

  14. Evidence for an evolutionary relationship between the large adaptor nucleoporin Nup192 and karyopherins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuwe, Tobias; Lin, Daniel H; Collins, Leslie N; Hurt, Ed; Hoelz, André

    2014-02-18

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is facilitated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are massive proteinaceous transport channels embedded in the nuclear envelope. Nup192 is a major component of an adaptor nucleoporin subcomplex proposed to link the NPC coat with the central transport channel. Here, we present the structure of the ∼110-kDa N-terminal domain (NTD) of Nup192 at 2.7-Å resolution. The structure reveals an open ring-shaped architecture composed of Huntingtin, EF3, PP2A, and TOR1 (HEAT) and Armadillo (ARM) repeats. A comparison of different conformations indicates that the NTD consists of two rigid halves connected by a flexible hinge. Unexpectedly, the two halves of the ring are structurally related to karyopherin-α (Kap-α) and β-karyopherin family members. Biochemically, we identify a conserved patch that binds an unstructured segment in Nup53 and show that a C-terminal tail region binds to a putative helical fragment in Nic96. The Nup53 segment that binds Nup192 is a classical nuclear localization-like sequence that interacts with Kap-α in a mutually exclusive and mechanistically distinct manner. The disruption of the Nup53 and Nic96 binding sites in vivo yields growth and mRNA export defects, revealing their critical role in proper NPC function. Surprisingly, both interactions are dispensable for NPC localization, suggesting that Nup192 possesses another nucleoporin interaction partner. These data indicate that the structured domains in the adaptor nucleoporin complex are held together by peptide interactions that resemble those found in karyopherin•cargo complexes and support the proposal that the adaptor nucleoporins arose from ancestral karyopherins. PMID:24505056

  15. DNA as Tunable Adaptor for siRNA Polyplex Stabilization and Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissig, Philipp; Klein, Philipp M; Hadwiger, Philipp; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    siRNA and microRNA are promising therapeutic agents, which are engaged in a natural mechanism called RNA interference that modulates gene expression posttranscriptionally. For intracellular delivery of such nucleic acid triggers, we use sequence-defined cationic polymers manufactured through solid phase chemistry. They consist of an oligoethanamino amide core for siRNA complexation and optional domains for nanoparticle shielding and cell targeting. Due to the small size of siRNA, electrostatic complexes with polycations are less stable, and consequently intracellular delivery is less efficient. Here we use DNA oligomers as adaptors to increase size and charge of cargo siRNA, resulting in increased polyplex stability, which in turn boosts transfection efficiency. Extending a single siRNA with a 181-nucleotide DNA adaptor is sufficient to provide maximum gene silencing aided by cationic polymers. Interestingly, this simple strategy was far more effective than merging defined numbers (4-10) of siRNA units into one DNA scaffolded construct. For DNA attachment, the 3' end of the siRNA passenger strand was beneficial over the 5' end. The impact of the attachment site however was resolved by introducing bioreducible disulfides at the connection point. We also show that DNA adaptors provide the opportunity to readily link additional functional domains to siRNA. Exemplified by the covalent conjugation of the endosomolytic influenza peptide INF-7 to siRNA via a DNA backbone strand and complexing this construct with a targeting polymer, we could form a highly functional polyethylene glycol-shielded polyplex to downregulate a luciferase gene in folate receptor-positive cells. PMID:26928236

  16. Involvement of β3A Subunit of Adaptor Protein-3 in Intracellular Trafficking of Receptor-like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PCP-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui DONG; Hong YUAN; Weirong JIN; Yan SHEN; Xiaojing XU; Hongyang WANG

    2007-01-01

    PCP-2 is a human receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase and a member of the MAM domain family cloned in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Previous studies showed that PCP-2 directly interacted with β-catenin through the juxtamembrane domain, dephosphorylated β-catenin and played an important role in the regulation of cell adhesion. Recent study showed that PCP-2 was also involved in the repression of β-catenin-induced transcriptional activity. Here we describe the interactions of PCP-2 with the β3A subunit of adaptor protein (AP)-3 and sorting nexin (SNX) 3. These protein complexes were detected using the yeast two-hybrid assay with the juxtamembrane and membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PCP-2 as "bait". Both AP-3 and SNX3 are molecules involved in intracellular trafficking of membrane receptors. The association between the β3A subunit of AP-3 and PCP-2 was further confirmed in mammalian cells. Our results suggested a possible mechanism of intracellular trafficking of PCP-2 mediated by AP-3 and SNX3 which might participate in the regulation of PCP-2 functions.

  17. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  18. Bacteria/virus filter membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, M. S.; Goodwin, F.; Roebelen, G.

    1977-01-01

    Hollow acrylate fiber membrane that filters bacterial and viral organisms can be used with closed-cycle life-support systems for underwater habitations or laboratories. Membrane also has applications in fields of medicine, gnotobiotics, pharmaceutical production, and industries and research facilities that require sterile water. Device eliminates need for strong chemicals or sterilizing agents, thereby reducing costs.

  19. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  20. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  1. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  2. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  3. Effectiveness of Needleless Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, M.; Bayuse, T.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid Isolation in the medication vial: Air/ fluid isolation maneuvers were used to move the medication to the septum end of vial. This isolation may be achieved in multiple ways based on the experience of the astronaut with fluid management in microgravity. If vial adaptors/blunt cannula or syringe assembly is inserted into the to vial before fluid isolation commences, the stability of this assembly should be considered in an effort to limit the risk of "slinging off" of the vial during isolation. Alternatively, fluid isolation can be performed prior to attaching the syringe/vial adaptor assembly. Terrestrial practices for medication withdrawal from a nonvented vial require injection of an equivalent amount of air as the expected medication volume prior to withdrawing liquid. In microgravity, this action is still valid, however the injection of additional air into the vial creates a multitude of micro bubbles and increases the volume of medication mixed with air that then must be withdrawn to achieve the desired drug volume in syringe. This practice is more likely to be required when using vials >30ml in size and injection volumes >10mL. It is felt that based on the microgravity flight, the practice of air injection is more of a hindrance than help.

  4. The Adaptor Protein Rai/ShcC Promotes Astrocyte-Dependent Inflammation during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Ortensi, Barbara; Pelicci, Giuliana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ballerini, Clara; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana

    2016-07-15

    Th17 cells have been casually associated to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We have previously demonstrated that Rai/ShcC, a member of the Shc family of adaptor proteins, negatively regulates Th17 cell differentiation and lupus autoimmunity. In this study, we have investigated the pathogenic outcome of the Th17 bias associated with Rai deficiency on multiple sclerosis development, using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. We found that, unexpectedly, EAE was less severe in Rai(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts despite an enhanced generation of myelin-specific Th17 cells that infiltrated into the CNS. Nevertheless, when adoptively transferred into immunodeficient Rai(+/+) mice, these cells promoted a more severe disease compared with wild-type encephalitogenic Th17 cells. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by a dampened inflammatory response of astrocytes, which were found to express Rai, to IL-17. The results provide evidence that Rai plays opposite roles in Th17 cell differentiation and astrocyte activation, with the latter dominant over the former in EAE, highlighting this adaptor as a potential novel target for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27288534

  5. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  6. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  7. Novicidin interactions with phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balakrishnan, Vijay Shankar

    Antimicrobial peptides target bacterial cell membranes and are considered as potential antibiotics. Their interactions with cell membranes are studied using different approaches. This thesis comprises of the biophysical investigations on the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin, interacting with...... liposomes. The lipid-induced changes in the peptide due to membrane binding, and the peptide-induced changes in the membrane properties were investigated using various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, and the structural and thermodynamic aspects of peptide-lipid interactions are discussed. This helps...... in understanding not only the antimicrobial nature of Novicidin, but also sheds light on the membrane-peptide interactions....

  8. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  9. Effectiveness of Needles Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, Melinda; Bayuse, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The need for a new system of injectable medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was identified. It is desired that this system fly medications in their original manufacturer's packaging, allowing the system to comply with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines while minimizing the resupply frequency due to medication expiration. Pre-filled syringes are desired, however, the evolving nature of the healthcare marketplace requires flexibility in the redesign. If medications must be supplied in a vial, a system is required that allows for the safe withdrawal of medication from the vial into a syringe for administration in microgravity. During two reduced gravity flights, the effectiveness of two versions of a blunt cannula and needleless vial adaptors was evaluated to facilitate the withdrawal of liquid medication from a vial into a syringe for injection. Other parameters assessed included the ability to withdraw the required amount of medication and whether this is dependent on vial size, liquid, or the total volume of fluid within the vial. Injectable medications proposed for flight on ISS were used for this evaluation. Due to differing sizes of vials and the fluid properties of the medications, the needleless vial adaptors proved to be too cumbersome to recommend for use on the ISS. The blunt cannula, specifically the plastic version, proved to be more effective at removing medication from the various sizes of vials and are the recommended hardware for ISS. Fluid isolation within the vials and syringes is an important step in preparing medication for injection regardless of the hardware used. Although isolation is a challenge in the relatively short parabolas during flight, it is not an obstacle for sustained microgravity. This presentation will provide an overview of the products tested as well as the challenges identified during the microgravity flights.

  10. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRAper se(KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  11. The Influences of Connectors and Adaptors to Fiber-To-The-Home Network Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Ab-Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The reliability of the entire communications network was dependent on the reliability of each single element. Connector was important devices that can affect the performance of the fiber communication. There were a large number of issues that affect the performance of fiber optic connectors in todays networks. These factors were increasingly as data rates, the number of wavelengths and transmission distances continue to escalate. Approach: Therefore this study was carried out to test on the influence of connectors and adapters to the performance of the optical network. Initially the actual attenuation of connector and adaptor were tested by using multifunction loss tester. The first two 1 m corning optical fibers with a connector at each end are measured. Then, both the 1 m corning optical fibers were joined together by an adaptor and connected to the Multifunction loss tester. Three types of wavelength are used as the source to test the attenuation of the fiber which is 1310, 1490-1550 nm. In order to measure the Bit Error Rate (BER and the power loss in optical fiber communication, a simple simulation was carried out by using software opti sys. Results: The attenuation on the connector was caused mainly by existence of impurities in the connector, less perfect connection, scattering of beam and others. These causes the parameter such as power received, Q-factor, minimum BER and also the eye-height to change. Changes in these parameters also affect the performance at the user end. It was very critical that causes of attenuation to be eliminated. Conclusion/Recommendations: From the result it can be concluded that, the greater the attenuation, the greater the decrease in power received. It also affects the Q-factor of the system where as the attenuation increase, the maximum Q-factor decreases. As for the minimum BER, minimum BER changes as the attenuation increase initially, after a maximum value it decreases as the

  12. The Src homology and collagen A (ShcA) adaptor protein is required for the spatial organization of the costamere/Z-disk network during heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlih, Mohamed; Host, Lionel; Martin, Sophie; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Monassier, Laurent; Terrand, Jérôme; Messaddeq, Nadia; Radke, Michael; Gotthardt, Michael; Bruban, Véronique; Kober, Frank; Bernard, Monique; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Abt-Jijon, Francisco; Boucher, Philippe; Matz, Rachel L

    2015-01-23

    Src homology and collagen A (ShcA) is an adaptor protein that binds to tyrosine kinase receptors. Its germ line deletion is embryonic lethal with abnormal cardiovascular system formation, and its role in cardiovascular development is unknown. To investigate its functional role in cardiovascular development in mice, ShcA was deleted in cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells by crossing ShcA flox mice with SM22a-Cre transgenic mice. Conditional mutant mice developed signs of severe dilated cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarctions, and premature death. No evidence of a vascular contribution to the phenotype was observed. Histological analysis of the heart revealed aberrant sarcomeric Z-disk and M-band structures, and misalignments of T-tubules with Z-disks. We find that not only the ErbB3/Neuregulin signaling pathway but also the baroreceptor reflex response, which have been functionally associated, are altered in the mutant mice. We further demonstrate that ShcA interacts with Caveolin-1 and the costameric protein plasma membrane Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA), and that its deletion leads to abnormal dystrophin signaling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ShcA interacts with crucial proteins and pathways that link Z-disk and costamere. PMID:25488665

  13. The Src Homology and Collagen A (ShcA) Adaptor Protein Is Required for the Spatial Organization of the Costamere/Z-disk Network during Heart Development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlih, Mohamed; Host, Lionel; Martin, Sophie; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Monassier, Laurent; Terrand, Jérôme; Messaddeq, Nadia; Radke, Michael; Gotthardt, Michael; Bruban, Véronique; Kober, Frank; Bernard, Monique; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Abt-Jijon, Francisco; Boucher, Philippe; Matz, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Src homology and collagen A (ShcA) is an adaptor protein that binds to tyrosine kinase receptors. Its germ line deletion is embryonic lethal with abnormal cardiovascular system formation, and its role in cardiovascular development is unknown. To investigate its functional role in cardiovascular development in mice, ShcA was deleted in cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells by crossing ShcA flox mice with SM22a-Cre transgenic mice. Conditional mutant mice developed signs of severe dilated cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarctions, and premature death. No evidence of a vascular contribution to the phenotype was observed. Histological analysis of the heart revealed aberrant sarcomeric Z-disk and M-band structures, and misalignments of T-tubules with Z-disks. We find that not only the ErbB3/Neuregulin signaling pathway but also the baroreceptor reflex response, which have been functionally associated, are altered in the mutant mice. We further demonstrate that ShcA interacts with Caveolin-1 and the costameric protein plasma membrane Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA), and that its deletion leads to abnormal dystrophin signaling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ShcA interacts with crucial proteins and pathways that link Z-disk and costamere. PMID:25488665

  14. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  15. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  16. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  17. New Class of Competitive Inhibitor of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmour, Raymond; Foster, J. Estelle; Sheng, Qin; McClain, Jonathan R.; Riley, Anna; Sun, Pei-Ming; Ng, Wai-Leung; Yan, Dalai; Nicas, Thalia I.; Henry, Kenneth; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial histidine kinases have been proposed as targets for the discovery of new antibiotics, yet few specific inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases have been reported. We report here a novel thienopyridine (TEP) compound that inhibits bacterial histidine kinases competitively with respect to ATP but does not comparably inhibit mammalian serine/threonine kinases. Although it partitions into membranes and does not inhibit the growth of bacterial or mammalian cells, TEP could serve as a s...

  18. Crystal structure of Toll-like receptor adaptor MAL/TIRAP reveals the molecular basis for signal transduction and disease protection

    OpenAIRE

    Valkov, Eugene; Stamp, Anna; DiMaio, Frank; Baker, David; Verstak, Brett; Roversi, Pietro; Kellie, Stuart; Sweet, Matthew J.; Mansell, Ashley; Gay, Nicholas J.; Jennifer L Martin; Kobe, Bostjan

    2011-01-01

    Initiation of the innate immune response requires agonist recognition by pathogen-recognition receptors such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptors are critical in orchestrating the signal transduction pathways after TLR and interleukin-1 receptor activation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) adaptor-like (MAL)/TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) is involved in bridging MyD88 to TLR2 and TLR4 in response...

  19. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  20. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications for...

  1. PROPERTIES OF BACTERIAL CELLULOSE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF PAPER

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Hua Gao; Ke-Fu Chen; Ren-Dang Yang; Fei Yang; Wen-Jia Han

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a promising source of biodegradable polymers having high purity. The time required to disperse bacterial cellulose wet membranes was studied, along with evaluation by infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis of the dispersed bacterial fiber and tests of the physical properties of the sheet. The results showed that bacterial cellulose wet membrane can be dispersed well, forming fibers when the dispersing time was 3 minutes at a suitable concentration. FT-IR results sho...

  2. Comparison Study on Finite Element Model for Structural Analysis of Lower CTS Cylinder Lifting Adaptor in ITER Assembly Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER tokamak assembly tools are purpose-built and specially designed to complete the ITER tokamak machine which includes; Vacuum Vessel (VV), VV Thermal Shield (VVTS) and Cryostat Thermal Shield (CTS), Toroidal Field Coil (TFC) and Poloidal Field (PF) coils, and other components contained in the cryostat. Based on the engineering design and design description documents prepared by the ITER organization (IO). In this paper, FE models to verify the structural integrity of the Lower Cryostat Thermal Shield (LCTS) Lifting Adaptor are prepared and compared with their structure analysis result. In the paper, each analysis result with difference BC applied was compared with the equivalent stress and the results of analysis were evaluated according to SM490YB's allowable stress. And the conclusions of this paper are summarized as following. - The structural stabilities of the LCTS lift adaptor have been studied using ANSYS codes for verifying structural strength for this tool

  3. The membrane: transertion as an organizing principle in membrane heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi; Fishov, Itzhak; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Norris, Vic

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial membrane exhibits a significantly heterogeneous distribution of lipids and proteins. This heterogeneity results mainly from lipid–lipid, protein–protein, and lipid–protein associations which are orchestrated by the coupled transcription, translation and insertion of nascent proteins into and through membrane (transertion). Transertion is central not only to the individual assembly and disassembly of large physically linked groups of macromolecules (alias hyperstructures) but als...

  4. Membrane structure and radiation and hyperthermic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general structure of the biological membrane and its involvement in cell damage from radiation and hyperthermic insults are discussed using bacterial cells as an example. Bacterial cells are useful models for these types of studies because they possess a simple membrane system whose composition can be readily altered. Also, various strains exist having different sensitivities to radiation and heat. For example, the response of Escherichia coli cells to ionizing radiation is found to be related to the degree of association between its DNA and membrane. The cell membrane, particularly the lipid component, is an important target in hyperthermic cell killing. The composition and organization of the membrane lipids can influence a cell's response to heat. Heat-induced changes in membrane lipids lead to altered distribution of E. coli proteins, particularly their translocation to the outer membrane. These and other aspects are discussed in this review. (author)

  5. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  6. Chemical-genetic disruption of clathrin function spares adaptor complex 3–dependent endosome vesicle biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Grossniklaus, Emily J.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Peden, Andrew A.; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A role for clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle biogenesis has been inferred from biochemical interactions and colocalization between this adaptor and clathrin. The functionality of these molecular associations, however, is controversial. We comprehensively explore the role of clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle budding, using rapid chemical-genetic perturbation of clathrin function with a clathrin light chain–FKBP chimera oligomerizable by the drug AP20187. We find that AP-3 interacts and coloc...

  7. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  8. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  9. Cysteine-based regulation of the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master transcription factor containing a powerful acidic transcriptional activation domain. Nrf2-dependent gene expression impacts cancer chemoprevention strategies, inflammatory responses, and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal conditions, association of Nrf2 with the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1 results in the rapid Nrf2 ubiquitylation and proteasome-dependent degradation. Inhibition of Keap1 function blocks ubiquitylation of Nrf2, allowing newly synthesized Nrf2 to translocate into the nucleus, bind to ARE sites and direct target gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments coupled with proteomic analysis support a model in which Keap1 contains at least 2 distinct cysteine motifs. The first is located at Cys 151 in the BTB domain. The second is located in the intervening domain and centers around Cys 273 and 288. Adduction or oxidation at Cys151 has been shown to produce a conformational change in Keap1 that results in dissociation of Keap1 from CUL3, thereby inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitylation. Thus, adduction captures specific chemical information and translates it into biochemical information via changes in structural conformation.

  10. Canine hepacivirus NS3 serine protease can cleave the human adaptor proteins MAVS and TRIF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Parera

    Full Text Available Canine hepacivirus (CHV was recently identified in domestic dogs and horses. The finding that CHV is genetically the virus most closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV has raised the question of whether HCV might have evolved as the result of close contact between dogs and/or horses and humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the NS3/4A serine protease of CHV specifically cleaves human mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll-IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-beta (TRIF. The proteolytic activity of CHV NS3/4A was evaluated using a bacteriophage lambda genetic screen. Human MAVS- and TRIF-specific cleavage sites were engineered into the lambda cI repressor. Upon infection of Escherichia coli cells coexpressing these repressors and a CHV NS3/4A construct, lambda phage replicated up to 2000-fold more efficiently than in cells expressing a CHV protease variant carrying the inactivating substitution S139A. Comparable results were obtained when several HCV NS3/4A constructs of genotype 1b were assayed. This indicates that CHV can disrupt the human innate antiviral defense signaling pathway and suggests a possible evolutionary relationship between CHV and HCV.

  11. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedoldi, Sara; Paterson, Jennifer C; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Rüdiger, Thomas; Angelisova, Pavla; Du, Ming Q; Roberton, Helen; Roncador, Giovanna; Sanchez, Lydia; Pozzobon, Michela; Masir, Noraidah; Barry, Richard; Pileri, Stefano; Mason, David Y; Marafioti, Teresa; Horejsí, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (of which 7 have been identified so far) are involved in receptor signaling in immune cells. They have only a short extracellular region, with most of the molecule comprising a substantial intracytoplasmic region carrying multiple tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by Src- or Syk-family kinases. In this paper, we report an immunohistologic study of 6 of these molecules in normal and neoplastic human tissue sections and show that they are restricted to subpopulations of lymphoid cells, being present in either T cells (LAT, LIME, and TRIM), B cells (NTAL), or subsets of both cell types (PAG and SIT). Their expression in neoplastic lymphoid cells broadly reflects that of normal lymphoid tissue, including the positivity of plasma cells and myeloma/plasmacytoma for LIME, NTAL, PAG, and SIT. However, this study also revealed some reactions that may be of diagnostic/prognostic value. For example, lymphocytic lymphoma and mantle-cell lymphoma showed similar profiles but differed clearly from follicle-center lymphoma, whereas PAG tended to be selectively expressed in germinal center-derived subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These molecules represent a potentially important addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers detectable in routine biopsies that can be used in hematopathologic studies. PMID:16160011

  12. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  13. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Ylösmäki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-structural protein-1 (NS1 of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10 regulator of kinase and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL. This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif.

  14. Adaptor protein LNK is a negative regulator of brain neural stem cell proliferation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlenius, Henrik; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Monni, Emanuela; Oki, Koichi; Wattananit, Somsak; Darsalia, Vladimer; Iosif, Robert E; Torper, Olof; Wood, James C; Braun, Sebastian; Jagemann, Lucas; Nuber, Ulrike A; Englund, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik W; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2012-04-11

    Ischemic stroke causes transient increase of neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and migration of newly formed neuroblasts toward the damaged area where they mature to striatal neurons. The molecular mechanisms regulating this plastic response, probably involved in structural reorganization and functional recovery, are poorly understood. The adaptor protein LNK suppresses hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, but its presence and role in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that LNK is expressed in NSPCs in the adult mouse and human SVZ. Lnk(-/-) mice exhibited increased NSPC proliferation after stroke, but not in intact brain or following status epilepticus. Deletion of Lnk caused increased NSPC proliferation while overexpression decreased mitotic activity of these cells in vitro. We found that Lnk expression after stroke increased in SVZ through the transcription factors STAT1/3. LNK attenuated insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling by inhibition of AKT phosphorylation, resulting in reduced NSPC proliferation. Our findings identify LNK as a stroke-specific, endogenous negative regulator of NSPC proliferation, and suggest that LNK signaling is a novel mechanism influencing plastic responses in postischemic brain. PMID:22496561

  15. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  16. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  17. Subversion of membrane transport pathways by vacuolar pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Alix, Eric; Mukherjee, Shaeri; Roy, Craig R.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian phagocytes control bacterial infections effectively through phagocytosis, the process by which particles engulfed at the cell surface are transported to lysosomes for destruction. However, intracellular pathogens have evolved mechanisms to avoid this fate. Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver proteins into host cells that subvert signaling pathways controlling membrane transport. These bacterial effectors modulate the function of proteins that regula...

  18. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  19. 细菌纤维素膜作为生物支架构建组织工程角膜上皮的可行性研究%Feasibility of bacterial cellulose membrane as biological scaffold for construction of tissue engineering corneal epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹静洁; 张琛; 赵少贞; 万怡灶; 胡达

    2016-01-01

    Background Corneal transplantation is a primary method for the treatment of serious corneal diseases, but its application is limited because of the shortage of corneal donor.The study on tissue engineering corneal epithelium provides a new approach to corneal transplantation, and the biological scaffold materials for tissue engineering corneal epithelium is an issue of increasing concern.Bacterial cellulose membrane has been used in medical field,but its application in tissue engineering corneal epithelium deserves more researching.Objective This study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of bacterial cellulose membrane as a biological scaffold of tissue engineering corneal epithelium.Methods Corneal epithelium was isolated from 1 month-old New Zealand White rabbit.Corneal epithelial cells were cultured using explant method and identified by detecting the CK-3 expression using immunofluorescence technique.The second generation ceils were inoculated on bacterial cellulose membrane and culture plate, respectively, and the growth status of the cells were examined and compared under the optical microscope.The cell activity/toxicity test was performed by LIVE/DEAD cell staining kit at the third day after inoculation to evaluate the survival rate.The ultrastructure of the cell surface was examined under the scanning electron microscope.The study was performed in accordance with the ARVO Statement.Results Rabbit corneal epithelial cells grew well 1 week after primarily cultured with a cobblestone-like appearance and positive response for CK3 antibody.The cells on the bacterial cellulose membrane presented a round shape and regular arrangement and showed the green fluorescence for LIVE/DEAD test,with the survival rate 100%.Abundant leafy protrusion, microvilli and intercellular junction were seen under the scanning electron microscope.In addition, mitosis phase of cells and many filopodia between the cells and bacterial cellulose membrane were also exhibited

  20. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, David; Lomoio, Selene; Haydon, Philip G.; Moss, Stephen J.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is required for production of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC). Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates. PMID:27192432

  1. N-terminal tyrosine modulation of the endocytic adaptor function of the beta-arrestins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Sébastien; Fralish, Gregory B; Laporte, Stéphane; Caron, Marc G; Barak, Larry S

    2007-06-29

    The highly homologous beta-arrestin1 and -2 adaptor proteins play important roles in the function of G protein-coupled receptors. Either beta-arrestin variant can function as a molecular chaperone for clathrin-mediated receptor internalization. This role depends primarily upon two distinct, contiguous C-terminal beta-arrestin motifs recognizing clathrin and the beta-adaptin subunit of AP2. However, a molecular basis is lacking to explain the different endocytic efficacies of the two beta-arrestin isoforms and the observation that beta-arrestin N-terminal substitution mutants can act as dominant negative inhibitors of receptor endocytosis. Despite the near identity of the beta-arrestins throughout their N termini, sequence variability is present at a small number of residues and includes tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions. Here we show that corresponding N-terminal (Y/F)VTL sequences in beta-arrestin1 and -2 differentially regulate mu-adaptin binding. Our results indicate that the beta-arrestin1 Tyr-54 lessens the interaction with mu-adaptin and moreover is a Src phosphorylation site. A gain of endocytic function is obtained with the beta-arrestin1 Y54F substitution, which improves both the beta-arrestin1 interaction with mu-adaptin and the ability to enhance beta2-adrenergic receptor internalization. These data indicate that beta-arrestin2 utilizes mu-adaptin as an endocytic partner, and that the inability of beta-arrestin1 to sustain a similar degree of interaction with mu-adaptin may result from coordination of Tyr-54 by neighboring residues or its modification by Src kinase. Additionally, these naturally occurring variations in beta-arrestins may also differentially regulate the composition of the signaling complexes organized on the receptor. PMID:17456469

  2. The TIR-domain containing adaptor TRAM is required for TLR7 mediated RANTES production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enda Shevlin

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 plays a vital role in the immune response to ssRNA viruses such as human rhinovirus (HRV and Influenza, against which there are currently no treatments or vaccines with long term efficacy available. Clearly, a more comprehensive understanding of the TLR7 signaling axis will contribute to its molecular targeting. TRIF related adaptor molecule (TRAM plays a vital role in TLR4 signaling by recruiting TRIF to TLR4, followed by endosomal trafficking of the complex and initiation of IRF3 dependent type I interferon production as well as NF-κB dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR7 functionality, we found that TRAM(-/- murine macrophages exhibited a transcriptional and translational impairment in TLR7 mediated RANTES, but not TNFα, production. Suppression of TRAM expression in human macrophages also resulted in an impairment in TLR7 mediated CCL5 and IFN-β, but not TNFα, gene induction. Furthermore, suppression of endogenous human TRAM expression in human macrophages significantly impaired RV16 induced CCL5 and IFNβ, but not TNFα gene induction. Additionally, TRAM-G2A dose-dependently inhibited TLR7 mediated activation of CCL5, IFNβ and IFNα reporter genes. TLR7-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 was impaired in TRAM(-/- cells. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that TRAM physically interacts with MyD88 upon TLR7 stimulation, but not under basal conditions. Our results clearly demonstrate that TRAM plays a, hitherto unappreciated, role in TLR7 signaling through a novel signaling axis containing, but not limited to, MyD88, TRAM and IRF3 towards the activation of anti-viral immunity.

  3. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Adriani

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brai

  4. Molecular mechanisms of membrane targeting antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epand, Richard M; Walker, Chelsea; Epand, Raquel F; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial membrane provides a target for antimicrobial peptides. There are two groups of bacteria that have characteristically different surface membranes. One is the Gram-negative bacteria that have an outer membrane rich in lipopolysaccharide. Several antimicrobials have been found to inhibit the synthesis of this lipid, and it is expected that more will be developed. In addition, antimicrobial peptides can bind to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and block passage of solutes between the periplasm and the cell exterior, resulting in bacterial toxicity. In Gram-positive bacteria, the major bacterial lipid component, phosphatidylglycerol can be chemically modified by bacterial enzymes to convert the lipid from anionic to cationic or zwitterionic form. This process leads to increased levels of resistance of the bacteria against polycationic antimicrobial agents. Inhibitors of this enzyme would provide protection against the development of bacterial resistance. There are antimicrobial agents that directly target a component of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes that can act on both Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria. Many of these are cyclic peptides with a rigid binding site capable of binding a lipid component. This binding targets antimicrobial agents to bacteria, rather than being toxic to host cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26514603

  5. Cooperative and independent roles of the Drp1 adaptors Mff, MiD49 and MiD51 in mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osellame, Laura D; Singh, Abeer P; Stroud, David A; Palmer, Catherine S; Stojanovski, Diana; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Cytosolic dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, also known as DNM1L) is required for both mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission. Drp1-dependent division of these organelles is facilitated by a number of adaptor proteins at mitochondrial and peroxisomal surfaces. To investigate the interplay of these adaptor proteins, we used gene-editing technology to create a suite of cell lines lacking the adaptors MiD49 (also known as MIEF2), MiD51 (also known as MIEF1), Mff and Fis1. Increased mitochondrial connectivity was observed following loss of individual adaptors, and this was further enhanced following the combined loss of MiD51 and Mff. Moreover, loss of adaptors also conferred increased resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic stimuli, with MiD49 and MiD51 showing the more prominent role. Using a proximity-based biotin labeling approach, we found close associations between MiD51, Mff and Drp1, but not Fis1. Furthermore, we found that MiD51 can suppress Mff-dependent enhancement of Drp1 GTPase activity. Our data indicates that Mff and MiD51 regulate Drp1 in specific ways to promote mitochondrial fission. PMID:27076521

  6. Consortin, a trans-Golgi network cargo receptor for the plasma membrane targeting and recycling of connexins

    OpenAIRE

    del Castillo, F. J.; Cohen-Salmon, M; Charollais, A.; Caille, D.; Lampe, P. D.; Chavrier, P; Meda, P.; Petit, C

    2009-01-01

    Targeting of numerous transmembrane proteins to the cell surface is thought to depend on their recognition by cargo receptors that interact with the adaptor machinery for anterograde traffic at the distal end of the Golgi complex. We report here on consortin, a novel integral membrane protein that is predicted to be intrinsically disordered, i.e. that contains large segments whose native state is unstructured. We identified consortin as a binding partner of connexins, the building blocks of g...

  7. Characterization of Toll-like receptors in primary lung epithelial cells: strong impact of the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C on the regulation of Toll-like receptors, adaptor proteins and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weith Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral exacerbations play a crucial role in a variety of lung diseases including COPD or asthma. Since the lung epithelium is a major source of various inflammatory mediators that affect the immune response, we analyzed the inflammatory reaction of primary lung epithelial cells to different microbial molecules that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR. Methods The effects of TLR ligands on primary small airway epithelial cells were analyzed in detail with respect to cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion. In addition, the regulation of the expression of TLRs and their adaptor proteins in small airway epithelial cells was investigated. Results Our data demonstrate that poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA, mediated the strongest proinflammatory effects among the tested ligands, including an increased secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, GRO-α, TARC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RANTES, IFN-β, IP-10 and ITAC as well as an increased release of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-13. Furthermore, our data show that poly(I:C as well as type-1 and type-2 cytokines have a pronounced effect on the expression of TLRs and molecules involved in TLR signaling in small airway epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced an elevated expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR3 and increased the gene expression of the general TLR adaptor MyD88 and IRAK-2. Simultaneously, poly(I:C decreased the expression of TLR5, TLR6 and TOLLIP. Conclusion Poly(I:C, an analog of viral dsRNA and a TLR3 ligand, triggers a strong inflammatory response in small airway epithelial cells that is likely to contribute to viral exacerbations of pulmonary diseases like asthma or COPD. The pronounced effects of poly(I:C on the expression of Toll-like receptors and molecules involved in TLR signaling is assumed to influence the immune response of the lung epithelium to viral and bacterial infections. Likewise, the regulation of TLR expression by type

  8. Competitive and Cooperative Interactions Mediate RNA Transfer from Herpesvirus Saimiri ORF57 to the Mammalian Export Adaptor ALYREF

    OpenAIRE

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Priti Kalra; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2014-01-01

    The essential herpesvirus adaptor protein HVS ORF57, which has homologs in all other herpesviruses, promotes viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. ORF57 protein specifically recognizes viral mRNA transcripts, and binds to proteins of the cellular transcription-export (TREX) complex, in particular ALYREF. This interaction introduces viral mRNA to the NXF1 pathway, subsequently directing it to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have used a range o...

  9. Enzymatic Modification of Polyethersulfone Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schroën

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic modification of polyethersulfone (PES membranes has been found not only feasible, but also an environmentally attractive way to vary surface properties systematically. In this paper, we summarize the effect of modification layers on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on PES membranes and surfaces. The enzyme laccase was used to covalently bind (polyphenolic acids to the membrane, and compared to other membrane modification methods, this method is very mild and did not influence the mechanical strength negatively. Depending on the conditions used during modification, the modification layers were capable of influencing interactions with typical fouling species, such as protein, and to influence attachment of microorganisms. We also show that the modification method can be successfully applied to hollow fiber membranes; and depending on the pore size of the base membrane, proteins were partially rejected by the membrane. In conclusion, we have shown that enzymatic membrane modification is a versatile and economically attractive method that can be used to influence various interactions that normally lead to surface contamination, pore blocking, and considerable flux loss in membranes.

  10. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  11. Gynecologic conditions and bacterial vaginosis: implications for the non-pregnant patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Sweet, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is characterized by a shift from the predominant lactobacillus vaginal flora to an overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an increased risk of gynecologic complications, including pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infection, cervicitis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and possibly cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The obstetrical risks associated with bacterial vaginosis include premature rupture of membranes, preterm ...

  12. Bacterial strategies of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Fu, Chih-Iung; Otto, Michael

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a key component of the host's innate immune system, targeting invasive and colonizing bacteria. For successful survival and colonization of the host, bacteria have a series of mechanisms to interfere with AMP activity, and AMP resistance is intimately connected with the virulence potential of bacterial pathogens. In particular, because AMPs are considered as potential novel antimicrobial drugs, it is vital to understand bacterial AMP resistance mechanisms. This review gives a comparative overview of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strategies of resistance to various AMPs, such as repulsion or sequestration by bacterial surface structures, alteration of membrane charge or fluidity, degradation and removal by efflux pumps.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160595

  13. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  14. Bacterial Cellulose-Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites for Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Saska, S.; H.S. Barud; Gaspar, A. M. M.; Marchetto, R.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Y. Messaddeq

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and to evaluate the biological properties of bacterial cellulose-hydroxyapatite (BC-HA) nanocomposite membranes for bone regeneration. Nanocomposites were prepared from bacterial cellulose membranes sequentially incubated in solutions of CaCl2 followed by Na2HPO4. BC-HA membranes were evaluated in noncritical bone defects in rat tibiae at 1, 4, and 16 weeks. Thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of the mineral phase was 40%–50% of the total wei...

  15. The TPLATE Adaptor Complex Drives Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadeyne, A.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, C.; Rubbo, Di S.; Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major mechanism for eukaryotic plasma membrane-based proteome turn-over. In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis is essential for physiology and development, but the identification and organization of the machinery operating this process remains largely obscure.

  16. Rho-dependent membrane folding causes Shigella entry into epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, T; Giry, M; Boquet, P; Sansonetti, P

    1996-01-01

    The small GTPase rho is functionally involved in the formation of cytoskeletal structures like stress fibers or focal adhesion plaques. Shigella entry into HeLa cells induces a blossom-like membrane structure at the bacterial entry site. We show here that this membrane-folding process is rho-dependent. The three rho isoforms were recruited into bacterial entry sites with differential localization relative to the membrane structure. A rho-specific inhibitor abolished Shigella-induced membrane ...

  17. Membrane Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Burbano, Marie S; Sadler, Mary E; Diamond, Jason; Baker, Simon; Greiner, Anthony D; Arabi, Sara; Wong, Joseph; Doody, Alexandra; Padhye, Lokesh P; Sears, Keith; Kistenmacher, Peter; Kent, Fraser; Tootchi, Leila; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Saddredini, Sara; Schilling, Bill; Min, Kyungnan; McCandless, Robert; Danker, Bryce; Gamage, Neranga P; Wang, Sunny; Aerts, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2015, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:27620084

  18. Membrane Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Sadler, Mary E; Greiner, Anthony D; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Min, Kyungnan; Zhang, Kai; Arabi, Sara; Burbano, Marie S; Kent, Fraser; Shoaf, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2014, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, fixed film and anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:26420079

  19. Examination of Bacterial Characteristics of Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors in Three Pilot-Scale Plants for Treating Low-Strength Wastewater by Application of the Colony-Forming-Curve Analysis Method

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Naoaki; Tokiwa, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yasuo; Fujiki, Kiichi; Taroda, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic sludge ecosystems arising in anaerobic membrane bioreactors of three pilot-scale plants treating low-strength (less than 1 g of biological oxygen demand per liter) sewage or soybean-processing wastewater were examined by analysis of the colony-forming-curves (CFC) obtained by counting colonies at suitable intervals. The wastewaters, containing high amounts of suspended solids (SS) (SS/chemical oxygen demand ratio, 0.51 to 0.80), were treated by using two types of bioreactors: (...

  20. Membrane Tension Inhibits Deformation by Coat Proteins in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, Julian; Drubin, David; Oster, George; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-02-01

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), clathrin and various adaptor proteins coat a patch of the plasma membrane, which is reshaped to form a budded vesicle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that elevated membrane tension can inhibit bud formation by a clathrin coat. In this study, we investigate the impact of membrane tension on the mechanics of membrane budding by simulating clathrin coats that either grow in area or progressively induce greater curvature. At low membrane tension, progressively increasing the area of a curvature-generating coat causes the membrane to smoothly evolve from a flat to budded morphology, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high membrane tensions. Interestingly, at physiologically relevant, intermediate membrane tensions, the shape evolution of the membrane undergoes a snapthrough instability in which increasing coat area causes the membrane to "snap" from an open, U-shaped bud to a closed, $\\Omega$-shaped bud. This instability is accompanied by a large energy barrier, which could cause a developing endocytic pit to stall if the binding energy of additional coat is insufficient to overcome this barrier. Similar results were found for a coat of constant area in which the spontaneous curvature progressively increases. Additionally, a pulling force on the bud, simulating a force from actin polymerization, is sufficient to drive a transition from an open to closed bud, overcoming the energy barrier opposing this transition.

  1. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  2. Pembuatan Membran Selulosa Bakteri Coating Kitosan - Kolagen Untuk Aplikasi Gtr ( Guide Tissue Regeneration ) Sebagai Pembalut Luka Pada Mencit (Mus Musculus)Secara In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Humaira, Nadia Maulida

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose produced from the fermentation process used in the development of Acetobacter xylinum to increase efficiency of bacterial cellulose one of them in the biomedical field , is membrane . This study aimed to determine the effect concentration of chitosan-collagen, see optimum characterization of bacterial cellulose membrane coating of chitosan-collagen that can be used in the application as wound dressings in mice by In Vivo. Preparation of the bacterial cellulose membrane usi...

  3. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  4. Disruption of adaptor protein 2mu (AP-2mu) in cochlear hair cells impairs vesicle reloading of synaptic release sites and hearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, S.; Maritzen, T.; Wichmann, C.; Jing, Z.; Neef, A.; Revelo, N.H.; Al-Moyed, H.; Meese, S.; Wojcik, S.M.; Panou, I.; Bulut, H.; Schu, P.; Ficner, R.; Reisinger, E.; Rizzoli, S.O.; Neef, J.; Strenzke, N.; Haucke, V.; Moser, T.

    2015-01-01

    Active zones (AZs) of inner hair cells (IHCs) indefatigably release hundreds of vesicles per second, requiring each release site to reload vesicles at tens per second. Here, we report that the endocytic adaptor protein 2mu (AP-2mu) is required for release site replenishment and hearing. We show that

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  6. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E; Pelicci, P G; Pouysségur, J; Van Obberghen-Schilling, E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....... recently been elucidated biochemically and genetically. The present study was undertaken to determine whether common signaling components are used by these two distinct classes of receptors. Here we report that the adaptor protein Shc, is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following stimulation of the...

  7. A Patient-Controlled Analgesia Adaptor to Mitigate Postsurgical Pain for Combat Casualties With Multiple Limb Amputation: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Paul F; Isaacson, Brad M; Johnson, Elizabeth; Rhoades, Daniel S; Lindholm, Mark P; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-08-01

    The use of explosive armaments during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn has resulted in a significant number of injured U.S. service members. These weapons often generate substantial extremity trauma requiring multiple surgical procedures to preserve life, limb, and restore function. For those individuals who require multiple surgeries, the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices can be an effective way to achieve adequate pain management and promote successful rehabilitation and recovery during inpatient treatment. A subpopulation of patients are unable to independently control a PCA device because of severe multiple limb dysfunction and/or loss. In response to the needs of these patients, our team designed and developed a custom adaptor to assist service members who would otherwise not be able to use a PCA. Patient feedback of the device indicated a positive response, improved independence, and overall satisfaction during inpatient hospitalization. PMID:27483540

  8. Competitive and cooperative interactions mediate RNA transfer from herpesvirus saimiri ORF57 to the mammalian export adaptor ALYREF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Tunnicliffe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The essential herpesvirus adaptor protein HVS ORF57, which has homologs in all other herpesviruses, promotes viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. ORF57 protein specifically recognizes viral mRNA transcripts, and binds to proteins of the cellular transcription-export (TREX complex, in particular ALYREF. This interaction introduces viral mRNA to the NXF1 pathway, subsequently directing it to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have used a range of techniques to reveal the sites for direct contact between RNA and ORF57 in the absence and presence of ALYREF. A binding site within ORF57 was characterized which recognizes specific viral mRNA motifs. When ALYREF is present, part of this ORF57 RNA binding site, composed of an α-helix, binds preferentially to ALYREF. This competitively displaces viral RNA from the α-helix, but contact with RNA is still maintained by a flanking region. At the same time, the flexible N-terminal domain of ALYREF comes into contact with the viral RNA, which becomes engaged in an extensive network of synergistic interactions with both ALYREF and ORF57. Transfer of RNA to ALYREF in the ternary complex, and involvement of individual ORF57 residues in RNA recognition, were confirmed by UV cross-linking and mutagenesis. The atomic-resolution structure of the ORF57-ALYREF interface was determined, which noticeably differed from the homologous ICP27-ALYREF structure. Together, the data provides the first site-specific description of how viral mRNA is locked by a herpes viral adaptor protein in complex with cellular ALYREF, giving herpesvirus access to the cellular mRNA export machinery. The NMR strategy used may be more generally applicable to the study of fuzzy protein-protein-RNA complexes which involve flexible polypeptide regions.

  9. A lipid zipper triggers bacterial invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Eierhoff, Thorsten; Bastian, Björn; Thuenauer, Roland; Madl, Josef; Audfray, Aymeric; Aigal, Sahaja; Juillot, Samuel; Rydell, Gustaf E.; Müller, Stefan; Bentzmann, Sophie de; Imberty, Anne; Fleck, Christian; Römer, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    Entry of bacteria into host cells critically depends on their proper engulfment by the plasma membrane. So far, actin polymerization has been described as a major driving force in this process. However, our study reveals that the interaction of the bacterial surface lectin LecA with the host cell glycosphingolipid Gb3 is fully sufficient to promote engulfment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas actin polymerization is dispensable. Hence, the formation of a “lipid zipper” represents a previousl...

  10. Biophysical studies of membrane channel polypeptides

    CERN Document Server

    Galbraith, T P

    2001-01-01

    Membrane channels facilitate the flow of ions across biological membranes, a process which is important in numerous cellular functions. The study of large integral membrane proteins is made difficult by identification, production and purification problems, and detailed knowledge of their three-dimensional structures is relatively scarce. The study of simple 'model' membrane proteins has given valuable insight into the structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in general. The bacterial peptide gramicidin has been the subject of intense study for many years, and has provided important information into the structural basis of channel function. Peptaibols, a class of fungal membrane peptides which includes alamethicin and antiamoebin, have also been useful in relating structural details to molecular ion transport processes. Gramicidin crystals were grown in the presence of phospholipids with various headgroups and acyl chains. The diffraction patterns of the crystals obtained were processed, but found to be in...

  11. Antibacterial Effect of Human Amnion Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kashani, L. (MD; Okhly, M. (BSc); Ghaemi, EA. (PhD); N. Behnampour; Kashani, E. (MD; Okhly, HO. (BSc); Fendereski, S. (BSc); Bazoori, M. (BSc; Falsafi, L. (MSc)

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Along with antibiotics, the use of biological methods to combat bacteria is notably considered. A natural barrier such as amniotic membrane is one of the ways of dealing with bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial effect of human amniotic membrane. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was performed in Dezyani teaching Hospital of Gorgan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. To evaluate the antibacterial activity agains...

  12. PROPERTIES OF BACTERIAL CELLULOSE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF PAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hua Gao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose is a promising source of biodegradable polymers having high purity. The time required to disperse bacterial cellulose wet membranes was studied, along with evaluation by infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis of the dispersed bacterial fiber and tests of the physical properties of the sheet. The results showed that bacterial cellulose wet membrane can be dispersed well, forming fibers when the dispersing time was 3 minutes at a suitable concentration. FT-IR results showed that the composition of bacterial fiber is similar to that of bleached softwood fibers. Thus, the morphology, thermal performance, and the length of bacterial fibers are significantly different. The sheets’ physical properties show that with the increasing dosage of bacterial fibers (relative to softwood fiber, the properties of tensile index, tear index, burst index, and stiffness greatly improve, while the porosity and the relative water absorption decrease.

  13. Hijacking of eukaryotic functions by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Ana; García del Portillo, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved as a group of microorganisms endowed with weapons to hijack many biological processes of eukaryotic cells. This review discusses how these pathogens perturb diverse host cell functions, such as cytoskeleton dynamics and organelle vesicular trafficking. Alteration of the cytoskeleton is discussed in the context of the bacterial entry process (invasion), which occurs either by activation of membrane-located host receptors ("zipper" mechani...

  14. Evidence against roles for phorbol binding protein Munc13-1, ADAM adaptor Eve-1, or vesicle trafficking phosphoproteins Munc18 or NSF as phospho-state-sensitive modulators of phorbol/PKC-activated Alzheimer APP ectodomain shedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovestone Simon

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shedding of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP ectodomain can be accelerated by phorbol esters, compounds that act via protein kinase C (PKC or through unconventional phorbol-binding proteins such as Munc13-1. We have previously demonstrated that application of phorbol esters or purified PKC potentiates budding of APP-bearing secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and toward the plasma membrane where APP becomes a substrate for enzymes responsible for shedding, known collectively as α-secretase(s. However, molecular identification of the presumptive "phospho-state-sensitive modulators of ectodomain shedding" (PMES responsible for regulated shedding has been challenging. Here, we examined the effects on APP ectodomain shedding of four phorbol-sensitive proteins involved in regulation of vesicular membrane trafficking of APP: Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and Eve-1. Results Overexpression of either phorbol-sensitive wildtype Munc13-1 or phorbol-insensitive Munc13-1 H567K resulted in increased basal APP ectodomain shedding. However, in contrast to the report of Roßner et al (2004, phorbol ester-dependent APP ectodomain shedding from cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 wildtype was indistinguishable from that observed following application of phorbol to cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 H567K mutant. This pattern of similar effects on basal and stimulated APP shedding was also observed for Munc18 and NSF. Eve-1, an ADAM adaptor protein reported to be essential for PKC-regulated shedding of pro-EGF, was found to play no obvious role in regulated shedding of sAPPα. Conclusion Our results indicate that, in the HEK293 system, Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and EVE-1 fail to meet essential criteria for identity as PMES for APP.

  15. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  16. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  17. Apolipoprotein L-I Promotes Trypanosome Lysis by Forming Pores in Lysosomal Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morga, David; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Paturiaux-Hanocq, Françoise; Nolan, Derek P.; Lins, Laurence; Homblé, Fabrice; Vanhamme, Luc; Tebabi, Patricia; Pays, Annette; Poelvoorde, Philippe; Jacquet, Alain; Brasseur, Robert; Pays, Etienne

    2005-07-01

    Apolipoprotein L-I is the trypanolytic factor of human serum. Here we show that this protein contains a membrane pore-forming domain functionally similar to that of bacterial colicins, flanked by a membrane-addressing domain. In lipid bilayer membranes, apolipoprotein L-I formed anion channels. In Trypanosoma brucei, apolipoprotein L-I was targeted to the lysosomal membrane and triggered depolarization of this membrane, continuous influx of chloride, and subsequent osmotic swelling of the lysosome until the trypanosome lysed.

  18. The bacterial Sec-translocase: structure and mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, Jelger A.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most bacterial secretory proteins pass across the cytoplasmic membrane via the translocase, which consists of a protein-conducting channel SecYEG and an ATP-dependent motor protein SecA. The ancillary SecDF membrane protein complex promotes the final stages of translocation. Recent years have seen a major advance in our understanding of the structural and biochemical basis of protein translocation, and this has led to a detailed model of the translocation mechanism.

  19. A stable live bacterial vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Wafula, Denis; Tram, Meilinn; Wu, Terry H; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-06-01

    Formulating vaccines into a dry form enhances its thermal stability. This is critical to prevent administering damaged and ineffective vaccines, and to reduce its final cost. A number of vaccines in the market as well as those being evaluated in the clinical setting are in a dry solid state; yet none of these vaccines have achieved long-term stability at high temperatures. We used spray-drying to formulate a recombinant live attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm; expressing Francisella tularensis immune protective antigen pathogenicity island protein IglC) bacterial vaccine into a thermostable dry powder using various sugars and an amino acid. Lm powder vaccine showed minimal loss in viability when stored for more than a year at ambient room temperature (∼23°C) or for 180days at 40°C. High temperature viability was achieved by maintaining an inert atmosphere in the storage container and removing oxygen free radicals that damage bacterial membranes. Further, in vitro antigenicity was confirmed by infecting a dendritic cell line with cultures derived from spray dried Lm and detection of an intracellularly expressed protective antigen. A combination of stabilizing excipients, a cost effective one-step drying process, and appropriate storage conditions could provide a viable option for producing, storing and transporting heat-sensitive vaccines, especially in regions of the world that require them the most. PMID:27020530

  20. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. ► Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. ► FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin (β3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that FK506 treatment

  1. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawawi, M.S.F. [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) (Malaysia); Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); McHugh, K.P. [University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Fl (United States); Haynes, D.R. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Crotti, T.N., E-mail: tania.crotti@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  2. Axionic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurilia, A. (Dept. of Physics, California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States)); Spallucci, E. (Dipt. di Fisica Teorica, Univ. Trieste (Italy) INFN, Sezione Trieste (Italy))

    1992-05-21

    A metal ring removed from a soap-water solution encloses a film of soap which can be mathematically described as a minimal surface having the ring as its only boundary. This is known to everybody. In this letter we suggest a relativistic extension of the above fluidodynamic system where the soap film is replaced by a Kalb-Ramand gauge potential B{sub {mu}{nu}}(x) and the ring by a closed string. The interaction between the B{sub {mu}{nu}} field and the string current excites a new configuration of the system consisting of a relativistic membrane bounded by the string. We call such a classical solution of the equation of motion an axionic membrane. As a dynamical system, the axionic membrane admits a Hamilton-Jacobi formulation which is an extension of the HJ theory of electromagnetic strings. (orig.).

  3. Cationic amphipathic peptides accumulate sialylated proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weghuber, Julian; Aichinger, Michael C.; Brameshuber, Mario; Wieser, Stefan; Ruprecht, Verena; Plochberger, Birgit; Madl, Josef; Horner, Andreas; Reipert, Siegfried; Lohner, Karl; Henics, Tamas; Schuetz, Gerhard J

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selectively target bacterial membranes by electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids. It turned out that for inhibition of microbial growth a high CAMP membrane concentration is required, which can be realized by the incorporation of hydrophobic groups within the peptide. Increasing hydrophobicity, however, reduces the CAMP selectivity for bacterial over eukaryotic host membranes, thereby causing the risk of detrimental side-effects. In t...

  4. PRR7 Is a transmembrane adaptor protein expressed in activated T cells involved in regulation of T cell receptor signaling and apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Dráber, Peter; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ormsby, Tereza; Otáhal, Pavel; Angelisová, Pavla; Brdička, Tomáš; Pačes, Jan; Hořejší, Václav; Drbal, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 22 (2011), s. 19617-19629. ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant ostatní: GAČR(CZ) MEM/09/E011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PRR7 * transmembrane adaptor protein * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  5. Protein Interaction Profiling of the p97 Adaptor UBXD1 Points to a Role for the Complex in Modulating ERGIC-53 Trafficking*

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, Dale S.; Lee, J. Eugene; Beauparlant, Stephen L.; Kyle, Dane B.; den Besten, Willem; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    UBXD1 is a member of the poorly understood subfamily of p97 adaptors that do not harbor a ubiquitin association domain or bind ubiquitin-modified proteins. Of clinical importance, p97 mutants found in familial neurodegenerative conditions Inclusion Body Myopathy Paget's disease of the bone and/or Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis are defective at interacting with UBXD1, indicating that functions regulated by a p97-UBXD1 complex are altered in these diseases. We have pe...

  6. Syk Kinase-Coupled C-type Lectin Receptors Engage Protein Kinase C-δ to Elicit Card9 Adaptor-Mediated Innate Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, Dominikus; Neumann, Konstantin; Bergmann, Hanna; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Guler, Reto; Rojowska, Anna; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Brombacher, Frank; Urlaub, Henning; Baier, Gottfried; Brown, Gordon D.; Leitges, Michael; Ruland, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Summary C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that couple with the kinase Syk are major pattern recognition receptors for the activation of innate immunity and host defense. CLRs recognize fungi and other forms of microbial or sterile danger, and they induce inflammatory responses through the adaptor protein Card9. The mechanisms relaying CLR proximal signals to the core Card9 module are unknown. Here we demonstrated that protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) was activated upon Dectin-1-Syk signaling, mediated ...

  7. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  8. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  9. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  10. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  11. Disinfection of a Polyamide Nanofiltration Membrane using Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Heffernan, R.; Semião, A.J.C.; Desmond, P; Cao, H.; Safari, A.; Habimana, O; Casey, E.

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative that nanofiltration membranes are disinfected before they are used for laboratory-scale bacterial adhesion or biofouling experiments, yet currently no suitable disinfection protocol exists. This study aimed to determine if an ethanol treatment at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) could be used to effectively disinfect nanofiltration membranes without altering membrane properties which could affect research. Two strains of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Staphyloc...

  12. Multiple pathways for regulation of sigmaS (RpoS) stability in Escherichia coli via the action of multiple anti-adaptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Cunning, Christofer; Baptiste, Patrick Jean; Elliott, Thomas; Gottesman, Susan

    2008-04-01

    SigmaS, the stationary phase sigma factor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella, is regulated at multiple levels. The sigmaS protein is unstable during exponential growth and is stabilized during stationary phase and after various stress treatments. Degradation requires both the ClpXP protease and the adaptor RssB. The small antiadaptor protein IraP is made in response to phosphate starvation and interacts with RssB, causing sigmaS stabilization under this stress condition. IraP is essential for sigmaS stabilization in some but not all starvation conditions, suggesting the existence of other anti-adaptor proteins. We report here the identification of new regulators of sigmaS stability, important under other stress conditions. IraM (inhibitor of RssB activity during Magnesium starvation) and IraD (inhibitor of RssB activity after DNA damage) inhibit sigmaS proteolysis both in vivo and in vitro. Our results reveal that multiple anti-adaptor proteins allow the regulation of sigmaS stability through the regulation of RssB activity under a variety of stress conditions. PMID:18383615

  13. Anisotropic membrane curvature sensing by antibacterial peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Lindén, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe a new approach to study curvature sensing, by simulating the direction-dependent interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. These findings provide new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides, which might aid the development of new antibiotics. Our approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane p...

  14. Anisotropic Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Lindén, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe an approach to study curvature sensing by simulating the interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. Our findings provide evidence for direction-dependent curvature sensing mechanisms in amphipathic peptides and challenge existing theories of hydrophobic insertion. The buckling approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature-sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane proteins. PMID:26745422

  15. Development of an implantable synthetic membrane for the treatment of preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sabiniano; Bullock, Anthony J; Anumba, Dilly O; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-02-01

    Preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes is a very common condition leading to premature labour of a non viable fetus. Significant morbidities may occur when preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes management is attempted to prolong the pregnancy for fetal maturation. Reducing the rate of loss of amniotic fluid and providing a barrier to bacterial entry may allow the pregnancy to continue to term, avoiding complications. Our aim is to develop a synthetic biocompatible membrane to form a distensible barrier for cervical closure which acts to reduce fluid loss and provide a surface for epithelial ingrowth to help repair the damaged membranes. Therefore, a bilayer membrane was developed using an electrospinning technique of combining two FDA-approved polymers, poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) and polyurethane (Z3) polymer. This was compared to a plain electrospun Z3 membrane. The physical and mechanical properties were assessed using scanning electron microscope images and a BOSE tensiometer, respectively, and compared to native fetal membranes. The performance of the membranes in preventing fluid loss was assessed by measuring their ability to support a column of water. Finally the ability of the membranes to support cell ingrowth was assessed by culturing adipose-derived stem cells on the membranes for two weeks and assessing metabolic activity after 7 and 14 days. The physical properties of the bilayer were similar to that of the native fetal membranes and it was resistant to fluid penetration. This bilayer membrane presented mechanical properties close to those for fetal membranes and showed elastic distention, which may be crucial for progress of the pregnancy. The membrane was also able to retain surgical sutures. In addition, it also supported the attachment and growth of adipose-derived stem cells for two weeks. In conclusion, this membrane may prove a useful approach in the treatment of preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes and now merits further

  16. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis. PMID:27501536

  17. Functional interaction of megalin with the megalinbinding protein (MegBP), a novel tetratrico peptide repeat-containing adaptor molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Helle Heibroch; Hilpert, Jan; Militz, Daniel; Zandler, Valerie; Jacobsen, Christian; Roebroek, Anton J M; Willnow, Thomas E

    2003-02-01

    Megalin is a member of the LDL receptor gene family that plays an important role in forebrain development and in cellular vitamin D metabolism through endocytic uptake of vitamin D metabolites. Similar to other receptors in this gene family, megalin is believed to functionally interact with intracellular proteins through adaptors that bind to the receptor tail and regulate its endocytic and signal transducing activities. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified a novel scaffold protein with tetratrico peptide repeats, the megalin-binding protein (MegBP) that associates with the receptor. The binding site of MegBP was mapped to an N-terminal region on the receptor tail harboring a proline-rich peptide element. MegBP binding did not block the endocytic activity of the receptor; however, overexpression resulted in cellular lethality. In further screens, we identified proteins that bound to MegBP and thus might be recruited to the megalin tail. MegBP-interacting partners included several transcriptional regulators such as the SKI-interacting protein (SKIP), a co-activator of the vitamin D receptor. These finding suggest a model whereby megalin directly participates in transcriptional regulation through controlled sequestration or release of transcription factors via MegBP. PMID:12508107

  18. Matrilin-2, an extracellular adaptor protein, is needed for the regeneration of muscle, nerve and other tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    va Korpos; Ferenc Dek; Ibolya Kiss

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) performs essential functions in the differentiation, maintenance and remodeling of tissues during development and regeneration, and it undergoes dynamic chang-es during remodeling concomitant to alterations in the cell-ECM interactions. Here we discuss recent data addressing the critical role of the widely expressed ECM protein, matrilin-2 (Matn2) in the timely onset of differentiation and regeneration processes in myogenic, neural and other tissues and in tumorigenesis. As a multiadhesion adaptor protein, it interacts with other ECM proteins and integrins. Matn2 promotes neurite outgrowth, Schwann cell migration, neuromuscular junc-tion formation, skeletal muscle and liver regeneration and skin wound healing. Matn2 deposition by myoblasts is crucial for the timely induction of the global switch toward terminal myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration by affecting transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein 7/Smad and other signal transduction pathways. Depending on the type of tissue and the pathomechanism, Matn2 can also promote or suppress tumor growth.

  19. Early Loss of Telomerase Action in Yeast Creates a Dependence on the DNA Damage Response Adaptor Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kyle A; Smith, Dana L; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2016-07-15

    Telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes, protecting them from degradation and inappropriate DNA repair processes that can lead to genomic instability. A short telomere elicits increased telomerase action on itself that replenishes telomere length, thereby stabilizing the telomere. In the prolonged absence of telomerase activity in dividing cells, telomeres eventually become critically short, inducing a permanent cell cycle arrest (senescence). We recently showed that even early after telomerase inactivation (ETI), yeast cells have accelerated mother cell aging and mildly perturbed cell cycles. Here, we show that the complete disruption of DNA damage response (DDR) adaptor proteins in ETI cells causes severe growth defects. This synthetic-lethality phenotype was as pronounced as that caused by extensive DNA damage in wild-type cells but showed genetic dependencies distinct from such damage and was completely alleviated by SML1 deletion, which increases deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. Our results indicated that these deleterious effects in ETI cells cannot be accounted for solely by the slow erosion of telomeres due to incomplete replication that leads to senescence. We propose that normally occurring telomeric DNA replication stress is resolved by telomerase activity and the DDR in two parallel pathways and that deletion of Sml1 prevents this stress. PMID:27161319

  20. The Adaptor Protein-1 μ1B Subunit Expands the Repertoire of Basolateral Sorting Signal Recognition in Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoli; Mattera, Rafael; Ren, Xuefeng; Chen, Yu; Retamal, Claudio; González, Alfonso; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An outstanding question in protein sorting is why polarized epithelial cells express two isoforms of the μ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin adaptor complex: the ubiquitous μ1A and the epithelial-specific μ1B. Previous studies led to the notion that μ1A and μ1B mediate basolateral sorting predominantly from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes, respectively. Using improved analytical tools, however, we find that μ1A and μ1B largely colocalize with each other. They also colocalize to similar extents with TGN and recycling endosome markers, as well as with basolateral cargoes transiting biosynthetic and endocytic-recycling routes. Instead, the two isoforms differ in their signal-recognition specificity. In particular, μ1B preferentially binds a subset of signals from cargoes that are sorted basolaterally in a μ1B-dependent manner. We conclude that expression of distinct μ1 isoforms in epithelial cells expands the repertoire of signals recognized by AP-1 for sorting of a broader range of cargoes to the basolateral surface. PMID:24229647

  1. The cytoskeleton adaptor protein ankyrin-1 is upregulated by p53 following DNA damage and alters cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A E; Lu, W-T; Godfrey, J D; Antonov, A V; Paicu, C; Moxon, S; Dalmay, T; Wilczynska, A; Muller, P A J; Bushell, M

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of the genome is maintained by a host of surveillance and repair mechanisms that are pivotal for cellular function. The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a major component of the DNA damage response pathway and plays a vital role in the maintenance of cell-cycle checkpoints. Here we show that a microRNA, miR-486, and its host gene ankyrin-1 (ANK1) are induced by p53 following DNA damage. Strikingly, the cytoskeleton adaptor protein ankyrin-1 was induced over 80-fold following DNA damage. ANK1 is upregulated in response to a variety of DNA damage agents in a range of cell types. We demonstrate that miR-486-5p is involved in controlling G1/S transition following DNA damage, whereas the induction of the ankyrin-1 protein alters the structure of the actin cytoskeleton and sustains limited cell migration during DNA damage. Importantly, we found that higher ANK1 expression correlates with decreased survival in cancer patients. Thus, these observations highlight ANK1 as an important effector downstream of the p53 pathway. PMID:27054339

  2. Identification of lysines within membrane-anchored Mga2p120 that are targets of Rsp5p ubiquitination and mediate mobilization of tethered Mga2p90

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Shcherbik, Natalia; Vasilescu, Julian; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Figeys, Daniel; Haines, Dale S.

    2008-01-01

    Mga2p90 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localized transcription factor that is released from the ER membrane by a unique ubiquitin-dependent mechanism. Mga2p90 mobilization requires poly-ubiquitination of its associating membrane-bound Mga2p120 anchor and subsequent Mga2p120-Mga2p90 complex disassembly that is mediated by ATPase Cdc48p and its heteromeric ubiquitin-binding adaptor Npl4p-Ufd1p. Although previous studies have identified the ubiquitin ligase (i.e. Rsp5p) and ligase binding site...

  3. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    prototypes, Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual...

  4. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26807915

  5. Bacterial S-layer protein coupling to lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weygand, M.; Wetzer, B.; Pum, D.; Sleytr, U.B.; Cuvillier, N.; Kjær, K.; Howes, P.B.; Lösche, M.

    1999-01-01

    The coupling of bacterial surface (S)-layer proteins to lipid membranes is studied in molecular detail for proteins from Bacillus sphaericus CCM2177 and B. coagulans E38-66 recrystallized at dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) monolayers on aqueous buffer. A comparison of the monolayer str...

  6. The Role of Lipid Domains in Bacterial Cell Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Muchová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are vital structures for cellular life forms. As thin, hydrophobic films, they provide a physical barrier separating the aqueous cytoplasm from the outside world or from the interiors of other cellular compartments. They maintain a selective permeability for the import and export of water-soluble compounds, enabling the living cell to maintain a stable chemical environment for biological processes. Cell membranes are primarily composed of two crucial substances, lipids and proteins. Bacterial membranes can sense environmental changes or communication signals from other cells and they support different cell processes, including cell division, differentiation, protein secretion and supplementary protein functions. The original fluid mosaic model of membrane structure has been recently revised because it has become apparent that domains of different lipid composition are present in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. In this review, we summarize different aspects of phospholipid domain formation in bacterial membranes, mainly in Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. We describe the role of these lipid domains in membrane dynamics and the localization of specific proteins and protein complexes in relation to the regulation of cellular function.

  7. A Common Fold Mediates Vertebrate Defense and Bacterial Attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, Carlos J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Law, Ruby H.P.; Butcher, Rebecca E.; Kan, Wan-Ting; Bird, Catherina H.; Ung, Kheng; Browne, Kylie A.; Baran, Katherine; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; Faux, Noel G.; Wong, Wilson; Porter, Corrine J.; Pike, Robert N.; Ellisdon, Andrew M.; Pearce, Mary C.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Emsley, Jonas; Smith, A. Ian; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A.; Bird, Phillip I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Whisstock, James C. (PMCI-A); (Monash); (Nottingham)

    2008-10-02

    Proteins containing membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domains play important roles in vertebrate immunity, embryonic development, and neural-cell migration. In vertebrates, the ninth component of complement and perforin form oligomeric pores that lyse bacteria and kill virus-infected cells, respectively. However, the mechanism of MACPF function is unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF protein, Plu-MACPF from Photorhabdus luminescens, to 2.0 angstrom resolution. The MACPF domain reveals structural similarity with poreforming cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) from Gram-positive bacteria. This suggests that lytic MACPF proteins may use a CDC-like mechanism to form pores and disrupt cell membranes. Sequence similarity between bacterial and vertebrate MACPF domains suggests that the fold of the CDCs, a family of proteins important for bacterial pathogenesis, is probably used by vertebrates for defense against infection.

  8. Participation of ezrin in bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophoblast giant (TG cells are involved in systematic removal of bacterial pathogens from the maternal-fetal interface of the placenta. In particular, TG cells have the ability to take up extracellular antigens by active phagocytosis induced by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma. We previously reported that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 present on the surface of TG cells mediated the uptake of Brucella abortus. However, the mechanism of bacterial uptake by TG cells is not completely understood. Here we identified ezrin, a member of ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM protein family, as a molecule associated with Hsc70. Methods Mouse TG cells were employed in all experiments, and B. abortus was used as the bacterial antigen. Confirmation of the binding capacity of ERM protein was assessed by pull-down assay and ELISA using recombinant Hsc70 and ERM proteins. Ezrin was depleted using siRNA and the depletion examined by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence staining. Results The expression level of ezrin was higher in TG cells than in trophoblast stem (TS cells, and ezrin knockdown TG cells showed a reduction in bacterial uptake ability. Although tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin was not related to bacterial uptake activity, localization of Hsc70 on the membrane was affected by the depletion of ezrin in TG cells. Conclusion Ezrin associates with Hsc70 that locates on the membrane of TG cells and participates in the bacterial uptake by TG cells.

  9. Bacterial Sphingomyelinases and Phospholipases as Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Naylor, Claire; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flieger, Antje

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are a heterogeneous group of esterases which are usually surface associated or secreted by a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These enzymes hydrolyze sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids, respectively, generating products identical to the ones produced by eukaryotic enzymes which play crucial roles in distinct physiological processes, including membrane dynamics, cellular signaling, migration, growth, and death. Several bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are essential for virulence of extracellular, facultative, or obligate intracellular pathogens, as these enzymes contribute to phagosomal escape or phagosomal maturation avoidance, favoring tissue colonization, infection establishment and progression, or immune response evasion. This work presents a classification proposal for bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases that considers not only their enzymatic activities but also their structural aspects. An overview of the main physiopathological activities is provided for each enzyme type, as are examples in which inactivation of a sphingomyelinase- or a phospholipase-encoding gene impairs the virulence of a pathogen. The identification of sphingomyelinases and phospholipases important for bacterial pathogenesis and the development of inhibitors for these enzymes could generate candidate vaccines and therapeutic agents, which will diminish the impacts of the associated human and animal diseases. PMID:27307578

  10. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  11. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  12. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  13. Characterising antimicrobial protein-membrane complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are host defence molecules that protect organisms from microbial infection. A number of hypotheses for AMP activity have been proposed which involve protein membrane interactions. However, there is a paucity of information describing AMP-membrane complexes in detail. The aim of this project is to characterise the interactions of amoebapore-A (APA-1) with membrane models using primarily solution-state NMR spectroscopy. APA-1 is an AMP which is regulated by a pH-dependent dimerisation event. Based on the atomic resolution solution structure of monomeric APA-1, it is proposed that this dimerisation is a prerequisite for ring-like hexameric pore formation. Due to the cytotoxicity of APA-1, we have developed a cell-free system to produce this protein. To facilitate our studies, we have adapted the cell-free system to isotope label APA-1. 13C/15N-enriched APA-1 sample was achieved and we have begun characterising APA-1 dimerisation and membrane interactions using NMR spectroscopy and other biochemical/biophysical methods. Neutron reflectometry is a surface-sensitive technique and therefore represents an ideal technique to probe how APA-1 interacts with membranes at the molecular level under different physiological conditions. Using Platypus, the pH-induced APA-1-membrane interactions should be detectable as an increase of the amount of protein adsorbed at the membrane surface and changes in the membrane properties. Specifically, detailed information of the structure and dimensions of the protein-membrane complex, the position and amount of the protein in the membrane, and the perturbation of the membrane phospholipids on protein incorporation can be extracted from the neutron reflectometry measurement. Such information will enable critical assessment of current proposed mechanisms of AMP activity in bacterial membranes and complement our NMR studies

  14. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism. PMID:26443779

  15. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  16. Enhancing biocompatibility of some cation selective electrodes using heparin modified bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Ibrahim H A; Abdel-Sattar, R; Keshk, Sherif M A S

    2015-12-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) and heparin-modified bacterial cellulose (HBC) were utilized to enhance the biocompatibility of highly thrombogenic PVC-based potassium and calcium membrane electrodes. Three types of membrane electrodes were prepared: (1) conventional PVC electrode (control), (2) PVC-based electrode sandwiched with bacterial cellulose membrane (BC-PVC), and (3) PVC-based electrode sandwiched with heparin-modified bacterial cellulose membrane (HBC-PVC). The potentiometric response characteristics of the modified potassium and calcium membrane electrodes (BC-PVC and HBC-PVC) were compared with those of the control PVC-based potassium and calcium selective electrode, respectively. Response characteristics of the modified membrane electrodes were comparable to the control PVC membrane electrode. The platelet adhesion investigations indicated that (BC) and (HBC) layers are less thrombogenic compared to PVC. Therefore, use of BC or HBC would enable the enhancement of the biocompatibility of PVC-based membrane electrodes for potassium and calcium while practically maintaining the overall electrochemical performance of the PVC sensing film. PMID:26428173

  17. Mutations in BICD2, which encodes a golgin and important motor adaptor, cause congenital autosomal-dominant spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveling, Kornelia; Martinez-Carrera, Lilian A; Hölker, Irmgard; Heister, Angelien; Verrips, Aad; Hosseini-Barkooie, Seyyed Mohsen; Gilissen, Christian; Vermeer, Sascha; Pennings, Maartje; Meijer, Rowdy; te Riele, Margot; Frijns, Catharina J M; Suchowersky, Oksana; MacLaren, Linda; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Sinke, Richard J; Zerres, Klaus; Lowry, R Brian; Lemmink, Henny H; Garbes, Lutz; Veltman, Joris A; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Scheffer, Hans; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2013-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders caused by degeneration of lower motor neurons. Although functional loss of SMN1 is associated with autosomal-recessive childhood SMA, the genetic cause for most families affected by dominantly inherited SMA is unknown. Here, we identified pathogenic variants in bicaudal D homolog 2 (Drosophila) (BICD2) in three families afflicted with autosomal-dominant SMA. Affected individuals displayed congenital slowly progressive muscle weakness mainly of the lower limbs and congenital contractures. In a large Dutch family, linkage analysis identified a 9q22.3 locus in which exome sequencing uncovered c.320C>T (p.Ser107Leu) in BICD2. Sequencing of 23 additional families affected by dominant SMA led to the identification of pathogenic variants in one family from Canada (c.2108C>T [p.Thr703Met]) and one from the Netherlands (c.563A>C [p.Asn188Thr]). BICD2 is a golgin and motor-adaptor protein involved in Golgi dynamics and vesicular and mRNA transport. Transient transfection of HeLa cells with all three mutant BICD2 cDNAs caused massive Golgi fragmentation. This observation was even more prominent in primary fibroblasts from an individual harboring c.2108C>T (p.Thr703Met) (affecting the C-terminal coiled-coil domain) and slightly less evident in individuals with c.563A>C (p.Asn188Thr) (affecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain). Furthermore, BICD2 levels were reduced in affected individuals and trapped within the fragmented Golgi. Previous studies have shown that Drosophila mutant BicD causes reduced larvae locomotion by impaired clathrin-mediated synaptic endocytosis in neuromuscular junctions. These data emphasize the relevance of BICD2 in synaptic-vesicle recycling and support the conclusion that BICD2 mutations cause congenital slowly progressive dominant SMA. PMID:23664116

  18. The adaptor CARD9 is required for adaptive but not innate immunity to oral mucosal Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishu, Shrinivas; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Huppler, Anna R; Conti, Heather R; Ghilardi, Nico; Mamo, Anna J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-03-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC [thrush]) is an opportunistic infection caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans. OPC is common in individuals with HIV/AIDS, infants, patients on chemotherapy, and individuals with congenital immune defects. Immunity to OPC is strongly dependent on the interleukin-23 (IL-23)/IL-17R axis, as mice and humans with defects in IL-17R signaling (IL17F, ACT1, IL-17RA) or in genes that direct Th17 differentiation (STAT3, STAT1, CARD9) are prone to mucocutaneous candidiasis. Conventional Th17 cells are induced in response to C. albicans infection via signals from C-type lectin receptors, which signal through the adaptor CARD9, leading to production of Th17-inducing cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-23. Recent data indicate that IL-17 can also be made by numerous innate cell subsets. These innate "type 17" cells resemble conventional Th17 cells, but they can be activated without need for prior antigen exposure. Because C. albicans is not a commensal organism in rodents and mice are thus naive to this fungus, we had the opportunity to assess the role of CARD9 in innate versus adaptive responses using an OPC infection model. As expected, CARD9(-/-) mice failed to mount an adaptive Th17 response following oral Candida infection. Surprisingly, however, CARD9(-/-) mice had preserved innate IL-17-dependent responses to Candida and were almost fully resistant to OPC. Thus, CARD9 is important primarily for adaptive immunity to C. albicans, whereas alternate recognition systems appear to be needed for effective innate responses. PMID:24379290

  19. The protein moiety of Brucella abortus outer membrane protein 16 is a new bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern that activates dendritic cells in vivo, induces a Th1 immune response, and is a promising self-adjuvanting vaccine against systemic and oral acquired brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquevich, Karina A; García Samartino, Clara; Coria, Lorena M; Estein, Silvia M; Zwerdling, Astrid; Ibañez, Andrés E; Barrionuevo, Paula; Oliveira, Fernanda Souza de; Carvalho, Natalia Barbosa; Borkowski, Julia; Oliveira, Sergio Costa; Warzecha, Heribert; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2010-05-01

    Knowing the inherent stimulatory properties of the lipid moiety of bacterial lipoproteins, we first hypothesized that Brucella abortus outer membrane protein (Omp)16 lipoprotein would be able to elicit a protective immune response without the need of external adjuvants. In this study, we demonstrate that Omp16 administered by the i.p. route confers significant protection against B. abortus infection and that the protective response evoked is independent of the protein lipidation. To date, Omp16 is the first Brucella protein that without the requirement of external adjuvants is able to induce similar protection levels to the control live vaccine S19. Moreover, the protein portion of Omp16 (unlipidated Omp16 [U-Omp16]) elicits a protective response when administered by the oral route. Either systemic or oral immunization with U-Omp16 elicits a Th1-specific response. These abilities of U-Omp16 indicate that it is endowed with self-adjuvanting properties. The adjuvanticity of U-Omp16 could be explained, at least in part, by its capacity to activate dendritic cells in vivo. U-Omp16 is also able to stimulate dendritic cells and macrophages in vitro. The latter property and its ability to induce a protective Th1 immune response against B. abortus infection have been found to be TLR4 dependent. The facts that U-Omp16 is an oral protective Ag and possesses a mucosal self-adjuvanting property led us to develop a plant-made vaccine expressing U-Omp16. Our results indicate that plant-expressed recombinant U-Omp16 is able to confer protective immunity, when given orally, indicating that a plant-based oral vaccine expressing U-Omp16 could be a valuable approach to controlling this disease. PMID:20351187

  20. Omniphobic Membrane for Robust Membrane Distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, SH; Nejati, S; Boo, C; Hu, YX; Osuji, CO; Ehmelech, M

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we fabricate an omniphobic microporous membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a hydrophilic glass fiber membrane with silica nanoparticles followed by surface fluorination and polymer coating. The modified glass fiber membrane exhibits an anti-wetting property not only against water but also against low surface tension organic solvents that easily wet a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane that is commonly used in MD applications. By comparing the performance of the PTFE and omniphobic membranes in direct contact MD experiments in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), we show that SDS wets the hydrophobic PTFE membrane but not the omniphobic membrane. Our results suggest that omniphobic membranes are critical for MD applications with feed waters containing surface active species, such as oil and gas produced water, to prevent membrane pore wetting.

  1. Fusion of bacterial spheroplasts by electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthe, H J; Adler, J

    1985-09-25

    Spheroplasts of Escherichia coli or Salmonella typhimurium were found to fuse in an electric field. We employed the fusion method developed by Zimmermann and Scheurich (1981): Close membrane contact between cells is established by dielectrophoresis (formation of chains of cells by an a.c. field), then membrane fusion is induced by the application of short pulses of direct current. Under optimum conditions the fusion yield was routinely 90%. Fusable spheroplasts were obtained by first growing filamentous bacteria in the presence of cephalexin, then converting these to spheroplasts by the use of lysozyme. The fusion products were viable and regenerated to the regular bacterial form. Fusion of genetically different spheroplasts resulted in strains of bacteria possessing a combination of genetic markers. Fusion could not be achieved with spheroplasts obtained by growing the cells in the presence of penicillin or by using lysozyme on bacteria of usual size. PMID:3899175

  2. Membrane fusion during phage lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaure, Manoj; Berry, Joel; Kongari, Rohit; Cahill, Jesse; Young, Ry

    2015-04-28

    In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. Until recently, it was thought that degradation of the peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary and sufficient for osmotic bursting of the cell. Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). This is accomplished by spanins, which are phage-encoded proteins that connect the cytoplasmic membrane (inner membrane, IM) and the OM. The mechanism by which the spanins destroy the OM is unknown. Here we show that the spanins of the paradigm coliphage lambda mediate efficient membrane fusion. This supports the notion that the last step of lysis is the fusion of the IM and OM. Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. PMID:25870259

  3. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments

  4. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe;

    2006-01-01

    and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin......APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays...

  5. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Sigma 2 Subunit of the Adaptor Protein 1 Complex, AP1S2, Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation

    OpenAIRE

    Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Stevens, Claire ; Teague, Jon ; Edkins, Sarah ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Avis, Tim ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Butler, Adam ; Cole, Jennifer ; Dicks, Ed ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Harrison, Rachel ; Hills, Katy 

    2006-01-01

    In a systematic sequencing screen of the coding exons of the X chromosome in 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), we identified two nonsense mutations and one consensus splice-site mutation in the AP1S2 gene on Xp22 in three families. Affected individuals in these families showed mild-to-profound mental retardation. Other features included hypotonia early in life and delay in walking. AP1S2 encodes an adaptin protein that constitutes part of the adaptor protein complex found ...

  6. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  7. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  8. Membranes for energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinemann, K.V.; Pereira Nunes, S. (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    This volume contains the following chapters: 1. Sulfonated poly(arylether)-type polymers as proton exchange membranes: Synthesis and performance; 2. Polyimide ionomer membranes for PEFCs and DMFCs; 3. Membranes for high temperature PEFC based on acid-doped polybenzimidazoles; 4. Membrane for medium temperature PEFC based on Nafion filled with layered metal phosphates and phosphonates 5. Composite membranes for high temperature direct methanol fuel cells; 6. Dense ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation; 7. Membranes in energy systems with CO{sub 2} capture 8. Palladium membranes for hydrogen separation; 9. Membranes for power generation by pressure retarded osmosis.

  9. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria.......Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...

  10. Formation of bacterial membrane ice-nucleating lipoglycoprotein complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozloff, L. M.; Turner, M.A.; Arellano, F

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary finding that nonprotein additions to the protein product of the ice-nucleating gene of Pseudomonas syringae or Erwinia herbicola are essential for ice nucleation at the warmest temperatures has led to experiments aimed at identifying possible linkages between the ice protein and the other components. It appears that the protein is coupled to various sugars through N- and O-glycan linkages. Mannose residues are apparently bound via an N-glycan bond to the amide nitrogen of one ...

  11. The role of Na/+/ in transport processes of bacterial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Until recently it was generally held that transport in bacteria was linked exclusively to proton circulation, in contrast to most eucaryotic systems, which depended on Na(+) circulation. The present review is intended to trace recent developments which have led to the discarding of this idea. The discussion covers transport of Na(+) and other cations, effects of Na(+) and Na(+) gradients on metabolite transport, properties of Na(+)-dependent transport carriers, and evolutionary considerations of Na(+) transport. It is now apparent that the transport of Na(+) is an important part of energy metabolism in bacteria, and that Na(+) gradients as well as H(+) gradients are used in these systems for the conservation and transmission of energy. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain the evolution of Na/K systems, and it is presently difficult to decide between them.

  12. Electrophysiology of mycoplasma membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Schummer, U.; Schiefer, H G

    1983-01-01

    The influence of transmembrane ion fluxes on mycoplasma membrane potentials was studied. Fluorescence intensity of potential-sensitive carbocyanine dyes was calibrated vs. electric membrane potential. Potassium and sodium ion diffusion potentials significantly contributed to mycoplasma membrane potential. Chloride ions were obviously freely permeable across mycoplasma membranes. Under growth conditions the mycoplasma membrane potential was estimated to be delta psi = - 80 mV.

  13. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  14. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. PMID:24316190

  15. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  16. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  17. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  18. Thin-Membrane Sensor With Biochemical Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, George D.; Worley, Jennings F.

    1992-01-01

    Modular sensor electrochemically detects chemical or biological agent, indicating presence of agent via gate-membrane-crossing ion current triggered by chemical reaction between agent and recognition protein conjugated to channel blocker. Used in such laboratory, industrial, or field applications as detection of bacterial toxins in food, military chemical agents in air, and pesticides or other contaminants in environment. Also used in biological screening for hepatitis, acquired immune-deficiency syndrome, and like.

  19. Membrane protein structure determination in membrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-09-17

    The two principal components of biological membranes, the lipid bilayer and the proteins integrated within it, have coevolved for specific functions that mediate the interactions of cells with their environment. Molecular structures can provide very significant insights about protein function. In the case of membrane proteins, the physical and chemical properties of lipids and proteins are highly interdependent; therefore structure determination should include the membrane environment. Considering the membrane alongside the protein eliminates the possibility that crystal contacts or detergent molecules could distort protein structure, dynamics, and function and enables ligand binding studies to be performed in a natural setting. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is compatible with three-dimensional structure determination of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayer membranes under physiological conditions and has played an important role in elucidating the physical and chemical properties of biological membranes, providing key information about the structure and dynamics of the phospholipid components. Recently, developments in the recombinant expression of membrane proteins, sample preparation, pulse sequences for high-resolution spectroscopy, radio frequency probes, high-field magnets, and computational methods have enabled a number of membrane protein structures to be determined in lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we illustrate solid-state NMR methods with examples from two bacterial outer membrane proteins (OmpX and Ail) that form integral membrane β-barrels. The ability to measure orientation-dependent frequencies in the solid-state NMR spectra of membrane-embedded proteins provides the foundation for a powerful approach to structure determination based primarily on orientation restraints. Orientation restraints are particularly useful for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins because they provide information about both three-dimensional structure

  20. Expression of Chicken Toll-Like Receptors and Signal Adaptors in Spleen and Cecum of Young Chickens Infected with Eimeria tenella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zuo-yong; HU Shi-jun; WANG Zhi-ying; GUO Zhi-li; QIN Bo; NIE Kui

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of highly conserved molecules which initiate the innate immune response to pathogens by recognizing structural motifs of microbes. Understanding the changes in chicken Toll-like receptors (ChTLRs) and signal adaptors expression that occur with Eimeria tenella infection will help to elucidate the molecular basis of immune control of coccidiosis caused by Eimeria. The present study detected the dynamic changes in the expression of ChTLRs and associated signal adaptors in the spleen and cecum of E. tenella-infected chickens during the early stage of infection. The results showed that the expression peak for ChTLRs, MyD88 and TRIF occurred at 12 h post-infection (hpi), ChTLR3, ChTLR15 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the spleen of E. tenella infected chickens were signiifcantly higher (P<0.05) than that of negative control chickens, and there were similar tendencies of these molecules expression in the cecum and spleen of E. tenella-infected chickens. The expression of MyD88 was upregulated at four time points in the cecum of E. tenella-infected chickens. The results of this study indicate that ChTLR3, ChTLR15 and MyD88 play a role in young chickens infected with E. tenella.

  1. TLR adaptor MyD88 is essential for pathogen control during oral toxoplasma gondii infection but not adaptive immunity induced by a vaccine strain of the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Egan, Charlotte E; Warren, Amy L; Taylor, Gregory A; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Denkers, Eric Y

    2008-09-01

    TLR adaptor MyD88 activation is important in host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii during i.p. infection, but the function of this signaling pathway during oral infection, in which mucosal immunity assumes a predominant role, has not been examined. In this study, we show that MyD88(-/-) mice fail to control the parasite and succumb within 2 wk of oral infection. Early during infection, T cell IFN-gamma production, recruitment of neutrophils and induction of p47 GTPase IGTP (Irgm3) in the intestinal mucosa were dependent upon functional MyD88. Unexpectedly, these responses were MyD88-independent later during acute infection. In particular, CD4(+) T cell IFN-gamma reached normal levels independently of MyD88, despite continued absence of IL-12 in these animals. The i.p. vaccination of MyD88(-/-) mice with an avirulent T. gondii uracil auxotroph elicited robust IFN-gamma responses and protective immunity to challenge with a high virulence T. gondii strain. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 is required to control Toxoplasma infection, but that the parasite can trigger adaptive immunity without the need for this TLR adaptor molecule. PMID:18714019

  2. Phosphorylation of APP-CTF-AICD domains and interaction with adaptor proteins: signal transduction and/or transcriptional role--relevance for Alzheimer pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettini, Gennaro; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Rodriguez, Guido

    2010-12-01

    In recent decades, the study of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and of its proteolytic products carboxy terminal fragment (CTF), APP intracellular C-terminal domain (AICD) and amyloid beta has been mostly focussed on the role of APP as a producer of the toxic amyloid beta peptide. Here, we reconsider the role of APP suggesting, in a provocative way, the protein as a central player in a putative signalling pathway. We highlight the presence in the cytosolic tail of APP of the YENPTY motif which is typical of tyrosine kinase receptors, the phosphorylation of the tyrosine, serine and threonine residues, the kinases involved and the interaction with intracellular adaptor proteins. In particular, we examine the interaction with Shc and Grb2 regulators, which through the activation of Ras proteins elicit downstream signalling events such as the MAPK pathway. The review also addresses the interaction of APP, CTFs and AICD with other adaptor proteins and in particular with Fe65 for nuclear transcriptional activity and the importance of phosphorylation for sorting the secretases involved in the amyloidogenic or non-amyloidogenic pathways. We provide a novel perspective on Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, focussing on the perturbation of the physiological activities of APP-CTFs and AICD as an alternative perspective from that which normally focuses on the accumulation of neurotoxic proteolytic fragments. PMID:21039524

  3. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    The IX International Conference on Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST IX) was held from 14 to 19 January 2007 in Laughlin, NV, a town in the Mojave Desert on the Nevada-Arizona border near old Route 66 and along the banks of the Colorado River. This area is a home to rattlesnakes, sagebrush, abandoned gold mines, and compulsive gamblers. What better venue could scientists possibly dream of for a professional meeting? So there they were, about 190 scientists gathered in the Aquarius Casino Resort, the largest hotel and casino in Laughlin, discussing the latest advances in the field. Aside from a brief excursion to an abandoned gold mine and a dinner cruise on the Colorado River, the scientists focused on nothing but their data and hypotheses, in spirited arguments and rebuttals, and outlined their visions and future plans in a friendly and open environment. The BLAST IX program was dense, with nearly 50 talks and over 90 posters. For that reason, this meeting report will not attempt to be comprehensive; instead it will first provide general background information on the central topics of the meeting and then highlight only a few talks that were of special interest to us and hopefully to the wider scientific community. We will also attempt to articulate some of the future directions or perspectives to the best of our abilities. The best known and understood bacterial motility mechanism is swimming powered by flagella. The rotation of bacterial flagella drives this form of bacterial movement in an aqueous environment. A bacterial flagellum consists of a helical filament attached to the cell body through a complex structure known as the hook-basal body, which drives flagellar rotation. The essential components of the basal body are the MotA-MotB motor-stator proteins bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. These stator proteins interact with proteins that comprise the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings, which are components of the motor imbedded in the

  4. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    OpenAIRE

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Van, Lier, G

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A self-forming dynamic membrane only requires a support material over which a cake layer is formed, which determines the rejection properties of the system. The present research studies the applicat...

  5. Preparation of succinylated cellulose membranes for functionalization purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Viana, Renato M; Faria-Tischer, Paula C S; Tischer, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    The anhydroglucose chains of cellulose possess hydroxyls that facilitate different chemical modification strategies to expand on, or provide new applications for membranes produced by the bacteria Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Conjugation with biomolecules such as proteins, especially by the amine groups, is of great value and interest for the production of biomaterial derivatives from bacterial cellulose. To assist in these modifications, cellulose was succinylated in order to prevent steric hindrance and to create an attachment point for conjugation. Bacterial cellulose membranes were first treated in dichloromethane and reacted with succinic anhydride through a series of conditions. The membrane structure remained intact after these first processes and the product was confirmed by Infra-Red spectroscopy and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and atomic force microscopy. Hydrolyzed collagen was used as a model protein of interest to be conjugated to these membranes, which furnished a biomaterial functionalized over its surface. PMID:27185111

  6. Comparison of a new inorganic membrane filter (Anopore) with a track-etched polycarbonate membrane filter (Nuclepore) for direct counting of bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, S E; Ditner, S A; Freeman, C.; Whitaker, C J; Lock, M A

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial counts obtained by using a new Anopore inorganic membrane filter were 21 to 33% higher than those obtained by using a Nuclepore polycarbonate membrane filter. In addition, the inorganic filter had higher flow rates, permitting lower vacuum pressures to be used, while the intrinsically flat, rigid surface resulted in easier focusing and sharp definition of bacteria across the whole field of view.

  7. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  8. Distinct in vitro interaction pattern of dopamine receptor subtypes with adaptor proteins involved in post-endocytotic receptor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Hadrup, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying targeted sorting of endocytosed receptors for recycling to the plasma membrane or degradation in lysosomes are poorly understood. In this report, the C-terminal tails of the five dopamine receptors (D1-D5) were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins...

  9. A saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A G; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-04-01

    A limiting factor in membrane protein research is the ability to solubilize and stabilize such proteins. Detergents are used most often for solubilizing membrane proteins, but they are associated with protein instability and poor compatibility with structural and biophysical studies. Here we present a saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system, Salipro, which allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of saposin proteins. We demonstrate the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as by the direct solubilization and nanoparticle incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. Our approach facilitated high-resolution structural studies of the bacterial peptide transporter PeptTSo2 by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and allowed us to stabilize the HIV envelope glycoprotein in a functional state. PMID:26950744

  10. Evolutionary transitions in bacterial symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Joel L.; Skophammer, Ryan G.; Regus, John U.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse bacterial lineages form beneficial infections with eukaryotic hosts. The origins, evolution, and breakdown of these mutualisms represent important evolutionary transitions. To examine these key events, we synthesize data from diverse interactions between bacteria and eukaryote hosts. Five evolutionary transitions are investigated, including the origins of bacterial associations with eukaryotes, the origins and subsequent stable maintenance of bacterial mutualism with hosts, the captur...

  11. Newer systems for bacterial resistances to toxic heavy metals.

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, S; Ji, G.

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids contain specific genes for resistances to toxic heavy metal ions including Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+, Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sb3+, and Zn2+. Recent progress with plasmid copper-resistance systems in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas syringae show a system of four gene products, an inner membrane protein (PcoD), an outer membrane protein (PcoB), and two periplasmic Cu(2+)-binding proteins (PcoA and PcoC). Synthesis of this system is governed by two regulator...

  12. Erythrocyte membrane proteins and membrane skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yiqin; LIU Junfan

    2007-01-01

    Considerable advances in the research field of erythrocyte membrane were achieved in the recent two decades.New findings in the structure-function correlation and interactions of erythrocyte membrane proteins have attracted extensive attention.Interesting progress was also made in the molecular pathogenesis of erythrocyte membrane disorders.Advances in the composition,function and interaction of erythrocyte membrane proteins,erythrocyte membrane skeleton,and relevant diseases are briefly described and summarized here on the basis of domestic and world literatures.

  13. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  14. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations. PMID:25917390

  15. A membrane disdrometer based on membrane vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raindrop sizes were indirectly determined through the distinctive vibrations and sounds that occur when raindrops of different sizes impact on a membrane. The relationships between diameter, raindrop kinetic momentum, membrane deflection, and impact force were analyzed. Membrane deflection and vibration models were created, and the optimum membrane diameter and thickness were identified. A prototype membrane disdrometer was developed on the basis of these findings. The relationship between raindrop size and membrane vibration sound pressure was determined experimentally. The fundamental parameter of raindrop size recognition was used. The test results indicate that raindrops 0.4–2.0 mm in diameter can be detected by the proposed membrane disdrometer, and 50 raindrops per second in a zone area of 28.3 cm2 can be detected in natural rain. (paper)

  16. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  17. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  18. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  19. Spatial organization shapes the turnover of a bacterial transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Pandey, Shristi; Boettiger, Alistair N; Wang, Siyuan; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the transcriptome has emerged as a powerful means for regulating the post-transcriptional fate of RNA in eukaryotes; however, whether prokaryotes use RNA spatial organization as a mechanism for post-transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here we used super-resolution microscopy to image the E. coli transcriptome and observed a genome-wide spatial organization of RNA: mRNAs encoding inner-membrane proteins are enriched at the membrane, whereas mRNAs encoding outer-membrane, cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins are distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Membrane enrichment is caused by co-translational insertion of signal peptides recognized by the signal-recognition particle. Time-resolved RNA-sequencing revealed that degradation rates of inner-membrane-protein mRNAs are on average greater that those of the other mRNAs and that this selective destabilization of inner-membrane-protein mRNAs is abolished by dissociating the RNA degradosome from the membrane. Together, these results demonstrate that the bacterial transcriptome is spatially organized and suggest that this organization shapes the post-transcriptional dynamics of mRNAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13065.001 PMID:27198188

  20. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  1. Mechanism of biological denitrification inhibition: procyanidins induce an allosteric transition of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase through membrane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Poly, Franck; Piola, Florence; Pancton, Muriel; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Haichar, Feth El Zahar

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that procyanidins fromFallopiaspp. inhibit bacterial denitrification, a phenomenon called biological denitrification inhibition (BDI). However, the mechanisms involved in such a process remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of BDI involving procyanidins, using the model strainPseudomonas brassicacearumNFM 421. The aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration, cell permeability and cell viability ofP. brassicacearumwere determined as a function of procyanidin concentration. The effect of procyanidins on the bacterial membrane was observed using transmission electronic microscopy. Bacterial growth, denitrification, NO3- and NO2-reductase activity, and the expression of subunits of NO3- (encoded by the genenarG) and NO2-reductase (encoded by the genenirS) under NO3or NO2were measured with and without procyanidins. Procyanidins inhibited the denitrification process without affecting aerobic respiration at low concentrations. Procyanidins also disturbed cell membranes without affecting cell viability. They specifically inhibited NO3- but not NO2-reductase.Pseudomonas brassicacearumresponded to procyanidins by over-expression of the membrane-bound NO3-reductase subunit (encoded by the genenarG). Our results suggest that procyanidins can specifically inhibit membrane-bound NO3-reductase inducing enzymatic conformational changes through membrane disturbance and thatP. brassicacearumresponds by over-expressing membrane-bound NO3-reductase. Our results lead the way to a better understanding of BDI. PMID:26906096

  2. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  3. Compositional asynchronous membrane systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cosmin Bonchis; Cornel Izbasa; Gabriel Ciobanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithmic way of building complex membrane systems by coupling elementary membranes. Its application seems particularly valuable in the case of asynchronous membrane systems, since the resulting membrane system remains asynchronous. The composition method is based on a handshake mechanism implemented by using antiport rules and promoters.

  4. Composite sensor membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arun; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Yue, Min

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  5. Novel disk modules for membrane separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reverse osmosis (RO) system at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina has experienced fouling from trace quantities of inorganics (Al, Fe, and Si) and l.E5-l.E7/ml bacteria. The bacteria are primarily produced in an upstream Hg-removal resin bed/activated carbon bed process. The bacteria adhere to the colloidal inorganics that are in the membrane feed at their solubility limits (having been precipitated and removed upstream by a ceramic microfilter system). The resulting bacterial/inorganic foulant adheres to the membrane surface and results in high feed pressures and poor salt rejection. The feed pressure increases because the membrane system at the ETF is designed to produce a constant rate of treated water, or permeate. This is accomplished by increasing the membrane feed pressure whenever permeate flow drops. These performance losses have been attributed to bacteria present in the feed, and several potential solutions have been proposed and demonstrated here at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Advanced hybrid plate-and-frame modules have been developed that increase the applicability of membrane systems by using hydrodynamics rather than pretreatment to prevent membrane fouling

  6. Novel disk modules for membrane separation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siler, J.L.

    1993-12-06

    The reverse osmosis (RO) system at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina has experienced fouling from trace quantities of inorganics (Al, Fe, and Si) and l.E5-l.E7/ml bacteria. The bacteria are primarily produced in an upstream Hg-removal resin bed/activated carbon bed process. The bacteria adhere to the colloidal inorganics that are in the membrane feed at their solubility limits (having been precipitated and removed upstream by a ceramic microfilter system). The resulting bacterial/inorganic foulant adheres to the membrane surface and results in high feed pressures and poor salt rejection. The feed pressure increases because the membrane system at the ETF is designed to produce a constant rate of treated water, or permeate. This is accomplished by increasing the membrane feed pressure whenever permeate flow drops. These performance losses have been attributed to bacteria present in the feed, and several potential solutions have been proposed and demonstrated here at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Advanced hybrid plate-and-frame modules have been developed that increase the applicability of membrane systems by using hydrodynamics rather than pretreatment to prevent membrane fouling.

  7. Disposable Membrane Sensors for Biohazardous Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexander G.

    The concept of bilayer lipid membrane sensing is elaborated. Disposable bilayer lipid membrane sensors permit both stochastic and deterministic sensing regimes. Technology for membrane sensor preparation is described in details. Stochastic membrane sensing using ion channels is described. Detection of cyano-bacterial toxins in waters by means of a stochastic sensing (ion channel induction) reveals a signature for a particular toxin type. This signature is especially well revealed by using the method of current-voltage surfaces, which establishes a bridge between stochastic and deterministic sensing by applying a time-averaging procedure. Flexoelectricity of membranes provides another way of deterministic sensing, of a stimulus-response type. The flexoelectric response is modulated by adsorption of the analyte over the membrane surface. Detection of environmental pollution of waters by heavy metal ions (Cd++ and Hg++) is thereby rendered possible. This approach is confronted with a stochastic sensing of the same metal ions by alteration of the channel open/closed probability and average channel current of two familiar channels, gramicidin and alamethicin.

  8. Host defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Los, F.C.O.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs), the most common bacterial toxins, contribute to infection by perforating host cell membranes. Excessive use and lack of new development of antibiotics are causing increasing numbers of drug-resistant bacteria, like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A review of primary literature shows PFTs may form a viable target for new antibiotics, warranting their further investigation. This thesis describes three studies on host...

  9. The Three Bacterial Lines of Defense against Antimicrobial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Zhou; Qing-Shan Shi; Xiao-Mo Huang; Xiao-Bao Xie

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents target a range of extra- and/or intracellular loci from cytoplasmic wall to membrane, intracellular enzymes and genetic materials. Meanwhile, many resistance mechanisms employed by bacteria to counter antimicrobial agents have been found and reported in the past decades. Based on their spatially distinct sites of action and distribution of location, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of bacteria were categorized into three groups, coined the three lines of bacterial defe...

  10. Bacterial Conjugation in the Cytoplasm of Mouse Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yin Mei; de Groof, Ad J. C.; Bhattacharjee, Mrinal K.; Figurski, David H.; Eric A Schon

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular pathogenic organisms such as salmonellae and shigellae are able to evade the effects of many antibiotics because the drugs are not able to penetrate the plasma membrane. In addition, these bacteria may be able to transfer genes within cells while protected from the action of drugs. The primary mode by which virulence and antibiotic resistance genes are spread is bacterial conjugation. Salmonellae have been shown to be competent for conjugation in the vacuoles of cultured mammali...

  11. Physical and chemical properties of freeze-dried amnio-chorion membranes sterilized by γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical and chemical properties of freeze-dried amnio-chorion membranes sterilized by γ-irradiation. Investigation on physical and chemical properties of freeze-dried amnio-chorion membrane as well as the total number of bacteria contained were done on irradiated and unirradiated membranes. Parameters observed to evaluate the membranes were tensile strength, water vapour transmission rate, Aw, infrared spectra and total bacterial count before irradiation. These membranes will be used as biological burn dressing. The effects of storage time up to 1 month at room temperatures, i.e. 29 +- 20C on mechanical properties of freeze-dried membranes were also done. No significant change could be observed on physical and chemical properties of radiation sterilized membranes compared to unirradiated ones (p. 0.1). To protect the physical properties of freeze-dried membranes it is suggested that the membranes be processed as quickly as possible after delivery. (author). 10 figs, 7 refs

  12. Controlling bacterial infections by inhibiting proton-dependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneti, Galoz; Meir, Ohad; Mor, Amram

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is recognized as one of the greatest threats in modern healthcare, taking a staggering toll worldwide. New approaches for controlling bacterial infections must be designed, eventually combining multiple strategies for complimentary therapies. This review explores an old/new paradigm for multi-targeted antibacterial therapy, focused at disturbing bacterial cytoplasmic membrane functions at sub minimal inhibitory concentrations, namely through superficial physical alterations of the bilayer, thereby perturbing transmembrane signals transduction. Such a paradigm may have the advantage of fighting the infection while avoiding many of the known resistance mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26522076

  13. Alternatives to overcoming bacterial resistances: State-of-the-art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Alessandra C; Moutinho, Carla G; Pinto, Flávio C; Del Fiol, Fernando S; Jozala, Angela; Chaud, Marco V; Vila, Marta M D C; Teixeira, José A; Balcão, Victor M

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, bacterial resistance to chemical antibiotics has reached such a high level that endangers public health. Presently, the adoption of alternative strategies that promote the elimination of resistant microbial strains from the environment is of utmost importance. This review discusses and analyses several (potential) alternative strategies to current chemical antibiotics. Bacteriophage (or phage) therapy, although not new, makes use of strictly lytic phage particles as an alternative, or a complement, in the antimicrobial treatment of bacterial infections. It is being rediscovered as a safe method, because these biological entities devoid of any metabolic machinery do not possess any affinity whatsoever to eukaryotic cells. Lysin therapy is also recognized as an innovative antimicrobial therapeutic option, since the topical administration of preparations containing purified recombinant lysins with amounts in the order of nanograms, in infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, demonstrated a high therapeutic potential by causing immediate lysis of the target bacterial cells. Additionally, this therapy exhibits the potential to act synergistically when combined with certain chemical antibiotics already available on the market. Another potential alternative antimicrobial therapy is based on the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), amphiphilic polypeptides that cause disruption of the bacterial membrane and can be used in the treatment of bacterial, fungal and viral infections, in the prevention of biofilm formation, and as antitumoral agents. Interestingly, bacteriocins are a common strategy of bacterial defense against other bacterial agents, eliminating the potential opponents of the former and increasing the number of available nutrients in the environment for their own growth. They can be applied in the food industry as biopreservatives and as probiotics, and also in fighting multi-resistant bacterial strains. The use of antibacterial antibodies

  14. Membrane fusion proteins of type I secretion system and tripartite efflux pumps share a binding motif for TolC in gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minho Lee

    Full Text Available The Hly translocator complex of Escherichia coli catalyzes type I secretion of the toxin hemolysin A (HlyA. In this complex, HlyB is an inner membrane ABC (ATP Binding Cassette-type transporter, TolC is an outer membrane channel protein, and HlyD is a periplasmic adaptor anchored in the inner membrane that bridges HlyB to TolC. This tripartite organization is reminiscent of that of drug efflux systems such as AcrA-AcrB-TolC and MacA-MacB-TolC of E. coli. We have previously shown the crucial role of conserved residues located at the hairpin tip region of AcrA and MacA adaptors during assembly of their cognate systems. In this study, we investigated the role of the putative tip region of HlyD using HlyD mutants with single amino acid substitutions at the conserved positions. In vivo and in vitro data show that all mutations abolished HlyD binding to TolC and resulted in the absence of HlyA secretion. Together, our results suggest that, similarly to AcrA and MacA, HlyD interacts with TolC in a tip-to-tip manner. A general model in which these conserved interactions induce opening of TolC during drug efflux and type I secretion is discussed.

  15. Microfluidic microbial fuel cells: from membrane to membrane free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic microbial fuel cells (MMFCs) are small carbon-neutral devices that use self-organized bacteria to degrade organic substrates and harness energy from the waste water. Conventional MMFCs have made great strides in the past decade and have overcome some limitations, such as high capital costs and low energy output. A co-laminar flow MFC has been first proposed in 2011 with the potential to be an attractively power source to niche applications. Co-laminar MFCs typically operate without any physical membranes separating the reactants, and bacterial ecosystems can be easily manipulated by regulating the inlet conditions. This paper highlights recent accomplishments in the development of co-laminar MFCs, emphasizing basic principles, mass transport and fluid dynamics including boundary layer theory, entrance conditions and mixing zone issues. Furthermore, the development of current techniques, major challenges and the potential research directions are discussed.

  16. Gram-Negative Bacterial Sensors for Eukaryotic Signal Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lesouhaitier

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence exists showing that eukaryotic signal molecules synthesized and released by the host can activate the virulence of opportunistic pathogens. The sensitivity of prokaryotes to host signal molecules requires the presence of bacterial sensors. These prokaryotic sensors, or receptors, have a double function: stereospecific recognition in a complex environment and transduction of the message in order to initiate bacterial physiological modifications. As messengers are generally unable to freely cross the bacterial membrane, they require either the presence of sensors anchored in the membrane or transporters allowing direct recognition inside the bacterial cytoplasm. Since the discovery of quorum sensing, it was established that the production of virulence factors by bacteria is tightly growth-phase regulated. It is now obvious that expression of bacterial virulence is also controlled by detection of the eukaryotic messengers released in the micro-environment as endocrine or neuro-endocrine modulators. In the presence of host physiological stress many eukaryotic factors are released and detected by Gram-negative bacteria which in return rapidly adapt their physiology. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can bind elements of the host immune system such as interferon-γ and dynorphin and then through quorum sensing circuitry enhance its virulence. Escherichia coli sensitivity to the neurohormones of the catecholamines family appears relayed by a recently identified bacterial adrenergic receptor. In the present review, we will describe the mechanisms by which various eukaryotic signal molecules produced by host may activate Gram-negative bacteria virulence. Particular attention will be paid to Pseudomonas, a genus whose representative species, P. aeruginosa, is a common opportunistic pathogen. The discussion will be particularly focused on the pivotal role played by these new types of pathogen sensors from the sensing to the transduction

  17. A bacterial toxin inhibits DNA replication elongation through a direct interaction with the β sliding clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher D; Phung, Tuyen N; Huang, David; Laub, Michael T

    2013-12-12

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous on bacterial chromosomes, yet the mechanisms regulating their activity and the molecular targets of toxins remain incompletely defined. Here, we identify SocAB, an atypical TA system in Caulobacter crescentus. Unlike canonical TA systems, the toxin SocB is unstable and constitutively degraded by the protease ClpXP; this degradation requires the antitoxin, SocA, as a proteolytic adaptor. We find that the toxin, SocB, blocks replication elongation through an interaction with the sliding clamp, driving replication fork collapse. Mutations that suppress SocB toxicity map to either the hydrophobic cleft on the clamp that binds DNA polymerase III or a clamp-binding motif in SocB. Our findings suggest that SocB disrupts replication by outcompeting other clamp-binding proteins. Collectively, our results expand the diversity of mechanisms employed by TA systems to regulate toxin activity and inhibit bacterial growth, and they suggest that inhibiting clamp function may be a generalizable antibacterial strategy. PMID:24239291

  18. Improved Fixation of Cellulose-Acetate Reverse-Osmosis Membrane for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kutz, S. M.; Bentley, D L; Sinclair, N A

    1985-01-01

    Fixation of cellulose-acetate membranes with either glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide or glutaraldehyde-ruthenium tetroxide resulted in extensive electron beam damage. Beam damage was eliminated and the bacterial surface structure was preserved, however, when cellulose-acetate membranes were fixed with glutaraldehyderuthenium tetroxide and treated successively with thiocarbohydrazide and osmium tetroxide.

  19. Phosphatidylglycerol is involved in protein translocation across Escherichia coli inner membranes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. de Vrije; R.L. de Swart (Rik); W. Dowhan; J. Tommassen (Jan); B. de Kruijff

    1988-01-01

    textabstractNewly synthesized proteins to be exported out of the cytoplasm of bacterial cells have to pass across the inner membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria ATP, a membrane potential, the products of the sec genes and leader peptidases (enzymes which cleave the N-terminal signal peptides of the p

  20. Characterization of biofoulants illustrates different membrane fouling mechanisms for aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yanghui

    2015-11-17

    This study compares the membrane fouling mechanisms of aerobic (AeMBR) and anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) of the same reactor configuration at similar operating conditions. Although both the AeMBR and AnMBR achieved more than 90% COD removal efficiency, the fouling mechanisms were different. Molecular weight (MW) fingerprint profiles showed that a majority of fragments in anaerobic soluble microbial products (SMP) were retained by the membrane and some fragments were present in both SMP and in soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), suggesting that the physical retention of SMP components contributed to the AnMBR membrane fouling. One of the dominant fragments was comprised of glycoliproprotein (size 630-640 kD) and correlated in abundance in AnMBR-EPS with the extent of anaerobic membrane fouling. In contrast, all detected AeMBR-SMP fragments permeated through the membrane. Aerobic SMP and soluble EPS also showed very different fingerprinting profiles. A large amount of adenosine triphosphate was present in the AeMBR-EPS, suggesting that microbial activity arising from certain bacterial populations, such as unclassified Comamonadaceae and unclassified Chitinophagaceae, may play a role in aerobic membrane fouling. This study underlines the differences in fouling mechanisms between AeMBR and AnMBR systems and can be applied to facilitate the development of appropriate fouling control strategies.

  1. Expression of the neuronal adaptor protein X11alpha protects against memory dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2010-01-01

    X11alpha is a neuronal-specific adaptor protein that binds to the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Overexpression of X11alpha reduces Abeta production but whether X11alpha also protects against Abeta-related memory dysfunction is not known. To test this possibility, we crossed X11alpha transgenic mice with AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice. AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice produce high levels of brain Abeta and develop age-related defects in memory function that correlate with increasing Abeta load. Overexpression of X11alpha alone had no detectable adverse effect upon behavior. However, X11alpha reduced brain Abeta levels and corrected spatial reference memory defects in aged X11alpha\\/AbetaPP double transgenics. Thus, X11alpha may be a therapeutic target for Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  2. A novel method for evaluating microglial activation using ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 staining: cell body to cell size ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Bertha Hovens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to validate a newly developed methodology of semi-automatic image analysis to analyze microglial morphology as marker for microglial activation in ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 (IBA-1 stained brain sections. Methods: The novel method was compared to currently used analysis methods, visual characterization of activation stage and optical density measurement, in brain sections of young and aged rats that had undergone surgery or remained naοve. Results: The cell body to cell size ratio of microglia was strongly correlated to the visual characterization activation stage. In addition, we observed specific surgery and age-related changes in cell body size, size of the dendritic processes and cell body to cell size ratio. Conclusion: The novel analysis method provides a sensitive marker for microglial activation in the rat brain, which is quick and easy to perform and provides additional information about microglial morphology.

  3. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  4. Membrane fluids and Dirac membrane fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M G

    2004-01-01

    The relation between two different methods of membrane fluid description is clarified by construction of combined method. Dirac membrane field appears naturally in new approach. It provides a possibility to consider new aspects of electrodynamics-type theories with electric and magnetic sources. The membrane fluid models automatically prohibit simulatenos existence of electric and magnetic currents. Possible applications to the dark energy problem are mentioned.

  5. Adaptor bypass mutations of Bacillus subtilis spx suggest a mechanism for YjbH-enhanced proteolysis of the regulator Spx by ClpXP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chio Mui; Hahn, Erik; Zuber, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary The global regulator, Spx, is under proteolytic control exerted by the adaptor YjbH and ATP-dependent protease ClpXP in Bacillus subtilis. While YjbH is observed to bind the Spx C-terminus, YjbH shows little affinity for ClpXP, indicating adaptor activity that does not operate by tethering. Chimeric proteins derived from B. subtilis AbrB and the Spx C-terminus showed that a 28 residue C-terminal section of Spx (AbrB28), but not the last 12 or 16 residues (AbrB12, AbrB16), was required for YjbH interaction and for ClpXP proteolysis, although the rate of AbrB28 proteolysis was not affected by YjbH addition. The result suggested that the YjbH-targeted 28 residue segment of the Spx C-terminus bears a ClpXP-recognition element(s) that is hidden in the intact Spx protein. Residue substitutions in the conserved helix α6 of the C-terminal region generated Spx substrates that were degraded by ClpXP at accelerated rates compared to wild type Spx, and showed reduced dependency on the YjbH activity. The residue substitutions also weakened the interaction between Spx and YjbH. The results suggest a model in which YjbH, through interaction with residues of α6 helix, exposes the C-terminus of Spx for recognition and proteolysis by ClpXP. PMID:24942655

  6. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  7. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  8. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  9. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  10. Biophysical studies of membrane channel polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbraith, Toby Patrick

    2001-07-01

    Membrane channels facilitate the flow of ions across biological membranes, a process which is important in numerous cellular functions. The study of large integral membrane proteins is made difficult by identification, production and purification problems, and detailed knowledge of their three-dimensional structures is relatively scarce. The study of simple 'model' membrane proteins has given valuable insight into the structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in general. The bacterial peptide gramicidin has been the subject of intense study for many years, and has provided important information into the structural basis of channel function. Peptaibols, a class of fungal membrane peptides which includes alamethicin and antiamoebin, have also been useful in relating structural details to molecular ion transport processes. Gramicidin crystals were grown in the presence of phospholipids with various headgroups and acyl chains. The diffraction patterns of the crystals obtained were processed, but found to be insufficient for high-resolution structural refinement. Analysis of the crystal space group and cell dimensions suggest that gramicidin adopts the same conformation as the closed, ion-free pore form previously published. Circular dichroism studies of gramicidin in small unilamellar vesicles of phospholipids with acyl chains of varying length show that the conformation of gramicidin is affected by the width of the bilayer. The structure of antiamoebin I in deuterated methanol was determined using 2D NMR spectroscopy techniques. It was compared with previously published solid state structures of this molecule, and found to be significantly different. The solution structure may represent an intermediate pre-insertion conformation which is not feasible in the more highly ordered membrane or crystal environment. A possible mechanism for membrane insertion is proposed. (author)

  11. Transmembrane Adaptor Protein PAG/CBP Is Involved in both Positive and Negative Regulation of Mast Cell Signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráberová, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Potůčková, Lucie; Hálová, Ivana; Bambousková, Monika; Polakovičová, Iva; Xavier, R.J.; Seed, B.; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 23 (2014), s. 4285-4300. ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : plasma membrane * cel signaling * IgE receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.777, year: 2014

  12. Bacterial Cellulose-Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and to evaluate the biological properties of bacterial cellulose-hydroxyapatite (BC-HA nanocomposite membranes for bone regeneration. Nanocomposites were prepared from bacterial cellulose membranes sequentially incubated in solutions of CaCl2 followed by Na2HPO4. BC-HA membranes were evaluated in noncritical bone defects in rat tibiae at 1, 4, and 16 weeks. Thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of the mineral phase was 40%–50% of the total weight. Spectroscopy, electronic microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyses, and X-ray diffraction showed formation of HA crystals on BC nanofibres. Low crystallinity HA crystals presented Ca/P a molar ratio of 1.5 (calcium-deficient HA, similar to physiological bone. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis showed bands assigned to phosphate and carbonate ions. In vivo tests showed no inflammatory reaction after 1 week. After 4 weeks, defects were observed to be completely filled in by new bone tissue. The BC-HA membranes were effective for bone regeneration.

  13. Phosphoproteins involved in bacterial signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells adjust their behavior continuously in response to changing environmental conditions. A number of specific stimulus-response systems have been investigated in bacteria. These include the chemotaxis system (Che), the nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr), the phosphorus system (Pho), the system that controls expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) in response to changes in osmotic pressure, the sporulation system (SpoO), and the virulence system (Vir) that mediates bacterial infectivity of damaged plant tissues. Surprisingly, all of these systems show a common set of components. In each case, the signal transduction proteins include members of two homologous families, which appear to comprise a cascade: Sensory information feeds into the first component, which activates the second component that, in turn, modulates a target activity within the cell. In this paper, the authors present evidence that the communication between the two components involves a phospho-transfer mechanism that is common to all of these regulatory systems

  14. Architecture of beta-barrel membrane proteins: analysis of trimeric porins.

    OpenAIRE

    Seshadri, K.; Garemyr, R.; Wallin, E.; von Heijne, G; Elofsson, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the known three-dimensional structures of trimeric porins from bacterial outer membranes. The distribution of surface-exposed residues in a direction perpendicular to the membrane is similar to that in helical membrane proteins, with aliphatic residues concentrated in the central 20 A of the bilayer. Outside these residues is a layer of aromatic residues, followed by polar and charged residues. Residues in the trimer interface are more conserved than residues not in the inter...

  15. Bacterial contamination of enteral diets.

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1986-01-01

    Enteral feeding solutions can be contaminated by bacterial micro-organisms already present in the ingredients, or introduced during preparation or transport, or in the hospital ward. During jejunostomy feeding without pump or filter, ascending bacterial invasion of the feeding bag is possible. In patients with lowered immune response contaminated feedings can cause serious septic clinical problems. The progressive loss of the nutritional value of the enteral feeding solution by bacterial cont...

  16. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulent-like motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedge-like "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that a maximal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp regi...

  17. Antibiofilm effect enhanced by modification of 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles on polysulfone membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Biofouling impedes the performance of membrane bioreactors. In this study, we investigated the antifouling effects of polysulfone membranes that were modified by 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles. The membranes to be tested were embedded within a drip flow biofilm reactor, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was inoculated and allowed to establish biofilm on the tested membranes. It was found that 1,2,3-triazole and palladium nanoparticles can inhibit the bacterial growth in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The decrease in bacterial growth was observed along with a decrease in the amount of total polysaccharide and Pel polysaccharide within the biofilm matrix but not the protein content.

  18. Membrane Automata with Priorities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luděk Cienciala; Lucie Ciencialová

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the one-way P automata with priorities are introduced. Such automata are P systemshere the membranes are only allowed to consume objects from parent membranes, under the given conditions. The result of computation of these systems is the set of multiset sequences consumed by skin membrane intc the system. The rules associated in some order with each membrane cannot modify any objects, they can only move them through membrane. We show that P automata with priorities and two membranes can accept every recursively enumerated language.

  19. Synthesis of flexible magnetic nanohybrid based on bacterial cellulose under ultrasonic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible magnetic membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) was successfully prepared by in-situ synthesis of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles under different conditions and its properties were characterized. The results demonstrated that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with PEG were well homogeneously dispersed in the BC matrix under ultrasonic irradiation with the saturation magnetization of 40.58 emu/g. Besides that, the membranes exhibited the striking flexibility and mechanical properties. This study provided a green and facile method to inhibit magnetic nanoparticle aggregation without compromising the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. Magnetically responsive BC membrane would have potential applications in electronic actuators, information storage, electromagnetic shielding coating and anti-counterfeit. - Highlights: ► Flexible magnetic film is prepared by in situ synthesis on bacterial cellulose. ► Ultrasound and PEG are used together to inhibit the nanoparticle aggregation. ► The magnetic membrane demonstrates the great superparamagnetic behavior

  20. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  1. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M;

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p <0.001). Ceftriaxone plus penicillin as empirical treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... was 75% for penicillin-susceptible episodes, and 24% for penicillin-non-susceptible episodes (p <0.001). Cases involving staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae were under-reported. Among 51 ABM cases with no identified risk factors, nine of 11 cases with penicillin...

  2. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  3. Membrane fouling potentials and cellular properties of bacteria isolated from fouled membranes in a MBR treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, So; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Membrane fouling remains a major challenge for wider application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) to wastewater treatment. Membrane fouling is mainly caused by microorganisms and their excreted microbial products. For development of more effective control strategies, it is important to identify and characterize the microorganisms that are responsible for membrane fouling. In this study, 41 bacterial strains were isolated from fouled microfiltration membranes in a pilot-scale MBR treating real municipal wastewater, and their membrane fouling potentials were directly measured using bench-scale cross-flow membrane filtration systems (CFMFSs) and related to their cellular properties. It was found that the fouling potential was highly strain dependent, suggesting that bacterial identification at the strain level is essential to identify key fouling-causing bacteria (FCB). The FCB showed some common cellular properties. The most prominent feature of FCB was that they formed convex colonies having swollen podgy shape and smooth lustrous surfaces with high water, hydrophilic organic matter and carbohydrate content. However, general and rigid biofilm formation potential as determined by microtiter plates and cell surface properties (i.e., hydrophobicity and surface charge) did not correlate with the fouling potential in this study. These results suggest that the fouling potential should be directly evaluated under filtration conditions, and the colony water content could be a useful indicator to identify the FCB. PMID:27232989

  4. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics. PMID:26640046

  5. Heterologous expression and purification of membrane-bound pyrophosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellosalo, J.; Kajander, T.; Palmgren, Michael Broberg;

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases) are enzymes that couple the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate to pumping of protons or sodium ions. In plants and bacteria they are important for relieving stress caused by low energy levels during anoxia, drought, nutrient deficiency, cold and low...... obtain structural information for drug design. We have tested the expression of eight integral membrane pyrophosphatases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six from bacterial and archaeal sources and two from protozoa. Two proteins originating from hyperthermophilic organisms were purified in dimeric and...... at levels that would allow their purification for crystallization purposes. Highlights ¿ We have tested expression of eight membrane-bound pyrophosphatases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ¿ We have made functional T4-lysozyme-membrane-bound pyrophosphatase chimeras. ¿ We have purified membrane...

  6. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  7. Ankyrin-B directs membrane tethering of periaxin and is required for maintenance of lens fiber cell hexagonal shape and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Walters, Mark; Brophy, Peter J; Bennett, Vann; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2016-01-15

    Periaxin (Prx), a PDZ domain protein expressed preferentially in myelinating Schwann cells and lens fibers, plays a key role in membrane scaffolding and cytoarchitecture. Little is known, however, about how Prx is anchored to the plasma membrane. Here we report that ankyrin-B (AnkB), a well-characterized adaptor protein involved in linking the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to integral membrane proteins, is required for membrane association of Prx in lens fibers and colocalizes with Prx in hexagonal fiber cells. Under AnkB haploinsufficiency, Prx accumulates in the soluble fraction with a concomitant loss from the membrane-enriched fraction of mouse lenses. Moreover, AnkB haploinsufficiency induced age-dependent disruptions in fiber cell hexagonal geometry and radial alignment and decreased compressive stiffness in mouse lenses parallel to the changes observed in Prx null mouse lens. Both AnkB- and Prx-deficient mice exhibit disruptions in membrane organization of the spectrin-actin network and the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in lens fiber cells. Taken together, these observations reveal that AnkB is required for Prx membrane anchoring and for maintenance of lens fiber cell hexagonal geometry, membrane skeleton organization, and biomechanics. PMID:26538089

  8. Mechanism of activation of bacterial cellulose synthase by cyclic-di-GMP

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Jacob L.W.; McNamara, Joshua T.; Zimmer, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP stimulates the synthesis of bacterial cellulose, frequently found in biofilms. Bacterial cellulose is synthesized and translocated across the inner membrane by a complex of the cellulose synthase BcsA and BcsB subunits. Here we present crystal structures of the cyclic-di-GMP-activated BcsA–B complex. The structures reveal that cyclic-di-GMP releases an auto-inhibited state of the enzyme by breaking a salt bridge which otherwise tethers a conserve...

  9. Hrs and SNX3 functions in sorting and membrane invagination within multivesicular bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Pons

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available After internalization, ubiquitinated signaling receptors are delivered to early endosomes. There, they are sorted and incorporated into the intralumenal invaginations of nascent multivesicular bodies, which function as transport intermediates to late endosomes. Receptor sorting is achieved by Hrs--an adaptor--like protein that binds membrane PtdIns3P via a FYVE motif-and then by ESCRT complexes, which presumably also mediate the invagination process. Eventually, intralumenal vesicles are delivered to lysosomes, leading to the notion that EGF receptor sorting into multivesicular bodies mediates lysosomal targeting. Here, we report that Hrs is essential for lysosomal targeting but dispensable for multivesicular body biogenesis and transport to late endosomes. By contrast, we find that the PtdIns3P-binding protein SNX3 is required for multivesicular body formation, but not for EGF receptor degradation. PtdIns3P thus controls the complementary functions of Hrs and SNX3 in sorting and multivesicular body biogenesis.

  10. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  11. Antibacterial Effect of Human Amnion Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashani, L. (MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Along with antibiotics, the use of biological methods to combat bacteria is notably considered. A natural barrier such as amniotic membrane is one of the ways of dealing with bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial effect of human amniotic membrane. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was performed in Dezyani teaching Hospital of Gorgan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. To evaluate the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bacteria, 20 amniotic membranes were obtained from postpartum mothers and examined by repeated dilution, diffusion and extraction techniques. Data were collected by observation method and described by mean and standard deviation. Results: The antibacterial activity was found in 15% of the samples against Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while no antibacterial activity was found against E. coli. Given the 15% positive responses, "Diffusion" and "repeated dilution" techniques were more effective in investigating the antibacterial effect of amniotic membrane. Conclusion: The results show the probability of antimicrobial effect of amniotic membrane tissue and it seems that this property can be affected by many factors.

  12. Bacillus subtilis Spore Inner Membrane Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linli; Abhyankar, Wishwas; Ouwerling, Natasja; Dekker, Henk L; van Veen, Henk; van der Wel, Nicole N; Roseboom, Winfried; de Koning, Leo J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G

    2016-02-01

    The endospore is the dormant form of Bacillus subtilis and many other Firmicutes. By sporulation, these spore formers can survive very harsh physical and chemical conditions. Yet, they need to go through germination to return to their growing form. The spore inner membrane (IM) has been shown to play an essential role in triggering the initiation of germination. In this study, we isolated the IM of bacterial spores, in parallel with the isolation of the membrane of vegetative cells. With the use of GeLC-MS/MS, over 900 proteins were identified from the B. subtilis spore IM preparations. By bioinformatics-based membrane protein predictions, ca. one-third could be predicted to be membrane-localized. A large number of unique proteins as well as proteins common to the two membrane proteomes were identified. In addition to previously known IM proteins, a number of IM proteins were newly identified, at least some of which are likely to provide new insights into IM physiology, unveiling proteins putatively involved in spore germination machinery and hence putative germination inhibition targets. PMID:26731423

  13. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  14. Gynecologic Conditions and Bacterial Vaginosis: Implications for the Non-Pregnant Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Sweet

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is characterized by a shift from the predominant lactobacillus vaginal flora to an overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an increased risk of gynecologic complications, including pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infection, cervicitis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and possibly cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. The obstetrical risks associated with bacterial vaginosis include premature rupture of membranes, preterm labor and delivery, chorioamnionitis and postpartum endometritis. Despite the health risks associated with bacterial vaginosis and its high prevalence in women of childbearing age, bacterial vaginosis continues to be largely ignored by clinicians, particularly in asymptomatic women. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 8:184–190, 2000.

  15. Poring over membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    A new book on membrane science and technology focuses on the use of atomic force microscopy in the study and characterization of polymer membranes and also provides practical tips on how to undertake an experiment.

  16. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  17. Solvent resistant nanofiltration membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, Szymon Maria

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes preparation and characterization of membranes for organic solvent filtration (OSF). The main aim was developing membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) with molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1.

  18. Premature rupture of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When the water breaks early, it is called premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Most women will go ... th week of pregnancy, it is called preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). The earlier your water ...

  19. Ionene membrane battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moacanin, J.; Tom, H. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Ionic transport characteristics of ionenes, insoluble membranes from soluble polyelectrolyte compositions, are studied for possible application in a battery separator. Effectiveness of the thin film of separator membrane essentially determines battery lifetime.

  20. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  1. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  2. Membrane Curvature in Flaviviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wei; Kaufmann, Bärbel; Chipman, Paul R.; Kuhn, Richard J; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated interplay between membrane proteins and the lipid bilayer is required for such processes as transporter function and the entrance of enveloped viruses into host cells. In this study, three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy density maps of mature and immature flaviviruses were analyzed to assess the curvature of the membrane leaflets and its relation to membrane-bound viral glycoproteins. The overall morphology of the viral membrane is determined by icosahedral scaffolding compo...

  3. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  4. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the...... benefits and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial...

  5. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  6. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  7. Controls and constrains of the membrane disrupting action of Aurein 1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmiri, Mahdi; Enciso, Marta; Mechler, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Aurein 1.2 is a 13 residue antimicrobial peptide secreted by the Australian tree frog Litoria Aurea. It is a surface-acting membrane disrupting peptide that permeabilizes bacterial membranes via the carpet mechanism; the molecular details of this process are mostly unknown. Here the mechanism of action of Aurein 1.2 was investigated with an emphasis on the role of membrane charge and C-terminal amidation of the peptide. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) fingerprinting it was found that the membrane charge correlates with membrane affinity of the peptide, however the binding and the membrane disrupting processes are not charge driven; increased membrane charge reduces the membrane disrupting activity. Coarse grain simulations revealed that phenylalanine residues act as membrane anchors. Accordingly Aurein 1.2 has the ability to bind to any membrane. Furthermore, bundling precludes membrane disruption in case of wild type peptides, while non C-terminal amidated peptides form random aggregates leading to detachment from the membrane. Hence C-terminal amidation is crucial for Aurein 1.2 action. Our results suggest that Aurein 1.2 acts via aggregation driven membrane penetration. The concomitant change in the tension of the outer leaflet imposes a spontaneous curvature on the membrane, leading to disintegration.

  8. Bacterial Gibberellins Induce Systemic Resistance of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. FEKLISTOVA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed today that some rhizosphere bacteria can ensure induced systemic resistance to pathogens. In this paper we tested the ability of gibberellins produced by rhizosphere non-pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aurantiaca to induce systemic resistance to alternariosis agent – Alternaria brassicicola – in oilseed rape plants.Oilseed rape (Brássica nápus is one of the most promising oil-bearing croppers. It allows improving the supply of population with vegetable oil, animal and poultry industries with high quality vegetable protein. It is used for biofuel production as well.Gibberellin preparation was isolated from liquid culture of strain Pseudomonas aurantiaca grown in 250 mL of M9 medium (48 h, 28 °C under darkroom conditions. Gibberellins were extracted according procedure described by Tien et al. (1979. Gibberellins concentration in the medium was determined by fluorometric method.Elicitor activity of bacterial metabolites – gibberellins – was analyzed in model system of artificial inoculation of oilseed rape germs with phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola. The elicitor action efficiency was evaluated on the 15th day of oilseed rape cultivation based on the percentage of leaf surface covered by necrotic lesions.Gibberellins were shown to induce systemic resistance resulted in decreasing of oil seed plants   vulnerability by 52.7%.It is known that under the unfavorable conditions plants synthesis the reactive oxygen intermediates   which activate destructive processes. One of the first organism reactions to stress action is the change of the lipid peroxidation level. It was shown that treatment of the soil with gibberellins resulted in decreasing of the lipid peroxidation level twofold.Gibberellins were shown to have a similar effect on permeability of cell membranes for free nucleotides. The permeability of cell membranes in leaves decreased 2.8-fold at room temperature. We suggest that gibberellins

  9. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura;

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane separates the cellular contents from the surrounding environment. Nutrients must enter through the plasma membrane in order to reach the cell interior, and toxic metabolites and several ions leave the cell by traveling across the same barrier. Biological pumps in the plasma...... membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  10. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  11. Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  12. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions on the...... microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  13. The adaptor function of TRAPPC2 in mammalian TRAPPs explains TRAPPC2-associated SEDT and TRAPPC9-associated congenital intellectual disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TRAPP (Transport protein particle complex is a conserved protein complex functioning at various steps in vesicle transport. Although yeast has three functionally and structurally distinct forms, TRAPPI, II and III, emerging evidence suggests that mammalian TRAPP complex may be different. Mutations in the TRAPP complex subunit 2 (TRAPPC2 cause X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, while mutations in the TRAPP complex subunit 9 (TRAPPC9 cause postnatal mental retardation with microcephaly. The structural interplay between these subunits found in mammalian equivalent of TRAPPI and those specific to TRAPPII and TRAPPIII remains largely unknown and we undertook the present study to examine the interaction between these subunits. Here, we reveal that the mammalian equivalent of the TRAPPII complex is structurally distinct from the yeast counterpart thus leading to insight into mechanism of disease. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed how TRAPPII- or TRAPPIII- specific subunits interact with the six-subunit core complex of TRAPP by co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells. TRAPPC2 binds to TRAPPII-specific subunit TRAPPC9, which in turn binds to TRAPPC10. Unexpectedly, TRAPPC2 can also bind to the putative TRAPPIII-specific subunit, TRAPPC8. Endogenous TRAPPC9-positive TRAPPII complex does not contain TRAPPC8, suggesting that TRAPPC2 binds to either TRAPPC9 or TRAPPC8 during the formation of the mammalian equivalents of TRAPPII or TRAPPIII, respectively. Therefore, TRAPPC2 serves as an adaptor for the formation of these complexes. A disease-causing mutation of TRAPPC2, D47Y, failed to interact with either TRAPPC9 or TRAPPC8, suggesting that aspartate 47 in TRAPPC2 is at or near the site of interaction with TRAPPC9 or TRAPPC8, mediating the formation of TRAPPII and/or TRAPPIII. Furthermore, disease-causing deletional mutants of TRAPPC9 all failed to interact with TRAPPC2 and TRAPPC10. CONCLUSIONS: TRAPPC2 serves as an adaptor for the

  14. Limited diffusive fluxes of substrate facilitate coexistence of two competing bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Or, D.; Smets, Barth F.

    2008-01-01

    dish and a perforated Teflon((R)) membrane to control diffusive fluxes of substrate (benzoate) whilst permitting direct observation of bacterial colonies. The system was inoculated with prescribed strains of Pseudomonas, whose growth was quantified by microscopic monitoring of the fluorescent proteins...

  15. Specific labeling of peptidoglycan precursors as a tool for bacterial cell wall studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Olrichs, N.K.; Breukink, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Wall chart: The predominant component of the bacterial cell wall, peptidoglycan, consists of long alternating stretches of aminosugar subunits interlinked in a large three-dimensional network and is formed from precursors through several cytosolic and membrane-bound steps. The high tolerance of the

  16. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  17. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  18. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere. PMID:22457983

  19. Increased abundance of the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1) in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes: evidence for altered adiponectin signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R.M.; Yi, Z; De Filippis, E.; Berria, R.; S. Shahani; P. Sathyanarayana; Sherman, V.; K. Fujiwara; Meyer, C.; Christ-Roberts, C.; Hwang, H; Finlayson, J.; Dong, L. Q.; Mandarino, L. J.; Bajaj, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The adiponectin signalling pathway is largely unknown, but recently the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1), has been shown to interact directly with adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR)1. APPL1 is present in C2C12 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle, but its presence in human skeletal muscle has not been investigated. Methods Samples from type 2 diabetic, and lean and non-diabetic obese participants w...

  20. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph Histone Modification in IgH Locus S Regions Targets 14-3-3 Adaptors and AID to Specify Antibody Class-Switch DNA Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guideng Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor and a downstream (acceptor S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5′-AGCT-3′ repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is “written” specifically in S regions and is “read” by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome.