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Sample records for bacteria-stimulated intestinal epithelial

  1. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through bacteria-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with lecithin in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, Simone; Moser, Lydia;

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Endotoxemia was shown to be integral in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice. In the current study, the role of conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and phosphatidylcholine on the permeability of endotoxin through a layer of intestinal epithelial cells and the consequent activat...

  2. Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Dharam P.; Dombkowski, Alan A.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Parker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in the biology of stem cells has resulted in significant interest in the development of normal epithelial cell lines from the intestinal mucosa, both to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration and to develop treatment models of degenerative disorders of the digestive tract. However, the difficulty of propagating cell lines of normal intestinal epithelium has impeded research into the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation of stem/progeni...

  3. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  4. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

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    Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events; restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs, regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  5. Microecology, intestinal epithelial barrier and necrotizing enterocolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Renu; Tepas, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Soon after birth, the neonatal intestine is confronted with a massive antigenic challenge of microbial colonization. Microbial signals are required for maturation of several physiological, anatomical, and biochemical functions of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) after birth. Commensal bacteria regulate intestinal innate and adaptive immunity and provide stimuli for ongoing repair and restitution of IEB. Colonization by pathogenic bacteria and/or dysmature response to microbial stimuli can ...

  6. Apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cells after bacterial invasion.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J. M.; Eckmann, L; Savidge, T. C.; Lowe, D C; Witthöft, T; Kagnoff, M F

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cells that line the human intestinal mucosa are the initial site of host invasion by bacterial pathogens. The studies herein define apoptosis as a new category of intestinal epithelial cell response to bacterial infection. Human colon epithelial cells are shown to undergo apoptosis following infection with invasive enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella or enteroinvasive Escherichia coli. In contrast to the rapid onset of apoptosis seen after bacterial infection of mouse monocyte-ma...

  7. [Epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouiten-Mekki, Lilia; Serghini, Meriem; Fekih, Monia; Kallel, Lamia; Matri, Samira; Ben Mustapha, Nadia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2013-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the principal inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) which physiopathology is currently poorly elucidated. During these diseases, the participation of the epithelial cell in the installation and the perpetuation of the intestinal inflammation is now clearly implicated. In fact, the intestinal epithelium located at the interface between the internal environment and the intestinal luminal, is key to the homeostatic regulation of the intestinal barrier. This barrier can schematically be regarded as being three barriers in one: a physical, chemical and immune barrier. The barrier function of epithelial cell can be altered by various mechanisms as occurs in IBD. The goal of this article is to review the literature on the role of the epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and its implication in the IBD. PMID:24356146

  8. Intestinal epithelial vitamin D receptor signaling inhibits experimental colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Weicheng; Chen, Yunzi; Golan, Maya Aharoni; Annunziata, Maria L.; Du, Jie; Dougherty, Urszula; Kong, Juan; Musch, Mark; Huang, Yong; Pekow, Joel; Zheng, Changqing; Bissonnette, Marc; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Li, Yan Chun

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of vitamin D on colitis have been previously documented. Global vitamin D receptor (VDR) deletion exaggerates colitis, but the relative anticolitic contribution of epithelial and nonepithelial VDR signaling is unknown. Here, we showed that colonic epithelial VDR expression was substantially reduced in patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Moreover, targeted expression of human VDR (hVDR) in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) protected mice from developing...

  9. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

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    Ping-Chang Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Psychological stress is one of the factors associated with many human diseases; the mechanisms need to be further understood. Methods : Rats were subjected to chronic water avoid stress. Intestinal epithelial heat shock protein (HSP 70 was evaluated. The intestinal epithelial permeability was examined with Ussing chamber technique. Results : HSP70 was detected in normal intestinal epithelial cells. Psychological stress decreased HSP70 in the intestinal epithelial cells that correlated with the stress-induced intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability. Pretreatment with HSP70 abrogated stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusions : Chronic stress inhibits HSP70 activity in rat intestinal epithelial layer that is associated with intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, which can be prevented by pretreatment with HSP70 protein. (Yang PC, Tu YH, Perdue MH, Oluwole C, Struiksma S. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  10. Immune-epithelial crosstalk at the intestinal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkopf, Nadine; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    The intestinal tract is one of the most complex organs of the human body. It has to exercise various functions including food and water absorption, as well as barrier and immune regulation. These functions affect not only the gut itself, but influence the overall health of the organism. Diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer therefore severely affect the patient's quality of life and can become life-threatening. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) play an important role in intestinal inflammation, infection, and cancer development. IECs not only constitute the first barrier in the gut against the lumen, they also constantly signal information about the gut lumen to immune cells, thereby influencing their behaviour. In contrast, by producing various antimicrobial peptides, IECs shape the microbial community within the gut. IECs also respond to cytokines and other mediators of immune cells in the lamina propria. Interactions between epithelial cells and immune cells in the intestine are responsible for gut homeostasis, and modulations of this crosstalk have been reported in studies of gut diseases. This review discusses the wide field of immune-epithelial interactions and shows the importance of immune-epithelial crosstalk in the intestine to gut homeostasis and the overall health status. PMID:24469679

  11. Attachment of Giardia lamblia to rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Inge, P M; Edson, C M; Farthing, M J

    1988-01-01

    The human enteric protozoan, Giardia lamblia, has surface membrane lectin activity which mediates parasite adherence to erythrocytes. To determine whether an intestinal binding site exists for this lectin we have studied the interaction in vitro between axenically cultured Giardia trophozoites and isolated rat intestinal epithelial cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that Giardia attached to the apical microvillus membrane and basolateral membrane of rat enterocytes. Any location on th...

  12. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera-Hernandez (Monica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  13. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevie Struiksma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological stress is one of the factors associated with many human diseases; the mechanisms need to be further understood. Methods: Rats were subjected to chronic water avoid stress. Intestinal epithelial heat shock protein (HSP 70 was evaluated. The intestinal epithelial permeability was examined with Ussing chamber technique. Results: HSP70 was detected in normal intestinal epithelial cells. Psychological stress decreased HSP70 in the intestinal epithelial cells that correlated with the stress-induced intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability. Pretreatment with HSP70 abrogated stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusions: Chronic stress inhibits HSP70 activity in rat intestinal epithelial layer that is associated with intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, which can be prevented by pretreatment with HSP70 protein.

  14. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D; Boudjadi, Salah; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2016-11-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt-villus axis. One important check-point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361-2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  15. Epithelial calcineurin controls microbiota-dependent intestinal tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuker, Kenneth; Muff, Stefanie; Wang, Jun; Künzel, Sven; Bosse, Esther; Zeissig, Yvonne; Luzzi, Giuseppina; Basic, Marijana; Strigli, Anne; Ulbricht, Andrea; Kaser, Arthur; Arlt, Alexander; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; van den Brink, Gijs R; Schafmayer, Clemens; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Becker, Thomas; Bianchi, Marco E; Bleich, André; Röcken, Christoph; Hampe, Jochen; Schreiber, Stefan; Baines, John F; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation-associated pathways are active in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and contribute to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Calcineurin, a phosphatase required for the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors, shows increased expression in CRC. We therefore investigated the role of calcineurin in intestinal tumor development. We demonstrate that calcineurin and NFAT factors are constitutively expressed by primary IECs and selectively activated in intestinal tumors as a result of impaired stratification of the tumor-associated microbiota and toll-like receptor signaling. Epithelial calcineurin supports the survival and proliferation of cancer stem cells in an NFAT-dependent manner and promotes the development of intestinal tumors in mice. Moreover, somatic mutations that have been identified in human CRC are associated with constitutive activation of calcineurin, whereas nuclear translocation of NFAT is associated with increased death from CRC. These findings highlight an epithelial cell-intrinsic pathway that integrates signals derived from the commensal microbiota to promote intestinal tumor development. PMID:27043494

  16. Fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplant.

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    Qiurong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intestinal chronic rejection (CR is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation.

  17. Fish Oil Enhances Recovery of Intestinal Microbiota and Epithelial Integrity in Chronic Rejection of Intestinal Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chenyang; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Yanmei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2011-01-01

    Background The intestinal chronic rejection (CR) is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. Methods/Principal Findings The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. Conclusions/Significance Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation. PMID:21698145

  18. Polarizing intestinal epithelial cells electrically through Ror2

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, L; McCaig, CD; Scott, RH; Zhao, S.; G. Milne; Clevers, H; Zhao, M; Pu, J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The apicobasal polarity of enterocytes determines where the brush border membrane (apical membrane) will form, but how this apical membrane faces the lumen is not well understood. The electrical signal across the epithelium could serve as a coordinating cue, orienting and polarizing enterocytes. Here, we show that applying a physiological electric field to intestinal epithelial cells, to mimic the natural electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference, polarized p...

  19. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

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    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways. PMID:25629818

  20. Interaction exists between matriptase inhibitors and intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pászti-Gere, Erzsebet; Barna, Réka Fanni; Ujhelyi, Gabriella; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    The type II trypsin-like transmembrane serine protease matriptase, is mainly expressed in epithelial cells and one of the key regulators in the formation and maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity. Therefore, we have studied the inhibition of matriptase in a non-transformed porcine intestinal IPEC-J2 cell monolayer cultured on polyester membrane inserts by the non-selective 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzosulphonylfluoride (AEBSF) and four more selective 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors. It was found that suppression of matriptase activity by MI-432 and MI-460 led to decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of the cell monolayer and to an enhanced transport of fluorescently labelled dextran, a marker for paracellular transport between apical and basolateral compartments. To this date this is the first report in which the inhibition of matriptase activity by synthetic inhibitors has been correlated to a reduced barrier integrity of a non-cancerous IPEC-J2 epithelial cell monolayer in order to describe interaction between matriptase activity and intestinal epithelium in vitro. PMID:26118419

  1. Isolation of intestinal epithelial cells and evaluation of transport functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Epithelial cells can be isolated from the small intestine of chickens by a procedure involving hyaluronidase treatment of the intact tissue. The isolated cells retain a high degree of functional activity as assessed by the formation of 70-fold gradients of alpha-MG. Stability of the sugar gradients reflects maintenance of stable electrochemical Na+ gradients across the plasma membrane. The cells can be used to evaluate the properties of Na(+)-dependent sugar transport, Na(+)-independent sugar transport, ion transport, metabolism, membrane potentials, and the integration of these events, all of which are important to achieving a stable sugar gradient.

  2. Isolation of intestinal epithelial cells and evaluation of transport functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells can be isolated from the small intestine of chickens by a procedure involving hyaluronidase treatment of the intact tissue. The isolated cells retain a high degree of functional activity as assessed by the formation of 70-fold gradients of alpha-MG. Stability of the sugar gradients reflects maintenance of stable electrochemical Na+ gradients across the plasma membrane. The cells can be used to evaluate the properties of Na(+)-dependent sugar transport, Na(+)-independent sugar transport, ion transport, metabolism, membrane potentials, and the integration of these events, all of which are important to achieving a stable sugar gradient

  3. DUSP10 regulates intestinal epithelial cell growth and colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, C W; Weerasooriya, M; Guo, J; James, S J; Poh, H M; Osato, M; Flavell, R A; Dong, C; Yang, H; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-14

    Dual specificity phosphatase 10 (DUSP10), also known as MAP kinase phosphatase 5 (MKP5), negatively regulates the activation of MAP kinases. Genetic polymorphisms and aberrant expression of this gene are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in humans. However, the role of DUSP10 in intestinal epithelial tumorigenesis is not clear. Here, we showed that DUSP10 knockout (KO) mice had increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and migration and developed less severe colitis than wild-type (WT) mice in response to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) treatment, which is associated with increased ERK1/2 activation and Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) expression in IEC. In line with increased IEC proliferation, DUSP10 KO mice developed more colon tumours with increased severity compared with WT mice in response to administration of DSS and azoxymethane (AOM). Furthermore, survival analysis of CRC patients demonstrated that high DUSP10 expression in tumours was associated with significant improvement in survival probability. Overexpression of DUSP10 in Caco-2 and RCM-1 cells inhibited cell proliferation. Our study showed that DUSP10 negatively regulates IEC growth and acts as a suppressor for CRC. Therefore, it could be targeted for the development of therapies for colitis and CRC. PMID:25772234

  4. Apical Gene Transfer into Quiescent Human and Canine Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Lentivirus Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Seppen, Jurgen; Barry, Simon C.; Klinkspoor, J. Henriette; Katen, Louis J.; Lee, Sum P; Garcia, J. Victor; Osborne, William R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells secrete a protective luminal mucus barrier inhibiting viral gene transfer. Quiescent, polarized monolayers of primary epithelial cells from dog gallbladder and human colon are efficiently transduced through the apical mucus side by lentivirus vectors, suggesting their application to intestinal gene therapy.

  5. Interleukin-23 Increases Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzerling, Nathan P; Donohoe, Deborah; Fredrich, Katherine; Gourlay, David M; Liedel, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    Background Breast milk has a heterogeneous composition that differs between mothers and changes throughout the first weeks after birth. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-23 has a highly variable expression in human breast milk. We hypothesize that IL-23 found in human breast milk is biologically active and promotes epithelial barrier dysfunction. Methods The immature rat small intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18, was grown on cell inserts or standard cell culture plates. Confluent cultures were exposed to human breast milk with high or low levels of IL-23 and barrier function was measured using a flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-70). In addition, protein and mRNA expression of occludin and ZO-1 were measured and immunofluorescence used to stain occludin and ZO-1. Results Exposure to breast milk with high levels of IL-23 caused an increase flux of FD-70 compared with both controls and breast milk with low levels of IL-23. The protein expression of ZO-1 but not occludin was decreased by exposure to high levels of IL-23. These results correlate with immunofluorescent staining of ZO-1 and occludin which show decreased staining of occludin in both the groups exposed to breast milk with high and low IL-23. Conversely, cells exposed to high IL-23 breast milk had little peripheral staining of ZO-1 compared with controls and low IL-23 breast milk. Conclusion IL-23 in human breast milk is biologically active and negatively affects the barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells through the degradation of tight junction proteins. PMID:26007691

  6. Immunochemical, biomolecular and biochemical characterization of bovine epithelial intestinal primocultures

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    Mainil Jacques

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultures of enterocytes and colonocytes represent valuable tools to study growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. In vitro models may be used to evaluate passage or toxicity of drugs, interactions of enteropathogenes bacteria strains with intestinal epithelium and other physiologic or pathologic phenomenon involving the digestive tract. Results Cultures of bovine colonocytes and jejunocytes were obtained from organoid-enriched preparations, using a combination of enzymatic and mechanical disruption of the intestine epithelium, followed by an isopicnic centrifugation discarding most single cells. Confluent cell monolayers arising from plated organoids exhibited epithelium typical features, such as the pavement-like structure, the presence of apical microvilli and tight junctions. Accordingly, cells expressed several markers of enterocyte brush border (i.e. maltase, alkaline phosphatase and fatty acid binding protein as well as an epithelial cytoskeleton component (cytokeratin 18. However, enterocyte primocultures were also positive for the vimentin immunostaining (mesenchyme marker. Vimentin expression studies showed that this gene is constitutively expressed in bovine enterocytes. Comparison of the vimentin expression profile with the pattern of brush border enzymes activities, suggested that the decrease of cell differentiation level observed during the enterocyte isolation procedure and early passages of the primoculture could result from a post-transcriptional de-repression of vimentin synthesis. The low differentiation level of bovine enterocytes in vitro could partly be counteracted adding butyrate (1–2 mM or using a glucose-deprived culture medium. Conclusion The present study describes several complementary approaches to characterize bovine primary cultures of intestinal cells. Cultured cells kept their morphologic and functional characteristics during several generations.

  7. Bovine lactoferrin regulates cell survival, apoptosis and inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells and preterm pig intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Stensballe, Allan; Bendixen, Emøke; Sangild, Per T.; Chatterton, Dereck E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLF) may modulate neonatal intestinal inflammation. Previous studies in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) indicated that moderate bLF doses enhance proliferation whereas high doses trigger inflammation. To further elucidate cellular mechanisms, we profiled the porcine IEC...... proteome after stimulation with bLF at 0, 0.1, 1 and 10g/L by LC-MS-based proteomics. Key pathways were analyzed in the intestine of formula-fed preterm pigs with and without supplementation of 10g/L bLF. Levels of 123 IEC proteins were altered by bLF. Low bLF doses (0.1-1g/L) up-regulated 11 proteins...... acid metabolism, and altered three proteins enhancing the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway. In the preterm pig intestine, bLF at 10g/L decreased villus height/crypt depth ratio and up-regulated the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and HIF-1α, indicating elevated intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. In...

  8. Critical Roles of Intestinal Epithelial Vitamin D Receptor Signaling in Controlling Gut Mucosal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yan Chun; Chen, Yunzi; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Although vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in the intestine, the role of VDR signaling in the gut is not fully understood. Our recent studies unveil a regulatory circuit that centers gut epithelial VDR as a key molecule in the control of mucosal inflammation and colitis development. On the one hand, intestinal epithelial VDR signaling protects the integrity of the mucosal barrier by inhibiting inflammation-induced epithelial cell apoptosis. This barrier-protecting, anti-colitic act...

  9. The role of intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of NEC

    OpenAIRE

    Halpern, Melissa D.; Patricia W Denning

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays an important role in maintaining host health. Breakdown of intestinal barrier function is known to play a role in many diseases such as infectious enteritis, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases. Recently, increasing research has demonstrated the importance of understanding how intestinal epithelial barrier function develops in the premature neonate in order to develop strategies to promote its maturation. Opti...

  10. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

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    Nadine Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  11. Effect of Dachengqi Tang (大承气汤) Granule on Proliferation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Rats with Experimental Intestinal Obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康毅; 林秀珍

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of Dachengqi Tang (DCQT) granule on the proliferation of the intestinal epithelial cells in rats with experimental intestinal obstruction. Methods: Experimental intestinal obstruction models were established in rats and autoradiography with 3H-TdR was used to determine 3H-TdR labeling counts of intestinal epithelial cells in rats. Results: DCQT granule had no effects on 3H-TdR labeling counts of intestinal epithelial cells in normal rats. DCQT granule obviously increases the rate of renovation in intestinal epithelial cells of the intestinal obstruction rats. Conclusion: DCQT granule could reinforce the intestinal mucosa's defensive function by means of increasing the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

  12. Toxicity of food-relevant nanoparticles in intestinal epithelial models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Christie

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being incorporated into common consumer products, including in foods and food packaging, for their unique properties at the nanoscale. Food-grade silica and titania are used as anti-caking and whitening agents, respectively, and these particle size distributions are composed of approximately one-third nanoparticles. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles can be used for their antimicrobial properties. However, little is known about the interactions of nanoparticles in the body upon ingestion. This study was performed to investigate the role of nanoparticle characteristics including surface chemistry, dissolution, and material type on toxicity to the intestinal epithelium. Only mild acute toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was observed after 24-hour treatment of intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells based on the results of toxicity assays measuring necrosis, apoptosis, membrane damage, and mitochondrial activity. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were not observed to be toxic although all nanoparticles were internalized by cells. In vitro digestion of nanoparticles in solutions representing the stomach and intestines prior to treatment of cells did not alter nanoparticle toxicity. Long-term repeated treatment of cells weekly for 24 hours with nanoparticles did not change nanoparticle cytotoxicity or the growth rate of the treated cell populations. Thus, silica, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to induce little toxicity in intestinal epithelial cells. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a model for silica used in foods that could be tracked in vitro and in vivo. To maintain an exterior of pure silica, a silica shell was hydrolyzed around a core particle of quantum dots or a fluorescent dye electrostatically associated with a commercial silica particle. The quantum dots used were optimized from a previously reported microwave quantum dot synthesis to a quantum yield of 40%. Characterization

  13. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  14. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with a large number of high affinity binding sites in the cell membrane. Binding of 125I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) is linear with time for 40 to 50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels (10 to 15 picomole cAMP/mg cellular protein) at steady state. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl--independent Na+ influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorpromazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na+ entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na+ influx provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na+ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na+ during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na+ but not Cl- influx preparations can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na+/H+ neutral exchange system. Data on the coupling relationship between Na+ transport and the intra- and extracellular pH in the enterocytes show that an amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na+/H+ exchange process occurs. This coupling between Na+ and H+ is partially inhibited by CT and dbcAMP, suggesting that the Na+/H+ exchange may be a cAMP-regulated process. 31 references, 32 figures, 5 tables

  15. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with the cell membrane. This involves a large number (17 million per cell) of high affinity binding sites which belong to a single class. Binding of biologically active 125I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected in the isolated cells. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) of the enterocytes to cholera toxin is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels at steady stae. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl--independent Na+ influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorporomazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na+ entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na+ influx into the enterocytes provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na+ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT and Na+ during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na+ but no Cl- influx in our villus cell preparation can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na+/H+ neutral exchange system

  16. Mechanism of Interferon-γ–Induced Increase in T84 Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Boivin, Michel A.; Roy, Praveen K.; Bradley, Angela; Kennedy, John C.; Rihani, Tuhama; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the intestinal inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. IFN-γ induced disturbance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated to be an important mechanism contributing to intestinal inflammation. The intracellular mechanisms that mediate the IFN-γ induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the role of th...

  17. Kruppel-like factor 4 regulates intestinal epithelial cell morphology and polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxin Yu

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in regulating cell lineage differentiation during development and maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the intestine. In normal intestine, KLF4 is predominantly expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells. It has been identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. KLF4 knockout mice demonstrated a decrease in number of goblet cells in the colon, and conditional ablation of KLF4 from the intestinal epithelium led to altered epithelial homeostasis. However, the role of KLF4 in differentiated intestinal cells and colon cancer cells, as well as the mechanism by which it regulates homeostasis and represses tumorigenesis in the intestine is not well understood. In our study, KLF4 was partially depleted in the differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. We found a significant increase in the number of goblet cells in the KLF4-deleted small intestine, suggesting that KLF4 is not only required for goblet cell differentiation, but also required for maintaining goblet cell numbers through its function in inhibiting cell proliferation. The number and position of Paneth cells also changed. This is consistent with the KLF4 knockout study using villin-Cre [1]. Through immunohistochemistry (IHC staining and statistical analysis, we found that a stem cell and/or tuft cell marker, DCAMKL1, and a proliferation marker, Ki67, are affected by KLF4 depletion, while an enteroendocrine cell marker, neurotensin (NT, was not affected. In addition, we found KLF4 depletion altered the morphology and polarity of the intestinal epithelial cells. Using a three-dimensional (3D intestinal epithelial cyst formation assay, we found that KLF4 is essential for cell polarity and crypt-cyst formation in human colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that, as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, KLF4 affects intestinal epithelial cell

  18. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating c...

  19. Interferon-γ regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through converging β-catenin signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Nava, Porfirio; Koch, Stefan; Laukoetter, Mike G.; Lee, Winston Y.; Kolegraff, Keli; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Beeman, Neal; Addis, Caroline; Gerner-Smidt, Kirsten; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Li, Linheng; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have been proposed to regulate epithelial homeostasis during intestinal inflammation. We report here that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulates the crucial homeostatic functions of cell proliferation and apoptosis through serine-threonine protein kinase AKT-β-catenin and Wingless-Int (Wnt)-β-catenin signaling pathways. Short-term exposure of intestinal epithelial cells to IFN-γ resulted in activation of β-catenin through AKT, followed by induction of the secreted Wnt inhibitor...

  20. Milk Modulates Campylobacter Invasion into Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwen, Rogier; van Neerven, R J Joost

    2015-09-01

    Raw milk is a recognized source of Campylobacter outbreaks, but pasteurization is an effective way to eliminate the causative agent of Campylobacteriosis. Whereas breastfeeding is protective against infectious diseases, consumption of formula milk is thought to be not. However, in relation to Campylobacter, such data is currently unavailable. Although both pasteurized and formula milk are pathogen free and prepared in a quality controlled manner, the effect they have on the virulence of Campylobacter species is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of cow, goat, horse, and formula milk on Campylobacter invasion into intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, a pathogenic feature of this bacterial species, using a gentamicin exclusion invasion assay. We found that all milk products modulated the invasion of Campylobacter species into the Caco-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Control experiments showed that the milks were not toxic for the Caco-2 cells and that the effect on invasion is caused by heat labile (e.g., milk proteins) or heat stable (e.g., sugar/lipids) components depending on the Campylobacter species studied. This in vitro study shows for the first time that pasteurized and formula milk affect the invasion of Campylobacter. We recommend a prospective study to examine whether pasteurized and formula milk affect Campylobacteriosis. PMID:26495128

  1. Peroxisomes in intestinal and gallbladder epithelial cells of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L. (Teleostei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A.J.H. de; Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of microbodies in the epithelial cells of the intestine and gallbladder of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L., is described. In the intestine the organelles are predominantly located in the apical and perinuclear zone of the cells and may contain small crystalline cores. In ga

  2. TNFalpha regulates sugar transporters in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2

    OpenAIRE

    Barrenetxe, J; Barber, A; Lostao, M P; Rodriguez-Yoldi, M.J. (M.J.); Gascon, S. (S.); Sanchez, O.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: During intestinal inflammation TNFα levels are increased and as a consequence malabsorption of nutrients may occur. We have previously demonstrated that TNFα inhibits galactose, fructose and leucine intestinal absorption in animal models. In continuation with our work, the purpose of the present study was to investigate in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2, the effect of TNFα on sugar transport and to identify the intracellular mechanisms involved. METHODS: ...

  3. Reciprocal regulation of the primary sodium absorptive pathways in rat intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Coon, Steven; Kekuda, Ramesh; Saha, Prosenjit; Sundaram, Uma

    2010-01-01

    Sodium absorption in the mammalian small intestine occurs predominantly by two primary pathways that include Na/H exchange (NHE3) and Na-glucose cotransport (SGLT1) on the brush border membrane (BBM) of villus cells. However, whether NHE3 and SGLT1 function together to regulate intestinal sodium absorption is unknown. Nontransformed small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) were transfected with either NHE3 or SGLT1 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and were grown in confluent monolayers on tr...

  4. Bacterial Wall Components such as Lipothecoid Acid, Peptidoglycan, Liposaccharide and Lipid A Stimulate Cell Proliferation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya, Jaime H.; Neopikhanov, Vadim; Söderman, Charlotte; Uribe, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicate that the microflora contains mitogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Our aim is to examine whether cell wall components of both Gram-negative and positive bacteria influence cell proliferation in small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. A human colonic epithelial cell line from adenocarcinoma (IEC-6) and a nontransformed small intestinal cell line from germ-free rats (LS-123) were incubated with (a) lipothecoid acid from Streptococcus faecalis at 1.56–50 ...

  5. Commensal Bacteria and Epithelial Cross Talk in the Developing Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Rautava, Samuli; Walker, W. Allan

    2007-01-01

    Indigenous intestinal microbes have co-evolved with the intestinal immune system to form a symbiotic ecosystem. In the postnatal period, intestinal microbes provide the developing gut with stimuli that are necessary for healthy maturation of the intestinal immune system. Cross talk between the host and commensal microbes is an essential component of gut homeostasis mechanisms also in later life. During recent years, innovative research has shed light on the molecular mechanisms of these inter...

  6. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  7. A Comparative Study on Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Resident Gut Bacteria (ii) Effect of Arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to use facultative gut bacteria as an alternate to animals for the initial gastrointestinal toxicity screening of heavy metals, a comparative study on rat intestinal epithelial cells and resident gut bacteria was undertaken.Methods in vitro growth rate of four gut bacteria, dehydrogenase (DHA) and esterase (EA) activity test, intestinal epithelial and bacterial cell membrane enzymes and in situ effect of arsenite were analysed. Results Growth profile of mixed resident population of gut bacteria and pure isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Staphylococcus sp.revealed an arsenite (2-20 ppm) concentration-dependent inhibition. The viability pattern of epithelial cells also showed similar changes. DHA and EA tests revealed significant inhibition (40%-72%) with arsenite exposure of 5 and 10 ppm in isolated gut bacteria and epithelial cells. Decrease in membrane alkaline phosphatase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities was in the range of 33%-55% in four bacteria at the arsenite exposure of 10 ppm, whereas it was 60%-65% in intestinal epithelial villus cells. in situ incubation of arsenite using intestinal loops also showed more or less similar changes in membrane enzymes of resident gut bacterial population and epithelial cells. Conclusion The results indicate that facultative gut bacteria can be used as suitable in vitro model for the preliminary screening of arsenical gastrointestinal cytotoxic effects.

  8. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6 was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  9. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  10. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  11. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  12. Circadian regulation of epithelial functions in the intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2013), s. 11-24. ISSN 1748-1708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0969; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian rhythms * intestine * colon * proliferation * digestion * intestinal transport Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.251, year: 2013

  13. Internalization-dependent recognition of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis by intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Basler, Tina; Duerr, Claudia U; Rohde, Manfred; Goethe, Ralph; Hornef, Mathias W

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, a highly prevalent chronic intestinal infection in domestic and wildlife ruminants. The microbial pathogenesis of MAP infection has attracted additional attention due to an association with the human enteric inflammatory Crohn's disease. MAP is acquired by the faecal-oral route prompting us to study the interaction with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. MAP was rapidly internalized and accumulated in a late endosomal compartment. In contrast to other opportunistic mycobacteria or M. bovis, MAP induced significant epithelial activation as indicated by a NF-kappaB-independent but Erk-dependent chemokine secretion. Surprisingly, MAP-induced chemokine production was completely internalization-dependent as inhibition of Rac-dependent bacterial uptake abolished epithelial activation. In accordance, innate immune recognition of MAP by differentiated intestinal epithelial cells occurred through the intracellularly localized pattern recognition receptors toll-like receptor 9 and NOD1 with signal transduction via the adaptor molecules MyD88 and RIP2. The internalization-dependent innate immune activation of intestinal epithelial cells is in contrast to the stimulation of professional phagocytes by extracellular bacterial constituents and might significantly contribute to the histopathological changes observed during enteric MAP infection. PMID:19681906

  14. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella Adhesion to Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schierack, P.; Kleta, S; Tedin, K.; Babila, J.T.; Oswald, S.; Oelschlaeger, T A; Hiemann, R.; Paetzold, S; Wieler, L H

    2011-01-01

    Background The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including in...

  15. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Enhances Heat Stress-Impaired Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guizhen Xiao; Liqun Tang; Fangfang Yuan; Wei Zhu; Shaoheng Zhang; Zhifeng Liu; Yan Geng; Xiaowen Qiu; Yali Zhang; Lei Su

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier is known to have an important etiologic role in the pathophysiology of heat stroke. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in maintaining and protecting the TJ structure and function. This study is aimed at investigating whether n-3 PUFAs could alleviate heat stress-induced dysfunction of intestinal tight junction. METHODS: Human i...

  16. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 coordinates multiple processes in a model of intestinal epithelial cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 transcription factors (HNF1α/β) are associated with diabetes. These factors are well studied in the liver, pancreas and kidney, where they direct tissue-specific gene regulation. However, they also have an important role in the biology of many other tissues, including the intestine. We investigated the transcriptional network governed by HNF1 in an intestinal epithelial cell line (Caco2). We used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by direct sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify HNF1 binding sites genome-wide. Direct targets of HNF1 were validated using conventional ChIP assays and confirmed by siRNA-mediated depletion of HNF1, followed by RT-qPCR. Gene ontology process enrichment analysis of the HNF1 targets identified multiple processes with a role in intestinal epithelial cell function, including properties of the cell membrane, cellular response to hormones, and regulation of biosynthetic processes. Approximately 50% of HNF1 binding sites were also occupied by other members of the intestinal transcriptional network, including hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A), caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), and forkhead box A2 (FOXA2). Depletion of HNF1 in Caco2 cells increases FOXA2 abundance and decreases levels of CDX2, illustrating the coordinated activities of the network. These data suggest that HNF1 plays an important role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell function, both directly and through interactions with other intestinal transcription factors. PMID:26855178

  17. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  18. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per Torp; Li, Yanqi;

    2016-01-01

    bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source of...

  19. Molecular properties of adult mouse gastric and intestinal epithelial progenitors in their niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannakis, Marios; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Mills, Jason C;

    2006-01-01

    We have sequenced 36,641 expressed sequence tags from laser capture microdissected adult mouse gastric and small intestinal epithelial progenitors, obtaining 4031 and 3324 unique transcripts, respectively. Using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, each data set was compared with cDNA libraries from intact ...

  20. Permeability and modulation of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duizer, E.

    1999-01-01

    The bioavailability of all ingested compounds is to a great extend determined by the ability of these compounds to pass the intestinal epithelium. A high bioavailability is guaranteed for most nutrients and electrolytes since they are actively absorbed by the epithelium. The same epithelium, however

  1. Epithelial structure and function in the hen lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, G.; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sigvatur S.;

    2006-01-01

    and the proportion of 'mitrochondrial-rich' (MR) cells. The latter may be the sites of proton secretion in the lower intestine. A cAMP-activated chloride secretion pathway is also present in both colon and coprodeum, and may be mediated by a CFTR-like Cl- channel. There are still a number of...

  2. Mechanism of Interferon-γ–Induced Increase in T84 Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Michel A.; Roy, Praveen K.; Bradley, Angela; Kennedy, John C.; Rihani, Tuhama

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the intestinal inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. IFN-γ induced disturbance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated to be an important mechanism contributing to intestinal inflammation. The intracellular mechanisms that mediate the IFN-γ induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathway in the regulation of the IFN-γ induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability using the T84 intestinal epithelial cell line. IFN-γ caused an increase in T84 intestinal epithelial TJ permeability and depletion of TJ protein, occludin. The IFN-γ induced increase in TJ permeability and alteration in occludin protein was associated with rapid activation of PI3-K; and inhibition of PI3-K activation prevented the IFN-γ induced effects. IFN-γ also caused a delayed but more prolonged activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB); inhibition of NF-κB also prevented the increase in T84 TJ permeability and alteration in occludin expression. The IFN-γ induced activation of NF-κB was mediated by a cross-talk with PI3-K pathway. In conclusion, the IFN-γ induced increase in T84 TJ permeability and alteration in occludin protein expression were mediated by the PI3-K pathway. These results show for the first time that the IFN-γ modulation of TJ protein and TJ barrier function is regulated by a cross-talk between PI3-K and NF-κB pathways. PMID:19128033

  3. Mechanism of interferon-gamma-induced increase in T84 intestinal epithelial tight junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Michel A; Roy, Praveen K; Bradley, Angela; Kennedy, John C; Rihani, Tuhama; Ma, Thomas Y

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the intestinal inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. IFN-gamma induced disturbance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated to be an important mechanism contributing to intestinal inflammation. The intracellular mechanisms that mediate the IFN-gamma induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathway in the regulation of the IFN-gamma induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability using the T84 intestinal epithelial cell line. IFN-gamma caused an increase in T84 intestinal epithelial TJ permeability and depletion of TJ protein, occludin. The IFN-gamma induced increase in TJ permeability and alteration in occludin protein was associated with rapid activation of PI3-K; and inhibition of PI3-K activation prevented the IFN-gamma induced effects. IFN-gamma also caused a delayed but more prolonged activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB); inhibition of NF-kappaB also prevented the increase in T84 TJ permeability and alteration in occludin expression. The IFN-gamma induced activation of NF-kappaB was mediated by a cross-talk with PI3-K pathway. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma induced increase in T84 TJ permeability and alteration in occludin protein expression were mediated by the PI3-K pathway. These results show for the first time that the IFN-gamma modulation of TJ protein and TJ barrier function is regulated by a cross-talk between PI3-K and NF-kappaB pathways. PMID:19128033

  4. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus

  5. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Nobukatsu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro, E-mail: kii.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Hayashi, Ryohei [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima University (Japan); Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  6. Ussing Chamber Technique to Measure Intestinal Epithelial Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; MacGregor, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are polarized and have tight junctions that contribute to barrier function. Assessment of barrier function typically involves measurement of electrophysiological parameters or movement of nonionic particles across an epithelium. Here, we describe measurement of transepithelial electrical conductance or resistance, determination of dilution potential, and assessment of flux of nonionic particles such as dextran or mannitol, with particular emphasis on Ussing chamber techniques. PMID:27246022

  7. Interferon-γ suppresses intestinal epithelial aquaporin-1 expression via Janus kinase and STAT3 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Dicay

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with dysregulated electrolyte and water transport and resultant diarrhea. Aquaporins are transmembrane proteins that function as water channels in intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated the effect of the inflammatory cytokine, interferon-γ, which is a major player in inflammatory bowel diseases, on aquaporin-1 expression in a mouse colonic epithelial cell line, CMT93. CMT93 monolayers were exposed to 10 ng/mL interferon-γ and aquaporin-1 mRNA and protein expressions were measured by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. In other experiments, CMT93 cells were pretreated with inhibitors or were transfected with siRNA to block the effects of Janus kinases, STATs 1 and 3, or interferon regulatory factor 2, prior to treatment with interferon-γ. Interferon-γ decreased aquaporin-1 expression in mouse intestinal epithelial cells in a manner that did not depend on the classical STAT1/JAK2/IRF-1 pathway, but rather, on an alternate Janus kinase (likely JAK1 as well as on STAT3. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-γ may contribute to diarrhea associated with intestinal inflammation in part through regulation of the epithelial aquaporin-1 water channel via a non-classical JAK/STAT receptor signalling pathway.

  8. Interferon-γ regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through converging β-catenin signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Porfirio; Koch, Stefan; Laukoetter, Mike G; Lee, Winston Y; Kolegraff, Keli; Capaldo, Christopher T; Beeman, Neal; Addis, Caroline; Gerner-Smidt, Kirsten; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Li, Linheng; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Inflammatory cytokines have been proposed to regulate epithelial homeostasis during intestinal inflammation. We report here that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulates the crucial homeostatic functions of cell proliferation and apoptosis through serine-threonine protein kinase AKT-β-catenin and Wingless-Int (Wnt)-β-catenin signaling pathways. Short-term exposure of intestinal epithelial cells to IFN-γ resulted in activation of β-catenin through AKT, followed by induction of the secreted Wnt inhibitor Dkk1. Consequently, we observed an increase in Dkk1-mediated apoptosis upon extended IFN-γ treatment, and reduced proliferation through depletion of the Wnt co-receptor LRP6. These effects were enhanced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α, suggesting synergism between the two cytokines. Consistent with these results, colitis in vivo was associated with decreased β-catenin-T-cell factor (TCF) signaling, loss of plasma membrane-associated LRP6, and reduced epithelial cell proliferation. Proliferation was partially restored in IFN-γ - deficient mice. Thus, we propose that IFN-γ regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis by sequential regulation of converging β-catenin signaling pathways. PMID:20303298

  9. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  10. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  11. Release of metabolic enzymes by Giardia in response to interaction with intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringqvist, Emma; Palm, J E Daniel; Skarin, Hanna; Hehl, Adrian B; Weiland, Malin; Davids, Barbara J; Reiner, David S; Griffiths, William J; Eckmann, Lars; Gillin, Frances D; Svärd, Staffan G

    2008-06-01

    Giardia lamblia, an important cause of diarrheal disease, resides in the small intestinal lumen in close apposition to epithelial cells. Since the disease mechanisms underlying giardiasis are poorly understood, elucidating the specific interactions of the parasite with the host epithelium is likely to provide clues to understanding the pathogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that contact of Giardia lamblia with intestinal epithelial cells might lead to release of specific proteins. Using established co-culture models, intestinal ligated loops and a proteomics approach, we identified three G. lamblia proteins (arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase and enolase), previously recognized as immunodominant antigens during acute giardiasis. Release was stimulated by cell-cell interactions, since only small amounts of arginine deiminase and enolase were detected in the medium after culturing of G. lamblia alone. The secreted G. lamblia proteins were localized to the cytoplasm and the inside of the plasma membrane of trophozoites. Furthermore, in vitro studies with recombinant arginine deiminase showed that the secreted Giardia proteins can disable host innate immune factors such as nitric oxide production. These results indicate that contact of Giardia with epithelial cells triggers metabolic enzyme release, which might facilitate effective colonization of the human small intestine. PMID:18359106

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid enhances heat stress-impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function in Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guizhen Xiao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ barrier is known to have an important etiologic role in the pathophysiology of heat stroke. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, play a role in maintaining and protecting the TJ structure and function. This study is aimed at investigating whether n-3 PUFAs could alleviate heat stress-induced dysfunction of intestinal tight junction. METHODS: Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were pre-incubated with EPA, DHA or arachidonic acid (AA and then exposed to heat stress. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP permeability were measured to analyze barrier integrity. Levels of TJ proteins, including occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-2, were analyzed by Western blot and localized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Messenger RNA levels were determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. TJ morphology was observed by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: EPA effectively attenuated the decrease in TEER and impairment of intestinal permeability in HRP flux induced by heat exposure. EPA significantly elevated the expression of occludin and ZO-1, while DHA was less effective and AA was not at all effective. The distortion and redistribution of TJ proteins, and disruption of morphology were also effectively prevented by pretreatment with EPA. CONCLUSION: This study indicates for the first time that EPA is more potent than DHA in protecting against heat-induced permeability dysfunction and epithelial barrier damage of tight junction.

  13. Permeability and modulation of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Duizer, E.

    1999-01-01

    The bioavailability of all ingested compounds is to a great extend determined by the ability of these compounds to pass the intestinal epithelium. A high bioavailability is guaranteed for most nutrients and electrolytes since they are actively absorbed by the epithelium. The same epithelium, however, renders the entrance of non-nutrient (potentially harmful) hydrophilic (macro-) molecules, viruses and bacteria into the systemic circulation very low by presenting an almost impermeable barrier ...

  14. Expansion of intestinal epithelial stem cells during murine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Dehmer

    Full Text Available Murine small intestinal crypt development is initiated during the first postnatal week. Soon after formation, overall increases in the number of crypts occurs through a bifurcating process called crypt fission, which is believed to be driven by developmental increases in the number of intestinal stem cells (ISCs. Recent evidence suggests that a heterogeneous population of ISCs exists within the adult intestine. Actively cycling ISCs are labeled by Lgr5, Ascl2 and Olfm4; whereas slowly cycling or quiescent ISC are marked by Bmi1 and mTert. The goal of this study was to correlate the expression of these markers with indirect measures of ISC expansion during development, including quantification of crypt fission and side population (SP sorting. Significant changes were observed in the percent of crypt fission and SP cells consistent with ISC expansion between postnatal day 14 and 21. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for the various ISC marker mRNAs demonstrated divergent patterns of expression. mTert surged earliest, during the first week of life as crypts are initially being formed, whereas Lgr5 and Bmi1 peaked on day 14. Olfm4 and Ascl2 had variable expression patterns. To assess the number and location of Lgr5-expressing cells during this period, histologic sections from intestines of Lgr5-EGFP mice were subjected to quantitative analysis. There was attenuated Lgr5-EGFP expression at birth and through the first week of life. Once crypts were formed, the overall number and percent of Lgr5-EGFP positive cells per crypt remain stable throughout development and into adulthood. These data were supported by Lgr5 in situ hybridization in wild-type mice. We conclude that heterogeneous populations of ISCs are expanding as measured by SP sorting and mRNA expression at distinct developmental time points.

  15. A novel anti-inflammatory role of GPR120 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Priyamvada, Shubha; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Alrefai, Waddah A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Borthakur, Alip

    2016-04-01

    GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor-4) is a G protein-coupled receptor for medium- and long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, including ω-3 fatty acids. Recent studies have shown GPR120 to play cardinal roles in metabolic disorders via modulation of gut hormone secretion and insulin sensitivity and to exert anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages and adipose tissues. However, information on anti-inflammatory role of GPR120 at the level of intestinal epithelium is very limited. Current studies demonstrated differential levels of GPR120 mRNA and protein along the length of the human, mouse, and rat intestine and delineated distinct anti-inflammatory responses following GPR120 activation in model human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, but not in model mouse intestinal epithelial endocrine cell line STC-1. In Caco-2 cells, GPR120 was internalized, bound to β-arrestin-2, and attenuated NF-κB activation in response to 30-min exposure to the agonists GW9508, TUG-891, or docosahexaenoic acid. These effects were abrogated in response to small interfering RNA silencing of β-arrestin-2. Treatment of STC-1 cells with these agonists did not induce receptor internalization and had no effects on NF-κB activation, although treatment with the agonists GW9508 or TUG-891 for 6 h augmented the synthesis and secretion of the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 in this cell line. Our studies for the first time demonstrated a GPR120-mediated novel anti-inflammatory pathway in specific intestinal epithelial cell types that could be of therapeutic relevance to intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26791484

  16. Bifidobacterium lactis 420 and fish oil enhance intestinal epithelial integrity in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkala, Kati; Laitinen, Kirsi; Röytiö, Henna

    2016-03-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a predisposing factor for low-grade inflammation-associated conditions, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Dietary components may influence intestinal barrier integrity. We hypothesized that the dietary supplements Bifidobacterium lactis 420, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil have beneficial impacts on intestinal barrier integrity. In addition, we hypothesized that the coadministration of these components results in synergistic benefits to the integrity of the intestinal barrier. To study this, we investigated the impact of cell-free culture supernatant from dietary supplements B lactis 420 and L rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil, separately and in combination, on intestinal permeability in a CaCo-2 cell model. Administered separately, both B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil significantly increased the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier, as determined by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), whereas L rhamnosus did not. The TEER increase with B lactis 420 was dose dependent. Interestingly, a combination of B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil negated the increase in TEER of the single components. mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, was not altered, but the mRNA expression of myosin light chain kinase increased after fish oil treatment. To conclude, single dietary components, namely, B lactis 420 and fish oil, induced beneficial effects on intestinal barrier integrity in vitro, whereas a combination of 2 beneficial test compounds resulted in a null effect. PMID:26923511

  17. Lineage-specific expression of bestrophin-2 and bestrophin-4 in human intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Go; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Murano, Tatsuro;

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate the absorption and secretion of anions, such as HCO3(-) or Cl(-). Bestrophin genes represent a newly identified group of calcium-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs). Studies have suggested that, among the four human bestrophin-family genes, bestrophin-2...... (BEST2) and bestrophin-4 (BEST4) might be expressed within the intestinal tissue. Consistently, a study showed that BEST2 is expressed by human colonic goblet cells. However, their precise expression pattern along the gastrointestinal tract, or the lineage specificity of the cells expressing these genes...

  18. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. PMID:26174178

  19. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); D.J. van Nispen; S. Ferdinandusse; M. Jorritsma; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were loca

  20. Aggregation Substance Increases Adherence and Internalization, but Not Translocation, of Enterococcus faecalis through Different Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Sartingen, S.; Rozdzinski, E; Muscholl-Silberhorn, A.; Marre, R

    2000-01-01

    The aggregation substance of Enterococcus faecalis increased bacterial adherence to and internalization by epithelial cells originating from the colon and duodenum but not by cells derived from the ileum. However, enterococcal translocation through monolayers of intestinal epithelium was not observed.

  1. KLF4 regulation in intestinal epithelial cell maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) transcription factor suppresses tumorigenesis in gastrointestinal epithelium. Thus, its expression is decreased in gastric and colon cancers. Moreover, KLF4 regulates both differentiation and growth that is likely fundamental to its tumor suppressor activity. We dissected the expression of Klf4 in the normal mouse intestinal epithelium along the crypt-villus and cephalo-caudal axes. Klf4 reached its highest level in differentiated cells of the villus, with levels in the duodenum > jejunum > ileum, in inverse relation to the representation of goblet cells in these regions, the lineage previously linked to KLF4. In parallel, in vitro studies using HT29cl.16E and Caco2 colon cancer cell lines clarified that KLF4 increased coincident with differentiation along both the goblet and absorptive cell lineages, respectively, and that KLF4 levels also increased during differentiation induced by the short chain fatty acid butyrate, independently of cell fate. Moreover, we determined that lower levels of KLF4 expression in the proliferative compartment of the intestinal epithelium are regulated by the transcription factors TCF4 and SOX9, an effector and a target, respectively, of β-catenin/Tcf signaling, and independently of CDX2. Thus, reduced levels of KLF4 tumor suppressor activity in colon tumors may be driven by elevated β-catenin/Tcf signaling

  2. Evaluation of preparation methods for MS-based analysis of intestinal epithelial cell proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    The gut epithelium formed between an organism and the environment plays an essential role in host–microbe interactions, yet remains one of the least characterized mammalian tissues. Especially the membrane proteins, which are critical to bacterial adhesion, are understudied, because these proteins...... are low in abundance, and large amounts of sample is needed for their preparation and for undertaking MS-based analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate three different methods for isolation and preparation of pig intestinal epithelial cells for MS-based analysis of the proteome. Samples were...... of ease and speed of sample preparation, as well as protein recovery. In comparison, more gentle methods where intestinal epithelial cells are harvested by shaking are more time consuming, result in lower protein yield, and are prone to increased technical variation due to multiple steps involved....

  3. Enteric glia cells attenuate cytomix-induced intestinal epithelial barrier breakdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A Cheadle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier failure may lead to systemic inflammation and distant organ injury in patients following severe injury. Enteric glia cells (EGCs have been shown to play an important role in maintaining gut barrier integrity through secretion of S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO. We have recently shown than Vagal Nerve Stimulation (VNS increases EGC activation, which was associated with improved gut barrier integrity. Thus, we sought to further study the mechanism by which EGCs prevent intestinal barrier breakdown utilizing an in vitro model. We postulated that EGCs, through the secretion of GSNO, would improve intestinal barrier function through improved expression and localization of intestinal tight junction proteins. METHODS: Epithelial cells were co-cultured with EGCs or incubated with GSNO and exposed to Cytomix (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL-1β for 24 hours. Barrier function was assessed by permeability to 4kDa FITC-Dextran. Changes in tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and phospho-MLC (P-MLC were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot. KEY RESULTS: Co-culture of Cytomix-stimulated epithelial monolayers with EGCs prevented increases in permeability and improved expression and localization of occludin, ZO-1, and P-MLC. Further, treatment of epithelial monolayers with GSNO also prevented Cytomix-induced increases in permeability and exhibited a similar improvement in expression and localization of occludin, ZO-1, and P-MLC. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: The addition of EGCs, or their secreted mediator GSNO, prevents epithelial barrier failure after injury and improved expression of tight junction proteins. Thus, therapies that increase EGC activation, such as VNS, may be a novel strategy to limit barrier failure in patients following severe injury.

  4. Epithelial apoptosis in mechanistically distinct methods of injury in the murine small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, D.; Robertson, C M; Stromberg, P.E.; J. R. Martin; Dunne, W. M.; Houchen, C.W.; Barrett, T A; Ayala, A; Perl, M.; Buchman, T G; Coopersmith, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Gut epithelial apoptosis is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple diseases. This study characterized intestinal apoptosis in three mechanistically distinct injuries with different kinetics of cell death. FVB/N mice were subjected to gamma radiation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia or injection of monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody and sacrificed 4, 12, or 24 hours post-injury (n=10/time point). Apoptosis was quantified in the jejunum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), active caspase-3, terminal...

  5. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  6. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  7. ERK5 signalling rescues intestinal epithelial turnover and tumour cell proliferation upon ERK1/2 abrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Petrus R.; Taniguchi, Koji; Harris, Alexandra R.; Bertin, Samuel; Takahashi, Naoki; Duong, Jen; Campos, Alejandro D.; Powis, Garth; Corr, Maripat; Karin, Michael; Raz, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    The ERK1/2 MAPK signalling module integrates extracellular cues that induce proliferation and differentiation of epithelial lineages, and is an established oncogenic driver, particularly in the intestine. However, the interrelation of the ERK1/2 module relative to other signalling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells and colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear. Here we show that loss of Erk1/2 in intestinal epithelial cells results in defects in nutrient absorption, epithelial cell migration and secretory cell differentiation. However, intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is not impeded, implying compensatory mechanisms. Genetic deletion of Erk1/2 or pharmacological targeting of MEK1/2 results in supraphysiological activity of the ERK5 pathway. Furthermore, targeting both pathways causes a more effective suppression of cell proliferation in murine intestinal organoids and human CRC lines. These results suggest that ERK5 provides a common bypass route in intestinal epithelial cells, which rescues cell proliferation upon abrogation of ERK1/2 signalling, with therapeutic implications in CRC. PMID:27187615

  8. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating cells, which coincided with a displacement of the polarity protein Par6 from the leading edge. Consequently, the relocation of the microtubule organizing center and the Golgi apparatus in the direction of migration was significantly and persistently inhibited in the presence of Dkk-1. Small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of Dkk-1 confirmed that extracellular exposure to Dkk-1 was required for this effect. Together, these data demonstrate a novel role of Dkk-1 in the regulation of directional polarization of migrating intestinal epithelial cells, which contributes to the effect of Dkk-1 on wound closure in vivo. PMID:19776352

  9. Food contaminant zearalenone and its metabolites affect cytokine synthesis and intestinal epithelial integrity of porcine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Daniela E; Motiu, Monica; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the first barrier against food contaminants. Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic mycotoxin that was identified as a common contaminant of cereal grains and food and feedstuffs. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro effects of ZEN and some of its metabolites (α-ZOL, β-ZOL) in concentrations of 10-100 µM on a swine epithelial cell line: Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). We demonstrated that both ZEN metabolites were more toxic for IPEC cells as resulted from the XTT test, while for doses lower than 10 µM, only β-ZOL showed a more pronounced cytotoxicity versus epithelial cells as resulted from neutral red assay. ZEN has no effect on TER values, while α-ZOL significantly decreased the TER values, starting with day 4 of treatment. β-ZOL had a dual effect, firstly it induced a significant increase of TER, and then, starting on day 6, it induced a dramatic decrease of TER values as compared with on day 0. Concerning the cytokine synthesis, our results showed that ZEN has a tendency to increase the synthesis of IL-8 and IL-10. By contrast, α- and β-ZOL decreased the expression of both IL-8 and IL-10, in a dose dependent manner. In conclusion, our results showed that ZEN and its metabolites differently affected porcine intestinal cell viability, transepithelial resistance and cytokine synthesis with important implication for gut health. PMID:26035492

  10. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

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    Dismuke Adria D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  11. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

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    Kohn Aimee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  12. Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by the crosstalk between epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Monica; Chieppa, Marcello; Salucci, Valentina; Avogadri, Francesca; Sonzogni, Angelica; Sampietro, Gianluca M; Nespoli, Angelo; Viale, Giuseppe; Allavena, Paola; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    The control of damaging inflammation by the mucosal immune system in response to commensal and harmful ingested bacteria is unknown. Here we show epithelial cells conditioned mucosal dendritic cells through the constitutive release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and other mediators, resulting in the induction of 'noninflammatory' dendritic cells. Epithelial cell-conditioned dendritic cells released interleukins 10 and 6 but not interleukin 12, and they promoted the polarization of T cells toward a 'classical' noninflammatory T helper type 2 response, even after exposure to a T helper type 1-inducing pathogen. This control of immune responses seemed to be lost in patients with Crohn disease. Thus, the intimate interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells may help to maintain gut immune homeostasis. PMID:15821737

  13. Intestinal epithelial function and villus surface area in rats with bile fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously found reduced absorption of vitamin B-12 in rats with choledochocolic fistulae. To investigate whether the reduction is caused by epithelial dysfunction or mucosal hypoplasia, choledocholic fistulae were made in 11 rats, whereas 10 rats were sham-operated. The epithelial function was evaluated 9 days later by measuring the uptake of 57CoB 1 2 and glucose in perfused intestinal segments, and by determining the activities of 11 mucosal enzymes. Hypoplasia was investigated by performing morphometric measurements of the villus surface area and by measuring the weight, protein, and DNA in mucosal scrapings. The results suggest that choledochocolic fistulae in rats do not impair epithelial function or cause mucosal hypoplasia. The urinary excretion of indican was increased in the fistula-operated rats, but further studies are needed to establish the significance of this observation

  14. Heme in intestinal epithelial cell turnover, differentiation,detoxification, inflammation, carcinogenesis, absorption and motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip S Oates; Adrian R West

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a simple epithelium that undergoes constant renewal involving cell division,differentiation and cell death. In addition, the epithelial lining separates the hostile processes of digestion and absorption that occur in the intestinal lumen from the aseptic environment of the internal milieu by defensive mechanisms that protect the epithelium from being breached. Central to these defensive processes is the synthesis of heme and its catabolism by heme oxygenase (HO). Dietary heme is also an important source of iron for the body which is taken up intact by the enterocyte.This review describes the recent literature on the diverse properties of heme/HO in the intestine tract.The roles of heme/HO in the regulation of the cell cycle/apoptosis, detoxification of xenobiotics, oxidative stress,inflammation, development of colon cancer, hemeiron absorption and intestinal motility are specifically examined.

  15. Cell dedifferentiation and epithelial to mesenchymal transitions during intestinal regeneration in H. glaberrima

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    Rivera-Cruz Angélica

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining the type and source of cells involved in regenerative processes has been one of the most important goals of researchers in the field of regeneration biology. We have previously used several cellular markers to characterize the cells involved in the regeneration of the intestine in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima. Results We have now obtained a monoclonal antibody that labels the mesothelium; the outer layer of the gut wall composed of peritoneocytes and myocytes. Using this antibody we studied the role of this tissue layer in the early stages of intestinal regeneration. We have now shown that the mesothelial cells of the mesentery, specifically the muscle component, undergo dedifferentiation from very early on in the regeneration process. Cell proliferation, on the other hand, increases much later, and mainly takes place in the mesothelium or coelomic epithelium of the regenerating intestinal rudiment. Moreover, we have found that the formation of the intestinal rudiment involves a novel regenerative mechanism where epithelial cells ingress into the connective tissue and acquire mesenchymal phenotypes. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that the dedifferentiating mesothelium provides the initial source of cells for the formation of the intestinal rudiment. At later stages, cell proliferation supplies additional cells necessary for the increase in size of the regenerate. Our data also shows that the mechanism of epithelial to mesenchymal transition provides many of the connective tissue cells found in the regenerating intestine. These results present some new and important information as to the cellular basis of organ regeneration and in particular to the process of regeneration of visceral organs.

  16. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  17. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  18. Functional expression of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nagahiro; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Nakamata, Junichi; Doi, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2010-05-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are exposed to external environment, microbial and viral products, and serve as essential barriers to antigens. Recent studies have shown that IECs express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and respond to microbial components. The antimicrobial and antiviral barriers consist of many molecules including TLRs. To investigate the further component of this barrier in intestine, we examined the expression of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). PKR is a player in the cellular antiviral response and phosphorylates alpha-subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF-2alpha) to block protein synthesis and induces apoptosis. In this study, we showed that the expression of PKR was restricted to the cytoplasm of absorptive epithelial cells in the intestine of adult rat. We also demonstrated that PKR was expressed in the cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). The level of PKR protein expression and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) increased in the cultured IEC-6 cells in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of PKR by the 2-aminopurine treatment decreased ALP activity in the IEC-6 cells. Treatment of IEC-6 cells with synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of hydrocortisone also provoked suppression of PKR expression and ALP activity. This modulation might be mediated by signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 (STAT-1) protein. We concluded that PKR is expressed in IECs as potent barriers to antigens and is a possible modulator of the differentiation of rat IECs. PMID:20213745

  19. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [3H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [3H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-κB, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  20. Histological alterations of intestinal villi and epithelial cells after feeding dietary sugar cane extract in piglets

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    Toshikazu Kawai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of sugar cane extract (SCE on the piglet intestinal histology were observed. Twelve castrated male piglets weaned at the age of 26 days were allotted to three groups fed diets containing 0, 0.05 or 0.10% SCE. At the end of feeding experiment, each intestinal segment was taken for light or scanning electron microscopy. Feed intake, body weight gain and feed efficiency did not show a difference among groups. Most of the values for villus height, villus area, cell area and cell mitosis numbers were not different among groups, except for that the villus area of the 0.10% SCE group and the cell area of both SCE groups increased significantly at the jejunum compared to the control (P<0.05. For cell mitosis numbers, the 0.10% SCE group was higher than the 0.05% SCE group at the jejunum. Compared with the majority of flat cells of each intestinal segment in the control, the SCE groups had protuberated cells. In the 0.05% SCE group, deeper cells at the sites of recently exfoliated cells in the duodenum, cell clusters aggregated by protuberated cells in the jejunum and much more protuberant cells in the ileum were observed. These histological intestinal alterations suggest that SCE could raise the functions of intestinal villi and epithelial cells, especially at the 0.05%.

  1. Promotion of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Turnover by Commensal Bacteria: Role of Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

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    Jung-Ha Park

    Full Text Available The life span of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs is short (3-5 days, and its regulation is thought to be important for homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium. We have now investigated the role of commensal bacteria in regulation of IEC turnover in the small intestine. The proliferative activity of IECs in intestinal crypts as well as the migration of these cells along the crypt-villus axis were markedly attenuated both in germ-free mice and in specific pathogen-free (SPF mice treated with a mixture of antibiotics, with antibiotics selective for Gram-positive bacteria being most effective in this regard. Oral administration of chloroform-treated feces of SPF mice to germ-free mice resulted in a marked increase in IEC turnover, suggesting that spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria contribute to this effect. Oral administration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs as bacterial fermentation products also restored the turnover of IECs in antibiotic-treated SPF mice as well as promoted the development of intestinal organoids in vitro. Antibiotic treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK, ribosomal protein S6, and STAT3 in IECs of SPF mice. Our results thus suggest that Gram-positive commensal bacteria are a major determinant of IEC turnover, and that their stimulatory effect is mediated by SCFAs.

  2. Promotion of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Turnover by Commensal Bacteria: Role of Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Ha; Kotani, Takenori; Konno, Tasuku; Setiawan, Jajar; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Usui, Yutaro; Hatano, Naoya; Shinohara, Masakazu; Saito, Yasuyuki; Murata, Yoji; Matozaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The life span of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) is short (3-5 days), and its regulation is thought to be important for homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium. We have now investigated the role of commensal bacteria in regulation of IEC turnover in the small intestine. The proliferative activity of IECs in intestinal crypts as well as the migration of these cells along the crypt-villus axis were markedly attenuated both in germ-free mice and in specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice treated with a mixture of antibiotics, with antibiotics selective for Gram-positive bacteria being most effective in this regard. Oral administration of chloroform-treated feces of SPF mice to germ-free mice resulted in a marked increase in IEC turnover, suggesting that spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria contribute to this effect. Oral administration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as bacterial fermentation products also restored the turnover of IECs in antibiotic-treated SPF mice as well as promoted the development of intestinal organoids in vitro. Antibiotic treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK, ribosomal protein S6, and STAT3 in IECs of SPF mice. Our results thus suggest that Gram-positive commensal bacteria are a major determinant of IEC turnover, and that their stimulatory effect is mediated by SCFAs. PMID:27232601

  3. Expression of integrin alphavbeta6 in the intestinal epithelial cells of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

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    Bai-Sui Feng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is about 0.05% in industrialized countries. The pathogenesis of IBD remains to be further understood. The present study aims to elucidate the expression of integrin αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBD. Materials and Methods: Colonic biopsy was obtained from a group of IBD patients. The expression of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa was detected by Western blotting. Human colonic epithelial cell line T84 cells were stimulated by microbial antigen flagellin. The expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: The levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa were much lower than it in normal control subjects. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO were higher in IBD patients that were negatively correlated with the levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa. The expression of αvβ6 was detectable in T84 cells at naïve status that could be upregulated by exposure to microbial antigen flagellin. Pretreatment with MPO dramatically suppressed the expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells. Conclusions: We conclude that the expression of αvβ6 was suppressed in IBD intestinal mucosa, which could be resulted from the high levels of MPO.

  4. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  5. Arginine Consumption by the Intestinal Parasite Giardia intestinalis Reduces Proliferation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, Maria C.; Persson, Lo; Svard, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the host´s production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consu...

  6. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Erin E; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and killed 24 h later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both hematoxylin-eosin and active caspase 3 staining. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1, and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid-/- mice and animals with intestine-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, Fas ligand-/- mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, although the former may be more functionally significant. PMID:22592747

  7. Cross-talk between intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghadban, Sara; Kaissi, Samira; Homaidan, Fadia R.; Naim, Hassan Y.; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves functional impairment of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), concomitant with the infiltration of the lamina propria by inflammatory cells. We explored the reciprocal paracrine and direct interaction between human IECs and macrophages (MΦ) in a co-culture system that mimics some aspects of IBD. We investigated the expression of intercellular junctional proteins in cultured IECs under inflammatory conditions and in tissues from IBD patients. IECs establish functional gap junctions with IECs and MΦ, respectively. Connexin (Cx26) and Cx43 expression in cultured IECs is augmented under inflammatory conditions; while, Cx43-associated junctional complexes partners, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and β-catenin expression is decreased. The expression of Cx26 and Cx43 in IBD tissues is redistributed to the basal membrane of IEC, which is associated with decrease in junctional complex proteins’ expression, collagen type IV expression and infiltration of MΦ. These data support the notion that the combination of paracrine and hetero-cellular communication between IECs and MΦs may regulate epithelial cell function through the establishment of junctional complexes between inflammatory cells and IECs, which ultimately contribute to the dys-regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27417573

  8. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p < 0.05). Immunoelectron microscopic and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed that GAPDH is located on the surface layer of L. reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:25867279

  9. The impact of hypoxia on intestinal epithelial cell functions: consequences for invasion by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Chotikatum, Sucheera; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-12-01

    The maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in human tissues is mediated by several cellular adaptations in response to low-oxygen stress, called hypoxia. A decrease in tissue oxygen levels is initially counteracted by increasing local blood flow to overcome diminished oxygenation and avoid hypoxic stress. However, studies have shown that the physiological oxygen concentrations in several tissues are much lower than atmospheric (normoxic) conditions, and the oxygen supply is finely regulated in individual cell types. The gastrointestinal tract has been described to subsist in a state of physiologically low oxygen level and is thus depicted as a tissue in the state of constant low-grade inflammation. The intestinal epithelial cell layer plays a vital role in the immune response to inflammation and infections that occur within the intestinal tissue and is involved in many of the adaptation responses to hypoxic stress. This is especially relevant in the context of inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, this review aims to describe the intestinal epithelial cellular response to hypoxia and the consequences for host interactions with invading gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. PMID:27002817

  10. Epithelial IL-23R Signaling Licenses Protective IL-22 Responses in Intestinal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, Konrad; Rehman, Ateequr; Falk-Paulsen, Maren; Secher, Thomas; Kuiper, Jan; Tran, Florian; Pfeuffer, Steffen; Sheibani-Tezerji, Raheleh; Breuer, Alexandra; Luzius, Anne; Jentzsch, Marlene; Häsler, Robert; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Will, Olga; Lipinski, Simone; Bharti, Richa; Adolph, Timon; Iovanna, Juan L; Kempster, Sarah L; Blumberg, Richard S; Schreiber, Stefan; Becher, Burkhard; Chamaillard, Mathias; Kaser, Arthur; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2016-08-23

    A plethora of functional and genetic studies have suggested a key role for the IL-23 pathway in chronic intestinal inflammation. Currently, pathogenic actions of IL-23 have been ascribed to specific effects on immune cells. Herein, we unveil a protective role of IL-23R signaling. Mice deficient in IL-23R expression in intestinal epithelial cells (Il23R(ΔIEC)) have reduced Reg3b expression, show a disturbed colonic microflora with an expansion of flagellated bacteria, and succumb to DSS colitis. Surprisingly, Il23R(ΔIEC) mice show impaired mucosal IL-22 induction in response to IL-23. αThy-1 treatment significantly deteriorates colitis in Il23R(ΔIEC) animals, which can be rescued by IL-22 application. Importantly, exogenous Reg3b administration rescues DSS-treated Il23R(ΔIEC) mice by recruiting neutrophils as IL-22-producing cells, thereby restoring mucosal IL-22 levels. The study identifies a critical barrier-protective immune pathway that originates from, and is orchestrated by, IL-23R signaling in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27524624

  11. Inhibitory effect of carnosine on interleukin-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells through translational regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dong Ok; Satsu, Hideo; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2008-05-01

    The enhanced intestinal production of pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to inflammation and carcinogenesis, and therefore its down-regulation by nutrients could represent a promising therapeutic approach. We found for the first time that the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in intestinal epithelial cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide or TNF-alpha was suppressed in the presence of carnosine (beta-Ala-His), a dietary dipeptide. Interestingly, carnosine had no influence on the stimulus-induced IL-8 mRNA expression, although the intracellular production and secretion of IL-8 were significantly inhibited by carnosine. The inhibitory effect of carnosine on the IL-8 secretion differed from that of other histidine-containing dipeptides like Gly-His, Ala-His, and anserine (beta-Ala-1-methyl-His), which inhibited both the hydrogen peroxide-induced secretion and mRNA expression of IL-8. These observations indicate that carnosine inhibited IL-8 secretion along a unique pathway, in which IL-8 production was suppressed at a post-transcriptional level, for instance, translation. The hypothesis that carnosine inhibited the translation of IL-8 mRNA is supported by the finding that the phosphorylation of eIF4E, an initiation factor, in stimulated Caco-2 cells was inhibited by carnosine. These results suggest that carnosine is a novel type of anti-inflammatory agent that down-regulates the inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells by a unique mechanism. PMID:18397832

  12. High therapeutic efficacy of Cathelicidin-WA against postweaning diarrhea via inhibiting inflammation and enhancing epithelial barrier in the intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongbo; Zhang, Lin; Gan, Zhenshun; Xiong, Haitao; Yu, Caihua; Du, Huahua; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of death among young mammals, especially during weaning. Here, we investigated the effects of Cathelicidin-WA (CWA) on diarrhea, intestinal morphology, inflammatory responses, epithelial barrier and microbiota in the intestine of young mammals during weaning. Piglets with clinical diarrhea were selected and treated with saline (control), CWA or enrofloxacin (Enro) for 4 days. Both CWA and Enro effectively attenuated diarrhea. Compared with the control, CWA decreased IL-6, IL-8 and IL-22 levels and reduced neutrophil infiltration into the jejunum. CWA inhibited inflammation by down-regulating the TLR4-, MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent pathways. Additionally, CWA improved intestinal morphology by increasing villus and microvillus heights and enhancing intestinal barrier function by increasing tight junction (TJ) protein expression and augmenting wound-healing ability in intestinal epithelial cells. CWA also improved microbiota composition and increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels in feces. By contrast, Enro not only disrupted the intestinal barrier but also negatively affected microbiota composition and SCFA levels in the intestine. In conclusion, CWA effectively attenuated inflammation, enhanced intestinal barrier function, and improved microbiota composition in the intestines of weaned piglets. These results suggest that CWA could be an effective and safe therapy for diarrhea or other intestinal diseases in young mammals. PMID:27181680

  13. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  14. Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol affect rat intestinal epithelial cells: a concentration related study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Bianca; Severino, Lorella; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Marzocco, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract represents a crucial first level defence against ingested toxins. Among them, Nivalenol is a trichotecenes mycotoxin frequently found on cereals and processed grains; when it contaminates human food and animal feed it is often associated with another widespread contaminant, Deoxynivalenol. Following their ingestion, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to concentrations of these trichothecenes high enough to cause mycotoxicosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol on intestinal cells in an in vitro model system utilizing the non-tumorigenic rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol (5-80 µM) significantly affected IEC-6 viability through a pro-apoptotic process which mainly involved the following steps: (i) Bax induction; (ii) Bcl-2 inhibition, and (iii) caspase-3 activation. Moreover, treatment with Nivalenol produced a significant cell cycle arrest of IEC-6 cells, primarily at the G(0)/G(1) interphase and in the S phase, with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of cells in G(2). Interestingly, when administered at lower concentrations (0.1-2.5 µM), both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol affected epithelial cell migration (restitution), representing the initial step in gastrointestinal wound healing in the gut. This reduced motility was associated with significant remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and changes in expression of connexin-43 and focal adhesion kinase. The concentration range of Nivalenol or Deoxynivalenol we have tested is comparable with the mean estimated daily intake of consumers eating contaminated food. Thus, our results further highlight the risks associated with intake of even low levels of these toxins. PMID:23251682

  15. Carrageenan Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Vitro1–3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies in animal models have shown that the commonly used food additive carrageenan (CGN) induces inflammation and intestinal neoplasia. We performed the first studies to determine the effects of CGN exposure on human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in tissue culture and tested the effect of very low concentrations (1–10 mg/L) of undegraded, high-molecular weight CGN. These concentrations of CGN are less than the anticipated exposure of the human colon to CGN from the average Western diet. In the human colonic epithelial cell line NCM460 and in primary human colonic epithelial cells that were exposed to CGN for 1–8 d, we found increased cell death, reduced cell proliferation, and cell cycle arrest compared with unexposed control cells. After 6–8 d of CGN exposure, the percentage of cells reentering G0–G1 significantly decreased and the percentages of cells in S and G2-M phases significantly increased. Increases in activated p53, p21, and p15 followed CGN exposure, consistent with CGN-induced cell cycle arrest. Additional data, including DNA ladder, poly ADP ribose polymerase Western blot, nuclear DNA staining, and activities of caspases 3 and 7, indicated no evidence of increased apoptosis following CGN exposure and were consistent with CGN-induced necrotic cell death. These data document for the first time, to our knowledge, marked adverse effects of low concentrations of CGN on survival of normal human IEC and suggest that CGN exposure may have a role in development of human intestinal pathology. PMID:18287351

  16. Heparin stimulates the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, N; Cove, F L; Evans, G S

    1994-02-01

    Heparin is a sulphated glycosaminoglycan derived from mast cells and has a number of functions including the inhibition of proliferation in several cell types and interactions with a range of heparin-binding growth factors. We report that heparin is a trophic factor in primary cultures of rat small intestinal epithelium. Heparin elicits a dose-dependent increase in epithelial proliferation and inhibits the growth of associated mesenchyme. The trophic effect of this molecule is not reproduced by other glycosaminoglycans including heparan sulphate but is dependent upon extensive molecular sulphation. Highly sulphated polysaccharides that are structurally unrelated to heparin (e.g. dextran sulphate and pentosan polysulphate) also stimulate epithelial proliferation in primary cultures. Heparin may act by the potentiation of mesenchyme-derived heparin-binding growth factors and these data suggest an in vivo role for mast cell-derived heparin in mucosal wound regeneration. PMID:8207071

  17. Immunopathology of giardiasis: the role of lymphocytes in intestinal epithelial injury and malfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AG Buret

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocyte-mediated pathogenesis is common to a variety of enteropathies, including giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, bacterial enteritis, celiac's disease, food anaphylaxis, and Crohn's disease. In giardiasis as well as in these other disorders, a diffuse loss of microvillous brush border, combined or not with villus atrophy, is responsible for disaccharidase insufficiencies and malabsorption of electrolytes, nutrients, and water, which ultimately cause diarrheal symptoms. Other mucosal changes may include crypt hyperplasia and increased infiltration of intra-epithelial lymphocytes. Recent studies using models of giardiasis have shed new light on the immune regulation of these abnormalities. Indeed, experiments using an athymic mouse model of infection have found that these epithelial injuries were T cell-dependent. Findings from further research indicate that that the loss of brush border surface area, reduced disaccharidase activities, and increase crypt-villus ratios are mediated by CD8+ T cells, whereas both CD8+ and CD4+ small mesenteric lymph node T cells regulate the influx of intra-epithelial lymphocytes. Future investigations need to characterize the CD8+ T cell signaling cascades that ultimately lead to epithelial injury and malfunction in giardiasis and other malabsorptive disorders of the intestine.

  18. Phytic acid protects porcine intestinal epithelial cells from deoxynivalenol (DON) cytotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Graziela Drociunas; Silva, Caio Abércio da; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of phytic acid (IP(6)) as a possible inhibitor of cellular damage induced by toxic substances such as mycotoxins on a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-1). We first observed that a dose of 5 mM phytic acid decreases cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of cell monolayer. We next investigate the effect of non-cytotoxic dose of phytic acid on the deoxinivalenol (DON) induced decreased TEER. We showed th...

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta mediates intestinal healing and susceptibility to injury in vitro and in vivo through epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Paul L; Rosenberg, Ian M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Koh, Theodore; Wong, Josée F; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2003-02-01

    In vitro studies suggest that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has potent effects on gastrointestinal mucosal integrity, wound repair, and neoplasia. However, the multiplicity of actions of this peptide on many different cell types confounds efforts to define the role of TGF-beta within the intestinal epithelium in vivo. To delineate these effects selective blockade of intestinal epithelial TGF-beta activity was undertaken through targeted expression of a dominant-negative (DN) TGF-beta RII to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Stable intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-6 lines overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN (nucleotides -7 to 573) were established. Transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN under the regulation of a modified liver fatty acid-binding promoter (LFABP-PTS4) were constructed. In vitro healing was assessed by wounding of confluent monolayers. Colitis was induced by the addition of dextran sodium sulfate (2.5 to 7.5% w/v) to their drinking water. Overexpression of TGF-beta RII-DN in intestinal epithelial cell-6 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell migration and TGF-beta-stimulated wound healing in vitro. TGF-beta RII-DN transgenic mice did not exhibit baseline intestinal inflammation or changes in survival, body weight, epithelial cell proliferation, aberrant crypt foci, or tumor formation. TGF-beta RII-DN mice were markedly more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and exhibited impaired recovery after colonic injury. TGF-beta is required for intestinal mucosal healing and TGF-beta modulation of the intestinal epithelium plays a central role in determining susceptibility to injury. PMID:12547717

  20. The Ets dominant repressor En/Erm enhances intestinal epithelial tumorigenesis in ApcMin mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ets transcription factors have been widely implicated in the control of tumorigenesis, with most studies suggesting tumor-promoting roles. However, few studies have examined Ets tumorigenesis-modifying functions in vivo using model genetic systems. Using mice expressing a previously characterized Ets dominant repressor transgene in the intestinal epithelium (Villin-En/Erm), we examined the consequences of blocking endogenous Ets-mediated transcriptional activation on tumorigenesis in the ApcMin model of intestinal carcinoma. En/Erm expression in the intestine, at levels not associated with overt crypt-villus dysmorphogenesis, results in a marked increase in tumor number in ApcMin animals. Moreover, when examined histologically, tumors from En/Erm-expressing animals show a trend toward greater stromal invasiveness. Detailed analysis of crypt-villus homeostasis in these En/Erm transgenic animals suggests increased epithelial turnover as one possible mechanism for the enhanced tumorigenesis. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for a tumor-restricting function of endogenous Ets factors in the intestinal epithelium

  1. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

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    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  2. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Guédon, Eric; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health. PMID:25946041

  3. FOXA2 regulates a network of genes involved in critical functions of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosalia, Nehal; Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead box A (FOXA) family of pioneer transcription factors is critical for the development of many endoderm-derived tissues. Their importance in regulating biological processes in the lung and liver is extensively characterized, though much less is known about their role in intestine. Here we investigate the contribution of FOXA2 to coordinating intestinal epithelial cell function using postconfluent Caco2 cells, differentiated into an enterocyte-like model. FOXA2 binding sites genome-wide were determined by ChIP-seq and direct targets of the factor were validated by ChIP-qPCR and siRNA-mediated depletion of FOXA1/2 followed by RT-qPCR. Peaks of FOXA2 occupancy were frequent at loci contributing to gene ontology pathways of regulation of cell migration, cell motion, and plasma membrane function. Depletion of both FOXA1 and FOXA2 led to a significant reduction in the expression of multiple transmembrane proteins including ion channels and transporters, which form a network that is essential for maintaining normal ion and solute transport. One of the targets was the adenosine A2B receptor, and reduced receptor mRNA levels were associated with a functional decrease in intracellular cyclic AMP. We also observed that 30% of FOXA2 binding sites contained a GATA motif and that FOXA1/A2 depletion reduced GATA-4, but not GATA-6 protein levels. These data show that FOXA2 plays a pivotal role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell function. Moreover, that the FOXA and GATA families of transcription factors may work cooperatively to regulate gene expression genome-wide in the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25921584

  4. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

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    Daniela Catanzaro

    Full Text Available Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA, were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study

  5. Mast cells modulate transport of CD23/IgE/antigen complex across human intestinal epithelial barrier

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    Ping-Chang Yang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy and chronic intestinal inflammation are common in western countries. The complex of antigen/IgE is taken up into the body from the gut lumen with the aid of epithelial cell-derived CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor II that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of intestinal allergy. This study aimed to elucidate the role of mast cell on modulation of antigen/IgE complex transport across intestinal epithelial barrier. Methods: Human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 cell monolayer was used as a study platform. Transepithelial electric resistance (TER and permeability to ovalbumin (OVA were used as the markers of intestinal epithelial barrier function that were recorded in response to the stimulation of mast cell-derived chemical mediators. Results: Conditioned media from naïve mast cell line HMC-1 cells or monocyte cell line THP-1 cells significantly upregulated the expression of CD23 and increased the antigen transport across the epithelium. Treatment with stem cell factor (SCF, nerve growth factor (NGF, retinoic acid (RA or dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO enhanced CD23 expression in HT29 cells. Conditioned media from SCF, NGF or RA-treated HMC-1 cells, and SCF, NGF, DMSO or RA-treated THP-1 cells enhanced immune complex transport via enhancing the expression of the CD23 in HT29 cells and the release of inflammatory mediator TNF-α. Nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor, tryptase and TNF-α inhibited the increase in CD23 in HT29 cells and prevents the enhancement of epithelial barrier permeability. Conclusions: Mast cells play an important role in modulating the intestinal CD23 expression and the transport of antigen/IgE/CD23 complex across epithelial barrier.

  6. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  7. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination

  8. Regulation of intracellular Zn homeostasis in two intestinal epithelial cell models at various maturation time points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefeller, Eva-Maria; Bondzio, Angelika; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Martens, Holger; Einspanier, Ralf; Scharfen, Franziska; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert; Lodemann, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    After weaning, piglets are often fed diets supplemented with high concentrations of zinc (Zn) to decrease post-weaning diarrhea. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of Zn homeostasis within intestinal epithelial cells during excessive Zn exposure. High Zn concentrations elevated the intracellular Zn level in IPEC-J2 and Caco-2 cells which was influenced by differentiation status and time of exposure. With increasing Zn concentrations, mRNA and protein levels of metallothionein (MT) and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT1) were upregulated, whereas zinc transporter 4 (ZIP4) expression was downregulated. Metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF1) mRNA expression was upregulated at high Zn concentrations in IPEC-J2 cells, which corresponded to higher intracellular Zn concentrations. Based on these results, we suggest that intestinal epithelial cells adapt the expression of these genes to the amount of extracellular Zn available in order to maintain Zn homeostasis. Cell line-dependent differences in the regulation of Zn homeostasis were detected. PMID:25757458

  9. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Tyrosine Kinase 2 Transduces IL-22 Signals To Protect from Acute Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainzl, Eva; Stockinger, Silvia; Rauch, Isabella; Heider, Susanne; Berry, David; Lassnig, Caroline; Schwab, Clarissa; Rosebrock, Felix; Milinovich, Gabriel; Schlederer, Michaela; Wagner, Michael; Schleper, Christa; Loy, Alexander; Urich, Tim; Kenner, Lukas; Han, Xiaonan; Decker, Thomas; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2015-11-15

    In the intestinal tract, IL-22 activates STAT3 to promote intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) homeostasis and tissue healing. The mechanism has remained obscure, but we demonstrate that IL-22 acts via tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), a member of the Jak family. Using a mouse model for colitis, we show that Tyk2 deficiency is associated with an altered composition of the gut microbiota and exacerbates inflammatory bowel disease. Colitic Tyk2(-/-) mice have less p-STAT3 in colon tissue and their IECs proliferate less efficiently. Tyk2-deficient primary IECs show reduced p-STAT3 in response to IL-22 stimulation, and expression of IL-22-STAT3 target genes is reduced in IECs from healthy and colitic Tyk2(-/-) mice. Experiments with conditional Tyk2(-/-) mice reveal that IEC-specific depletion of Tyk2 aggravates colitis. Disease symptoms can be alleviated by administering high doses of rIL-22-Fc, indicating that Tyk2 deficiency can be rescued via the IL-22 receptor complex. The pivotal function of Tyk2 in IL-22-dependent colitis was confirmed in Citrobacter rodentium-induced disease. Thus, Tyk2 protects against acute colitis in part by amplifying inflammation-induced epithelial IL-22 signaling to STAT3. PMID:26432894

  10. Mechanisms of Action of Zinc on Intestinal Epithelial Electrogenic Ion Secretion: Insights into its Anti-Diarrheal Actions

    OpenAIRE

    Bzik, V. A.; Medani, Mekki; Baird, Alan W; Winter, Desmond C.; Brayden, David James

    2012-01-01

    Objectives  Zinc is a useful addition to oral rehydration therapy for acute diarrhoea. We have assessed the mechanism of its epithelial antisecretory action when intestinal epithelial tight junctions were pharmacologically opened. Methods  Rat isolated ileal and colonic mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and exposed to ZnSO4 (Zn2+) in the presence of secretagogues and inhibition of short circuit current (Isc) was measured. Key findings  Pre-incubation with basolateral but not api...

  11. Apical Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Salmonella typhimurium Requires Villin to Remodel the Brush Border Actin Cytoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Lhocine, Nouara; Arena, Ellen T.; Bomme, Perrine; Ubelmann, Florent; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Robine, Sylvie; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Salmonella invasion of intestinal epithelial cells requires extensive, though transient, actin modifications at the site of bacterial entry. The actin-modifying protein villin is present in the brush border where it participates in the constitution of microvilli and in epithelial restitution after damage through its actin-severing activity. We investigated a possible role for villin in Salmonella invasion. The absence of villin, which is normally located at the bacterial entry site, l...

  12. Constitutive activation of the MEK/ERK pathway inhibits intestinal epithelial cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Etienne; Boucher, Marie-Josée; Mongrain, Sébastien; Boudreau, François; Asselin, Claude; Rivard, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK cascade regulates intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. Indeed, while barely detectable in differentiated cells of the villi, ERK1/2-activated forms are detected in the nucleus of undifferentiated human intestinal crypt cells. In addition, we and others have reported that ERKs are selectively inactivated during enterocyte differentiation. However, whether inactivation of the ERK pathway is necessary for inhibition of both proliferation and induction of differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells is unknown. Human Caco-2/15 cells, undifferentiated crypt IEC-6 cells, and differentiating Cdx3-expressing IEC-6 cells were infected with retroviruses encoding either a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MEK1 wild type (wtMEK) or a constitutively active S218D/S222D MEK1 mutant (caMEK). Protein and gene expression was assessed by Western blotting, semiquantitative RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. Morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. We found that 1) IEC-6/Cdx3 cells formed multicellular layers after confluence and differentiated after 30 days in culture, as assessed by increased polarization, microvilli formation, expression of differentiation markers, and ERK1/2 inhibition; 2) while activated MEK prevented neither the inhibition of ERK1/2 activities nor the differentiation process in postconfluent Caco-2/15 cells, caMEK expression prevented ERK inhibition in postconfluent IEC-6/Cdx3 cells, thus leading to maintenance of elevated ERK1/2 activities; 3) caMEK-expressing IEC-6/Cdx3 cells exhibited altered multicellular structure organization, poorly defined tight junctions, reduced number of microvilli on the apical surface, and decreased expression of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α transcription factor and differentiation markers, namely apolipoprotein A-4, fatty acid-binding protein, calbindin-3, mucin 2, alkaline phosphatase, and sucrase-isomaltase; and 4) increased Cdx3 phosphorylation on serine-60 (S60) in IEC-6/Cdx3 cells expressing

  13. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Ying; NAITO, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intest...

  14. Butyrate Produced by Commensal Bacteria Potentiates Phorbol Esters Induced AP-1 Response in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect...

  15. Selenium and vitamin E together improve intestinal epithelial barrier function and alleviate oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Cottrell, Jeremy J; Furness, John B; Rivera, Leni R; Kelly, Fletcher W; Wijesiriwardana, Udani; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Fothergill, Linda J; Bravo, David M; Celi, Pietro; Leury, Brian J; Gabler, Nicholas K; Dunshea, Frank R

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Oxidative stress may play a role in compromising intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in pigs subjected to heat stress, but it is unknown whether an increase of dietary antioxidants (selenium and vitamin E) could alleviate gut leakiness in heat-stressed pigs. What is the main finding and its importance? Levels of dietary selenium (1.0 p.p.m.) and vitamin E (200 IU kg(-1) ) greater than those usually recommended for pigs reduced intestinal leakiness caused by heat stress. This finding suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in compromising intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in heat-stressed pigs and also provides a nutritional strategy for mitigating these effects. Heat stress compromises the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity of mammals through mechanisms that may include oxidative stress. Our objective was to test whether dietary supplementation with antioxidants, selenium (Se) and vitamin E (VE), protects intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in heat-stressed pigs. Female growing pigs (n = 48) were randomly assigned to four diets containing from 0.2 p.p.m. Se and 17 IU kg(-1) VE (control, National Research Council recommended) to 1.0 p.p.m. Se and 200 IU kg(-1) VE for 14 days. Six pigs from each dietary treatment were then exposed to either thermoneutral (20°C) or heat-stress conditions (35°C 09.00-17.00 h and 28°C overnight) for 2 days. Transepithelial electrical resistance and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (4 kDa; FD4) permeability were measured in isolated jejunum and ileum using Ussing chambers. Rectal temperature, respiratory rate and intestinal HSP70 mRNA abundance increased (all P intestinal barrier function were reduced (P intestinal barrier integrity, associated with a reduction in oxidative stress. PMID:27064134

  16. Probiotic bacteria regulate intestinal epithelial permeability in experimental ileitis by a TNF-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Corridoni

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the probiotic mixture, VSL#3, prevents the onset of ileitis in SAMP/YitFc (SAMP mice, and this effect was associated with stimulation of epithelial-derived TNF. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s of VSL#3-mediated protection on epithelial barrier function and to further investigate the "paradoxical" effects of TNF in preventing SAMP ileitis.Permeability was evaluated in SAMP mice prior to the onset of inflammation and during established disease by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER on ex vivo-cultured ilea following exposure to VSL#3 conditioned media (CM, TNF or VSL#3-CM + anti-TNF. Tight junction (TJ proteins were assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and confocal microscopy, and TNFRI/TNFRII expression measured in freshly isolated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC from SAMP and control AKR mice.Culture with either VSL#3-CM or TNF resulted in decreased ileal paracellular permeability in pre-inflamed SAMP, but not SAMP with established disease, while addition of anti-TNF abrogated these effects. Modulation of the TJ proteins, claudin-2 and occludin, occurred with a significant decrease in claudin-2 and increase in occludin following stimulation with VSL#3-CM or TNF. TNF protein levels increased in supernatants of SAMP ilea incubated with VSL#3-CM compared to vehicle, while IEC-derived TNFR mRNA expression decreased in young, and was elevated in inflamed, SAMP versus AKR mice.Our data demonstrate that the previously established efficacy of VSL#3 in preventing SAMP ileitis is due to direct innate and homeostatic effects of TNF on the gut epithelium, modulation of the TJ proteins, claudin-2 and occludin, and overall improvement of intestinal permeability.

  17. Epithelial apoptosis in mechanistically distinct methods of injury in the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, D; Robertson, C M; Stromberg, P E; Martin, J R; Dunne, W M; Houchen, C W; Barrett, T A; Ayala, A; Perl, M; Buchman, T G; Coopersmith, C M

    2007-06-01

    Gut epithelial apoptosis is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple diseases. This study characterized intestinal apoptosis in three mechanistically distinct injuries with different kinetics of cell death. FVB/N mice were subjected to gamma radiation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia or injection of monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody and sacrificed 4, 12, or 24 hours post-injury (n=10/time point). Apoptosis was quantified in the jejunum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), active caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL), in situ oligoligation reaction (ISOL,) cytokeratin 18, and annexin V staining. Reproducible results were obtained only for H&E, active caspase-3, TUNEL and ISOL, which were quantified and compared against each other for each injury at each time point. Kinetics of injury were different with early apoptosis highest following radiation, late apoptosis highest following anti CD3, and more consistent levels following pneumonia. ISOL was the most consistent stain and was always statistically indistinguishable from at least 2 stains. In contrast, active caspase-3 demonstrated lower levels of apoptosis, while the TUNEL assay had higher levels of apoptosis in the most severely injured intestine regardless of mechanism of injury. H&E was a statistical outlier more commonly than any other stain. This suggests that regardless of mechanism or kinetics of injury, ISOL correlates to other quantification methods of detecting gut epithelial apoptosis more than any other method studied and compares favorably to other commonly accepted techniques of quantifying apoptosis in a large intestinal cross sectional by balancing sensitivity and specificity across a range of times and levels of death. PMID:17357092

  18. Chronic low vitamin intake potentiates cisplatin-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in WNIN rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bodiga Vijayalakshmi; Boindala Sesikeran; Putcha Udaykumar; Subramaniam Kalyanasundaram; Manchala Raghunath

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if cisplatin alters vitamin status and if VR modulates cisplatin induced intestinal apoptosis and oxidative stress in Wistar/NIN (WNIN) male rats.METHODS: Weanling, WNIN male rats (n = 12 per group) received adlibitum for 17 wk: control diet (20%protein) or the same with 50% vitamin restriction. They were then sub-divided into two groups of six rats each and administered cisplatin (2.61 mg/kg bodyweight)once a week for three wk or PBS (vehicle control).Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis was monitored by morphometry, Annexin-V binding, M30 cytodeath assay and DNA fragmentation. Structural and functional integrity of the villus were assessed by villus height /crypt depth ratio and activities of alkaline phosphatase,lys, ala-dipeptidyl amino-peptidase, respectively. To assess the probable mechanism(s) of altered apoptosis,oxidative stress parameters, caspase-3 activity, and expression of Bcl-2 and Bax were determined.RESULTS: Cisplatin per se decreased plasma vitamin levels and they were the lowest in VR animals treated with cisplatin. As expected VR increased only villus apoptosis, whereas cisplatin increased stem cell apoptosis in the crypt. However, cisplatin treatment of VR rats increased apoptosis both in villus and crypt regions and was associated with higher levels of TBARS,protein carbonyls and caspase-3 activity, but lower GSH concentrations. VR induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression was further lowered by cisplatin. Bax expression,unaffected by VR was increased on cisplatin treatment.Mucosal functional integrity was severely compromised in cisplatin treated VR-rats.CONCLUSION: Low intake of vitamins increases the sensitivity of rats to cisplatin and promotes intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.

  19. Relationship between β-catenin expression and epithelial cell proliferation in gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adriana Romiti; Pietro Mingazzini; Angelo Zullo; Francesco Borrini; Ida Sarcina; Cesare Hassan; Simon Winn; Silverio Tomao; Aldo Vecchione; Sergio Morini

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate β-catenin expression in patients with intestinal metaplasia, and to look for a possible relationship between β-catenin expression and either epithelial proliferation values or Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection.METHODS: Twenty patients with complete type intestinal metaplasia were studied. β-Catenin expression and epithelial cell proliferation in antral mucosa were assessed using an immunohistochemical analysis. Hpylori infectionwas detected by histology and a rapid urease test.RESULTS: Reduced β-catenin expression on the surface of metaplastic cells was detected in 13 (65%) out of 20 patients. Moreover, in eight (40%) patients intranuclear expression of β-catenin was found. When patients were analyzed according to Hpylori infection, the prevalence of both β-catenin reduction at the cell surface and its intranuclear localization did not significantly differ between infected and uninfected patients. Cell proliferation was higher in patients with intranudear β-catenin expression as compared to the remaining patients, although the difference failed to reach the statistical significance (36±8.9 vs 27.2±11.4, P = 0.06). On the contrary, a similar cell proliferation value was observed between patients with reduced expression of β-catenin on cell surface and those with a normal expression (28.1±11.8 vs26.1±8.8, P= 0.7).Hpyloriinfection significantly increased cell proliferation (33.3±10.2% vs 24.6±7.4%, respectively, P= 0.04).CONCLUSION: Both cell surface reduction and intranuclear accumulation of β-catenin were detected in intestinal metaplasia. The intranuclear localization of β-catenin increases cell proliferation. H pylori infection does not seem to play a direct role in β-catenin alterations, whilst it significantly increases cell proliferation.

  20. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  1. Ethanol in utero induces epithelial cell damage and altered kinetics in the developing rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, G; Del Rio, J A; García-Valero, J; López-Tejero, M D

    1996-11-01

    The effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on the intestinal maturation of rat fetuses was investigated to understand the nutritional alterations found in the offspring of alcoholic mothers. Female Wistar rats were maintained on solid diet and 25% ethanol solution as drinking fluid during pregnancy, and non-alcoholic isocaloric pregnant mothers were used as controls. At birth, intestines from unsuckled pups were removed for study. The weight and length of the intestine decreased significantly when ethanol was present in utero. Ultrastructural evaluation of the epithelium revealed loss of contact between neighboring enterocytes and abnormal dilation of the cisternae of the Golgi apparatus in ethanol-exposed pups. Further, increased lysosome-like vesiculation and enhanced lysosomal beta-galactosidase activity was observed in these neonates. The total number of absorptive enterocytes in the epithelium was reduced by 30% in ethanol-exposed neonates as compared to controls, due to altered cell growth and death during fetal life. Ethanol in utero stimulated epithelial cell migration which compensated cell loss, as demonstrated by 5'-Bromodeoxyuridine labeling. These findings could have important implications for the assimilation of nutrients and failure to thrive in infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. PMID:9035346

  2. Role of myosin light chain kinase in intestinal epithelial barrier defects in a rat model of bowel obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li-Ling

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bowel obstruction is a common cause of abdominal emergency, since the patients are at increased risk of septicemia resulting in high mortality rate. While the compartmentalized changes in enteric microfloral population and augmentation of bacterial translocation (BT have already been reported using experimental obstruction models, alterations in epithelial permeability of the obstructed guts has not been studied in detail. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK is actively involved in the contraction of epithelial perijunctional actinomyosin ring and thereby increases paracellular permeability. In the current study we attempt to investigate the role of MLCK in epithelial barrier defects using a rat model of simple mechanical obstruction. Methods Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injection of ML-7 (a MLCK inhibitor or vehicle at 24, 12 and 1 hrs before and 12 hrs after intestinal obstruction (IO. The distal small intestine was obstructed with a single ligature placed 10 cm proximal to the ileocecal junction in IO rats for 24 hrs. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Results Mucosal injury, such as villous blunting and increased crypt/villus ratio, was observed in the distal small intestine of IO rats. Despite massive enterocyte shedding, intestinal villi were covered with a contiguous epithelial layer without cell apoptosis. Increased transmural macromolecular flux was noticed in the distal small intestine and the proximal colon after IO. The bacterial colony forming units in the spleen and liver of IO rats were significantly higher than those of sham controls. Addition of ML-7 ameliorated the IO-triggered epithelial MLC phosphorylation, mucosal injury and macromolecular flux, but not the level of BT. Conclusions The results suggest that IO-induced premature enterocytic sloughing and enhanced paracellular antigenic flux were mediated by epithelial MLCK activation. In addition, enteric bacteria may undergo transcytotic routes

  3. Coating with luminal gut-constituents alters adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Sinnecker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropogenic nanoparticles (NPs have found their way into many goods of everyday life. Inhalation, ingestion and skin contact are potential routes for NPs to enter the body. In particular the digestive tract with its huge absorptive surface area provides a prime gateway for NP uptake. Considering that NPs are covered by luminal gut-constituents en route through the gastrointestinal tract, we wanted to know if such modifications have an influence on the interaction between NPs and enterocytes.Results: We investigated the consequences of a treatment with various luminal gut-constituents on the adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene particles 20, 100 and 200 nm in size represented our anthropogenic NPs, and differentiated Caco-2 cells served as model for mature enterocytes of the small intestine. Pretreatment with the proteins BSA and casein consistently reduced the adherence of all NPs to the cultured enterocytes, while incubation of NPs with meat extract had no obvious effect on particle adherence. In contrast, contact with intestinal fluid appeared to increase the particle-cell interaction of 20 and 100 nm NPs.Conclusion: Luminal gut-constituents may both attenuate and augment the adherence of NPs to cell surfaces. These effects appear to be dependent on the particle size as well as on the type of interacting protein. While some proteins will rather passivate particles towards cell attachment, possibly by increasing colloid stability or camouflaging attachment sites, certain components of intestinal fluid are capable to modify particle surfaces in such a way that interactions with cellular surface structures result in an increased binding.

  4. Characterization of in vitro effects of patulin on intestinal epithelial and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, R; Alvito, P; Kleiveland, C R; Lea, T E

    2016-05-27

    The intestinal mucosa is the first biological barrier encountered by natural toxins, and could possibly be exposed to high amounts of dietary mycotoxins. Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by Penicillium spp. during fruit spoilage, is one of the best known enteropathogenic mycotoxins able to alter functions of the intestine (Maresca et al., 2008). This study evaluated the effects of PAT on barrier function of the gut mucosa utilizing the intestinal epithelial cell model Caco-2, and scrutinized immunomodulatory effects using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and human blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) as test systems. PAT exposure reduced Caco-2 cell viability at concentrations above 12μM. As expected, the integrity of a polarized Caco-2 monolayer was affected by PAT exposure, as demonstrated by a decrease in TER values, becoming more pronounced at 50μM. No effects were detected on the expression levels of the tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-3 at 50μM. However, the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) declined. Also, levels of phospho-MLC2 (p-MLC2) increased after 24h of exposure to 50μM of PAT. T cell proliferation was highly sensitive to PAT with major effects for concentrations above 10nM of PAT. The same conditions did not affect the maturation of moDC. PAT causes a reduction in Caco-2 barrier function mainly by perturbation of ZO-1 levels and the phosphorylation of MLC. Low doses of PAT strongly inhibited T cell proliferation induced by a polyclonal activator, but had no effect on the maturation of moDC. These results provide new information that strengthens the concept that the epithelium and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa are important targets for the toxic effects of food contaminants like mycotoxins. PMID:27067107

  5. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Amol; Cotton, James A; Dixon, Brent R.; Gedamu, Lashitew; Robin M. Yates; Buret, Andre G.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cyste...

  6. Krüppel-like factor 5 is essential for proliferation and survival of mouse intestinal epithelial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandayam O. Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5 is a pro-proliferative transcription factor that is expressed in dividing epithelial cells of the intestinal crypt. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 has been identified as a stem cell marker in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. To determine whether KLF5 regulates proliferation of intestinal stem cells, we investigated the effects of Klf5 deletion specifically from the intestinal stem cells in adult mice. Mice with inducible intestinal stem cell-specific deletion of Klf5 (Lgr5-Klf5fl/fl were injected with tamoxifen for 5 consecutive days to induce Lgr5-driven Cre expression. Intestinal and colonic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry at various time points up to 112 days following start of tamoxifen treatment. Klf5 is co-localized in the crypt-based columnar (CBC cells that express Lgr5. By 11 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, Lgr5-positive crypts from which Klf5 was deleted exhibited a loss of proliferation that was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Beginning at 14 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, both Klf5 expression and proliferation were re-established in the transit-amplifying epithelial cells but not in the Lgr5-positive CBC cells. By 112 days post-treatment, up to 90% of the Lgr5-positive cells from which Klf5 was deleted were lost from the intestinal crypts. These results indicate a critical role for KLF5 in the survival and maintenance of intestinal stem cells.

  7. Loss of Survivin in Intestinal Epithelial Progenitor Cells Leads to Mitotic Catastrophe and Breakdown of Gut Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Eva; Wittkopf, Nadine; Günther, Claudia; Leppkes, Moritz; Okada, Hitoshi; Watson, Alastair J; Podstawa, Eva; Backert, Ingo; Amann, Kerstin; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    A tightly regulated balance of proliferation and cell death of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) is essential for maintenance of gut homeostasis. Survivin is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in several cancer types, but little is known about its role in adult gut tissue. Here, we show that Survivin is specifically expressed in transit-amplifying cells and Lgr5(+) stem cells. Genetic loss of Survivin in IECs resulted in destruction of intestinal integrity, mucosal inflammation, and death of the animals. Survivin deletion was associated with decreased epithelial proliferation due to defective chromosomal segregation. Moreover, Survivin-deficient animals showed induced phosphorylation of p53 and H2AX and increased levels of cell-intrinsic apoptosis in IECs. Consequently, induced deletion of Survivin in Lgr5(+) stem cells led to cell death. In summary, Survivin is a key regulator of gut tissue integrity by regulating epithelial homeostasis in the stem cell niche. PMID:26832409

  8. Loss of Survivin in Intestinal Epithelial Progenitor Cells Leads to Mitotic Catastrophe and Breakdown of Gut Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Martini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A tightly regulated balance of proliferation and cell death of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs is essential for maintenance of gut homeostasis. Survivin is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in several cancer types, but little is known about its role in adult gut tissue. Here, we show that Survivin is specifically expressed in transit-amplifying cells and Lgr5+ stem cells. Genetic loss of Survivin in IECs resulted in destruction of intestinal integrity, mucosal inflammation, and death of the animals. Survivin deletion was associated with decreased epithelial proliferation due to defective chromosomal segregation. Moreover, Survivin-deficient animals showed induced phosphorylation of p53 and H2AX and increased levels of cell-intrinsic apoptosis in IECs. Consequently, induced deletion of Survivin in Lgr5+ stem cells led to cell death. In summary, Survivin is a key regulator of gut tissue integrity by regulating epithelial homeostasis in the stem cell niche.

  9. CLMP Is Essential for Intestinal Development, but Does Not Play a Key Role in Cellular Processes Involved in Intestinal Epithelial Development

    OpenAIRE

    Werf, Christine; Hsiao, Nai-hua; Conroy, Siobhan; Paredes, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana; Sribudiani, Yunia; Seruca, Raquel; Hofstra, Robert; Westers, Helga; van IJzendoorn, Sven

    2013-01-01

    textabstractLoss-of-function mutations in CLMP have been found in patients with Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome (CSBS), suggesting that its encoded protein plays a major role in intestinal development. CLMP is a membrane protein that co-localizes with tight junction proteins, but its function is largely unknown. We expressed wild-type (WT)-CLMP and a mutant-CLMP (associated with CSBS) in human intestinal epithelial T84 cells that, as we show here, do not produce endogenous CLMP. We investigat...

  10. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-20

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models. PMID

  11. Inflammation Controls Sensitivity of Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells to Galectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Cecilia I; Papa Gobbi, Rodrigo; Smaldini, Paola; Orsini Delgado, María Lucía; Candia, Martín; Zanuzzi, Carolina; Sambuelli, Alicia; Rocca, Andrés; Toscano, Marta A; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Docena, Guillermo H

    2016-07-01

    Galectins play key roles in the inflammatory cascade. In this study, we aimed to analyze the effect of galectin-1 (Gal-1) in the function of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) isolated from healthy and inflamed mucosa. IECs isolated from mice or patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) were incubated with different pro-inflammatory cytokines, and Gal-1 binding, secretion of homeostatic factors and viability were assessed. Experimental models of food allergy and colitis were used to evaluate the in vivo influence of inflammation on Gal-1 binding and modulation of IECs. We found an enhanced binding of Gal-1 to: (a) murine IECs exposed to IL-1β, TNF, and IL-13; (b) IECs from inflamed areas in intestinal tissue from IBD patients; (c) small bowel of allergic mice; and (d) colon from mice with experimental colitis. Our results showed that low concentrations of Gal-1 favored a tolerogenic micro-environment, whereas high concentrations of this lectin modulated viability of IECs through mechanisms involving activation of caspase-9 and modulation of Bcl-2 protein family members. Our results showed that, when added in the presence of diverse pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-13 and IL-5, Gal-1 differentially promoted the secretion of growth factors including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), epidermal growth factor (EGF), IL-10, IL-25, and transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 ). In conclusion, we found an augmented binding of Gal-1 to IECs when exposed in vitro or in vivo to inflammatory stimuli, showing different effects depending on Gal-1 concentration. These findings highlight the importance of the inflammatory micro-environment of mucosal tissues in modulating IECs susceptibility to the immunoregulatory lectin Gal-1 and its role in epithelial cell homeostasis. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1575-1585, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566180

  12. Thyroid hormone activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling involved in adult epithelial development during intestinal remodeling in Xenopus laevis.

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    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2016-08-01

    During amphibian intestinal remodeling, thyroid hormone (TH) induces some larval epithelial cells to dedifferentiate into adult stem cells, which newly generate the absorptive epithelium analogous to the mammalian epithelium. To clarify molecular mechanisms underlying adult epithelial development, we here focus on TH response genes that are associated with the canonical Wnt pathway. Our quantitative reverse transcription plus polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses indicate that all of the genes examined, including β-catenin, c-Myc and secreted frizzle-related protein 2 (SFRP2), are up-regulated in Xenopus laevis intestine during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis. Moreover, immunoreactivity for nuclear β-catenin becomes detectable in adult stem cells from the start of their appearance and then increases in intensity in adult epithelial primordia derived from the stem cells, which actively proliferate and coexpress Wnt target genes c-Myc and LGR5. These expression profiles strongly suggest the involvement of the canonical Wnt pathway in the maintenance and/or proliferation of adult stem/progenitor cells. More importantly, by using organ cultures of the tadpole intestine, we have experimentally shown that the addition of exogenous SFRP2 protein to the culture medium promotes cell proliferation of the adult epithelial primordia, whereas inhibition of endogenous SFRP2 by its antibody suppresses their proliferation. The inhibition of SFRP2 suppresses larval epithelial changes in shape from simple columnar to stem-cell-like roundish cells, resulting in the failure of epithelial dedifferentiation. Thus, TH-up-regulated SFRP2 in the postembryonic intestine promotes adult stem cell development, possibly by acting as an agonist of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:27068920

  13. Intestinal Epithelial Serum Amyloid A Modulates Bacterial Growth In Vitro and Pro-Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Experimental Colitis

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    Wang Yu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a major acute phase protein of unknown function. SAA is mostly expressed in the liver, but also in other tissues including the intestinal epithelium. SAA reportedly has anti-bacterial effects, and because inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD result from a breakdown in homeostatic interactions between intestinal epithelia and bacteria, we hypothesized that SAA is protective during experimental colitis. Methods Intestinal SAA expression was measured in mouse and human samples. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis was induced in SAA 1/2 double knockout (DKO mice and in wildtype controls. Anti-bacterial effects of SAA1/2 were tested in intestinal epithelial cell lines transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding the CE/J SAA isoform or control vectors prior to exposure to live Escherichia coli. Results Significant levels of SAA1/SAA2 RNA and SAA protein were detected by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in mouse colonic epithelium. SAA3 expression was weaker, but similarly distributed. SAA1/2 RNA was present in the ileum and colon of conventional mice and in the colon of germfree mice. Expression of SAA3 was strongly regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharides in cultured epithelial cell lines, whereas SAA1/2 expression was constitutive and not LPS inducible. Overexpression of SAA1/2 in cultured epithelial cell lines reduced the viability of co-cultured E. coli. This might partially explain the observed increase in susceptibility of DKO mice to DSS colitis. SAA1/2 expression was increased in colon samples obtained from Crohn's Disease patients compared to controls. Conclusions Intestinal epithelial SAA displays bactericidal properties in vitro and could play a protective role in experimental mouse colitis. Altered expression of SAA in intestinal biopsies from Crohn's Disease patients suggests that SAA is involved in the disease process..

  14. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  15. In vivo gene expression profiling of human intestinal epithelial cells: analysis by laser microdissection of formalin fixed tissues

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    Sabir Sadiah

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The small intestinal epithelium mediates vital functions of nutrient absorption and host defense. The spatial organization of the epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis segregates them into regions of specialized function. However, the differences in transcriptional programming and the molecular machinery that governs the migration, adhesion, and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cell lineages in humans remain under-explored. To increase our understanding of these mechanisms, we have evaluated gene expression patterns of ileal epithelial cells isolated by laser capture microdissection from either the villus epithelial or crypt cell regions of healthy human small intestinal mucosa. Expression profiles in villus and crypt epithelium were determined by DNA microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry based methods. The expression levels of selected epithelial biomarkers were also compared between gastrointestinal tissues. Results Previously established biomarkers as well as a novel and distinct set of genes believed to be linked to epithelial cell motility, adhesion, and differentiation were found to be enriched in each of the two corresponding cell populations (GEO accession: GSE10629. Additionally, high baseline expression levels of innate antimicrobials, alpha defensin 5 (HD5 and regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (Reg3A, were detected exclusively within the small bowel crypt, most notably in the ileum in comparison to other sites along the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion The elucidation of differential gene expression patterns between crypt and villus epithelial cell lineages in human ileal tissue provides novel insights into the molecular machinery that mediates their functions and spatial organization. Moreover, our findings establish an important framework of knowledge for future investigations of human gastrointestinal diseases.

  16. Uptake of codeine into intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) and brain endothelial (RBE4) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Wiebke; Bernhagen, Jennifer; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Brandsch, Matthias

    2010-09-11

    Orally administered codeine has to permeate both the intestinal and the blood-brain barrier in order to act as analgesic and cough suppressant. In this study we characterized the uptake of codeine at intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) and brain endothelial (RBE4) cells. At both cell types, uptake of [(3)H]codeine was independent of an inwardly directed Na(+) gradient. Uptake was, however, strongly stimulated by an outwardly directed H(+) gradient and inhibited by the protonophore FCCP. [(3)H]Codeine uptake into Caco-2 cells was strongly temperature dependent. In the presence of excess amounts of unlabeled codeine, the uptake was inhibited by up to 87% (Caco-2) or 94% (RBE4), respectively. Synthetic opioids and some non-opioid organic cations like propranolol, pyrilamine and quinidine potently inhibited [(3)H]codeine uptake. Several prototype substrates of known transporters for amino acids, neurotransmitters and organic cations were ineffective. Our data are consistent with a hypothetic saturable, H(+)-dependent (antiport) mechanism not yet identified on a molecular level. The pH dependence of codeine uptake and its intracellular accumulation can partially also be explained by a model comprising diffusional membrane permeation of unionized species of codeine followed by codeine sequestration into acidic vesicles and distribution into cellular lipids. PMID:20510359

  17. In vitro Intestinal Mucosal Epithelial Responses to Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi and Attenuated Typhoid Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Maria; Lammers, Karen M; Levine, Myron M; Sztein, Marcelo B; Fasano, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by S. Typhi, is responsible for approximately 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. Little information is available regarding epithelium-bacterial interactions in S. Typhi infection. We have evaluated in vitro the effects of wild-type S. Typhi, the licensed Ty21a typhoid vaccine and the leading strains CVD 908-htrA and CVD 909 vaccine candidates on intestinal barrier function and immune response. Caco2 monolayers infected with wild-type S. Typhi exhibited alterations in the organization of tight junctions, increased paracellular permeability, and a rapid decrease in Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance as early as 4 h post-exposure. S. Typhi triggered the secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6. Caco2 cells infected with the attenuated strains exhibited a milder pro-inflammatory response with minimal disruption of the barrier integrity. We conclude that wild-type S. Typhi causes marked transient alterations of the intestinal mucosa that are more pronounced than those observed with Ty21a or new generation attenuated typhoid vaccine candidates. PMID:23408152

  18. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per T; Li, Yanqi; Bering, Stine B; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-02-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels of bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source of whey, with the lowest level being found in WPC derived from acid whey. Following acid activation, WPC from acid whey enhanced IEC proliferation compared with WPC from sweet whey or nonactivated WPC. Low-heat-treated WPC from acid whey induced greater secretion of IL-8 in IEC than either standard WPC from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC, especially from acid whey, may enhance proliferation and cytokine responses of IEC. These considerations could be important to maintain optimal bioactivity of infant formulas, including their maturational and immunological effects on the developing intestine. PMID:26709184

  19. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  20. Ethanolamine enhances the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells via the mTOR signaling pathway and mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huansheng; Xiong, Xia; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-05-01

    Ethanolamine (Etn), which is the base constituent of phosphatidylethanolamine, a major phospholipid in animal cell membranes, is required for the proliferation of many types of mammalian epithelial cells. However, it is not clear whether the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells requires Etn. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of Etn on the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The addition of Etn at 100 or 200 μM was found to enhance the proliferation of IPEC-1 cells. The expression of cell cycle-related proteins CDK4, RB3, cyclin A, and PCNA was also enhanced by Etn. Moreover, the expression or phosphorylation levels of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway protein and the expression of proteins related to mitochondrial function were also affected by Etn in IPEC-1 cells. These results indicate that Etn promotes the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells by exerting effects on mTOR signaling pathway and mitochondrial function. PMID:27083163

  1. Dissecting stromal-epithelial interactions in a 3D in vitro cellularized intestinal model for permeability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Araújo, Francisca; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Absorption evaluation plays an increasingly important role at the early stage of drug discovery due to its potential to scan the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) properties of new drug candidates. Therefore, a new three-dimensional (3D) in vitro model replicating the intestinal functioning is herein proposed aiming to dissect the stromal-epithelial interactions and evaluate the permeation of a model drug, insulin. Inspired on the intestinal mucosal architecture, the present model comprises intestinal myofibroblasts (CCD18-Co cells) embedded in Matrigel, onto which epithelial enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and mucus-producing cells (HT29-MTX cells) were seeded. CCD18-Co myofibroblasts showed to have a central role in the remodeling of the surrounding matrix confirmed by the production of fibronectin. Subsequently, this matrix revealed to be essential to the maintenance of the model architecture by supporting the overlying epithelial cells. In terms of functionality, this model allowed the efficient prediction of insulin permeability in which the presence of mucus, the less tight character between Caco-2 and HT29-MTX epithelial cells and the 3D assembly were critical factors. Concluding, this model constitutes a robust tool in the drug development field with potential to bridge the traditional 2D cell culture models and in vivo animal models. PMID:25934277

  2. Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology Release of metabolic enzymes by Giardia in response to interaction with intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringqvist, Emma; Palm, J.E. Daniel; Skarin, Hanna; Hehl, Adrian B.; Weiland, Malin; Davids, Barbara J.; Reiner, David S.; Griffiths, William J.; Eckmann, Lars; Gillin, Frances D.; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, an important cause of diarrheal disease, resides in the small intestinal lumen in close apposition to epithelial cells. Since the disease mechanisms underlying giardiasis are poorly understood, elucidating the specific interactions of the parasite with the host epithelium is likely to provide clues to understanding the pathogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that contact of Giardia lamblia with intestinal epithelial cells might lead to release of specific proteins. Using established co-culture models, intestinal ligated loops and a proteomics approach, we identified three G. lamblia proteins (arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase and enolase), previously recognized as immunodominant antigens during acute giardiasis. Release was stimulated by cell–cell interactions, since only small amounts of argi-nine deiminase and enolase were detected in the medium after culturing of G. lamblia alone. The secreted G. lamblia proteins were localized to the cytoplasm and the inside of the plasma membrane of trophozoites. Furthermore, in vitro studies with recombinant arginine deiminase showed that the secreted Giardia proteins can disable host innate immune factors such as nitric oxide production. These results indicate that contact of Giardia with epithelial cells triggers metabolic enzyme release, which might facilitate effective colonization of the human small intestine. PMID:18359106

  3. Effect of selenium nanoparticles with different sizes in primary cultured intestinal epithelial cells of crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang YB

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanbo Wang, Xuxia Yan, Linglin Fu Marine Resources and Nutrition Biology Research Center, Food Quality and Safety Department, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nano-selenium (Se, with its high bioavailability and low toxicity, has attracted wide attention for its potential application in the prevention of oxidative damage in animal tissues. However, the effect of nano-Se of different sizes on the intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio is poorly understood. Our study showed that different sizes and doses of nano-Se have varied effects on the cellular protein contents and the enzyme activities of secreted lactate dehydrogenase, intracellular sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. It was also indicated that nano-Se had a size-dependent effect on the primary intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp. Thus, these findings may bring us a step closer to understanding the size effect and the bioavailability of nano-Se on the intestinal tract of the crucian carp. Keywords: selenium nanoparticle, intestinal epithelial cell, crucian carp, primary culture

  4. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Heat Stress-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo.

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    Shasha He

    Full Text Available Heat stress is important in the pathogenesis of intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Ferulic acid (FA, a phenolic acid widely found in fruits and vegetables, can scavenge free radicals and activate cell stress responses. This study is aimed at investigating protective effects of FA on heat stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. Intestinal epithelial (IEC-6 cells were pretreated with FA for 4 h and then exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER and increased permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran (FD4. Both effects were inhibited by FA in a dose-dependent manner. FA significantly attenuated the decrease in occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression observed with heat stress. The distortion and redistribution of occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin proteins were also effectively prevented by FA pretreatment. Moreover, heat stress diminished electron-dense material detected in tight junctions (TJs, an effect also alleviated by FA in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo heat stress model, FA (50 mg/kg was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 consecutive days prior to exposure to heat stress. FA pretreatment significantly attenuated the effects of heat stress on the small intestine, including the increased FD4 permeability, disrupted tight junctions and microvilli structure, and reduced occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FA pretreatment is potentially protective against heat stress-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  5. Bacteria regulate intestinal epithelial cell differentiation factors both in vitro and in vivo.

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    Svetlana Becker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human colon harbours a plethora of bacteria known to broadly impact on mucosal metabolism and function and thought to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and colon cancer development. In this report, we investigated the effect of colonic bacteria on epithelial cell differentiation factors in vitro and in vivo. As key transcription factors we focused on Hes1, known to direct towards an absorptive cell fate, Hath1 and KLF4, which govern goblet cell. METHODS: Expression of the transcription factors Hes1, Hath1 and KLF4, the mucins Muc1 and Muc2 and the defensin HBD2 were measured by real-time PCR in LS174T cells following incubation with several heat-inactivated E. coli strains, including the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917+/- flagellin, Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. For protein detection Western blot experiments and chamber-slide immunostaining were performed. Finally, mRNA and protein expression of these factors was evaluated in the colon of germfree vs. specific pathogen free vs. conventionalized mice and colonic goblet cells were counted. RESULTS: Expression of Hes1 and Hath1, and to a minor degree also of KLF4, was reduced by E. coli K-12 and E. coli Nissle 1917. In contrast, Muc1 and HBD2 expression were significantly enhanced, independent of the Notch signalling pathway. Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 regulated Hes1, Hath1, Muc1 and HBD2 through flagellin. In vivo experiments confirmed the observed in vitro effects of bacteria by a diminished colonic expression of Hath1 and KLF4 in specific pathogen free and conventionalized mice as compared to germ free mice whereas the number of goblet cells was unchanged in these mice. CONCLUSIONS: Intestinal bacteria influence the intestinal epithelial differentiation factors Hes1, Hath1 and KLF4, as well as Muc1 and HBD2, in vitro and in vivo. The induction of Muc1 and HBD2 seems to be triggered directly by bacteria and not by Notch.

  6. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  7. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy

  8. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory responses in human intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Alip Borthakur

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been used as alternative prevention and therapy modalities in intestinal inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Pathophysiology of IBD and NEC includes the production of diverse lipid mediators, including platelet-activating factor (PAF that mediate inflammatory responses in the disease. PAF is known to activate NF-κB, however, the mechanisms of PAF-induced inflammation are not fully defined. We have recently described a novel PAF-triggered pathway of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, requiring the pivotal role of the adaptor protein Bcl10 and its interactions with CARMA3 and MALT1. The current studies examined the potential role of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus in reversing the PAF-induced, Bcl10-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in IECs. PAF treatment (5 µM×24 h of NCM460 and Caco-2 cells significantly increased nuclear p65 NF-κB levels and IL-8 secretion (2-3-fold, P<0.05, compared to control, which were blocked by pretreatment of the cells for 6 h with L. acidophilus (LA or its culture supernatant (CS, followed by continued treatments with PAF for 24 h. LA-CS also attenuated PAF-induced increase in Bcl10 mRNA and protein levels and Bcl10 promoter activity. LA-CS did not alter PAF-induced interaction of Bcl10 with CARMA3, but attenuated Bcl10 interaction with MALT1 and also PAF-induced ubiquitination of IKKγ. Efficacy of bacteria-free CS of LA in counteracting PAF-induced inflammatory cascade suggests that soluble factor(s in the CS of LA mediate these effects. These results define a novel mechanism by which probiotics counteract PAF-induced inflammation in IECs.

  9. Strategies of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica to evade the innate immune responses of intestinal epithelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ankri

    2002-11-01

    Molecules expressed by the pathogenic ameoba Entamoeba histolytica but weakly expressed or absent from the non-pathogenic ameoba Entamoeba dispar could be used by intestinal epithelial cells to discriminate between the two species and to initiate an appropriate inflammatory response. Among the possible molecules involved in this identification are the Gal/GalNac lectin and the lipophosphoglycan. Once the inflammatory response is initiated, E. histolytica trophozoites have to protect themselves against reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by intestinal epithelial cells, oxygen intermediates, and cytotoxic molecules released by activated neutrophils. By screening the E. histolytica genome, we have identified proteins that may play a role in the defence strategy of the parasite. One of these proteins, a serine proteinase inhibitor, inhibits human neutrophil cathepsin G, a key component of the host defence.

  10. Short chain fatty acids stimulate epithelial mucin 2 expression through differential effects on prostaglandin E(1) and E(2) production by intestinal myofibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Willemsen, L.E.; Koetsier, M A; Deventer, van, S.J.H.; Tol, van, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The mucus layer protects the gastrointestinal mucosa from mechanical, chemical, and microbial challenge. Mucin 2 (MUC-2) is the most prominent mucin secreted by intestinal epithelial cells. There is accumulating evidence that subepithelial myofibroblasts regulate intestinal epithelial cell function and are an important source of prostaglandins (PG). PG enhance mucin secretion and are key players in mucoprotection. The role of bacterial fermentation products in these processes dese...

  11. Inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway in human intestinal epithelial cells by commensal Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaci, Ghalia; Lakhdari, Omar; Doré, Joël; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Delorme, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Streptococcus salivarius exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and monocytes. Strains were screened using a reporter clone, HT-29/kB-luc-E, induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Supernatant from each strain downregulated NF-κB activation. The two most efficient strains produced an active metabolite (<3 kDa) which was able to downregulate the secretion of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). PMID:21602373

  12. Inhibition of the NF-κB Pathway in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Commensal Streptococcus salivarius ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaci, Ghalia; Lakhdari, Omar; Doré, Joël; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M.; Delorme, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and monocytes. Strains were screened using a reporter clone, HT-29/kB-luc-E, induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Supernatant from each strain downregulated NF-κB activation. The two most efficient strains produced an active metabolite (<3 kDa) which was able to downregulate the secretion of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). PMID:21602373

  13. Immunoregulatory Effect of Bifidobacteria Strains in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells through Modulation of Ubiquitin-Editing Enzyme A20 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Tomosada, Yohsuke; Villena, Julio; Murata, Kozue; Chiba, Eriko; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Aso, Hisashi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Saito, Tadao; KITAZAWA, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously showed that evaluation of anti-inflammatory activities of lactic acid bacteria in porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells is useful for selecting potentially immunobiotic strains. Objective The aims of the present study were: i) to select potentially immunomodulatory bifidobacteria that beneficially modulate the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4-triggered inflammatory response in PIE cells and; ii) to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-inflamma...

  14. Identification of Store-independent and Store-operated Ca2+ Conductances in Caenorhabditis elegans Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Estevez, Ana Y.; Roberts, Randolph K.; Strange, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers significant experimental advantages for defining the genetic basis of diverse biological processes. Genetic and physiological analyses have demonstrated that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)–dependent Ca2+ oscillations in intestinal epithelial cells play a central role in regulating the nematode defecation cycle, an ultradian rhythm with a periodicity of 45–50 s. Patch clamp studies combined with behavioral assays and forward and reverse genetic sc...

  15. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and commensal E. coli K12 differentially affect the inflammasome in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Helen M; Apladas, Aretussa; Scharl, Michael; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The probiotic bacterial strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC), diarrhea and constipation. Its beneficial effects in the treatment of UC have been demonstrated in several controlled clinical studies; however, the mechanism of action on the cellular level is still not completely clear. The intracellular pattern recognition receptor NLRP3 is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), activates caspase-1 within the inflamma...

  16. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces cytokine and chemokine production via NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yujun; Lü, Xuena; Man, Chaoxin; Han, Linlin; Shan, Yi; Qu, Xingguang; Liu, Ying; Yang, Shiqin; Xue, Yuqing; Zhang, Yinghua

    2012-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells can respond to certain bacteria by producing an array of cytokines and chemokines which are associated with host immune responses. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a characterized probiotic, originally isolated from human feces. This study aimed to test the ability of L. acidophilus NCFM to stimulate cytokine and chemokine production in intestinal epithelial cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their upregulation. In experiments using intestinal epithelial cell lines and mouse models, we observed that L. acidophilus NCFM could rapidly but transiently upregulate a number of effector genes encoding cytokines and chemokines such as interleukin 1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL20 and that cytokines showed lower expression levels with L. acidophilus NCFM treatment than chemokines. Moreover, L. acidophilus NCFM could activate a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), in intestinal epithelial cell lines. The phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in intestinal epithelial cell lines was also enhanced by L. acidophilus NCFM. Furthermore, inhibitors of NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate [PDTC]) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) significantly reduced cytokine and chemokine production in the intestinal epithelial cell lines stimulated by L. acidophilus NCFM, suggesting that both NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were important for the production of cytokines and chemokines induced by L. acidophilus NCFM. PMID:22357649

  17. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Regulate Secretion of IL-8 from Human Intestinal Epithelial Cell Lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarat, M; Vasiljevic, T; Apostolopoulos, V; Donkor, O

    2015-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) including acetate, propionate and butyrate play an important role in the physiological functions of epithelial cells and colonocytes, such as immune response regulation. Human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) contribute in intestinal immune response via different ways, such as production of different immune factors including Interleukin (IL) IL-8, which act as chemoattractant for neutrophils, and subsequently enhance inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effects of SCFAs on IECs viability and production of IL-8 in vitro. SCFAs were co-cultured with either normal intestinal epithelial (T4056) or adenocarcinoma derived (HT-29) cell lines for 24-96 h in the presence of E.coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Cell viability, proliferation, production of IL-8 and expression of IL-8 mRNA were determined in the cell cultures. The result showed that 20 mM of SCFAs was non-cytotoxic to T4056 and enhanced their growth, whereas the growth of HT-29 was inhibited. The SCFAs down regulated LPS-stimulated IL-8 secretion with different response patterns, but no obvious effects on the release of IL-8 from non LPS- stimulated cells. In conclusion, SCFAs showed regulatory effect on release of LPS-stimulated IL-8 as well as the expression of mRNA of IL-8; these might explain the anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic mechanism of SCFAs. PMID:26436853

  18. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca(2+) uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  19. Neonatal Fc Receptor-Mediated IgG Transport Across Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Potentially Provide the Mucosal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinyue; Li, Fei; He, Qigai; Jin, Hui; Liu, Mei; Li, Shaowen; Hu, Sishun; Xiao, Yuncai; Bi, Dingren; Li, Zili

    2016-06-01

    It has been well characterized that piglets can absorb colostrum IgG across the intestine to neonatal bloodstream and a certain level of IgG has been found in the mucosal secretions of the porcine intestinal tract. However, little is known about how the maternal IgG transport across the intestinal barrier and how IgG enter the lumen of intestinal tract. In this study, we demonstrated that the porcine neonatal Fc receptor (pFcRn) was expressed in a model of normal porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) as well as in kidney cells (PK-15), and pFcRn was mainly distributed in the apical side of the polarized IPEC-J2 cells. Analyzing the phylogenetic relatedness of this gene we found that swine and human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) amino acid sequence are closer than rodents. We also showed that pFcRn mediated bidirectional IgG transport across polarized IPEC-J2 cells and bound to IgG in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, pFcRn-transcytosed viral-specific IgG reduced the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) yield from the luminal direction by a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) assay. Our results indicate that pFcRn-dependent bidirectional IgG transport across the intestinal epithelium plays critical role in the acquisition of humoral immunity in early life and in host defense at mucosal surfaces. PMID:26982157

  20. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  1. Interferon-γ induces expression of MHC class II on intestinal epithelial cells and protects mice from colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Thelemann

    Full Text Available Immune responses against intestinal microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and involve CD4(+ T cells, which are activated by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APCs. However, it is largely unexplored how inflammation-induced MHCII expression by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC affects CD4(+ T cell-mediated immunity or tolerance induction in vivo. Here, we investigated how epithelial MHCII expression is induced and how a deficiency in inducible epithelial MHCII expression alters susceptibility to colitis and the outcome of colon-specific immune responses. Colitis was induced in mice that lacked inducible expression of MHCII molecules on all nonhematopoietic cells, or specifically on IECs, by continuous infection with Helicobacter hepaticus and administration of interleukin (IL-10 receptor-blocking antibodies (anti-IL10R mAb. To assess the role of interferon (IFN-γ in inducing epithelial MHCII expression, the T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis was used. Abrogation of MHCII expression by nonhematopoietic cells or IECs induces colitis associated with increased colonic frequencies of innate immune cells and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. CD4(+ T-helper type (Th1 cells - but not group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs or Th17 cells - are elevated, resulting in an unfavourably altered ratio between CD4(+ T cells and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+ regulatory T (Treg cells. IFN-γ produced mainly by CD4(+ T cells is required to upregulate MHCII expression by IECs. These results suggest that, in addition to its proinflammatory roles, IFN-γ exerts a critical anti-inflammatory function in the intestine which protects against colitis by inducing MHCII expression on IECs. This may explain the failure of anti-IFN-γ treatment to induce remission in IBD patients, despite the association of elevated IFN-γ and IBD.

  2. Altered intestinal microbial flora and impaired epithelial barrier structure and function in CKD: the nature, mechanisms, consequences and potential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Zhao, Ying-Yong; Pahl, Madeleine V

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in systemic inflammation and oxidative stress which play a central role in CKD progression and its adverse consequences. Although many of the causes and consequences of oxidative stress and inflammation in CKD have been extensively explored, little attention had been paid to the intestine and its microbial flora as a potential source of these problems. Our recent studies have revealed significant disruption of the colonic, ileal, jejunal and gastric epithelial tight junction in different models of CKD in rats. Moreover, the disruption of the epithelial barrier structure and function found in uremic animals was replicated in cultured human colonocytes exposed to uremic human plasma in vitro We have further found significant changes in the composition and function of colonic bacterial flora in humans and animals with advanced CKD. Together, uremia-induced impairment of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and changes in composition of the gut microbiome contribute to the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by accommodating the translocation of endotoxin, microbial fragments and other noxious luminal products in the circulation. In addition, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, trimethylamine-N-oxide and many as-yet unidentified retained compounds in end-stage renal disease patients. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the gut microbiome and intestinal epithelial barrier structure and their role in the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. In addition, potential interventions aimed at mitigating these abnormalities are briefly discussed. PMID:25883197

  3. Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: lessons learned from animal models and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Mercado, Joseph R; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pizarro, Theresa T

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier. PMID:24062746

  4. Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: Lessons learned from animal models and human genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca ePastorelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier.

  5. Effects of biodegradable Mg–6Zn alloy extracts on apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the effects of Mg–6Zn alloys on apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. ► The apoptosis was evaluated by investigating the expression of caspase-1 and Bcl-2. ► The IEC-6 cells displayed better cell functions in 60% or 20% extract. ► The conspicuous alkaline environment is disadvantageous to apoptosis of IEC cells. ► The excessive Mg concentration is disadvantageous to apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: In this study, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6 were cultured in different concentration extracts of Mg–6Zn alloys for different time periods. To achieve a total of three concentrations (100%, 60% and 20% concentration), the extracts were serially diluted with Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium High Glucose to observe a dose–response relationship. We studied the indirect effects of Mg–6Zn alloys on IEC-6 cells apoptosis. The apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was measured using flow cytometry. And the apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was evaluated by investigating the expression of caspase-1and Bcl-2 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting tests. It was found that the levels of apoptosis in IEC-6 cells cultured in 100% Mg–6Zn alloy extracts were significantly higher than those in 60% and 20% extracts; the 100% extract can down-regulate expression of Bcl-2 after culture. The in vitro results indicated that the conspicuous alkaline environment and excessive Mg concentration, even Zn concentration caused by rapid corrosion of Mg–6Zn alloys promote IEC-6 cells apoptosis, although further experiments will be necessary to formally prove our conclusions. Therefore, the adjustment of the degradation rate is needed for using Mg–Zn alloy as a surgical suture material.

  6. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase may decrease intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and improve intestinal epithelial barrier function after ischemia- reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Yun Zheng; Xiao-Bing Fu; Jian-Guo Xu; Jing-Yu Zhao; Tong-Zhu Sun; Wei Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat small intestine after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)insult and the relationship between activation of p38 MAPK and apoptotic cell death of intestine.METHODS: Ninety Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups, namely sham-operated group (C), I/R vehicle group (R) and SB203580 pre-treated group(S).In groups R and S, the superior mesenteric artery(SMA)was separated and occluded for 45 min, then released for reperfusion for0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h. In group C, SMA was separated without occlusion. Plasma D-lactate levels were examined and histological changes were observed under a light microscope. The activity of p38 MAPK was determined by Western immunoblotting and apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUDP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL).RESULTS: Intestinal ischemia followed by reperfusion activated p38 MAPK, and the maximal level of activation (7.3-fold vs sham-operated group) was reached 30 min after I/R. Treatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor,reduced intestinal apoptosis (26.72±3.39% vs62.50±3.08%in I/R vehicle, P<0.01) and decreased plasma D-lactate level (0.78±0.15 mmol/L in I/R vehicle vs0.42±0.17 mmol/L in SB-treated group) and improved post-ischemic intestinal histological damage.CONCLUSION: p38 MAPK plays a crucial role in the signal transduction pathway mediating post-ischemic intestinal apoptosis, and inhibition of p38 MAPK may attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  7. Changes in intestinal glucocorticoid sensitivity in early life shape the risk of epithelial barrier defect in maternal-deprived rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Moussaoui

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GC contribute to human intestine ontogeny and accelerate gut barrier development in preparation to birth. Rat gut is immature at birth, and high intestinal GC sensitivity during the first two weeks of life resembles that of premature infants. This makes suckling rats a model to investigate postpartum impact of maternal separation (MS-associated GC release in preterm babies, and whether GC sensitivity may shape MS effects in immature gut. A 4 hours-MS applied once at postnatal day (PND10 enhanced plasma corticosterone in male and female pups, increased by two times the total in vivo intestinal permeability (IP to oral FITC-Dextran 4 kDa (FD4 immediately after the end of MS, and induced bacterial translocation (BT to liver and spleen. Ussing chamber experiments demonstrated a 2-fold increase of permeability to FD4 in the colon immediately after the end of MS, but not in the ileum. Colonic permeability was not only increased for FD4 but also to intact horseradish peroxidase 44 kDa in MS pups. In vivo, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR antagonist RU486 or ML7 blockade of myosin light chain kinase controlling epithelial cytoskeleton contraction prevented MS-induced IP increase to oral FD4 and BT. In addition, the GR agonist dexamethasone dose-dependently mimicked MS-increase of IP to oral FD4. In contrast, MS effects on IP to oral FD4 and BT were absent at PND20, a model for full-term infant, characterized by a marked drop of IP to FD4 in response to dexamethasone, and decreased GR expression in the colon only compared to PND10 pups. These results show that high intestinal GC responsiveness in a rat model of prematurity defines a vulnerable window for a post-delivery MS, evoking immediate disruption of epithelial integrity in the large intestine, and increasing susceptibility to macromolecule passage and bacteremia.

  8. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries. (author)

  9. Degradation of coeliac disease-inducing rye secalin by germinating cereal enzymes: diminishing toxic effects in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, S M; Lindfors, K; Venäläinen, J I; Hautala, A; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A; Kaukovirta-Norja, A; Auriola, S; Mauriala, T; Mäki, M; Kaukinen, K

    2010-08-01

    Currently the only treatment for coeliac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet excluding food products containing wheat, rye and barley. There is, however, only scarce evidence as to harmful effects of rye in coeliac disease. To confirm the assumption that rye should be excluded from the coeliac patient's diet, we now sought to establish whether rye secalin activates toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models as extensively as wheat gliadin. Further, we investigated the efficacy of germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyse secalin into short fragments and whether secalin-induced harmful effects can be reduced by such pretreatment. In the current study, secalin elicited toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells similarly to gliadin: it induced epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion and actin reorganization. In high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), germinating barley enzymes provided the most efficient degradation of secalin and gliadin peptides and was thus selected for further in vitro analysis. After germinating barley enzyme pretreatment, all toxic reactions induced by secalin were ameliorated. We conclude that germinating enzymes from barley are particularly efficient in the degradation of rye secalin. In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for coeliac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality coeliac-safe food products. PMID:20560983

  10. Determination of tolerable fatty acids and cholera toxin concentrations using human intestinal epithelial cells and BALB/c mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamari, Farshad; Tychowski, Joanna; Lorentzen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The positive role of fatty acids in the prevention and alleviation of non-human and human diseases have been and continue to be extensively documented. These roles include influences on infectious and non-infectious diseases including prevention of inflammation as well as mucosal immunity to infectious diseases. Cholera is an acute intestinal illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It occurs in developing nations and if left untreated, can result in death. While vaccines for cholera exist, they are not always effective and other preventative methods are needed. We set out to determine tolerable concentrations of three fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and cholera toxin using mouse BALB/C macrophages and human intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. We solubilized the above fatty acids and used cell proliferation assays to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of the fatty acids that are not detrimental to human intestinal epithelial cell viability. We solubilized cholera toxin and used it in an assay to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of cholera toxin that do not statistically decrease cell viability in BALB/C macrophages. We found the optimum fatty acid concentrations to be between 1-5 ng/μl, and that for cholera toxin to be < 30 ng per treatment. This data may aid future studies that aim to find a protective mucosal role for fatty acids in prevention or alleviation of cholera infections. PMID:23748896

  11. Competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli,enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Shun Zhong; Zhen-Shu Zhang; Ji-De Wang; Zhuo-Sheng Lai; Qun-Ying Wang; Ling-Jia Pan; Yue-Xin Ren

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli(ETEC), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli(EPEC) and Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile)to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027 (B. ado 1027).METHODS: The binding of bacteria to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo was counted by adhesion assay. The inhibition of adherence of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of B. ado 1027was evaluated quantitatively by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The purified adhesin at the concentration of 10μg/mL, 20μg/mL and 30μg/mL except at 1μg/mL and 5μg/mL could inhibit significantly the adhesion of ETEC,EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo.Moreover, we observed that a reduction in bacterial adhesion was occurred with increase in the concentration of adhesin,and MFI (Mean fluorescent intensity) was decreased with increase in the concentration of adhesin.CONCLUSION: The purified adhesin of B. ado 1027 can inhibit the adhesion of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo in a dose-dependent manner.

  12. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Mariarita; Coretti, Lorena; Florio, Ermanno; Pezone, Antonio; Calabrò, Viola; Falco, Geppino; Keller, Simona; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Vittorio Enrico; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3), methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27) and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene. PMID:27253528

  13. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline;

    2007-01-01

    -kappaB activation and cytokine secretion in vitro. Thus, DMBT1 may play an important role in the first line of mucosal defense conferring immune exclusion of bacterial cell wall components. Dysregulated intestinal DMBT1 expression due to mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 gene may be part of the complex pathophysiology......Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...

  14. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J;

    2010-01-01

    comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33...... regulation of apoptosis and adipogenesis, and lipid-metabolism related regulation by the probiotics. Specific changes such as regulation of cell-cell adhesion by B. lactis 420, superoxide metabolism by L. salivarius Ls-33, and regulation of MAPK pathway by L. acidophilus NCFM™ were noted. Furthermore...

  15. Epithelial barrier and ion transport in coeliac sprue: electrical measurements on intestinal aspiration biopsy specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    Schulzke, J D; Schulzke, I; Fromm, M.; Riecken, E O

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function and ion transport was studied in coeliac sprue using a miniaturised Ussing device for measurements on diagnostic aspiration biopsy specimens from the jejunum of untreated or gluten free nourished sprue patients, or from healthy controls. Pure epithelial resistance (Re) indicating epithelial barrier function was determined by transmural alternating current impedance analysis. It was reduced by 56% in acute sprue mean (SEM) (9 (1) omega.cm2) compared with controls (2...

  16. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 stimulates P-glycoprotein expression and function in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saksena, Seema; Priyamvada, Shubha; Kumar, Anoop; Akhtar, Maria; Soni, Vikas; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu Natarajan; Alakkam, Anas; Alrefai, Waddah A.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal P-glycoprotein (Pgp/multidrug resistance 1), encoded by the ATP-binding cassette B1 gene, is primarily involved in the transepithelial efflux of toxic metabolites and xenobiotics from the mucosa into the gut lumen. Reduced Pgp function and expression has been shown to be associated with intestinal inflammatory disorders. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF2) has emerged as a potential target for modulation of intestinal inflammation and maintenance of gut mucosal integrity. Whether K...

  17. Functional Comparison of Human Colonic Carcinoma Cell Lines and Primary Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells for Investigations of Intestinal Drug Permeability and First-Pass Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Chapron, Brian D; Wang, Zhican; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2016-03-01

    To further the development of a model for simultaneously assessing intestinal absorption and first-pass metabolism in vitro, Caco-2, LS180, T84, and fetal human small intestinal epithelial cells (fSIECs) were cultured on permeable inserts, and the integrity of cell monolayers, CYP3A4 activity, and the inducibility of enzymes and transporters involved in intestinal drug disposition were measured. Caco-2, T84, and fSIECs all formed tight junctions, as assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy for zonula occludens-1, which was well organized into circumscribing strands in T84, Caco-2, and fSIECs but was diffuse in LS180 cells. The transepithelial electrical resistance value for LS180 monolayers was lower than that for Caco-2, T84, and fSIECs. In addition, the apical-to-basolateral permeability of the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow across LS180 monolayers was greater than in fSIECs, T84, and Caco-2 monolayers. The transcellular marker propranolol exhibited similar permeability across all cells. With regard to metabolic capacity, T84 and LS180 cells showed comparable basal midazolam hydroxylation activity and was inducible by rifampin and 1α,25(OH)2D3 in LS180 cells, but only marginally so in T84 cells. The basal CYP3A4 activity of fSIECs and Caco-2 cells was much lower and not inducible. Interestingly, some of the drug transporters expressed in LS180 and Caco-2 cells were induced by either 1α,25(OH)2D3 or rifampin or both, but effects were limited in the other two cell lines. These results suggest that none of the cell lines tested fully replicated the drug disposition properties of the small intestine and that the search for an ideal screening tool must continue. PMID:26700954

  18. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa. PMID:26324224

  19. Interleukin-17 is a potent immuno-modulator and regulator of normal human intestinal epithelial cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upregulation of the T-cell derived cytokine interleukin (IL-17) was reported in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders. In this study, we analyzed the effect of IL-17 on human intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) turnover and functions. Proliferation and apoptosis in response to IL-17 was monitored in HIEC (cell counts, [3H]thymidine incorporation method, and annexinV-PI-apoptosis assay). Signalling pathways were analyzed by Western blots, electromobility shift assay, and immunofluorescence studies. IL-17 proved to be a potent inhibitor of HIEC proliferation without any pro-apoptotic/necrotic effect. The growth inhibitory effect of IL-17 was mediated via the p38 stress kinase. Consequently, the p38-SAPkinase-inhibitor SB203580 abrogated this anti-mitotic effect. In parallel, IL-17 provoked the degradation of IκBα, allowing nuclear translocation of the p65 NF-κB subunit and induction of the NF-κB-controlled genes IL-6 and -8. IL-17 potently blocks epithelial cell turnover while at the same time amplifying an inflammatory response in a positive feedback manner

  20. Butyrate produced by commensal bacteria potentiates phorbol esters induced AP-1 response in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Nepelska

    Full Text Available The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells.

  1. New Ways of Thinking about (and Teaching about) Intestinal Epithelial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kim E.

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes a presentation made at the Teaching Refresher Course of the American Physiological Society, which was held at the Experimental Biology meeting in 2007. The intestinal epithelium has important ion transport and barrier functions that contribute pivotally to normal physiological functioning of the intestine and other body…

  2. Protective effects of ψ taraxasterol 3-O-myristate and arnidiol 3-O-myristate isolated from Calendula officinalis on epithelial intestinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Catanzaro, Daniela; Cocetta, Veronica; Igl, Nadine; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Cecconello, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2016-03-01

    The triterpene esters ᴪ taraxasterol-3-O-myristate (1) and arnidiol-3-O-myristate (2) were tested for their ability to protect epithelial intestinal barrier in an in vitro model. Their effects on ROS production and on trans-epithelial resistance were investigated on CaCo-2 cell monolayers both in basal and stress-induced conditions. Both compounds were able to modulate the stress damage induced by H2O2 and INFγ+TNFα, showing a potential use as model compounds for the study of new therapeutic agents for intestinal inflammations. PMID:26791917

  3. Chimeric-transgenic mice represent a powerful tool for studying how the proliferation and differentiation programs of intestinal epithelial cell lineages are regulated.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermiston, M L; Green, R. P.; Gordon, J I

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo system has been developed for examining the effects of wild-type or mutant proteins on cell fate determination in the mouse intestinal epithelium or on the proliferation and differentiation programs of its component epithelial lineages. This system takes advantage of the fact that at the conclusion of gut morphogenesis, each intestinal crypt is composed of a monoclonal population of cells descended from a single active multipotent stem cell, each villus is supplied by several monoc...

  4. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Plog

    Full Text Available The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype.

  5. AT1R blocker losartan attenuates intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in a mouse model of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Jing; Shi, Yong-Yan; Wang, En-Bo; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Qun

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin II, which is the main effector of the renin‑angiotensin system, has an important role in intestinal inflammation via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of the AT1R blocker losartan on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Losartan was administered to male adult C57BL/6 J mice 2 weeks prior to the induction of colitis, and images of the whole colon were captured to record changes, scored according to a microscopic scoring system, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed in order to investigate colonic inflammation. In addition, intestinal epithelial barrier permeability was evaluated, and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis was measured using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and apoptosis-related protein expression levels were detected by western blotting. Losartan was able to attenuate TNBS-induced body weight loss and colonic damage. Furthermore, T helper 1-mediated proinflammatory cytokines were suppressed by losartan, and gut permeability was largely preserved. TUNEL staining revealed reduced IEC apoptosis in the losartan-treated mice. Losartan also increased the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2)/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio and suppressed caspase-3 induction. These results suggested that the AT1R blocker losartan may attenuate TNBS-induced colitis by inhibiting the apoptosis of IECs. The effects of losartan were partially mediated through increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and subsequently suppressing the induction of the proapoptotic mediator caspase-3. PMID:26676112

  6. Ephrin-B reverse signaling induces expression of wound healing associated genes in IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Hafner; Stefanie Meyer; Ilja Hagen; Bernd Becker; Alexander Roesch; Michael Landthaler; Thomas Vogt

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Eph receptors and ephrin ligands play a pivotal role in development and tissue maintenance. Since previous data have indicated an involvement of ephrin-B2 in epithelial healing, we investigated the gene expression and downstream signaling pathways induced by ephrin-B mediated cell-cell signaling in intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Upon stimulation of ephrin-B pathways in IFC-6 cells with recombinant rat EphB1-Fc, gene expression was analyzed by Affymetrix(R) rat genome 230 high density arrays at different time points. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, MAP kinase pathways and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation downstream of ephrin-B were investigated by immunoblotting and fluorescence microscopy.RESULTS: Stimulation of the ephrin-B reverse signaling pathway in IEC-6 cells induces predominant expression of genes known to be involved into wound healing/cell migration, antiapoptotic pathways, host defense and inflammation. Cox-2, c-Fos, Egr-1, Egr-2, and MCP-1 were found among the most significantly regulated genes.Furthermore, we show that the expression of repairrelated genes is also accompanied by activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway and FAK, two key regulators of epithelial restitution.CONCLUSION: Stimulation of the ephrin-B reverse signaling pathway induces a phenotype characterized by upregulation of repair-related genes, which may partially be mediated by ERK1/2 pathways.

  7. Identification of store-independent and store-operated Ca2+ conductances in Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Ana Y; Roberts, Randolph K; Strange, Kevin

    2003-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers significant experimental advantages for defining the genetic basis of diverse biological processes. Genetic and physiological analyses have demonstrated that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ oscillations in intestinal epithelial cells play a central role in regulating the nematode defecation cycle, an ultradian rhythm with a periodicity of 45-50 s. Patch clamp studies combined with behavioral assays and forward and reverse genetic screening would provide a powerful approach for defining the molecular details of oscillatory Ca2+ signaling. However, electrophysiological characterization of the intestinal epithelium has not been possible because of its relative inaccessibility. We developed primary intestinal epithelial cell cultures that circumvent this problem. Intestinal cells express two highly Ca2+-selective, voltage-independent conductances. One conductance, IORCa, is constitutively active, exhibits strong outward rectification, is 60-70-fold more selective for Ca2+ than Na+, is inhibited by intracellular Mg2+ with a K1/2 of 692 microM, and is insensitive to Ca2+ store depletion. Inhibition of IORCa with high intracellular Mg2+ concentrations revealed the presence of a small amplitude conductance that was activated by passive depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Active depletion of Ca2+ stores with IP3 or ionomycin increased the rate of current activation approximately 8- and approximately 22-fold compared with passive store depletion. The store-operated conductance, ISOC, exhibits strong inward rectification, and the channel is highly selective for Ca2+ over monovalent cations with a divalent cation selectivity sequence of Ca2+ > Ba2+ approximately Sr2+. Reversal potentials for ISOC could not be detected accurately between 0 and +80 mV, suggesting that PCa/PNa of the channel may exceed 1,000:1. Lanthanum, SKF 96365, and 2-APB inhibit both IORCa and ISOC reversibly. Our studies provide the first

  8. Gut microbiome-derived metabolites modulate intestinal epithelial cell damage and mitigate graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Nathan D; Jenq, Robert; Mathew, Anna V; Koenigsknecht, Mark; Hanash, Alan; Toubai, Tomomi; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Wu, Shin-Rong; Sun, Yaping; Rossi, Corinne; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Byun, Jaeman; Shono, Yusuke; Lindemans, Caroline; Calafiore, Marco; Schmidt, Thomas C; Honda, Kenya; Young, Vincent B; Pennathur, Subramaniam; van den Brink, Marcel; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    The effect of alterations in intestinal microbiota on microbial metabolites and on disease processes such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is not known. Here we carried out an unbiased analysis to identify previously unidentified alterations in gastrointestinal microbiota-derived short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (allo-BMT). Alterations in the amount of only one SCFA, butyrate, were observed only in the intestinal tissue. The reduced butyrate in CD326(+) intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) after allo-BMT resulted in decreased histone acetylation, which was restored after local administration of exogenous butyrate. Butyrate restoration improved IEC junctional integrity, decreased apoptosis and mitigated GVHD. Furthermore, alteration of the indigenous microbiota with 17 rationally selected strains of high butyrate-producing Clostridia also decreased GVHD. These data demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized role of microbial metabolites and suggest that local and specific alteration of microbial metabolites has direct salutary effects on GVHD target tissues and can mitigate disease severity. PMID:26998764

  9. Fluorescently labeled methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enters intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells by fluid-phase endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Fenyvesi

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are widely used excipients for increasing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Their effect on drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract is explained by their solubility- and permeability-enhancement. The aims of this study were to investigate penetration properties of fluorescently labeled randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (FITC-RAMEB on Caco-2 cell layer and examine the cellular entry of cyclodextrins on intestinal cells. The permeability of FITC-RAMEB through Caco-2 monolayers was very limited. Using this compound in 0.05 mM concentration the permeability coefficient was 3.35±1.29×10(-8 cm/s and its permeability did not change in the presence of 5 mM randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin. Despite of the low permeability, cellular accumulation of FITC-RAMEB in cytoplasmic vesicles was significant and showed strong time and concentration dependence, similar to the characteristics of the macropinocytosis marker Lucifer Yellow. The internalization process was fully inhibited at 0°C and it was drastically reduced at 37°C applying rottlerin, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Notably, FITC-RAMEB colocalized with the early endosome organizer Rab5a. These results have revealed that FITC-RAMEB is able to enter intestinal epithelial cells by fluid-phase endocytosis from the apical side. This mechanism can be an additional process which helps to overcome the intestinal barrier and contributes to the bioavailability enhancement of cyclodextrins.

  10. Glucose and Palmitate Differentially Regulate PFKFB3/iPFK2 and Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchlett, Rachel; Li, Honggui; Guo, Xin; Qi, Ting; Zhao, JiaJia; Zheng, Juan; Woo, Shih-Lung; Pei, Ya; Liu, Mengyang; Hu, Xiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Ting; Yang, Sijun; Li, Qifu; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Huo, Yuqing; Wu, Chaodong

    2016-01-01

    The gene PFKFB3 encodes for inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase, a glycolysis-regulatory enzyme that protects against diet-induced intestine inflammation. However, it is unclear how nutrient overload regulates PFKFB3 expression and inflammatory responses in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). In the present study, primary IECs were isolated from small intestine of C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Additionally, CMT-93 cells, a cell line for IECs, were cultured in low glucose (LG, 5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG, 27.5 mmol/L) medium and treated with palmitate (50 μmol/L) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) for 24 hr. These cells were analyzed for PFKFB3 and inflammatory markers. Compared with LFD, HFD feeding decreased IEC PFKFB3 expression and increased IEC proinflammatory responses. In CMT-93 cells, HG significantly increased PFKFB3 expression and proinflammatory responses compared with LG. Interestingly, palmitate decreased PFKFB3 expression and increased proinflammatory responses compared with BSA, regardless of glucose concentrations. Furthermore, HG significantly increased PFKFB3 promoter transcription activity compared with LG. Upon PFKFB3 overexpression, proinflammatory responses in CMT-93 cells were decreased. Taken together, these results indicate that in IECs glucose stimulates PFKFB3 expression and palmitate contributes to increased proinflammatory responses. Therefore, PFKFB3 regulates IEC inflammatory status in response to macronutrients. PMID:27387960

  11. Human intestinal epithelial cells in innate immunity : interactions with normal microbiota and pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Gangwei

    2009-01-01

    Rod-shaped bacteria were previously shown to be associated with the small intestinal epithelium of children with celiac disease (CD). Using culture-dependent and independent methods, we characterized the microbiota of small intestine in children with CD and controls. The normal microbiota constitutes an unique organ-specific biofilm. Dominant bacteria are Streptococcus, Neisseria, Veillonella, Gemella, Actinomyces, Rothia and Haemophilus. Altogether 162 Genus Level Operational Taxonomic Units...

  12. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Perrone, Erin E.; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and sacrificed 24 hours later. Septic animals had a marked increas...

  13. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  14. Physiological Concentration of Exogenous Lactate Reduces Antimycin A Triggered Oxidative Stress in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2 In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Stefan; Junnikkala, Sami; Renner, Lydia; Hynönen, Ulla; Hartig, Roland; Nossol, Constanze; Barta-Böszörményi, Anikó; Dänicke, Sven; Souffrant, Wolfgang-Bernhard; Palva, Airi; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kluess, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Weaning triggers an adaptation of the gut function including luminal lactate generation by lactobacilli, depending on gastrointestinal site. We hypothesized that both lactobacilli and lactate influence porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In vivo experiments showed that concentration of lactate was significantly higher in gastric, duodenal and jejunal chyme of suckling piglets compared to their weaned counterparts. In an in vitro study we investigated the impact of physiological lactate concentration as derived from the in vivo study on the porcine intestinal epithelial cells IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2. We detected direct adherence of lactobacilli on the apical epithelial surface and a modulated F-actin structure. Application of lactobacilli culture supernatant alone or lactate (25 mM) at low pH (pH 4) changed the F-actin structure in a similar manner. Treatment of IPEC cultures with lactate at near neutral pH resulted in a significantly reduced superoxide-generation in Antimycin A-challenged cells. This protective effect was nearly completely reversed by inhibition of cellular lactate uptake via monocarboxylate transporter. Lactate treatment enhanced NADH autofluorescence ratio (Fcytosol/Fnucleus) in non-challenged cells, indicating an increased availability of reduced nucleotides, but did not change the overall ATP content of the cells. Lactobacilli-derived physiological lactate concentration in intestine is relevant for alleviation of redox stress in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27054581

  15. Influence of the intrinsic gut microbiota on transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the early life development of intestinal epithelial integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Frøkjær, Hanne;

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between the gut microbiota and the integrity of the intestinal mucus layer is important both in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier as part of the innate immune defense, and in the conservation of gut homeostasis. Interesting parameters are the mucins, which protect the mucosal...

  16. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with phosphatidylcholine in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, S.; Moser, L.;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endotoxemia was shown to be integral in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice. In the current study, the role of conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and phosphatidylcholine on the permeability of endotoxin through a layer of intestinal epithelial cells and the consequent...

  17. Effect of CpG-ODN combined with radiation on micronuclei cell of the human intestinal crypt epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order study the changes of micronuclei cell frequency in the non-immune cell types, the human intestinal crypt epithelial cell (HIEC) was treated by CpG-ODN after radiation. MTT assay and micronuclei assay were used in this research. The result of MTT assay shows that CpG-ODN does not have any toxicity to HIEC in the concentration range of 0.00-1.25 μmol/L. Micronuclei assay measurement indicates that CpG-ODN can protect HIEC from radiation damage by reducing the micronucleus frequency (MNF) and the micronucleus cell frequency (MNCF). The experiment results reveal that CpG-ODN is safe and may have radioprotection effect on some non-immune human cell types. (authors)

  18. New insights into mycotoxin mixtures: The toxicity of low doses of Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells is synergistic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. DON is often present with other type B trichothecenes such as 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), nivalenol (NIV) and fusarenon-X (FX). Although the cytotoxicity of individual mycotoxins has been widely studied, data on the toxicity of mycotoxin mixtures are limited. The aim of this study was to assess interactions caused by co-exposure to Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells. Proliferating Caco-2 cells were exposed to increasing doses of Type B trichothecenes, alone or in binary or ternary mixtures. The MTT test and neutral red uptake, respectively linked to mitochondrial and lysosomal functions, were used to measure intestinal epithelial cytotoxicity. The five tested mycotoxins had a dose-dependent effect on proliferating enterocytes and could be classified in increasing order of toxicity: 3-ADON < 15-ADON ≈ DON < NIV ≪ FX. Binary or ternary mixtures also showed a dose-dependent effect. At low concentrations (cytotoxic effect between 10 and 30–40%), mycotoxin combinations were synergistic; however DON–NIV–FX mixture showed antagonism. At higher concentrations (cytotoxic effect around 50%), the combinations had an additive or nearly additive effect. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of low doses of mycotoxins in food commodities and diet may be more toxic than predicted from the mycotoxins alone. Considering the frequent co-occurrence of trichothecenes in the diet and the concentrations of toxins to which consumers are exposed, this synergy should be taken into account. - Highlights: • We assessed the individual and combined cytotoxicity of five trichothecenes. • The tested concentrations correspond to the French consumer exposure levels. • The type of interaction in combined cytotoxicity varied with the effect level. • Low doses of Type B trichothecenes induced synergistic

  19. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J; Ouwehand, A C; Hansen, E Bech; Romero, D A; Rautonen, N

    2010-09-01

    The complex microbial population residing in the human gastrointestinal tract consists of commensal, potential pathogenic and beneficial species, which are probably perceived differently by the host and consequently could be expected to trigger specific transcriptional responses. Here, we provide a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33 DCE-induced changes were overall more similar to those of B. lactis 420 than to L. acidophilus NCFM™, which is consistent with previously observed in vivo immunomodulation properties. In the gene ontology and pathway analyses both specific and unspecific changes were observed. Common to all was the regulation of apoptosis and adipogenesis, and lipid-metabolism related regulation by the probiotics. Specific changes such as regulation of cell-cell adhesion by B. lactis 420, superoxide metabolism by L. salivarius Ls-33, and regulation of MAPK pathway by L. acidophilus NCFM™ were noted. Furthermore, fundamental differences were observed between the pathogenic and probiotic treatments in the Toll-like receptor pathway, especially for adapter molecules with a lowered level of transcriptional activation of MyD88, TRIF, IRAK1 and TRAF6 by probiotics compared to EHEC. The results in this study provide insights into the relationship between probiotics and human intestinal epithelial cells, notably with regard to strain-specific responses, and highlight the differences between transcriptional responses to pathogenic and probiotic bacteria. PMID:21831765

  20. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  1. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs

  2. New insights into mycotoxin mixtures: The toxicity of low doses of Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells is synergistic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Institut des Sciences Biomédicales Appliquées, Cotonou, Bénin (Benin); Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Gauthier, Thierry; Abrami, Roberta [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Abiola, François A. [Institut des Sciences Biomédicales Appliquées, Cotonou, Bénin (Benin); Oswald, Isabelle P., E-mail: Isabelle.Oswald@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Puel, Olivier [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France)

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. DON is often present with other type B trichothecenes such as 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), nivalenol (NIV) and fusarenon-X (FX). Although the cytotoxicity of individual mycotoxins has been widely studied, data on the toxicity of mycotoxin mixtures are limited. The aim of this study was to assess interactions caused by co-exposure to Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells. Proliferating Caco-2 cells were exposed to increasing doses of Type B trichothecenes, alone or in binary or ternary mixtures. The MTT test and neutral red uptake, respectively linked to mitochondrial and lysosomal functions, were used to measure intestinal epithelial cytotoxicity. The five tested mycotoxins had a dose-dependent effect on proliferating enterocytes and could be classified in increasing order of toxicity: 3-ADON < 15-ADON ≈ DON < NIV ≪ FX. Binary or ternary mixtures also showed a dose-dependent effect. At low concentrations (cytotoxic effect between 10 and 30–40%), mycotoxin combinations were synergistic; however DON–NIV–FX mixture showed antagonism. At higher concentrations (cytotoxic effect around 50%), the combinations had an additive or nearly additive effect. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of low doses of mycotoxins in food commodities and diet may be more toxic than predicted from the mycotoxins alone. Considering the frequent co-occurrence of trichothecenes in the diet and the concentrations of toxins to which consumers are exposed, this synergy should be taken into account. - Highlights: • We assessed the individual and combined cytotoxicity of five trichothecenes. • The tested concentrations correspond to the French consumer exposure levels. • The type of interaction in combined cytotoxicity varied with the effect level. • Low doses of Type B trichothecenes induced synergistic

  3. Development of relationship between intestinal commensal bacteria and intestinal epithelial barrier%肠道共生细菌和肠上皮屏障间关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施君

    2010-01-01

    After birth,human intestinal tract mucosa is exposed to a large community of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. As a first line of defense,the intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) kills the pathogen by signaling to the innate immune system, through pattern recognition receptors, while it produces protective respond towards the commensal bacteria. Intestinal epithelial cells play an important role in forming immune tolerance to the commensal bacteria and make intestinal homeostasis. Commensal bacteria can resist the pathogenic bacteria invasion. The signals of commensal are required for development of intestinal epithelial barrier and intestinal innate and adaptive immunity. It is essential for the host to have a balance between the commensal bacteria and intestinal tract,once the balance is broken, the intestinal inflammation disease will be caused. Thus ,this review will discuss the relationship between intestinal commensal bacteria and intestinal epithelial barrier in several aspects, such as the role of the commensal bacteria, the mechanism of producing commensal tolerance by IEB and the disease caused by imbalance between the commensal and IEB.%人类出生后,其胃肠道黏膜表面与肠道共生细菌和致病性病原体密切接触.肠道上皮屏障作为抵御细菌入侵的第一道防线,通过模式识别受体产生对致病性病原体杀伤性免疫应答,而对共生细菌产生保护性应答.肠上皮细胞在对共生细菌形成免疫耐受,维持肠道免疫稳态中发挥重要作用.共生细菌能协助肠道上皮抵御病原体侵袭,并调节肠道免疫发育和免疫功能.在共生细菌和宿主肠道之间形成免疫平衡,否则易引起肠道炎症疾病.该文从共生细菌对宿主肠道的作用、肠上皮屏障对共生细菌形成免疫耐受机制以及肠道上皮屏障对共生细菌识别平衡破坏引起的疾病等多方面对共生细菌和肠上皮屏障之间关系作一综述.

  4. An experimental platform using human intestinal epithelial cell lines to differentiate between hazardous and non-hazardous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Bryan P; Pirzai, Waheed; Eaton, Alex D; Harper, Marc; Roper, Jason; Zimmermann, Cindi; Ladics, Gregory S; Layton, Raymond J; Delaney, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    Human intestinal epithelial cell lines (T84, Caco-2, and HCT-8) grown on permeable Transwell™ filters serve as models of the gastrointestinal barrier. In this study, this in vitro model system was evaluated for effectiveness at distinguishing between hazardous and non-hazardous proteins. Indicators of cytotoxicity (LDH release, MTT conversion), monolayer barrier integrity ([(3)H]-inulin flux, horseradish peroxidase flux, trans-epithelial electrical resistance [TEER]), and inflammation (IL-8, IL-6 release) were monitored following exposure to hazardous or non-hazardous proteins. The hazardous proteins examined include streptolysin O (from Streptococcus pyogenes), Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B, heat-labile toxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, listeriolysin O (from Listeria monocytogenes), melittin (from bee venom), and mastoparan (from wasp venom). Non-hazardous proteins included bovine and porcine serum albumin, bovine fibronectin, and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisco) from spinach. Food allergenic proteins bovine milk β-lactoglobulin and peanut Ara h 2 were also tested as was the anti-nutritive food protein wheat germ agglutinin. Results demonstrated that this model system effectively distinguished between hazardous and non-hazardous proteins through combined analysis of multiple cells lines and assays. This experimental strategy may represent a useful adjunct to multi-component analysis of proteins with unknown hazard profiles. PMID:27060235

  5. Genome-wide analysis of CDX2 binding in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Hansen, Morten; Jensen, Tine G K;

    2010-01-01

    resulting in a high throughput experimental method of identifying direct targets of specific transcription factors. The method was applied to CDX2, leading to the identification of the direct binding of CDX2 to several known and novel target genes in the intestinal cell. Examination of the transcript levels...

  6. Transport of quercetin di-sodium salt in the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayer 139.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milane, H A; Al Ahmad, A; Naitchabane, M; Vandamme, T F; Jung, L; Ubeaud, G

    2007-01-01

    Quercetin di-sodium salt (QDS), a water-soluble derivative of quercetin (Q), is a potent free radical scavenger. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro intestinal transport of QDS compared to that of Q using the Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cell line. The apical (A) to basolateral (B) transport of QDS was found to be higher than the B to A transport of this compound. This polarized transport involved the presence of a carrier protein system. The involvement of the sodium/glucose transporter-1 (SGLT-1) was shown by using phloridzin, a selective inhibitor of this conveyor system. However, the transport of Q was not affected by this inhibitor. Moreover, the influx of QDS was pH-sensitive and decreased at pH 5.5 compared with that observed at pH 7.4 and 6.5. The permeability of QDS was 10-fold higher than that of Q. This could be explained by the involvement of SLGT-1 and the absence of an active efflux pump in the absorption of QDS in comparison with Q. This finding was supported by comparing the solubility of Q with that of QDS. This study indicates that both the higher solubility of QDS and its dependence on the SGLT-1 transport system resulted in more efficient permeability compared to Q. PMID:18062406

  7. Escherichia coli isolated from a Crohn's disease patient adheres, invades, and induces inflammatory responses in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Allen, Christopher A; Taormina, Joanna; Swidsinski, Alexander; Tutt, Christopher B; Jezek, G Eric; Islas-Islas, Martha; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are a major health concern both in the United States and around the world. Evidence now suggests that a new category of Escherichia coli, designated Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) is highly prevalent in Crohn's Disease (CD) patients. AIEC strains have been shown to colonize and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). However, the role AIEC strains play in the induction of an inflammatory response is not known. Therefore, we examined several E. coli strains (designated LF82, O83:H1, 6604 and 6655) that were isolated from CD patients for their ability to induce inflammation in two IEC, Caco-2BBe and T-84 cells. Results showed that each strain had varying abilities to adhere to and invade IEC as well as induced cytokine secretion from polarized IEC. However, E. coli O83:H1 displayed the best characteristics of AIEC strains as compared to the prototype AIEC strain LF82, inducing cytokine secretion from IEC and promoting immune cell migration through IEC. Upon further analysis, E. coli O83:H1 did not harbor virulence genes present in known pathogenic intestinal organisms. Further characterization of E. coli O83:H1 virulence determinants showed that a non-flagellated O83:H1 strain significantly decreased the organism's ability to adhere to and invade both IEC and elicit IEC cytokine secretion compared to the wild type and complemented strains. These findings demonstrate that E. coli O83:H1 possesses the characteristics of the AIEC LF82 strain that may contribute to the low-grade, chronic inflammation observed in Crohn's disease. PMID:17900983

  8. Enteric bacterial invasion of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro is dramatically enhanced using a vertical diffusion chamber model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Neveda; Mills, Dominic C; Wren, Brendan W; Dorrell, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of bacterial pathogens with host cells have been investigated extensively using in vitro cell culture methods. However as such cell culture assays are performed under aerobic conditions, these in vitro models may not accurately represent the in vivo environment in which the host-pathogen interactions take place. We have developed an in vitro model of infection that permits the coculture of bacteria and host cells under different medium and gas conditions. The Vertical Diffusion Chamber (VDC) model mimics the conditions in the human intestine where bacteria will be under conditions of very low oxygen whilst tissue will be supplied with oxygen from the blood stream. Placing polarized intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) monolayers grown in Snapwell inserts into a VDC creates separate apical and basolateral compartments. The basolateral compartment is filled with cell culture medium, sealed and perfused with oxygen whilst the apical compartment is filled with broth, kept open and incubated under microaerobic conditions. Both Caco-2 and T84 IECs can be maintained in the VDC under these conditions without any apparent detrimental effects on cell survival or monolayer integrity. Coculturing experiments performed with different C. jejuni wild-type strains and different IEC lines in the VDC model with microaerobic conditions in the apical compartment reproducibly result in an increase in the number of interacting (almost 10-fold) and intracellular (almost 100-fold) bacteria compared to aerobic culture conditions. The environment created in the VDC model more closely mimics the environment encountered by C. jejuni in the human intestine and highlights the importance of performing in vitro infection assays under conditions that more closely mimic the in vivo reality. We propose that use of the VDC model will allow new interpretations of the interactions between bacterial pathogens and host cells. PMID:24192850

  9. Effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus reuteri on gut barrier function and heat shock proteins in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Ahl, David; Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Jan Erik; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of highly conserved proteins that can serve as intestinal gate keepers in gut homeostasis. Here, effects of a probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and two novel porcine isolates, Lactobacillus johnsonii strain P47-HY and Lactobacillus reuteri strain P43-HUV, on cytoprotective HSP expression and gut barrier function, were investigated in a porcine IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cell line model. The IPEC-J2 cells polarized on a permeable filter exhibited villus-like cell phenotype with development of apical microvilli. Western blot analysis detected HSP expression in IPEC-J2 and revealed that L. johnsonii and L. reuteri strains were able to significantly induce HSP27, despite high basal expression in IPEC-J2, whereas LGG did not. For HSP72, only the supernatant of L. reuteri induced the expression, which was comparable to the heat shock treatment, which indicated that HSP72 expression was more stimulus specific. The protective effect of lactobacilli was further studied in IPEC-J2 under an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) challenge. ETEC caused intestinal barrier destruction, as reflected by loss of cell-cell contact, reduced IPEC-J2 cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance, and disruption of tight junction protein zonula occludens-1. In contrast, the L. reuteri treatment substantially counteracted these detrimental effects and preserved the barrier function. L. johnsonii and LGG also achieved barrier protection, partly by directly inhibiting ETEC attachment. Together, the results indicate that specific strains of Lactobacillus can enhance gut barrier function through cytoprotective HSP induction and fortify the cell protection against ETEC challenge through tight junction protein modulation and direct interaction with pathogens. PMID:25847917

  10. Nonpathogenic Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917 Inhibits Signal Transduction in Intestinal Epithelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kamada, Nobuhiko; Maeda, Kenichi; Inoue, Nagamu; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Okamoto, Susumu; Hong, Kyong Su; Yamada, Takaya; Watanabe, Noriaki; Tsuchimoto, Kanji; Ogata, Haruhiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2007-01-01

    Although the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 has been used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, the precise mechanisms of action of this strain remain unclear. In the present study, we estimated the anti-inflammatory effect of E. coli Nissle 1917 on inflammatory responses in vitro to determine the suppressive mechanism of Nissle 1917 on the inflammatory process. To determine the effect of E. coli Nissle 1917, the human colonic epithelial cell line HCT15 was incubate...

  11. Bacteria regulate intestinal epithelial cell differentiation factors both in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Svetlana; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Wullaert, Andy; Pasparakis, Manolis; Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F; Gersemann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human colon harbours a plethora of bacteria known to broadly impact on mucosal metabolism and function and thought to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and colon cancer development. In this report, we investigated the effect of colonic bacteria on epithelial cell differentiation factors in vitro and in vivo. As key transcription factors we focused on Hes1, known to direct towards an absorptive cell fate, Hath1 and KLF4, which govern goblet cell. Methods...

  12. Bacteria Regulate Intestinal Epithelial Cell Differentiation Factors Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Svetlana; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Wullaert, Andy; Pasparakis, Manolis; Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F; Gersemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: The human colon harbours a plethora of bacteria known to broadly impact on mucosal metabolism and function and thought to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and colon cancer development. In this report, we investigated the effect of colonic bacteria on epithelial cell differentiation factors in vitro and in vivo. As key transcription factors we focused on Hes1, known to direct towards an absorptive cell fate, Hath1 and KLF4, which govern goblet cell. Method...

  13. In vitro small intestinal epithelial cell growth on a nanocomposite polycaprolactone scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ashish; Vara, Dina S.; Punshon, Geoffrey; Sales, Kevin M.; Winslet, Marc C.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of the small intestine remains experimental despite worldwide attempts to develop a functional substitute for short bowel syndrome. Most published studies have reported predominant use of PLLA (poly-L-lactide acid)/PGA (polyglycolic acid) copolymer as the scaffold material, and studies have been limited by in vivo experiments. This lack of progress has inspired a fresh perspective and provoked further investigation and development in this field of tissue engineering. In the...

  14. Acetaminophen Changes Intestinal Epithelial Cell Membrane Properties, Subsequently Affecting Absorption Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Schäfer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acetaminophen (APAP effects on intestinal barrier properties are less investigated. APAP may lead to a changed bioavailability of a subsequently administered drug or diet in the body. We investigated the influence of APAP on enterocytic cell membrane properties that are able to modify the net intestinal absorption of administered substances across the Caco-2 barrier model. Methods: The effect of APAP on cytotoxicity was measured by LDH assay, TER value and cell capacitance label-free using impedance monitoring, membrane permeability by FITC-dextrans, and efflux transporter MDR1 activity by Rh123. APAP levels were determined by HPLC analysis. Cell membrane topography and microvilli were investigated using SEM and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (Alpi and tight junction protein 1 (TJP1 expression by western blot analysis. Results: APAP changed the apical cell surface, reduced the number of microvilli and protein expression of Alpi as a brush border marker and TJP1, increased the membrane integrity and concurrently decreased cell capacitance over time. In addition, APAP decreased the permeability to small molecules and increased the efflux transporter activity, MDR1. Conclusion: APAP alters the Caco-2 cell membrane properties by different mechanisms and reduces the permeability to administered substances. These findings may help to optimize therapeutic implications.

  15. Autophagy Deficiency Diminishes Indomethacin-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Cell Damage through Activation of the ERK/Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takatoshi; Yokoe, Shunichi; Edogawa, Shoko; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Takuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Asahi, Michio

    2015-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause epithelial cell damage in the stomach, intestine, and colon. NSAIDs are reported to induce autophagy and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells; however, their role in cell damage is poorly understood. To examine the role of autophagy in cell damage, we used autophagy-related gene Atg5-conditional knockout mice, in which the Atg5 gene is only knocked out in intestinal epithelial cells. In an indomethacin (IM)-induced gastrointestinal ulcer mouse model, intestinal epithelium damage was reduced in Atg5-conditional knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. IM-induced damage in IEC6 rat intestinal epithelial cells was reduced when Atg5 was silenced (IEC6shAtg5 cells). Western blot analyses indicated that IM-induced apoptosis decreased, and the potent, oxidative stress-related extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor-erythroid2-like2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) signaling pathway was upregulated in IEC6shAtg5 cells. An experiment using a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive fluorescent dye in IEC6shAtg5 cells revealed that the amount of ROS at the baseline and the rate of increase after IM treatment were lower than in intact IEC6 cells. The mitochondrial membrane potential at the baseline and the reduction rate in IM-treated IEC6shAtg5 cells were lower than in intact IEC6 cells, indicating that autophagy deficiency increased ROS production caused by mitochondrial disturbance. Furthermore, MnTMPyP, a manganese-superoxide dismutase mimetic, significantly inhibited IM-induced autophagy and subsequent apoptosis as well as activation of the ERK/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. These data suggest that autophagy deficiency and subsequent activation of the ERK/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway diminished IM-induced, apoptosis-mediated intestinal epithelial cell damage, and genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms in autophagy-related genes could predict NSAID-induced intestinal injury. PMID:26404472

  16. Effects of quinoa hull meal on piglet performance and intestinal epithelial physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Fernández, José Adalberto; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Saponin-containing feed additives have shown positive effects on pig performance. Quinoa hull has high saponin content and may be of interest as a feed additive. This study aimed to evaluate quinoa hull meal (QHM) as a feed additive in a pig diet. The effects of QHM were assessed for three dosages...... of South American (SA) origin (100, 300 and 500 mg/kg) and one dosage of Danish (DK) quinoa (300 mg/kg). In addition, the effect of dietary SA-QHM and SA-QHM-extract on jejunal epithelial physiology was studied ex vivo in Ussing chambers. The experiment included 400 piglets weaned at 28 ± 2 days of...

  17. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Sukhotnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1 Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP for 5 days; 2 O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3 O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration.

  18. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhotnik, Igor; Starikov, Alona; Coran, Arnold G.; Pollak, Yulia; Sohotnik, Rima; Shaoul, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1) Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP) for 5 days; 2) O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3) O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration. PMID:25717388

  19. Strategies for Profiling Single Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Targeted Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    McDowell, W.; Box, A. (Antonio); Staehling, K.; Wang, F.; Li, L.; Zueckert-Gaudenz, K.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted gene expression profiling of single cells permits the study of heterogeneity in cell populations. Here, a pool of mouse intestinal crypt-base CD44+/GRP78- cells was collected by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Aliquots were either loaded onto Fluidigm's C1 System for microfluidic cell capture and cDNA synthesis in nanoliter volumes, or flow-sorted directly into individual PCR plate wells for cDNA synthesis in microliter volumes. The pre-amplified cDNAs were transferred to the Bi...

  20. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62 on Intestinal Epithelial and Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Melo, Tauá; Almeida, Milena Evangelista; Passos Rezende, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are known for their ability to modulate the immune system. They have been shown to inhibit inflammation in experiments with animal models, cell culture, and clinical trials. The objective of this study was to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62, isolated from cocoa fermentation, in a cell culture model. Lp62 inhibited IL-8 production by Salmonella Typhi-stimulated HT-29 cells and prevented the adhesion of pathogens to these epithelial cells. The probiotic strain was able to modulate TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-17 secretion by J774 macrophages. J774 activation was reduced by coincubation with Lp62. PBMC culture showed significantly higher levels of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes following treatment with Lp62. Probiotics also induced increased IL-10 secretion by mononuclear cells. L. plantarum Lp62 was able to inhibit inflammatory stimulation in epithelial cells and macrophages and activated a tolerogenic profile in mononuclear cells of healthy donors. These results indicate this strain for a possible application in the treatment or prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27446958

  1. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  2. Flagellin-induced tolerance of the Toll-like receptor 5 signaling pathway in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Fegan, Pamela E; Desai, Anjali S; Madara, James L; Hobert, Michael E

    2007-03-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a gram-negative enteric pathogen that invades the mucosal epithelium and is associated with diarrheal illness in humans. Flagellin from S. typhimurium and other gram-negative bacteria has been shown to be the predominant proinflammatory mediator through activation of the basolateral Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). Recent evidence has shown that prior exposure can render immune cells tolerant to subsequent challenges by TLR ligands. Accordingly, we examined whether prior exposure to purified flagellin would render human intestinal epithelial cells insensitive to future contact. We found that flagellin-induced tolerance is common to polarized epithelial cells and prevents further activation of proinflammatory signaling cascades by both purified flagellin and Salmonella bacteria but does not affect TNF-alpha stimulation of the same pathways. Flagellin tolerance is a rapid process that does not require protein synthesis, and that occurs within 1 to 2 h of flagellin exposure. Prolonged flagellin exposure blocks activation of the NF-kappaB, MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase signaling pathways and results in the internalization of a fraction of the basolateral TLR5 without affecting the polarity or total expression of TLR5. After removal of flagellin, cells require more than 24 h to fully recover their ability to mount a normal proinflammatory response. We have found that activation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase and Akt by flagellin has a small damping effect in the early stages of flagellin signaling but is not responsible for tolerance. Our study indicates that inhibition of TLR5-associated IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 activity occurs during the development of flagellin tolerance and is likely to be the cause of tolerance. PMID:17138965

  3. Oat β-glucan depresses SGLT1- and GLUT2-mediated glucose transport in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Nazanin N; Purslow, Peter P; Tosh, Susan M; Bakovic, Marica

    2016-06-01

    Oat β-glucan consumption is linked to reduced risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity by lowering glycemic response and serum level of low-density lipoproteins. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of action of oat β-glucan at the interface between the gut wall and the lumen responsible for attenuating glucose levels. We proposed that viscous oat β-glucan acts as a physical barrier to glucose uptake in normally absorptive gut epithelial cells IEC-6 by affecting the expression of intestinal glucose transporters. Concentration and time-dependent changes in glucose uptake were established by using a nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. The effectiveness of nutrient transport in IEC-6 cells was shown by significant differences in glucose uptake and corresponding transporter expression. The expressions of glucose transporters sodium-glucose-linked transport protein 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) increased with time (0-60 minutes) and glucose levels (5-25 mmol/L). The suppression of glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression by increasing concentrations (4-8 mg/mL) of oat β-glucan demonstrated a direct effect of the physical properties of oat β-glucan on glucose transport. These results affirmed oat β-glucan as a dietary agent for minimizing postprandial glucose and showed that modulating the activity of the key intestinal glucose transporters with oat β-glucan could be an effective way of lowering blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. PMID:27188900

  4. Differential Effect of Lactobacillus johnsonii BFE 6128 on Expression of Genes Related to TLR Pathways and Innate Immunity in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Stephanie; Rodriguez Gómez, Manuel; Watzl, Bernhard; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Franz, Charles M A P; Vizoso Pinto, María G

    2010-12-01

    Probiotics have been shown to enhance immune defenses, but their mechanisms of action are only partially understood. We investigated the modulation of signal pathways involved in innate immunity in enterocytes by Lactobacillus johnsonii BFE 6128 isolated from 'Kule naoto', a Maasai traditional fermented milk product. This lactobacillus sensitized HT29 intestinal epithelial cells toward recognition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by increasing the IL-8 levels released after challenge with this pathogen and by differentially modulating genes related to toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways and innate immunity. Thus, the modulation of pro-inflammatory mediators and TLR-pathway-related molecules may be an important mechanism contributing to the potential stimulation of innate immunity by lactobacilli at the intestinal epithelial level. PMID:26781315

  5. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cells co-cultured with intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Yeun Kim; Myeong Soo Park; Geun Eog Ji

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO investigate cytokine production and cell surface phenotypes of dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of epithelial cells stimulated by probiotics.METHODS:Mouse DC were cultured alone or together with mouse epithelial cell monolayers in normal or inverted systems and were stimulated with heat-killed probiotic bacteria,Bifidobacteriumlactis AD011 (BL),Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 (BB),Lactobacillus casei IBS041 (LC),and Lactobacillus acidophilus AD031 (LA),for 12 h.Cytokine levels in the culture supernatants were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and phenotypic analysis of DC was investigated by flow cytometry.RESULTS:BB and LC in single-cultured DC increased the expression of I-Ad,CD86 and CD40 (I-Ad,18.51 vs 30.88,46.11; CD86,62.74 vs 92.7,104.12; CD40,0.67vs 6.39,3.37,P < 0.05).All of the experimental probiotics increased the production of inflammatory cytokines,interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α.However,in the normal co-culture systems,LC and LA decreased the expression of I-Ad (39.46 vs 30.32,33.26,P < 0.05),and none of the experimental probiotics increased the levels of IL-6 or TNF-α.In the inverted coculture systems,LC decreased the expression of CD40 (1.36 vs-2.27,P < 0.05),and all of the experimental probiotics decreased the levels of IL-6.In addition,BL increased the production of IL-10 (103.8 vs 166.0,P< 0.05) and LC and LA increased transforming growth factor-3 secretion (235.9 vs 618.9,607.6,P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:These results suggest that specific probiotic strains exert differential immune modulation mediated by the interaction of dendritic cells and epithelial cells in the homeostasis of gastrointestinal tract.

  6. The K5 Capsule of Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917 Is Important in Mediating Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Chemokine Induction▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hafez, Mohamed; Hayes, Kelly; Goldrick, Marie; Warhurst, Geoff; Grencis, Richard; Roberts, Ian S

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 has been widely used as a probiotic for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disorders and shown to have immunomodulatory effects. Nissle 1917 expresses a K5 capsule, the expression of which often is associated with extraintestinal and urinary tract isolates of E. coli. In this paper, we investigate the role of the K5 capsule in mediating interactions between Nissle 1917 and intestinal epithelial cells. We show that the loss of capsule significantly reduced ...

  7. Enhanced Wound Healing by Recombinant Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 via Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Therapeutic Implication Using Recombinant Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hye Jin; Ahn, Jung Hoon; Park, Seong-Hwan; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa has a remarkable ability to repair damage with the support of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which stimulates epithelial migration and proliferative reepithelialization. For the treatment of mucosal injuries, it is important to develop efficient methods for the localized delivery of mucoactive biotherapeutics. The basic idea in the present study came from the assumption that an intestinal probiotic vehicle can carry and deliver key recombinant medicinal proteins to...

  8. Disruption of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 K5 Capsule Biosynthesis, through Loss of Distinct kfi genes, Modulates Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Impact on Cell Health

    OpenAIRE

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Patel, Bhavik A; Dedi, Cinzia; Wendy M. Macfarlane; Jones, Brian V.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is among the best characterised probiotics, with a proven clinical impact in a range of conditions. Despite this, the mechanisms underlying these "probiotic effects" are not clearly defined. Here we applied random transposon mutagenesis to identify genes relevant to the interaction of EcN with intestinal epithelial cells. This demonstrated mutants disrupted in the kfiB gene, of the K5 capsule biosynthesis cluster, to be significantly enhanced in attachment t...

  9. Fermented milk containing Lactobacillus GG alleviated DSS-induced colitis in mice and activated epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoyo Yoda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was assessed for its ability to alleviate DSS-induced colitis in mice and activate epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study mice were treated with DSS to induce colitis and they were given Lactobacillus GG fermented milk to assess the effect of probiotic on colitis. Lactobacillus GG fermented milk significantly reduced the colitis associated changes suggesting a protective effect against DSS induced colitis.

  10. Fermented milk containing Lactobacillus GG alleviated DSS-induced colitis in mice and activated epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; He, Fang; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was assessed for its ability to alleviate DSS-induced colitis in mice and activate epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study mice were treated with DSS to induce colitis and they were given Lactobacillus GG fermented milk to assess the effect of probiotic on colitis. Lactobacillus GG fermented milk significantly reduced the colitis associated changes suggesting a protective effect against DSS induced colitis.Key...

  11. Ectopic splenic tissues mimicking gastro-intestinal stromal tumour in a patient after splenectomy for a giant epithelial cyst of spleen: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chung Kam Man; Lau Hiu Yan Stephanie; Lau Wan Yee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ectopic splenic tissues left after a previous splenectomy can masquerade as a gastro-intestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Presentation of case: Splenectomy was carried out for a 17-year-old girl with a giant epithelial cyst of spleen. Four years later, an upper endoscopy carried out for dyspepsia revealed two sub-mucosal lesions at the posterior wall of the gastric fundus. Computed tomography diagnosed a GIST. At operation, a dump-bell shaped extragastric mass was excised. Histo...

  12. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E; Brahmamdan, Pavan; McDonough, Jacquelyn S; Leathersich, Ann M; Dominguez, Jessica A; Clark, Andrew T; Fox, Amy C; Dunne, W Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-01-01

    World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR) from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy) followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01). Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01). These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24204769

  13. Cholinergic muscarinic receptor activation augments murine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we showed that M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R; gene name Chrm3) deficiency attenuates murine intestinal neoplasia, supporting the hypothesis that muscarinic receptors play an important role in intestinal tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, in the present study we treated mice with bethanechol, a non-selective muscarinic receptor agonist without nicotinic receptor activity, and examined its effects on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon neoplasia. Mice were provided with drinking water containing 400 μg/mL bethanechol chloride or water without additions (control) for a total of 20 weeks, a period that included the initial 6 weeks when mice received intraperitoneal injections of AOM. When euthanized at week 20, control mice had 8.0 ± 1.3 tumors per animal, whereas bethanechol-treated mice had 10.4 ± 1.5 tumors per mouse (mean ± SE; P = 0.023), a 30% increase. Strikingly, tumor volume per animal was increased 52% in bethanechol-treated compared with control mice (179.7 ± 21.0 vs. 111. 8 ± 22.4 mm3; P = 0.047). On histological examination, bethenechol-treated mice also had more adenocarcinomas per animal (8.0 ± 1.0 vs. 4.1 ± 0.6 for control mice, P = 0.0042). Cell proliferation in both normal mucosa and adenocarcinomas was increased in bethanechol-treated compared to control mice. Also, in tumors, bethanechol treatment increased expression of Chrm3, Egfr and post-Egfr signaling molecules Myc and cyclin D1. Bethanechol treatment increased the thickness of normal colonic mucosa and the expression of selected matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp) genes, including Mmp7, Mmp10 and Mmp13. These findings support a prominent role for muscarinic receptors in colon neoplasia, and identify post-receptor signaling molecules as potential therapeutic targets

  14. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjae Jung

    Full Text Available World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01. Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01. These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target.

  15. Differential Regulation of TLR Signaling on the Induction of Antiviral Interferons in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Enterovirus 71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyang; Ji, Lianfu; Yuan, Xinhui; Jin, Yu; Cardona, Carol J.; Xing, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, which can lead to fatal neurological complications in young children and infants. Few gastrointestinal symptoms are observed clinically, suggesting the presence of a unique immunity to EV71 in the gut. We reported a robust induction of interferons (IFNs) in human intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29), which was suppressed in other types such as RD and HeLa cells. The underlying mechanism for the apparent difference remains obscure. In this study we report that in EV71-infected HT-29 cells, TLR/TRIF signaling was essential to IFN induction; viral replication increased and the induction of IFN-α, -β, -ω, -κ, and -ε decreased markedly in TRIF-silenced HT-29 cells. Importantly, TRIF was degraded by viral 3Cpro in RD cells, but resisted cleavage, and IRF3 was activated and translocated into the nucleus in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that IFNs were induced differentially in human HT-29 cells through an intact TLR/TRIF signaling, which differs from other cell types and may be implicated in viral pathogenesis in EV71 infection. PMID:27007979

  16. Cytokine modulation (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10) by human breast milk lipids on intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Girolamo J; Sánchez, Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    Human breast milk is the best form of nourishment for infants during the first year of life. It is composed by a complex mixture of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Breast milk provides nutrients and bioactive factors that themselves modulate maturation and development of the gastrointestinal tract. Many studies have shown that it provides protection against gastrointestinal tract inflammation. In this sense, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of human breast milk lipids on epithelial intestinal cells (Caco-2) cytokine regulation and the fatty acid transporter protein (FATP) involved in this process. Caco-2 cells were cultivated and stimulated with different concentration of human milk lipids from healthy human mothers (18-30-year-olds) or single commercial lipids for 48 h. We measured the concentrations and mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 cytokines by immunoassay (ELISA) and quantitative-PCR (qRT-PCR) technique, respectively. We observed a two to three times decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (p < 0.01) as well as an increase in anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in cells stimulated with increasing concentrations of breast milk lipids. These results suggest that human breast milk lipids could have an important role on the cytokine modulation in the newborn bowel. PMID:26441050

  17. Differential Regulation of TLR Signaling on the Induction of Antiviral Interferons in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyang; Ji, Lianfu; Yuan, Xinhui; Jin, Yu; Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, which can lead to fatal neurological complications in young children and infants. Few gastrointestinal symptoms are observed clinically, suggesting the presence of a unique immunity to EV71 in the gut. We reported a robust induction of interferons (IFNs) in human intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29), which was suppressed in other types such as RD and HeLa cells. The underlying mechanism for the apparent difference remains obscure. In this study we report that in EV71-infected HT-29 cells, TLR/TRIF signaling was essential to IFN induction; viral replication increased and the induction of IFN-α, -β, -ω, -κ, and -ε decreased markedly in TRIF-silenced HT-29 cells. Importantly, TRIF was degraded by viral 3Cpro in RD cells, but resisted cleavage, and IRF3 was activated and translocated into the nucleus in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that IFNs were induced differentially in human HT-29 cells through an intact TLR/TRIF signaling, which differs from other cell types and may be implicated in viral pathogenesis in EV71 infection. PMID:27007979

  18. Protecting Intestinal Epithelial Cell Number 6 against Fission Neutron Irradiation through NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gong-Min; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Shui-Ming; Xu, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Jing; Li, Jin-Feng; Wang, Yun-Liang; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the change of NF-κB signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cell induced by fission neutron irradiation and the influence of the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY294002. Three groups of IEC-6 cell lines were given: control group, neutron irradiation of 4Gy group, and neutron irradiation of 4Gy with LY294002 treatment group. Except the control group, the other groups were irradiated by neutron of 4Gy. LY294002 was given before 24 hours of neutron irradiation. At 6 h and 24 h after neutron irradiation, the morphologic changes, proliferation ability, apoptosis, and necrosis rates of the IEC-6 cell lines were assayed and the changes of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt pathway were detected. At 6 h and 24 h after neutron irradiation of 4Gy, the proliferation ability of the IEC-6 cells decreased and lots of apoptotic and necrotic cells were found. The injuries in LY294002 treatment and neutron irradiation group were more serious than those in control and neutron irradiation groups. The results suggest that IEC-6 cells were obviously damaged and induced serious apoptosis and necrosis by neutron irradiation of 4Gy; the NF-κB signaling pathway in IEC-6 was activated by neutron irradiation which could protect IEC-6 against injury by neutron irradiation; LY294002 could inhibit the activity of IEC-6 cells. PMID:25866755

  19. Protecting Intestinal Epithelial Cell Number 6 against Fission Neutron Irradiation through NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong-Min Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the change of NF-κB signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cell induced by fission neutron irradiation and the influence of the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY294002. Three groups of IEC-6 cell lines were given: control group, neutron irradiation of 4Gy group, and neutron irradiation of 4Gy with LY294002 treatment group. Except the control group, the other groups were irradiated by neutron of 4Gy. LY294002 was given before 24 hours of neutron irradiation. At 6 h and 24 h after neutron irradiation, the morphologic changes, proliferation ability, apoptosis, and necrosis rates of the IEC-6 cell lines were assayed and the changes of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt pathway were detected. At 6 h and 24 h after neutron irradiation of 4Gy, the proliferation ability of the IEC-6 cells decreased and lots of apoptotic and necrotic cells were found. The injuries in LY294002 treatment and neutron irradiation group were more serious than those in control and neutron irradiation groups. The results suggest that IEC-6 cells were obviously damaged and induced serious apoptosis and necrosis by neutron irradiation of 4Gy; the NF-κB signaling pathway in IEC-6 was activated by neutron irradiation which could protect IEC-6 against injury by neutron irradiation; LY294002 could inhibit the activity of IEC-6 cells.

  20. Excreted/secreted Trichuris suis products reduce barrier function and suppress inflammatory cytokine production of intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiemstra, I. H.; Klaver, E. J.; Vrijland, K.; Kringel, Helene; Andreasen, Annette; Bouma, G.; Kraal, G.; Die, I. van; Haan, J. M. M. den

    2014-01-01

    . This resulted in an increased passage of soluble compounds to the basolateral side that affected DC function. In addition, T. suis E/S suppressed LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by CMT93/69 cells, whereas the production of the TH2 response-inducing cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin....... The intestinal epithelium forms an efficient barrier between the intestinal lumen containing the microbial flora and helminths, and dendritic cells (DCs) present in the lamina propria that determine the TH response. Here, we investigated how excreted/secreted (E/S) products of T. suis affect the...... barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in order to reach the DCs and modulate the immune response. We show that T. suis E/S products reduce the barrier function and the expression of the tight junction proteins EMP-1 and claudin-4 in IEC CMT93/69 monolayers in a glycan-dependent manner...

  1. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Vongsa, Rebecca A; Wendt, Michael K; Dwinell, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the progression to colon cancer. In addition to the well-characterized role of chemokines in directed trafficking of immune cells to the gut mucosa, the expression of chemokine receptors on the cells of the epithelium makes them active participants in the chemokine signaling network. Recent findings demonstrate an important role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in epithelial barrier repair and maintenance as well as an intricate involvement in limiting metastasis of colonic carcinoma. Increased recognition of the association between barrier defects and inflammation and the subsequent progression to cancer in IBD thus implicates chemokines as key regulators of mucosal homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. PMID:18452220

  2. Vasoactive-intestinal-Peptide (vip) modulates the growth fraction of epithelial skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, U; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G

    1992-06-01

    Using the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT, modifications of the growth fraction due to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were determined by immunostaining with monoclonal antibody Ki67. In addition, the expression of VIP receptor and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor have been analysed. VIP (10-(7) to 10-(11) M) produced an almost doubling of the total number of Ki67-positive cells in cultures with 2% fetal calf serum (FCS), wheras it was ineffective in FCS-free and 10% FCS cultures. The nuclear Ki67-staining patterns were classified into four categories. In FCS-free cultures VIP induced a shift from type III (light nucleus, staining nuclei) to type II (multiple, intensely stained spots). In cultures with 2% FCS, VIP induced a shift from type II to type III. VIP receptor expression was facilitated by VIP, when cells were grown in a medium supplemented with 10% FCS. VIP increased EGF receptor expression in FCS-free cultures but decreased the number EGF receptor-positive cells in experiments with 2% FCS. In conclusion, VIP is capable to modulate the growth fraction and receptor expression of HaCaT cells in vitro. The effects are dependent on the concentration of FCS within the culture medium. The findings might be of interest for keratinocyte pathology in general and dermatooncology in particular. PMID:21584504

  3. The viability and intestinal epithelial cell adhesion of probiotic strain combination--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątek, Jacek; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena; Olejnik, Anna; Krauss, Hanna; Wierzbicki, Krzysztof; Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Głowacki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    To be effective, probiotic bacteria must exhibit a number of functional characteristics, including the resistance to gastric acidity and the ability to adhere to the intestinal epithelium. In this study, we examined in vitro the viability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) combination after exposure to low pH, and the adhesion of LAB to Caco-2 cells during coincubation of 9 bacterial strains. To test bacterial viability, 6 commercially available products were incubated in 0.1 N HCl at pH 1.2 for 60 min. The greatest growth inhibition was noted for the non-capsulated product containing the Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain (log reduction of CFU = 6.4), and the best survival observed for the product containing 9 bacterial strains, equipped with a modern capsule made according to the Multi-Resistant Encapsulation technology (log reduction of CFU = 0.1). In the adhesion experiment, the combination of 9 bacterial strains was added to 17-day-old Caco-2 cell culture for 90 min. The greatest efficiency of adhesion was observed for the inoculum containing 5.5x10(8) CFU/mL/9.6 cm(2) of Caco-2 and the dose of probiotic bacteria of 190 cells per one Caco-2 cell. As a result, approximately 157 bacterial cells adhered to one Caco-2 cell. The results indicate that the combination of 9 bacterial strains in the examined product is characterized as highly adhesive. PMID:22462453

  4. Ephrin-B2 is differentially expressed in the intestinal epithelium in Crohn's disease and contributes to accelerated epithelial wound healing in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Hafner; Michael Landthaler; Thomas Vogt; Stefanie Meyer; Thomas Langmann; Gerd Schmitz; Frauke Bataille; Ilja Hagen; Bernd Becker; Alexander Roesch; Gerhard Rogler

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane bound receptor-like ligands, the ephrins, represent a bi-directional cell-cell contact signaling system that directs epithelial movements in development. The meaning of this system in the adult human gut is unknown. We investigated the Eph/ephrin mRNA expression in the intestinal epithelium of healthy controls and patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: mRNA expression profiles of all Eph/ephrin family members in normal small intestine and colon were established by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, differential expression in IBD was investigated by cDNA array technology, and validated by both real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Potential effects of enhanced EphB/ephrin-B signaling were analyzed in an in vitro IEC-6 cell scratch wound model.RESULTS: Human adult intestinal mucosa exhibits a complex pattern of Eph receptors and ephrins. Beside the known prominent co-expression of EphA2 and ephrinA1,we found abundantly co-expressed EphB2 and ephrin-B1/2.Interestingly, cDNA array data, validated by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, showed upregulation of ephrin-B2 in both perilesional and lesional intestinal epithelial cells of IBD patients, suggesting a role in epithelial homeostasis. Stimulation of ephrin-B signaling in ephrinB1/2 expressing rat IEC-6-cells with recombinant EphB1Fc resulted in a significant dose-dependent acceleration of wound closure. Furthermore, fluorescence microscopy showed that EphB1-Fc induced coordinated migration of wound edge cells is associated with enhanced formation of lamellipodial protrusions into the wound, increased actin stress fiber assembly and production of laminin at the wound edge.CONCLUSION: EphB/ephrin-B signaling might represent a novel protective mechanism that promotes intestinal epithelial wound healing, with potential impact on epithelial restitution in IBD.

  5. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-[2-3H]mannose or L-[5,6-3H]fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with [2-3H]mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with [2-3H]mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-[1,6-3H]glucosamine and L-[1-14C]fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced 3H-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine

  6. Modulation of cytochrome P450 metabolism and transport across intestinal epithelial barrier by ginger biophenolics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Mukkavilli

    Full Text Available Natural and complementary therapies in conjunction with mainstream cancer care are steadily gaining popularity. Ginger extract (GE confers significant health-promoting benefits owing to complex additive and/or synergistic interactions between its bioactive constituents. Recently, we showed that preservation of natural "milieu" confers superior anticancer activity on GE over its constituent phytochemicals, 6-gingerol (6G, 8-gingerol (8 G, 10-gingerol (10 G and 6-shogaol (6S, through enterohepatic recirculation. Here we further evaluate and compare the effects of GE and its major bioactive constituents on cytochrome P450 (CYP enzyme activity in human liver microsomes by monitoring metabolites of CYP-specific substrates using LC/MS/MS detection methods. Our data demonstrate that individual gingerols are potent inhibitors of CYP isozymes, whereas GE exhibits a much higher half-maximal inhibition value, indicating no possible herb-drug interactions. However, GE's inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2C8 reflects additive interactions among the constituents. In addition, studies performed to evaluate transporter-mediated intestinal efflux using Caco-2 cells revealed that GE and its phenolics are not substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp. Intriguingly, however, 10 G and 6S were not detected in the receiver compartment, indicating possible biotransformation across the Caco-2 monolayer. These data strengthen the notion that an interplay of complex interactions among ginger phytochemicals when fed as whole extract dictates its bioactivity highlighting the importance of consuming whole foods over single agents. Our study substantiates the need for an in-depth analysis of hepatic biotransformation events and distribution profiles of GE and its active phenolics for the design of safe regimens.

  7. Screening of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli Able to Antagonize the Cytotoxic Effect of Clostridium difficile upon Intestinal Epithelial HT29 Monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Varela, Lorena; Alonso-Guervos, Marta; García-Suárez, Olivia; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen inhabiting the human gut, often being the aetiological agent of infections after a microbiota dysbiosis following, for example, an antibiotic treatment. C. difficile infections (CDI) constitute a growing health problem with increasing rates of morbidity and mortality at groups of risk, such as elderly and hospitalized patients, but also in populations traditionally considered low-risk. This could be related to the occurrence of virulent strains which, among other factors, have high-level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, more efficient sporulation and markedly high toxin production. Several novel intervention strategies against CDI are currently under study, such as the use of probiotics to counteract the growth and/or toxigenic activity of C. difficile. In this work, we have analyzed the capability of twenty Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains, from human intestinal origin, to counteract the toxic effect of C. difficile LMG21717 upon the human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29. For this purpose, we incubated the bacteria together with toxigenic supernatants obtained from C. difficile. After this co-incubation new supernatants were collected in order to quantify the remnant A and B toxins, as well as to determine their residual toxic effect upon HT29 monolayers. To this end, the real time cell analyser (RTCA) model, recently developed in our group to monitor C. difficile toxic effect, was used. Results obtained showed that strains of Bifidobacterium longum and B. breve were able to reduce the toxic effect of the pathogen upon HT29, the RTCA normalized cell-index values being inversely correlated with the amount of remnant toxin in the supernatant. The strain B. longum IPLA20022 showed the highest ability to counteract the cytotoxic effect of C. difficile acting directly against the toxin, also having the highest capability for removing the toxins from the clostridial toxigenic supernatant. Image analysis

  8. Influence of dietary ingredients on in vitro inflammatory response of intestinal porcine epithelial cells challenged by an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Rafael G; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Martín-Orúe, Susana M; Pérez, José F; Klasing, Kirk C

    2011-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 is the main bacterial cause of diarrhea in piglets around weaning and the adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosa is a prerequisite step for its colonization. In this study, the adhesion of a fimbriated ETEC and a non-fimbriated E. coli (NFEC) to the intestinal cells and the activation of the innate immune system were evaluated using a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The impact of several feedstuffs (wheat bran (WB); casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP); mannan-oligosaccharides (MOS); locust bean extract (LB) and Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract (AO)) on ETEC attachment and the inflammatory response were also studied. The gene expression of TLR-4; TLR-5; IL-1β; IL-8; IL-10 and TNF-α were quantified using Cyclophilin-A, as a reference gene, and related to a non-challenged treatment. The fimbriated strain was markedly better than the non-fimbriated strain at adherence to intestinal cells and inducing an inflammatory response. All the feedstuffs studied were able to reduce the adhesion of ETEC, with the greatest decrease with CGMP or MOS at highest concentration. Regarding the inflammatory response, the highest dose of WB promoted the lowest relative expression of cytokines and chemokines. All tested feedstuffs were able to reduce the adhesion of ETEC to IPEC-J2 and interfere on the innate inflammatory response; however WB should be further studied according to the beneficial results on the intestinal inflammatory process evidenced in this study. PMID:21944732

  9. Intestinal Microbial Dysbiosis and Colonic Epithelial Cell Hyperproliferation by Dietary α-Mangostin is Independent of Mouse Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Gutierrez-Orozco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG, the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution.

  10. Immunoregulatory effect of bifidobacteria strains in porcine intestinal epithelial cells through modulation of ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohsuke Tomosada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed that evaluation of anti-inflammatory activities of lactic acid bacteria in porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE cells is useful for selecting potentially immunobiotic strains. OBJECTIVE: The aims of the present study were: i to select potentially immunomodulatory bifidobacteria that beneficially modulate the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4-triggered inflammatory response in PIE cells and; ii to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of immunobiotics by evaluating the role of TLR2 and TLR negative regulators in the modulation of proinflammatory cytokine production and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB pathways in PIE cells. RESULTS: Bifidobacteria longum BB536 and B. breve M-16V strains significantly downregulated levels of interleukin (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1 and IL-6 in PIE cells challenged with heat-killed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Moreover, BB536 and M-16V strains attenuated the proinflammatory response by modulating the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. In addition, our findings provide evidence for a key role for the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 in the anti-inflammatory effect of immunobiotic bifidobacteria in PIE cells. CONCLUSIONS: We show new data regarding the mechanism involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of immunobiotics. Several strains with immunoregulatory capabilities used a common mechanism to induce tolerance in PIE cells. Immunoregulatory strains interacted with TLR2, upregulated the expression of A20 in PIE cells, and beneficially modulated the subsequent TLR4 activation by reducing the activation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We also show that the combination of TLR2 activation and A20 induction can be used as biomarkers to screen and select potential immunoregulatory bifidobacteria strains.

  11. Intestinal microbial dysbiosis and colonic epithelial cell hyperproliferation by dietary α-mangostin is independent of mouse strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Galley, Jeffrey D; Bailey, Michael T; Clinton, Steven K; Lesinski, Gregory B; Failla, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution. PMID:25621505

  12. Monitoring in real time the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile upon the intestinal epithelial cell line HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Lorena; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) has been increased not only among hospitalized patients, but also in healthy individuals traditionally considered as low risk population. Current treatment of CDI involves the use of antibiotics to eliminate the pathogen, although recurrent relapses have also been reported. For this reason, the search of new antimicrobials is a very active area of research. The strategy to use inhibitors of toxin's activity has however been less explored in spite of being a promising option. In this regard, the lack of fast and reliable in vitro screening methods to search for novel anti-toxin drugs has hampered this approach. The aim of the current study was to develop a method to monitor in real time the cytotoxicity of C. difficile upon the human colonocyte-like HT29 line, since epithelial intestinal cells are the primary targets of the toxins. The label-free, impedance based RCTA (real time cell analyser) technology was used to follow overtime the behaviour of HT29 in response to C. difficile LMG21717 producing both A and B toxins. Results obtained showed that the selection of the medium to grow the pathogen had a great influence in obtaining toxigenic supernatants, given that some culture media avoided the release of the toxins. A cytotoxic dose- and time-dependent effect of the supernatant obtained from GAM medium upon HT29 and Caco2 cells was detected. The sigmoid-curve fit of data obtained with HT29 allowed the calculation of different toxicological parameters, such as EC50 and LOAEL values. Finally, the modification in the behaviour of HT29 reordered in the RTCA was correlated with the cell rounding effect, typically induced by these toxins, visualized by time-lapsed captures using an optical microscope. Therefore, this RTCA method developed to test cytotoxicity kinetics of C. difficile supernatants upon IEC could be a valuable in vitro model for the screening of new anti-CDI agents. PMID:26436983

  13. Modulation of pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion from HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells by commensal bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sibartie, Shomik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) secrete the chemokine CCL20 in response to infection by various enteropathogenic bacteria or exposure to bacterial flagellin. CCL20 recruits immature dendritic cells and lymphocytes to target sites. Here we investigated IEC responses to various pathogenic and commensal bacteria as well as the modulatory effects of commensal bacteria on pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion. HT-29 human IECs were incubated with commensal bacteria (Bifidobacterium infantis or Lactobacillus salivarius), or with Salmonella typhimurium, its flagellin, Clostridium difficile, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, or Mycobacterium smegmatis for varying times. In some studies, HT-29 cells were pre-treated with a commensal strain for 2 hr prior to infection or flagellin stimulation. CCL20 and interleukin (IL)-8 secretion and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Compared to untreated cells, S. typhimurium, C. difficile, M. paratuberculosis, and flagellin activated NF-kappaB and stimulated significant secretion of CCL20 and IL-8 by HT-29 cells. Conversely, B. infantis, L. salivarius or M. smegmatis did not activate NF-kappaB or augment CCL20 or IL-8 production. Treatment with B. infantis, but not L. salivarius, dose-dependently inhibited the baseline secretion of CCL20. In cells pre-treated with B. infantis, C. difficile-, S. typhimurium-, and flagellin-induced CCL20 were significantly attenuated. B. infantis did not limit M. Paratuberculosis-induced CCL20 secretion. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to demonstrate that a commensal strain can attenuate CCL20 secretion in HT-29 IECs. Collectively, the data indicate that M. paratuberculosis may mediate mucosal damage and that B. infantis can exert immunomodulatory effects on IECs that mediate host responses to flagellin and flagellated enteric pathogens.

  14. Candida albicans infection leads to barrier breakdown and a MAPK/NF-κB mediated stress response in the intestinal epithelial cell line C2BBe1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhringer, Michael; Pohlers, Susann; Schulze, Sylvie; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Piegsa, Judith; Weber, Michael; Martin, Ronny; Hünniger, Kerstin; Linde, Jörg; Guthke, Reinhard; Kurzai, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) form a tight barrier to the gut lumen. Paracellular permeability of the intestinal barrier is regulated by tight junction proteins and can be modulated by microorganisms and other stimuli. The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, a frequent commensal of the human mucosa, has the capacity of traversing this barrier and establishing systemic disease within the host. Infection of polarized C2BBe1 IEC with wild-type C. albicans led to a transient increase of transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) before subsequent barrier disruption, accompanied by a strong decline of junctional protein levels and substantial, but considerably delayed cytotoxicity. Time-resolved microarray-based transcriptome analysis of C. albicans challenged IEC revealed a prominent role of NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways in the response to infection. Hence, we inferred a gene regulatory network based on differentially expressed NF-κB and MAPK pathway components and their predicted transcriptional targets. The network model predicted activation of GDF15 by NF-κB was experimentally validated. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activation in C. albicans infected C2BBe1 cells led to enhanced cytotoxicity in the epithelial cells. Taken together our study identifies NF-κB activation as an important protective signalling pathway in the response of epithelial cells to C. albicans. PMID:26752615

  15. Nitric oxide (NO) production in mammalian non-tumorigenic epithelial cells of the small intestine and macrophages induced by individual strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pipenbaher, Natasa; Møller, Peter Lange; Dolinsek, Jan;

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) affects multiple gastrointestinal functions, including mucosal inflammation and antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to screen the ability of probiotic bacteria to stimulate NO production in porcine intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in the presence and...... absence of interferon gamma (INF-¿). Production of NO in intestinal epithelium was stimulated by individual strains of lactobacilli without INF-¿ priming. While none of the tested bifidobacteria were capable of inducing NO production, most constitutively secreted NO. Most tested strains induced a...... significant increase in NO production compared with the control cells in the macrophage cell line 3D4/21. Results support the protective role of the individual strains of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and may lead to new approaches for manipulating and regulating immune responses at the mucosal...

  16. Protective Effects of Transforming Growth Factor β2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Regulation of Proteins Associated with Stress and Endotoxin Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Jacobsen, Susanne; Sangild, Per T; Bendixen, Emøke; Chatterton, Dereck E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharid...

  17. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Jacobsen, Susanne; Sangild, Per Torp; Bendixen, Emøke; Chatterton, Dereck E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharid...

  18. Activation of MEK1 or MEK2 isoform is sufficient to fully transform intestinal epithelial cells and induce the formation of metastatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ras-dependent ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway plays a central role in cell proliferation control and is frequently activated in human colorectal cancer. Small-molecule inhibitors of MEK1/MEK2 are therefore viewed as attractive drug candidates for the targeted therapy of this malignancy. However, the exact contribution of MEK1 and MEK2 to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer remains to be established. Wild type and constitutively active forms of MEK1 and MEK2 were ectopically expressed by retroviral gene transfer in the normal intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. We studied the impact of MEK1 and MEK2 activation on cellular morphology, cell proliferation, survival, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenesis in mice. RNA interference was used to test the requirement for MEK1 and MEK2 function in maintaining the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells. We found that expression of activated MEK1 or MEK2 is sufficient to morphologically transform intestinal epithelial cells, dysregulate cell proliferation and induce the formation of high-grade adenocarcinomas after orthotopic transplantation in mice. A large proportion of these intestinal tumors metastasize to the liver and lung. Mechanistically, activation of MEK1 or MEK2 up-regulates the expression of matrix metalloproteinases, promotes invasiveness and protects cells from undergoing anoikis. Importantly, we show that silencing of MEK2 expression completely suppresses the proliferation of human colon carcinoma cell lines, whereas inactivation of MEK1 has a much weaker effect. MEK1 and MEK2 isoforms have similar transforming properties and are able to induce the formation of metastatic intestinal tumors in mice. Our results suggest that MEK2 plays a more important role than MEK1 in sustaining the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells

  19. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-κB signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-κB was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-κB inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  20. The arachidonic acid metabolite 11β-ProstaglandinF2α controls intestinal epithelial healing: deficiency in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquenlorge, Sabrina; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Jaulin, Julie; Cenac, Nicolas; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Duchalais, Emilie; Neunlist, Michel; Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne

    2016-01-01

    In healthy gut enteric glial cells (EGC) are essential to intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) functions. In Crohn's Disease (CD), both EGC phenotype and IEB functions are altered, but putative involvement of EGC in CD pathogenesis remains unknown and study of human EGC are lacking. EGC isolated from CD and control patients showed similar expression of glial markers and EGC-derived soluble factors (IL6, TGF-β, proEGF, GSH) but CD EGC failed to increase IEB resistance and healing. Lipid profiling showed that CD EGC produced decreased amounts of 15-HETE, 18-HEPE, 15dPGJ2 and 11βPGF2α as compared to healthy EGC. They also had reduced expression of the L-PGDS and AKR1C3 enzymes. Produced by healthy EGC, the 11βPGF2 activated PPARγ receptor of intestinal epithelial cells to induce cell spreading and IEB wound repair. In addition to this novel healing mechanism our data show that CD EGC presented impaired ability to promote IEB functions through defect in L-PGDS-AKR1C3-11βPGF2α dependent pathway. PMID:27140063

  1. The arachidonic acid metabolite 11β-ProstaglandinF2α controls intestinal epithelial healing: deficiency in patients with Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquenlorge, Sabrina; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Jaulin, Julie; Cenac, Nicolas; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Duchalais, Emilie; Neunlist, Michel; Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne

    2016-01-01

    In healthy gut enteric glial cells (EGC) are essential to intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) functions. In Crohn’s Disease (CD), both EGC phenotype and IEB functions are altered, but putative involvement of EGC in CD pathogenesis remains unknown and study of human EGC are lacking. EGC isolated from CD and control patients showed similar expression of glial markers and EGC-derived soluble factors (IL6, TGF-β, proEGF, GSH) but CD EGC failed to increase IEB resistance and healing. Lipid profiling showed that CD EGC produced decreased amounts of 15-HETE, 18-HEPE, 15dPGJ2 and 11βPGF2α as compared to healthy EGC. They also had reduced expression of the L-PGDS and AKR1C3 enzymes. Produced by healthy EGC, the 11βPGF2 activated PPARγ receptor of intestinal epithelial cells to induce cell spreading and IEB wound repair. In addition to this novel healing mechanism our data show that CD EGC presented impaired ability to promote IEB functions through defect in L-PGDS-AKR1C3-11βPGF2α dependent pathway. PMID:27140063

  2. Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane vesicle-associated proteolytic activity promotes bacterial invasion by mediating cleavage of intestinal epithelial cell E-cadherin and occludin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Abdi; Nasher, Fauzy; Jagatia, Heena; Gundogdu, Ozan; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wren, Brendan; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) play an important role in the pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni produces OMVs that trigger IL-8, IL-6, hBD-3 and TNF-α responses from T84 intestinal epithelial cells and are cytotoxic to Caco-2 IECs and Galleria mellonella larvae. Proteomic analysis of 11168H OMVs identified the presence of three proteases, HtrA, Cj0511 and Cj1365c. In this study, 11168H OMVs were shown to possess proteolytic activity that was reduced by pretreatment with specific serine protease inhibitors. OMVs isolated from 11168H htrA, Cj0511 or Cj1365c mutants possess significantly reduced proteolytic activity. 11168H OMVs are able to cleave both E-cadherin and occludin, but this cleavage is reduced with OMVs pretreated with serine protease inhibitors and also with OMVs isolated from htrA or Cj1365c mutants. Co-incubation of T84 monolayers with 11168H OMVs results in a visible reduction in both E-cadherin and occludin. The addition of 11168H OMVs to the co-culture of live 11168H bacteria with T84 cells results in enhanced levels of bacterial adhesion and invasion in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation of the cleavage of host cell structural proteins by C. jejuni OMVs should enhance our understanding of the interactions of this important pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26451973

  3. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Jacob G; Ward, Honorine D

    2016-05-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca(2+)-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  4. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii and β-galactomannan oligosaccharide on porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells challenged in vitro with Escherichia coli F4 (K88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badia Roger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Probiotic and prebiotics, often called "immune-enhancing" feed additives, are believed to deal with pathogens, preventing the need of an immune response and reducing tissue damage. In this study, we investigated if a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM had a similar protective role compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii (Scb, a proven probiotic, in the context of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infection. ETEC causes inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage in piglets, resulting in large economic loses worldwide. We observed that Scb and βGM products inhibited in vitro adhesion of ETEC on cell surface of porcine intestinal IPI-2I cells. Our data showed that Scb and βGM decreased the mRNA ETEC-induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, GM-CSF and chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL8 on intestinal IPI-2I. Furthermore, we investigated the putative immunomodulatory role of Scb and βGM on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs per se and under infection conditions. We observed a slight up-regulation of mRNA for TNF-α and CCR7 receptor after co-incubation of DC with Scb and βGM. However, no differences were found in DC activation upon ETEC infection and Scb or βGM co-culture. Therefore, our results indicate that, similar to probiotic Scb, prebiotic βGM may protect intestinal epithelial cells against intestinal pathogens. Finally, although these products may modulate DC activation, their effect under ETEC challenge conditions remains to be elucidated.

  5. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate enhances the epithelial barrier function and maintains intestinal homeostasis through integrin-p38 MAPK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Segawa

    Full Text Available Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P, a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK.

  6. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  7. Calcium-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-c-Src Signaling Cascade Mediates Disruption of Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junctions by Dextran Sulfate Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with the symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Ask1 or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased Tyr-phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced Tyr-phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto phosphorylation of c-Src. This study demonstrates that Ca2+-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-cSrc signaling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. PMID:25377781

  8. The regulation of the intestinal mucin MUC2 expression by short chain fatty acids: implications for epithelial protection

    OpenAIRE

    Burger-van Paassen, Nanda; Vincent, Audrey; Puiman, Patrycja J; van der Sluis, Maria; Bouma, Janneke; Boehm, Günther; Van Goudoever, Johannes B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Ingrid B Renes

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), fermentation products of bacteria, influence epithelial-specific gene expression. We hypothesize that SCFAs affect goblet cell-specific mucin MUC2 expression and thereby alter epithelial protection. Our aim was to study the mechanisms that regulate butyrate-mediated effects on MUC2 synthesis. Human goblet cell-like LS174T cells were treated with SCFAs, after which MUC2 mRNA levels and stability and MUC2 protein expression were analyzed. SCF...

  9. Pregnane-X-Receptor Mediates The Anti-inflammatory Activities of Rifaximin on Detoxification Pathways in Intestinal Epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Migliorati, Marco; Barbanti, Miriam; Cipriani, Sabrina; Palladino, Giuseppe; Distrutti, Eleonora; Renga, Barbara; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) is master gene overseeing detoxification of wide number of xenobiotics and is critical for maintenance of intestinal integrity. The intestinal expression of genes involved in cellular detoxification is down-regulated in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Rifaximin, is a non absorbable antibiotic endowed with a PXR agonistic activity. In the present study we have investigated whether rifaximin activates PXR in primary human colon ...

  10. Toll-like receptor 2 activation by β2→1-fructans protects barrier function of t84 human intestinal epithelial cells in a chain length-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, L.M.; Meyer, D.; Pullens, G.; Faas, M.M.; Venema, K.; Ramasamy, U.; Schols, H.A.; Vos, P. de

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear.We hypothesized that β2→1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2),

  11. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, D.; Holt, L.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that non-pathogenic Gram negative bacteria induce RelA phosphorylation, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism...

  12. Influence of the intrinsic gut microbiota on transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the early life development of intestinal epithelial integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Frøkjær, Hanne; Licht, Tine Rask

    The interplay between the gut microbiota and the integrity of the intestinal mucus layer is important both in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier as part of the innate immune defense, and in the conservation of gut homeostasis. Interesting parameters are the mucins, which protect the mucosal...... SPF animals, possibly as part of protective mechanism. Monocolonization with Lactobacillus NCFM and E.coli seemed to decrease levels towards levels observed in the SPF animals (except for Muc-3 in E.coli). Two of the tight junction genes (JAM-A, E-Cad) showed similar tendencies, whereas Tjp-1 showed......RNA expression. The analysis of the day 1 samples is ongoing and results will be presented at the meeting...

  13. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis KLDS 2.0603, a probiotic strain with digestive tract resistance and adhesion to the intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dequan; Sun, Yu; Huo, Gui-Cheng; Yang, Limei; Liu, Fei; Li, Aili; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2016-02-20

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 (abbreviated as KLDS 2.0603) is a probiotic strain isolated from the feces of an adult human. Previous studies showed that KLDS 2.0603 has a high resistance to simulated digestive tract conditions and a high ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). These two characteristics are essential requirements for the selection of probiotic bacteria. To explore the stress resistance mechanism to the digestive tract environment and the adhesive proteins of this strain, in this paper, we reported the complete genome sequence of KLDS 2.0603, which contains 19,469bp and encodes 1614 coding sequences(CDSs), 15 rRNA genes, 52 tRNA genes with 1678 open reading frames. PMID:26795356

  14. Up-regulation of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) via ERK1/2 signals attenuates sulindac sulfide-mediated cytotoxicity in the human intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to relieve pain and inflammation and have also received considerable attention because of their preventive effects against human cancer. However, the drug application is sometimes limited by the severe gastrointestinal ulcers and mucosal complications. In the present study, NSAID sulindac sulfide was investigated for the cytotoxic injury in the intestinal epithelial cells in association with an immediate inducible factor, early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1). Previously we reported that sulindac sulfide can suppress tumor cell invasion by inducing EGR-1. Extending the previous study, EGR-1 induction by sulindac sulfide was observed both in the non-transformed and transformed human intestinal epithelial cell lines. In terms of signaling pathway, ERK1/2 MAP kinases and its substrate Elk-1 transcription factor were involved in the sulindac sulfide-induced EGR-1 gene expression. Moreover, sulindac sulfide stimulated the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor EGR-1, which was also mediated by ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The roles of EGR-1 signals in the apoptotic cell death were assessed in the intestinal epithelial cells. Suppression of EGR-1 expression retarded cellular growth and colony forming activity in the intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, induced EGR-1 ameliorated sulindac sulfide-mediated apoptotic cell death and enhanced the cellular survival. Taken all together, sulindac sulfide activated ERK1/2 MAP kinases which then mediated EGR-1 induction and nuclear translocation, all of which played important roles in the cellular survival from NSAID-mediated cytotoxicity in the human intestinal epithelial cells, implicating the protective roles of EGR-1 in the NSAID-mediated mucosal injuries

  15. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lebeer, S.; Claes, I.J.; Tytgat, H.L.P.; Verhoeven, T.L.A.; Marien, E.; Ossowski, von, I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de, W.M.; Keersmaecker, de, S.C.; Vanderleyden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelia...

  16. Correlation between lack of norovirus replication and histo-blood group antigen expression in 3D-intestinal epithelial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroviruses (NoV) are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. An in vitro model for NoV replication remains elusive, making study of the virus difficult. One publication utilizing a 3-dimensional (3D) intestinal model derived from Int407 cells reported NoV replication and extensive cytopathi...

  17. The protective effect of interleukin-11 on the cell death induced by X-ray irradiation in cultured intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a well known anti-inflammatory cytokine that is associated with cell growth, and also participates in limiting X-ray irradiation induced intestinal mucosal injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of IL-11 on the cell injury induced by X-ray irradiation in rat intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells. Recombinant human IL-11 (rhIL-11) treated cells were irradiated and then examined for cell viability. To evaluate irradiation injury, trypan blue staining was used to detect the dead cells. The viability of irradiated cells was up-regulated by rhIL-11 treatment and also resulted in the activation of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6Rp). Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, suppressed the activation of S6Rp in rhIL-11 treated cells, and decreased the up-regulation of viability by rhIL-11 treatment in irradiated cells. The TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay was also performed to estimate the rate of apoptosis in X-ray induced cell death. There was no difference in the results between trypan blue staining and the TUNEL assay. Further, rhIL-11 down-regulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated cells. These results suggest that rhIL-11 may play an important role in protection from radiation injury. (author)

  18. The hemorrhagic coli pilus (HCP of Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an inducer of proinflammatory cytokine secretion in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Ledesma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7, the causative agent of hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, produces long bundles of type IV pili (TFP called hemorrhagic coli pili (HCP. HCP are capable of mediating several phenomena associated with pathogenicity: i adherence to human and bovine epithelial cells; ii invasion of epithelial cells; iii hemagglutination of rabbit erythrocytes; iv biofilm formation; v twitching motility; and vi specific binding to laminin and fibronectin. HCP are composed of a 19 kDa pilin subunit (HcpA encoded by the hcpA chromosomal gene (called prepilin peptidase-dependent gene [ppdD] in E. coli K-12. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the potential role of HCP of E. coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 in activating the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines from a variety of host epithelial cells. We found that purified HCP and a recombinant HcpA protein induced significant release of IL-8 and TNF-alpha, from cultured polarized intestinal cells (T84 and HT-29 cells and non-intestinal HeLa cells. Levels of proinflammatory IL-8 and TNF-alpha, but not IL-2, IL6, or IL-10 cytokines, were increased in the presence of HCP and recombinant HcpA after 6 h of incubation with >or=50 ng/ml of protein, suggesting that stimulation of IL-8 and TNF-alpha are dose and time-dependent. In addition, we also demonstrated that flagella are potent inducers of cytokine production. Furthermore, MAPK activation kinetics studies showed that EHEC induces p38 phosphorylation under HCP-producing conditions, and ERK1/2 and JNK activation was detectable after 3 h of EHEC infection. HT-29 cells were stimulated with epidermal growth factor stimulation of HT-29 cells for 30 min leading to activation of three MAPKs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The HcpA pilin monomer of the HCP produced by EHEC O157:H7 is a potent inducer of IL-8 and TNF-alpha release, an event which could play a

  19. Crosstalk between Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Intestinal Epithelial HIF Augments Tissue Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Caleb J; Zheng, Leon; Campbell, Eric L; Saeedi, Bejan; Scholz, Carsten C; Bayless, Amanda J; Wilson, Kelly E; Glover, Louise E; Kominsky, Douglas J; Magnuson, Aaron; Weir, Tiffany L; Ehrentraut, Stefan F; Pickel, Christina; Kuhn, Kristine A; Lanis, Jordi M; Nguyen, Vu; Taylor, Cormac T; Colgan, Sean P

    2015-05-13

    Interactions between the microbiota and distal gut are fundamental determinants of human health. Such interactions are concentrated at the colonic mucosa and provide energy for the host epithelium through the production of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate. We sought to determine the role of epithelial butyrate metabolism in establishing the austere oxygenation profile of the distal gut. Bacteria-derived butyrate affects epithelial O2 consumption and results in stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a transcription factor coordinating barrier protection. Antibiotic-mediated depletion of the microbiota reduces colonic butyrate and HIF expression, both of which are restored by butyrate supplementation. Additionally, germ-free mice exhibit diminished retention of O2-sensitive dyes and decreased stabilized HIF. Furthermore, the influences of butyrate are lost in cells lacking HIF, thus linking butyrate metabolism to stabilized HIF and barrier function. This work highlights a mechanism where host-microbe interactions augment barrier function in the distal gut. PMID:25865369

  20. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Sarah; Daneshian, Mardas; Bouwstra, Joke; Caloni, Francesca; Constant, Samuel; Davies, Donna E.; Dandekar, Gudrun; Guzman, Carlos A.; Fabian, Eric; Haltner, Eleonore; Hartung, Thomas; Hasiwa, Nina; Hayden, Patrick; Kandarova, Helena; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields, ranging from the utilization of ex vivo tissue to reconstructed in vitro models, and further to chip-based technologies, synthetic membrane systems and, of increasing current interest, in silico mo...

  1. Polarized secretion of IL-18 by IEC-18 intestinal epithelial cells: effect of probiotic Lactobacillus casei/paracasei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínská, Jiřina; Zákostelecká, Marie; Lisá, Věra; Kozáková, Hana; Dvorak, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2008), s. 338-338. ISSN 1138-7548. [Meeting European Intestinal Transport Group /22./. 07.09.2008-10.09.2008, Pamplona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME783 Grant ostatní: NIH(US) HD-47237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * cytokine IL-18 * probiotic Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Intestinal Microbial Dysbiosis and Colonic Epithelial Cell Hyperproliferation by Dietary α-Mangostin is Independent of Mouse Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Gutierrez-Orozco; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Jeffrey D. Galley; Bailey, Michael T.; Clinton, Steven K.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Failla, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represe...

  3. AT1R blocker losartan attenuates intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in a mouse model of Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, TIAN-JING; SHI, YONG-YAN; WANG, EN-BO; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II, which is the main effector of the renin-angiotensin system, has an important role in intestinal inflammation via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of the AT1R blocker losartan on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Losartan was administered to male adult C57BL/6 J mice 2 weeks prior to the induction of colitis, and images of the whole colon were captured to record changes, scored acc...

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus stimulates intestinal P-glycoprotein expression via a c-Fos/c-Jun-dependent mechanism in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, Shubha; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Kumar, Anoop; Soni, Vikas; Alrefai, Waddah A; Gill, Ravinder K; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Saksena, Seema

    2016-04-15

    Our previous studies showed that Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) culture supernatant (CS) increased P-glycoprotein [Pgp/multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)] function, expression, and promoter activity in Caco-2 cells. The current studies were designed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms mediating the stimulatory effects of LA CS on Pgp promoter activity. Deletion analysis indicated that the LA CS response element(s) is located in the -172/+428-bp region, and sequence analysis of this region revealed three potential binding sites for c-Fos or c-Jun: proximal activating protein (AP) 1a (-119/-98 bp), distal AP1b (-99/-78 bp), and AP1c (+175/+196 bp). LA CS (24 h) showed an approximately twofold increase in the protein expression of c-Fos and c-Jun in Caco-2 cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that LA CS markedly increased the binding of Caco-2 nuclear proteins to AP1a and AP1b, but not AP1c. The DNA-protein complex was completely eliminated by c-Fos antibody, while c-Jun antibody partially eliminated the complex. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis also showed that LA CS enhanced the association of c-Fos and c-Jun (by ∼4- and 1.5-fold, respectively) with endogenous Pgp promoter in Caco-2 cells (p-172/+1). Interestingly, overexpression of c-Fos or c-Jun activated Pgp promoter by nearly twofold each. This increase was further enhanced (∼14-fold) when c-Fos and c-Jun were simultaneously overexpressed, suggesting that the presence of one of these transcription factors potentiates the effect of the other. These studies, for the first time, provide evidence for the involvement of c-Fos/c-Jun in stimulation of Pgp gene expression by LA CS in the human intestine. PMID:26867563

  5. Disruption of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 K5 capsule biosynthesis, through loss of distinct kfi genes, modulates interaction with intestinal epithelial cells and impact on cell health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Nzakizwanayo

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN is among the best characterised probiotics, with a proven clinical impact in a range of conditions. Despite this, the mechanisms underlying these "probiotic effects" are not clearly defined. Here we applied random transposon mutagenesis to identify genes relevant to the interaction of EcN with intestinal epithelial cells. This demonstrated mutants disrupted in the kfiB gene, of the K5 capsule biosynthesis cluster, to be significantly enhanced in attachment to Caco-2 cells. However, this phenotype was distinct from that previously reported for EcN K5 deficient mutants (kfiC null mutants, prompting us to explore further the role of kfiB in EcN:Caco-2 interaction. Isogenic mutants with deletions in kfiB (EcNΔkfiB, or the more extensively characterised K5 capsule biosynthesis gene kfiC (EcNΔkfiC, were both shown to be capsule deficient, but displayed divergent phenotypes with regard to impact on Caco-2 cells. Compared with EcNΔkfiC and the EcN wild-type, EcNΔkfiB exhibited significantly greater attachment to Caco-2 cells, as well as apoptotic and cytotoxic effects. In contrast, EcNΔkfiC was comparable to the wild-type in these assays, but was shown to induce significantly greater COX-2 expression in Caco-2 cells. Distinct differences were also apparent in the pervading cell morphology and cellular aggregation between mutants. Overall, these observations reinforce the importance of the EcN K5 capsule in host-EcN interactions, but demonstrate that loss of distinct genes in the K5 pathway can modulate the impact of EcN on epithelial cell health.

  6. Disruption of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 K5 capsule biosynthesis, through loss of distinct kfi genes, modulates interaction with intestinal epithelial cells and impact on cell health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Patel, Bhavik A; Dedi, Cinzia; Macfarlane, Wendy M; Jones, Brian V

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is among the best characterised probiotics, with a proven clinical impact in a range of conditions. Despite this, the mechanisms underlying these "probiotic effects" are not clearly defined. Here we applied random transposon mutagenesis to identify genes relevant to the interaction of EcN with intestinal epithelial cells. This demonstrated mutants disrupted in the kfiB gene, of the K5 capsule biosynthesis cluster, to be significantly enhanced in attachment to Caco-2 cells. However, this phenotype was distinct from that previously reported for EcN K5 deficient mutants (kfiC null mutants), prompting us to explore further the role of kfiB in EcN:Caco-2 interaction. Isogenic mutants with deletions in kfiB (EcNΔkfiB), or the more extensively characterised K5 capsule biosynthesis gene kfiC (EcNΔkfiC), were both shown to be capsule deficient, but displayed divergent phenotypes with regard to impact on Caco-2 cells. Compared with EcNΔkfiC and the EcN wild-type, EcNΔkfiB exhibited significantly greater attachment to Caco-2 cells, as well as apoptotic and cytotoxic effects. In contrast, EcNΔkfiC was comparable to the wild-type in these assays, but was shown to induce significantly greater COX-2 expression in Caco-2 cells. Distinct differences were also apparent in the pervading cell morphology and cellular aggregation between mutants. Overall, these observations reinforce the importance of the EcN K5 capsule in host-EcN interactions, but demonstrate that loss of distinct genes in the K5 pathway can modulate the impact of EcN on epithelial cell health. PMID:25790373

  7. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Ninh Nguyen

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and changes in the cellular proteome were subsequently analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated with stress response pathways, among which five proteins were altered by LPS and restored by TGF-β2, whereas six were differentially expressed only by TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Based on previously reported biological functions, these patterns indicate the anti-stress and anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β2 in IECs. We conclude that TGF-β2 of dietary or endogenous origin may regulate the IEC responses against LPS stimuli, thereby supporting cellular homeostasis and innate immunity in response to bacterial colonization, and the first enteral feeding in early life.

  8. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Jacobsen, Susanne; Sangild, Per T; Bendixen, Emøke; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and changes in the cellular proteome were subsequently analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated with stress response pathways, among which five proteins were altered by LPS and restored by TGF-β2, whereas six were differentially expressed only by TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Based on previously reported biological functions, these patterns indicate the anti-stress and anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β2 in IECs. We conclude that TGF-β2 of dietary or endogenous origin may regulate the IEC responses against LPS stimuli, thereby supporting cellular homeostasis and innate immunity in response to bacterial colonization, and the first enteral feeding in early life. PMID:25668313

  9. A fluorescence-based demonstration of intestinal villi and epithelial cell in chickens fed dietary silicic acid powder including bamboo vinegar compound liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttanavut, J; Matsumoto, Y; Yamauchi, K

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the combined effect of silicic acid and bamboo vinegar compound liquid (SPV) on the growth and intestinal histological alterations in poultry. Forty-eight 7-day-old male Sanuki Cochin chickens were fed a commercial mash diet supplemented with SPV at 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% level ad libitum for 112 days. Body weight gain tended to improve with increased concentrations of dietary SPV, although these results were not statistically significant (PSPV groups, respectively, compared with the control. Cell mitosis within the duodenum and jejunum also increased in the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a prominent increase in the number of protuberant cells on the villus apical surface of the duodenum and jejunum for the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups compared with the control. Poultry in the 0.3% SPV group had the highest body weight gain and hypertrophied histological alterations of intestinal villi. Fluorescent microscopic images of cell mitosis and protuberant cells in the duodenal crypt clearly confirmed positive reactions for the activator protein 2α (AP-2α) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), compared with the control. The present results indicate that dietary SPV stimulates adsorption by the epithelial cells, which activate cell proliferation and self-renewal and regulate the expression of cell cycle regulators AP-2α and PCNA, resulting in higher body weight gain. Thus, we can conclude that a concentration of 0.3% dietary SPV is ideal for promoting growth in poultry. PMID:22936452

  10. Transcription of the Tollip gene is elevated in intestinal epithelial cells through impaired O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of the negative regulator Elf-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Transcriptional activation of the Tollitip gene is higher in IECs than in monocytes. → Nt -194/-186 region acts as a cis-element and is recognized by Elf-1. → Elf-1 suppresses Tollip gene transcription in monocytes but not in IECs. → O-GlcNAc modification is necessary for nuclear translocation of Elf-1. → O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of Elf-1 is impaired in IECs. -- Abstract: Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) must be tolerant of the large number of commensal bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract to avoid excessive inflammatory reactions. Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling, is known to be expressed at high levels in IECs, and to thereby contribute to the hyporesponsiveness of IECs to commensals. In this study, we analyzed the underlying mechanisms for elevated transcription of the Tollip gene in IECs using a human IEC line, Caco-2, and a human monocyte line, THP-1, as a control. Elf-1 was identified as a transcription factor that negatively regulates Tollip gene expression. The transcription factor Elf-1 was localized in the nucleus by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification, whereas the unmodified form was detected only in the cytoplasm. Comparison of Caco-2 and THP-1 cells revealed that O-GlcNAc modification of Elf-1 was significantly lower in IECs than in monocytes. Collectively, the results indicate that insufficient O-GlcNAc modification prevents Elf-1-mediated transcriptional repression and thereby upregulates Tollip gene expression in IECs.

  11. Oral and Fecal Campylobacter concisus Strains induce Barrier dysfunction by Apoptosis in HT-29/B6 Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Nielsen, Henrik Ib; Ejlertsen, Tove;

    Campylobacter concisus infections of the gastrointestinal tract can be accompanied by diarrhea and inflammation, whereas colonization of the human oral cavity might have a commensal nature. We focus on the pathophysiology of C. concisus and the effects of different clinical oral and fecal C....... concisus strains on human HT-29/B6 colon cells. Six oral and eight fecal strains of C. concisus were isolated. Mucus-producing HT-29/B6 epithelial monolayers were infected with the C. concisus strains. Transepithelial electrical resistance (R(t)) and tracer fluxes of different molecule size were measured...... in Ussing chambers. Tight junction (TJ) protein expression was determined by Western blotting, and subcellular TJ distribution was analyzed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Apoptosis induction was examined by TUNEL-staining and Western blot of caspase-3 activation. All strains invaded confluent...

  12. NF-kappa B- and AP-1-mediated induction of human beta defensin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells by Escherichia coli Nissle 1917: A novel effect of a probiotic bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Wehkamp, Jan; Harder, J; Wehkamp, K; Wehkamp-von Meissner, B; Schlee, M; Enders, C; Sonnenborn, U.; Nuding, S; S. Bengmark; Fellermann, K; Schroder, J.M.; Stange, E F

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the defensive mechanisms induced in epithelial cells by pathogenic versus probiotic bacteria. The aim of our study was to compare probiotic bacterial strains such as Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 with nonprobiotic, pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria with respect to innate defense mechanisms in the intestinal mucosal cell. Here we report that E. coli strain Nissle 1917 and a variety of other probiotic bacteria, including lactobacilli-in contrast to more than 40 differen...

  13. NF-κB- and AP-1-Mediated Induction of Human Beta Defensin-2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Escherichia coli Nissle 1917: a Novel Effect of a Probiotic Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Wehkamp, Jan; Harder, Jürgen; Wehkamp, Kai; Meissner, Birte Wehkamp-von; Schlee, Miriam; Enders, Corinne; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Nuding, Sabine; Bengmark, Stig; Fellermann, Klaus; Schröder, Jens Michael; Stange, Eduard F

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the defensive mechanisms induced in epithelial cells by pathogenic versus probiotic bacteria. The aim of our study was to compare probiotic bacterial strains such as Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 with nonprobiotic, pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria with respect to innate defense mechanisms in the intestinal mucosal cell. Here we report that E. coli strain Nissle 1917 and a variety of other probiotic bacteria, including lactobacilli—in contrast to more than 40 differen...

  14. Biphasic Regulation of Yes-associated Protein (YAP) Cellular Localization, Phosphorylation, and Activity by G Protein-coupled Receptor Agonists in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: A NOVEL ROLE FOR PROTEIN KINASE D (PKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Sinnett-Smith, James; Stevens, Jan V; Young, Steven H; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2016-08-19

    We examined the regulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) localization, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results show that stimulation of intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist angiotensin II, a potent mitogen for these cells, induced rapid translocation of YAP from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (within 15 min) and a concomitant increase in YAP phosphorylation at Ser(127) and Ser(397) Angiotensin II elicited YAP phosphorylation and cytoplasmic accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (ED50 = 0.3 nm). Similar YAP responses were provoked by stimulation with vasopressin or serum. Treatment of the cells with the protein kinase D (PKD) family inhibitors CRT0066101 and kb NB 142-70 prevented the increase in YAP phosphorylation on Ser(127) and Ser(397) via Lats2, YAP cytoplasmic accumulation, and increase in the mRNA levels of YAP/TEAD-regulated genes (Ctgf and Areg). Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3 markedly attenuated YAP nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, phosphorylation at Ser(127), and induction of Ctgf and Areg expression in response to GPCR activation. These results identify a novel role for the PKD family in the control of biphasic localization, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity of YAP in intestinal epithelial cells. In turn, YAP and TAZ are necessary for the stimulation of the proliferative response of intestinal epithelial cells to GPCR agonists that act via PKD. The discovery of interaction between YAP and PKD pathways identifies a novel cross-talk in signal transduction and demonstrates, for the first time, that the PKDs feed into the YAP pathway. PMID:27369082

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production. PMID:26907754

  16. Oral Treatment with Extract of Agaricus blazei Murill Enhanced Th1 Response through Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Suppressed OVA-Sensitized Allergy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Bouike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the mechanism of the antiallergic activity of Agaricus blazei Murill extract (ABME, the present paper used an in vivo allergy model and an in vitro intestinal gut model. During OVA sensitization, the serum IgE levels decreased significantly in ABME group. Interleukin (IL-4 and -5 produced from OVA-restimulated splenocytes was significantly decreased, and anti-CD3ε/CD28 antibody treatment also reduced IL-10, -4, and -5 production and increased IFN-γ production in ABME group. These results suggest that oral administration of ABME improves Th1/Th2 balance. Moreover, a coculture system constructed of Caco-2 cells and splenocytes from OT-II mice or RAW 264.7 cells indicated that the significant increases in IFN-γ production by ABME treatment. Therefore, it was concluded that the antiallergic activity of ABME was due to the activation of macrophages by epithelial cells and the promotion of the differentiation of naïve T cells into Th1 cells in the immune.

  17. Preventive Effect of TU-100 on a Type-2 Model of Colitis in Mice: Possible Involvement of Enhancing Adrenomedullin in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, have histopathologically and immunologically different characteristics. We previously reported that a traditional Japanese medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100, ameliorated a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid- (TNBS- induced type-1 model colitis exhibiting histopathological features of CD through adrenomedullin (ADM enhancement. Our current aims were to examine whether TU-100 ameliorates a type-2 model colitis that histologically resembles UC and identify the active ingredients. Methods. TU-100 was administered orally to mice with oxazolone- (OXN- induced type-2 model colitis. The morbidity was evaluated by body weight loss and the macroscopic score of colonic lesions. ADM was quantified using an EIA kit. Results. TU-100 prevented weight loss and colon ulceration. ADM production by intestinal epithelial cells was increased by TU-100 addition. Screening to identify active ingredients showed that [6]-shogaol and hydroxy α-sanshool enhanced ADM production. Conclusions. TU-100 exerted a protective effect in OXN-induced type-2 model colitis, indicating that TU-100 may be a beneficial agent for treatment of UC.

  18. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria attenuate the proinflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Christine M; Kostrzynska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response to infections and tissue injury; however, abnormal immune responses can give rise to chronic inflammation and contribute to disease progression. Various dietary components, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotics, have the potential to modulate intestinal inflammatory responses. One factor in particular, the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL-8), is one of the major mediators of the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to investigate modulation of the inflammatory host response induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in the presence of selected probiotics and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from human sources, dairy products, and farm animals. IL-8 gene expression and protein production in HT-29 cells were evaluated by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Pre-incubation of HT-29 cells with Lactobacillus kefir IM002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis FRP 61, Bifidobacterium longum FRP 68 and FRP 69, Bifidobacterium breve FRP 334, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IM080 significantly inhibited IL-8 secretion induced by Salmonella Typhimurium DT104. Co-culture of selected probiotics and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 reduced IL-8 production, while potential probiotics and LAB had no effect on IL-8 secretion in HT-29 cells preincubated with Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 prior to adding probiotics. Lactobacillus kefir IM002 supernatant also significantly reduced IL-8 production. In conclusion, our study suggests that probiotic bifidobacteria and LAB modulate cytokine induction and possess anti-inflammatory properties; however, the effectiveness is strain dependent. PMID:23391223

  19. Iron-ascorbate-mediated lipid peroxidation causes epigenetic changes in the antioxidant defense in intestinal epithelial cells: impact on inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Yara

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The gastrointestinal tract is frequently exposed to noxious stimuli that may cause oxidative stress, inflammation and injury. Intraluminal pro-oxidants from ingested nutrients especially iron salts and ascorbic acid frequently consumed together, can lead to catalytic formation of oxygen-derived free radicals that ultimately overwhelm the cellular antioxidant defense and lead to cell damage. HYPOTHESIS: Since the mechanisms remain sketchy, efforts have been exerted to evaluate the role of epigenetics in modulating components of endogenous enzymatic antioxidants in the intestine. To this end, Caco-2/15 cells were exposed to the iron-ascorbate oxygen radical-generating system. RESULTS: Fe/Asc induced a significant increase in lipid peroxidation as reflected by the elevated formation of malondialdehyde along with the alteration of antioxidant defense as evidenced by raised superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 and diminished glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities and genes. Consequently, there was an up-regulation of inflammatory processes illustrated by the activation of NF-κB transcription factor, the higher production of interleukin-6 and cycloxygenase-2 as well as the decrease of IκB. Assessment of promoter's methylation revealed decreased levels for SOD2 and increased degree for GPx2. On the other hand, pre-incubation of Caco-2/15 cells with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, or Trolox antioxidant normalized the activities of SOD2 and GPx, reduced lipid peroxidation and prevented inflammation. CONCLUSION: Redox and inflammatory modifications in response to Fe/Asc -mediated lipid peroxidation may implicate epigenetic methylation.

  20. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri cell and mucus-binding protein A (CmbA) in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hanne; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A; Axelsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, a symbiotic inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals, is marketed as a probiotic. The ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus is an interesting property with regard to probiotic features such as colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with the host. Here, we present a study performed to elucidate the role of sortase (SrtA), four putative sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs), and one C-terminal membrane-anchored cell surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 in adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus in vitro. This included mutagenesis of the genes encoding these proteins and complementation of mutants. A null mutation in hmpref0536_10255 encoding srtA resulted in significantly reduced adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus, indicating involvement of SDPs in adhesion. Evaluation of the bacterial adhesion revealed that of the five putative surface protein mutants tested, only a null mutation in the hmpref0536_10633 gene, encoding a putative SDP with an LPxTG motif, resulted in a significant loss of adhesion to both Caco-2 cells and mucus. Complementation with the functional gene on a plasmid restored adhesion to Caco-2 cells. However, complete restoration of adhesion to mucus was not achieved. Overexpression of hmpref0536_10633 in strain ATCC PTA 6475 resulted in an increased adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus compared with the WT strain. We conclude from these results that, among the putative surface proteins tested, the protein encoded by hmpref0536_10633 plays a critical role in binding of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 to Caco-2 cells and mucus. Based on this, we propose that this LPxTG motif containing protein should be referred to as cell and mucus binding protein A (CmbA). PMID:24473252

  1. The differential effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Salmonella-induced interleukin-8 and human beta-defensin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F-C

    2016-07-01

    Salmonellosis or Salmonella, one of the most common food-borne diseases, remains a major public health problem worldwide. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) play an essential role in the mucosal innate immunity of the host to defend against the invasion of Salmonella by interleukin (IL)-8 and human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2). Accumulated research has unravelled important roles of vitamin D in the regulation of innate immunity. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) on Salmonella-induced innate immunity in IECs. We demonstrate that pretreatment of 1,25D3 results in suppression of Salmonella-induced IL-8 but enhancement of hBD-2, either protein secretion and mRNA expression, in IECs. Furthermore, 1,25D3 enhanced Salmonella-induced membranous recruitment of nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD2) and its mRNA expression and activation of protein kinase B (Akt), a downstream effector of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signal counteracted the suppressive effect of 1,25D3 on Salmonella-induced IL-8 expression, while knock-down of NOD2 by siRNA diminished the enhanced hBD-2 expression. These data suggest differential regulation of 1,25D3 on Salmonella-induced IL-8 and hBD-2 expression in IECs via PI3K/Akt signal and NOD2 protein expression, respectively. Active vitamin D-enhanced anti-microbial peptide in Salmonella-infected IECs protected the host against infection, while modulation of proinflammatory responses by active vitamin D prevented the host from the detrimental effects of overwhelming inflammation. Thus, active vitamin D-induced innate immunity in IECs enhances the host's protective mechanism, which may provide an alternative therapy for invasive Salmonella infection. PMID:26990648

  2. Transitions in Oral and Intestinal Microflora Composition and Innate Immune Receptor-Dependent Stimulation during Mouse Development▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Osaka, Toshifumi; Tawaratsumida, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Chen, Grace Y.; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Commensal bacteria possess immunostimulatory activities that can modulate host responses to affect development and homeostasis in the intestine. However, how different populations of resident bacteria stimulate the immune system remains largely unknown. We characterized here the ability of intestinal and oral microflora to stimulate individual pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in bone marrow-derived macrophages and mesothelial cells. The intestinal but not oral microflora elicited age- and...

  3. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 preserves intestinal epithelial barrier function from TNF-α induced injury via suppression of NF-kB p65 mediated MLCK-P-MLC signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanwen; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Guowei; Zuo, Shuai; Zhang, Junling; Chen, Ziyi; Wang, Xin; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yucun; Wang, Pengyuan

    2015-05-01

    Substantial studies have demonstrated the protective effect of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) on intestinal barrier function, but the mechanisms are not fully illustrated. In this study, the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction was further investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers was evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and FITC-Dextran 40,000 Da (FD-40) trans-membrane flux. ZO-1 and Occludin were chosen as markers of the localization of tight junction (TJ) proteins for immunofluorescence. The expression of MLCK and phosphorylation level of myosin light chain (MLC) were measured by immunoblotting. The activation of NF-kB p65 was analyzed by EMSA and immunofluorescence. The results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 preserves intestinal epithelial barrier function from TNF-α induced injury via suppression of NF-kB p65 mediated activation of MLCK-P-MLC signaling pathway. PMID:25838204

  4. Outer Membrane Vesicles from the Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and the Commensal ECOR12 Enter Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis and Elicit Differential Effects on DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Fábrega, María-José; Toloza, Lorena; Badia, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal microbiota and the human host are complex. The gut mucosal surface is covered by a mucin layer that prevents bacteria from accessing the epithelial cells. Thus, the crosstalk between microbiota and the host mainly rely on secreted factors that can go through the mucus layer and reach the epithelium. In this context, vesicles released by commensal strains are seen as key players in signaling processes in the intestinal mucosa. Studies with Gram-negative pathogens showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are internalized into the host cell by endocytosis, but the entry mechanism for microbiota-derived vesicles is unknown. Escherichia coli strains are found as part of normal human gut microbiota. In this work, we elucidate the pathway that mediate internalization of OMVs from the probiotic E.coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and the commensal ECOR12 strains in several human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Time course measurement of fluorescence and microscopy analysis performed with rhodamine B-R18-labeled OMVs in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors showed that OMVs from these strains enter epithelial cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Vesicles use the same endocytosis pathway in polarized epithelial monolayers. Internalized OMVs are sorted to lysosomal compartments as shown by their colocalization with clathrin and specific markers of endosomes and lysosomes. OMVs from both strains did not affect cell viability, but reduce proliferation of HT-29 cells. Labeling of 8-oxo-dG adducts in DNA revealed that neither OMVs from EcN nor from ECOR12 promoted oxidative DNA damage. In contrast, flow cytometry analysis of phosphorylated γH2AX evidenced that OMVs from the probiotic EcN significantly produced more double strand breaks in DNA than ECOR12 OMVs. The EcN genotoxic effects have been attributed to the synthesis of colibactin. However, it is not known how colibactin is exported and delivered into host cells. Whether colibactin is secreted

  5. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB(+), TSB(+), MRS(+), and M17(+) in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P<0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P<0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3-5% for 24 h, 3-7% for 48 h, P<0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7-10% (P<0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis. PMID:24556751

  6. EPS-SJ Exopolisaccharide Produced by the Strain Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei BGSJ2-8 Is Involved in Adhesion to Epithelial Intestinal Cells and Decrease on E. coli Association to Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Milica; Miljković, Marija S.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Markelić, Milica B.; Veljović, Katarina; Tolinački, Maja; Soković, Svetlana; Korać, Aleksandra; Golić, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of an exopolysaccharide produced by natural dairy isolate Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei BGSJ2-8, in the adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and a decrease in Escherichia coli’s association with Caco-2 cells. Annotation of the BGSJ2-8 genome showed the presence of a gene cluster, epsSJ, which encodes the biosynthesis of the strain-specific exopolysaccharide EPS-SJ, detected as two fractions (P1 and P2) by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detection. SEC-MALLS analysis revealed that an EPS-SJ- mutant (EPS7, obtained by insertion mutagenesis of the glps_2198 gene encoding primary glycosyltransferase) does not produce the P2 fraction of EPS-SJ. Transmission electron microscopy showed that EPS7 mutant has a thinner cell wall compared to the EPS-SJ+ strain BGSJ2-83 (a plasmid free-derivative of BGSJ2-8). Interestingly, strain BGSJ2-83 showed higher adhesion to Caco-2 epithelial intestinal cell line than the EPS7 mutant. Accordingly, BGSJ2-83 effectively reduced E. coli ATCC25922’s association with Caco-2 cells, while EPS7 did not show statistically significant differences. In addition, the effect of EPS-SJ on the proliferation of lymphocytes in gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) was tested and the results showed that the reduction of GALT lymphocyte proliferation was higher by BGSJ2-83 than by the mutant. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report indicating that the presence of EPS (EPS-SJ) on the surface of lactobacilli can improve communication between bacteria and intestinal epithelium, implying its possible role in gut colonization. PMID:27014210

  7. Human embryonal epithelial cells of the developing small intestinal crypts can express the Hodgkin-cell associated antigen Ki-1 (CD30 in spontaneous abortions during the first trimester of gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsikouras Panagiotis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ki-1 (CD30 antigen expression is not found on peripheral blood cells but its expression can be induced in vitro on T and B lymphocytes by viruses and lectins. Expression of CD30 in normal tissues is very limited, being restricted mainly to a subpopulation of large lymphoid cells; in particular, cells of the recently described anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, the Reed-Sternberg (RS cells of Hodgkin's lymphoma and scattered large parafollicular cells in normal lymphoid tissues. More recent reports have described CD30 expression in non-hematopoietic and malignant cells such as cultured human macrophages, human decidual cells, histiocytic neoplastic cells, mesothelioma cells, embryonal carcinoma and seminoma cells. Results We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of CD30 antigen in 15 paraffin-embedded tissue samples representing small intestines from fetuses after spontaneous abortion in the 8th, 10th and 12th weeks using the monoclonal antibody Ki-1. Hormones had been administered to all our pregnant women to support gestation. In addition, a panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify leukocytes (CD45/LCA, B-lymphocytes (CD20/L-26 and T-lymphocytes (CD3. Our findings were correlated with those obtained simultaneously from intestinal tissue samples obtained from 15 fetuses after therapeutic or voluntary abortions. Conclusions The results showed that: (1 epithelial cells in the developing intestinal crypts express the CD30 (Ki-1 antigen; (2 CD30 expression in these epithelial cells is higher in cases of hormonal administration than in normal gestation. In the former cases (hormonal support of gestation a mild mononuclear intraepithelial infiltrate composed of CD3 (T-marker-positive cells accompanies the CD30-positive cells.

  8. 肠上皮通透性变化及其在烧伤休克发病中的作用%Alteration in intestinal epithelial permeability and its role in the pathogenesis of burn shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵克森

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier serves a dual role: to keep harmful external agents out of the body and to allow beneficial nutrients to enter the body. Tight junction (TJ) is of crucial importance for the barrier function. Over the past 15 years, some of the molecular events underlying the epithelial barrier regulation have been described. This forum introduces briefly the molecular structure of TJ and its regulation in gut barrier. It was shown that gut barrier function was impaired as early as 5 minutes post burn and became worst by 4 hours. In this forum the mechanism of gut barrier injury in burns is described,and it includes 4 aspects: the phosphorylation of TJ protein and perijunctional actin-myosin ring, the reduction of TJ proteins expression, the endocytosis of TJ proteins, and the apoptosis and necrosis of the epithelial cells. It is well known that the increase in gut permeability promotes bacterial translocation in burns.Moreover, a new auto-digestion theory of gut in shock and MODS was recently raised. Therefore, protection against gut barrier damage has again been recognized as a therapeutic target in shock and MODS treatment.%@@ 肠上皮通透性,关系到正常状态下营养物质的吸收和病理情况下肠道有害物质的入血,因此研究其变化机制具有重要意义.

  9. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy

  10. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell; Effets des rayonnements ionisants sur la structure et la fonction de la cellule epitheliale intestinale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haton, C

    2005-06-15

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  11. A mouse model of intestinal stem cell function and regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Slorach, E M; Campbell, F. C.; Dorin, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    We present here an in vivo mouse model for intestinal stem cell function and differentiation that uses postnatal intestinal epithelial cell aggregates to generate a differentiated murine small intestinal mucosa with full crypt-villus architecture. The process of neomucosal formation is highly similar to that of intestinal regeneration. Both in vivo grafting and primary culture of these cells reveal two different epithelial cell populations, which display properties consistent with intestinal ...

  12. Measurements of intestinal villi non-specific and ulcer-associated duodenitis-correlation between area of microdissected villus and villus epithelial cell count.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Hasan; Ferguson, A.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of villus height, villus area, together with counts of epithelial cells in individual villi, were performed on endoscopic duodenal biopsies from five groups of patients: controls, ulcer-associated duodenitis, mild and severe non-specific (non-ulcerative) duodenitis, cimetidine healed ulcer-associated duodenitis and cimetidine healed non-specific duodenitis. The objectives of the study were two-fold: to establish if epithelial cell count correlated with simpler measurements of vil...

  13. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  14. Hypo-responsiveness of interleukin-8 production in human embryonic epithelial intestine 407 cells independent of NF-κB pathway: New lessons from endotoxin and ribotoxic deoxynivalenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucosal epithelium senses external toxic insults and transmits the danger signals into the epithelial cells in order to activate a broad range of inflammatory responses. However, pre-exposure to the commensal endotoxins can induce inflammatory tolerance and maintain the homeostasis without excessive immune responses. We recently reported that ribotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) and its derivatives elicited the pro-inflammatory response as the mucosal insults in human epithelial cells. Taking the knowledge into consideration, we tested the hypothesis that endotoxin pre-exposure can attenuate ribotoxin-induced epithelial interleukin-8 (IL-8) production via a tolerance mechanism. Pre-exposure to endotoxin repressed IL-8 release and its gene expression. However, inflammatory tolerance was not mediated by the attenuated NF-κB activation which has been generally recognized as the major mediator of LPS-mediated toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway. Instead, pre-exposure to endotoxin was observed to trigger the delayed induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) which contributed to the diminished IL-8 production in the human epithelial cells. Moreover, endogenous PPAR-γ agonist suppressed toxicant-mediated interleukin-8 production and IL-8 mRNA stability. Taken together, endotoxin induced hypo-production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 in the human epithelial cells, which was associated with the delayed activation of PPAR-γ expression by pre-existing endotoxin

  15. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: 2010lijianguo@sina.cn [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  16. Dietary whole-grain wheat increases intestinal levels of bifidobacteria in humans and bifidobacterial abundance is negatively correlated with the effect of fecal water on trans-epithelial resistance in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Licht, Tine Rask; Kristensen, M.;

    composition in post-menopausal women following a 12-week energy restricted intervention with whole-grain wheat (WW, n=37) or refined wheat (RW, n=33). The WW intervention significantly increased the relative abundance of Bifidobacterium. Caco-2 cells were exposed to fecal water to determine effects of the......Consumption of whole grain products are considered to have beneficial effects on human health including decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, effects on gut microbial composition have only been studied limitedly. We used quantitative PCR to determine changes in the gut bacterial...... bacterial community metabolites on the trans-epithelial resistance (TER). Fecal water increased TER independent of diet, indicating that commensal bacteria provide metabolites facilitating an increase in intestinal integrity. TER was unexpectedly found to be negatively correlated to the relative abundance...

  17. Modification in Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Lipoprotein Assembly in Response to Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Knockdown in Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Marcil, Valérie; Seidman, Ernest; Sinnett, Daniel; Boudreau, François; Gendron, Fernand-Pierre; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Ménard, Daniel; Precourt, Louis-Philippe; Amre, Devendra; Levy, Emile

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a nuclear transcription factor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney, and pancreas. Many of its hepatic and pancreatic functions have been described, but limited information is available on its role in the gastrointestinal tract. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant functions of HNF4α as well as its implication in intestinal lipid transport and metabolism. To this end, the HNF4A gene was knocked ...

  18. Denatured globular protein and bile salt-coated nanoparticles for poorly water-soluble drugs: Penetration across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the circulation system and enhanced oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yang, Ke; Fan, Lifang; Lv, Yaqi; Jin, Zhu; Zhu, Shumin; Qin, Chao; Wang, Yiao; Yin, Lifang

    2015-11-10

    Oral drug delivery is the most preferred route for patients; however, the low solubility of drugs and the resultant poor absorption compromise the benefits of oral administration. On the other hand, for years, the overwhelmingly accepted mechanism for enhanced oral absorption using lipid nanocarriers was based on the process of lipid digestion and drug solubilization in the small intestine. Few reports indicated that other bypass pathways are involved in drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) for oral delivery of nanocarriers. Herein, we report a new nanoemulsion system with a denatured globular protein with a diameter of 30 nm, soybean protein isolates (SPI), and bile salt as emulsifiers, aiming to enhance the absorption of insoluble drugs and explore other pathways for absorption. A BCS class II drug, fenofibrate (FB), was used as the model drug. The SPI and bile salt-coated Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were prepared via a high-pressure homogenizing procedure. Interestingly, the present Ns could be converted to solid dosage form using fluid-bed coating technology, maintaining a nanoscale size. Most importantly, in a model of in situ rat intestinal perfusion, Ns could penetrate across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the systemic circulation and then obtain biodistribution into other tissues. In addition, Ns significantly improved FB oral absorption, exhibited as a greater than 2- and 2.5-fold increase in Cmax and AUC0-t, respectively, compared to the suspension formulation. Overall, the present Ns are promising nanocarriers for the oral delivery of insoluble drugs, and the penetration of intact Ns across the GIT barrier into systemic circulation may be a new strategy for improved drug absorption with the use of nanocarriers. PMID:26325310

  19. Relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Ruijuan

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microecosystem is composed of natural microflora, intestinal epithelial cells, and intestinal mucosal immune system. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a metabolic stress-induced liver injury associated with insulin resistance and genetic susceptibility. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence showing the involvement of imbalanced intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Overgrowth of intestinal microflora, increased permeability of intestinal mu...

  20. Development of a novel self micro-emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for reducing HIV protease inhibitor-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Bokai; Zha, Weibin; Wang, Yun; Wen, Cong; Stude, Elaine J; Wang, Xuan; Jin, Fang; Wang, Guangji; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Huiping

    2010-01-01

    The development of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) has been one of the most significant advances of the past decade in controlling HIV infection. Unfortunately, the benefits of HIV PIs are compromised by serious side effects. One of the most frequent and deleterious side effects of HIV PIs is severe gastrointestinal (GI) disorders including mucosal erosions, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and leak-flux diarrhea, which occurs in 16–62% of patients on HIV PIs. Although the underlying mechanisms ...

  1. Invasive Recurrence of an Intestinal-Type Mucinous Epithelial Neoplasm of Low Malignant Potential: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cosyns

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomyxoma peritonei is only rarely seen in conjunction with primary ovarian tumors. It has been suggested that only ruptured mucinous tumors arising in ovarian mature cystic teratomas can result in this clinical picture. We describe a case of a late invasive recurrence of a mucinous intestinal-type borderline ovarian tumor arising from a mature teratoma after complete surgical debulking. Borderline ovarian tumors behave indolently in the overwhelming majority of cases, and the prognosis is therefore usually outstanding.

  2. Intestine Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Intestine Transplant Although it is possible for a living donor to donate an intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ ...

  3. Differentiation and functional maturation of bone marrow-derived intestinal epithelial T cells expressing membrane T cell receptor in athymic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thymus dependency of murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was studied in an athymic F1----parent radiation chimera model. IEL, although not splenic or lymph node lymphocytes, from athymic chimeras displayed normal levels of cells bearing the class-specific T cell Ag, CD4 and CD8; the TCR-associated molecule, CD3; and the Thy-1 Ag. Moreover, two-color flow cytometric analyses of IEL from athymic mice demonstrated regulated expression of T cell Ag characteristic of IEL subset populations from thymus-bearing mice. In immunoprecipitation experiments, surface TCR-alpha beta or TCR-gamma delta were expressed on IEL, although not on splenic lymphocytes, from athymic chimeras. That IEL from athymic chimeras constituted a population of functionally mature effector cells activated in situ, similar to IEL from thymus-bearing mice, was demonstrated by the presence of CD3-mediated lytic activity of athymic lethally irradiated bone marrow reconstituted IEL. These data provide compelling evidence that intestinal T cells do not require thymic influence for maturation and development, and demonstrate that the microenvironment of the intestinal epithelium is uniquely adapted to regulate IEL differentiation

  4. Gastric or rectal instillation of short-chain fatty acids stimulates epithelial cell proliferation of small and large intestine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hirofumi; Shineha, Ryuzaburo; Satomi, Susumu; Sakata, Takashi

    2002-05-01

    Short-chain fatty acids stimulate gut epithelial cell proliferation in vivo, although the difference between oral and rectal routes is unknown. Accordingly, we examined the effect of oral or rectal administration of these acids. We instilled a mixture of acetic acid, propionic acid, and n-butyric acid (150, 60, and 60 mmol/liter, respectively; pH 6.5) or saline (270 mM, pH 6.5) into the stomach (2 ml) or rectum (1 ml) three times daily for five days in rats fed an elemental diet. We measured crypt cell production rate of the jejunum, ileum, and distal colon of these rats. The crypt cell production rate of these segments was higher in rats with gastric or rectal instillation of short-chain fatty acids than in saline controls. The rectal route was slightly more effective than the gastric route. The above results indicated that the instillation of short-chain fatty acids orally or rectally stimulated gut epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:12018914

  5. The role of bicarbonate ions and of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in chloride transport by epithelial cells of bullfrog small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, W M; Youmans, S J

    1980-01-01

    In an HCO3-free medium, isolated segments of bullfrog small intestine, stripped of their external muscle layers, displayed a small, serosal positive PD that did not, on the average, differ significantly from zero. Similarly, in this medium, the mean values of Isc and of net Na+ and Cl- absorption under short-circuit conditions did not differ significantly from zero. External HCO3- (25 mM) induced a highly significant serosal negative PD and Isc and a large net absorption of Cl-. Net Cl- absorption exceeded Isc, i.e., there was a significant net flux, JR, which was consistent with a net secretion of HCO3-. The ratio of the internal Cl-activity of the absorptive cells (alpha Cli) to its equilibrium value was larger in the presence than in the absence of HCO3-. In the presence of HCO3-, cAMP, added to the serosal medium, reversed the serosal negative PD and Isc, and inhibited, though it did not completely abolish, net Cl- absorption. JR was unchanged; tissue Cl- and alpha Cli were reduced, and tissue Na+ decreased and tissue K+ increased. When HCO3- and Cl- were removed from the bathing medium, the electrical response of the tissue to cAMP, though greatly attenuated, was not completely abolished. Under these conditions, cAMP induced a significant net Na+ absorption. A model for ion transport in the absorptive cells of the small intestine is proposed that is consistent with these findings. PMID:6249145

  6. Effect of dietary nonphytate phosphorus on laying performance and small intestinal epithelial phosphate transporter expression in Dwarf pink-shell laying hens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Nie; Ying Yang; Jianmin Yuan; Zhong Wang; Yuming Guo

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of various levels of dietary nonphytate phosphorus on laying performance and the expression patterns of phosphorus metabolism related genes in Dwarf pink-shell laying hens. A total of 405 28-week-old Dwarf pink-shell laying hens were fed the same corn-soybean basal meals but containing 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%or 0.40%nonphytate phosphorus. The results showed that feed intake, egg production, and average egg weights were quadratically correlated with dietary nonphytate phosphorus content (P<0.05), and the highest egg production, feed intake and average egg weights were achieved when dietary nonphytate phosphorus was at 0.3%(P<0.05). mRNA expression of intestinal sodium phosphorus co-transporter linearly decreased when dietary nonphytate phosphorus increased. mRNA and protein expression of intestinal calbindin and vitamin D receptor correlated quadratically with dietary nonphytate phosphorus, and the highest expression was found when dietary available phosphorus was at 0.25%to 0.3%. In conclusion, the ideal phosphorus requirement for Dwarf pink-shell layer hens is estimated to be 0.3%in a corn-soybean diet. With this level of phosphorus supplementation, calbindin and vitamin D receptor reached their highest expression.

  7. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Jacobsen, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects...... electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar...... differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated...

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  9. The effect of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) cysteine protease actinidin on the occludin tight junction network in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavic, Milena; Grozdanovic, Milica M; Bajic, Aleksandar; Jankovic, Radmila; Andjus, Pavle R; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2014-10-01

    Actinidin, a kiwifruit cysteine protease, is a marker allergen for genuine sensitization to this food allergen source. Inhalatory cysteine proteases have the capacity for disruption of tight junctions (TJs) enhancing the permeability of the bronchial epithelium. No such properties have been reported for allergenic food proteases so far. The aim was to determine the effect of actinidin on the integrity of T84 monolayers by evaluating its action on the TJ protein occludin. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence were employed for the detection of occludin protein alterations. Gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Breach of occludin network was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance, blue dextran leakage and passage of allergens from the apical to basolateral compartment. Actinidin exerted direct proteolytic cleavage of occludin; no alteration of occludin gene expression was detected. There was a reduction of occludin staining upon actinidin treatment as a consequence of its degradation and dispersion within the membrane. There was an increase in permeability of the T84 monolayer resulting in reduced transepithelial resistance, blue dextran leakage and passage of allergens actinidin and thaumatin-like protein from the apical to basolateral compartment. Opening of TJs by actinidin may increase intestinal permeability and contribute to the process of sensitization in kiwifruit allergy. PMID:25042511

  10. High hydrostatic pressure pre-treatment of whey proteins enhances whey protein hydrolysate inhibition of oxidative stress and IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André F. Piccolomini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: High hyperbaric pressure treatment of whey protein isolate (WPI causes changes in the protein structure that enhances the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of WPI. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of pressurized whey protein isolate (pWPI vs. native WPI (nWPI hydrolysates in Caco-2 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Design: Cells were cultured with different concentrations of pWPI or nWPI hydrolysates either 1 h before or 1 h after H2O2. Cell viability, IL-8 secretion, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, and the medium anti-oxidant capacity (FRAP assay were measured. Results: Prior to and after H2O2 exposure, pWPI and nWPI hydrolysates inhibited IL-8 secretion and ROS generation, and increased FRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal inhibition of H2O2-induced IL-8 secretion was greater with 2000 µg mL−1 of pWPI (50% vs. nWPI (30% hydrolysates. At the latter concentration, inhibition of H2O2-induced ROS formation reached 76% for pWPI, which was greater than for nWPI hydrolysates (32.5%. Conclusion: These results suggest that WPI hydrolysates can alleviate inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal cells exposed to oxidative injury, which is further enhanced by hyperbaric pressure pre-treatment of WPI.

  11. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  12. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Sturm; Axel U Dignass

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. Fortunately, the integrity of the gastrointestinal surface epithelium is rapidly reestablished even after extensive destruction. Rapid resealing of the epithelial barrier following injuries is accomplished by a process termed epithelial restitution, followed by more delayed mechanisms of epithelial wound healing including increased epithelial cell proliferation and epithelial cell differentiation. Restitution of the intestinal surface epithelium is modulated by a range of highly divergent factors among them a broad spectrum of structurally distinct regulatory peptides, variously described as growth factors or cytokines. Several regulatory peptide factors act from the basolateral site of the epithelial surface and enhance epithelial cell restitution through TGF-β-dependent pathways. In contrast, members of the trefoil factor family (TFF peptides) appear to stimulate epithelial restitution in conjunction with mucin glycoproteins through a TGF-β-independent mechanism from the apical site of the intestinal epithelium. In addition,a number of other peptide molecules like extracellular matrix factors and blood clotting factors and also nonpeptide molecules including phospholipids, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), adenine nucleotides, trace elements and pharmacological agents modulate intestinal epithelial repair mechanisms. Repeated damage and injury of the intestinal surface are key features of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases

  13. Validity of Serum Pepsinogen I/II Ratio for the Diagnosis of Gastric Epithelial Dysplasia and Intestinal Metaplasia during the Follow-Up of Patients at Risk for Intestinal-Type Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Dinis-Ribeiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A cohort of individuals (n = 136 with lesions as severe as atrophic chronic gastritis (ACG was cross-sectionally evaluated for the validity assessment of pepsinogen I (PGI and pepsinogen II (PGII serum levels for the diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia (IM and gastric dysplasia. PGI/PGII ratio [median (range] was 4 (0.57.5 in patients with ACG (n = 35; 4.6 (1.9-6.8 in type I IM (n = 18; 4.2 (1.4-5.9 in type II or type III IM limited to the antrum and incisura (n = 20; 2.4 (0.4-5.6 in extensive incomplete IM (n = 38; and 1.3 (0.4-6.4 in low-grade dysplasia (n = 23 (P = .002. Using histopathologic data as a reference test, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (CI 95% was 0.73 (0.64-0.82 for extensive IM, 0.72 (0.58-0.85 for the diagnosis of dysplasia, and 0.81 (0.66-0.95 for the diagnosis of high-grade dysplasia. Using a PGI/PGII ratio of ≤3 as the cutoff for dysplasia diagnosis, the sensitivity was 70% (62-78%, the specificity was 65% (57-73%, and the negative predictive value estimates were over 90%. No differences in PG levels according to age or gender were observed. Helicobacter pylori did not significantly influence validity measurement estimates. PGI/PGII serum level ratio can be used even in the management of patients with a high a priori probability for a positive test. It may be useful for the exclusion of more advanced lesions (extensive IM and neoplastic lesions.

  14. Rapid disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junction and barrier dysfunction by ionizing radiation in mouse colon in vivo: protection by N-acetyl-l-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Manda, Bhargavi; Meena, Avtar S; Yadav, Nikki; Szabo, Erzsebet; Balogh, Andrea; Lee, Sue Chin; Tigyi, Gabor; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2-24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascular-to-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding. PMID:26822914

  15. The role of hypoxia in intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yatrik M

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the intestine. IBD is a multifactorial disorder, and IBD-associated genes are critical in innate immune response, inflammatory response, autophagy, and epithelial barrier integrity. Moreover, epithelial oxygen tension plays a critical role in intestinal inflammation and resolution in IBD. The intestines have a dynamic and rapid fluctuation in cellular oxygen tension, which is dysregulated in IBD. Intestinal epithelial cells have a steep oxygen gradient where the tips of the villi are hypoxic and the oxygenation increases at the base of the villi. IBD results in heightened hypoxia throughout the mucosa. Hypoxia signals through a well-conserved family of transcription factors, where hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In inflamed mucosa, HIF-1α increases barrier protective genes, elicits protective innate immune responses, and activates an antimicrobial response through the increase in β-defensins. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining an epithelial-elicited inflammatory response and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. HIF-1α activation in colitis leads to a protective response, whereas chronic activation of HIF-2α increases the pro-inflammatory response, intestinal injury, and cancer. In this mini-review, we detail the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in intestinal inflammation and injury and therapeutic implications of targeting HIF signaling in IBD. PMID:26812949

  16. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of...... inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  17. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  18. 糖巨肽对新生大鼠坏死性小肠结肠炎肠组织损伤及肠上皮细胞凋亡的影响%Effects of glycomacropeptide on damage to intestinal tissue and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells in neonatal rats with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄龙光; 周伟; 荣箫; 陶莉; 卢伟能

    2012-01-01

    Group M (F =5.080,P =0.013 ).(4)Expression levels of intestinal PAF mRNA (2-△△C1 value):3.01 ±0.96 (Group M),1.56 ±0.29 (Group G),1.01 ±0.13 (Group N),the level of Group G was significantly lower than that of Group M (F=25.251,P =0.000).(5) Electron microscopy:Group N showed that its cell volume was mostly occupied by the nucleus,the structure was clear,nuclear membrane existed,suggesting the normal phase of cell; Group M showed that apoptotic body existed,suggestiug that the advanced stage phase of apoptosis; Group G showed that condensed chromatin marginated around the nuclear envelope,nuclear pores expanded,suggesting the early phase of apoptosis.(6)The apoptosis rate of intestinal epithelial cells by TUNEL detection:38.79 ±9.79 ( Group M),29.54 ± 7.30 ( Group G),6.37 ± 1.96 ( Group N ) ; the apoptosis rate of intestinal epithelial cells of Group G was significantly lower than that of Group M ( F =6.888,P =0.003 ).Conclusion GMP has protective effects on guts of neonatal rats with NEC,which may probably work by reducing TNF-α,IL-1 β and PAF expression,inhibiting the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells and reducing intestinal tissue injury.%目的 建立新生大鼠坏死性小肠结肠炎(NEC)模型,探讨糖巨肽对NEC新生大鼠肠道的保护作用.方法 36只SD新生大鼠采用抽签法随机分为NEC模型组、糖巨肰干预组和正常对照组,每组12只.大鼠出生后第1~3天均为母乳喂养;在第4~6天,正常对照组继续母乳喂养,而NEC模型组和糖巨肽干预组则通过人工喂养+缺氧复氧冷刺激的方法进行造模.第6天喂养结束后三组大鼠均置于保育箱中空腹24h,然后用颈椎脱臼法处死大鼠,取回盲部近段回肠组织进行固定、切片,行病理检查、TUNEL凋亡检测和电镜检查;同时取回盲部附近肠段制备组织匀浆,检测肠组织肿瘤坏死因子α(tumor necrosis factor-α,TNF-α)及白细胞介素1β(Interleukin-1β,IL-1β)的含量,并采用

  19. Potential role of chitinases and chitin-binding proteins in host-microbial interactions during the development of intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Hoa T.; Barnich, Nicolas; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    The small and large intestines contain an abundance of luminal antigens derived from food products and enteric microorganisms. The function of intestinal epithelial cells is tightly regulated by several factors produced by enteric bacteria and the epithelial cells themselves. Epithelial cells actively participate in regulating the homeostasis of intestine, and failure of this function leads to abnormal and host-microbial interactions resulting in the development of intestinal inflammation. Ma...

  20. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Beltrán

    Full Text Available The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi, and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF-preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes, 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2, 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor, 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP, 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor, or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator. cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi and H+ efflux (JH+ was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%, without altering basal pHi (range 7.144-7.172. STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa-decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting

  1. Intestinal trefoil factor induces inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kanai, Michiyuki; Mullen, Colleen; Podolsky, Daniel K.

    1998-01-01

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), a small, compact protease-resistant peptide, is abundantly expressed in goblet cells of large and small intestine. Although several biological activities of ITF have been identified, including promotion of wound healing, stimulation of epithelial cell migration, and protection of intestinal epithelial barrier, little is known about signaling events through which ITF mediates its physiological function. In this study, the effects of exogenous ITF on mitogen-act...

  2. Shiga Toxin Interaction with Human Intestinal Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Schüller

    2011-01-01

    After ingestion via contaminated food or water, enterohaemorrhagic E. coli colonises the intestinal mucosa and produces Shiga toxins (Stx). No Stx-specific secretion system has been described so far, and it is assumed that Stx are released into the gut lumen after bacterial lysis. Human intestinal epithelium does not express the Stx receptor Gb3 or other Stx binding sites, and it remains unknown how Stx cross the intestinal epithelial barrier and gain access to the systemic circulation. This ...

  3. 甲氨喋呤对肠黏膜上皮细胞增殖和凋亡影响的研究%Effect of methotrexate on proliferation and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏华芳; 俞康; 章圣辉; 江松福

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨甲氨喋呤对肠黏膜上皮IEC-6细胞增殖和凋亡的影响.方法:采用CCK-8法检测细胞增殖效应,TUNEL的流式细胞术分析凋亡细胞,分光光度法检测细胞内Caspase-3活性程度.结果:1)实验组细胞生长抑制率明显高于对照组,且随MTX药物浓度的增加和作用时间的延长而增加.2)0.05、0.5争5μg/mL MTX作用24 h,细胞凋亡率增加.与对照组相比,差异有统计学意义,P<0.01.3)0.05、0.5和5 μg/mL MTX作用24 h,Caspase-3活性增加,3组Caspase-3的活性分别是对照组的1.97,3.07和5.01倍.与对照组相比,各浓度药物组Caspase-3活性明显增强(P<0.05),且呈浓度依赖性.结论:甲氨喋呤对IEC-6细胞增殖有抑制作用,并通过诱导Caspase-3活化导致细胞凋亡.%OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of methotrexate on proliferation and apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells.METHODS:IEC-6 cells were treated with methotrexate at different concentrations and incubation time. Cell proliferation was assessed by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Flow eytometry (TUNEL method) was used to detect apoptotic cells. Caspases-3 activity was measured by Colorimetric assaying. RESULTS: 1) The proliferation of IEC-6 cell line was decreased while increasing of concentration or prolonging the incubation time. 2)The rates of cell apoptosis in groups treated with methotrexate in concentrations of 0.05, 0. 5 and 5 μg/mL for 24 h were higher than those of control group. There was a significant difference between methotrexate groups and control group (P <0.01). 3) The caspase-3 activity from cell lysates of IEC-6 cells treated with methotrexate in concentrations of 0.05, 0. 5 and 5μg/mL for 24 h were higher than that of control group (P <0. 05). The activity of caspase-3 in those three groups was increased to 1.97, 3.07 and 5.01 times as compared with the control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Methotrexate can effectively inhibit the proliferation of IEC-6

  4. 从肺肠上皮组织细胞变化分析肺与大肠相表里的内涵%Analysis of the Connotation of Interior-exteriorly Relation of the Lung and Large Intestine from Changes of the Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘声; 刘晓燕; 郭霞珍

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study and compare the human embryonic cell morphology characteristics,biological characteristics of prolifer-ation and apoptosis of pulmonary and intestinal epithelial in different period of the growth,with a view to the lung and the large intestine tissue on the homology of illustration,and can provide a reference for the theory of traditional Chinese medicine in the lung and the large intestine relationship.Methods:Lung and intestinal tissues in different stages of the embryonic development were embedded in paraffin, HE staining,to observe the epithelial tissue and cell morphology;proliferation and apoptosis of human embryo lung and intestinal epithe-lial cells in different stages were detected by flow cytometry.Results:In the early embryonic stage (9 to 16 weeks),lung and intestinal epithelial tissue and cell morphology were consistent,no significant differences in the biological characteristics of epithelial cell prolifera-tion and apoptosis (P>0.05).In medium embryonic stage (17 to 23 weeks),and late embryonic stage (24 weeks until born)epitheli-al tissue and cell morphology was not consistent,and there were significant differences in the biological characteristics of epithelial cell proliferation,apoptosis (P<0.05).Conclusion:Early embryonic stage (9 to 16 weeks)can provide a basis for"lung"and"the jeju-num,ileum,colon"homology.In addition,the adult lung and intestine is mainly mutual affiliate between functions,but may be related to the original homology of the associated.%目的:研究并比较人胚胎发育不同时期肺与肠上皮细胞形态特征,增殖与凋亡生物学特性,以期能为肺与大肠组织发生上的同源性提供例证,并能为中医理论中肺与大肠相互关系提供参考。方法:胚胎发育不同时期肺与肠组织石蜡包埋,HE染色,观察上皮组织及细胞形态;流式细胞术检测人胚胎不同时期肺与肠上皮细胞的增殖与凋亡,并进行分

  5. 参附注射液对大鼠肠缺血再灌注损伤和修复时肠上皮细胞的保护作用%Protective effect of shenfu injection on intestinal mucosal ischemia-reperfusion injury and intestinal epithelial cells at recovery phase in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王代宏; 何小飞; 李湘楚; 郑朝新; 张训臣

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Apoptosis plays a key role in intestinal mucosal ischemia-reperfusion injury and recovery; meanwhile, effect of shenfu injection on apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells during intestinal mucosal ischemia-reperfusion injury should be studied further.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the apoptosis of intestinal epithelium and characteristics of intestinal mucosal ischemia-reperfusion injury and recovery.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of General Surgery, Xianning Central Hospital;Department of General Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Central Laboratory,Xianning Central Hospital from March to August 2005. Fifty-four healthy male SD rats weighting 200-250 g were provided by Animal Center of Medical School, Wuhan University.METHODS: The rats were divided randomly into 3 experimental groups:control group (n=6), ischemia-reperfusion group (n=24) and shenfu treatment group (n=24). ① Pentobarbital sodium solution (40 mg/kg) was administrated into the intraperitoneal cavity to induce anaesthesia. Through a midline abdominal incision, the mesenteric blood vessel of a 15-cm segment of mid-intestine was occluded for 60-minute with an atraumatic vascular forceps. The control group underwent the same procedure except for unblocking the mesenteric blood vessel. At the end of 60 minutes ischemia period the forceps was removed to allow reperfusion, the abdominal cavity was closed. ShenFu injection (8 mL/kg ·h, 20 mL/kg ·d, produced from Yaan Three-Nine Pharmaceuticals Co, No: 030302) was injected 30 minutes before occlusion in SF treatment group, same quantity of 0.9% natrii chloride was injected in control group and ischemia-regeneration group at the same time, and oxygen was inbreathed during the operation and ischemia-regeneration. ② Experimental intestinal canals were sampled for the following analysis when all groups were respectively performed

  6. Shiga Toxin Interaction with Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schüller

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available After ingestion via contaminated food or water, enterohaemorrhagic E. coli colonises the intestinal mucosa and produces Shiga toxins (Stx. No Stx-specific secretion system has been described so far, and it is assumed that Stx are released into the gut lumen after bacterial lysis. Human intestinal epithelium does not express the Stx receptor Gb3 or other Stx binding sites, and it remains unknown how Stx cross the intestinal epithelial barrier and gain access to the systemic circulation. This review summarises current knowledge about the influence of the intestinal environment on Stx production and release, Stx interaction with intestinal epithelial cells and intracellular uptake, and toxin translocation into underlying tissues. Furthermore, it highlights gaps in understanding that need to be addressed by future research.

  7. 家蚕中肠上皮细胞增殖和分化的初步研究%A Preliminary Study on Proliferation and Differentiation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈毅彪; 李婷; 郑春琴; 郝向伟; 韦转琴; 向仲怀; 鲁成; 崔红娟

    2013-01-01

    In this study,we indentified the potential location of intestinal stem cells in the silkworm (Bombyx mori)through analysis of proliferation and differentiation of midgut epithelial cells during different developmental stages of larva to pupa.And we observed the morphological structure and cellular component of silkworm midgut during metamorphosis and development of silkworm larvae by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining.The results showed that the morphological structure and cellular component of silkworm midgut had remarkable changes in the process of molting and metamorphosis of silkworm larvae.The intestinal wall was thin at full appetite stage of each instar,became thicker before molting,and reached peak value at molting stage.There were three types of cells,namely columnar cells (CC),goblet cells (GC) and regenerative cells (RC),in the midgut epithelium.These three types of cells increased gradually with the advance of larval instar.Among them,the goblet cells increased continuously in all instars and reached peak value at molting stage,while the small cells near basal lamina increased at pre-molting stage.Observation by 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) and Phospho-histone H3 (PHH3)immunofluorescence staining revealed that midgut epithelial cells,especially the small cells near basal lamina of midgut epithelium,had the highest proliferation rate at premolting stage of each instar.Meanwhile,BrdU label retention assay disp.layed positive signal of BrdU retention in the midgut epithelium near basal lamina.These results demonstrated rapid proliferation of small cells near basal lamina of midgut epithelium during molting of silkworm larvae,suggesting the existence of potential intestinal stem cells in these small cells.%通过分析家蚕自幼虫期到蛹期发育过程中肠上皮细胞的增殖与分化情况,鉴定家蚕中肠干细胞的潜在定位.采用苏木精和伊红(Hematoxylin and Eosin,H&E)染色与4

  8. Intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  9. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    C.I. González; M. Cires; F. J. Jiménez; Rubio, T.

    2008-01-01

    La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada). En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuen...

  10. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada. En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuentemente afectado, sobre todo a nivel rectosigmodeo. La clínica de presentación es inespecífica, siendo lo más frecuente el dolor abdominal y/o pélvico de tipo cólico que coincide o se exacerba con la menstruación. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, diverticulitis, colitis isquémica y procesos neoplásicos, siendo el diagnóstico definitivo anatomopatológico. En cuanto al tratamiento, éste dependerá de la clínica y de la edad de la paciente, así como de sus deseos de embarazo.Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation. In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment

  11. Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Khushbu K; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient absorption is the basic function that drives mammalian intestinal biology. To facilitate nutrient uptake, the host's epithelial barrier is composed of a single layer of cells. This constraint is problematic, as a design of this type can be easily disrupted. The solution during the course of evolution was to add numerous host defense mechanisms that can help prevent local and systemic infection. These mechanisms include specialized epithelial cells that produce a physiochemical barrier overlying the cellular barrier, robust and organized adaptive and innate immune cells, and the ability to mount an inflammatory response that is commensurate with a specific threat level. The autophagy pathway is a critical cellular process that strongly influences all these functions. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23216414

  12. Probiotics promote gut health through stimulation of epithelial innate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnini, Cristiano; Saeed, Rubina; Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O.; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Probiotic formulations are widely available and have a variety of proposed beneficial effects, including promotion of gut health. The mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria in the intestine are still unclear but are generally attributed to an antiinflammatory effect. Here, we demonstrate that the multiple probiotic formulation VSL#3 prevents the onset of intestinal inflammation by local stimulation of epithelial innate immune responses (i.e., increased production of epithelial-derived TNF...

  13. Stem cells and lineages of the intestine: a developmental and evolutionary perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima, Shigeo; Gold, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition, migratory, multipotent stem cells (interstitial cells) contribute to the production of intestinal cells. In other phyla, intestinal cell replaceme...

  14. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circa...

  15. Effect of High Level of Zinc Oxide on Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Intestinal Mucosal Barrier in Early Weaning Piglets%高锌对早期断奶仔猪肠黏膜屏障和肠上皮细胞紧密连接蛋白表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡彩虹; 钱仲仓; 刘海萍; 徐勇

    2009-01-01

    为研究高剂量氧化锌对早期断奶仔猪肠黏膜屏障的影响并探讨其作用机理,选取54头21日龄断奶仔猪按胎次一致、体质量相近和公母各半方法分为3组,每组3个重复,每个重复6头.哺乳组仔猪继续哺乳至35日龄,基础日粮组饲喂基础日粮(110 mg·kg~(-1)锌),高锌组饲喂基础日粮+3 000 mg·kg~(-1)锌(氧化锌).分别于28和35日龄取样测定血浆D-乳酸、内毒素含量和二胺氧化酶(DAO)活性、肠系膜淋巴结细菌移位率以及结肠内容物大肠杆菌数,并分析回肠上皮细胞紧密连接蛋白Occludin和ZO-1的表达.结果显示:与哺乳组相比,断奶仔猪饲喂基础日粮,28日龄时血浆中D-乳酸、内毒素含量和DAO活性显著升高(P0.05);28日龄时,基础日粮组结肠内容物大肠杆菌数大于哺乳组(P0.05),35日龄时各组间差异不显著(P>0.05);与哺乳组相比,仔猪断奶后饲喂基础日粮使Occludin和ZO-1mRNA丰度以及ZO-1的表达下降(P0.05). At 28 and 35 d, bacterial translocation in mesenteric lymph nodes of pig-lets with high zinc was lower than that of piglets with basal diet(P>0.05). Colon E. coli of pig-lets with basal diet was increased compared to the control group (P0.05). The parameters did not differ among three groups at 35 d (P>0.05). Compared with the control, Occludin and ZO-1 mRNA and ZO-1 expression was significantly decreased in the basal diet group (P0.05), but the parameters of piglets with high zinc was greater than that of basal diet (P<0.05). It is suggested that early weaned piglets was in stresses, increasing in-testinal permeability and decreasing the expression of tight junction protein Occludin and ZO-1, and these damage may be relaxed by diet supplementation with high level of zinc oxide, through inhibiting bacterial adhesion in the intestinal mucosa and preventing the increase in epithelial cells permeability.

  16. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  17. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Johanna F.; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Bronsveld, Inez; Janssens, Hettie M.; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M.; Brandsma, Arianne M.; de Jong, Nienke W. M.; Bijvelds, Marcel J. C.; Scholte, Bob J.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Middendorp, Sabine; Beekman, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease ca

  18. Increased pulmonary and intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Adenis, A; Colombel, J.F.; Lecouffe, P; Wallaert, B.; Hecquet, B.; Marchandise, X; Cortot, A

    1992-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increased epithelial permeability may affect sites other than the intestine in patients with Crohn's disease by simultaneously evaluating their pulmonary and intestinal permeability. Pulmonary and intestinal permeability were measured by clearance of inhaled technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetate (99mTc-DTPA) and by urinary recovery of chromium-51 ethylene diamine tetracetate respectively in 22 patients with Crohn's disease. The half time clearance of ...

  19. Intestinal stem cell function in Drosophila and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the digestive tracts of most animals are short-lived, and are constantly replenished by the progeny of long-lived, resident intestinal stem cells. Proper regulation of intestinal stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation is critical for maintaining gut homeostasis. Here we review recent genetic studies of stem cell-mediated homeostatic growth in the Drosophila midgut and the mouse small intestine, highlighting similarities and differences in the mechanisms t...

  20. TLR2-independent induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Boulard, Olivier; Asquith, Mark J.; Powrie, Fiona; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between the intestinal microflora and host innate immune receptors play a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. Several studies have shown that TLR2 can modulate inflammatory responses in the gut. TLR2 signals enhance tight junction formation and fortify the epithelial barrier, and may play a crucial role in driving acute inflammatory responses towards intestinal bacterial pathogens. In addition, TLR2 agonists can have direct effects on both Th1 cells and Treg. To define the r...

  1. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... inflammation and infection of the abdominal cavity ( peritonitis ). Causes Causes of intestinal obstruction differ depending on the ...

  2. Intestinal Malrotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to maintain adequate nutrition (a condition known as short bowel syndrome). They may be dependent on intravenous nutrition for a time after surgery (or even permanently if too little intestine remains) ...

  3. Intestinal Coccidia

    OpenAIRE

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycl...

  4. Role of the intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike G Laukoetter; Porfirio Nava; Asma Nusrat

    2008-01-01

    A critical function of the intestinal mucosa is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the interstitium. The single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serves as a dynamic interface between the host and its environment. Cell polarity and structural properties of the epithelium is complex and is important in the development of epithelial barrier function. Epithelial cells associate with each other via a series of intercellular junctions. The apical most intercellular junctional complex referred to as the Apical Junction Complex (AJC) is important in not only cell-cell recognition, but also in the regulation of paracellular movement of fluid and solutes. Defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is now becoming evident that an aberrant epithelial barrier function plays a central role in the pathophysiology of IBD. Thus, a better understanding of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function in healthy and disease states such as IBD will foster new ideas for the development of therapies for such chronic disorders.

  5. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  6. Flavonoid-mediated inhibition of intestinal ABC transporters may affect the oral bioavailability of drugs, food-borne toxic compounds and bioactive ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, W.; Schutte, M.E.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The transcellular transport of ingested food ingredients across the intestinal epithelial barrier is an important factor determining bioavailability upon oral intake. This transcellular transport of many chemicals, food ingredients, drugs or toxic compounds over the intestinal epithelium can be high

  7. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  8. When Insult Is Added to Injury: Cross Talk between ILCs and Intestinal Epithelium in IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmé van der Gracht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are a recently described population of lymphocytes that have been implicated in both mucosal homeostasis and inflammation. Recent findings indicate a critical feedback loop in which damaged epithelium activates these innate immune cells to restore epithelial barrier function. This review will focus on the signalling pathways between damaged epithelium and ILCs involved in repair of the epithelial barrier and tissue homeostasis and the relationship of these processes with the control of IBD.

  9. Small & Large Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the large intestine produces no digestive enzymes. Chemical digestion is completed in the small intestine before the chyme reaches the large intestine. Functions of the large intestine include the absorption of water and electrolytes and the elimination of ...

  10. Evolutionary insights into postembryonic development of adult intestinal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizuya-Oka Atsuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult vertebrate intestine, multi-potent stem cells continuously generate all of the epithelial cells throughout the adulthood. While it has long been known that the frog intestine is formed via the development of adult intestinal stem cells during thyroid hormone (TH-dependent metamorphosis, the basic structure of the adult intestine is formed by birth in mammals and it is unclear if the subsequent maturation of the intestine involves any changes in the intestinal stem cells. Two recent papers showing that B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1 regulates postnatal epithelial stem cell reprogramming during mouse intestinal maturation support the model that adult intestinal stem cells are developed during postembryonic development in mammals, in a TH-dependent process similar to intestinal remodeling during amphibian metamorphosis. Since the formation of the adult intestine in both mammals and amphibians is closely associated with the adaptation from aquatic to terrestrial life during the peak of endogenous TH levels, the molecular mechanisms by which the adult stem cells are developed are likely evolutionally conserved.

  11. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  12. Potential Role of Probiotics in Mechanism of Intestinal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rashid Rajput and Wei Fen Li*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are nonpathogenic bacteria exert a constructive influence on health or physiology of the host. Effect of probiotics in the intestinal defense against variety of diseases is well known. The probiotics are involved in the mechanism of intestinal defense, support as antagonist against pathogens, improve intestinal epithelial layer and boost the innate as well as adaptive immunity. However these responses are also exerted by intestinal components. The intestinal components as well as probiotics play a reciprocal role to enhance the immune response of the individual. The possibilities of mechanism of action include the stimulation of epithelial cells, activation of dendritic cells via toll-like receptors (TLRs, conversely produce cytokines. These observations reviewed together advocate that specific immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria should be focusing on mechanism of action via antigen presenting cells (APC.

  13. Techniques of Functional and Motility Test: How to Perform and Interpret Intestinal Permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Asha; Makharia, Govind K

    2012-01-01

    Transport of molecules across the intestinal epithelium takes place through 2 major routes, ie, trans-cellular and paracellular. Assessment of intestinal permeability is performed to assess the overall function of transport through the intestinal epithelial paracellular route. Urinary excretion of disaccharides and monosaccharides and ratio of their excretion is a basis for measurement of intestinal permeability. Lactulose and mannitol ratio is the most commonly used test for assessment of sm...

  14. Role of high mobility group box-1 on the expression of intestinal epithelial tight junction protein in murine acute necrotizing pancreatitis%HMGB1对急性坏死性胰腺炎大鼠肠上皮细胞紧密连接相关蛋白表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾正刚; 郭仁宣

    2013-01-01

    目的:观察急性坏死性胰腺炎(ANP)大鼠肠黏膜中高迁移率族蛋白B1 (HMGB1)的表达对肠黏膜上皮细胞紧密连接功能的影响.方法:24只Wistar大鼠随机分为正常对照组、ANP组和丙酮酸乙酯(EP)处理组,分别于建模后24 h取材.测定血浆淀粉酶(AMY)、血浆D-乳酸、肠黏膜髓过氧化物酶(MPO)水平变化;应用Western blot法检测ANP大鼠肠黏膜中HMGB1和occludin蛋白水平的变化.结果:在建模后24 h,大鼠AMY、D-乳酸与肠黏膜MPO水平ANP组明显高于正常对照组和EP处理组(P<0.05),但EP处理组仍高于正常对照组(P< 0.05);ANP组大鼠肠黏膜HMGB1表达水平明显高于正常对照组和EP处理组(P<0.05),EP处理组高于正常对照组(P<0.05);而肠黏膜上皮细胞紧密连接蛋白occludin的表达ANP组较正常对照组和EP处理组下降(P<0.05),EP处理组低于正常对照组(P<0.05).结论:ANP大鼠肠黏膜中HMGB1表达增高,可通过降低occludin蛋白表达,增加肠黏膜屏障通透性.EP能显著抑制HMGB1表达,使occludin蛋白表达升高,对ANP肠黏膜损伤有明显保护作用.%Objective: To investigate the effect of high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) on the expression of intestinal epithelial tight junction protein in murine acute necrotizing pancreatitis(ANP). Methods:Twenty-four male health adult wistar rats were divided randomly into groups: control group, ANP group, and EP treatment group. Specimens were taken at 24h after operation respectively. The concentration of plasma amylase(AMY), plasma D-lactate and the activity of myeloperoxidase(MPO) in the intestinal tissue were determined. The expression of HMGB1 and oc-cludin protein in intestinal mucosa was detected by western blot. Results: In comparison with the control group, levels of plasma D-lactate and MPO in ANP group increased markedly at 24h after operation(P<0.05). The levels of D-lactate and MPO were markedly lowered in EP treatment group 24 h after ANP

  15. Differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into epithelial cells induced by fetal intestinal connective tissue%胎儿肠壁结缔组织诱导骨髓间充质干细胞分化为上皮细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪维伟; 王蓓; 张建华; 姜蓉

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells have ability of multi-directional differentiation, and can be induced to differentiate into epithelial cells in vitro. The differentiation of epithelial cells in fetal primitive gut is induced by mesochymal cells of intestines. The report of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)differentiate into epithelial cells induced by intestinal connective tissue has not been identified. OBJECTIVE: To observe the possibility of BMSCs differentiate into epithelial cells induced by fetal intestinal connective tissue. DESIGN: Culture in "vitro and comparative observation. SETTING: The experiment was carried out in the Department of Histology and Embryology, Chongqing Medical University from July 2004 to July 2006. MATERIALS: Epidermal growth factor (EGF, Sigma); CK, CK20 (Zhongshan Bio-Tech, Co.,Ltd). Bone marrow of limbs was collected from 6 aborted fetus samples aged 4-5 months. Adding Ficoll to centrifugalize, BMSCs were isolated, cultured and proliferated. The intestinal segment about 15 mmx5 mm was obtained sterilely from fetal duodenal papilla to colon, then muscular tunic and adventitia were peeled. Enzymatic digestion was used to remove the epithelial cells on the mucosa surface. The lump of intestinal connective tissue was cut into 15 minx5 nun. Fetus samples were provided by Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Clinical College, all the parturients agreed to the offer, and the experiment was approved by the hospital ethical committee. METHODS: The experiment was assigned into 4 groups. In groups A and B, the DAPI labelled BMSCs (3x104) at the third generation were transplanted on the submucosa of intestinal connective tissue;.In groups C and D, the DAPI labelled BMSCs were only cultured on the cover glass; In groups B and D, EGF in final concentration of 10 ng/mL was added. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After cultured for 12 days, the morphous and distribution of DAPI labelled BMSCs were observed under fluorescence microscope

  16. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen Lillelund;

    2002-01-01

    The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change in the...... a general down-regulation of genes in the low abundance class. Similar results were found using mouse small intestinal crypt and villus cells, suggesting that the phenomenon also occurs in the intestine in vivo. The expression data were subsequently used in a search for markers for subsets of...... epithelial cells by performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction on RNA extracted from laser dissected intestinal crypt and villi. In a screen of eight transcripts one - SART3 - was identified as a marker for human colonic crypts....

  17. Innate immune activation in intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Oliver J; Maloy, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host protection from infectious pathogens; yet precisely how pathogenic and commensal microbes are distinguished is not understood. Furthermore, aberrant innate immune activation may also drive intestinal pathology, as patients with IBD exhibit extensive infiltration of innate immune cells to the inflamed intestine, and polymorphisms in many innate immunity genes influence susceptibility to IBD. Thus, a balanced interaction between the microbiota and innate immune activation is required to maintain a healthy mutualistic relationship between the microbiota and the host, which when disturbed can result in intestinal inflammation. PMID:21912101

  18. Conjugation of 1-naphthol in human gastric epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Déchelotte, P; Varrentrapp, M; Meyer, H.J.; Schwenk, M.

    1993-01-01

    The biotransformation of xenobiotics is essential to the maintenance of the body's integrity. Mucosal biotransformation has been well documented in the small and large intestine of animals and humans but whether the gastric mucosa plays a role in detoxifying ingested compounds remains largely unknown. The conjugation of the model phenolic compounds, 1-naphthol, by human gastric epithelial cells was assessed in vitro. Freshly isolated and cultured epithelial cells were prepared from surgical s...

  19. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epi...

  20. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  1. Intestinal steroidogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucoc...

  2. Expression of an Intestine-Specific Transcription Factor (CDX1) in Intestinal Metaplasia and in Subsequently Developed Intestinal Type of Cholangiocarcinoma in Rat Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Ping; Silberg, Debra G.; Sirica, Alphonse E.

    2000-01-01

    CDX1 is a caudal-type homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor that has been shown to be selectively expressed in epithelial cells in intestinal metaplasia of the human stomach and esophagus and variably expressed in human gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Silberg DG, Furth EE, Taylor JK, Schuck T, Chiou T, Traber PG: Gastroenterology 1997, 113: 478–486). Through the use of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we investigated whether CDX1 is also uniquely associated with t...

  3. Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the porcine intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The normal intestinal epithelium is renewed with a turnover rate of 3-5 days. During Salmonella infection increased cell loss is observed, possibly as a result of programmed cell death (PCD). We have, therefore, studied the effects of Salmonella Typhimurium infection on three elements involved in...... in scattered epithelial cells and the number of positive cells increased with increasing times of exposure to Salmonella (P<0.0001). An increase in phospho-c-Jun in epithelial cells was already detectable 5 min after infection and often occurred in cells that appeared not to be invaded by the...

  4. Study on the receptor required for vitamin B12 intestinal absorption in the small intestinal mucous membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One and half hours after feeding of ''Co-vitamin B12 to rats, small intestines were extirpated. Using Weiser's method, gradient isolation of the intestinal epithelial cells from villus to crypt areas were carried out and five different levels of the villus and crypt areas were obtained. The uptakes of 57Co-vitamin B12 and the formations of Receptor-Intrinsic factor-57Co-vitamin B12 complex were measured, indicating that the upper villus cells have a higher uptake of 57Co-vitamin B12 and more increased formation of it than crypt cells of showing a gradient from crypt to villus. Alkaline phosphatase activity of these levels of epithelial cells also showed the same pattern. These results suggest that the receptor activity for vitamin B12 absorption in the intestinal epithelial cells indicate a gradient increase from crypt to villus areas. (auth.)

  5. Entry and release of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus are restricted to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Strous, G J; van der Ende, A; Rottier, P J

    1994-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) infects the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract of pigs, resulting in a high mortality rate in piglets. This study shows the interaction of TGEV with a porcine epithelial cell line. To determine the site of viral entry, LLC-PK1 cells were gro

  6. Regulation of homeostasis in the process of protein absorption from small intestine to blood

    OpenAIRE

    Akmal Yuldashev; Ravshan Rahmanov; Mukaddas Rahmatova; Margarita Tarinova; Aziza Nishanova; Gulnara Islamova

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopic and immunоfluorescent study in rats aged 1 and 3 days after birth allowed to establish a process of absorption of protein from the small intestine into the lymph and blood. Blood homeostasis was provided by the proteins filtrated from glomerular capillaries of nephrons and reabsorbed by the epithelial cells in canaliculi of nephrons. The absorbed natural heterologous protein was depleted by lysosomes of epithelial cells of intestine and kidneys and macrophages. It support...

  7. Intestinal Coccidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycle that has 20% thin layer and 80% thick layer. Oocyst with thick layer is able to live a long time in nature. They are the third or forth of gastroentritis disease that have digestive disorder like anorexia, nausea, persistent diarrhoea, malabsorption and leanness. The disease forms choronic and acute stages and it is able to kill the immunodeficiency cases. Sometimes it has HIV symptoms similar to pneumonia and respiratory track infection. Laboratory diagnosis is based on Oocyst finding in stool exam and that shitter floatation and Cr (KOH2 are the best methods. Modified zyh-lnelson and fleocroum are the best staining methods too. This parasite is transmitted by zoonotic and Antroponotic origin. Molecular studies have shown two Genotypes (I&II. Genotype I is aquatic and II is zoonotic. The prevalence rate is 3% in infants and 10% in calves. Cyclospora: This parasite is novel and is bigger than cryptosporidium.It isn't known a clear life cycle but is transmitted by water, vegetables and fruits as raspberries. and mulberries. Human is a specific host. When a parasite is in the intestine it causes inflammatory reaction in Entrocyte.The patient shows watery diarrhoea with nausea, vomitting, pain, Stomach cramp, anorexia, malabsorption and cachexia. The disease period is 3 monthes in immunodeficiency cases but it is selflimited in normal cases. Autofluorescence characteristic is differential diagnosis, prevalence rate of disease is unknown. Isospora: This

  8. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. PMID:26872546

  9. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The large intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible ... the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the cecum. Material passes through the ...

  10. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  11. RegIII proteins as gatekeepers of the intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Loonen, L.M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian RegIII proteins are expressed in the intestine and in the pancreas in response to inflammation or infection. In the mouse intestine, expression of RegIIIβ and RegIIIγ is increased by microbial colonization, inflammation and infection. At the outset of this thesis human PAP and mouse RegIIIγ were reported to be bactericidal for Gram-positive bacteria. Additionally, human PAP had been shown to attenuate NF-κbsignallingin human monocytes and epithelial cells and ...

  12. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caenorhabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing stud...

  13. A guide to Ussing chamber studies of mouse intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Lane L.

    2009-01-01

    The Ussing chamber provides a physiological system to measure the transport of ions, nutrients, and drugs across various epithelial tissues. One of the most studied epithelia is the intestine, which has provided several landmark discoveries regarding the mechanisms of ion transport processes. Adaptation of this method to mouse intestine adds the dimension of investigating genetic loss or gain of function as a means to identify proteins or processes affecting transepithelial transport. In this...

  14. Intestinal Epithelium and Autophagy: Partners in Gut Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Chieppa, Marcello; Eri, Rajaraman

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges of cell biology is to understand how each type of cell copes with its specific workload without suffering damage. Among the most intriguing questions concerns intestinal epithelial cells in mammals; these cells act as a barrier between the internally protected region and the external environment that is exposed constantly to food and microbes. A major process involved in the processing of microbes is autophagy. In the intestine, through multiple, complex...

  15. Innate Immune Activation in Intestinal Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host prot...

  16. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in [3H] leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of [35S] methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed

  17. The effects of high mobility group box-1 protein on the expression of intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin in murine severe acute pancreatitis%重症急性胰腺炎大鼠HMGB1对肠上皮细胞occludin表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾正刚; 郭仁宣

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察重症急性胰腺炎(SAP)大鼠肠组织中高迁移率族蛋白B1 (HMGB1)表达对肠黏膜上皮细胞紧密连接occludin蛋白表达的影响.方法 逆行胰胆管注射5%牛磺胆酸钠制作SAP模型.健康Wistar大鼠随机(随机数字法)分为对照组、SAP组、二硫代氨基甲酸吡咯烷(PDTC)处理组.测定血淀粉酶(AMY)、内毒素(LPS)及D-乳酸水平;光镜下观察胰腺和肠组织的病理变化;免疫组织化学法观察occludin分布和表达的变化;RT-PCR法检测大鼠肠组织中HMGB1的表达水平;Western blot法检测大鼠肠组织中HMGB1及occludin蛋白的表达水平.采用SPSS 13.0统计分析软件进行处理,P< 0.05为差异具有统计学意义.结果 在建模后24 h,SAP组大鼠血浆LPS及D-乳酸水平明显高于对照组,提示肠屏障通透性明显增加;PDTC处理组大鼠血浆LPS及D-乳酸水平明显低于SAP组(P<0.05).SAP组大鼠肠组织HMGB1表达水平较对照组明显升高,而occludin蛋白的表达较对照组下降;PDTC组大鼠肠组织HMGB1表达水平明显低于SAP组,occludin水平较SAP组升高(P<0.05).结论 SAP时,大鼠肠组织内HMGB1表达升高,通过降低occludin蛋白表达,来增加肠黏膜屏障通透性;PDTC可抑制HMGB1表达,上调occludin蛋白表达,改善肠黏膜屏障通透性.%Objective To observe the effect of high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) on the expression of intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin in murine severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).Methods Rat SAP model was estabilished by retrograde injection of 5 % sodium taurocholate into choledochopancreatic duct.Healthy wistar rats were divided randomly (random number) into three groups:control group,SAP group,pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) therapy group.Levels of plasm amylase,lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-lactate were determined.The changes of morphological damage of pancreasand intestinal tissues were observed by microscopy.The distribution

  18. Stem cells, self-renewal, and differentiation in the intestinal epithelium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Flier, L.G.; Clevers, H.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian intestine is covered by a single layer of epithelial cells that is renewed every 4-5 days. This high cell turnover makes it a very attractive and comprehensive adult organ system for the study of cell proliferation and differentiation. The intestine is composed of proliferative crypts,

  19. Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu extract prevents radiation-induced small intestinal injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to investigate the therapeutic effect of traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice. Methods: Proliferation improvement of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) was tested by MTT assay in vitro. The preventive effect of the prescription was also tested in vivo. Mice were treated with Shenlingbaizhu by intragastric administration immediately after receiving local irradiation to the abdomen at a dose of 10 Gy (60Co γ-ray). The body mass, diarrhea and survival were recorded. The pathological changes in the jejunum of mice were stained by HE and observed. Results: Shenlingbaizhu Extract could significantly promote the proliferation of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Shenlingbaizhu Extract treatment reduced the diarrhea of irradiated mice, improved the intestinal structural recovery and increased the mice survival. Conclusion: Traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract shows significant protective effect on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice, providing data for clinical treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. (authors)

  20. Microbiota regulate intestinal absorption and metabolism of fatty acids in the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semova, Ivana; Carten, Juliana D; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mackey, Lantz C; Knight, Rob; Farber, Steven A; Rawls, John F

    2012-09-13

    Regulation of intestinal dietary fat absorption is critical to maintaining energy balance. While intestinal microbiota clearly impact the host's energy balance, their role in intestinal absorption and extraintestinal metabolism of dietary fat is less clear. Using in vivo imaging of fluorescent fatty acid (FA) analogs delivered to gnotobiotic zebrafish hosts, we reveal that microbiota stimulate FA uptake and lipid droplet (LD) formation in the intestinal epithelium and liver. Microbiota increase epithelial LD number in a diet-dependent manner. The presence of food led to the intestinal enrichment of bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes. Diet-enriched Firmicutes and their products were sufficient to increase epithelial LD number, whereas LD size was increased by other bacterial types. Thus, different members of the intestinal microbiota promote FA absorption via distinct mechanisms. Diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition might influence fat absorption, providing mechanistic insight into how microbiota-diet interactions regulate host energy balance. PMID:22980325

  1. Requirement of the Shigella flexneri Virulence Plasmid in the Ability To Induce Trafficking of Neutrophils across Polarized Monolayers of the Intestinal Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Beth A.; Siber, Andrew M.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    1998-01-01

    Attachment of an array of enteric pathogens to epithelial surfaces is accompanied by recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) across the intestinal epithelium. In this report, we examine how Shigella-intestinal epithelium interactions evoke the mucosal inflammatory response. We modeled these interactions in vitro by using polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, T84, isolated human PMNs, and Shigella flexneri. We show that Shigella attachment to T84-cell bas...

  2. Membrane proteomics characterization of brush border membrane proteins of mice intestinal mucosa : case study: cholesterol absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Tsirogianni, Eirini

    2009-01-01

    The epithelial absorbing cells of the small intestinal villi, the enterocytes, are the main protagonists for the transport of nutrients from the intestinal lumen to the interstitial fluids. The oriented flow of nutrients is carried out by different and complementary transport systems present in the apical and the basolateral domains of the enterocyte’s plasma membrane. One of the distinctive characteristics of those intestinal cells is the presence of numerous structurally distinct protrusion...

  3. Time-resolved Quantitative Proteome Analysis of In Vivo Intestinal Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Jenny; Panchaud, Alexandre; Favre, Laurent; Bosco, Nabil; Mansourian, Robert; Benyacoub, Jalil; Blum, Stephanie; Jensen, Ole N.; Kussmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Postnatal intestinal development is a very dynamic process characterized by substantial morphological changes that coincide with functional adaption to the nutritional change from a diet rich in fat (milk) to a diet rich in carbohydrates on from weaning. Time-resolved studies of intestinal development have so far been limited to investigation at the transcription level or to single or few proteins at a time. In the present study, we elucidate proteomic changes of primary intestinal epithelial...

  4. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Hee Soon Shin; Sun Young Jung; Su Yeon Back; Jeong-Ryong Do; Dong-Hwa Shon

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier ...

  5. Regulation and expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transcripts in the intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, M.; Hurren, R; Zastawny, R. L.; Ling, V; Buick, R. N.

    1999-01-01

    A paucity of information exists on the regulation of gene expression in the undifferentiated intestine. The intestinal epithelium is one of the few normal tissues expressing the multidrug resistance (MDR) genes that confer the multidrug resistant phenotype to a variety of tumours. Expression of mdr1a has been observed in the primitive rat intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18. It is hypothesized that characterization of MDR gene expression in IEC-18 cells will provide insight into gene regu...

  6. Lipopolysaccharide induces intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in a TNFalpha-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Tuffin, Gèrald; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Stringent control of immune responses in the intestinal mucosa is critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of tissue damage, such as observed during inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal epithelial cells, primarily thought to form a simple physical barrier, critically regulate intestinal immune cell functions by producing immunoregulatory glucocorticoids on T-cell activation. In this study we investigated whether stimulation of cells of the innate immune system resul...

  7. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman;

    2004-01-01

    -CoA synthetase 5 pattern correlate with conversion of intestinal epithelial cells to a gastric phenotype. These results suggest that deranged acyl-CoA synthetase 5 expression, synthesis, and activity are closely related to the state of villus architecture and epithelial homeostasis in human small intestine.......Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology...

  8. Stimulation of intestinal growth and function with DPP-IV inhibition in a mouse short bowel syndrome model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sueyoshi, Ryo; Ignatoski, Kathleen M Woods; Okawada, Manabu;

    2014-01-01

    , and 7 days followed by 23 days washout period. Adaptive response was assessed by morphology, intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation (PCNA), epithelial barrier function (transepithelial resistance), RT-PCR for intestinal transport proteins, GLP-2R, and IGF-1R, and GLP-2 plasma levels. Glucose-stimulated...... sodium transport was assessed for intestinal absorptive function. Seven days of DPP4-I treatment facilitated an increase in GLP-2R levels, intestinal growth, and IEC proliferation. Treatment led to differential effects over time with greater absorptive function early, and enhanced proliferation at later...

  9. Gasotransmitters: Novel regulators of epithelial Na+ transport?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MikeAlthaus

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The vectorial transport of Na+ across epithelia is crucial for the maintenance of Na+ and water homeostasis in organs such as the kidneys, lung or intestine. Dysregulated Na+ transport processes are associated with various human diseases such as hypertension, the salt-wasting syndrome pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1, pulmonary edema, cystic fibrosis or intestinal disorders, which indicate that a precise regulation of epithelial Na+ transport is essential. Novel regulatory signaling molecules are gasotransmitters. There are currently three known gasotransmitters: nitric oxide (NO, carbon monoxide (CO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S. These molecules are endogenously produced in mammalian cells by specific enzymes and have been shown to regulate various physiological processes. There is a growing body of evidence, which indicates that gasotransmitters may also regulate Na+ transport across epithelia. This review will summarize the available data concerning NO, CO and H2S dependent regulation of epithelial Na+ transport processes and will discuss whether or not these mediators can be considered as true physiological regulators of epithelial Na+ transport biology.

  10. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuoka, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the int...

  11. Caspase-8 regulates TNF-α-induced epithelial necroptosis and terminal ileitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Claudia; Martini, Eva; Wittkopf, Nadine; Amann, Kerstin; Weigmann, Benno; Neumann, Helmut; Waldner, Maximilian J; Hedrick, Stephen M; Tenzer, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2011-09-15

    Dysfunction of the intestinal epithelium is believed to result in the excessive translocation of commensal bacteria into the bowel wall that drives chronic mucosal inflammation in Crohn's disease, an incurable inflammatory bowel disease in humans characterized by inflammation of the terminal ileum. In healthy individuals, the intestinal epithelium maintains a physical barrier, established by the tight contact of cells. Moreover, specialized epithelial cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells provide innate immune defence functions by secreting mucus and antimicrobial peptides, which hamper access and survival of bacteria adjacent to the epithelium. Epithelial cell death is a hallmark of intestinal inflammation and has been discussed as a possible pathogenic mechanism driving Crohn's disease in humans. However, the regulation of epithelial cell death and its role in intestinal homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a critical role for caspase-8 in regulating necroptosis of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and terminal ileitis. Mice with a conditional deletion of caspase-8 in the intestinal epithelium (Casp8(ΔIEC)) spontaneously developed inflammatory lesions in the terminal ileum and were highly susceptible to colitis. Casp8(ΔIEC) mice lacked Paneth cells and showed reduced numbers of goblet cells, indicating dysregulated antimicrobial immune cell functions of the intestinal epithelium. Casp8(ΔIEC) mice showed increased cell death in the Paneth cell area of small intestinal crypts. Epithelial cell death was induced by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was associated with increased expression of receptor-interacting protein 3 (Rip3; also known as Ripk3) and could be inhibited on blockade of necroptosis. Lastly, we identified high levels of RIP3 in human Paneth cells and increased necroptosis in the terminal ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, suggesting a potential role of necroptosis in the pathogenesis of this disease. Together, our

  12. Colonization and differentiation of transplanted embryonic stem cells in the irradiated intestine of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a common complication in radiotherapy for the cancer located in abdomen or pelvis. However, there is no effective treatment for radiation-induced intestinal injury now. It is therefore important to develop new treatments for radiation-induced intestinal injury. In this study, we investigated whether embryonic stem (ES) cells could be transplanted directly into the radiation-damaged intestine and could colonize and differentiate into the intestinal epithelial cells. The intestines of female nude mice (ICR nu/nu) were irradiated at a single dose of 30 Gy, and were immediately transplanted with male 129/Sv-derived ES cells into the wall of the irradiated intestine by direct injection. The intestine was removed on days 13 to 27 after transplantation. The Y-chromosome DNA of transplanted ES cells in the irradiated intestine was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Colonization and differentiation of transplanted ES cells in the irradiated intestine were analyzed by histological and immunohistochemical methods with antibodies against stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, α-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin AE1/AE3. The cells of donor origin were identified in the intestine of irradiated mice, and intestinal crypt-like structures were observed on day 13 after transplantation. Importantly, we observed that ES cells could differentiate into epithelial cells in the submucosa of irradiated intestine on day 13 and 27 after transplantation. These results suggest that transplanted ES cells could colonize and differentiate in the intestinal intestine. Such a new approach for damaged intestine with transplanted stem cells would be promising. (author)

  13. Severe intestinal coccidiosis in a newborn lion (Panthera leo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe coccidiosis was found in sections of small intestine of a less than 2 day old lion (Panthera leo) born in captivity. Schizonts, merozoites, gamonts, and unsporulated oocysts were located in epithelial cells of ileum. Ultrastructural examination indicated that schizonts divided by schizogony. ...

  14. Endocrine regulation of ion transport in the avian lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, Gary; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sighvatur S.; Skadhauge, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The lower intestine (colon and coprodeum) of the domestic fowl maintains a very active, transporting epithelium, with a microvillus brush border, columnar epithelial cells, and a variety of transport systems. The colon of normal or high salt-acclimated hens expresses sodium-linked glucose and ami...

  15. The intestinal epithelium as guardian of gut barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaiyi; Hornef, Mathias W; Dupont, Aline

    2015-11-01

    A single layer of epithelial cells separates the intestinal lumen from the underlying sterile tissue. It is exposed to a multitude of nutrients and a large number of commensal bacteria. Although the presence of commensal bacteria significantly contributes to nutrient digestion, vitamin synthesis and tissue maturation, their high number represents a permanent challenge to the integrity of the epithelial surface keeping the local immune system constantly on alert. In addition, the intestinal mucosa is challenged by a variety of enteropathogenic microorganisms. In both circumstances, the epithelium actively contributes to maintaining host-microbial homeostasis and antimicrobial host defence. It deploys a variety of mechanisms to restrict the presence of commensal bacteria to the intestinal lumen and to prevent translocation of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms to the underlying tissue. Enteropathogenic microorganisms in turn have learnt to evade the host's immune system and circumvent the antimicrobial host response. In the present article, we review recent advances that illustrate the intense and intimate host-microbial interaction at the epithelial level and improve our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:26294173

  16. Increased apoptosis in gastric mucosa adjacent to intestinal metaplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grieken, N C T; Meijer, G A; zur Hausen, A; Meuwissen, S G M; Baak, J P A; Kuipers, E J

    2003-01-01

    Background: The biological processes involved in the development of gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia are still incompletely understood. Reports testing the hypothesis that apoptosis leads to atrophy have yielded conflicting results. The availability of new antibodies for the detection of apoptotic cells in tissue sections has facilitated the analysis of the role of apoptosis in the gastritis–atrophy–intestinal metaplasia sequence. Methods: Archival material from 40 gastric resection specimens with normal mucosa (n = 5), chronic active gastritis (n = 17), or intestinal metaplasia (n = 18) was studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies directed against cleaved cytokeratin 18 and active caspase 3. Slides were scored on a 0–3 scale for the presence of apoptotic cells. Results: Normal gastric mucosa contained low numbers of apoptotic cells at the surface epithelium (mean score, 0.20). This number was significantly increased in cases with chronic gastritis (mean score, 1.06) and in those with intestinal metaplasia (mean score, 2.56). Within the intestinal metaplasia cases, 44 different foci of intestinal metaplasia were identified. In 39 of these 44 areas, concentrations of apoptotic cells were seen immediately adjacent to the foci of intestinal metaplasia, but not in the metaplastic epithelium itself. Conclusions: Apoptosis is uncommon in normal gastric mucosa. Chronic inflammation and intestinal metaplasia are associated with increased apoptosis, but occur mainly at the mucosal surface and not in the deeper layers. These findings do not support the concept that apoptosis underlies the loss of gastric glands and leads to atrophy, but the observed concentration of apoptotic epithelial cells adjacent to foci of intestinal metaplasia could be related to heterogeneity of epithelial damage, causing apoptosis, to which intestinal metaplasia is a response. PMID:12719456

  17. The intestinal barrier function and its involvement in digestive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Salvo-Romero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal mucosal surface is lined with epithelial cells representing an effective barrier made up with intercellular junctions that separate the inner and the outer environments, and block the passage of potentially harmful substances. However, epithelial cells are also responsible for the absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, hence a semipermeable barrier is required that selectively allows a number of substances in while keeping others out. To this end, the intestine developed the "intestinal barrier function", a defensive system involving various elements, both intra- and extracellular, that work in a coordinated way to impede the passage of antigens, toxins, and microbial byproducts, and simultaneously preserves the correct development of the epithelial barrier, the immune system, and the acquisition of tolerance against dietary antigens and the intestinal microbiota. Disturbances in the mechanisms of the barrier function favor the development of exaggerated immune responses; while exact implications remain unknown, changes in intestinal barrier function have been associated with the development of inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. This review details de various elements of the intestinal barrier function, and the key molecular and cellular changes described for gastrointestinal diseases associated with dysfunction in this defensive mechanism.

  18. The intestinal barrier function and its involvement in digestive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo Romero, Eloísa; Alonso Cotoner, Carmen; Pardo Camacho, Cristina; Casado Bedmar, Maite; Vicario, María

    2015-11-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal surface is lined with epithelial cells representing an effective barrier made up with intercellular junctions that separate the inner and the outer environments, and block the passage of potentially harmful substances. However, epithelial cells are also responsible for the absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, hence a semipermeable barrier is required that selectively allows a number of substances in while keeping others out. To this end, the intestine developed the "intestinal barrier function", a defensive system involving various elements, both intra- and extracellular, that work in a coordinated way to impede the passage of antigens, toxins, and microbial byproducts, and simultaneously preserves the correct development of the epithelial barrier, the immune system, and the acquisition of tolerance against dietary antigens and the intestinal microbiota. Disturbances in the mechanisms of the barrier function favor the development of exaggerated immune responses; while exact implications remain unknown, changes in intestinal barrier function have been associated with the development of inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. This review details de various elements of the intestinal barrier function, and the key molecular and cellular changes described for gastrointestinal diseases associated with dysfunction in this defensive mechanism. PMID:26541659

  19. Paneth cells: maestros of the small intestinal crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevers, Hans C; Bevins, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Paneth cells are highly specialized epithelial cells of the small intestine, where they coordinate many physiological functions. First identified more than a century ago on the basis of their readily discernible secretory granules by routine histology, these cells are located at the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn, tiny invaginations that line the mucosal surface all along the small intestine. Investigations over the past several decades determined that these cells synthesize and secrete substantial quantities of antimicrobial peptides and proteins. More recent studies have determined that these antimicrobial molecules are key mediators of host-microbe interactions, including homeostatic balance with colonizing microbiota and innate immune protection from enteric pathogens. Perhaps more intriguing, Paneth cells secrete factors that help sustain and modulate the epithelial stem and progenitor cells that cohabitate in the crypts and rejuvenate the small intestinal epithelium. Dysfunction of Paneth cell biology contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23398152

  20. Multiple targets of carbon monoxide gas in the intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract. It is important to investigate the precise pathogenesis of IBD, to evaluate new anti-inflammatory agents, and to develop novel drugs. Carbon monoxide (CO) has emerged as an important regulator of acute and chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory effects is only partially understood. Recent reports have demonstrated that CO could play a role in the functional modulation of epithelial and immunological cells in the intestine. In this short review, we have highlighted the recent findings that CO stimulates the epithelial cell restitution and FGF production from myofibroblasts. CO was also shown to regulate T cell activation and differentiation, and to activate macrophages. Finally, we have discussed the direction of translational research with respect to launching a novel agent for releasing CO in the intestine. PMID:27095232

  1. The SCFA butyrate stimulates the epithelial production of retinoic acid via inhibition of epithelial HDAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilderink, Ronald; Verseijden, Caroline; Seppen, Jurgen; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R; Lambers, Tim T; van Tol, Eric A; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2016-06-01

    In the intestinal mucosa, retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule. RA is derived from dietary vitamin A (retinol) through conversion by aldehyde dehydrogenases (aldh). Reduced levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are associated with pathological microbial dysbiosis, inflammatory disease, and allergy. We hypothesized that SCFAs contribute to mucosal homeostasis by enhancing RA production in intestinal epithelia. With the use of human and mouse epithelial cell lines and primary enteroids, we studied the effect of SCFAs on the production of RA. Functional RA conversion was analyzed by Adlefluor activity assays. Butyrate (0-20 mM), in contrast to other SCFAs, dose dependently induced aldh1a1 or aldh1a3 transcript expression and increased RA conversion in human and mouse epithelial cells. Epithelial cell line data were replicated in intestinal organoids. In these organoids, butyrate (2-5 mM) upregulated aldh1a3 expression (36-fold over control), whereas aldh1a1 was not significantly affected. Butyrate enhanced maturation markers (Mucin-2 and villin) but did not consistently affect stemness markers or other Wnt target genes (lgr5, olfm4, ascl2, cdkn1). In enteroids, the stimulation of RA production by SCFA was mimicked by inhibitors of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) but not by HDAC1/2 inhibitors nor by agonists of butyrate receptors G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR)43 or GPR109A, indicating that butyrate stimulates RA production via HDAC3 inhibition. We conclude that the SCFA butyrate inhibits HDAC3 and thereby supports epithelial RA production. PMID:27151945

  2. Mammary epithelial cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine Terra; Dembo, Micah;

    2007-01-01

    mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal...... organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal-epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit...

  3. Effects of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction of human colon carcinoma cells%富氢液对脂多糖刺激离体肠上皮 屏障功能障碍的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨涛; 谢克亮; 陈红光; 张红涛; 于洋; 王国林; 于泳浩

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction of human intestinal epithelial (Caco2) cells. Methods Caco2 cells (passages 28-35) were purchased from the Cell Bank of the Shanghai Institute of Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai, China, and they were cultured in Dulbecco minimum essential medium (DMEM) containing 20% fetal bovine serum. These cells were randomly divided into four groups: control group (group A), hydrogen-rich medium group (group B), LPS group (group C) and LPS + hydrogen-rich medium group (group D). Cells were cultured with normal medium in group A and group C or with hydrogen-rich medium in group B and group D. Meanwhile, 1 g/L LPS was simultaneously added into group C and group D, while an equivalent volume of normal saline was added into group A and group B instead. In vitro intestinal epithelial models were reproduced with monolayer filter-grown Caco2 and intestinal epithelium. The trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in models of each group was measured at different incubation times (0, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours). Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, respectively, after incubation for 24 hours. The expression levels of claudin-1 and occludin were respectively determined at 6, 12 and 24 hours of incubation by Western Blot assay. The morphological structure of claudin-1 and occludin was respectively observed after incubation for 24 hours with immunofluorescence staining. Results There was no statistical significance in variables between group A and group B. Compared with group A, it was shown that TEER was time-dependently decreased in groups C and D after 6 hours. Compared with group C, TEER in group D was increased after 6 hours. Compared with group A, the cell viability was significantly

  4. Differentiation-dependent activation of the human intestinal alkaline phosphatase promoter by HNF-4 in intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Bressendorff, Simon; Troelsen, Jesper T;

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPI) encodes a digestive brush-border enzyme, which is highly upregulated during small intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. To identify new putative promoter motifs responsible for the regulation of ALPI expression during differentiation of the...... of HNF-4alpha to stimulate the expression from the ALPI promoter was investigated in the nonintestinal Hela cell line. Cotransfection with an HNF-4alpha expression vector demonstrated a direct activation of the ALPI promoter through this -94 to -82 element. EMSA showed that HNF-4alpha from nuclear...... extracts of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) bound with high affinity to the predicted HNF-4 binding site. A 521 bp promoter fragment containing the HNF-4 binding site demonstrated a differentiation-dependent increase in promoter activity in Caco-2 cells. The presence of the HNF-4...

  5. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  6. The role of immunomodulators on intestinal barrier homeostasis in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maria Emília Rabelo; Araújo, Raquel Silva; de Barros, Patrícia Aparecida Vieira; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Abrantes, Fernanda Alves; Generoso, Simone de Vasconcelos; Fernandes, Simone Odília Antunes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal epithelium is composed of specialized epithelial cells that form a physical and biochemical barrier to commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. However, dysregulation of the epithelial barrier function can lead to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation across the intestinal mucosa, which contributes to local and systemic immune activation. The increase in these parameters is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, physical exercise under heat stress, intestinal obstruction, ischemia, and mucositis, among other conditions. Lately, there has been growing interest in immunomodulatory nutrients and probiotics that can regulate host immune and inflammatory responses and possibly restore the intestinal barrier. Immunomodulators such as amino acids (glutamine, arginine, tryptophan, and citrulline), fatty acids (short-chain and omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids), and probiotics (Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, and Lactobacillus) have been reported in the literature. Here, we review the critical roles of immunomodulatory nutrients in supporting gut barrier integrity and function. PMID:25660317

  7. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  8. TLR2-independent induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, Olivier; Asquith, Mark J; Powrie, Fiona; Maloy, Kevin J

    2010-02-01

    Interactions between the intestinal microflora and host innate immune receptors play a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. Several studies have shown that TLR2 can modulate inflammatory responses in the gut. TLR2 signals enhance tight junction formation and fortify the epithelial barrier, and may play a crucial role in driving acute inflammatory responses towards intestinal bacterial pathogens. In addition, TLR2 agonists can have direct effects on both Th1 cells and Treg. To define the role of TLR2 in the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation we examined the effects of TLR2 deletion on several complementary models of inflammatory bowel disease. Our results show that TLR2 signals are not required for the induction of chronic intestinal inflammation by either innate or adaptive immune responses. We further show that TLR2(-/-) mice harbor normal numbers of Foxp3(+) Treg that are able to suppress intestinal inflammation as effectively as their WT counterparts. We also did not find any intrinsic role for TLR2 for pathogenic effector T-cell responses in the gut. Thus, in contrast to their role in acute intestinal inflammation and repair, TLR2 signals may have a limited impact on the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:19950179

  9. Molecular aspects of intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Guizzardi, Solange; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2015-06-21

    Intestinal Ca(2+) absorption is a crucial physiological process for maintaining bone mineralization and Ca(2+) homeostasis. It occurs through the transcellular and paracellular pathways. The first route comprises 3 steps: the entrance of Ca(2+) across the brush border membranes (BBM) of enterocytes through epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV6, TRPV5, and Cav1.3; Ca(2+) movement from the BBM to the basolateral membranes by binding proteins with high Ca(2+) affinity (such as CB9k); and Ca(2+) extrusion into the blood. Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA1b) and sodium calcium exchanger (NCX1) are mainly involved in the exit of Ca(2+) from enterocytes. A novel molecule, the 4.1R protein, seems to be a partner of PMCA1b, since both molecules co-localize and interact. The paracellular pathway consists of Ca(2+) transport through transmembrane proteins of tight junction structures, such as claudins 2, 12, and 15. There is evidence of crosstalk between the transcellular and paracellular pathways in intestinal Ca(2+) transport. When intestinal oxidative stress is triggered, there is a decrease in the expression of several molecules of both pathways that inhibit intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Normalization of redox status in the intestine with drugs such as quercetin, ursodeoxycholic acid, or melatonin return intestinal Ca(2+) transport to control values. Calcitriol [1,25(OH)₂D₃] is the major controlling hormone of intestinal Ca(2+) transport. It increases the gene and protein expression of most of the molecules involved in both pathways. PTH, thyroid hormones, estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, and glucocorticoids apparently also regulate Ca(2+) transport by direct action, indirect mechanism mediated by the increase of renal 1,25(OH)₂D₃ production, or both. Different physiological conditions, such as growth, pregnancy, lactation, and aging, adjust intestinal Ca(2+) absorption according to Ca(2+) demands. Better knowledge of the molecular details of intestinal Ca(2

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following...... increased the relative absorption of wet weight (46 vs. 22%), energy (79 vs. 64%), and all macronutrients (all parameters P <0.05). These findings were supported by a 200% increase in sucrase and maltase activities, a 50% increase in small intestinal epithelial volume (P <0.05), as well as increased DNA and...

  11. Reappraisal of the Immunophenotype of Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs)—Gastric Pyloric and Small Intestinal Immunophenotype Expression in Gastric and Intestinal Type IPMNs—

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are mucin-producing neoplasms of the main and/or branch pancreatic ducts. To assess differences between various IPMN subtypes, immunohistochemical markers of gastric surface mucous cells (MUC5AC), gastric gland mucous cells (MUC6 and GlcNAcα1→4Galβ→R), gastric pyloric and duodenal epithelial cells (PDX1), intestinal cells (MUC2 and CDX2), small intestinal cells (CPS1) and large intestinal cells (SATB2) were evaluated in 33 surgically treated IPMNs. MUC2 expression classified IPMNs into gastric (n=17), intestinal (n=8) and mixed gastric and intestinal type (collision=7, composite=1). No differences in age or sex were observed among these types. MUC5AC and PDX1 were expressed in all IPMNs. MUC6 expression was higher in gastric and mixed types than in intestinal type. GlcNAcα1→4Galβ→R was detected in gastric and mixed type, but not in intestinal type. MUC2 and CDX2 expression were higher in intestinal type than gastric and mixed type. CPS1 expression was higher in intestinal type than gastric type. SATB2 was not observed in any IPMNs. Frequent abrupt transition between the two IPMN types in mixed-type IPMNs was observed. Gastric pyloric and small intestinal differentiation are characteristic of gastric and intestinal type IPMN, respectively, and these two IPMN types may have distinct pathogenesis

  12. Crypt region localization of intestinal stem cells in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial lining plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients, but exists in a harsh luminal environment that necessitates continual renewal. This renewal process involves epithelial cell proliferation in the crypt base and later cell migration from the crypt base to the luminal surface. This process is dependent on multi-potent progenitor cells, or stem cells, located in each crypt. There are about 4 to 6 stem cells per crypt, and these stem cells are believed to generate distinct end-differentiated epithelial cell types, including absorptive cells, goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells and Paneth cells, while also maintaining their own progenitor cell state. Earlier studies suggested that intestinal stem cells were located either in the crypt base interspersed between the Paneth cells [i.e. Crypt base columnar (CBC) cell model] or at an average position of 4 cells from the crypt base [I.e. Label-retaining cells (LRC +4) model]. Recent studies have employed biomarkers in the in vivo mammalian state to more precisely evaluate the location of these progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Most notable of these novel markers are Lgr5, a gene that encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor with expression restricted to CBC cells, and Bmi 1, which encodes a chromatin remodeling protein expressed by LRC. These studies raise the possibility that there may be separate stem cell lines or different states of stem cell activation involved in the renewal of normal mammalian intestinal tract.

  13. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokhan; Cipe; Ufuk; Oguz; Idiz; Deniz; Firat; Huseyin; Bektasoglu

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complexand vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota.

  14. Molecular aspects of intestinal calcium absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Guizzardi, Solange; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal Ca2+ absorption is a crucial physiological process for maintaining bone mineralization and Ca2+ homeostasis. It occurs through the transcellular and paracellular pathways. The first route comprises 3 steps: the entrance of Ca2+ across the brush border membranes (BBM) of enterocytes through epithelial Ca2+ channels TRPV6, TRPV5, and Cav1.3; Ca2+ movement from the BBM to the basolateral membranes by binding proteins with high Ca2+ affinity (such as CB9k); and Ca2+ extrusion into the ...

  15. Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

    2009-12-01

    Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

  16. Mucin dynamics in intestinal bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Lindén

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17 in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05. Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. CONCLUSION: Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection.

  17. Compartmentalization of Aquaporins in the Human Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendram V. Rajnarayanan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Improper localization of water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQP induce mucosal injury which is implicated in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The amino acid sequences of AQP3 and AQP10 are 79% similar and belong to the mammalian aquaglyceroporin subfamily. AQP10 is localized on the apical compartment of the intestinal epithelium called the glycocalyx while AQP3 is selectively targeted to the basolateral membrane. Despite the high sequence similarity and evolutionary relatedness, the molecular mechanism involved in the polarity, selective targeting and function of AQP3 and AQP10 in the intestine is largely unknown. Our hypothesis is that the differential polarity and selective targeting of AQP3 and AQP10 in the intestinal epithelial cells is influenced by amino acid signal motifs. We performed sequence and structural alignments to determine differences in signals for localization and posttranslational glycosylation. The basolateral sorting motif “YRLL” is present in AQP3 but absent in AQP10; while Nglycosylation signals are present in AQP10 but absent in AQP3. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of AQP3 is longer compared to AQP10. The sequence and structural differences between AQP3 and AQP10 provide insights into the differential compartmentalization and function of these two aquaporins commonly expressed in human intestines.

  18. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P receptors in human colon and small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and substance P are found in neurons in the lamina propria and submucosa and muscularis propria of human small intestine and colon. VIP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on epithelial, smooth muscle, and mononuclear cells. This study analyzes the distribution of [125I]VIP binding and [125I]substance P in human colon and small intestine using autoradiographic techniques. [125I]VIP binding was present in high density in the mucosal layer of colon and small intestine. [125I]VIP binding was not significantly greater than nonspecific binding in smooth muscle layers or the lymphoid follicles. In contrast, [125I]substance P binding was present in high density over the colonic muscle but was not present over the mucosal layer. In human colon cancer, [125I]VIP grain density over the malignant tissue was only slightly higher than background. These autoradiographic studies of [125I]VIP binding indicate that the highest density of VIP receptors was found in the small intestine and superficial colonic mucosa, whereas the density of substance P receptors was highest over the smooth muscle layers. These findings suggest a mismatch between immunochemical content of the peptide and autoradiographic density of the receptor

  19. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Arrest Induced by Lactate and Acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuki, Takahiro; Pédron, Thierry; Regnault, Béatrice; Mulet, Céline; Hara, Taeko; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interac...

  20. A Wild C. Elegans Strain Has Enhanced Epithelial Immunity to a Natural Microsporidian Parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Balla, Keir M.; Andersen, Erik C; Kruglyak, Leonid; Troemel, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pathogens impose selective pressures on their hosts, and combatting these pathogens is fundamental to the propagation of a species. Innate immunity is an ancient system that provides the foundation for pathogen resistance, with epithelial cells in humans increasingly appreciated to play key roles in innate defense. Here, we show that the nematode C. elegans displays genetic variation in epithelial immunity against intestinal infection by its natural pathogen, Nematocida parisii. Thi...

  1. How Shigella Utilizes Ca2+ Jagged Edge Signals during Invasion of Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnet, Mariette; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type III secretion system (T3SS). Through the injection of type III effectors, Shigella manipulates the actin cytoskeleton to induce its internalization in epithelial cells. At early invasion stages, Shigella induces atypical Ca2+ responses confined at entry sites allowing local cytoskeletal remodeling for bacteria engulfment. Global Ca2+ increase in the cell triggers the opening of connexin hemic...

  2. Characterization of bifidobacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gleinser, Marita

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of probiotics is discussed as a prerequisite for the persistence and the colonization of the gut. Based on previous studies of our group, the strain B. bifidum S17 could be identified as promising candidate to investigate adhesion properties (Riedel et al., 2006a; Preising et al., 2010). Several E. coli-Bifidobacterium shuttle vectors with different antibiotic resistances were generated. Using a gusA reporter assay the promoter Pgap was shown to have detectable transcriptional activi...

  3. Effect of Psychoneural Factors on Intestinal Epithelial Function

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Stress has been associated with abnormal gastrointestinal function, including diarrhea and abdominal pain, and stress-associated gastric ulceration has frequently been documented. Stress can also exacerbate ongoing pathophysiology and often precedes relapses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome. The relatively new field of psychoneuroimmunology is involved with the elucidation of mechanisms that explain the link between the central nervous system and immune-...

  4. Expression of CD14 on human intestinal epithelial cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Funda, David; Tučková, Ludmila; Farré Castany, Maria; Iwase, T.; Moro, I.; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Elsevier. Roč. 118, č. 4 (2000), s. 666. ISSN 0016-5085. [Annual Meeting of the American Gastroenterology Association /101./. 21.05.2000-24.05.2000, San Diego] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  5. Epithelial cell differentiation in normal and transgenic mouse intestinal isografts

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Transgenes consisting of segments of the rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene's 5' non-transcribed domain linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (minus its regulatory elements) have provided useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms that regulate cellular and spatial differentiation of the continuously renewing gut epithelium. We have removed the jejunum from normal and transgenic fetal mice before or coincident with, cytodifferentiation of its epithelium. These segments ...

  6. Impaired Growth of Small Intestinal Epithelium by Adrenalectomy in Weaning Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional maturation of the small intestine occurs during the weaning period in rats. It is known that this development is facilitated by glucocorticoid. However, the effect of glucocorticoid on morphological development of small intestine has yet to be clarified. The present study evaluated the morphological development and cell proliferation of the small intestine in adrenalectomized (ADX) rat pups. To further understand the mechanism of glucocorticoid effects on intestinal development, we examined the localization of the glucocorticoid receptor in the small intestine. Microscopic analysis showed that growth of villi and crypts is age-dependent, and is significantly attenuated in ADX rats compared with sham-operated rats. BrdU-positive cells, i.e. proliferating cells, were primarily observed in crypt compartments and rapidly increased in number during the early weaning period. The increase in BrdU-positive cells could be attenuated by adrenalectomy. The morphological development of small intestine may be associated with increased proliferation of epithelial cells. On the other hand, glucocorticoid receptors were found in epithelial cells of the mid- and lower villi and not in crypts where BrdU-positive cells were localized. These results indicate that the growth of small intestine is attenuated by adrenalectomy, and that glucocorticoid indirectly acts on proliferation of epithelial cells during the weaning period

  7. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1–11 have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes, goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  8. Bone marrow transplantation enhances trafficking of host-derived myelomonocytic cells that rescue intestinal mucosa after whole body radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Bone marrow (BM)-derived cells were demonstrated within intestines after radiation damage and were reported to be responsible for intestine repair. However, there was a discrepancy between intestine epithelial clonogenic regeneration, and mouse survival after BM transplantation (BMT) and radiation. The contribution of BM to acute intestine repair after radiation needed further investigation. Methods: Mouse survival, intestine microcolony assay, immunohistochemical studies of both intestine and BM were evaluated in mice after whole body irradiation (WBI) and BMT. Immunoblotting, flowcytometry, and double immunostaining were used to evaluate the amount and the character of stroma cells within intestines of recipient mice after receiving gender-mismatched BMT or BMT from green fluorescence donors. Results: Stromal cell proliferation within the lamina propria correlated with the beneficial effect of BMT to intestine recovery and day-8 survival of mice. Few donor-derived cells were found before the completion of intestine repair. The number of host but not donor-derived myelomonocytic and stromal cells increased dramatically within one week after radiation and BMT. Depletion of myelomonocytic cells of recipient mice abolished the mitigating effect of BMT. Conclusions: Besides rescuing injured BM from aplasia, BMT triggers trafficking of host CD11b(+) myelomonocytic cells from the host marrow to the radiation-injured intestinal mucosa, enhancing the proliferation of intestinal stroma cells, leading secondarily to epithelial regeneration.

  9. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of human intestinal defensin 5.

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, E M; van Dam, E; Valore, E V; Ganz, T

    1997-01-01

    Defensins are antibiotic peptides expressed in human and animal myeloid and epithelial cells. Due to the limited availability of natural peptides, the properties of human epithelial defensins have not been studied. We assayed the microbicidal activity of recombinant human intestinal defensin 5 (rHD-5) in the presence of salt (O to 150 mM NaCl) with varied pH (pH 5.5 to pH 8.5) and trypsin (25 and 250 microg/ml). rHD-5 exhibits microbicidal activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia ...

  10. Hyaluronic acid regulates normal intestinal and colonic growth in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Riehl, Terrence E.; Ee, Xueping; Stenson, William F

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, affects gastrointestinal epithelial proliferation in injury models, but its role in normal growth is unknown. We sought to determine the effects of exogenous HA on intestinal and colonic growth by intraperitoneal injection of HA twice a week into C57BL/6 mice from 3 to 8 wk of age. Similarly, to determine the effects of endogenous HA on intestinal and colonic growth, we administered PEP-1, a peptide that blocks the binding of HA t...

  11. Jejunum ileal intestinal atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio J. Puente Fonseca

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal atresia is one of the most important causes of intestinal obstruction in newborn. They constitute aorund 95% of total intestinal obstructions in this age group. Most of intestinal atresias are jejunoieal atresia. Although it is not frequent their relationship with other congenital anomalies, has been described the association in some cases with defects of intestine rotation, meconium peritonitis, with meconium ileus and rarely with the Hirschsprung diseases. The hereditary character has also been described in certain multiple intestinal atresias. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Jejunoileal atresia, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  12. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable...

  13. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. bacteria | biliary obstruction | epithelial barrier | ileum

  14. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  15. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying illness, stop the medication, or do both. Nutritional Support People with intestinal pseudo-obstruction often need nutritional support to prevent malnutrition and weight loss. Enteral nutrition ...

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of cell lines and scrapings of the human intestinal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renes Johan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro models are indispensable study objects in the fields of cell and molecular biology, with advantages such as accessibility, homogeneity of the cell population, reproducibility, and growth rate. The Caco-2 cell line, originating from a colon carcinoma, is a widely used in vitro model for small intestinal epithelium. Cancer cells have an altered metabolism, making it difficult to infer their representativity for the tissue from which they are derived. This study was designed to compare the protein expression pattern of Caco-2 cells with the patterns of intestinal epithelial cells from human small and large intestine. HT-29 intestinal cells, Hep G2 liver cells and TE 671 muscle cells were included too, the latter two as negative controls. Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed on each tissue and cell line protein sample. Principal component and cluster analysis revealed that global expression of intestinal epithelial scrapings differed from that of intestinal epithelial cell lines. Since all cultured cell lines clustered together, this finding was ascribed to an adaptation of cells to culture conditions and their tumor origin, and responsible proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. When investigating the profiles of Caco-2 cells and small intestinal cells in detail, a considerable overlap was observed. Conclusion Numerous proteins showed a similar expression in Caco-2 cells, HT-29 cells, and both the intestinal scrapings, of which some appear to be characteristic to human intestinal epithelium in vivo. In addition, several biologically significant proteins are expressed at comparable levels in Caco-2 cells and small intestinal scrapings, indicating the usability of this in vitro model. Caco-2 cells, however, appear to over-express as well as under-express certain proteins, which needs to be considered by scientists using this cell line. Hence, care should be taken to prevent misinterpretation of

  17. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    displaying folds that closely resembled the intestinal villi and formation of a tight barrier. Furthermore, the microelectrodes embedded in the microchip also allow real-time monitoring of the barrier integrity by means of measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance. Demonstrations of transport...... enable real-time detection of cell responses, adjustment of cellular stimulation etc. leading to establishment of conditional experiments. In this project, microfluidic systems engineering was leveraged to develop an eight chamber multi-layer microchip for intestinal barrier studies. Sandwiched between...... without compromising the epithelial cell viability and barrier function. Such a platform paves the way towards an alternative in vitro intestinal model for high throughput screening of drugs, chemicals, pathogens, intestinal diseases as well as toxicological studies....

  18. Impact of thymectomy and antilymphocytic serum on stem cells of the intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The population of stem cells of the intestinal epithelium was studied under conditions of the disturbed balance in the immune system on F1 (CBAxC57B1) mice. It has been shown that thymectomy in adult mice does not influence the stem region of the intestinal epithelium at early time of observation but causes a tendency to the changed number of epithelial stem cells in 4-6 months. Administration of specific sera against T-, B- and mixed lymphoid populations on the 1st day of observation produces an ambi us effect on the stem region and results in an increase of the number of epithelial stem cells on the 5th day. After administration of the antilymphocytic serum there have been determined morphological changes in the population of mature erythrocytes and undulatory fluctuations in the number of mitotic cells of the intestinal epithelium. These data suggest functional correlation of the intestinal epithelium and the state of the immunocompetent tissue

  19. Erlotinib promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlotinib, a popular drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), causes diarrhea in approximately 55% of patients receiving this drug. In the present study, we found that erlotinib induced barrier dysfunction in rat small intestine epithelial cells (IEC-6) by increasing epithelial permeability and down-regulating E-cadherin. The mRNA levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines (Il-6, Il-25 and Il-17f) were increased after erlotinib treatment in IEC-6 cells. Erlotinib concentration- and time-dependently induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in both IEC-6 and human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoN). Intestinal epithelial injury was also observed in male C57BL/6J mice administrated with erlotinib. Knockdown of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) with small interference RNA partially reversed erlotinib-induced apoptosis, production of IL-6 and down-regulation of E-cadherin in cultured intestinal epithelial cells. In conclusion, erlotinib caused ER stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium, contributing to its side effects of diarrhea in patients. - Highlights: • Erlotinib destroyed barrier integrity both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. • ER stress contributed to erlotinib-induced barrier dysfunction

  20. Erlotinib promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Lu; Hu, Lingna; Yang, Baofang; Fang, Xianying; Gao, Zhe; Li, Wanshuai; Sun, Yang; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xuefeng [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Shu, Yongqian [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 140 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Gu, Yanhong, E-mail: guluer@163.com [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 140 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wu, Xudong, E-mail: xudongwu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Erlotinib, a popular drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), causes diarrhea in approximately 55% of patients receiving this drug. In the present study, we found that erlotinib induced barrier dysfunction in rat small intestine epithelial cells (IEC-6) by increasing epithelial permeability and down-regulating E-cadherin. The mRNA levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines (Il-6, Il-25 and Il-17f) were increased after erlotinib treatment in IEC-6 cells. Erlotinib concentration- and time-dependently induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in both IEC-6 and human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoN). Intestinal epithelial injury was also observed in male C57BL/6J mice administrated with erlotinib. Knockdown of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) with small interference RNA partially reversed erlotinib-induced apoptosis, production of IL-6 and down-regulation of E-cadherin in cultured intestinal epithelial cells. In conclusion, erlotinib caused ER stress-mediated injury in the intestinal epithelium, contributing to its side effects of diarrhea in patients. - Highlights: • Erlotinib destroyed barrier integrity both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. • Erlotinib induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. • ER stress contributed to erlotinib-induced barrier dysfunction.

  1. Computational model of cell positioning: directed and collective migration in the intestinal crypt epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Shek Yoon; Chiam, K.-H.; Lim, Chwee Teck; Matsudaira, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The epithelium of the intestinal crypt is a dynamic tissue undergoing constant regeneration through cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and apoptosis. How the epithelial cells maintain correct positioning and how they migrate in a directed and collective fashion are still not well understood. In this paper, we developed a computational model to elucidate these processes. We show that differential adhesion between epithelial cells, caused by the differential activation of EphB rec...

  2. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as hum...

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Alistair eWalsham; Donald eMacKenzie; Vivienne eCook; Simon eWemyss-Holden; Claire eHews; Nathalie eJuge; Stephanie eSchüller

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small ...

  4. The Role of CD103+ Dendritic Cells in the Intestinal Mucosal Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Ruane, Darren Thomas; Ed C Lavelle

    2011-01-01

    While dendritic cells (DC) are central to the induction and regulation of adaptive immunity, these cells are very heterogenous and specific subsets can be characterized based on the expression of cell surface markers and functional properties. Intestinal CD103+ DCs are the subject of particular interest due to their role in regulating mucosal immunity. Since the epithelial surfaces are constantly exposed to a high antigenic load, tight regulation of innate and adaptive intestinal immune respo...

  5. Farnesoid X Receptor activation protects against intestinal inflammation: potential mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Gadaleta, R.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disorder, characterized by dysregulation of the mucosal immune system and compromised intestinal epithelial barrier. In IBD the immunological balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators is severely impaired and shifted towards the pro-inflammatory side. The nuclear transcription factor kappa B is a key regulator in this shift. The bile salt nuclear Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear r...

  6. Regulation of Intestinal Immune Responses through TLR Activation: Implications for Pro- and Prebiotics

    OpenAIRE

    de Kivit, Sander; Tobin, Mary C.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Landay, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chron...

  7. Vitamin D Receptor Negatively Regulates Bacterial-Stimulated NF-κB Activity in Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P.; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R. Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-κB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR−/− mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After ...

  8. Clinical relevance of intestinal peptide uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine available information on an independent peptide transporter 1(Pep T1) and its potential relevance to treatment, this evaluation was completed.METHODS: Fully published English language literature articles sourced through Pub Med related to protein digestion and absorption, specifically human peptide and amino acid transport, were accessed and reviewed.Papers from 1970 to the present, with particular emphasis on the past decade, were examined. In addition,abstracted information translated to English in Pub Med was also included. Finally, studies and reviews relevant to nutrient or drug uptake, particularly in human intestine were included for evaluation. This work represents a summary of all of these studies with particular reference to peptide transporter mediated assimilation of nutrients and pharmacologically active medications.RESULTS: Assimilation of dietary protein in humans involves gastric and pancreatic enzyme hydrolysis to luminal oligopeptides and free amino acids. During the ensuing intestinal phase, these hydrolytic products are transported into the epithelial cell and, eventually, the portal vein. A critical component of this process is the uptake of intact di-peptides and tri-peptides by an independent Pep T1. A number of "peptide-mimetic" pharmaceutical agents may also be transported through this carrier, important for uptake of different antibiotics, antiviral agents and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In addition, specific peptide products of intestinal bacteria may also be transported by Pep T1, with initiation and persistence of an immune response including increased cytokine production and associated intestinal inflammatory changes. Interestingly, these inflammatory changes may also be attenuated with orallyadministered anti-inflammatory tripeptides administered as site-specific nanoparticles and taken up by this Pep T1 transport protein. CONCLUSION: Further evaluation of the role of this transporter in treatment of

  9. Multiscale analysis of the murine intestine for modeling human diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Jesse; Herring, Charles A; Banerjee, Amrita; Simmons, Alan J.; Ken S. Lau

    2015-01-01

    When functioning properly, the intestine is one of the key interfaces between the human body and its environment. It is responsible for extracting nutrients from our food and excreting our waste products. It provides an environment for a host of healthful microbes and serves as a first defense against pathogenic ones. These processes require tight homeostatic controls, which are provided by the interactions of a complex mix of epithelial, stromal, neural and immune cells, as well as the resid...

  10. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Eriksson, André Huss; Andersen, Rikke; Frokjaer, Sven

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...

  11. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  12. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed. PMID:8018747

  13. Intestinal invagination Invaginación intestinal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayamnelys Aguilar Atanay

    Full Text Available Intestinal intussusceptions are the most frequent cause of acute surgical occlusive syndrome in infants; it is idiopathic in more than 90% of cases. Their treatment can be conservative, with reduction by means of imaging and hydrostatic procedures, or surgical. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Intestinal intussusceptions, approved by consensus in the 3th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Camagüey, Cuba; February 23 – 26, 2004.
    La invaginación intestinal es la causa más frecuente del síndrome de abdomen agudo quirúrgico oclusivo en lactantes y es idiopática en más del 90 % de los casos. Su tratamiento puede ser conservador, con reducción mediante procedimientos hidrostáticos combinados con vigilancia imaginológica, o quirúrgico. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para invaginación intestinal, aprobada por consenso en el 3er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Camagüey, 23 al 26 de febrero de 2004.

  14. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J;

    2008-01-01

    report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine....... Several studies have shown great interexaminer and intraexaminer variability in the assessment of the presence or absence and the grade of oral epithelial dysplasia. The Working Group considered the two class classification (no/questionable/ mild - low risk; moderate or severe - implying high risk) and...

  15. Transmural intestinal wall permeability in severe ischemia after enteral protease inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina E Altshuler

    Full Text Available In intestinal ischemia, inflammatory mediators in the small intestine's lumen such as food byproducts, bacteria, and digestive enzymes leak into the peritoneal space, lymph, and circulation, but the mechanisms by which the intestinal wall permeability initially increases are not well defined. We hypothesize that wall protease activity (independent of luminal proteases and apoptosis contribute to the increased transmural permeability of the intestine's wall in an acutely ischemic small intestine. To model intestinal ischemia, the proximal jejunum to the distal ileum in the rat was excised, the lumen was rapidly flushed with saline to remove luminal contents, sectioned into equal length segments, and filled with a tracer (fluorescein in saline, glucose, or protease inhibitors. The transmural fluorescein transport was determined over 2 hours. Villi structure and epithelial junctional proteins were analyzed. After ischemia, there was increased transmural permeability, loss of villi structure, and destruction of epithelial proteins. Supplementation with luminal glucose preserved the epithelium and significantly attenuated permeability and villi damage. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibitors (doxycycline, GM 6001, and serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in the lumen, significantly reduced the fluorescein transport compared to saline for 90 min of ischemia. Based on these results, we tested in an in-vivo model of hemorrhagic shock (90 min 30 mmHg, 3 hours observation for intestinal lesion formation. Single enteral interventions (saline, glucose, tranexamic acid did not prevent intestinal lesions, while the combination of enteral glucose and tranexamic acid prevented lesion formation after hemorrhagic shock. The results suggest that apoptotic and protease mediated breakdown cause increased permeability and damage to the intestinal wall. Metabolic support in the lumen of an ischemic intestine with glucose reduces the transport from the lumen

  16. Reprogramming of the human intestinal epigenome by surgical tissue transposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Fides D.; Triche, Timothy J.; Tsai, Yvonne C.; Su, Sheng-Fang; Martin, Sue Ellen; Daneshmand, Siamak; Skinner, Eila C.; Liang, Gangning; Chihara, Yoshitomo; Jones, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular cues play critical roles in the establishment of the epigenome during development and may also contribute to epigenetic perturbations found in disease states. The direct role of the local tissue environment on the post-development human epigenome, however, remains unclear due to limitations in studies of human subjects. Here, we use an isogenic human ileal neobladder surgical model and compare global DNA methylation levels of intestinal epithelial cells pre- and post-neobladder construction using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Our study is the first to quantify the effect of environmental cues on the human epigenome and show that the local tissue environment directly modulates DNA methylation patterns in normal differentiated cells in vivo. In the neobladder, the intestinal epithelial cells lose their tissue-specific epigenetic landscape in a time-dependent manner following the tissue’s exposure to a bladder environment. We find that de novo methylation of many intestine-specific enhancers occurs at the rate of 0.41% per month (P < 0.01, Pearson = 0.71), while demethylation of primarily non-intestine-specific transcribed regions occurs at the rate of −0.37% per month (P < 0.01, Pearson = −0.57). The dynamic resetting of the DNA methylome in the neobladder not only implicates local environmental cues in the shaping and maintenance of the epigenome but also illustrates an unexpected cross-talk between the epigenome and the cellular environment. PMID:24515120

  17. Coronaviruses in polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Horzinek, M C; Van der Ende, A; Strous, G J; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Coronaviruses have a marked tropism for epithelial cells. In this paper the interactions of the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) with epithelial cells are compared. Porcine (LLC-PK1) and murine (mTAL) epithelial cells were grown on permeable supp

  18. Epithelial Cell-Neutrophil Interactions in the Alimentary Tract: A Complex Dialog in Mucosal Surveillance and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Colgan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory diseases of mucosal organs as diverse as the lung, kidney, and intestine, inevitably require the intimate interactions of neutrophils with columnar epithelia. The physiologic consequences of such interactions often determine endpoint organ function, and for this reason, much recent interest has developed in identifying mechanisms and novel targets for the treatment of mucosal inflammation. Elegant in vitro model systems incorporating purified human neutrophils and human epithelial cells grown in physiologic orientations have aided in discovery of new and insightful pathways to define basic inflammatory pathways. Here, we will review the recent literature regarding the interactions between columnar epithelial cells and neutrophils, with an emphasis on intestinal epithelial cells, structural aspects of neutrophil transepithelial migration, molecular determinants of neutrophil-epithelial cell interactions, as well as modulation of these pathways. These recent studies highlight the dynamic nature of these pathways and lend insight into the complexity of treating mucosal inflammation.

  19. Regulation of intestinal immune responses through TLR activation: implications for pro- and prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander eDe Kivit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, allergic gastroenteritis (e.g. eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLR play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation.

  20. Effect of Deoxynivalenol and Other Type B Trichothecenes on the Intestine: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Pinton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The natural food contaminants, mycotoxins, are regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health, as up to 25% of the world’s crop production may be contaminated. The Fusarium genus produces large quantities of fusariotoxins, among which the trichothecenes are considered as a ubiquitous problem worldwide. The gastrointestinal tract is the first physiological barrier against food contaminants, as well as the first target for these toxicants. An increasing number of studies suggest that intestinal epithelial cells are targets for deoxynivalenol (DON and other Type B trichothecenes (TCTB. In humans, various adverse digestive symptoms are observed on acute exposure, and in animals, these toxins induce pathological lesions, including necrosis of the intestinal epithelium. They affect the integrity of the intestinal epithelium through alterations in cell morphology and differentiation and in the barrier function. Moreover, DON and TCTB modulate the activity of intestinal epithelium in its role in immune responsiveness. TCTB affect cytokine production by intestinal or immune cells and are supposed to interfere with the cross-talk between epithelial cells and other intestinal immune cells. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the effects of DON and other TCTB on the intestine.