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Sample records for bacteria strain rhodococcus

  1. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, W.R.; Singer, M.E.

    1990-08-28

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors. 2 figs.

  2. Coaggregation between Rhodococcus and Acinetobacter strains isolated from the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Sharifzadeh, Shahab; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Rickard, Alexander H

    2015-07-01

    In this study, coaggregation interactions between Rhodococcus and Acinetobacter strains isolated from food-processing surfaces were characterized. Rhodococcus sp. strain MF3727 formed intrageneric coaggregates with Rhodococcus sp. strain MF3803 and intergeneric coaggregates with 2 strains of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (MF3293, MF3627). Stronger coaggregation between A. calcoaceticus MF3727 and Rhodococcus sp. MF3293 was observed after growth in batch culture at 30 °C than at 20 °C, after growth in tryptic soy broth than in liquid R2A medium, and between cells in exponential and early stationary phases than cells in late stationary phase. The coaggregation ability of Rhodococcus sp. MF3727 was maintained even after heat and Proteinase K treatment, suggesting its ability to coaggregate was protein independent whereas the coaggregation determinants of the other strains involved proteinaceous cell-surface-associated polymers. Coaggregation was stable at pH 5-9. The mechanisms of coaggregation among Acinetobacter and Rhodococcus strains bare similarity to those displayed by coaggregating bacteria of oral and freshwater origin, with respect to binding between proteinaceous and nonproteinaceous determinants and the effect of environmental factors on coaggregation. Coaggregation may contribute to biofilm formation on industrial food surfaces, protecting bacteria against cleaning and disinfection.

  3. Fluorene transformation by bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkelstein, Z.I.; Baskunov, B.P.; Golovlev, E.L.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Baboshin, M.A.; Golovleva, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Of the four investigated Rhodococcus strains (R. rhodochrous172, R. opacus 4a and 557, and R. rhodnii 135), the first three strains were found to be able to completely transform fluorene when it was present in the medium as the sole source of carbon at a concentration of 12¿25 mg/l. At a fluorene

  4. Aerobic degradation of buprofezin via novel degradation intermediates by Rhodococcus sp. strain RX-3

    OpenAIRE

    Ruixue Li; Chun Dai; Guangli Wang; Shaoxian Wu; Yubao Gong; Yuanyuan Jiang; Zhijia Wang; Naiyue Sun

    2016-01-01

    Buprofezin is a commonly used chemical with satisfactory efficacy against sucking insect pests, but its disposal causes serious environmental problems. In this study, a bacterial strain RX-3 isolated by continuous enrichment from buprofezin-treated soil was tested for biodegradation of buprofezin. The bacteria were most similar to Rhodococcus sp. based on their morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, as well as phylogenetic placement inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequence....

  5. Haloalkane-utilizing Rhodococcus strains isolated from geographically distinct locations possess a highly conserved gene cluster encoding haloalkane catabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Bosma, T; Kulakov, LA; Larkin, MJ; Marchesi, [No Value; Weightman, AJ; Janssen, DB; Kulakov, Leonid A.; Larkin, Michael J.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Weightman, Andrew J.

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA and haloalkane dehalogenase (dhaA) genes of five gram-positive haloalkane-utilizing bacteria isolated from contaminated sites in Europe, Japan, and the United States and of the archetypal haloalkane-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain NCIMB13064 were compared.

  6. Isolation and characterization of styrene metabolism genes from styrene-assimilating soil bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Styrene metabolism genes were isolated from styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10. Strain ST-5 had a gene cluster containing four open reading frames which encoded styrene degradation enzymes. The genes showed high similarity to styABCD of Pseudomonas sp. Y2. On the other hand, strain ST-10 had only two genes which encoded styrene monooxygenase and flavin oxidoreductase (styAB). Escherichia coli transformants possessing the sty genes of strains ST-5 and ST-10 produced (S)-styrene oxide from styrene, indicating that these genes function as styrene degradation enzymes. Metabolite analysis by resting-cell reaction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that strain ST-5 converts styrene to phenylacetaldehyde via styrene oxide by styrene oxide isomerase (styC) reaction. On the other hand, strain ST-10 lacked this enzyme, and thus accumulated styrene oxide as an intermediate. HPLC analysis showed that styrene oxide was spontaneously isomerized to phenylacetaldehyde by chemical reaction. The produced phenylacetaldehyde was converted to phenylacetic acid (PAA) in strain ST-10 as well as in strain ST-5. Furthermore, phenylacetic acid was converted to phenylacetyl-CoA by the catalysis of phenylacetate-CoA ligase in strains ST-5 and ST-10. This study proposes possible styrene metabolism pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strains ST-5 and ST-10. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. MICs of Oxazolidinones for Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Humans and Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Bowersock, Terry L.; Salmon, Sarah A.; Portis, Ellen S.; Prescott, John F.; Robison, Denise A.; Ford, Charles W.; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    Eperezolid and linezolid are representatives of a new class of orally active, synthetic antimicrobial agents. The in vitro activity values (MICs) of linezolid, eperezolid, and comparator antibiotics against 102 strains of Rhodococcus equi isolated from humans and animals were determined. Linezolid was more active than eperezolid against the strains tested; premafloxacin was the most active comparator antibiotic.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain WMMA185, a Marine Sponge-Associated Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Adnani, Navid; Braun, Doug R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Chevrette, Marc G.; Currie, Cameron R.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhodococcus strain WMMA185 was isolated from the marine sponge Chondrilla nucula as part of ongoing drug discovery efforts. Analysis of the 4.44-Mb genome provides information regarding interspecies interactions as pertains to regulation of secondary metabolism and natural product biosynthetic potentials.

  9. Benzoate Catabolite Repression of the Phthalate Degradation Pathway in Rhodococcus sp. Strain DK17▿

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ki Young; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Kim, Eungbin

    2006-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 exhibits a catabolite repression-like response when provided simultaneously with benzoate and phthalate as carbon and energy sources. Benzoate in the medium is depleted to detection limits before the utilization of phthalate begins. The transcription of the genes encoding benzoate and phthalate dioxygenase paralleled the substrate utilization profile. Two mutant strains with defective benzoate dioxygenases were unable to utilize phthalate in the presence of benzoat...

  10. Potential of Rhodococcus strains for biotechnological vanillin production from ferulic acid and eugenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaggenborg, Rainer; Overhage, Jörg; Loos, Andrea; Archer, John A C; Lessard, Philip; Sinskey, Anthony J; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Priefert, Horst

    2006-10-01

    The potential of two Rhodococcus strains for biotechnological vanillin production from ferulic acid and eugenol was investigated. Genome sequence data of Rhodococcus sp. I24 suggested a coenzyme A-dependent, non-beta-oxidative pathway for ferulic acid bioconversion, which involves feruloyl-CoA synthetase (Fcs), enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase (Ech), and vanillin dehydrogenase (Vdh). This pathway was proven for Rhodococcus opacus PD630 by physiological characterization of knockout mutants. However, expression and functional characterization of corresponding structural genes from I24 suggested that degradation of ferulic acid in this strain proceeds via a beta-oxidative pathway. The vanillin precursor eugenol facilitated growth of I24 but not of PD630. Coniferyl aldehyde was an intermediate of eugenol degradation by I24. Since the genome sequence of I24 is devoid of eugenol hydroxylase homologous genes (ehyAB), eugenol bioconversion is most probably initiated by a new step in this bacterium. To establish eugenol bioconversion in PD630, the vanillyl alcohol oxidase gene (vaoA) from Penicillium simplicissimum CBS 170.90 was expressed in PD630 together with coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase (calA) and coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase (calB) genes from Pseudomonas sp. HR199. The recombinant strain converted eugenol to ferulic acid. The obtained data suggest that genetically engineered strains of I24 and PD630 are suitable candidates for vanillin production from eugenol.

  11. Improved Method for the Isolation of Biosurfactant Glycolipids from Rhodococcus sp. Strain H13A

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Frank O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method for the isolation of the biosurfactant glycolipids from Rhodococcus sp. strain H13A by using XM 50 diafiltration and isopropanol precipitation was devised. This procedure was advantageous since it removes protein coisolated when the glycolipids are obtained by organic extraction and silicic acid chromatography. The protein apparently does not contribute any biosurfactant characteristics to the glycolipids. The deacylated glycolipid backbone included only a disaccharide.

  12. [Respiratory infections caused by slow-growing bacteria: Nocardia, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschapasse, E; Hussenet, C; Bergeron, A; Lebeaux, D

    2017-06-01

    Pneumonia caused by slow-growing bacteria is rare but sometimes severe. These infections share many similarities such as several differential diagnoses, difficulties to identify the pathogen, the importance of involving the microbiologist in the diagnostic investigation and the need for prolonged antibiotic treatment. However, major differences distinguish them: Nocardia and Rhodococcus infect mainly immunocompromised patients while actinomycosis also concerns immunocompetent patients; the severity of nocardioses is related to their hematogenous spread while locoregional extension by contiguity makes the gravity of actinomycosis. For these diseases, molecular diagnostic tools are essential, either to obtain a species identification and guide treatment in the case of nocardiosis or to confirm the diagnosis from a biological sample. Treatment of these infections is complex due to: (1) the limited data in the literature; (2) the need for prolonged treatment of several months; (3) the management of toxicities and drug interactions for the treatment of Nocardia and Rhodococcus. Close cooperation between pneumonologists, infectious disease specialists and microbiologists is essential for the management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A new zearalenone biodegradation strategy using non-pathogenic Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszt, Rókus; Krifaton, Csilla; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Cserháti, Mátyás; Kriszt, Balázs; Kukolya, József; Czéh, Arpád; Fehér-Tóth, Szilvia; Török, Lívia; Szőke, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, Krisztina J; Barna, Teréz; Ferenczi, Szilamér

    2012-01-01

    Zearalenone (hereafter referred to as ZEA) is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium spp. on cereal grains. ZEA is one of the most hazardous natural endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) which induces hyper estrogenic responses in mammals. This can result in reproductive disorders in farm animals as well as in humans. Consequently, detoxification strategies for contaminated crops are crucial for food safety. In this study we have developed a bacterial based detoxification system using a non-pathogen Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Following 5 days treatment of ZEA with R. pyridinivorans K408 strain HPLC analyses showed an 87.21% ZEA-degradation efficiency of the bacterial enzyme systems. In another approach, the strain biotransformation ability has also been confirmed by a bioluminescent version of the yeast estrogen screening system (BLYES), which detected an 81.75% of biodegradability of ZEA, in a good agreement with the chemical analyses. Furthermore, the capacity of R. pyridinivorans to eliminate the estrogenic effects of ZEA was tested by using an immature uterotrophic assay. Prepubertal female rats were treated with vehicle (olive oil), 17β-estradiol, ZEA (0.1-1-5-10 mg/kg body weight) and LB broth containing 500 mg/l ZEA that has already been incubated with or without Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Uterine weights were measured and the mRNA level changes relating to apelin, aquaporin 5, complement component 2, and calbindin-3 genes were measured by qRT-PCR. These genes represent the major pathways that are affected by estromimetic compounds. Zearalenone feeding significantly increased the uterus weight in a dose dependent manner and at the same time upregulated complement component 2 and calbindin-3 expression as well as decreased apelin and aquaporin 5 mRNA levels comparable to that seen in 17β-estradiol exposed rats. In contrast, LB broth in which ZEA was incubated with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 prior to

  14. A new zearalenone biodegradation strategy using non-pathogenic Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rókus Kriszt

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (hereafter referred to as ZEA is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium spp. on cereal grains. ZEA is one of the most hazardous natural endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC which induces hyper estrogenic responses in mammals. This can result in reproductive disorders in farm animals as well as in humans. Consequently, detoxification strategies for contaminated crops are crucial for food safety. In this study we have developed a bacterial based detoxification system using a non-pathogen Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Following 5 days treatment of ZEA with R. pyridinivorans K408 strain HPLC analyses showed an 87.21% ZEA-degradation efficiency of the bacterial enzyme systems. In another approach, the strain biotransformation ability has also been confirmed by a bioluminescent version of the yeast estrogen screening system (BLYES, which detected an 81.75% of biodegradability of ZEA, in a good agreement with the chemical analyses. Furthermore, the capacity of R. pyridinivorans to eliminate the estrogenic effects of ZEA was tested by using an immature uterotrophic assay. Prepubertal female rats were treated with vehicle (olive oil, 17β-estradiol, ZEA (0.1-1-5-10 mg/kg body weight and LB broth containing 500 mg/l ZEA that has already been incubated with or without Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K408 strain. Uterine weights were measured and the mRNA level changes relating to apelin, aquaporin 5, complement component 2, and calbindin-3 genes were measured by qRT-PCR. These genes represent the major pathways that are affected by estromimetic compounds. Zearalenone feeding significantly increased the uterus weight in a dose dependent manner and at the same time upregulated complement component 2 and calbindin-3 expression as well as decreased apelin and aquaporin 5 mRNA levels comparable to that seen in 17β-estradiol exposed rats. In contrast, LB broth in which ZEA was incubated with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans K

  15. Molecular characterization of three 3-ketosteroid-Delta(1)-dehydrogenase isoenzynnes of Rhodococcus ruber strain Chol-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez de las Heras, Laura; van der Geize, Robert; Drzyzga, Oliver; Perera, Julian; Navarro Llorens, Juana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus ruber strain Chol-4 isolated from a sewage sludge sample is able to grow on minimal medium supplemented with steroids, showing a broad catabolic capacity. This paper reports the characterization of three different 3-ketosteroid-Delta(1)-dehydrogenases (KstDs) in the genome of R. ruber

  16. Biodegradation of buprofezin by Rhodococcus sp. strain YL-1 isolated from rice field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Ji; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Cao, Li; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-14

    A buprofezin-degrading bacterium, YL-1, was isolated from rice field soil. YL-1 was identified as Rhodococcus sp. on the basis of the comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. The strain could use buprofezin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth and was able to degrade 92.4% of 50 mg L(-1) buprofezin within 48 h in liquid culture. During the degradation of buprofezin, four possible metabolites, 2-tert-butylimino-3-isopropyl-1,3,5-thiadiazinan-4-one, N-tert-butyl-thioformimidic acid formylaminomethyl ester, 2-isothiocyanato-2-methyl-propane, and 2-isothiocyanato-propane, were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was strongly induced during the degradation of buprofezin. A novel microbial biodegradation pathway for buprofezin was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. The inoculation of soils treated with buprofezin with strain YL-1 resulted in a higher degradation rate than that observed in noninoculated soils, indicating that strain YL-1 has the potential to be used in the bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments.

  17. Analysis and optimization of triacylglycerol synthesis in novel oleaginous Rhodococcus and Streptomyces strains isolated from desert soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttig, Annika; Hauschild, Philippa; Madkour, Mohamed H; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Almakishah, Naief H; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-05-10

    As oleaginous microorganisms represent an upcoming novel feedstock for the biotechnological production of lipids or lipid-derived biofuels, we searched for novel, lipid-producing strains in desert soil. This was encouraged by the hypothesis that neutral lipids represent an ideal storage compound, especially under arid conditions, as several animals are known to outlast long periods in absence of drinking water by metabolizing their body fat. Ten lipid-accumulating bacterial strains, affiliated to the genera Bacillus, Cupriavidus, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces, were isolated from arid desert soil due to their ability to synthesize poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), triacylglycerols or wax esters. Particularly two Streptomyces sp. strains and one Rhodococcus sp. strain accumulate significant amounts of TAG under storage conditions under optimized cultivation conditions. Rhodococcus sp. A27 and Streptomyces sp. G49 synthesized approx. 30% (w/w) fatty acids from fructose or cellobiose, respectively, while Streptomyces isolate G25 reached a cellular fatty acid content of nearly 50% (w/w) when cultivated with cellobiose. The stored triacylglycerols were composed of 30-40% branched fatty acids, such as anteiso-pentadecanoic or iso-hexadecanoic acid. To date, this represents by far the highest lipid content described for streptomycetes. A biotechnological production of such lipids using (hemi)cellulose-derived raw material could be used to obtain sustainable biodiesel with a high proportion of branched-chain fatty acids to improve its cold-flow properties and oxidative stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effects of nitriles and amides on the growth and the nitrile hydratase activity of the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A Iu; Kuznetsova, M V; Ovechkina, G V; Kozlov, S V; Maksimova, Iu G; Demakov, V A

    2003-01-01

    Effects of some nitriles and amides, as well as glucose and ammonium, on the growth and the nitrile hydratase (EC 4.2.1.84) activity of the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1 isolated from soil were studied. The activity of nitrile hydratase mainly depended on carbon and nitrogen supply to cells. The activity of nitrile hydratase was high in the presence of glucose and ammonium at medium concentrations and decreased at concentrations of glucose more than 0.3%. Saturated unsubstituted aliphatic nitriles and amides were found to be a good source of nitrogen and carbon. However, the presence of nitriles and amides in the medium was not absolutely necessary for the expression of the activity of nitrile hydratase isolated from the Rhodococcus sp. strain gt1.

  19. Bioremediation of soil contaminated by dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane with the use of aerobic strain Rhodococcus wratislaviensis Ch628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, D. O.; Farafonova, V. V.; Shestakova, E. A.; Andreyev, D. N.; Maksimov, A. S.; Vasyanin, A. N.; Buzmakov, S. A.; Plotnikova, E. G.

    2017-10-01

    The concentration of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was determined in a sandy soil of specially Protected Natural Area Osinskaya Lesnaya Dacha (Perm region) 45 years after the last application of the insecticide in this area. The concentration of DDT in the soil exceeded the maximum permissible concentration by 250 times and reached 25.05 mg/kg of soil. Under the conditions of model experiment, efficient decontamination of the soil was recorded in the system with the introduced strain Rhodococcus wratislaviensis Ch628; the DDT concentration decreased by 99.7% and equaled 0.07 mg/kg. The process of DDT degradation proceeded slower in the model soil system with autochthonous microbial complex. In this case, 58.2% DDT degraded in 70 days, and the final concentration was 10.47 mg/kg. The soil lost its toxicity for animal and plant test objects by the end of the experiment only in the model system containing the R. wratislaviensis Ch628 strain.

  20. Functional characterization of 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylases in Rhodococcus ruber strain chol-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Govinda; Heras, Laura Fernández de Las; Perera, Julián; Llorens, Juana María Navarro

    2017-09-01

    The 3-Ketosteroid-9α-Hydroxylase, also known as KshAB [androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, NADH:oxygen oxidoreductase (9α-hydroxylating); EC 1.14.13.142)], is a key enzyme in the general scheme of the bacterial steroid catabolism in combination with a 3-ketosteroid-Δ 1 -dehydrogenase activity (KstD), being both responsible of the steroid nucleus (rings A/B) breakage. KshAB initiates the opening of the steroid ring by the 9α-hydroxylation of the C9 carbon of 4-ene-3-oxosteroids (e.g. AD) or 1,4-diene-3-oxosteroids (e.g. ADD), transforming them into 9α-hydroxy-4-androsten-3,17-dione (9OHAD) or 9α-hydroxy-1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (9OHADD), respectively. The redundancy of these enzymes in the actinobacterial genomes results in a serious difficulty for metabolic engineering this catabolic pathway to obtain intermediates of industrial interest. In this work, we have identified three homologous kshA genes and one kshB gen in different genomic regions of R. ruber strain Chol-4. We present a set of data that helps to understand their specific roles in this strain, including: i) description of the KshAB enzymes ii) construction and characterization of ΔkshB and single, double and triple ΔkshA mutants in R. ruber iii) growth studies of the above strains on different substrates and iv) genetic complementation and biotransformation assays with those strains. Our results show that KshA2 isoform is needed for the degradation of steroid substrates with short side chain, while KshA3 works on those molecules with longer side chains. KshA1 is a more versatile enzyme related to the cholic acid catabolism, although it also collaborates with KshA2 or KshA3 activities in the catabolism of steroids. Accordingly to what it is described for other Rhodococcus strains, our results also suggest that the side chain degradation is KshAB-independent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Individual or synchronous biodegradation of di-n-butyl phthalate and phenol by Rhodococcus ruber strain DP-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhixing; Niu, Chengzhen; Lu, Zhenmei, E-mail: lzhenmei@zju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • A Rhodococcus ruber strain degraded DBP and phenol. • Degradation kinetics of DBP or phenol fit modified first-order models. • Degradation interaction between DBP and phenol was studied by strain DP-2. • The degradation genes transcriptional were quantified by RT-qPCR. - Abstract: The bacterial strain DP-2, identified as Rhodococcus ruber, is able to effectively degrade di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and phenol. Degradation kinetics of DBP and phenol at different initial concentrations revealed DBP and phenol degradation to fit modified first-order models. The half-life of DBP degradation ranged from 15.81 to 27.75 h and phenol degradation from 14.52 to 45.52 h under the initial concentrations of 600–1200 mg/L. When strain DP-2 was cultured with a mixture of DBP (800 mg/L) and phenol (700 mg/L), DBP degradation rate was found to be only slightly influenced; however, phthalic acid (PA) accumulated, and phenol degradation was clearly inhibited during synchronous degradation. Transcriptional levels of degradation genes, phenol hydroxylase (pheu) and phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (pht), decreased significantly more during synchronous degradation than during individual degradation. Quantitative estimation of individual or synchronous degradation kinetics is essential to manage mixed hazardous compounds through biodegradation in industrial waste disposal.

  2. Biodesulfurization of Naphthothiophene and Benzothiophene through Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds by Rhodococcus sp. Strain WU-K2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Furuya, Toshiki; Sato, Rika; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Kino, Kuniki; Usami, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    Naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene (NTH) is an asymmetric structural isomer of dibenzothiophene (DBT), and in addition to DBT derivatives, NTH derivatives can also be detected in diesel oil following hydrodesulfurization treatment. Rhodococcus sp. strain WU-K2R was newly isolated from soil for its ability to grow in a medium with NTH as the sole source of sulfur, and growing cells of WU-K2R degraded 0.27 mM NTH within 7 days. WU-K2R could also grow in the medium with NTH sulfone, benzothiophene (BTH), 3-methyl-BTH, or 5-methyl-BTH as the sole source of sulfur but could not utilize DBT, DBT sulfone, or 4,6-dimethyl-DBT. On the other hand, WU-K2R did not utilize NTH or BTH as the sole source of carbon. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, desulfurized NTH metabolites were identified as NTH sulfone, 2′-hydroxynaphthylethene, and naphtho[2,1-b]furan. Moreover, since desulfurized BTH metabolites were identified as BTH sulfone, benzo[c][1,2]oxathiin S-oxide, benzo[c][1,2]oxathiin S,S-dioxide, o-hydroxystyrene, 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)ethan-1-al, and benzofuran, it was concluded that WU-K2R desulfurized NTH and BTH through the sulfur-specific degradation pathways with the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds. Therefore, Rhodococcus sp. strain WU-K2R, which could preferentially desulfurize asymmetric heterocyclic sulfur compounds such as NTH and BTH through the sulfur-specific degradation pathways, is a unique desulfurizing biocatalyst showing properties different from those of DBT-desulfurizing bacteria. PMID:12147483

  3. Biodegradation of phenol using recombinant plasmid-carrying Rhodococcus erythropolis strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídková, L.; Szököl, Juraj; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav; Nešvera, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 84, OCT 2013 (2013), s. 179-184 ISSN 0964-8305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * Phenol degradation * Wastewater Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2013

  4. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain CCM2595, a Phenol Derivative-Degrading Bacterium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnad, Hynek; Pátek, Miroslav; Fousek, Jan; Szököl, Juraj; Ulbrich, P.; Nešvera, Jan; Pačes, Václav; Vlček, Čestmír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2014) ISSN 2169-8287 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28283S; GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * genome sequence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Aerobic degradation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) via novel degradation intermediates by Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pandey, Janmejay; Vikram, Surendra; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh, E-mail: ssc@imtech.res.in

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • This study reports isolation of a novel bacterium capable of mineralizing 4-nitroaniline (4-NA). • This bacterium has been identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48. • Strain FK48 degrades 4-NA via a novel aerobic degradation pathway that involves 4-AP and 1,2,4-BT. • Subsequent degradation proceeds via ring fission and formation of maleylacetate. • This is the first report showing elucidation of catabolic pathway for microbial degradation 4-NA. -- Abstract: An aerobic strain, Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48, capable of growing on 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy has been isolated from enrichment cultures originating from contaminated soil samples. During growth studies with non- induced cells of FK48 catalyzed sequential denitrification (release of NO{sub 2} substituent) and deamination (release of NH{sub 2} substituent) of 4-NA. However, none of the degradation intermediates could be identified with growth studies. During resting cell studies, 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 transformed 4-NA via a previously unknown pathway which involved oxidative hydroxylation leading to formation of 4-aminophenol (4-AP). Subsequent degradation involved oxidated deamination of 4-AP and formation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) as the major identified terminal aromatic intermediate. Identification of these intermediates was ascertained by HPLC, and GC–MS analyses of the culture supernatants. 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 showed positive activity for 1,2,4-benzenetriol dioxygenase in spectrophotometric assay. This is the first conclusive study on aerobic microbial degradation of 4-NA and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway.

  6. Aerobic degradation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) via novel degradation intermediates by Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pandey, Janmejay; Vikram, Surendra; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study reports isolation of a novel bacterium capable of mineralizing 4-nitroaniline (4-NA). • This bacterium has been identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48. • Strain FK48 degrades 4-NA via a novel aerobic degradation pathway that involves 4-AP and 1,2,4-BT. • Subsequent degradation proceeds via ring fission and formation of maleylacetate. • This is the first report showing elucidation of catabolic pathway for microbial degradation 4-NA. -- Abstract: An aerobic strain, Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48, capable of growing on 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy has been isolated from enrichment cultures originating from contaminated soil samples. During growth studies with non- induced cells of FK48 catalyzed sequential denitrification (release of NO 2 substituent) and deamination (release of NH 2 substituent) of 4-NA. However, none of the degradation intermediates could be identified with growth studies. During resting cell studies, 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 transformed 4-NA via a previously unknown pathway which involved oxidative hydroxylation leading to formation of 4-aminophenol (4-AP). Subsequent degradation involved oxidated deamination of 4-AP and formation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) as the major identified terminal aromatic intermediate. Identification of these intermediates was ascertained by HPLC, and GC–MS analyses of the culture supernatants. 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 showed positive activity for 1,2,4-benzenetriol dioxygenase in spectrophotometric assay. This is the first conclusive study on aerobic microbial degradation of 4-NA and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway

  7. Bio-surfactants production from low cost substrate and degradation of diesel oil by a Rhodococcus strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadouk, Z.; Tazerouti, A.; Sadouk, Z.; Hacene, H.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of a Rhodococcus strain to produce surface-active agents from residual sunflower frying oil (RSFO) has been screened in batch cultures. During cultivation with RSFO at the concentration 3% (vol/vol), the strain has synthesized extra-cellular compounds which increase the E 24 emulsion index of the culture medium up to 63%. In their crude form, these substances lower the surface tension of water until 31.9 mN m -1 . The exponential growth with RSFO as the sole carbon source has developed at a specific growth rate μ = 0.55 d -1 . The critical micelle concentration of the crude product reached the value 287 mg L -1 (γCMC = 31.9 mN m -1 ). After methyl-esterification, the lipid fraction of bio-surfactants has been analyzed by GC-MS in EI, which reveals the presence of fatty acid methyl esters. The microorganism was also cultivated with the diesel oil as the sole carbon source at the concentration 1% (vol/vol): the active growth phase has developed at rate = 0.02 d -1 , without production of emulsifying substance: the microorganism seems to develop different modes of substrate uptake, according to the nature of the carbon source. The potential use of surface-active agents synthesized on RSFO by Rhodococcus erythropolis 16 LM.USTHB is in the oil industry with minimum purity specification, so that crude preparation could be used, at low cost, in clean-up of hydrocarbons contaminated sites and for enhanced oil recovery. (authors)

  8. Improvement of phytoremediation of an aged petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by Rhodococcus erythropolis CD 106 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płociniczak, Tomasz; Fic, Ewa; Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Pawlik, Małgorzata; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of soil inoculation with the Rhodococcus erythropolis CD 106 strain on the effectiveness of the phytoremediation of an aged hydrocarbon-contaminated [approx. 1% total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)] soil using ryegrass (Lolium perenne). The introduction of CD 106 into the soil significantly increased the biomass of ryegrass and the removal of hydrocarbons in planted soil. The fresh weight of the shoots and roots of plants inoculated with CD 106 increased by 49% and 30%, respectively. After 210 days of the experiment, the concentration of TPH was reduced by 31.2%, whereas in the planted, non-inoculated soil, it was reduced by 16.8%. By contrast, the concentration of petroleum hydrocarbon decreased by 18.7% in non-planted soil bioaugmented with the CD 106 strain. The rifampicin-resistant CD 106 strain survived after inoculation into soil and was detected in the soil during the entire experimental period, but the number of CD 106 cells decreased constantly during the enhanced phytoremediation and bioaugmentation experiments. The plant growth-promoting and hydrocarbon-degrading properties of CD 106, which are connected with its long-term survival and limited impact on autochthonous microflora, make this strain a good candidate for improving the phytoremediation efficiency of soil contaminated with hydrocarbons.

  9. Characterization of the Rhodococcus sp. MK1 strain and its pilot application for bioremediation of diesel oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Ágnes Erdeiné; Laczi, Krisztián; Zsíros, Szilvia; Kós, Péter; Tengölics, Roland; Bounedjoum, Naila; Kovács, Tamás; Rákhely, Gábor; Perei, Katalin

    2017-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and derivatives are widespread contaminants in both aquifers and soil, their elimination is in the primary focus of environmental studies. Microorganisms are key components in biological removal of pollutants. Strains capable to utilize hydrocarbons usually appear at the contaminated sites, but their metabolic activities are often restricted by the lack of nutrients and/or they can only utilize one or two components of a mixture. We isolated a novel Rhodococcus sp. MK1 strain capable to degrade the components of diesel oil simultaneously. The draft genome of the strain was determined and besides the chromosome, the presence of one plasmid could be revealed. Numerous routes for oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds were identified. The strain was tested in ex situ applications aiming to compare alternative solutions for microbial degradation of hydrocarbons. The results of bioaugmentation and biostimulation experiments clearly demonstrated that - in certain cases - the indigenous microbial community could be exploited for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils. Biostimulation seems to be efficient for removal of aged contaminations at lower concentration range, whereas bioaugmentation is necessary for the treatment of freshly and highly polluted sites.

  10. Molecular characterization of three 3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase isoenzymes of Rhodococcus ruber strain Chol-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de las Heras, Laura; van der Geize, Robert; Drzyzga, Oliver; Perera, Julián; María Navarro Llorens, Juana

    2012-11-01

    Rhodococcus ruber strain Chol-4 isolated from a sewage sludge sample is able to grow on minimal medium supplemented with steroids, showing a broad catabolic capacity. This paper reports the characterization of three different 3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenases (KstDs) in the genome of R. ruber strain Chol-4. The genome of this strain does not contain any homologues of a 3-keto-5α-steroid-Δ(4)-dehydrogenase (Kst4d or TesI) that appears in the genomes of Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 or Comamonas testosteroni. Growth experiments with kstD2 mutants, either a kstD2 single mutant, kstD2 double mutants in combination with kstD1 or kstD3, or the triple kstD1,2,3 mutant, proved that KstD2 is involved in the transformation of 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) to 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD) and in the conversion of 9α-hydroxy-4-androstene-3,17-dione (9OHAD) to 9α-hydroxy-1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (9OHADD). kstD2,3 and kstD1,2,3 R. ruber mutants (both lacking KstD2 and KstD3) did not grow in minimal medium with cholesterol as the only carbon source, thus demonstrating the involvement of KstD2 and KstD3 in cholesterol degradation. In contrast, mutation of kstD1 does not alter the bacterial growth on the steroids tested in this study and therefore, the role of this protein still remains unclear. The absence of a functional KstD2 in R. ruber mutants provoked in all cases an accumulation of 9OHAD, as a branch product probably formed by the action of a 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylase (KshAB) on the AD molecule. Therefore, KstD2 is a key enzyme in the AD catabolism pathway of R. ruber strain Chol-4 while KstD3 is involved in cholesterol catabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro and intra-macrophage gene expression by Rhodococcus equi strain 103.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Tanvir; Parreira, Valeria; Prescott, John F

    2005-09-30

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular respiratory pathogen of foals that persists and multiplies within macrophages. In foals, virulence is associated with 80-90 kb plasmids, which include a pathogenicity island (PI) containing the virulence-associated protein (vap) gene family, but detailed understanding of the basis of virulence is still poor. A 60 spot-based DNA microarray was developed containing eight PI genes and 42 chromosomal putative virulence or virulence-associated genes selected from a recent partial genome sequence in order to study transcription of these genes by R. equi grown inside macrophages and under in vitro conditions thought to simulate those of macrophages. In addition to seven PI genes, nine chromosomal genes involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism (choD, fadD13, fbpB), heme biosynthesis (hemE), iron utilization (mbtF), heat shock resistance and genes encoding chaperones (clpB, groEL), a sigma factor (sigK), and a transcriptional regulator (moxR) were significantly induced in R. equi growing inside macrophages. The pattern of R. equi chromosomal genes significantly transcribed inside macrophages largely differed from those transcribed under in vitro conditions (37 degrees C, pH 5.0 or 50mM H2O2 for 30 min). This study has identified genes, other than those of the virulence plasmid, the transcription of which is enhanced within equine macrophages. These genes should be investigated further to improve understanding of how this organism survives intracellularly.

  12. Immunization by intrabronchial administration to 1-week-old foals of an unmarked double gene disruption strain of Rhodococcus equi strain 103+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yanlong; Nicholson, Vivian; Woods, Katharine; Prescott, John F

    2007-11-15

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal granulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. However, there is no effective vaccine against this infection. In this study, the chromosomal genes isocitrate lyase (icl) and cholesterol oxidase (choE) were chosen as targets for mutation and assessment of the double mutant as an intrabronchial vaccine in 1-week-old foals. Using a modification of a suicide plasmid previously developed in this laboratory, we developed a choE-icl unmarked deletion mutant of R. equi strain 103+. Five 1-week-old foals were infected intrabronchially with the mutant and challenged intrabronchially with the parent, virulent, strain 2 weeks later. Three of the foals were protected against pneumonia caused by the virulent strain, but the other two foals developed pneumonia caused by the mutant strain during the post-challenge period. Since infection of 3-week-old foals by an icl mutant in an earlier study had shown complete attenuation of the strain, we conclude that a proportion of foals in the 1st week or so of life are predisposed to developing R. equi pneumonia because of an inability to mount an effective immune response. This has been suspected previously but this is the first time that this has been demonstrated experimentally.

  13. Bio-surfactants production from low cost substrate and degradation of diesel oil by a Rhodococcus strain; Production de biosurfactants sur un substrat economique et degradation du gasoil par une souche du genre Rhodococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadouk, Z.; Tazerouti, A. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Lab. de Synthese Organique, Faculte de Chimie, Algiers (Algeria); Sadouk, Z.; Hacene, H. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Lab. de Microbiologie, Faculte des Sciences Biologiques, Algiers (Algeria)

    2008-07-01

    The ability of a Rhodococcus strain to produce surface-active agents from residual sunflower frying oil (RSFO) has been screened in batch cultures. During cultivation with RSFO at the concentration 3% (vol/vol), the strain has synthesized extra-cellular compounds which increase the E{sub 24} emulsion index of the culture medium up to 63%. In their crude form, these substances lower the surface tension of water until 31.9 mN m{sup -1}. The exponential growth with RSFO as the sole carbon source has developed at a specific growth rate {mu} = 0.55 d{sup -1}. The critical micelle concentration of the crude product reached the value 287 mg L{sup -1} ({gamma}CMC = 31.9 mN m{sup -1}). After methyl-esterification, the lipid fraction of bio-surfactants has been analyzed by GC-MS in EI, which reveals the presence of fatty acid methyl esters. The microorganism was also cultivated with the diesel oil as the sole carbon source at the concentration 1% (vol/vol): the active growth phase has developed at rate = 0.02 d{sup -1}, without production of emulsifying substance: the microorganism seems to develop different modes of substrate uptake, according to the nature of the carbon source. The potential use of surface-active agents synthesized on RSFO by Rhodococcus erythropolis 16 LM.USTHB is in the oil industry with minimum purity specification, so that crude preparation could be used, at low cost, in clean-up of hydrocarbons contaminated sites and for enhanced oil recovery. (authors)

  14. A preliminary report on the contact-independent antagonism of Pseudogymnoascus destructans by Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP96253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Christopher T; Keel, M Kevin; Gabriel, Kyle T; Barlament, Courtney K; Tucker, Trudy A; Pierce, George E; Crow, Sidney A

    2014-09-26

    The recently-identified causative agent of White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been responsible for the mortality of an estimated 5.5 million North American bats since its emergence in 2006. A primary focus of the National Response Plan, established by multiple state, federal and tribal agencies in 2011, was the identification of biological control options for WNS. In an effort to identify potential biological control options for WNS, multiply induced cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP96253 was screened for anti-P. destructans activity. Conidia and mycelial plugs of P. destructans were exposed to induced R. rhodochrous in a closed air-space at 15°C, 7°C and 4°C and were evaluated for contact-independent inhibition of conidia germination and mycelial extension with positive results. Additionally, in situ application methods for induced R. rhodochrous, such as fixed-cell catalyst and fermentation cell-paste in non-growth conditions, were screened with positive results. R. rhodochrous was assayed for ex vivo activity via exposure to bat tissue explants inoculated with P. destructans conidia. Induced R. rhodochrous completely inhibited growth from conidia at 15°C and had a strong fungistatic effect at 4°C. Induced R. rhodochrous inhibited P. destructans growth from conidia when cultured in a shared air-space with bat tissue explants inoculated with P. destructans conidia. The identification of inducible biological agents with contact-independent anti- P. destructans activity is a major milestone in the development of viable biological control options for in situ application and provides the first example of contact-independent antagonism of this devastating wildlife pathogen.

  15. Biotechnological methods for chalcone reduction using whole cells of Lactobacillus, Rhodococcus and Rhodotorula strains as a way to produce new derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stompor, Monika; Kałużny, Mateusz; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Microbial strains of the genera Dietzia, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Streptomyces, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Penicillium, Rhodotorula and Lactobacillus were screened for the ability to convert chalcones. Synthesis of chalcones was performed by the Claisen-Schmidt reaction. There were three groups of chalcones obtained as the products, which included the derivatives containing 4-substituted chalcone, 2'-hydroxychalcone and 4'-methoxychalcone. The B ring of the chalcones was substituted in the para position with different groups, such as halide, hydroxyl, nitro, methyl, ethyl and ethoxy one. The structure-activity relationship of the tested chalcones in biotransformation processes was studied. It has been proven that Gram-positive bacterial strains Rhodococcus and Lactobacillus catalyzed reduction of C=C bond in the chalcones to give respective dihydrochalcones. The strain Rhodotorula rubra AM 82 transformed chalcones into dihydrochalcones and respective secondary alcohols. These results suggest that the probiotic strain of Lactobacillus can be used for biotransformations of chalcones, which has not been described before. The structure of new metabolites 14a and 15b were established as 4-ethoxy-4'-methoxydihydrochalcone and 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(4'-O-methylphenyl)-2-propan-1-ol, respectively, which was confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR analysis.

  16. Characterization of the expression of the thcB gene, coding for a pesticide-degrading cytochrome P-450 in Rhodococcus strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Z Q; Behki, R

    1996-01-01

    A cytochrome P-450 system in Rhodococcus strains, encoded by thcB, thcC, and thcD, participates in the degradation of thiocarbamates and several other pesticides. The regulation of the system was investigated by fusing a truncated lacZ in frame to thcB, the structural gene for the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase. Analysis of the thcB-lacZ fusion showed that the expression of thcB was 10-fold higher in the presence of the herbicide EPTC (s-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate). Similar enhancement of th...

  17. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. [Rhodococcus rhodochrous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbane, J.J.; Bielaga, B.A.

    1990-07-01

    The overall objective of this project is to sue molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. The work planned for the current quarter (May 1990 to July 1990) includes the following activities: (1) Construct a cloning vector that can be used in Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 from the small cryptic plasmid found in Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 190607; (2) Develop techniques for the genetic analysis of IGTS8; (3) Continue biochemical experiments, particularly those that may allow the identification of desulfurization-related enzymes; (4) Continue experiments with coal to determine the kinetics of organic sulfur removal.

  18. Efficacy of bacterial bioremediation: Demonstration of complete incorporation of hydrocarbons into membrane phospholipids from Rhodococcus hydrocarbon degrading bacteria by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, R.P.; Blumer, E.N.; Emmett, M.R.; Marshall, A.G.

    2000-02-01

    The authors present a method and example to establish complete incorporation of hydrocarbons into membrane phospholipids of putatively bioremediative bacteria. Bacteria are grown on minimal media containing a specified carbon source, either natural abundance or enriched. After extraction (but no other prior separation) of the membrane lipids, electrospray ionization yields a negative-ion FT-ICR mass spectrum containing prominent phospholipid parent ions. If {sup 13}C-enriched hydrocarbon incorporation is complete, then the mass of the parent ion will increase by n Da, in which n is the number of its constituent carbon atoms; moreover, the {sup 13}C isotopic distribution pattern will be reversed. The identities of the constituent fatty acids and polar headgroup are obtained by collisional dissociation (MS/MS), and their extent of {sup 13}C incorporation determined individually. The method is demonstrated for Rhodococcus rhodochrous (ATCC No. 53968), for which all 44 carbons of a representative phosphatidylinositol are shown to derive from the hydrocarbon source. Interestingly, although only C{sub 16} and C{sub 18} alkanes are provided in the growth medium, the bacteria synthesize uniformly enriched C16:0 and C19:0 fatty acids.

  19. Both epiphytic and endophytic strains of Rhodococcus fascians influence transporter gene expression and cytokinins in infected Pisum sativum L. seedlings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dhandapani, P.; Song, J.; Novák, Ondřej; Jameson, P. E.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 2 (2018), s. 231-242 ISSN 0167-6903 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-06613S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Amino acid transporter * Cell wall invertase * Cytokinin * Pea * Rhodococcus fascians * Sucrose transporter * Sugar Will Eventually be Exported Transporter (SWEET) Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2016

  20. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Takagi, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ktakagi@affrc.go.jp [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Kataoka, Ryota [Department of Environmental Science, University of Yamanashi, 41-4-37 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Kotake, Masaaki [Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Kiyota, Hiromasa [Graduate School of Environmental & Life Science, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yamazaki, Kenichi [Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Sakakibara, Futa [Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JSPS), 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Okada, Sanae [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. -- Highlights: •A novel endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium was isolated and named strain S1-1. •Strain S1-1 degraded endosulfan sulfate into a novel metabolite endosulfan diol monosulfate. •Endosulfan diol monosulfate showed higher polarity than other known metabolites of endosulfan. •We proposed the plausible metabolic pathway of endosulfan in terms of organic chemistry.

  1. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa; Takagi, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Ryota; Kotake, Masaaki; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Futa; Okada, Sanae

    2016-01-01

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. -- Highlights: •A novel endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium was isolated and named strain S1-1. •Strain S1-1 degraded endosulfan sulfate into a novel metabolite endosulfan diol monosulfate. •Endosulfan diol monosulfate showed higher polarity than other known metabolites of endosulfan. •We proposed the plausible metabolic pathway of endosulfan in terms of organic chemistry.

  2. Biodegradation of endosulfan by mixed bacteria culture strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodegradation of endosulfan by mixed bacteria culture strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Nsidibeabasi Calvin Nwokem, Calvin Onyedika Nwokem, Casmir Emmanuel Gimba, Beatrice Nkiruka Iwuala ...

  3. Growth kinetics and biodeterioration of polypropylene microplastics by Bacillus sp. and Rhodococcus sp. isolated from mangrove sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auta, H S; Emenike, C U; Jayanthi, B; Fauziah, S H

    2018-02-01

    Interest in the biodegradation of microplastics is due to their ubiquitous distribution, availability, high persistence in the environment and deleterious impact on marine biota. The present study evaluates the growth response and mechanism of polypropylene (PP) degradation by Bacillus sp. strain 27 and Rhodococcus sp. strain 36 isolated from mangrove sediments upon exposure to PP microplastics. Both bacteria strains were able to utilise PP microplastic for growth as confirmed by the reduction of the polymer mass. The weight loss was 6.4% by Rhodococcus sp. strain 36 and 4.0% by Bacillus sp. strain 27 after 40days of incubation. PP biodegradation was further confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses, which revealed structural and morphological changes in the PP microplastics with microbial treatment. These analyses showed that the isolates can colonise, modify and utilise PP microplastics as carbon source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The detection and phylogenetic analysis of the alkane 1-monooxygenase gene of members of the genus Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táncsics, András; Benedek, Tibor; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Veres, Péter G; Farkas, Milán; Máthé, István; Márialigeti, Károly; Kukolya, József; Lányi, Szabolcs; Kriszt, Balázs

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring and anthropogenic petroleum hydrocarbons are potential carbon sources for many bacteria. The AlkB-related alkane hydroxylases, which are integral membrane non-heme iron enzymes, play a key role in the microbial degradation of many of these hydrocarbons. Several members of the genus Rhodococcus are well-known alkane degraders and are known to harbor multiple alkB genes encoding for different alkane 1-monooxygenases. In the present study, 48 Rhodococcus strains, representing 35 species of the genus, were investigated to find out whether there was a dominant type of alkB gene widespread among species of the genus that could be used as a phylogenetic marker. Phylogenetic analysis of rhodococcal alkB gene sequences indicated that a certain type of alkB gene was present in almost every member of the genus Rhodococcus. These alkB genes were common in a unique nucleotide sequence stretch absent from other types of rhodococcal alkB genes that encoded a conserved amino acid motif: WLG(I/V/L)D(G/D)GL. The sequence identity of the targeted alkB gene in Rhodococcus ranged from 78.5 to 99.2% and showed higher nucleotide sequence variation at the inter-species level compared to the 16S rRNA gene (93.9-99.8%). The results indicated that the alkB gene type investigated might be applicable for: (i) differentiating closely related Rhodococcus species, (ii) properly assigning environmental isolates to existing Rhodococcus species, and finally (iii) assessing whether a new Rhodococcus isolate represents a novel species of the genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of growth media on cell envelope composition and nitrile hydratase stability in Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP 96253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Trudy-Ann; Crow, Sidney A; Pierce, George E

    2012-11-01

    Rhodococcus is an important industrial microorganism that possesses diverse metabolic capabilities; it also has a cell envelope, composed of an outer layer of mycolic acids and glycolipids. Selected Rhodococcus species when induced are capable of transforming nitriles to the corresponding amide by the enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase), and subsequently to the corresponding acid via an amidase. This nitrile biochemistry has generated interest in using the rhodococci as biocatalysts. It was hypothesized that altering sugars in the growth medium might impact cell envelope components and have effects on NHase. When the primary carbon source in growth media was changed from glucose to fructose, maltose, or maltodextrin, the NHase activity increased. Cells grown in the presence of maltose and maltodextrin showed the highest activities against propionitrile, 197 and 202 units/mg cdw, respectively. Stability of NHase was also affected as cells grown in the presence of maltose and maltodextrin retained more NHase activity at 55 °C (45 and 23 %, respectively) than cells grown in the presence of glucose or fructose (19 and 10 %, respectively). Supplementation of trehalose in the growth media resulted in increased NHase stability at 55 °C, as cells grown in the presence of glucose retained 40 % NHase activity as opposed to 19 % without the presence of trehalose. Changes in cell envelope components, such mycolic acids and glycolipids, were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC), respectively. Changing sugars and the addition of inducing components for NHase, such as cobalt and urea in growth media, resulted in changes in mycolic acid profiles. Mycolic acid content increased 5 times when cobalt and urea were added to media with glucose. Glycolipids levels were also affected by the changes in sugars and addition of inducing components. This research demonstrates that carbohydrate selection impacts NHase activity and

  6. Cloning, expression, and enzymatic activity evaluation of cholesterol oxidase gene isolated from a native Rhodococcus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Esmaeil Lashgarian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (CHO is one of the valuable enzymes that play an important role in: measurement of serum cholesterol, food industry as a biocatalyst and agriculture as a biological larvicide. This enzyme was produced by several bacterial strains. Wild type enzyme produced by Rhodococcus sp. secret two forms of CHO enzyme: extra cellular and membrane bound type which its amount is low and unstable. The goal of the study was cloning, expression, and enzymatic activity evaluation of cholesterol oxidase gene isolated from a native Rhodococcus sp. CHO gene was isolated from native bacteria and cloned into pET23a. In the next step, the construct was expressed in E.coli BL21 and induced by different concentration of IPTG ranges from 0.1 - 0.9 mM. This gene contains 1642 bp and encodes a protein consists of 533 amino acids. It has about 96 % homology with CHO gene isolated from Rhodococcus equi. The high expression was obtained in 0.5 mM concentration of IPTG after 4 hour induction. This recombinant enzyme had a molecular weight of 55 kDa, that secretion of intra cellular type is much more than extracellular form. The optimum pH and temperature conditions for the recombinant enzyme were 7.5 and 45°C, respectively. CHO enzyme obtained from Rhodococcus sp. is a cheap enzyme with medical and industrial applications that can be produced easily and purified in large scale with simple methods.

  7. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eCappelletti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD – coding for soluble di-iron monooxgenases (SDIMOs involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation – were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria Bertani broth. The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane and/or liquid (n-hexane short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step.

  8. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Martina; Presentato, Alessandro; Milazzo, Giorgio; Turner, Raymond J.; Fedi, Stefano; Frascari, Dario; Zannoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane) were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from n-butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD—coding for Soluble Di-Iron Monooxgenases (SDIMOs) involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation—were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids, or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria–Bertani broth). The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane) and/or liquid (n-hexane) short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step. PMID:26029173

  9. Nicotinoprotein methanol dehydrogenase enzymes in Gram-positive methylotrophic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hektor, Harm J.; Kloosterman, Harm; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2000-01-01

    A novel type of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme has been characterized from Gram-positive methylotrophic (Bacillus methanolicus, the actinomycetes Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri) and non-methylotrophic bacteria (Rhodococcus strains). Its in vivo role is in oxidation of methanol and

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rhodococcus Species Isolated from the Winter Skate Leucoraja ocellata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Julia; Ho, Ryan; Fernando, Dinesh; Kumar, Ayush; Loewen, Peter C; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Anderson, W Gary

    2016-09-01

    We report here a genome sequence for Rhodococcus sp. isolate UM008 isolated from the renal/interrenal tissue of the winter skate Leucoraja ocellata Genome sequence analysis suggests that Rhodococcus bacteria may act in a novel mutualistic relationship with their elasmobranch host, serving as biocatalysts in the steroidogenic pathway of 1α-hydroxycorticosterone. Copyright © 2016 Wiens et al.

  11. Evolutionary transitions between beneficial and phytopathogenic Rhodococcus challenge disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savory, Elizabeth A; Fuller, Skylar L; Weisberg, Alexandra J; Thomas, William J; Gordon, Michael I; Stevens, Danielle M; Creason, Allison L; Belcher, Michael S; Serdani, Maryna; Wiseman, Michele S; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Putnam, Melodie L; Chang, Jeff H

    2017-12-12

    Understanding how bacteria affect plant health is crucial for developing sustainable crop production systems. We coupled ecological sampling and genome sequencing to characterize the population genetic history of Rhodococcus and the distribution patterns of virulence plasmids in isolates from nurseries. Analysis of chromosome sequences shows that plants host multiple lineages of Rhodococcus , and suggested that these bacteria are transmitted due to independent introductions, reservoir populations, and point source outbreaks. We demonstrate that isolates lacking virulence genes promote beneficial plant growth, and that the acquisition of a virulence plasmid is sufficient to transition beneficial symbionts to phytopathogens. This evolutionary transition, along with the distribution patterns of plasmids, reveals the impact of horizontal gene transfer in rapidly generating new pathogenic lineages and provides an alternative explanation for pathogen transmission patterns. Results also uncovered a misdiagnosed epidemic that implicated beneficial Rhodococcus bacteria as pathogens of pistachio. The misdiagnosis perpetuated the unnecessary removal of trees and exacerbated economic losses.

  12. Probiotic properties of endemic strains of lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora N. Tkhruni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from various samples of matsun, yogurt and salted cheese from natural farms of Armenia were studied. They have high antimicrobial and probiotic activities, growth rate and differ by their resistance to enzymes. Supernatants of LAB retain bactericidal activity at рН 3.0-8.0 and inhibit growth of various microflora. The application of different methods of identification and LAB genotyping (API 50 CH, 16S rRNA sequencing, GS-PCR, RAPD PCR showed that isolated LAB evidenced a 99.9% similarity with L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and L. pentosus species and coccoid forms of Streptococcus and Enterococcus species. It can be concluded, that some strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from dairy products from natural farms of Armenia, can be properly used for biopreservation of some foodstuffs. On the basis of experimental data, the LAB can be used as basis for obtaining the new products of functional nutrition.

  13. [Characteristics of natural strains of naphthalene-utilizing bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, A A; Vasilenko, S L; Bulyga, I M; Titok, M A; Thomas, K M

    2005-01-01

    Sixty-three strains of bacteria capable of utilizing naphthalene as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated from 137 samples of soil taken in different sites in Belarus. All isolated bacteria contained extrachromosomal genetic elements of 45 to 150 kb in length. It was found that bacteria of 31 strains contained the IncP-9 incompatibility group plasmids, bacteria of one strain carried a plasmid containing replicons IncP-9 and IncP-7, and bacteria of 31 strains contained unidentified plasmids. Primary identification showed that the hosts of plasmids of naphthalene biodegradation are fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas (P. putida and P. aeruginosa; a total of 47 strains) and unidentified nonfluorescent microorganisms (a total of 16 strains). In addition to the ability to utilize naphthalene, some strains exhibited the ability to stimulate the growth and development of the root system of Secale cereale.

  14. Isolation of a nitrate-reducing bacteria strain from oil field brine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) strain with vigorous growth, strong nitrate reduction ability, strain B9 2-1, was isolated from Suizhong36-1 oilfield, its routine identification and analysis of 16S rRNA and also the competitive inhibition experiments with the enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were carried out.

  15. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, Marnix H

    2017-08-09

    Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways for the synthesis of a large number of specialized metabolites that are likely to be involved in microbe-microbe and host-microbe interactions. To systematically explore the specialized metabolic potential of this genus, we here performed a comprehensive analysis of the biosynthetic coding capacity across publicly available rhododoccal genomes, and compared these with those of several Mycobacterium strains as well as that of their mutual close relative Amycolicicoccus subflavus. Comparative genomic analysis shows that most predicted biosynthetic gene cluster families in these strains are clade-specific and lack any homology with gene clusters encoding the production of known natural products. Interestingly, many of these clusters appear to encode the biosynthesis of lipopeptides, which may play key roles in the diverse environments were rhodococci thrive, by acting as biosurfactants, pathogenicity factors or antimicrobials. We also identified several gene cluster families that are universally shared among all three genera, which therefore may have a more 'primary' role in their physiology. Inactivation of these clusters by mutagenesis might help to generate weaker strains that can be used as live vaccines. The genus Rhodococcus thus provides an interesting target for natural product discovery, in view of its large and mostly uncharacterized biosynthetic repertoire, its relatively fast growth and the availability of effective genetic tools for its genomic modification.

  16. Rhodococcus erythropolis MTHt3 biotransforms ergopeptines to lysergic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Thamhesl, Michaela; Apfelthaler, Elisabeth; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi Elisabeth; Kunz-Vekiru, Elisavet; Krska, Rudolf; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Moll, Wulf-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Background Ergopeptines are a predominant class of ergot alkaloids produced by tall fescue grass endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum or cereal pathogen Claviceps purpurea. The vasoconstrictive activity of ergopeptines makes them toxic for mammals, and they can be a problem in animal husbandry. Results We isolated an ergopeptine degrading bacterial strain, MTHt3, and classified it, based on its 16S rDNA sequence, as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis (Nocardiaceae, Actinobacteria). For strai...

  17. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  18. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways

  19. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, Marnix H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways

  20. Genome-based exploration of the specialized metabolic capacities of the genus Rhodococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Petrusma, Mirjan; Medema, Marnix H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus are well known for their ability to degrade a large range of organic compounds. Some rhodococci are free-living, saprophytic bacteria; others are animal and plant pathogens. Recently, several studies have shown that their genomes encode putative pathways

  1. Rhodococcus antrifimi sp. nov., isolated from dried bat dung of a cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwan Su; Kim, Youngju; Seong, Chi Nam; Lee, Soon Dong

    2015-11-01

    A Gram-reaction-positive, high DNA G+C content, non-motile actinobacterium, strain D7-21T, was isolated from dried bat dung inside a natural cave and its taxonomic status was examined by using a polyphasic approach. The 16S rRNA gene sequence study showed that the isolate belonged to the genus Rhodococcus and formed a cluster with Rhodococcus defluvii (98.98 % gene similarity), Rhodococcus equi (98.62 %) and Rhodococcus kunmingensis (97.66 %). Whole-cell hydrolysates contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose and galactose as the diagnostic diamino acid and sugars. MK-8(H2) was the predominant menaquinone. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, an unknown phosphoglycolipid and an unknown glycolipid. Mycolic acids were present. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and 10-methyl C18 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 70.1 mol%. A battery of phenotypic features and DNA-DNA relatedness data support that strain D7-21T ( = KCTC 29469T = DSM 46727T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which Rhodococcus antrifimi sp. nov. is proposed.

  2. Maintenance of Laboratory Strains of Obligately Anaerobic Rumen Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teather, Ronald M.

    1982-01-01

    Cultures of rumen bacteria can be stored at −20°C for at least 2 years in a liquid medium containing 20% glycerol. Thawing, sampling, and refreezing do not significantly affect viability. PMID:7125660

  3. Streptomyces lunalinharesii Strain 235 Shows the Potential to Inhibit Bacteria Involved in Biocorrosion Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco da Rosa, Juliana; Korenblum, Elisa; Franco-Cirigliano, Marcella Novaes; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Soares, Rosângela M. A.; Macrae, Andrew; Seldin, Lucy; Coelho, Rosalie R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Four actinomycete strains previously isolated from Brazilian soils were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus pumilus LF-4 and Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491, bacteria that are well known to be involved in biofilm formation and biocorrosion. Strain 235, belonging to the species Streptomyces lunalinharesii, inhibited the growth of both bacteria. The antimicrobial activity was seen over a wide range of pH, and after treatment with several chemicals and heat but not with...

  4. Virulence of Rhodococcus equi Isolated from Cats and Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, Shinji; Martens, Ronald J.; Julian, Alan; Garcia Ribeiro, Márcio; Rodrigues de Farias, Marconi; Sasaki, Yukako; Inuzuka, Kazuho; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Tsubaki, Shiro; Prescott, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Nine cat isolates and nine dog isolates of Rhodococcus equi from clinical material were investigated for the presence of the virulence-associated antigens (VapA and VapB) and virulence plasmids. Five of the cat isolates and one dog isolate were VapA positive and contained an 85-kb type I or an 87-kb type I plasmid. The remaining 12 isolates were avirulent R. equi strains and contained no virulence plasmids.

  5. Antagonistic effect of chosen lactic acid bacteria strains on Salmonella species in meat and fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka-Pawlicka, M; Uradziński, J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine of influence of 15 strains of lactic acid bacteria on the growth of 7 Salmonella spp. strains in model set-ups, and in meat and ripened fermented sausages. The investigations were performed within the framework of three alternate stages which differed in respect to the products studied, the number of Lactobacillus spp. strains and, partly, methodological approach. The ratio between lactic acid bacteria and Salmonella strains studied was, depending on the alternate, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1, respectively. The investigations also covered the water activity (a(w)) and pH of the tested products. The results obtained are shown in 12 figures and suggest that all the lactic acid bacteria strains used within the framework of the model set-ups showed antagonistic effect on all the Salmonella spp. strains. However, these abilities were not observed with respect to some lactic acid bacteria strains in meat and fermented sausage. The temperature and length of the incubation period of sausages, but not a(w) and pH, were found to have a distinct influence on the antagonistic interaction between the bacteria.

  6. THE STUDY OF ANTIBIOTIC- AND FAGOSENSITIVITY OF NOSOCOMIAL STRAINS BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM TRANSPLANTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Gabrielan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic and fagosensitivity most etiologically important nosocomial strains of bacteria – Pseudomonas aeru- ginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp. were studied. Multiple drug-resistant bacteria as gram-positive and gram-negative, isolated from 8 substrates, had been demonstrated. With regard to the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa >40% was observed in 40–50% of the strains to aminoglycosides – aztreonam, amikacin, netilmicin, and only 23–25% of the strains – to gentamicin and levofloxacin (an average of antibiotic susceptibility was 27%. All strains of ESBL Klebsiella drew up and were sensitive only to imipenem, meropenem and aminoglycosides. Specific phages lysed 43–48% of the strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Pro- teus spp., multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. It is proposed to introduce the use of phages in clinical practice. 

  7. Isolation and characterization of new strains of cholesterol-reducing bacteria from baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, A W; Gottesman, A R; Mott, G E

    1982-01-01

    We isolated and characterized nine new strains of cholesterol-reducing bacteria from feces and intestinal contents of baboons. Cholesterol-brain agar was used for the primary isolation, and subsequent biochemical tests were done in a lecithin-cholesterol broth containing plasmenylethanolamine and various substrates. All strains had similar colony and cell morphology, hydrolyzed the beta-glucosides esculin and amygdalin, metabolized pyruvate, and produced acetate and acetoin. Unlike previously reported strains, the nine new strains did not require cholesterol and an alkenyl ether lipid (e.g., plasmalogen) for growth; however, only two strains reduced cholesterol in the absence of the plasmalogen. These two strains also produced succinate as an end product. Carbohydrate fermentation was variable; some strains produced weak acid (pH 5.5 to 6.0) from only a few carbohydrates, whereas other strains produced strong acid reactions (pH less than or equal to 5.5) from a wide variety of carbohydrates.

  8. Inhibitory potential of nine mentha species against pathogenic bacteria strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Ahmad, N.; Rashid, M.; Ikram, A. U.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce secondary metabolites, which are used in their growth and defense against pathogenic agents. These plant based metabolites can be used as natural antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. Synthetic antibiotics caused different side effects and become resistant to bacteria. Therefore the main objective of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory potential of nine Mentha species extracts against pathogenic bacteria. The methanolic leaves extracts of nine Mentha species (Mentha arvensis, Mentha longifolia, Mentha officinalis, Mentha piperita, Mentha citrata, Mentha pulegium, Mentha royleana, Mentha spicata and Mentha suareolens) were compared for antimicrobial activities. These Mentha species showed strong antibacterial activity against four microorganisms tested. Mentha arvensis showed 25 mm and 30 mm zones of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholera and Enterobacter aerogens. Moreover, Mentha longifolia showed 24 mm zone of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus. Mentha officinalis showed 30 mm zone of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus. 25 mm inhibitory zone was recorded against Staphylococcus aureus by Mentha piperita. Mentha royleana showed 25 mm zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholera, while Mentha spicata showed 21 mm, 22 mm and 23 mm zones of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholera and Enterobacter aerogens. Moreover most of the Mentha species showed zone of inhibition in the range of 10-20 mm. (author)

  9. Selection of bacteriocin producer strains of lactic acid bacteria from a dairy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagno, M; Beoleito, V; Sesma, F; Raya, R; Font de Valdez, G; Eraso, A

    2002-01-01

    Two strains showing bacteriocin production were selected from a total of 206 lactic acid bacteria isolated from samples of milk, milk serum, whey and homemade cheeses in Southern Cordoba, Argentina. This property was detected by means of well diffusion assays. The strains were identified as Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus durans. The protein nature of those substances was proved by showing their sensitivity to type IV and XXV proteases, papaine, trypsin, pepsin and K proteinase. The bacteriocins inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringes and two strains of Staphylococcus aureus, an A-enterotoxin and a B-enterotoxin producers. All of these bacteria are common pathogens usually associated with food borne diseases (ETA). These lactic acid bacteria or their bacteriocins could be suitable candidates for food preservation and specially useful in the our regional dairy industry.

  10. Antibacterial activity of Achillea tenuifolia Lam. extract against standard bacteria and isolated strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Omidpanah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have been trying to develop new broad-spectrum antibiotics against the infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites for many decades. Prolonged usage of the antibiotics has led to the emergence of drug resistance among bacteria; therefore, there is a tremendous need for novel antimicrobial agents from different sources such as plants which are used in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial effect of Achillea tenuifolia. The plant material was extracted by maceration method using methanol three times at room temperature. The extract was concentrated after removing the solvent by rotary evaporator and then lyophilized using freeze dryer. Inhibitory effect of the extract was examined against four standard bacteria strains and two isolated strains from diseased hen using disk diffusion method and microdilution method to evaluate their inhibition zone diameter (IZD and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, respectively. The results showed that the extract of the plant was active against standard strains including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis with IZDs of 10.3±0.5, 14±0.0, 12±0.0 and 11.6±0.5, respectively. However, growths of isolated strains were not inhibited in the presence of the extract. Although, the growths of isolated strains were not inhibited by the plant extract, the standard strains were moderately susceptible to the extract; among those P. aeroginosa was more sensible than other tested strains

  11. A new laboratory cultivation of Paramecium bursaria using non-pathogenic bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bator, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    In most studies dealing with the laboratory cultivation of paramecia (Paramecium bursaria), Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria are used to inoculate the medium. However, Klebsiella pneumoniae is a typical pathogen, and its use is always associated with a risk of infection. The aim of the present research was to examine non-pathogenic bacteria strains as components of the medium for Paramecium bursaria. The paramecia were incubated on lettuce infusions bacterized with different bacteria strains: Bacillus subtilis DSM 10, Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Escherichia coli DSM 498, Micrococcus luteus DSM 348. A strain derived from the natural habitat of Paramecium bursaria was used as the control one. Experiments were conducted under constant light and in the dark. Paramecia cells were counted under a stereomicroscope on consecutive days of incubation. The obtained results show that the most intensive growth of Paramecium bursaria occurs in the presence of Escherichia coli DSM 498. The use of this strain as a component of the medium allows one to obtain a high number of ciliates regardless of the light conditions. It can be concluded that the Paramecium bursaria cultivation procedure can be modified by using the non-pathogenic bacteria strain Escherichia coli DSM 498 instead of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  12. Coaggregation between probiotic bacteria and caries-associated strains: An in vitro study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Lisa; Larsen, Ulla; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the in vitro abilities of probiotic bacteria derived from consumer products to coaggregate with caries-associated mutans streptococci. Material and Methods. Six lactobacillus strains (L. acidophilus (CCUG 5917), L. plantarum 299v, L. rhamnosus GG and LB21, L. paracasei F19, L....... A gastrointestinal pathogen (Escherichia coli) was aerobically cultivated on BHI broth as a positive control. After incubation, the bacteria were aerobically harvested, washed, and suspended in 10 mmol/l phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2). The probiotic strains were characterized with the API 50 CH system to confirm...... their identity. Coaggregation was determined by spectrophotometry in mixtures and bacterial suspensions alone after 1, 2, 4, and 24 h and expressed as the aggregation ratio (%). Results. All probiotic strains showed coaggregation abilities with the oral pathogens and the results were strain specific...

  13. Isolation and characterization of new strains of cholesterol-reducing bacteria from baboons.

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkley, A W; Gottesman, A R; Mott, G E

    1982-01-01

    We isolated and characterized nine new strains of cholesterol-reducing bacteria from feces and intestinal contents of baboons. Cholesterol-brain agar was used for the primary isolation, and subsequent biochemical tests were done in a lecithin-cholesterol broth containing plasmenylethanolamine and various substrates. All strains had similar colony and cell morphology, hydrolyzed the beta-glucosides esculin and amygdalin, metabolized pyruvate, and produced acetate and acetoin. Unlike previously...

  14. Seroprevalence of Rhodococcus equi in horses in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Tirosh-Levy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of pneumonia in foals and has extensive clinical, economic and possibly zoonotic consequences. This bacterium survives well in the environment and may be considered as normal flora of adult horses. Certain strains of this bacterium are extremely virulent in foals, and early identification and intervention is crucial for prognosis. Rhodococcus equi is endemic in many parts of the world and occasionally isolated in Israel. This study was designed to evaluate R. equi seroprevalence in adult horses in Israel to indirectly indicate the potential level of exposure of susceptible foals. Sera were collected from 144 horses during spring 2011 and from 293 horses during fall 2014, and the presence of antibodies against virulent R. equi was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Equine seroprevalence of R. equi was found to be 7.6% in 2011 and 5.1% in 2014. Only one farm had seropositive horses in 2011, whereas several farms had seropositive horses in 2014. No significant risk factors for seropositivity were found. Rhodococcus equi appears to be endemic in Israel. This is the first survey of R. equi in Israel that provides information on the epidemiology of this important bacterium.

  15. Seroprevalence of Rhodococcus equi in horses in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Gürbilek, Sevil E; Tel, Osman Y; Keskin, Oktay; Steinman, Amir

    2017-06-26

    Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of pneumonia in foals and has extensive clinical, economic and possibly zoonotic consequences. This bacterium survives well in the environment and may be considered as normal flora of adult horses. Certain strains of this bacterium are extremely virulent in foals, and early identification and intervention is crucial for prognosis. Rhodococcus equi is endemic in many parts of the world and occasionally isolated in Israel. This study was designed to evaluate R. equi seroprevalence in adult horses in Israel to indirectly indicate the potential level of exposure of susceptible foals. Sera were collected from 144 horses during spring 2011 and from 293 horses during fall 2014, and the presence of antibodies against virulent R. equi was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Equine seroprevalence of R. equi was found to be 7.6% in 2011 and 5.1% in 2014. Only one farm had seropositive horses in 2011, whereas several farms had seropositive horses in 2014. No significant risk factors for seropositivity were found. Rhodococcus equi appears to be endemic in Israel. This is the first survey of R. equi in Israel that provides information on the epidemiology of this important bacterium.

  16. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional yogurt and milk against Shigella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Mirzaei, Elnaze; Lashani, Elahe; Davoodabadi, Abolfazl

    2018-01-01

    Background: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are normal flora of the mouth, intestines and the female genital tract. They are also frequently found in meat, vegetables, and dairy products. Most of probiotic bacteria belong to the LAB group. Some probiotic LAB are useful in prevention and treatment of diarrheal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of LAB isolated from traditional yogurt and milk against Shigella strains. Materials and methods: Forty LAB strains were isolated from traditional yogurt and milk. The antimicrobial activity of LAB against Shigella strains (eight S. flexneri , four S. sonnei ) was examined using the agar-well diffusion assay. LAB strains with antimicrobial effect against all Shigella strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Six LAB strains inhibited the growth of all 12 Shigella strains. Lb. paracasei Y1-3, Lb. paracasei Y8-1 and Lb. fermentum Y2-2 were isolated from yogurt. Lb. paracasei M18-1, Lb. parelimentarius M4-3 and Lb. plantarum M19-1 were isolated from milk. Conclusion: This study showed that Lactobacillus strains with good inhibitory activity against S. flexneri and S. sonnei could be isolated from traditional yogurt and milk.

  17. Genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jussila, Minna M.; Jurgens, German; Lindstroem, Kristina; Suominen, Leena

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 50 indigenous meta-toluate tolerating bacteria isolated from oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis on selective medium was characterized and identified by classical and molecular methods. 16S rDNA partial sequencing showed the presence of five major lineages of the Bacteria domain. Gram-positive Rhodococcus, Bacillus and Arthrobacter and gram-negative Pseudomonas were the most abundant genera. Only one-fifth of the strains that tolerated m-toluate also degraded m-toluate. The inoculum Pseudomonas putida PaW85 was not found in the rhizosphere samples. The ability to degrade m-toluate by the TOL plasmid was detected only in species of the genus Pseudomonas. However, a few Rhodococcus erythropolis strains were found which were able to degrade m-toluate. A new finding was that Pseudomonas migulae strains and a few P. oryzihabitans strains were able to grow on m-toluate and most likely contained the TOL plasmid. Because strain specific differences in degradation abilities were found for P. oryzihabitans, separation at the strain level was important. For strain specific separation (GTG) 5 fingerprinting was the best method. A combination of the single locus ribotyping and the whole genomic fingerprinting techniques with the selective partial sequencing formed a practical molecular toolbox for studying genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere. - Bacterial diversity during rhizoremediation in oil-contaminated soil is characterized by a combination of molecular methods

  18. Antibacterial activity of curcuma long varieties against different strains of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Jabeen, S.; Ilyas, S.; Aslam, F.; Manzoor, F.; Ali, A.

    2010-01-01

    Crude extracts of curcuminoids and essential oil of Curcuma long varieties Kasur, Faisalabad and Bannu were studied for their antibacterial activity against 4 bacterial strains viz., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus macerans, Bacillus licheniformis and Azotobacter using agar well diffusion method. Solvents used to determine antibacterial activity were ethanol and methanol. Ethanol was used for the extraction of curcuminoids. Essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and diluted in methanol by serial dilution method. Both Curcuminoids and oil showed zone of inhibition against all tested strains of bacteria. Among all the three turmeric varieties, Kasur variety had the most inhibitory effect on the growth of all bacterial strains tested as compared to Faisalabad and Bannu varieties. Among all the bacterial strains B. subtilis was the most sensitive to turmeric extracts of curcuminoids and oil. The MIC value for different strains and varieties ranged from 3.0 to 20.6 mm in diameter. (author)

  19. Recovery and subsequent characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate from Rhodococcus equi cells grown on crude palm kernel oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Altaee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus equi was isolated from fertile soil, and mineral salt media (MM and trace elements were used to provide the necessary elements for its growth and PHB production in addition to using crude palm kernel oil (CPKO 1% as the carbon source. Gas chromatography (GC demonstrated that the composition of the recovered biopolymer was homopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB. The strain of the present study has a dry biomass of 1.43 (g/l with 38% PHB, as determined by GC. The recovered PHB was characterized by NMR to study the chemical structure. In addition, DSC and TGA were used to study the thermal properties of the recovered polymer, where the melting temperature (Tm was 173 °C, the glass transition temperature (Tg was 2.79 °C, and the decomposition temperature (Td was 276 °C. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC was used to study the molecular mass of the recovered PHB in addition to comparing the results with other studies using different bacteria and substrates, where the molecular weight was 642 kDa, to enable its usage in many applications. The present study demonstrated the use of an inexpensive substrate for PHB production, i.e., using gram-positive bacteria to produce PHB polymer with characterization.

  20. Evaluation of the intestinal colonization by microencapsulated probiotic bacteria in comparison with the same uncoated strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Piano, Mario; Carmagnola, Stefania; Andorno, Silvano; Pagliarulo, Michela; Tari, Roberto; Mogna, Luca; Strozzi, Gian Paolo; Sforza, Filomena; Capurso, Lucio

    2010-09-01

    Beneficial findings concerning probiotics are increasing day by day. However, one of the most important parameter which affects the probiotic activity of a microorganism is its survival during the gastroduodenal transit. Some microencapsulation techniques could be applied to bacterial cells to improve this parameter. A comparison between the intestinal colonization by microencapsulated bacteria and the same not microencapsulated strains has been conducted in a double blind, randomized, cross-over study. The study (April to July 2005) involved 44 healthy volunteers. In particular, participants were divided into 2 groups: group A (21 participants) received a mix of probiotic strains Lactobacillus plantarum LP01 (LMG P-21021) and Bifidobacterium breve BR03 (DSM 16604) in an uncoated form, group B (23 participants) was given the same strains microencapsulated with a gastroresistant material. The not microencapsulated strains were administered at 5 x 10(9) colony forming units/strain/d for 21 days, whereas the microencapsulated bacteria were given at 1 x 10(9) colony forming units/strain/d for 21 days. At the end of the first period of treatment with probiotics a 3 weeks washout phase has been included in the study protocol. At the end of the washout period the groups were crossed: in detail, group A had the microencapsulated and group B the uncoated bacteria. The administered amounts of each strain were the same as the first treatment. The quantitative evaluation of intestinal colonization by strains microencapsulated or not microencapsulated was made by fecal samples examination at the beginning of the clinical trial, after 10 and 21 days of each treatment period. In particular, fecal heterofermentative Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria have been counted. A statistically significant increase in the fecal amounts of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria was recorded in both groups at the end of each treatment compared with d0 or d42 (Pstrains to colonize the human gut, either

  1. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in isogenous bacteria strains with different radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.I.; Goncharenko, E.N.; Yudz, T.I.; Samojlenko, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in isogenous bacterial strains with various radiosensitivity is investigated. In micrococcus radiodurans mutants with defects in the DNA repair systems the superoxide dismutase activity is lower than in the wild type cells. In investigated Escherichia coli strains differing in radiosensitivity, no alteration in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity is found. The conclusion is drawn that viability of bacteria subjected to the effect of ionizing radiations is determined by the efficiency of DNA repair systems whose functional reliability is sometimes connected with the catalase and suferoxide dismutase activity

  3. Selection of oleuropein-degrading lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from fermenting Moroccan green olives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghabbour, N.; Lamzira, Z.; Thonart, P.; Cidalia, P.; Markaouid, M.; Asehraoua, A.

    2011-07-01

    A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%), Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%), Lactobacillus brevis (9.61%) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%). All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3%) were found able to degrade oleuropein, when evaluated by either oleuropein or 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-glucuronide (X-Gluc) as substrates. The biodegradation capacity of the selected strains of each species was confirmed by HPLC analysis. (Author).

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Probiotic Bacteria Isolated From Broiler Feces and Commercial Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Darabi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The extensive use of antibiotics in animal farms to promote the growth rate and prevent the enteric pathogen has led to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and drug residues in the birds body. In the recent years, probiotics have been constantly studied for their inhibitory effects on pathogenic bacteria. Objectives: The current study aimed to assess the effect of magnesium oxide on controlling serum phosphorus levels and evaluate its side effects. Materials and Methods: Antibacterial activity of local and commercial probiotic bacteria was investigated using colony overlay assay. Then antibacterial activity of local and commercial probiotics against each pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were compared. Results: Local strain of lactic acid bacteria had significantly higher antibacterial activity compared to those of the commercial probiotics. Local probiotics showed a significantly stronger activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli compared to all commercial probiotics. Conclusions: Administration of mono strain of Lactobacillus salivarius ES1, or co-administration of ES1 and L. salivarius ES6, is not only more effective than commercial probiotics against Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus spp. and E.coli, but also, will have no negative effects on micro flora balance of local birds.

  5. Biofouling inhibition in MBR by Rhodococcus sp. BH4 isolated from real MBR plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sang-Ryoung; Cheong, Won-Suk; Lee, Chung-Hak; Lee, Jung-Kee

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that an indigenous quorum quenching bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. BH4, which was isolated from a real plant of membrane bioreactor (MBR) has promising potential to control biofouling in MBR. However, little is known about quorum quenching mechanisms by the strain BH4. In this study, various characteristics of strain BH4 were investigated to elucidate its behavior in more detail in the mixed liquor of MBR. The N-acyl homoserine lactone hydrolase (AHL-lactonase) gene of strain BH4 showed a high degree of identity to qsdA in Rhodococcus erythropolis W2. The LC-ESI-MS analysis of the degradation product by strain BH4 confirmed that it inactivated AHL activity by hydrolyzing the lactone bond of AHL. It degraded a wide range of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but there was a large difference in the degradation rate of each AHL compared to other reported AHL-lactonase-producing strains belonging to Rhodococcus genus. Its quorum quenching activity was confirmed not only in the Luria-Bertani medium, but also in the synthetic wastewater. Furthermore, the amount of strain BH4 encapsulated in the vessel as well as the material of the vessel substantially affected the quorum quenching activity of strain BH4, which provides useful information, particularly for the biofouling control in a real MBR plant from an engineering point of view.

  6. In vitro effect of josamycin in strains of Rhodococcus equi isolated from pulmonar infections in foals / Efeito in vitro da josamicina em cepas de rhodocaccus equi isoladas de afecções pulmonares em potros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Galvão Dias Júnior

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Antmicrobial susceptibility test was performed in thirty-one samples of Rhodococcus equi isolated from iung infections in foals. Among the antimicrobial tosted, erythromycin (100,0 %, rifampin (96.3%. neomycin (93,6 %Josamycin (90,4% and gentamicin (90,4 %presented the highest sensitivity against R- equi- The most-common occurrence of resistance was observed from cephalexim (100,0 %}, lincomycin (100,0 %, cephalothin (96,3 %. oxacillin (96,8 %, penicillin G (96,8 %, amoxicillin (90,3 % and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (83,8 %. The highest susceptibility of the R. equi to josamycin, suggest the drug as alternative for therapy of R. equi infections in foals.Procedeu-se o teste de sensibilidade microbiana in vitro pelo teste de difusão com discos em 31 cepas de Rhodococcus equi. isoladas de afecções pulmonares cm potros. frente a 20 antimicrobianos. Os maioires índices de sensibilidade de R. equi foram constatados para entromicina (100,0 %, níampicina (96.8 %}t ncomicina (93. 6 %. josamicina (90.4% e gentamicina (90A %. Os maiores índices de resistência do agente foram verificados para cefalexina (100,0%, lincomicina (100.0%, cefalotina (96.8 %, oxacilino (96,8 %}, penicilina G (96,3 %, amoxicilina (90.3 % e sulfametoxazol/trimetoprim (83,8 %. A alta sensibilidade das cepas de R. equi para a josamicina, sugere a possibilidade de utilização da droga como alternativa no tratamento da rodococose em potros.

  7. Streptomyces lunalinharesii Strain 235 Shows the Potential to Inhibit Bacteria Involved in Biocorrosion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pacheco da Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four actinomycete strains previously isolated from Brazilian soils were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus pumilus LF-4 and Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491, bacteria that are well known to be involved in biofilm formation and biocorrosion. Strain 235, belonging to the species Streptomyces lunalinharesii, inhibited the growth of both bacteria. The antimicrobial activity was seen over a wide range of pH, and after treatment with several chemicals and heat but not with proteinase K and trypsin. The antimicrobial substances present in the concentrated supernatant from growth media were partially characterized by SDS-PAGE and extracellular polypeptides were seen. Bands in the size range of 12 to 14.4 kDa caused antimicrobial activity. Transmission electron microscopy of D. alaskensis cells treated with the concentrated supernatant containing the antimicrobial substances revealed the formation of prominent bubbles, the spherical double-layered structures on the cell membrane, and the periplasmic space completely filled with electron-dense material. This is the first report on the production of antimicrobial substances by actinomycetes against bacteria involved in biocorrosion processes, and these findings may be of great relevance as an alternative source of biocides to those currently employed in the petroleum industry.

  8. Streptomyces lunalinharesii strain 235 shows the potential to inhibit bacteria involved in biocorrosion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco da Rosa, Juliana; Korenblum, Elisa; Franco-Cirigliano, Marcella Novaes; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Soares, Rosângela M A; Macrae, Andrew; Seldin, Lucy; Coelho, Rosalie R R

    2013-01-01

    Four actinomycete strains previously isolated from Brazilian soils were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus pumilus LF-4 and Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491, bacteria that are well known to be involved in biofilm formation and biocorrosion. Strain 235, belonging to the species Streptomyces lunalinharesii, inhibited the growth of both bacteria. The antimicrobial activity was seen over a wide range of pH, and after treatment with several chemicals and heat but not with proteinase K and trypsin. The antimicrobial substances present in the concentrated supernatant from growth media were partially characterized by SDS-PAGE and extracellular polypeptides were seen. Bands in the size range of 12 to 14.4 kDa caused antimicrobial activity. Transmission electron microscopy of D. alaskensis cells treated with the concentrated supernatant containing the antimicrobial substances revealed the formation of prominent bubbles, the spherical double-layered structures on the cell membrane, and the periplasmic space completely filled with electron-dense material. This is the first report on the production of antimicrobial substances by actinomycetes against bacteria involved in biocorrosion processes, and these findings may be of great relevance as an alternative source of biocides to those currently employed in the petroleum industry.

  9. Lactic acid bacteria from raw milk as potentially beneficial strains to prevent bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeche, M Carolina; Pellegrino, Matías; Frola, Ignacio; Larriestra, Alejandro; Bogni, Cristina; Nader-Macías, M E Fátima

    2012-02-01

    Bovine mastitis produces a wide variety of problems in the dairy farm. The treatment of this disease is based on the use of antibiotics which are not always effective. These drugs are also responsible for the presence of residues in the milk and the increase of antibiotic-resistant strains. Probiotic products were proposed as a valid alternative to antibiotic therapies and are also useful for the prevention of infectious syndromes. With the aim of designing a probiotic product to prevent bovine mastitis, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from foremilk samples from different dairy farms in Córdoba-Argentina. One hundred and seventeen LAB were isolated and their beneficial characteristics such as the production of inhibitory substances, surface properties and production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) were assessed. Most of them displayed low degree of hydrophobicity, autoaggregation, EPS negative phenotype and were identified as Enterococcus hirae and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Nine LAB strains inhibited three indicator bacteria. Some isolates were pre-selected and genetically identified according to the results obtained. Antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were studied for the assessment of the safety of the strains. The results obtained were compared to those reported previously from samples obtained in the North-western area of the country and some differences were found. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bactericidal activities of GM flax seedcake extract on pathogenic bacteria clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Magdalena; Dorotkiewicz-Jach, Agata; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Arendt, Malgorzata; Kulma, Anna; Szopa, Jan

    2014-07-29

    The antibiotic resistance of pathogenic microorganisms is a worldwide problem. Each year several million people across the world acquire infections with bacteria that are antibiotic-resistant, which is costly in terms of human health. New antibiotics are extremely needed to overcome the current resistance problem. Transgenic flax plants overproducing compounds from phenylpropanoid pathway accumulate phenolic derivatives of potential antioxidative, and thus, antimicrobial activity. Alkali hydrolyzed seedcake extract containing coumaric acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and lignan in high quantities was used as an assayed against pathogenic bacteria (commonly used model organisms and clinical strains). It was shown that the extract components had antibacterial activity, which might be useful as a prophylactic against bacterial infection. Bacteria topoisomerase II (gyrase) inhibition and genomic DNA disintegration are suggested to be the main reason for rendering antibacterial action. The data obtained strongly suggest that the seedcake extract preparation is a suitable candidate for antimicrobial action with a broad spectrum and partial selectivity. Such preparation can be applied in cases where there is a risk of multibacterial infection and excellent answer on global increase in multidrug resistance in pathogenic bacteria.

  11. Dielectrophoresis-based discrimination of bacteria at the strain level based on their surface properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Braff

    Full Text Available Insulator-based dielectrophoresis can be used to manipulate biological particles, but has thus far found limited practical applications due to low sensitivity. We present linear sweep three-dimensional insulator-based dielectrophoresis as a considerably more sensitive approach for strain-level discrimination bacteria. In this work, linear sweep three-dimensional insulator-based dielectrophoresis was performed on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 along with six isogenic mutants as well as Streptococcus mitis SF100 and PS344. Strain-level discrimination was achieved between these clinically important pathogens with applied electric fields below 10 V/mm. This low voltage, high sensitivity technique has potential applications in clinical diagnostics as well as microbial physiology research.

  12. Quantification of Azospirillum brasilense FP2 Bacteria in Wheat Roots by Strain-Specific Quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Maria Isabel; Alqueres, Sylvia Maria Campbell; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães

    2015-10-01

    Azospirillum is a rhizobacterial genus containing plant growth-promoting species associated with different crops worldwide. Azospirillum brasilense strains exhibit a growth-promoting effect by means of phytohormone production and possibly by N2 fixation. However, one of the most important factors for achieving an increase in crop yield by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria is the survival of the inoculant in the rhizosphere, which is not always achieved. The objective of this study was to develop quantitative PCR protocols for the strain-specific quantification of A. brasilense FP2. A novel approach was applied to identify strain-specific DNA sequences based on a comparison of the genomic sequences within the same species. The draft genome sequences of A. brasilense FP2 and Sp245 were aligned, and FP2-specific regions were filtered and checked for other possible matches in public databases. Strain-specific regions were then selected to design and evaluate strain-specific primer pairs. The primer pairs AzoR2.1, AzoR2.2, AzoR5.1, AzoR5.2, and AzoR5.3 were specific for the A. brasilense FP2 strain. These primer pairs were used to monitor quantitatively the population of A. brasilense in wheat roots under sterile and nonsterile growth conditions. In addition, coinoculations with other plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat were performed under nonsterile conditions. The results showed that A. brasilense FP2 inoculated into wheat roots is highly competitive and achieves high cell numbers (∼10(7) CFU/g [fresh weight] of root) in the rhizosphere even under nonsterile conditions and when coinoculated with other rhizobacteria, maintaining the population at rather stable levels for at least up to 13 days after inoculation. The strategy used here can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequences are available. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Endosulfan Resistance Profile of Soil Bacteria and Potential Application of Resistant Strains in Bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandini P.K.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, bacterial strains were isolated from the soils of Wayanad District, Kerala, India and the isolates were tested for their tolerance to endosulfan and potential in bioremediation technology. Pesticide contamination in the soils, soil physico-chemical characteristics and socio-economic impacts of pesticide application were also analyzed. 28 pesticide compounds in the soil samples were analyzed and the results revealed that there was no pesticide residues in the soils. As per the survey conducted the pesticide application is very high in the study area and the level of awareness among the farmers was very poor regarding the method of application and its socio-economic and ecological impacts. A total of 9 bacterial strains were isolated with 50μg/ml of endosulfan in the isolating media and the results showed that most of the bacterial strains were highly resistance to endosulfan. Out of the 9 strains isolated 6 were highly resistant to endosulfan (500- 700μg/ml and the other 3 isolates showed the resistance of 250-500μg/ml. From the studied isolate, isolate 9 demonstrating prolific growth and high resistance was selected to check their capability to degrade endosulfan over time. Identification of the selected strain reveals that it belongs to the genus Bacillus. Results of endosulfan removal studies showed that with increase in time, the biomass of the bacterial strains increased. The complete disappearance of endosulfan from the spiked and inoculated broth during the first day of incubation (24 hour interval was observed. While the control flask showed the presence of endosulfan during the experimental period. Pesticide resistant bacteria are widely distributed in the soils of selected study area and the tolerance varied between bacteria even though they were isolated from the soils of the same area. The selected Bacillus species carry the ability to degrade endosulfan at accelerated rates and it could be useful in framing a

  14. Metal adsorption capabilities of clinoptilolite and selected strains of bacteria from mine water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamba, B. B.; Dlamini, N. P.; Nyembe, D. W.; Mulaba-Bafubiandi, A. F.

    Small-scale mining has socio-economic advantages such as the reduction of unemployment and the general improvement of the economy. However, these operations if not properly managed or controlled have a potential to cause environmental damage, particularly with respect to the contamination of groundwater and water supplies that are not distant from where these mining activities take place. This paper focuses on metal removal from water contaminated by heavy metals emanating from small-scale mining operations using clinoptilolite and bacteria. Removal of As, Ni, Mn, Au, Co, Cu and Fe was carried out on mine water samples using original and HCl-activated (in 0.02 M and 0.04 M) natural clinoptilolite and bacterial strains (a mixed consortia of Bacillus strains ( Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus firmus, Bacillus fusiformis, Bacillus macroides and Bacillus licheniformis), Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella spp. and a mixed consortia of Acidithiobcillus caldus, Leptospirillum spp., Ferroplasma spp. and Sulphobacillus spp.). The purpose of the study was to compare the removal efficiencies of the bacterial strains versus natural clinoptilolite adsorbents for metal cations. The Bacillus consortia removed most of the metals up to 98% metal removal efficiency with the exception of nickel where clinoptilolite showed good removal efficiency. The 0.02 M HCl-activated clinoptilolite also demonstrated excellent removal capabilities with Cu, Co and Fe removal efficiency of up to 98%. Both clinoptilolite and bacteria demonstrated capabilities of removing Cu 2+, Co 2+, Fe 2+, Mn 2+, As 3+ and Au from solution which augurs well for metal recovery from mining and mineral processing solutions, as well as in water decontamination.

  15. Vanillin Catabolism in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao-Ping; Chow, Mindy; Liu, Chi-Chun; Lau, Alice; Liu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Genes encoding vanillin dehydrogenase (vdh) and vanillate O-demethylase (vanAB) were identified in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 using gene disruption and enzyme activities. During growth on vanillin or vanillate, vanA was highly upregulated while vdh was not. This study contributes to our understanding of lignin degradation by RHA1 and other actinomycetes. PMID:22057861

  16. Biodegradation potential of the genus Rhodococcus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Uhnáková, Bronislava; Pátek, Miroslav; Nešvera, Jan; Křen, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2009), s. 162-177 ISSN 0160-4120 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk 2B06151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : rhodococcus * aromatics * nitriles Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.786, year: 2009

  17. Heterologous expression of enterocin AS-48 in several strains of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M; Martínez-Bueno, M; Martín, M C; Valdivia, E; Maqueda, M

    2007-05-01

    Enterococcus faecalis produces a cationic and circular enterocin, AS-48, of 7149 Da, the genetic determinants of which are located within the pMB2 plasmid. We have compared enterocin AS-48 production by different enterococci species with that of other 'safe' lactic acid bacteris (LAB) (GRAS status) and looked into the subsequent application of this enterocin in food production. In an effort to exploit this system for the heterologous expression of enterocin AS-48, a number of vectors containing the as-48 cluster were constructed and used to transform several LAB strains (genera Enterococcus, Lactococcus and Lactobacillus) Heterologous production of enterocin AS-48 failed when bacteria other than those belonging to the genus Enterococcus were used as hosts, although expression of a partial level of resistance against AS-48 were always detected, ruling out the possibility of a lack of recognition of the enterococcal promoters. Our results reveal the special capacity of species from the genus Enterococcus to produce AS-48, an enterocin that requires a post-transcriptional modification to generate a circular peptide with a wide range of inhibitory activity against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. Preliminary experiments in foodstuffs using nonvirulent enterococci with interesting functional properties reveal the possibility of a biotechnological application of these transformants.

  18. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of Bradyrhizobium strains: revealing high diversity of tropical diazotrophic symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Menna, Pâmela; Bangel, Eliane Villamil; Hungria, Mariangela

    2012-04-01

    Symbiotic association of several genera of bacteria collectively called as rhizobia and plants belonging to the family Leguminosae (=Fabaceae) results in the process of biological nitrogen fixation, playing a key role in global N cycling, and also bringing relevant contributions to the agriculture. Bradyrhizobium is considered as the ancestral of all nitrogen-fixing rhizobial species, probably originated in the tropics. The genus encompasses a variety of diverse bacteria, but the diversity captured in the analysis of the 16S rRNA is often low. In this study, we analyzed twelve Bradyrhizobium strains selected from previous studies performed by our group for showing high genetic diversity in relation to the described species. In addition to the 16S rRNA, five housekeeping genes (recA, atpD, glnII, gyrB and rpoB) were analyzed in the MLSA (multilocus sequence analysis) approach. Analysis of each gene and of the concatenated housekeeping genes captured a considerably higher level of genetic diversity, with indication of putative new species. The results highlight the high genetic variability associated with Bradyrhizobium microsymbionts of a variety of legumes. In addition, the MLSA approach has proved to represent a rapid and reliable method to be employed in phylogenetic and taxonomic studies, speeding the identification of the still poorly known diversity of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia in the tropics.

  19. Application of two bacterial strains for wastewater bioremediation and assessment of phenolics biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisio, Cintia E; Quevedo, María R; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents. In this work, two bacterial strains isolated from polluted environments constitutes a promising alternative since they were able to remove several phenolic compounds not only from synthetic solutions but also from effluents derived from a chemical industry and a tannery which are complex matrices. Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 showed ability to completely remove 2-methoxyphenol (1000 mg/L) while Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 not only degrade the same concentration of this compound but also removed 4- chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol with high efficiency. Moreover, both bacteria degraded phenols naturally present or even exogenously added at high concentrations in effluents from the chemical industry and a tannery in short time (up to 5 d). In addition, a significant reduction of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values was achieved after 7 d of treatment for both effluents using Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS1, respectively. These results showed that Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 might be considered as useful biotechnological tools for an efficient treatment of different effluents, since they showed wide versatility to detoxify these complex matrices, even supplemented with high phenol concentrations.

  20. Bio desulfurization of a system containing synthetic fuel by rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277; Remocao de compostos sulfurosos de sitema bifasico contendo combustivel sintetico por Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maass, Danielle; Souza, Antonio Augusto Ulson de; Souza, Selene Maria de Arruda Guelli Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    For decades the burning of fossil fuels released a lot of pollutants in the atmosphere. Among the most harmful is sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), which reacts with the moisture in the air and turns into sulfuric acid, being the main cause of acid rain. Acid rain is very harmful to animal and plant kingdoms; accelerates the corrosion's processes of buildings and monuments, and causes serious health problems for humans. As a result, many countries have reformed their legislation to require the sale of fuels with very low sulfur content. The existing processes of desulfurization are not capable of removing sulfur so low. Therefore, there has developed a new process called bio desulfurization. In this process, the degradation of sulfur occurs through the action of microorganisms that act as catalysts. The bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis has emerged as one of the most promising for bio desulfurization because it removes the sulfur without breaking the benzene rings, thereby maintaining the potential energy of the same. Using dibenzothiophene as a model of sulfur compounds, the products of the bio desulfurization process are 2- hydroxybiphenyl and sulfate. In this study we sought to examine the desulfurizing capacity of national Rhodococcus erythropolis strain ATCC4277 in a batch reactor using concentrations of organic phase (n-dodecane) of 20 and 80% (v/v). Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC4277 was capable of degrading DBT in 93.3 and 98.0% in the presence of 20 and 80% (v/v) of synthetic fuel, respectively. (author)

  1. The Survey of Withani somnifera Extraction against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteria to Selective Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bokaeian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Due  to  more  resistance  of  pathogenic  bacteria  to  new  and  current antibiotics  researchers  are  looking  to  find  the  agents  of  herbal  with  antimicrobial activities in order to replace chemical drugs.Methods:   The herbal extract of Withani somnifera was done by using a rotary vacuum,20 strains of Pseudomons aeruginosa were isolated from urinary infections hospitalized patients  in  city of Zabol  hospital.  The  MIC  Withani  somnifera  were  determined  by dilution method in various concentrations. Sensitivity of strains to multiple antibiotics was evaluated by standard disk diffusion Kirby-Bauer.Results:    The  result  showed  that  P.  aeruginosa  were  resistance  to  4  of the  agents including ampicillin  (85%, nitrofurantoin  (65%, nalidixic acid  (65%, ciprofloxacin (15% and for 5 strains of Pseudomonas showed MIC with activity of 100 ppm.Conclusion:   This  study  has  suggested  the  effect  of  winter  cherry  extract  on  P. aeruginosa in the in vitro assay. It s effectiveness of on in vivo system can be examined in future.

  2. Kinetic analysis of strains of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in cocoa pulp simulation media toward development of a starter culture for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeber, Timothy; Janssens, Maarten; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2010-12-01

    The composition of cocoa pulp simulation media (PSM) was optimized with species-specific strains of lactic acid bacteria (PSM-LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (PSM-AAB). Also, laboratory fermentations were carried out in PSM to investigate growth and metabolite production of strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and of Acetobacter pasteurianus isolated from Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations, in view of the development of a defined starter culture. In a first step, a selection of strains was made out of a pool of strains of these LAB and AAB species, obtained from previous studies, based on their fermentation kinetics in PSM. Also, various concentrations of citric acid in the presence of glucose and/or fructose (PSM-LAB) and of lactic acid in the presence of ethanol (PSM-AAB) were tested. These data could explain the competitiveness of particular cocoa-specific strains, namely, L. plantarum 80 (homolactic and acid tolerant), L. fermentum 222 (heterolactic, citric acid fermenting, mannitol producing, and less acid tolerant), and A. pasteurianus 386B (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid overoxidizing, acid tolerant, and moderately heat tolerant), during the natural cocoa bean fermentation process. For instance, it turned out that the capacity to use citric acid, which was exhibited by L. fermentum 222, is of the utmost importance. Also, the formation of mannitol was dependent not only on the LAB strain but also on environmental conditions. A mixture of L. plantarum 80, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B can now be considered a mixed-strain starter culture for better controlled and more reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes.

  3. Kinetic Analysis of Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Acetic Acid Bacteria in Cocoa Pulp Simulation Media toward Development of a Starter Culture for Cocoa Bean Fermentation ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeber, Timothy; Janssens, Maarten; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2010-01-01

    The composition of cocoa pulp simulation media (PSM) was optimized with species-specific strains of lactic acid bacteria (PSM-LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (PSM-AAB). Also, laboratory fermentations were carried out in PSM to investigate growth and metabolite production of strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and of Acetobacter pasteurianus isolated from Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations, in view of the development of a defined starter culture. In a first step, a selection of strains was made out of a pool of strains of these LAB and AAB species, obtained from previous studies, based on their fermentation kinetics in PSM. Also, various concentrations of citric acid in the presence of glucose and/or fructose (PSM-LAB) and of lactic acid in the presence of ethanol (PSM-AAB) were tested. These data could explain the competitiveness of particular cocoa-specific strains, namely, L. plantarum 80 (homolactic and acid tolerant), L. fermentum 222 (heterolactic, citric acid fermenting, mannitol producing, and less acid tolerant), and A. pasteurianus 386B (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid overoxidizing, acid tolerant, and moderately heat tolerant), during the natural cocoa bean fermentation process. For instance, it turned out that the capacity to use citric acid, which was exhibited by L. fermentum 222, is of the utmost importance. Also, the formation of mannitol was dependent not only on the LAB strain but also on environmental conditions. A mixture of L. plantarum 80, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B can now be considered a mixed-strain starter culture for better controlled and more reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes. PMID:20889778

  4. [Antagonism between hospital strains of Staphylococcus aureus and lactic acid bacteria in vitro and the use of the latter as a sanitary agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambartsumian, A D; Dekhtsunian, K M; Atopek, S Ia; Erzinkian, L A

    1983-08-01

    The study of antagonism between S. aureus hospital strains and lactic acid bacteria, strain 317/402 "Nariné", revealed that the latter possessed high antagonistic activity. A new method for the sanitation of carriers of S. aureus hospital strains was developed; this method made it possible to limit the epidemiological significance of 82% of these strains.

  5. THE STUDY OF DIRECTED FERMENTATION PROCESS USING STRAINS OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FOR OBTAINING VEGETABLE PRODUCTS OF STABLE QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kondratenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study the process of directed fermentation of whitehead cabbage variety ‘Slava’, using strains of lactic acid bacteria and their consortium with the degree of their mutual influence. As strains of lactic acid bacteria, we have chosen the following: VCR 536 Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum VKM V-578. To obtain comparable results, all experiments were performed on model mediums. For the first time we studied the dynamics of changes in quality indicators at the process of directed fermentation using strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB including their consortiums. The mathematical model developed adequately describes the degree of destruction of glucose and fructose in the fermentation process. The raw material was undergone to homogenization and sterilization with the aim to create optimal conditionsfor the development of the target microorganisms and to detect the degree of  restruction of fructose and glucose by different strains of microorganisms. The mathematical model developed adequately described the degree of destruction of fructose and glucose in the treatment process. The use of a consortium of lactic acid bacteria (L. plantarum+L. casei to this culture medium is shown to be impractical. The addition of fructose in quantity 0.5% to weight of the model medium enabled to intensify significantly the process of white cabbage fermentation.

  6. Screening lactic acid bacteria strains with ability to bind di-n-butyl phthalate via Turbiscan technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Zhao; Hongfei, Zhao; Shoukat, Sana; Xiaochen, Zhang; Bolin, Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that poses a risk to humans. Previous work indicates that the ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to bind phthalic acid esters is strain-specific. As cell suspensions of LAB strains in aqueous solution are likely to be colloidal dispersions, this study provided a technique to efficiently screen LAB strains that bind DBP via Turbiscan, which has been widely used to measure the stability of emulsions or colloidal dispersions. Eleven LAB strains belonging to Lactobacillus plantarum, Lb. pentosus, Lb. paralimentarius, Lb. helveticus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lb. acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Bifidobacterium bifidum species were used in this study, and seven of them were selected to test in an earlier stage of exploring the process for finding a screening method; others were used for a validation test. It was observed that the various values of the 10 h Turbiscan Stability Index (TSI) of the cell suspension from each strain, at the equilibrium time of dispersed particles according to the peak thickness of cell-suspensions as measured by Turbiscan, had significant negative correlations with the DBP-binding percentage of LAB strains. Higher TSI values are correlated with lower binding of bacteria strains to DBP with a correlation coefficient of 0.8292. Cell surface hydrocarbons of LAB strains and their adherence were observed to correlate with DBP-binding percentages and may lead to the different states of aggregation or equilibrium of bacterial cell-suspensions, and the aggregation of bacterial cells resulted in fewer binding sites in the cell wall for DBP. Finally, four LAB strains were randomly selected to verify the feasibility of the method. In all, the findings demonstrate that TSI might be used as a tool to quickly screen strains that bind DBP. The present work could be extended to the removal of other toxic compounds, when screening of high-efficiency strains is required.

  7. Effect of chosen lactic acid bacteria strains on Staphylococcus aureus in vitro as well as in meat and raw sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka-Pawlicka, M; Uradziński, J; Wiszniewska, A

    2004-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the influence of 15 strains of lactic acid bacteria on the growth of 2 Staphylococcus aureus strains in vitro as well as in meat and raw sausages. The investigations were performed within the framework of three alternate stages which differed in respect to the products studied, the number of Lactobacillus sp. strains and, partly, methodological approach. The study also considered water activity (a(w)) and pH of the products investigated. The results obtained are demonstrated in 5 diagrams. It was found that among 15 strains of Lactobacillus aureus investigated only one strain, Lactobacillus helveticus T 78, showed antagonistic effect on studied strains of Staphylococcus aureus both in vitro as well as in meat and raw sausages. Five other strains of Lactobacillus spp. displayed the antagonistic effect in vitro only. The temperature and incubation time of sausages, but also the type of sausage stuffing were found to have a distinct or slight influence, respectively, on the antagonistic interaction between the bacteria. However, this phenomenon was affected by neither a(w) nor pH.

  8. Distribution of a Nocardia brasiliensis Catalase Gene Fragment in Members of the Genera Nocardia, Gordona, and Rhodococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Johnson, Wendy M.; Welsh, Oliverio; Resendiz-Uresti, Francisco L.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.

    1999-01-01

    An immunodominant protein from Nocardia brasiliensis, P61, was subjected to amino-terminal and internal sequence analysis. Three sequences of 22, 17, and 38 residues, respectively, were obtained and compared with the protein database from GenBank by using the BLAST system. The sequences showed homology to some eukaryotic catalases and to a bromoperoxidase-catalase from Streptomyces violaceus. Its identity as a catalase was confirmed by analysis of its enzymatic activity on H2O2 and by a double-staining method on a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and ferricyanide; the result showed only catalase activity, but no peroxidase. By using one of the internal amino acid sequences and a consensus catalase motif (VGNNTP), we were able to design a PCR assay that generated a 500-bp PCR product. The amplicon was analyzed, and the nucleotide sequence was compared to the GenBank database with the observation of high homology to other bacterial and eukaryotic catalases. A PCR assay based on this target sequence was performed with primers NB10 and NB11 to confirm the presence of the NB10-NB11 gene fragment in several N. brasiliensis strains isolated from mycetoma. The same assay was used to determine whether there were homologous sequences in several type strains from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordona, and Streptomyces. All of the N. brasiliensis strains presented a positive result but only some of the actinomycetes species tested were positive in the PCR assay. In order to confirm these findings, genomic DNA was subjected to Southern blot analysis. A 1.7-kbp band was observed in the N. brasiliensis strains, and bands of different molecular weight were observed in cross-reacting actinomycetes. Sequence analysis of the amplicons of selected actinomycetes showed high homology in this catalase fragment, thus demonstrating that this protein is highly conserved in this group of bacteria. PMID:10325357

  9. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Contains a Novel Degradation Pathway for Limonene

    OpenAIRE

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Swarts, Henk J.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain DCL14, which is able to grow on limonene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from a freshwater sediment sample. This organism was identified as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis by chemotaxonomic and genetic studies. R. erythropolis DCL14 also assimilated the terpenes limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, carveol, carvone, and (−)-menthol, while perillyl alcohol was not utilized as a carbon and energy source. Induction tests with cells grown on limonene revealed t...

  10. The Equine Antimicrobial Peptide eCATH1 Is Effective against the Facultative Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlusselhuber, Margot; Torelli, Riccardo; Martini, Cecilia; Leippe, Matthias; Cattoir, Vincent; Leclercq, Roland; Laugier, Claire; Grötzinger, Joachim; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, the causal agent of rhodococcosis, is a major pathogen of foals and is also responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised humans. Of great concern, strains resistant to currently used antibiotics have emerged. As the number of drugs that are efficient in vivo is limited because of the intracellular localization of the bacterium inside macrophages, new active but cell-permeant drugs will be needed in the near future. In the present study, we evaluated, by in vitro and ex vivo experiments, the ability of the alpha-helical equine antimicrobial peptide eCATH1 to kill intracellular bacterial cells. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of the peptide was assessed in experimental rhodococcosis induced in mice, while the in vivo toxicity was evaluated by behavioral and histopathological analysis. The study revealed that eCATH1 significantly reduced the number of bacteria inside macrophages. Furthermore, the bactericidal potential of the peptide was maintained in vivo at doses that appeared to have no visible deleterious effects for the mice even after 7 days of treatment. Indeed, daily subcutaneous injections of 1 mg/kg body weight of eCATH1 led to a significant reduction of the bacterial load in organs comparable to that obtained after treatment with 10 mg/kg body weight of rifampin. Interestingly, the combination of the peptide with rifampin showed a synergistic interaction in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. These results emphasize the therapeutic potential that eCATH1 represents in the treatment of rhodococcosis. PMID:23817377

  11. Inhibition of food-related bacteria by antibacterial substances produced by Pseudomonas sp. strains isolated from pasteurized milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Ferreira Rangel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the production of antimicrobial substances by strains of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from pasteurized milk and their potential action against food-related bacteria were investigated. Samples of pasteurized milk were purchased from arbitrarily chosen commercial establishments in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the four samples analyzed, three presented several typical colonies of Pseudomonas. About 100 colonies were chosen and subjected to biochemical tests for confirmation of their identity. Eighteen strains of the Pseudomonas genus were identified and submitted to tests for the production of antimicrobial substances. Twelve strains (66.7% were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, four (22.2% as P. aeruginosa, one (5.5% as P. mendocina and one (5.5% as P. pseudoalcaligenes. Only two P. fluorescens strains were unable to produce any antimicrobial substance against any of the indicator strains tested. Most of the strains presented a broad spectrum of action, inhibiting reference and food-related strains such as Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Hafnia alvei, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. Five antimicrobial substance-producing strains, which presented the broadest spectrum of action, were also tested against Staphylococcus aureus reference strains and 26 Staphylococcus sp. strains isolated from foods, some of which were resistant to antibiotics. The producer strains 8.1 and 8.3, both P. aeruginosa, were able to inhibit all the staphylococcal strains tested. The antimicrobial substances produced by strains 8.1 and 8.3 did not seem to be typical bacteriocins, since they were resistant to the three proteolytic enzymes tested. Experiments involving the characterization of these substances are being carried out in order to evaluate their biotechnological application.

  12. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea: Sequencing a Myriad of Type Strains

    KAUST Repository

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Woyke, Tanja; Gö ker, Markus; Parker, Charles T.; Amann, Rudolf; Beck, Brian J.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chun, Jongsik; Colwell, Rita R.; Danchin, Antoine; Dawyndt, Peter; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; DeLong, Edward F.; Detter, John C.; De Vos, Paul; Donohue, Timothy J.; Dong, Xiu-Zhu; Ehrlich, Dusko S.; Fraser, Claire; Gibbs, Richard; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glö ckner, Frank Oliver; Jansson, Janet K.; Keasling, Jay D.; Knight, Rob; Labeda, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lee, Jung-Sook; Li, Wen-Jun; MA, Juncai; Markowitz, Victor; Moore, Edward R. B.; Morrison, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Nelson, Karen E.; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ouzounis, Christos A.; Pace, Norman; Parkhill, Julian; Qin, Nan; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Sikorski, Johannes; Smith, David; Sogin, Mitch; Stevens, Rick; Stingl, Ulrich; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Taylor, Dorothea; Tiedje, Jim M.; Tindall, Brian; Wagner, Michael; Weinstock, George; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Owen; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Field, Dawn; Whitman, William B.; Garrity, George M.; Klenk, Hans Peter

    2014-01-01

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  13. Genomic encyclopedia of bacteria and archaea: sequencing a myriad of type strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos C Kyrpides

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance. However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000. This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  14. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea: Sequencing a Myriad of Type Strains

    KAUST Repository

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2014-08-05

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet\\'s most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet\\'s genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  15. Bioaccumulation of 137Cs by culture collection strains of bacteria and fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipiska, M.; Rozloznik, M.; Augustin, J.

    2003-01-01

    Soil decontamination of soil contaminated by low-level activities of radionuclides, mainly by caesium-137, which come from accidental releases by maintenance of nuclear devices and by liquid wastes reprocessing, is long-term and expensive technology. Knowledge of the causations, which control the processes of bioaccumulation of radionuclides, is a necessary condition for critical assessment and successful utilization of processes of bioremediation in situ in practise. The authors present the experimentally gained quantitative values of bioaccumulation of caesium-137 from water solutions by micro organism cultures of Rhodotorula aurantiaca CCY 20-9-1, Sacharomyces cerevisiae, Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 15906, Streptomyces sp. DX-IX, Coriolus versicolor CCWDF-14 and Rhizopus sp. R-18. Intensively growing cultures reach the highest values of bioaccumulation; the cultures in non-growing phase reach several orders lower values. From researched micro organisms the highest values of bioaccumulation of Cs + 5.1 pmol/g (wet weight) at initial concentration of Cs + in solution co = 1 nmol/l (without carrier) and 29.2 μmol/g (wet weight) at co = 6 mmol/l Cs + (adding of carrier CsCl) were found out at growing culture S. cerevisiae as model of eukaryotic cell after an achievement of maximal stationary grow phase. Acquired information refer to the possible role of soil micro organisms at bioaccumulation of 137 Cs in contaminated soils and their potential utilization in lowering of radioactive contamination of environment (authors)

  16. Screening and identification of lactic acid bacteria strains with high acid-producing from traditional fermented yak yogurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 57 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated and purified from traditional fermented Yak Yogurt in Hongyuan-Sichuan and Yangbajing-Tibet. The strains with high acid-produced were screened by soluble calcium circle and titratable acidity determination. The five strains, 7-1, 22-1, 28-1, 34-1 and 62-1, possessed the high acid-producing and the value of titratable acidity is 196.2, 191.1, 192.2, 194.8 and 200.2 T respectively. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, 22-1 was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, 28-1 as Lactobacillus casei, 34-1 as Lactobacillus fermentium, 7-1 and 62-1 as Enterococcus durans. This study could provide the evidence for researching fermentation strains to improve yogurt quality.

  17. Characterisation of lactic acid bacteria in spontaneously fermented camel milk and selection of strains for fermentation of camel milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugl, Angelina June Brandt; Berhe, Tesfemariam; Kiran, Anil

    2017-01-01

    The microbial communities in spontaneously fermented camel milk from Ethiopia were characterised through metagenomic 16S rRNA sequencing and lactic acid bacteria were isolated with the goal of selecting strains suitable as starter cultures. The fermented camel milk microbiota was dominated either...... by Lactobacillales or by Enterobacteriaceae, depending on incubation temperature and the provider of the milk. Strains of species with a potential use as starter cultures i.e., Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Pediococcus acidilactici, were isolated. Fast acidifiers of camel milk have been isolated...

  18. From oil spills to barley growth - oil-degrading soil bacteria and their promoting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasch, Annett; Reinhard, Anne; Alimbetova, Anna; Omirbekova, Anel; Pasler, Lisa; Schumann, Peter; Kabisch, Johannes; Mukasheva, Togzhan; Schauer, Frieder

    2016-11-01

    Heavy contamination of soils by crude oil is omnipresent in areas of oil recovery and exploitation. Bioremediation by indigenous plants in cooperation with hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms is an economically and ecologically feasible means to reclaim contaminated soils. To study the effects of indigenous soil bacteria capable of utilizing oil hydrocarbons on biomass production of plants growing in oil-contaminated soils eight bacterial strains were isolated from contaminated soils in Kazakhstan and characterized for their abilities to degrade oil components. Four of them, identified as species of Gordonia and Rhodococcus turned out to be effective degraders. They produced a variety of organic acids from oil components, of which 59 were identified and 7 of them are hitherto unknown acidic oil metabolites. One of them, Rhodococcus erythropolis SBUG 2054, utilized more than 140 oil components. Inoculating barley seeds together with different combinations of these bacterial strains restored normal growth of the plants on contaminated soils, demonstrating the power of this approach for bioremediation. Furthermore, we suggest that the plant promoting effect of these bacteria is not only due to the elimination of toxic oil hydrocarbons but possibly also to the accumulation of a variety of organic acids which modulate the barley's rhizosphere environment. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Members of the genera Paenibacillus and Rhodococcus harbor genes homologous to enterococcal glycopeptide resistance genes vanA and vanB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, L.; Christensen, H.; Hasman, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Genes homologous to enterococcal glycopeptide resistance genes vanA and vanB were found in glycopeptide-resistant Paenibacillus and Rhodococcus strains from soil. The putative D-Ala:D-Lac ligase genes in Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 and Paenibacillus apiarius PA-B2B were closely related...

  20. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Rhodococcus erythropolis MTHt3 biotransforms ergopeptines to lysergic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamhesl, Michaela; Apfelthaler, Elisabeth; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi Elisabeth; Kunz-Vekiru, Elisavet; Krska, Rudolf; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Moll, Wulf-Dieter

    2015-03-28

    Ergopeptines are a predominant class of ergot alkaloids produced by tall fescue grass endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum or cereal pathogen Claviceps purpurea. The vasoconstrictive activity of ergopeptines makes them toxic for mammals, and they can be a problem in animal husbandry. We isolated an ergopeptine degrading bacterial strain, MTHt3, and classified it, based on its 16S rDNA sequence, as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis (Nocardiaceae, Actinobacteria). For strain isolation, mixed microbial cultures were obtained from artificially ergot alkaloid-enriched soil, and provided with the ergopeptine ergotamine in mineral medium for enrichment. Individual colonies derived from such mixed cultures were screened for ergotamine degradation by high performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. R. erythropolis MTHt3 converted ergotamine to ergine (lysergic acid amide) and further to lysergic acid, which accumulated as an end product. No other tested R. erythropolis strain degraded ergotamine. R. erythropolis MTHt3 degraded all ergopeptines found in an ergot extract, namely ergotamine, ergovaline, ergocristine, ergocryptine, ergocornine, and ergosine, but the simpler lysergic acid derivatives agroclavine, chanoclavine, and ergometrine were not degraded. Temperature and pH dependence of ergotamine and ergine bioconversion activity was different for the two reactions. Degradation of ergopeptines to ergine is a previously unknown microbial reaction. The reaction end product, lysergic acid, has no or much lower vasoconstrictive activity than ergopeptines. If the genes encoding enzymes for ergopeptine catabolism can be cloned and expressed in recombinant hosts, application of ergopeptine and ergine degrading enzymes for reduction of toxicity of ergot alkaloid-contaminated animal feed may be feasible.

  2. Antagonistic effect of chosen lactic acid bacteria strains on Yersinia enterocolitica species in model set-ups, meat and fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka-Pawlicka, M; Uradziński, J

    2003-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the influence of 15 strains of lactic acid bacteria on the growth of 8 Yersinia enterocolitica strains in model set-ups, and in meat and ageing fermented sausages. The investigations were performed within the framework of three alternate stages which differed in respect to the products studied, the number of Lactobacillus sp. strains and, partly, methodological approach. The ratio between lactic acid bacteria and Yersinia enterocolitica strains studied was, depending on the variant of experiment, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1, respectively. The study also considered water activity (aw) and pH of the products investigated. The results suggest that all the lactic acid bacteria strains used within the framework of the model set-ups had antagonistic effect on all the Salmonella sp. strains. However, this ability was not observed with respect to of tested lactic acid bacteria strains in meat and fermented sausage. This ability was possessed by one of the strains investigated--Lactobacillus helveticus T 78. The temperature and time of the incubation of sausages, but not aw and pH, were found to have a distinct influence on the antagonistic interaction between the bacteria tested.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of polyphenol-rich fractions from Sida alba L. (Malvaceae) against co-trimoxazol-resistant bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, Kiessoun; Hilou, Adama; Mavoungou, Jacques François; Lepengué, Alexis Nicaise; Souza, Alain; Barro, Nicolas; Datté, Jacques Y; M'batchi, Bertrand; Nacoulma, Odile Germaine

    2012-02-24

    The increased resistance of microorganisms to the currently used antimicrobials has lead to the evaluation of other agents that might have antimicrobial activity. Medicinal plants are sources of phytochemicals which are able to initiate different biological activities including antimicrobials In vitro antibacterial (MIC, MBC and time-kill studies) of polyphenol-rich fractions from Sida alba L. (Malvaceae) was assessed using ten bacteria strains (Gram-negative and Gram-positive). All test bacteria were susceptible to the polyphenol-rich fractions. Time-kill results showed that after 5 h exposition there was no viable microorganism in the initial inoculum and the effect of polyphenol-rich fractions was faster on Enterococcus faecalis (Gram-positive bacterium) comparatively to the other bacteria strains. The data analysis indicates that the tested of polyphenol-rich fractions has significant effects when compared with the standard antibiotic. These results therefore justify the traditional use of sida alba L., alone or in combination with other herbs to treat bacterial infections.

  4. Successful bioaugmentation of an activated sludge reactor with Rhodococcus sp. YYL for efficient tetrahydrofuran degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yanlai; Lu, Zhenmei; Zhu, Fengxiang; Min, Hang; Bian, Caimiao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Rhodococcus sp. YYL is an efficient tetrahydrofuran-degrading strain. • Strain YYL was used to augment an activated sludge system for THF degradation. • Successful bioaugmentation was achieved only by coinoculation of strain YYL and the two bacilli. • Successful bioaugmentation of the system resulted in efficient THF degradation. -- Abstract: The exchange of tetrahydrofuran (THF)-containing wastewater should significantly affect the performance of an activated sludge system. In this study, the feasibility of using THF-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL to bioaugment an activated sludge system treating THF wastewater was explored. As indicated by a DGGE analysis, strain YYL alone could not dominate the system, with the concentration of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) decreasing to nearly half of the initial concentration after 45 d, and the microbial diversity was found to be significantly reduced. However, after the reactor was augmented with the mixed culture of strain YYL and two bacilli initially coexisting in the enriched isolation source, strain YYL quickly became dominant in the system and was incorporated into the activated sludge. The concentration of MLSS increased from 2.1 g/L to 7.3 g/L in 20 d, and the efficiency of THF removal from the system was remarkably improved. After the successful bioaugmentation, more than 95% of THF was completely removed from the wastewater when 20 mM THF was continuously loaded into the system. In conclusion, our research first demonstrates that bioaugmentation of activated sludge system for THF degradation is feasible but that successful bioaugmentation should utilize a THF-degrading mixed culture as the inoculum, in which the two bacilli might help strain YYL colonize in activated sludge by co-aggregation

  5. Cultural and morphological properties of the vaccine strain Yersinia pestis EV NIIEG bacteria after photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianova, Onega V.; Lyapina, Anna M.; Khizhnyakova, Mariya A.; Laskavy, Vladislav N.; Feodorova, Valentina A.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.

    2015-03-01

    New method of photoinactivation of plague microbes (bacteria Yersinia pestis) has been suggested. Rate of growth of colonies of Y. pestis EV NIIEG at specific regimes of photo processing have been analyzed. Dependence of growth on exposure time and concentrations of photosensitizer (methylene blue) has been studied. Number of colony forming units of Y. pestis EV NIIEG bacteria as a function of intensity of light and concentration of methylene blue has been scrutinized.

  6. Effects of the inclusion of a mixed Psychrotrophic bacteria strain for sewage treatment in constructed wetland in winter seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Meizhen; Li, Zhengtao; Yang, Yuewei; Chen, Junfeng; Jiang, Jie

    2018-04-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been used globally in wastewater treatment for years. CWs represent an efficient ecological system which is both energy-saving and low in investment for construction and operational cost. In addition, CWs also have the advantage of being easy to operate and maintain. However, the operation of CWs at northern latitudes (both mid and high) is sometimes quite demanding, due to the inhibitory effect of low temperatures that often occur in winter. To evaluate the wastewater treatment performance of a culture of mixed Psychrotrophic bacteria strains in an integrated vertical-flow CW, the removal rates of ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N), chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrite nitrogen [Formula: see text], nitrate nitrogen [Formula: see text] and total phosphorus (TP) were quantified at different bacterial dosages to determine the best bacterial dosage and establish kinetic degradation models of the mixed strains. The bacterial culture was made up of Psychrobacter TM-1, Sphingobacterium TM-2 and Pseudomonas TM-3, mixed together at a volume/volume ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 (at bacterial suspension concentrations of 4.4 × 10 9  ml -1 ). Results showed that the organic pollutants (nitrogen and phosphorus) in the sewage could be efficiently removed by the culture of mixed Psychrotrophic bacteria. The optimal dosage of this mixed bacteria strain was 2.5%, and the treatment efficiency of COD, NH 3 -N, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], total nitrogen and TP were stable at 91.8%, 91.1%, 88.0%, 93.8%, 94.8% and 95.2%, respectively, which were 1.5, 2.0, 2.1, 1.5, 2.2 and 1.3 times those of the control group. In addition, a pseudo-first-order degradation model was a good fit for the degradation pattern observed for each of these pollutants.

  7. Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from cattle slaughtered at two abattoirs in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouzrout Rachid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine Tuberculosis is prevalent in Algeria despite governmental attempts to control the disease. The objective of this study was to conduct, for the first time, molecular characterization of a population sample of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from slaughter cattle in Algeria. Between August and November 2007, 7250 animals were consecutively screened at the abattoirs of Algiers and Blida. In 260 animals, gross visible granulomatous lesions were detected and put into culture. Bacterial isolates were subsequently analysed by molecular methods. Results Altogether, 101 bacterial strains from 100 animals were subjected to molecular characterization. M. bovis was isolated from 88 animals. Other bacteria isolated included one strain of M. caprae, four Rhodococcus equi strains, three Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM and five strains of other bacterial species. The M. bovis strains isolated showed 22 different spoligotype patterns; four of them had not been previously reported. The majority of M. bovis strains (89% showed spoligotype patterns that were previously observed in strains from European cattle. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR typing supported a link between M. bovis strains from Algeria and France. One spoligotype pattern has also been shown to be frequent in M. bovis strains from Mali although the VNTR pattern of the Algerian strains differed from the Malian strains. Conclusion M. bovis infections account for a high amount of granulomatous lesions detected in Algerian slaughter cattle during standard meat inspection at Algiers and Blida abattoir. Molecular typing results suggested a link between Algerian and European strains of M. bovis.

  8. Direct delignification of untreated bark chips with mixed cultures of bacteria. [Bacillus and Cellulomonas strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, A M; Gillie, J P; Lebeault, J M

    1981-01-01

    Delignification of pine bark chips was observed after about 35 days when they were the sole carbon source in mixed liquid cultures of cellulolytic and lignin degrading strains of Bacillus and Cellulomonas. No delignification was observed in pure cultures. Free tannins liberated from the chips were also degraded in most of the cultures. The necessity of combining a cellulolytic and lignin degrading bacterial strain to obtain delignification is discussed. (Refs. 25).

  9. Lipid composition in a strain of Bacillus subtilis, a producer of iturin A lipopeptides that are active against uropathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, Przemysław; Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Siewiera, Paulina; Moryl, Magdalena; Płaza, Grażyna; Chojniak, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections are a common disease in humans. Therefore, new methods are needed to destroy biofilms that are formed by uropathogens. Iturin A lipopeptides (LPs) C14 and C15 are potent biosurfactants synthetized by the Bacillus subtilis I'1a strain. The biological activity of extracted LPs was confirmed by examining extracts from I'1a cultures against uropathogenic bacteria that had been isolated from biofilms on urinary catheters. Compared with cultures of DSM 3257, which produce surfactin at a relatively low level, the extract obtained from strain I'1a exhibited a greater inhibitory effect against both planktonic and sessile forms of Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii and Enterococcus faecalis. Moreover, cyclic LP biosurfactants may disturb the integrity of cytoplasmic membranes; therefore, we investigated the effects of synthetized LPs on fatty acids and phospholipids of B. subtilis. LPs and lipids were analyzed using GC-MS, LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF techniques. Compared with B. subtilis DSM 3257, membranes of the I'1a strain were characterized by an increased amount of anteiso fatty acids and a ten-fold higher ratio of phosphatidylglycerol (PG)-to-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Interestingly, in cultures of B. subtilis DSM 3257 supplemented with LP extracts of the I'1a strain, the PG-to-PE ratio was fourfold higher, and the amount of anteiso fatty acids was also increased.

  10. Isolation of cultivable thermophilic lactic acid bacteria from cheeses made with mesophilic starter and molecular comparison with dairy-related Lactobacillus helveticus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Elisabeth Penderup; Ardö, Ylva Margareta; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2009-01-01

    -related Lact. helveticus strains indicated that one isolate was a Lact. helveticus. Partial sequencing of 16S rRNA confirmed this, and the remaining four strains were identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus fermentum and Enterococcus faecium. The rep-PCR profile of the isolated Lact. helveticus......Aims: To isolate cultivable thermophilic lactic acid bacteria from cheeses made with mesophilic starter and compare them with dairy-related Lactobacillus helveticus strains using molecular typing methods. Methods and Results: The number of thermophilic bacteria in seven commercial cheeses...

  11. Biosurfactant production by halotolerant Rhodococcus fascians from Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Victoria; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia

    2010-08-01

    Isolate A-3 from Antarctic soil in Casey Station, Wilkes Land, was characterized for growth on hydrocarbons. Use of glucose or kerosene as a sole carbon source in the culture medium favoured biosynthesis of surfactant which, by thin-layer chromatography, indicated the formation of a rhamnose-containing glycolipid. This compound lowered the surface tension at the air/water interface to 27 mN/m as well as inhibited the growth of B. subtilis ATCC 6633 and exhibited hemolytic activity. A highly hydrophobic surface of the cells suggests that uptake occurs via a direct cell-hydrocarbon substrate contact. Strain A-3 is Gram-positive, halotolerant, catalase positive, urease negative and has rod-coccus shape. Its cell walls contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. Phylogenetic analysis based on comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain A-3 is closely related to Rhodococcus fascians with which it shares 100% sequence similarity. This is the first report on rhamnose-containing biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus fascians isolated from Antarctic soil.

  12. Biodegradation of dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate by Rhodococcus sp. L4 isolated from activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Fei; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Jinhui; Zeng, Xin; Luo, Qifang; Wang, Lin

    2009-09-15

    In this study, an aerobic bacterial strain capable of utilizing dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) as sole carbon source and energy was isolated from activated sludge collected from a dyeing plant. According to its morphology, physiochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence, the strain was identified as Rhodococcus ruber. The biodegradation batch tests of DMP, DEP and DBP by the Rhodococcus sp. L4 showed the optimal pH value, temperature and substrate concentration: pH 7.0-8.0, 30-37 degrees C and PAEs concentration Kinetics of degradation have also been performed at different initial concentrations. The results show that the degradation can be described with exponential model. The half-life of degradation was about 1.30 days when the concentration of PAEs mixture was lower than 300 mg/L. PAEs contaminated water samples (300 mg/L) with non-emulsification and completed emulsification were prepared to investigate the effect on PAEs degradation rate. Little difference between the above two sample preparations was observed in terms of ultimate degradation rate. Rhodococcus sp. L4 can also grow on phenol, sodium benzoate or naphthalene solution as sole carbon source and energy which suggests its ability in resisting environmental toxicants. This work provides some new evidence for the possibility of applying Rhodococcus for contaminated water remediation in the area of industry.

  13. Chromium (VI) biosorption properties of multiple resistant bacteria isolated from industrial sewerage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetibo, Ganiyu Oladunjoye; Ilori, Matthew Olusoji; Obayori, Oluwafemi Sunday; Amund, Olukayode Oladipo

    2013-08-01

    Chromium (VI) [Cr (VI)] biosorption by four resistant autochthonous bacterial strains was investigated to determine their potential for use in sustainable marine water-pollution control. Maximum exchange between Cr (VI) ions and protons on the cells surfaces were at 30-35 °C, pH 2.0 and 350-450 mg/L. The bacterial strains effectively removed 79.0-90.5 % Cr (VI) ions from solution. Furthermore, 85.3-93.0 % of Cr (VI) ions were regenerated from the biomasses, and 83.4-91.7 % of the metal was adsorbed when the biomasses was reused. Langmuir isotherm performed better than Freundlich isotherm, depicting that Cr (VI) affinity was in the sequence Rhodococcus sp. AL03Ni > Burkholderia cepacia AL96Co > Corynebacterium kutscheri FL108Hg > Pseudomonas aeruginosa CA207Ni. Biosorption isotherms confirmed that Rhodococcus sp. AL03Ni was a better biosorbent with a maximum uptake of 107.46 mg of Cr (VI) per g (dry weight) of biomass. The results highlight the high potential of the organisms for bacteria-based detoxification of Cr (VI) via biosorption.

  14. Characterization of Virulence Plasmids and Serotyping of Rhodococcus equi Isolates from Submaxillary Lymph Nodes of Pigs in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Makrai, László; Takayama, Saki; Dénes, Béla; Hajtós, István; Sasaki, Yukako; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Tsubaki, Shiro; Major, Andrea; Fodor, László; Varga, János; Takai, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    The plasmid types and serotypes of 164 Rhodococcus equi strains obtained from submaxillary lymph nodes of swine from different piggeries in 28 villages and towns located throughout the country were examined. The strains were tested by PCR for the presence of 15- to 17-kDa virulence-associated protein antigen (VapA) and 20-kDa virulence-associated protein antigen (VapB) genes. Plasmid DNAs were isolated and analyzed by digestion with restriction endonucleases to estimate size and compare their...

  15. Distribution of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the soil environment and their contribution to bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Yuki; Horii, Sachie; Matsuno, Toshihide; Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Mukai, Masaki; Kubo, Motoki

    2013-05-01

    A real-time PCR quantification method for indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (HDB) carrying the alkB gene in the soil environment was developed to investigate their distribution in soil. The detection limit of indigenous HDB by the method was 1 × 10(6) cells/g-soil. The indigenous HDB were widely distributed throughout the soil environment and ranged from 3.7 × 10(7) to 5.0 × 10(8) cells/g-soil, and the ratio to total bacteria was 0.1-4.3 %. The dynamics of total bacteria, indigenous HDB, and Rhodococcus erythropolis NDKK6 (carrying alkB R2) during bioremediation were analyzed. During bioremediation with an inorganic nutrient treatment, the numbers of these bacteria were slightly increased. The numbers of HDB (both indigenous bacteria and strain NDKK6) were gradually decreased from the middle stage of bioremediation. Meanwhile, the numbers of these bacteria were highly increased and were maintained during bioremediation with an organic nutrient. The organic treatment led to activation of not only the soil bacteria but also the HDB, so an efficient bioremediation was carried out.

  16. Succession of Selected Strains of Acetobacter pasteurianus and Other Acetic Acid Bacteria in Traditional Balsamic Vinegar

    OpenAIRE

    Gullo, M.; De Vero, L.; Giudici, P.

    2009-01-01

    The application of a selected Acetobacter pasteurianus strain for traditional balsamic vinegar production was assessed. Genomic DNA was extracted from biofilms after enrichment cultures on GYC medium (10% glucose, 1.0% yeast extract, 2.0% calcium carbonate) and used for PCR/denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus/PCR sequencing. Results suggested that double-culture fermentation is suitable for traditional balsamic...

  17. Biodegradation waste of the stations service by Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucci, Oscar Hector; Acuna, Adrian Javier; Pucci, Graciela Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The strain Rhodococcus erythropolis ohp-al-gp was isolated from turbine oil contaminated soil from northern Santa Cruz province, Argentina. Because of its potential in bioremediation, the aim was to know the abilities for degradation of pure compounds and mixtures of hydrocarbons, as well as degradation in the presence and absence of diesel nitrogen measured by gas chromatography. The strain possesses the ability to use diesel, kerosene, lubricating oil, pristane, hexane, heptane, octane, pentadecane and hexadecane. R. erythropolis ohp-al-gp has excellent potential for bioremediation of hydrocarbons, which are conflictive as lubricating oils, their potential use in removing mud from washing engines or gas stations would be its most important application. The degradation rate in optimal culture conditions, gives it an additional advantage. It also has a low degradation in the absence of nitrogen, a frequent limiting factor in Patagonian soils.

  18. Competitive advantage of bacteriocinogenic strains within lactic acid bacteria consortium of raw milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Rogelj

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of gene determinants for different bacteriocins has been already demonstrated in traditional Slovenian types of raw milk cheeses ‘Tolminc’ and ‘Kraški’. These genes were present also in the cultivable microbiota. In this research the aim was to establish how the presence of gene determinants for bacteriocins in microbial consortia is reflected in its antimicrobial activity. In addition, one of the goals was to determine whether the strains that carry gene determinants for bacteriocins have any competitive growth advantage in microbial population. Microbial consortium of ‘Tolminc’ cheese was propagated in milk and examined at the end of propagation its antimicrobial activity and the presence of gene determinants for bacteriocins. Comparison of the results obtained before and after propagation leaded to the conclusion that most of the strains possessing gene determinants for bacteriocins were unable to persist during propagation. The strains which did persist during propagation carried gene determinants for enterocins P, L50B and cytolysin. Antimicrobial activity of consortium before and after propagation was not substantially different and cannot be attributed to any of detected bacteriocins.

  19. Characterization of Exoelectrogenic Bacteria Enterobacter Strains Isolated from a Microbial Fuel Cell Exposed to Copper Shock Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Cuijie; Li, Jiangwei; Qin, Dan; Chen, Lixiang; Zhao, Feng; Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Hongbo; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of generating electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained increasing interest. Here fourteen exoelectrogenic bacterial strains were isolated from the anodic biofilm in an MFC before and after copper (Cu) shock load by Hungate roll-tube technique with solid ferric (III) oxide as an electron acceptor and acetate as an electron donor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that they were all closely related to Enterobacter ludwigii DSM 16688T within the Enterobacteriaceae family, although these isolated bacteria showed slightly different morphology before and after Cu shock load. Two representative strains R2B1 (before Cu shock load) and B4B2 (after Cu shock load) were chosen for further analysis. B4B2 is resistant to 200 mg L−1 of Cu(II) while R2B1 is not, which indicated the potential selection of the Cu shock load. Raman analysis revealed that both R2B1 and B4B2 contained c-type cytochromes. Cyclic voltammetry measurements revealed that strain R2B1 had the capacity to transfer electrons to electrodes. The experimental results demonstrated that strain R2B1 was capable of utilizing a wide range of substrates, including Luria-Bertani (LB) broth, cellulose, acetate, citrate, glucose, sucrose, glycerol and lactose to generate electricity, with the highest current density of 440 mA·m−2 generated from LB-fed MFC. Further experiments indicated that the bacterial cell density had potential correlation with the current density. PMID:25412475

  20. Characterization of exoelectrogenic bacteria enterobacter strains isolated from a microbial fuel cell exposed to copper shock load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijie Feng

    Full Text Available Microorganisms capable of generating electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs have gained increasing interest. Here fourteen exoelectrogenic bacterial strains were isolated from the anodic biofilm in an MFC before and after copper (Cu shock load by Hungate roll-tube technique with solid ferric (III oxide as an electron acceptor and acetate as an electron donor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that they were all closely related to Enterobacter ludwigii DSM 16688T within the Enterobacteriaceae family, although these isolated bacteria showed slightly different morphology before and after Cu shock load. Two representative strains R2B1 (before Cu shock load and B4B2 (after Cu shock load were chosen for further analysis. B4B2 is resistant to 200 mg L-1 of Cu(II while R2B1 is not, which indicated the potential selection of the Cu shock load. Raman analysis revealed that both R2B1 and B4B2 contained c-type cytochromes. Cyclic voltammetry measurements revealed that strain R2B1 had the capacity to transfer electrons to electrodes. The experimental results demonstrated that strain R2B1 was capable of utilizing a wide range of substrates, including Luria-Bertani (LB broth, cellulose, acetate, citrate, glucose, sucrose, glycerol and lactose to generate electricity, with the highest current density of 440 mA·m-2 generated from LB-fed MFC. Further experiments indicated that the bacterial cell density had potential correlation with the current density.

  1. Recovery of metallo-tolerant and antibiotic resistant psychrophilic bacteria from Siachen glacier, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafiq

    Full Text Available Cultureable bacterial diversity of previously unexplored Siachen glacier, Pakistan, was studied. Out of 50 isolates 33 (66% were Gram negative and 17 (34% Gram positive. About half of the isolates were pigment producers and were able to grow at 4-37°C. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed Gram negative bacteria dominated by Proteobacteria (especially γ-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The genus Pseudomonas (51.51%, 17 was dominant among γ- proteobacteria. β-proteobacteria constituted 4 (12.12% Alcaligenes and 4 (12.12% Janthinobacterium strains. Among Gram positive bacteria, phylum Actinobacteria, Rhodococcus (23.52%, 4 and Arthrobacter (23.52%, 4 were the dominating genra. Other bacteria belonged to Phylum Firmicutes with representative genus Carnobacterium (11.76%, 2 and 4 isolates represented 4 genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Staphylococcus and Planomicrobium. Most of the Gram negative bacteria were moderate halophiles, while most of the Gram positives were extreme halophiles and were able to grow up to 6.12 M of NaCl. More than 2/3 of the isolates showed antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant S. aureus, E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterococcus faecium, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus and ATCC strains. Gram positive bacteria (94.11% were more resistant to heavy metals as compared to Gram negative (78.79% and showed maximum tolerance against iron and least tolerance against mercury.

  2. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  3. ECOLOGY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS 2066-7 STRAIN: A BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF BACTERIA ONION DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Sadik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth response of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans 2066-7 to change in water activity (aw, temperature, and pH was determined in vitro in basic medium. The minimum temperature at which 2066-7 was able to grow was 7°C, and the growth of 2066-7 did not change at varying pH levels (4–10.34. The best growth was obtained at a water activity of 0.98 in all media modified with the four solutes (glucose, glycerol, NaCl and polyethylene glycol. The solute used to reduce water activity had a great influence on bacterial growth, especially at unfavorable conditions (low temperature. This study has defined the range of environmental conditions (aw, pH, and temperature over which the bacteria may be developed for biological control of plant diseases.

  4. Prebiotic and synbiotic effects on rats fed malted barley with selected bacteria strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Zhong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Butyric acid, one of the key products formed when β-glucans are degraded by the microbiota in the colon, has been proposed to be important for colonic health. Glutamine bound to the fibre may have similar effects once it has been liberated from the fibre in the colon. Both β-glucans and glutamine are found in high amounts in malted barley. Lactobacillus rhamnosus together with malt has been shown to increase the formation of butyric acid further in rats. Objective: To investigate whether Lactobacillus rhamnosus 271, Lactobacillus paracasei 87002, Lactobacillus plantarum HEAL 9 and 19, and Bifidobacterium infantis CURE 21 affect the levels of short-chain fatty acids and glutamine in caecum and portal blood of rats fed barley malt. Design: The experimental diets were fed for 12 days. The daily dose of the probiotic strain was 1×109 colony forming units and the intake of fibre 0.82 g/day. Results: The malt mostly contained insoluble fibre polymers (93%, consisting of glucose and xylose (38–41 g/kg and some arabinose (21 g/kg. The fibre polysaccharides were quite resistant to fermentation in the rats, regardless of whether or not probiotics were added (25–30% were fermented. Caecal and portal levels of acetic acid decreased in the rats after the addition of L. plantarum HEAL 9 and L. rhamnosus 271, and also the levels of butyric acid. Viable counts of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae were unaffected, while the caecal composition of Lactobacilli was influenced by the type of strain administrated. Portal levels of glutamine were unchanged, but glycine levels increased with L. plantarum HEAL 9 and 19 and phenylalanine with L. rhamnosus 271. Conclusions: Although the probiotic strains survived and reached the caecum, except B. infantis CURE 21, there were no effects on viable counts or in the fermentation of different fibre components, but the formation of some bacterial metabolites decreased. This may be due to

  5. Key volatile aroma compounds of lactic acid fermented malt based beverages - impact of lactic acid bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsogning Dongmo, Sorelle; Sacher, Bertram; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Becker, Thomas

    2017-08-15

    This study aims to define the aroma composition and key aroma compounds of barley malt wort beverages produced from fermentation using six lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry-olfactometry and flame ionization detection was employed; key aroma compounds were determined by means of aroma extract dilution analysis. Fifty-six detected volatile compounds were similar among beverages. However, significant differences were observed in the concentration of individual compounds. Key aroma compounds (flavor dilution (FD) factors ≥16) were β-damascenone, furaneol, phenylacetic acid, 2-phenylethanol, 4-vinylguaiacol, sotolon, methional, vanillin, acetic acid, nor-furaneol, guaiacol and ethyl 2-methylbutanoate. Furthermore, acetaldehyde had the greatest odor activity value of up to 4266. Sensory analyses revealed large differences in the flavor profile. Beverage from L. plantarum Lp. 758 showed the highest FD factors in key aroma compounds and was correlated to fruity flavors. Therefore, we suggest that suitable LAB strain selection may improve the flavor of malt based beverages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lag phase and biomass determination of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans GM3 for degradation of phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Defiery, M. E. J.; Reddy, G.

    2018-05-01

    Among various techniques available for removal of phenol, biodegradation is an eco-friendly and cost effective method. Thus, it is required to understand the process of biodegradation of phenol, such as investigate on lag phase and biomass concentration. Phenol degrading bacteria were isolated from soil samples of industrial sites in enriched mineral salts medium (MSM) with phenol as a sole source of energy and carbon. One isolate of potential phenol degradation from consortium for phenol degrading studies was identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans GM3. Lag phase and biomass determination of R. pyridinivorans GM3 was studied with different phenol concentrations under pH 8.5 at temperature 32 Co and 200 rpm. Microbial biomass was directly proportional to increasing phenol concentration between 1.0 to 2.0 g/L with a maximum dry biomass of 1.745 g/L was noted after complete degradation of 2.0 g/L phenol in 48 hours.

  7. Management of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns I

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Imogen Johns Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, UK Abstract: Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, is the most important cause of pneumonia in foals aged 3 weeks to 5 months. The disease occurs worldwide, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality on endemically affected farms. Foals appear to become infected early in life, but clinical signs are typically delayed until 1–3 months of age because of the insidious nature of the disease. Although pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation, up to 74% of foals may concurrently have extrapulmonary disorders, including both extrapulmonary infections (abdominal abscessation, colitis, osteomyelitis and immune-mediated disorders (nonseptic synovitis, uveitis. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical signs and abnormalities on hematologic screening and thoracic imaging in an appropriately aged foal and is confirmed by bacteriologic culture of the organism. Management of R. equi infections, in particular on farms with endemic disease, combines appropriate treatment of affected foals with preventative measures targeted at preventing infection and identifying foals before the development of severe disease. The combination of rifampin and a macrolide antimicrobial is recommended for treatment, as the combination is synergistic, reaches high intracellular concentrations, and should minimize the development of antimicrobial resistance. The prognosis for survival for foals with R. equi pneumonia is good, especially in foals mildly or subclinically affected, as is the prognosis for future athletic performance. Screening for early identification before the development of clinical signs has been advocated on endemically affected farms, although the most appropriate method, the timing of screening, and the selection of foals requiring treatment have yet to be determined. Recent evidence suggests that

  8. Rhodococcus equi Parte 2: imunologia e profilaxia Rhodococcus equi Part 2: immunology and profilaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Rusca Correa Porto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi é um patógeno ubíquo e habitante da flora intestinal dos equinos de importância na neonatologia equina. Todos os potros são expostos à doença ao nascimento, porém alguns a desenvolvem e outros não. Este artigo revisa características da resposta imune, tanto em adultos competentes quanto em potros suscetíveis ao patógeno. A resposta imune humoral é abordada, incluindo uma discussão sobre o uso do plasma hiperimune como ferramenta profilática. O papel dos mecanismos de imunidade inata na suscetibilidade de alguns potros ao R. equi é também abordado. Da mesma maneira, os componentes envolvidos na resposta cito-mediada são revisados, com atenção particular às pesquisas direcionadas ao desenvolvimento de uma vacina efetiva para ser utilizada em potros.Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen in equine neonatology that is ubiquitous and a normal intestinal inhabitant of equines. All foals are exposed at birth, however, some foals develop disease and others do not. This article reviews concepts of the equine immune response, both in the immune adult and susceptible neonate, with respect to this pathogen. Humoral immune responses are addressed, with a discussion on the use of hyperimmune plasma as a prophylactic tool. The role that innate immune mechanisms play in the susceptibility of some foals to R. equi infection is also highlighted. Likewise, cell-mediated immune components are reviewed, with particular attention directed towards research to develop an effective vaccine for foals.

  9. EVALUACIÓN DE LA BIOTRANSFORMACIÓN DE GERANIOL Y (R-(+-α-PINENO EMPLEANDO CÉLULAS DE Rhodococcus opacus DSM 44313 EVALUATION OF THE BIOTRANSFORMATION OF GERANIOL AND (R-(+-α-PINENE USING CELL OF Rhodococcus opacus DSM 44313

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JENNIFER PILAR ROJAS

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La alta biodisponibilidad de los monoterpenos los hace precursores promisorios en los procesos de biotransformación, mediante los que se producen compuestos de valor agregado que pueden considerarse naturales, debido a que se obtienen por métodos enzimáticos a partir de precursores aislados de la naturaleza. En el presente estudio se evaluó la biotransformación de geraniol y (R-(+-α-pineno empleando la cepa bacteriana Rhodococcus opacus DSM 44313, para ello se determinó la influencia del tiempo de crecimiento de la bacteria, tomando suspensiones celulares en la mitad y finalizando la fase exponencial. También se evaluaron tres tiempos de reacción (12, 24 y 48 h y el efecto de un cosolvente, agregando los sustratos puros y disueltos en etanol al 10%. A partir del geraniol se produjeron geranial, ácido geránico y 6-metil-5-hepten-2-ona, sólo cuando el sustrato se adicionó puro, y se formaron en mayor concentración cuando la bacteria estaba finalizando su fase de crecimiento exponencial. Con el (R-(+-α-pineno se produjo como compuesto principal el (R-(+-cis-verbenol, siendo mayor su concentración agregando el pineno disuelto en etanol, y cuando la bacteria se encontraba en la mitad de su fase de crecimiento exponencial. Los resultados indican que el comportamiento de la bacteria cambia según el sustrato adicionado, debido a las propiedades de cada monoterpeno, pero los compuestos obtenidos con ambos sustratos tienen importantes aplicaciones en las industrias farmacéutica, alimenticia y de perfumeríaThe high bioavailability of monoterpenes make them promising precursors in biotransformation processes, through which produce value-added compounds that can be considered natural because they are obtained by enzymatic methods from precursors isolated from nature. In the present study we evaluated the biotransformation of geraniol and (R-(+-α-pinene using a bacterial strain of Rhodococcus opacus DSM 44313; the influence of growth time

  10. Severe Rhodococcus equi pneumonia: case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Gaub, J

    1991-01-01

    or sputum on standard media, but is frequently regarded as a contaminant. Mortality from Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is high (25%) and early surgical intervention has been recommended. Based on this review, the benefit of surgery seems dubious, whereas good results have been obtained using long......-term antibiotic treatment with erythromycin plus rifampicin, or vancomycin in combination with either of these antibiotics....

  11. Isolation and characterization of Rhodococcus ruber CGMCC3090 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB. ISSN 1684–5315 .... the soil samples by an enrichment culture method in basal medium containing 0.5 ..... The phylogeny of the genus Rhodococcus currently remains ...

  12. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vi...

  13. Biodegradation of Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate by Rhodococcus ruber YC-YT1 in Contaminated Water and Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Ting Yang; Lei Ren; Yang Jia; Shuanghu Fan; Junhuan Wang; Jiayi Wang; Ruth Nahurira; Haisheng Wang; Yanchun Yan

    2018-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylehxyl) phthalate (DEHP) is one of the most broadly representative phthalic acid esters (PAEs) used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) production, and is considered to be an endocrine-disrupting chemical. DEHP and its monoester metabolites are responsible for adverse effects on human health. An efficient DEHP-degrading bacterial strain Rhodococcus ruber YC-YT1, with super salt tolerance (0–12% NaCl), is the first DEHP-degrader isolated from marine plastic debris found in c...

  14. Enhanced degradation of chlorpyrifos in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by five strains of endophytic bacteria and their plant growth promotional ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fayun; Ge, Jing; Li, Yisong; He, Shuang; Zhong, Jianfeng; Liu, Xianjing; Yu, Xiangyang

    2017-10-01

    Endophytic bacteria reside in plant tissues, such as roots, stems, leaves and seeds. Most of them can stimulate plant growth or alleviate phytotoxicity of pollutants. There are handful species with dual functions stimulating plant growth and degrading pollutants have been reported. Five endophytic bacteria were isolated from chlorpyrifos (CP) treated rice plants and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RRA, Bacillus megaterium strain RRB, Sphingobacterium siyangensis strain RSA, Stenotrophomonas pavanii strain RSB and Curtobacterium plantarum strain RSC according to morphological characteristics, physiological and biochemical tests, and 16S rDNA phylogeny. All of them possessed some plant growth promotional traits, including indole acetic acid and siderophore production, secretion of phosphate solubilization and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase. The bacteria were marked with the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene and successfully colonized into rice plants. All isolates were able to degrade CP in vitro and in vivo. The five isolates degraded more than 90% of CP in 24 h when the initial concentration was lower than 5 mg/L. CP degradation was significantly enhanced in the infested rice plants and rice grains. The final CP residual was reduced up to 80% in the infested rice grains compared to the controls. The results indicate that these isolates are promising bio-inoculants for the removal or detoxification of CP residues in rice plants and grains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential Role of Diploscapter sp. Strain LKC25, a Bacterivorous Nematode from Soil, as a Vector of Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria to Preharvest Fruits and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daunte S.; Anderson, Gary L.; Beuchat, Larry R.; Carta, Lynn K.; Williams, Phillip L.

    2005-01-01

    Diploscapter, a thermotolerant, free-living soil bacterial-feeding nematode commonly found in compost, sewage, and agricultural soil in the United States, was studied to determine its potential role as a vehicle of Salmonella enterica serotype Poona, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in contaminating preharvest fruits and vegetables. The ability of Diploscapter sp. strain LKC25 to survive on agar media, in cow manure, and in composted turkey manure and to be attracted to, ingest, and disperse food-borne pathogens inoculated into soil or a mixture of soil and composted turkey manure was investigated. Diploscapter sp. strain LKC25 survived and reproduced in lawns of S. enterica serotype Poona, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes on agar media and in cow manure and composted turkey manure. Attraction of Diploscapter sp. strain LKC25 to colonies of pathogenic bacteria on tryptic soy agar within 10, 20, 30, and 60 min and 24 h was determined. At least 85% of the worms initially placed 0.5 to 1 cm away from bacterial colonies migrated to the colonies within 1 h. Within 24 h, ≥90% of the worms were embedded in colonies. The potential of Diploscapter sp. strain LKC25 to shed pathogenic bacteria after exposure to bacteria inoculated into soil or a mixture of soil and composted turkey manure was investigated. Results indicate that Diploscapter sp. strain LKC25 can shed pathogenic bacteria after exposure to pathogens in these milieus. They also demonstrate its potential to serve as a vector of food-borne pathogenic bacteria in soil, with or without amendment with compost, to the surface of preharvest fruits and vegetables in contact with soil. PMID:15870330

  16. Isolating and evaluating lactic acid bacteria strains for effectiveness on silage quality at low temperatures on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siran; Yuan, Xianjun; Dong, Zhihao; Li, Junfeng; Shao, Tao

    2017-11-01

    Four lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains isolated from straw silages on the Tibetan Plateau were characterized, and their effects on the fermentation quality of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) at different temperatures (10°C, 15°C and 25°C) were studied. These LAB isolates were evaluated using the acids production ability test, morphological observation, Gram staining, physiological, biochemical and acid tolerance tests. All the isolates (M1, LM8, LO7 and LOG9) could grow at 5-20°C, pH 3.5-7.0 and NaCl (3.0%, 6.5%). Strains M1, LM8, LO7 and LOG9 were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, L. coryniformis, Pediococcus pentosaceus and P. acidilactici, respectively, by sequencing 16S ribosomal DNA. The four isolates were added to Italian ryegrass for ensiling for 30 days at various temperatures. Compared with the corresponding control, inoculating with isolates M1, LM8 and LO7 could improve the silage quality of Italian ryegrass at low temperatures, indicated by significantly (P lactic acid (LA) contents and ratios of lactic acid/acetic acid (LA/AA), and significantly (P < 0.05) lower pH and ammonia nitrogen/total nitrogen (AN/TN). Compared with other isolates, LM8 performed better at 10°C and 15°C, indicated by the higher (P < 0.05) LA content and ratio of LA/AA, and the lower (P < 0.05) pH and AN/TN. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Enhanced biodegradation of diesel oil by a newly identified Rhodococcus baikonurensis EN3 in the presence of mycolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Kim, M K; Singleton, I; Goodfellow, M; Lee, S-T

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize a bacterium, strain EN3, capable of using diesel oil as a major carbon and energy source, and to analyse the enhancement of diesel oil degradation by this organism using synthetic mycolic acid (2-hexyl-3-hydroxyldecanoic acid). An actinomycete with the ability to degrade diesel oil was isolated from oil contaminated soil and characterized. The strain had phenotypic properties consistent with its classification in the genus Rhodococcus showing a 16S rRNA gene similarity of 99.7% with Rhodococcus baikonurensis DSM 44587(T). The ability of the characterized strain to degrade diesel oil at various concentrations (1000, 5000, 10 000 and 20 000 mg l(-1)) was determined. The effect of synthetic mycolic acid on the biodegradation of diesel oil was investigated at the 20 000 mg l(-1) concentration; the surfactant was added to the flask cultures at three different concentrations (10, 50 and 100 mg l(-1)) and degradation followed over 7 days. Enhanced degradation was found at all three concentrations of the surfactant. In addition, the enhancement of diesel oil degradation by other surfactants was observed. The synthetic mycolic acid has potential for the remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites from both an economic and applied perspective as it can stimulate biodegradation at low concentrations. This study showed that the synthesized mycolic acid can be used for potential applications in the bioremediation industries, for example, in oil spill clean-up, diesel fuel remediation and biostimulation.

  18. [The impact of UV radiation B and C in vitro on different of bacteria strains isolated from patients hospitalized in the Warsaw Medical University Clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongies, Witold; Wultańska, Dorota; Kot, Katarzyna; Bogusz, Aleksandra; Rongies, Magdalena; Świercz, Paweł; Swierszcz, Paweł; Lewandowska, Monika; Cholewińska, Grazyna; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, Felicja

    2011-01-01

    Infections in human body caused by various microbes are a significant problem in modern medicine. Special attention is put to infections of wounds, which are a significant threat to the life of patients. Attempts to treat these wounds base mainly on the application of various chemical preparations (locally) and systematic antibiotic treatment. UV radiation, because of its anti-bacterial activity, appear a complementary issue in therapy. AIM OF THE SURVEY: The aim of this study was an examination of the sensitivity of bacteria strains isolated from patients hospitalised in the Warsaw Medical University clinics, and prove that antibiotics and operation of UV B and C radiation with Endolamp 474 may become a complementary or alternative method of treatment. The study used 65 strains grown aerobically (15 strains of Escherichia coli, 20 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 15 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, 15 strains of Streptococcus and Enterococcus sp). The same strains were planted on different excipients and were subjected to UV radiation using Endolamp 474. Correctly prepared strains were radiated from a 25 cm distance in various durations (from 5 seconds to 105 seconds). As a result of UV irradiation of microorganisms studied B and C using 474 Endolampy received varied, but the great sensitivity to the effects of this radiation, in all tested bacterial strains. UV radiation on microorganisms requires further study, also in vivo.

  19. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin), a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum), Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Jana; Levina, Natalja; van der Linden, Mark; Gruhlke, Martin; Martin, Christian; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2017-10-12

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate) synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure) by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H₂O₂ using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas , Streptococcus , and Staphylococcus , including multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH). Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  20. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin, a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum, Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Reiter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H2O2 using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus, including multi-drug resistant (MDR strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH. Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  1. Draft genome sequence of pathogenic bacteria Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain Ba94C2, associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease isolate from South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leda Restrepo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a pathogenic bacteria which has been associated to the early mortality syndrome (EMS also known as hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND causing high mortality in shrimp farms. Pathogenic strains contain two homologous genes related to insecticidal toxin genes, PirA and PirB, these toxin genes are located on a plasmid contained within the bacteria. Genomic sequences have allowed the finding of two strains with a divergent structure related to the geographic region from where they were found. The isolates from the geographic collection of Southeast Asia and Mexico show variable regions on the plasmid genome, indicating that even though they are not alike they still conserve the toxin genes. In this paper, we report for the first time, a pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strain in shrimp from South America that showed symptoms of AHPND. The genomic analysis revealed that this strain of V. parahaemolyticus found in South America appears to be more related to the Southeast Asia as compared to the Mexican strains. This finding is of major importance for the shrimp industry, especially in regards to the urgent need for disease control strategies to avoid large EMS outbreaks and economic loss, and to determine its dispersion in South America. The whole-genome shotgun project of V. parahaemolyticus strain Ba94C2 have been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession PRJNA335761.

  2. Study of antagonistic effects of Lactobacillus strains as probiotics on multi drug resistant (MDR) bacteria isolated from urinary tract infections (UTIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Atiyeh; Kasra-Kermanshahi, Roha; Gharavi, Sara; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Saffarian, Parvaneh

    2014-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by bacteria is one of the most frequent infections in human population. Inappropriate use of antibiotics, often leads to appearance of drug resistance in bacteria. However, use of probiotic bacteria has been suggested as a partial replacement. This study was aimed to assess the antagonistic effects of Lactobacillus standard strains against bacteria isolated from UTI infections. Among 600 samples; those with ≥10,000 cfu/ml were selected as UTI positive samples. Enterococcus sp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter sp., and Escherichia coli were found the most prevalent UTI causative agents. All isolates were screened for multi drug resistance and subjected to the antimicrobial effects of three Lactobacillus strains by using microplate technique and the MICs amounts were determined. In order to verify the origin of antibiotic resistance of isolates, plasmid curing using ethidium bromide and acridine orange was carried out. No antagonistic activity in Lactobacilli suspension was detected against test on Enterococcus and Enterobacter strains and K. pneumoniae, which were resistant to most antibiotics. However, an inhibitory effect was observed for E. coli which were resistant to 8-9 antibiotics. In addition, L. casei was determined to be the most effective probiotic. RESULTS from replica plating suggested one of the plasmids could be related to the gene responsible for ampicillin resistance. Treatment of E. coli with probiotic suspension was not effective on inhibition of the plasmid carrying hypothetical ampicillin resistant gene. Moreover, the plasmid profiles obtained from probiotic-treated isolates were identical to untreated isolates.

  3. Biotransformation of geosmin by terpene-degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two terpene-degrading bacteria that are able to transform geosmin have been identified. Pseudomonas sp. SBR3-tpnb, isolated on -terpinene, converts geosmin to several products; the major products are keto-geosmins. This geosmin transformation ability is inducible by -terpinene. Rhodococcus wratisl...

  4. Degradation Capability of n-hexadecane Degrading Bacteria from Petroleum Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG Huai-li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Samplings were performed in the petroleum contaminated soils of Dongying, Shandong Province of China. Degrading bacteria was isolated through enrichment in a Bushnel-Hass medium, with n-hexadecane as the sole source of carbon and energy. Then the isolated strains were identified by amplification of 16S rDNA gene and sequencing. The strain TZSX2 was selected as the powerful bacteria with stronger degradation ability, which was then identified as Rhodococcus hoagii genera based on the constructing results of the phylogenetic tree. The optimum temperature that allowed both high growth and efficient degradation ratio was in the scope of 28~36 ℃, and gas chromatography results showed that approximately more than 30% of n-hexadecane could be degraded in one week of incubation within the temperature range. Moreover, the strain TZSX2 was able to grow in high concentrations of n-hexadecane. The degradation rate reached 79% when the initial n-hexadecane concentration was 2 mL·L-1,while it still achieved 12% with n-hexadecane concentration of 20 mL·L-1. The optimal pH was 9 that allowed the highest growth and the greatest degradation rate of 91%. Above all, the screened strain TZSX2 showed high capabilities of alkali tolerance with excellent degradation efficiency for even high concentration of n-hexadecane, and thus it would be quite suitable for the remediation of petroleum contaminated soils especially in the extreme environment.

  5. Lactate- and acetate-based cross-feeding interactions between selected strains of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and colon bacteria in the presence of inulin-type fructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Frédéric; Verce, Marko; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-01-16

    Cross-feeding interactions were studied between selected strains of lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria that consume lactate but are not able to degrade inulin-type fructans (ITF) in a medium for colon bacteria (supplemented with ITF as energy source and acetate when necessary). Degradation of oligofructose by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 and inulin by Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 resulted in the release of free fructose into the medium and the production of mainly lactate (lactobacilli) and acetate (B. longum LMG 11047). During bicultures of Lb. acidophilus IBB 801 and Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662 T on oligofructose, the latter strain converted lactate (produced by the former strain from oligofructose) into butyrate and gases, but only in the presence of acetate. During bicultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and A. caccae DSM 14662 T or Eubacterium hallii DSM 17630 on inulin, the butyrate-producing strains consumed low concentrations of lactate and acetate generated by inulin degradation by the Lactobacillus strain. As more acetate was produced during tricultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and B. longum LMG 11047, which degraded inulin simultaneously, and A. caccae DSM 14662 T or E. hallii DSM 17630, a complete conversion of lactate into butyrate and gases by these butyrate-producing strains occurred. Therefore, butyrate production by lactate-consuming, butyrate-producing colon bacterial strains incapable of ITF degradation, resulted from cross-feeding of monosaccharides and lactate by an ITF-degrading Lactobacillus strain and acetate produced by a Bifidobacterium strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Rhodococcus sp. on desulfurization, swelling and extraction of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang De-qiang; Shui Heng-fu [University of Technology of Anhui, Maanshang (China). School of Chemical Engineering

    2006-08-15

    Bio-desulfurization of coal by rhodococcus sp. was studied. Some kinds of coal were swelled with different organic solvents, and then the swelled coals were treated by rhodococcus sp. The results show that the ratios of desulfurization of coals increase after they are swelled, especially swelled with NMP, the ratio is more than 80%. The swelling and extraction of coal were also studied after the coal had been treated by rhodococcus sp. The results show that the ratios of swelling increase more than 65%, but the extraction yield decreases for the coal treated by rhodococcus sp. 11 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent infant

    OpenAIRE

    P Devi; S Malhotra; A Chadha

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi , previously known as Corynebacterium equi, is one of the most important causes of zoonotic infection in grazing animals. Increased cases of human infection with R. equi have been reported especially in immunocompromised patients. Infection in immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We report a case of R. equi bacteremia in a 26-day-old immunocompetent infant with recurrent swellings on different parts of the body. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever repo...

  8. Listeria monocytogenes strains show large variations in competitive growth in mixed culture biofilms and suspensions with bacteria from food processing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heir, Even; Møretrø, Trond; Simensen, Andreas; Langsrud, Solveig

    2018-06-20

    Interactions and competition between resident bacteria in food processing environments could affect their ability to survive, grow and persist in microhabitats and niches in the food industry. In this study, the competitive ability of L. monocytogenes strains grown together in separate culture mixes with other L. monocytogenes (L. mono mix), L. innocua (Listeria mix), Gram-negative bacteria (Gram- mix) and with a multigenera mix (Listeria + Gram- mix) was investigated in biofilms on stainless steel and in suspensions at 12 °C. The mixed cultures included resident bacteria from processing surfaces in meat and salmon industry represented by L. monocytogenes (n = 6), L. innocua (n = 5) and Gram-negative bacteria (n = 6; Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas fragi, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia). Despite hampered in growth in mixed cultures, L. monocytogenes established in biofilms with counts at day nine between 7.3 and 9.0 log per coupon with the lowest counts in the Listeria + G- mix that was dominated by Pseudomonas. Specific L. innocua inhibited growth of L. monocytogenes strains differently; inhibition that was further enhanced by the background Gram-negative microbiota. In these multispecies and multibacteria cultures, the growth competitive effects lead to the dominance of a strong competitor L. monocytogenes strain that was only slightly inhibited by L. innocua and showed strong competitive abilities in mixed cultures with resident Gram-negative bacteria. The results indicates complex patterns of bacterial interactions and L. monocytogenes inhibition in the multibacteria cultures that only partially depend on cell contact and likely involve various antagonistic and bacterial tolerance mechanisms. The study indicates large variations among L. monocytogenes in their competitiveness under multibacterial culture conditions that should be considered in further studies towards understanding of L

  9. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins

  10. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murzin, Alexey G. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Meijer, Wim G. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Wilkinson, Anthony J., E-mail: tony.wilkinson@york.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  11. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant.

  12. Optimization of phenol biodegradation by efficient bacteria isolated from petrochemical effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahriari Moghadam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is an environmental pollutant present in industrial wastewaters such as refineries, coal processing and petrochemicals products. In this study three phenol degrading bacteria from Arak Petrochemical Complex effluent were isolated which consume phenol. Molecular analysis was used to identify bacteria and isolated bacteria were identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans (NS1, Advenella faeciporci (NS2 and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (NS3. Among the isolated strains, NS1 had the highest ability to degrade phenol. In order to observe the best yield in phenol biodegradation using NS1, optimization was performed using one factor at a time of experimental design to investigate the effect of four factors, including pH, temperature, phosphate and urea concentration. The optimal biodegradation condition through or tho pathway was pH = 8, urea = 1 g/L, temperature = 30°C and K2HPO4 = 0.5 g/L. Under the suggested condition, a biodegradation efficiency of 100% was achieved. Moreover, NS1 has shown growth and phenol degradation in concentrations between 250 to 2000 mg/L. In a nutshell, the results revealed thatphenol efficiently consumed by NS1 as the sole carbon source. Obviously, the isolate strain may be seen as an important tool in the bioremediation of wastewater effluent, petrochemical complex.

  13. Bee Venom (Apis Mellifera an Effective Potential Alternative to Gentamicin for Specific Bacteria Strains Bee Venom an Effective Potential for Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mellitine, a major component of bee venom (BV, Apis mellifera, is more active against gram positive than gram negative bacteria. Moreover, BV has been reported to have multiple effects, including antibacterial, antivirus, and anti-inflammation effects, in various types of cells. In addition, wasp venom has bee

  14. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of Adansonia digitata L. Seed oil gotten from Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria, on some strains of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocholi Paul Edogbanya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of essential oils as antibacterial agents have become popular over the years, this is in a bid to search for alternative ways of dealing with strains of bacteria that have become resistant to conventional antibiotics. This study was carried out to evaluate the antibacterial potentials of Adansonia digitata seed oil from Zaria, Kaduna state, Nigeria, on the clinical isolates of some bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The oil was extracted from the seeds using the soxhlet extraction method with n-hexane as the solvent. Well diffusion method was used to test susceptibility of the strains of bacteria to the oil, using Gentamycin and Streptomycin as standard positive controls. Experiments were carried out in duplicates. Data obtained from the experiment was analysed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT, with P < 0.05 considered significant. The results revealed that A. digitata oil was unable to create any inhibition zones in the bacteria cultures. From this research it can be concluded that A. digitata oil had no Antibacterial activity.

  15. Cholesterol oxidase (ChoE) is not important in the virulence of Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yanlong; Dupont, Chris; Sydor, Tobias; Haas, Albert; Prescott, John F

    2006-12-20

    To analyze further the role in virulence of the prominent cholesterol oxidase (ChoE) of Rhodococcus equi, an allelic exchange choE mutant from strain 103+ was constructed and assessed for virulence in macrophages, in mice, and in foals. There was no difference between the mutant and parent strain in cytotoxic activity for macrophages or in intra-macrophage multiplication. No evidence of attenuation was obtained in macrophages and in mice, but there was slight attenuation apparent in four intra-bronchially infected foals compared to infection of four foals with the virulent parent strain, based on a delayed rise in temperature of the choE-mutant infected foals. However, bacterial colony counts in the lung 2 weeks after infection were not significantly different, although there was a slight but non-significant (P=0.12) difference in lung:body weight ratio of the choE mutant versus virulent parent infected foals (mean 2.67+/-0.25% compared to 4.58+/-0.96%). We conclude that the cholesterol oxidase is not important for the virulence of R. equi.

  16. Emulsification of crude oil by an alkane-oxidizing Rhodococcus species isolated from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Bruheim, P.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Scince and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Josefsen, K.; Vatland, A. [SINTEF SI, Oslo (Norway). Industrial Chemistry Div.

    1998-04-01

    A Rhodococcus species, which has proven to be the best of 99 oil-emulsifying bacteria isolated from seawater, was characterized. This bacterium produced very stable oil-in-water emulsions from different crude oils with various content of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, by utilizing C{sub 1}1 and C{sub 3}3 n-alkanes as carbon and energy sources. Bacteria that produce stable emulsions are often able to adhere strongly to hydrocarbons or hydrophobic surfaces. It was at these surfaces that extensive emulsification of the residual oil and accumulation of acidic oxidation products occurred. The acidic products were consumed in a second step. This step was characterized by linear growth and an increasing number of cells growing in the water phase. The most extensive emulsification occurred at the end of the exponential phase. There was no evidence of surfactants at the end of the exponential phase, however, a polymeric compound with emulsifying activity, tightly bound to the oil droplets, was isolated, suggesting that the emulsification resulted from the release of the hydrophobic cell surface discarded during growth limitations. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Diversion of phagosome trafficking by pathogenic Rhodococcus equi depends on mycolic acid chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Tobias; von Bargen, Kristine; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Huth, Gitta; Holst, Otto; Wohlmann, Jens; Becken, Ulrike; Dykstra, Tobias; Söhl, Kristina; Lindner, Buko; Prescott, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a close relative of Mycobacterium spp. and a facultative intracellular pathogen which arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages before the late endocytic stage. We have screened a transposon mutant library of R. equi for mutants with decreased capability to prevent phagolysosome formation. This screen yielded a mutant in the gene for β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein)-synthase A (KasA), a key enzyme of the long-chain mycolic acid synthesizing FAS-II system. The longest kasA mutant mycolic acid chains were 10 carbon units shorter than those of wild-type bacteria. Coating of non-pathogenic E. coli with purified wild-type trehalose dimycolate reduced phagolysosome formation substantially which was not the case with shorter kasA mutant-derived trehalose dimycolate. The mutant was moderately attenuated in macrophages and in a mouse infection model, but was fully cytotoxic.Whereas loss of KasA is lethal in mycobacteria, R. equi kasA mutant multiplication in broth was normal proving that long-chain mycolic acid compounds are not necessarily required for cellular integrity and viability of the bacteria that typically produce them. This study demonstrates a central role of mycolic acid chain length in diversion of trafficking by R. equi. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Diversity of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine macroalgae from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Sergio; Alvarado, Pamela; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jian; Garrido, Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the diversity and roles of Gram-positive and pigmented bacteria in Antarctic environments, especially those associated with marine macroorganisms. This work is the first study about the diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine Antarctic macroalgae. A total of 31 pigmented Gram-positive strains were isolated from the surface of six species of macroalgae collected in the King George Island, South Shetland Islands. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ≥99%, 18 phylotypes were defined, which were clustered into 11 genera of Actinobacteria (Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Citricoccus, Kocuria, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Rhodococcus, Salinibacterium and Sanguibacter) and one genus of the Firmicutes (Staphylococcus). It was found that five isolates displayed antimicrobial activity against a set of macroalgae-associated bacteria. The active isolates were phylogenetically related to Agrococcus baldri, Brachybacterium rhamnosum, Citricoccus zhacaiensis and Kocuria palustris. The results indicate that a diverse community of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria is associated with Antartic macroalgae and suggest its potential as a promising source of antimicrobial and pigmented natural compounds. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Esterase activities of intracellular extracts of wild strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Serra da Estrela cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Angela C.; Tavares, Tânia G.; Malcata, F. Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain ESB110019 and Lactobacillus plantarum strain ESB5004, novel strains that were previously isolated from the wild adventitious microflora of certified Serra da Estrela cheeses, were assayed for esterase activity using, as substrates, ortho- and para-nitrophenyl derivatives of fatty acids. Both strains preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain fatty acids; L. lactis ESB110019 exhibited a stronger esterase activity than Lb. plantarum ESB5004 and cleaved the p-n...

  20. Antibacterial activity of amino- and amido- terminated poly (amidoamine)-G6 dendrimer on isolated bacteria from clinical specimens and standard strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Ayoob; Nazari, Shahram; Allahabadi, Ahmad; Falanji, Farahnaz; Akbari Dourbash, Fakhreddin Akbari Dourbash; Rezai, Zahra; Alizadeh Matboo, Soudabeh; Hekmat-Shoar, Reza; Mohseni, Seyed Mohsen; Majidi, Gharib

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nanoscale poly (amidoamine) dendrimers have been investigated for their biological demands, but their antibacterial activity has not been widely discovered. Thus, the sixth generation of poly (amidoamine) dendrimer (PAMAM-G6) was synthesized and its antibacterial activities were evaluated on Gram-negative bacteria; P. aeruginosa, E. coli, A. baumannii, S. typhimurium, S. dysenteriae, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, and Gram-positive bacteria, and S.aureus and B. subtilis, which were isolated from different clinical specimens and standard strains of these bacteria. Methods: In this study, 980 specimens including urine (47%), blood (27%), sputum (13%), wounds (8%), and burns (5%) were collected from clinical specimens of 16 hospitals and clinics in city of Sabzevar, Iran. Then, the target bacteria were isolated and identified using standard methods. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentrations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were determined according to guidelines described by clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI). Standard discs were prepared using 0.025, 0.25, 2.5, and 25 μg/mL concentrations of PAMAM-G6 on Mueller-Hinton agar plates to determinate the zone of inhibition. The cytotoxicity of PAMAM-G6 dendrimer was evaluated in HCT116 cells by MTT assay. Results: The most important isolated bacteria were E. coli (23.65%), S. aureus (24.7%), P. aeruginosa (10.49%), B. subtilis (7.7%), S. typhimurium (8.87%), A. baumannii (7.02%), K. pneumoniae (7.1%), P. mirabilis (6.46%), and S. dysenteriae (3.6%). Moreover, it was found that poly (amidoamine)–G6 exhibited more antibacterial efficacy on standard strains than isolated bacteria from clinical samples (p<0.05). The cytotoxicity of PAMAM-G6 to the cells showed that cytotoxicity depended on the concentration level and exposure time. Conclusion: The PAMAM-G6 dendrimer showed a positive impact on the removal of dominant bacterial isolated from clinical

  1. Impact of the microscale distribution of a Pseudomonas strain introduced into soil on potential contacts with indigenous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Pallud, C.; Bertolla, F.

    2005-01-01

    Soil bioaugmentation is a promising approach in soil bioremediation and agriculture. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the fate and activity of introduced bacteria in soil and thus of their impact on the soil environment is still limited. The microscale spatial distribution of introduced bacteria has...... rarely been studied, although it determines the encounter probability between introduced cells and any components of the soil ecosystem and thus plays a role in the ecology of introduced bacteria. For example, conjugal gene transfer from introduced bacteria to indigenous bacteria requires cell......-to-cell contact, the probability of which depends on their spatial distribution. To quantitatively characterize the microscale distribution of an introduced bacterial population and its dynamics, a gfp-tagged derivative of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was introduced by percolation in repacked soil columns. Initially...

  2. Draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from the indoor environment: Staphylococcus capitis strain H36, S. capitis strain H65, S. cohnii strain H62, S. hominis strain H69, Microbacterium sp. strain H83, Mycobacterium iranicum strain H39, Plantibacter sp. strain H53, and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strain H72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Coil, David A; Schichnes, Denise; Lindow, Steven E; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A; Adams, Rachel I

    2017-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of eight bacterial strains of the genera Staphylococcus , Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Plantibacter, and Pseudomonas . These isolates were obtained from aerosol sampling of bathrooms of five residences in the San Francisco Bay area. Taxonomic classifications as well as the genome sequence and gene annotation of the isolates are described. As part of the "Built Environment Reference Genome" project, these isolates and associated genome data provide valuable resources for studying the microbiology of the built environment.

  3. Draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from the indoor environment: Staphylococcus capitis strain H36, S. capitis strain H65, S. cohnii strain H62, S. hominis strain H69, Microbacterium sp. strain H83, Mycobacterium iranicum strain H39, Plantibacter sp. strain H53, and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strain H72

    OpenAIRE

    Lymperopoulou, Despoina S.; Coil, David A.; Schichnes, Denise; Lindow, Steven E.; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Adams, Rachel I.

    2017-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of eight bacterial strains of the genera Staphylococcus, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Plantibacter, and Pseudomonas. These isolates were obtained from aerosol sampling of bathrooms of five residences in the San Francisco Bay area. Taxonomic classifications as well as the genome sequence and gene annotation of the isolates are described. As part of the ?Built Environment Reference Genome? project, these isolates and associated genome data provide val...

  4. In-situ determination of the mechanical properties of gliding or non-motile bacteria by atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions without immobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Dhahri

    Full Text Available We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions.

  5. In-Situ Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Gliding or Non-Motile Bacteria by Atomic Force Microscopy under Physiological Conditions without Immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Samia; Ramonda, Michel; Marlière, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM) around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions. PMID:23593493

  6. Biotransformation of d-Limonene to (+) trans-Carveol by Toluene-Grown Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duetz, Wouter A.; Fjällman, Ann H. M.; Ren, Shuyu; Jourdat, Catherine; Witholt, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    The toluene-degrading strain Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 was found to hydroxylate d-limonene exclusively in the 6-position, yielding enantiomerically pure (+) trans-carveol and traces of (+) carvone. This biotransformation was studied using cells cultivated in chemostat culture with toluene as a carbon and energy source. The maximal specific activity of (+) trans-carveol formation was 14.7 U (g of cells [dry weight])−1, and the final yield was 94 to 97%. Toluene was found to be a strong competitive inhibitor of the d-limonene conversion. Glucose-grown cells did not form any trans-carveol from d-limonene. These results suggest that one of the enzymes involved in toluene degradation is responsible for this allylic monohydroxylation. Another toluene degrader (Rhodococcus globerulus PWD8) had a lower specific activity but was found to oxidize most of the formed trans-carveol to (+) carvone, allowing for the biocatalytic production of this flavor compound. PMID:11375201

  7. Screening of lactic acid bacteria from Indonesia reveals glucansucrase and fructansucrase genes in two different Weissella confusa strains from soya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, Amarila; Radji, Maksum; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2009-01-01

    Homopolysaccharide (glucan and fructan) synthesis from sucrose by sucrase enzymes in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been well studied in the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. This study aimed to identify and characterize genes encoding glucansucrase/glucosyltransferase (GTF) and

  8. Biomass production and small-scale testing of freeze-dried lactic acid bacteria starter strains for cassava fermentations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edward, VA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on their predominance in Gari fermentations, as well as suitable technological properties, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Weissella paramesenteroides and Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains were investigated...

  9. Aerobic Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine by the Propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H.; McClay, Kevin R.; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [14C]NDMA to 14CO2, growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation. PMID:19542346

  10. Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Devi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi , previously known as Corynebacterium equi, is one of the most important causes of zoonotic infection in grazing animals. Increased cases of human infection with R. equi have been reported especially in immunocompromised patients. Infection in immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We report a case of R. equi bacteremia in a 26-day-old immunocompetent infant with recurrent swellings on different parts of the body. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report of R. equi bacteremia from an immunocompetent patient from Northern India.

  11. Screening for Genes Coding for Putative Antitumor Compounds, Antimicrobial and Enzymatic Activities from Haloalkalitolerant and Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria Strains of Algerian Sahara Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okba Selama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments may often contain unusual bacterial groups whose physiology is distinct from those of normal environments. To satisfy the need for new bioactive pharmaceuticals compounds and enzymes, we report here the isolation of novel bacteria from an extreme environment. Thirteen selected haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria were isolated from Algerian Sahara Desert soils. These isolates were screened for the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds using PCR based methods. Enzymatic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined by using cultural dependant methods. Several of these isolates are typical of desert and alkaline saline soils, but, in addition, we report for the first time the presence of a potential new member of the genus Nocardia with particular activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to their haloalkali character, the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, combined with the antimicrobial activity against a broad range of indicator strains and their enzymatic potential, makes them suitable for biotechnology applications.

  12. The influence of biosurfactants released by S-mitis BMS on the adhesion of pioneer strains and cariogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoogmoed, CG; Van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    The influence of Streptococcus mitis BMS biosurfactants on the adhesion of eight pioneer and four cariogenic oral bacterial strains was, for a first screening, examined in a microtiter plate assay. The adhesion to pellicle-coated wells of three cariogenic strains was inhibited >70% by the

  13. Identification and characterization of thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from coconut water vinegar in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumpuli, P A B N; Watanabe, Taisuke; Toyama, Hirohide

    2014-01-01

    From the pellicle formed on top of brewing coconut water vinegar in Sri Lanka, three Acetobacter strains (SL13E-2, SL13E-3, and SL13E-4) that grow at 42 °C and four Gluconobacter strains (SL13-5, SL13-6, SL13-7, and SL13-8) grow at 37 °C were identified as Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii, respectively. Acetic acid production by the isolated Acetobacter strains was examined. All three strains gave 4% acetic acid from 6% initial ethanol at 37 °C, and 2.5% acetic acid from 4% initial ethanol at 40 °C. Compared with the two other strains, SL13E-4 showed both slower growth and slower acetic acid production. As well as the thermotolerant SKU1108 strain, the activities of the alcohol dehydrogenase and the aldehyde dehydrogenase of SL13E-2 and SL13E-4 were more stable than those of the mesophilic strain. The isolated strains were used to produce coconut water vinegar at higher temperatures than typically used for vinegar production.

  14. Accumulation of a poly(hydroxyalkanoate) copolymer containing primarily 3-hydroxyvalerate from simple carbohydrate substrates by Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 40126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, G W; Anderson, A J; Williams, D R; Dawes, E A; Ewing, D F

    1991-04-01

    A number of taxonomically-related bacteria have been identified which accumulate poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) copolymers containing primarily 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) monomer units from a range of unrelated single carbon sources. One of these, Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 40126, was further investigated and shown to produce a copolymer containing 75 mol% 3HV and 25 mol% 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) from glucose as sole carbon source. Polyesters containing both 3HV and 3HB monomer units, together with 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB), 5-hydroxyvalerate (5HV) or 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx), were also produced by this organism from certain accumulation substrates. With valeric acid as substrate, almost pure (99 mol% 3HV) poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) was produced. N.m.r. analysis confirmed the composition of these polyesters. The thermal properties and molecular weight of the copolymer produced from glucose were comparable to those of PHB produced by Alcaligenes eutrophus.

  15. Molecular approaches to understand the regulation of N2O emission from denitrifying bacteria - model strains and soil communities (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostegard, A.; Bakken, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of N2O from agricultural soils are largely caused by denitrifying bacteria. Field measurements of N2O fluxes show large variations and depend on several environmental factors, and possibly also on the composition of the denitrifying microbial community. The temporal and spatial variation of fluxes are not adequately captured by biogeochemical models, and few options for mitigations have been invented, which underscores the need to understand the mechanisms underlying the emissions of N2O. Analyses of denitrification genes and transcripts extracted from soils are important for describing the system, but may have limited value for prediction of N2O emissions. In contrast, phenotypic analyses are direct measures of the organisms’ responses to changing environmental conditions. Our approach is to combine phenotypic characterizations using high-resolution gas kinetics, with gene transcription analyses to study denitrification regulatory phenotypes (DRP) of bacterial strains or complex microbial communities. The rich data sets obtained provide a basis for refinement of biochemical and physiological research on this key process in the nitrogen cycle. The strength of this combined approach is illustrated by a series of experiments investigating effects of soil pH on denitrification. Soil pH emerges as a master variable determining the microbial community composition as well as its denitrification product ratio (N2O/N2), with higher ratio in acid than in alkaline soil. It is therefore likely that emissions of N2O from agro-ecosystems will increase in large parts of the world where soil pH is decreasing due to intensified management and increased use of chemical fertilizers. Considering its immense implications, surprisingly few attempts have been made to unravel the mechanisms involved in the pH-control of the product stoichiometry of denitrification. We investigated the kinetics of gas transformations (O2, NO, N2O and N2) and transcription of functional genes

  16. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria from swine milk and characterization of potential probiotic strains with antagonistic effects against swine-associated gastrointestinal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilodrán-Vega, Sandra Rayén; Villena, Julio; Valdebenito, José; Salas, María José; Parra, Cristian; Ruiz, Alvaro; Kitazawa, Haruki; García, Apolinaria

    2016-06-01

    Probiotics are usually isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. The search of probiotics in human milk is a recent field of research, as the existence of the human milk microbiome was discovered only about a decade ago. To our knowledge, no reports regarding the potential probiotic effect of bacteria from swine milk have been published. In this work, we isolated several lactic acid bacteria from swine milk and evaluated them for them potential as probiotics. Among the isolated strains, Lactobacillus curvatus TUCO-5E showed antagonistic effects against swine-associated gastrointestinal pathogens. TUCO-5E was able to reduce the growth of enterotoxigenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains as well as pathogenic salmonella. In vitro exclusion and displacement assays in intestinal epithelial cells showed a remarkable antagonistic effect for L. curvatus TUCO-5E against Salmonella sp. strain TUCO-I7 and Salmonella enterica ATCC 13096. Moreover, by using a mouse model of Salmonella infection, we were able to demonstrate that preventative administration of L. curvatus TUCO-5E for 5 consecutive days was capable of decreasing the number of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the liver and spleen of treated mice, compared with the controls, and prevented dissemination of the pathogen to the blood stream. Therefore, we have demonstrated here that swine milk is an interesting source of beneficial bacteria. In addition, the results of this work suggest that L. curvatus TUCO-5E is a good candidate to study in vivo the protective effect of probiotics against intestinal infection and damage induced by Salmonella infection in the porcine host.

  17. Radiological findings in three acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinxin; Tang Xiaoping; Zhang Lieguang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearances of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in three patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome ( AIDS). Methods: Thoracic imaging appearances of' Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in three patients with AIDS were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The chest radiograph showed patchy consolidations and small nodules (n=3), large consolidations with multiple cavitations (n=2). CT showed large lobar or segmental consolidations with multiple cavitations (n=2), patchy consolidations (n=2), bronchiectasis (n=1), multiple small centrilobular nodules (n=2) and tree-in-bud patterns (n=2). Conclusion: The most common radiological findings in AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pulmonary infection are large consolidations with multiple cavitations and multiple centrilobular nodules. (authors)

  18. Styrene Oxide Isomerase of Rhodococcus opacus 1CP, a Highly Stable and Considerably Active Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, Janosch A. D.; Tischler, Dirk; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Schlömann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Styrene oxide isomerase (SOI) is involved in peripheral styrene catabolism of bacteria and converts styrene oxide to phenylacetaldehyde. Here, we report on the identification, enrichment, and biochemical characterization of a novel representative from the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. The enzyme, which is strongly induced during growth on styrene, was shown to be membrane integrated, and a convenient procedure was developed to highly enrich the protein in active form from the wild-type host. A specific activity of about 370 U mg−1 represents the highest activity reported for this enzyme class so far. This, in combination with a wide pH and temperature tolerance, the independence from cofactors, and the ability to convert a spectrum of substituted styrene oxides, makes a biocatalytic application imaginable. First, semipreparative conversions were performed from which up to 760 μmol of the pure phenylacetaldehyde could be obtained from 130 U of enriched SOI. Product concentrations of up to 76 mM were achieved. However, due to the high chemical reactivity of the aldehyde function, SOI was shown to be the subject of an irreversible product inhibition. A half-life of 15 min was determined at a phenylacetaldehyde concentration of about 55 mM, indicating substantial limitations of applicability and the need to modify the process. PMID:22504818

  19. [Cloning and expression of Micrococcus luteus IAM 14879 Rpf and its role in the recovery of the VBNC state in Rhodococcus sp. DS471].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Linxian; Zhang, Pinghua; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun; Yokota, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to produce the Rpf (resuscitation promoting factor) protein by cloning and expressing the rpf gene, secreted by Micrococcus luteus IAM 14879, in Escherichia coli and to evaluate its role in the recovery of the VBNC (viable but non-culturable) state in high-GC Gram-positive bacteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from Micrococcus luteus IAM 14879 and the rpf gene was amplified by PCR using specific primers. The PCR products was purified, cloned into a pET15b expression vector, and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Then the pET15b plasmid expression vector was used to confirm the purification of the recombinant proteins via SDS-PAGE. The VBNC state cells from the high-GC Gram-positive bacteria, Rhodococcus sp. DS471, were used to confirm the promotion and recovery of growth capacity. Rhodococcus sp. DS471 were isolated from soil and closely related to Micrococcus luteus IAM 14879. The gene sequences confirmed that the rpf gene from Micrococcus luteus IAM 14879 that was expressed in Escherichia coli, was 672 bp. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the recombinant Rpf protein was obtained successfully, and further studies showed it capable of promoting the recovery of the VBNC state by about 100-fold relative to the control. Rpf of Micrococus luteus IAM 14879 can be successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and shows a strong ability to promote the recovery of the VBNC state of cells of Rhodococcus sp. DS471.

  20. Antifungal activity of strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from a semolina ecosystem against Penicillium roqueforti, Aspergillus niger and Endomyces fibuliger contaminating bakery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Francesca; Favilla, Mara; De Bellis, Palmira; Sisto, Angelo; de Candia, Silvia; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2009-09-01

    Thirty samples of Italian durum wheat semolina and whole durum wheat semolina, generally used for the production of Southern Italy's traditional breads, were subjected to microbiological analysis in order to explore their lactic acid bacteria (LAB) diversity and to find strains with antifungal activity. A total of 125 presumptive LAB isolates (Gram-positive and catalase-negative) were characterized by repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (REP-PCR) and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, leading to the identification of the following species: Weissella confusa, Weissella cibaria, Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus rossiae and Lactobacillus plantarum. The REP-PCR results delineated 17 different patterns whose cluster analysis clearly differentiated W. cibaria from W. confusa isolates. Seventeen strains, each characterized by a different REP-PCR pattern, were screened for their antifungal properties. They were grown in a flour-based medium, comparable to a real food system, and the resulting fermentation products (FPs) were tested against fungal species generally contaminating bakery products, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium roqueforti and Endomyces fibuliger. The results of the study indicated a strong inhibitory activity - comparable to that obtained with the common preservative calcium propionate (0.3% w/v) - of ten LAB strains against the most widespread contaminant of bakery products, P. roqueforti. The screening also highlighted the unexplored antifungal activity of L. citreum, L. rossiae and W. cibaria (1 strain), which inhibited all fungal strains to the same or a higher extent compared with calcium propionate. The fermentation products of these three strains were characterized by low pH values, and a high content of lactic and acetic acids.

  1. From the wound to the bench : exoproteome interplay between wound-colonizing Staphylococcus aureus strains and co-existing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pérez, Andrea N.; de Jong, Anne; Junker, Sabryna; Becher, Dörte; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Duipmans, José C.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2018-01-01

    Wound-colonizing microorganisms can form complex and dynamic polymicrobial communities where pathogens and commensals may co-exist, cooperate or compete with each other. The present study was aimed at identifying possible interactions between different bacteria isolated from the same chronic wound

  2. Real-time PCR quantification of the plant growth promoting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae strain SmR1 in maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tomás Pellizzaro; do Amaral, Fernanda Plucani; Dall'Asta, Pamela; Brod, Fábio Cristiano Angonesi; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave

    2014-07-01

    The plant growth promoting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is an endophytic diazotroph found in several economically important crops. Considering that methods to monitor the plant-bacteria interaction are required, our objective was to develop a real-time PCR method for quantification of PGPB H. seropedicae in the rhizosphere of maize seedlings. Primer pairs were designed, and their specificity was verified using DNA from 12 different bacterial species. Ten standard curves of qPCR assay using HERBAS1 primers and tenfold serial dilutions of H. seropedicae SmR1 DNA were performed, and PCR efficiency of 91 % and correlation coefficient of 0.99 were obtained. H. seropedicae SmR1 limit of detection was 10(1) copies (corresponding to 60.3 fg of bacterial DNA). qPCR assay using HERBAS1 was used to detect and quantify H. seropedicae strain SmR1 in inoculated maize roots, cultivated in vitro and in pots, harvested 1, 4, 7, and 10 days after inoculation. The estimated bacterial DNA copy number per gram of root was in the range 10(7)-10(9) for plants grown in vitro and it was around 10(6) for plants grown in pots. Primer pair HERBAS1 was able to quantify H. seropedicae SmR1, and this assay can be useful for monitoring plant-bacteria interaction.

  3. [Phylogenetic analysis and nitrogen removal characteristics of a heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacteria strain from marine environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuemei; Li, Qiufen; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Huaide; Zhao, Jun; Qu, Keming

    2012-06-04

    We determined the phylogenetic position of a heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacterium X3, and detected its nitrogen removal characteristics for providing evidence to explain the principle of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification and to improve the process in purification of marine-culture wastewater. The evolutionary position of the strain was determined based on its morphological, physiological, biochemical characteristics and 16SrRNA gene sequence. The nitrification-denitrification ability of this strain was detected by detecting its nitrogen removal efficiency and growth on different inorganic nitrogen source. Strain X3 was identified as Halomonas sp. It grew optimally at salinity 3%, pH 8.5, C:N 10:1 at 28 degrees C, and it could still survive at 15% salinity. The removal of NH4+ -N, NO2(-) -N and NO3(-) -N was 98.29%, 99.07%, 96.48% respectively within 24 h. When three inorganic nitrogen existed simultaneously, it always utilized ammonia firstly, and the total inorganic nitrogen removal was higher than with only one nitrogen, suggesting that strain X3 has the ability of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification and completing the whole nitrogen removing process. Strain X3 belonged to the genus of Halomonas. It had strong simultaneous nitrification and denitrification capability and could live in high-salinity environment.

  4. Comparison of adhesive gut bacteria composition, immunity, and disease resistance in juvenile hybrid tilapia fed two different Lactobacillus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenshu; Ren, Pengfei; He, Suxu; Xu, Li; Yang, Yaling; Gu, Zemao; Zhou, Zhigang

    2013-07-01

    This study compares the effects of two Lactobacillus strains, highly adhesive Lactobacillus brevis JCM 1170 (HALB) and less-adhesive Lactobacillus acidophilus JCM 1132 (LALB), on the survival and growth, adhesive gut bacterial communities, immunity, and protection against pathogenic bacterial infection in juvenile hybrid tilapia. During a 5-week feeding trial the fish were fed a diet containing 0 to 10(9) cells/g feed of the two Lactobacillus strains. Samples of intestine, kidney, and spleen were taken at the start and at 10, 20, and 35 days for analysis of stress tolerance and cytokine gene mRNA levels and to assess the diversity of adhesive gut bacterial communities. A 14-day immersion challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila NJ-1 was also performed following the feeding trial. The results showed no significant differences in survival rate, weight gain, or feed conversion in the different dietary treatments. The adhesive gut bacterial communities were strikingly altered in the fish fed either the HALB or the LALB, but the response was more rapid and substantial with the adhesive strain. The two strains induced similar changes in the patterns (upregulation or downregulation) of intestinal, splenic or kidney cytokine expression, but they differed in the degree of response for these genes. Changes in intestinal HSP70 expression levels coincided with changes in the similarity coefficient of the adhesive gut bacterial communities between the probiotic treatments. The highest dose of the HALB appeared to protect against the toxic effects of immersion in A. hydrophila (P Lactobacillus strains adhere to the gut may be a favorable criterion in selecting probiotic strain for aquaculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children: a contribution to get insight into the virulence of the bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Vitoriano

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA "on" status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence

  6. Calcium carbonate formation on mica supported extracellular polymeric substance produced by Rhodococcus opacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra, E-mail: aszczes@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin 20-031 (Poland); Czemierska, Magdalena; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna [Department of Biochemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin 20-031 (Poland)

    2016-10-15

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from Rhodococcus opacus bacterial strain was used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation using the vapour diffusion method. The total exopolymer and water-soluble exopolymer fraction of different concentrations were spread on the mica surface by the spin-coating method. The obtained layers were characterized using the atomic force microscopy measurement and XPS analysis. The effects of polymer concentration, initial pH of calcium chloride solution and precipitation time on the obtained crystals properties were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the precipitated minerals. It was found that the type of precipitated CaCO{sub 3} polymorph and the crystal size depend on the kind of EPS fraction. The obtained results indicates that the water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth, whereas the total EPS stabilizes vaterite and this effect is stronger at basic pH. It seems to be due to different contents of the functional group of EPS fractions. - Highlights: • CaCO{sub 3} crystal size and polymorph can be controlled by EPS substance obtained from R. opacus. • The water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth. • The total EPS stabilizes vaterite. • This effect is stronger at basic pH.

  7. The sensor kinase MprB is required for Rhodococcus equi virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Iain; Parreira, Valeria R; Lepp, Dion; Mutharia, Lucy M; Vazquez-Boland, José A; Prescott, John F

    2011-01-10

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil bacterium and, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a member of the mycolata. Through possession of a virulence plasmid, it has the ability to infect the alveolar macrophages of foals, resulting in pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia. The virulence plasmid has an orphan two-component system (TCS) regulatory gene, orf8, mutation of which completely attenuates virulence. This study attempted to find the cognate sensor kinase (SK) of orf8. Annotation of the R. equi strain 103 genome identified 23 TCSs encoded on the chromosome, which were used in a DNA microarray to compare TCS gene transcription in murine macrophage-like cells to growth in vitro. This identified six SKs as significantly up-regulated during growth in macrophages. Mutants of these SKs were constructed and their ability to persist in macrophages was determined with one SK, MprB, found to be required for intracellular survival. The attenuation of the mprB- mutant, and its complementation, was confirmed in a mouse virulence assay. In silico analysis of the R. equi genome sequence identified an MprA binding box motif homologous to that of M. tuberculosis, on mprA, pepD, sigB and sigE. The results of this study also show that R. equi responds to the macrophage environment differently from M. tuberculosis. MprB is the first SK identified as required for R. equi virulence and intracellular survival. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium carbonate formation on mica supported extracellular polymeric substance produced by Rhodococcus opacus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra; Czemierska, Magdalena; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from Rhodococcus opacus bacterial strain was used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation using the vapour diffusion method. The total exopolymer and water-soluble exopolymer fraction of different concentrations were spread on the mica surface by the spin-coating method. The obtained layers were characterized using the atomic force microscopy measurement and XPS analysis. The effects of polymer concentration, initial pH of calcium chloride solution and precipitation time on the obtained crystals properties were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the precipitated minerals. It was found that the type of precipitated CaCO 3 polymorph and the crystal size depend on the kind of EPS fraction. The obtained results indicates that the water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth, whereas the total EPS stabilizes vaterite and this effect is stronger at basic pH. It seems to be due to different contents of the functional group of EPS fractions. - Highlights: • CaCO 3 crystal size and polymorph can be controlled by EPS substance obtained from R. opacus. • The water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth. • The total EPS stabilizes vaterite. • This effect is stronger at basic pH.

  9. Successful treatment of Rhodococcus equi pulmonary infection in a renal transplant recipient.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, H. P.; Bowler, I. C.; Watson, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    The rhodococcus is a mycobacterium-like organism which is normally a pathogen in foals. It usually spreads by direct contact or by aerosol from horse faeces and causes pyogranulomatous pulmonary infections. Occasionally, it acts opportunistically to infect immuno-compromised human hosts, most commonly those with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Here we report a pulmonary infection by Rhodococcus equi in a renal transplant recipient who was successfully treated. The literature o...

  10. Isolation and characterization of two novel ethanol-tolerant facultative-anaerobic thermophilic bacteria strains from waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jiunn C N; Svenson, Charles J; Nakasugi, Kenlee; Leong, Caine T C; Bowman, John P; Chen, Betty; Glenn, Dianne R; Neilan, Brett A; Rogers, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    In a search for potential ethanologens, waste compost was screened for ethanol-tolerant thermophilic microorganisms. Two thermophilic bacterial strains, M5EXG and M10EXG, with tolerance of 5 and 10% (v/v) ethanol, respectively, were isolated. Both isolates are facultative anaerobic, non-spore forming, non-motile, catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, Gram-negative rods that are capable of utilizing a range of carbon sources including arabinose, galactose, mannose, glucose and xylose and produce low amounts of ethanol, acetate and lactate. Growth of both isolates was observed in fully defined minimal media within the temperature range 50-80 degrees C and pH 6.0-8.0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed that both isolates clustered with members of subgroup 5 of the genus Bacillus. G+C contents and DNA-DNA relatedness of M5EXG and M10EXG revealed that they are strains belonging to Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius. However, physiological and biochemical differences were evident when isolates M5EXG and M10EXG were compared with G. thermoglucosidasius type strain (DSM 2542(T)). The new thermophilic, ethanol-tolerant strains of G. thermoglucosidasius may be candidates for ethanol production at elevated temperatures.

  11. Bacteremia por Rhodococcus equi em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: relato de caso Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Secchi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi é um importante agente de infecções zoonóticas, podendo causar sérias infecções em humanos, principalmente em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Neste estudo, nós relatamos o caso de uma bacteremia fatal devido a Rhodococcus equi em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (HIV positivo.Rhodococcus equi is an important agent for zoonotic infections, and may cause serious infections in humans, especially immunocompromised patients. In this study, a case of fatal bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV positive is reported.

  12. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG and apolipoprotein B (apo B secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole by individual and mixed bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Simone; Yargeau, Viviane

    2011-07-01

    Antibiotic compounds, like sulfamethoxazole (SMX), have become a concern in the aquatic environment due to the potential development of antibacterial resistances. Due to excretion and disposal, SMX has been frequently detected in wastewaters and surface waters. SMX removal in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) ranges from 0% to 90%, and there are opposing results regarding its biodegradability at lab scale. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of pure cultures of individual and mixed consortia of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus equi, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Rhodococcus rhodocrous, and Rhodococcus zopfii) known to exist in WWTP activated sludge to remove SMX. Results showed that R. equi alone had the greatest ability to remove SMX leading to 29% removal (with glucose) and the formation of a metabolite. Degradation pathways and metabolite structures have been proposed based on the potential enzymes produced by R. equi. When R. equi was mixed with other microorganisms, a positive synergistic effect was not observed and the maximum SMX removal achieved was 5%. This indicates that pure culture results cannot be extrapolated to mixed culture conditions, and the methodology developed here to study the biodegradability of compounds under controlled mixed culture conditions offers an alternative to conventional studies using pure bacterial cultures or inocula from activated sludge sources consisting of unknown and variable microbial populations.

  14. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

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    Carla Giles

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  15. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so

  16. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sheri L; Dibartolo, Genevieve; Denef, Vincent J; Goltsman, Daniela S Aliaga; Thelen, Michael P; Banfield, Jillian F

    2008-07-22

    Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic) datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x). The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type) at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity) have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the observed patterns of

  17. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri L Simmons

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x. The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the

  18. Whole-genome sequencing of Bacillus velezensis LS69, a strain with a broad inhibitory spectrum against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqiang; Kong, Yingying; Fan, Yajing; Geng, Ce; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2017-05-10

    Bacillus velezensis LS69 was found to exhibit antagonistic activity against a diverse spectrum of pathogenic bacteria. It has one circular chromosome of 3,917,761bp with 3,643 open reading frames. Genome analysis identified ten gene clusters involved in nonribosomal synthesis of polyketides (macrolactin, bacillaene and difficidin), lipopeptides (surfactin, fengycin, bacilysin and iturin A) and bacteriocins (amylolysin and amylocyclicin). In addition, B. velezensis LS69 was found to contain a series of genes involved in enhancing plant growth and triggering plant immunity. Whole genome sequencing of Bacillus velezensis LS69 will provide a basis for elucidation of its biocontrol mechanisms and facilitate its applications in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of feeding tannin-degrading bacteria Streptococcus gallolyticus strain TDGB 406 on meat quality of goats fed with Quercus semicarpifolia leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushalendra; Chaudhary, L C; Agarwal, Neeta; Kamra, D N

    2016-10-01

    The effect of feeding tannin-degrading bacteria (Streptococcus gallolyticus strain TDGB 406) on carcass characteristics of goats fed with oak (Quercus semicarpifolia) leaves was studied on 18 male goats (4 months old, average body weight 9.50 ± 1.50 kg), distributed into three groups of six animals each. The animals of group 1 served as control, while the animals of groups 2 and 3 were given (at 5 ml/kg live weight) autoclaved and live culture of isolate TDGB 406 (10(6) cells/ml), respectively. The animals were fed with oak leaves as a basal roughage source and maize hay along with fixed quantity of concentrate mixture. After 4 months of feeding, the animals were slaughtered for carcass studies. The feeding of live culture of isolate TDGB 406 did not cause any effect (P > 0.05) on pre-slaughter weight, empty body weight, carcass weight, dressing percent, and yield of wholesale cuts (neck, rack, shoulder, breast, shank, loin, leg, and flank) of the goat meat. The chemical composition of longissimus dorsi muscle was comparable (P > 0.05) among the groups. The organoleptic evaluation of pressure-cooked meat in terms of tenderness and overall palatability was increased significantly (P meat of group 3 where live culture was supplemented. The other attributes were similar among the groups. It was concluded that supplementation of tannin-degrading bacteria S. gallolyticus strain TDGB 406 to goats fed with oak leaves did not affect the carcass characteristics and meat quality.

  20. Endosulfan induced alteration in bacterial protein profile and RNA yield of Klebsiella sp. M3, Achromobacter sp. M6, and Rhodococcus sp. M2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhu; Singh, Dileep Kumar

    2014-01-30

    Three bacterial strains identified as Klebsiella sp. M3, Achromobacter sp. M6 and Rhodococcus sp. M2 were isolated by soil enrichment with endosulfan followed by shake flask enrichment technique. They were efficiently degrading endosulfan in the NSM (non sulfur medium) broth. Degradation of endosulfan was faster with the cell free extract of bacterial cells grown in the sulfur deficient medium (NSM) supplemented with endosulfan than that of nutrient rich medium (Luria Bertani). In the cell free extract of NSM supplemented with endosulfan as sole sulfur source, a unique band was visualized on SDS-PAGE but not with magnesium sulfate as the sole sulfur source in NSM and LB with endosulfan. Expression of a unique polypeptide band was speculated to be induced by endosulfan under sulfur starved condition. These unique polypeptide bands were identified as OmpK35 protein, sulfate binding protein and outer membrane porin protein, respectively, in Klebsiella sp. M3, Achromobacter sp. M6 and Rhodococcus sp. M2. Endosulfan showed dose dependent negative effect on total RNA yield of bacterial strains in nutrient rich medium. Absence of plasmid DNA indicated the presence of endosulfan metabolizing gene on genomic DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacteria hold their breath upon surface contact as shown in a strain of Escherichia coli, using dispersed surfaces and flow cytometry analysis.

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    Jing Geng

    Full Text Available Bacteria are ubiquitously distributed throughout our planet, mainly in the form of adherent communities in which cells exhibit specific traits. The mechanisms underpinning the physiological shift in surface-attached bacteria are complex, multifactorial and still partially unclear. Here we address the question of the existence of early surface sensing through implementation of a functional response to initial surface contact. For this purpose, we developed a new experimental approach enabling simultaneous monitoring of free-floating, aggregated and adherent cells via the use of dispersed surfaces as adhesive substrates and flow cytometry analysis. With this system, we analyzed, in parallel, the constitutively expressed GFP content of the cells and production of a respiration probe--a fluorescent reduced tetrazolium ion. In an Escherichia coli strain constitutively expressing curli, a major E. coli adhesin, we found that single cell surface contact induced a decrease in the cell respiration level compared to free-floating single cells present in the same sample. Moreover, we show here that cell surface contact with an artificial surface and with another cell caused reduction in respiration. We confirm the existence of a bacterial cell "sense of touch" ensuring early signalling of surface contact formation through respiration down modulation.

  2. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomusiak, Anna; Strus, Magdalena; Heczko, Piotr B; Adamski, Paweł; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4-6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag(®), or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally). The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits) in both vaginal pH (Pvaginal microbiota, as demonstrated by predominance of the Lactobacillus bacteria in vaginal microbiota.

  3. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and/or bacteria to enhancing plant drought tolerance under natural soil conditions: effectiveness of autochthonous or allochthonous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, N; Armada, E; Duque, E; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2015-02-01

    Autochthonous microorganisms [a consortium of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)] were assayed and compared to Rhizophagus intraradices (Ri), Bacillus megaterium (Bm) or Pseudomonas putida (Psp) and non-inoculation on Trifolium repens in a natural arid soil under drought conditions. The autochthonous bacteria Bt and the allochthonous bacteria Psp increased nutrients and the relative water content and decreased stomatal conductance, electrolyte leakage, proline and APX activity, indicating their abilities to alleviate the drought stress. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly enhanced plant growth, nutrient uptake and the relative water content, particularly when associated with specific bacteria minimizing drought stress-imposed effects. Specific combinations of autochthonous or allochthonous inoculants also contributed to plant drought tolerance by changing proline and antioxidative activities. However, non-inoculated plants had low relative water and nutrients contents, shoot proline accumulation and glutathione reductase activity, but the highest superoxide dismutase activity, stomatal conductance and electrolyte leakage. Microbial activities irrespective of the microbial origin seem to be coordinately functioning in the plant as an adaptive response to modulated water stress tolerance and minimizing the stress damage. The autochthonous AM fungi with Bt or Psp and those allochthonous Ri with Bm or Psp inoculants increased water stress alleviation. The autochthonous Bt showed the greatest ability to survive under high osmotic stress compared to the allochthonous strains, but when single inoculated or associated with Ri or AM fungi were similarly efficient in terms of physiological and nutritional status and in increasing plant drought tolerance, attenuating and compensating for the detrimental effect of water limitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Performance analysis of a solar photovoltaic hybrid system for electricity generation and simultaneous water disinfection of wild bacteria strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichel, N.; Vivar, M.; Fuentes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new hybrid solar water disinfection and energy generation system was designed and tested. • SOLWAT comprises a water disinfection reactor and a PV module fully integrated into a single unit. • Natural water with wild strains of E. coli, Enterococcus spp. and C. perfringens were studied. • The water disinfection reactor located above the PV module did not affect the final energy output. • The SOLWAT disinfection results were always higher than conventional PET bottles. - Abstract: A hybrid solar water disinfection and energy generation system for meeting the needs of safe drinking water and electricity was designed and tested in Alcalá de Henares (Spain) under summer climatic conditions to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. Natural water sources with wild strains of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and Clostridium perfringens (including spores) were studied. Results showed that SOLWAT disinfection efficiency was higher than conventional PET bottles and that the water disinfection reactor located above the PV module did not affect the total energy output produced by the hybrid system in comparison to the single PV module, achieving the same power losses over the 6 h of sun exposure in relation to their power at standard test conditions (STC).

  5. Isolation and identification of Aeromonas caviae strain KS-1 as TBTC- and lead-resistant estuarine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Kashif; Naik, Milind Mohan; Pandey, Anju; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTC)- and lead-resistant estuarine bacterium from Mandovi estuary, Goa, India was isolated and identified as Aeromonas caviae strain KS-1 based on biochemical characteristics and FAME analysis. It tolerates TBTC and lead up to 1.0 and 1.4 mM, respectively, in the minimal salt medium (MSM) supplemented with 0.4 % glucose. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed a unique morphological pattern in the form of long inter-connected chains of bacterial cells on exposure to 1 mM TBTC, whereas cells remained unaltered in presence of 1.4 mM Pb(NO₃)₂ but significant biosorption of lead (8 %) on the cell surface of this isolate was clearly revealed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. SDS-PAGE analysis of whole-cell proteins of this lead-resistant isolate interestingly demonstrated three lead-induced proteins with molecular mass of 15.7, 16.9 and 32.4 kDa, respectively, when bacterial cells were grown under the stress of 1.4 mM Pb (NO₃)₂. This clearly demonstrated their possible involvement exclusively in lead resistance. A. caviae strain KS-1 also showed tolerance to several other heavy metals, viz. zinc, cadmium, copper and mercury. Therefore, we can employ this TBTC and lead-resistant bacterial isolate for lead bioremediation and also for biomonitoring TBTC from lead and TBTC contaminated environment.

  6. Mesophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Diversity Encountered in Brazilian Farms Producing Milk with Particular Interest in Lactococcus lactis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, L M P; Chuat, V; Madec, M N; Araújo, E A; de Carvalho, A F; Valence, F

    2016-10-01

    The milk produced in regions with different traditions in Brazil is used for artisanal product production, which is characterized by different sensorial characteristics. This study aimed to identify the bacterial ecosystem of farms located in a traditional dairy region in the state of Minas Gerais and to characterize Lactococcus lactis strains, the species of interest in this study, using a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) protocol and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. Samples were collected from raw milk and dairy environment from six farms. A total of 50 isolates were analyzed using 16S rRNA sequencing and species-specific PCR. Five genera were identified: Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, Enterococcus, and Staphylococcus, from ten different species. MLST (with six housekeeping genes) and PFGE (with SmaI endonuclease) were used for the characterization of 20 isolates of Lactococcus lactis from a dairy collection in this study. Both methods revealed a high clonal diversity of strains with a higher discriminatory level for PFGE (15 pulsotypes), compared to MLST (12 ST). This study contributes to the preservation of the Brazilian dairy heritage and provides insights into a part of the LAB population found in raw milk and dairy environment.

  7. Comparative Genomics of Rhodococcus equi Virulence Plasmids Indicates Host-Driven Evolution of the vap Pathogenicity Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Iain; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2017-05-01

    The conjugative virulence plasmid is a key component of the Rhodococcus equi accessory genome essential for pathogenesis. Three host-associated virulence plasmid types have been identified the equine pVAPA and porcine pVAPB circular variants, and the linear pVAPN found in bovine (ruminant) isolates. We recently characterized the R. equi pangenome (Anastasi E, et al. 2016. Pangenome and phylogenomic analysis of the pathogenic actinobacterium Rhodococcus equi. Genome Biol Evol. 8:3140-3148.) and we report here the comparative analysis of the virulence plasmid genomes. Plasmids within each host-associated type were highly similar despite their diverse origins. Variation was accounted for by scattered single nucleotide polymorphisms and short nucleotide indels, while larger indels-mostly in the plasticity region near the vap pathogencity island (PAI)-defined plasmid genomic subtypes. Only one of the plasmids analyzed, of pVAPN type, was exceptionally divergent due to accumulation of indels in the housekeeping backbone. Each host-associated plasmid type carried a unique PAI differing in vap gene complement, suggesting animal host-specific evolution of the vap multigene family. Complete conservation of the vap PAI was observed within each host-associated plasmid type. Both diversity of host-associated plasmid types and clonality of specific chromosomal-plasmid genomic type combinations were observed within the same R. equi phylogenomic subclade. Our data indicate that the overall strong conservation of the R. equi host-associated virulence plasmids is the combined result of host-driven selection, lateral transfer between strains, and geographical spread due to international livestock exchanges. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Combined application of bio-organic phosphate and phosphorus solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus strain MWT 14) improve the performance of bread wheat with low fertilizer input under an arid climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Muhammad; Khalid, Umaira; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shah, Ghulam Mustafa; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Shahid, Muhammad; Mahmood, Khalid; Ahmad, Naveed; Kareem, Fazal

    2018-04-24

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of bio-organic phosphate either alone or in combination with phosphorus solubilizing bacteria strain (Bacillus MWT-14) on the growth and productivity of two wheat cultivars (Galaxy-2013 and Punjab-2011) along with recommended (150-100NPkgha -1 ) and half dose (75-50NPkgha -1 ) of fertilizers. The combined application of bio-organic phosphate and the phosphorous solubilizing bacteria strain at either fertilizer level significantly improved the growth, yield parameters and productivity of both wheat cultivars compared to non-inoculated control treatments. The cultivar Punjab-2011 produced the higher chlorophyll contents, crop growth rate, and the straw yield at half dose of NP fertilizer; while Galaxy-2013, with the combined application of bio-organic phosphate and phosphorous solubilizing bacteria under recommended NP fertilizer dose. Combined over both NP fertilizer levels, the combined use of bio-organic phosphate and phosphorous solubilizing bacteria enhanced the grain yield of cultivar Galaxy-2013 by 54.3% and that of cultivar Punjab-2011 by 83.3%. The combined application of bio-organic phosphate and phosphorous solubilizing bacteria also increased the population of phosphorous solubilizing bacteria, the soil organic matter and phosphorous contents in the soil. In conclusion, the combined application of bio-organic phosphate and phosphorous solubilizing bacteria offers an eco-friendly option to harvest the better wheat yield with low fertilizer input under arid climate. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Adaptability of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts to sourdoughs prepared from cereals, pseudocereals and cassava and use of competitive strains as starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Stephanie A; Seitter, Michael; Singer, Ulrike; Brandt, Markus J; Hertel, Christian

    2009-04-15

    The adaptability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts to sourdoughs prepared from cereals, pseudocereals and cassava was investigated using PCR-DGGE and bacteriological culture combined with rRNA gene sequence analysis. Sourdoughs were prepared either from flours of the cereals wheat, rye, oat, barley, rice, maize, and millet, or from the pseudocereals amaranth, quinoa, and buckwheat, or from cassava, using a starter consisting of various species of LAB and yeasts. Doughs were propagated until a stable microbiota was established. The dominant LAB and yeast species were Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pontis, Lactobacillus spicheri, Issatchenkia orientalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The proportion of the species within the microbiota varied. L. paralimentarius dominated in the pseudocereal sourdoughs, L. fermentum, L. plantarum and L. spicheri in the cassava sourdough, and L. fermentum, L. helveticus and L. pontis in the cereal sourdoughs. S. cerevisiae constituted the dominating yeast, except for quinoa sourdough, where I. orientalis also reached similar counts, and buckwheat and oat sourdoughs, where no yeasts could be detected. To assess the usefulness of competitive LAB and yeasts as starters, the fermentations were repeated using flours from rice, maize, millet and the pseudocereals, and by starting the dough fermentation with selected dominant strains. At the end of fermentation, most of starter strains belonged to the dominating microbiota. For the rice, millet and quinoa sourdoughs the species composition was similar to that of the prior fermentation, whereas in the other sourdoughs, the composition differed.

  10. Localization of Low Copy Number Plasmid pRC4 in Replicating Rod and Non-Replicating Cocci Cells of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Singhi

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus are gram-positive bacteria, which can exist in two different shapes rod and cocci. A number of studies have been done in the past on replication and stability of small plasmids in this bacterium; however, there are no reports on spatial localization and segregation of these plasmids. In the present study, a low copy number plasmid pDS3 containing pRC4 replicon was visualized in growing cells of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 (NBRC100887 using P1 parS-ParB-GFP system. Cells were initially cocci and then became rod shaped in exponential phase. Cocci cells were found to be non-replicating as evident by the presence of single fluorescence focus corresponding to the plasmid and diffuse fluorescence of DnaB-GFP. Rod shaped cells contained plasmid either present as one fluorescent focus observed at the cell center or two foci localized at quarter positions. The results suggest that the plasmid is replicated at the cell center and then it goes to quarter position. In order to observe the localization of plasmid with respect to nucleoid, plasmid segregation was also studied in filaments where it was found to be replicated at the cell center in a nucleoid free region. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on segregation of small plasmids in R. erythropolis.

  11. Enhanced fertilization effect of a compost obtained from mixed herbs waste inoculated with novel strains of mesophilic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Snežana M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed medicinal plant waste was composted with addition of novel bacterial strains belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Paenybacillus, Bacillus and Hymenobacter. The composting was followed by assessment of chemical and biological parameters including C/N ratio, loss of organic matter, phosphorous and potassium content as well as CO2 generation and dehydrogenase activity during 164 days. The selected mesophilic bacterial starters had a potential to significantly reduce the period of mixed herb waste decomposition, from about 6 months to about 2.5 months. Based on the seed germination index of four plants (Fagopirum esculentum, Thymus vulgaris, Cynara scolimus and Lavandula officinalis the germination and radial root growth of the investigated plants was improved by the inoculated compost. The germination index of all tested species on the mature inoculated composts was in average 60% higher compared to the control compost. The research indicates that the mesophilic starter addition into the herbs waste can contribute to the speed of waste decomposition and lead to the improvement of biofertilization effect of the obtained compost. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR 31035

  12. Serological survey of Rhodococcus equi infection in horses in Hokkaido.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Y; Noda, H; Nagahata, H

    1992-08-01

    Serological survey of Rhodococcus equi infection in horses in Hokkaido was performed using ELISA. Of 2,879 horse sera, 318 (11.0%) gave antibody-positive (OD greater than or equal to 0.3) reactions. The antibody-positive rate of female was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) than that of male, and no statistical difference between Anglo-Arab and thoroughbred was detected in the antibody-positive rate. The maximum antibody-positive rate (27.1%) was shown at 14 years of age. The antibody-positive rates on the 160 farms were found to vary widely from 0 to 78.9%. A significant difference (p less than 0.01) in the antibody-positive rate was detected among horse farms. It was elucidated that 100 (62.5%) out of 160 horse farms had an antibody-positive horse. These results indicate that R. equi was widespread on horse farms, and the level of environmental contamination with R. equi differed among horse farms.

  13. Rhodococcus equi: the many facets of a pathogenic actinomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Boland, José A; Giguère, Steeve; Hapeshi, Alexia; MacArthur, Iain; Anastasi, Elisa; Valero-Rello, Ana

    2013-11-29

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil-dwelling pathogenic actinomycete that causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary pyogranulomatous infections in a variety of animal species and people. Young foals are particularly susceptible and develop a life-threatening pneumonic disease that is endemic at many horse-breeding farms worldwide. R. equi is a facultative intracellular parasite of macrophages that replicates within a modified phagocytic vacuole. Its pathogenicity depends on a virulence plasmid that promotes intracellular survival by preventing phagosome-lysosome fusion. Species-specific tropism of R. equi for horses, pigs and cattle appears to be determined by host-adapted virulence plasmid types. Molecular epidemiological studies of these plasmids suggest that human R. equi infection is zoonotic. Analysis of the recently determined R. equi genome sequence has identified additional virulence determinants on the bacterial chromosome. This review summarizes our current understanding of the clinical aspects, biology, pathogenesis and immunity of this fascinating microbe with plasmid-governed infectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Seroepidemiological survey of Rhodococcus equi infection in asymptomatic horses and donkeys from southeast Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, O Y; Arserim, N B; Keskin, O

    2011-12-01

    In order to assess the level of Rhodococcus equi infection in southeast Turkey, 679 sera from healthy foals and adult horses and 78 sera from donkeys were tested by indirect ELISA using a R. equi reference strain (ATCC 33701) as antigen. Eighty (11.7%) sera from horses and 9 (11.5%) sera from donkeys with titres >0.85 were positive. The prevalence of seropositive horses in Sanliurfa Province was higher than in Diyarbakir Province; 56 (13.9%) horses in Sanliurfa Province and 24 (8.7%) horses in Diyarbakir Province were defined as seropositive. In Sanliurfa Province 14.5% of female (n=343) and 10.1% of male (n = 59) horses tested were defined as seropositive, while in Diyarbakir Province more males (11.4%, n=114) were seropositive than females (6.7%, n=163). Horses 1 to 5 years of age were found to have the highest seropositivity rate in both provinces. A total of 78 sera from donkeys were investigated in Sanliurfa Province, of which 9 (11.5%) were positive by ELISA. Among the 9 positive sera, 6 (12.8%) were from donkeys 1-5 years old and 3 (13.6%) were from donkeys >5 years of age. No positive sera were found in donkeys less than 1 year old. Five (12.5%) sera of females and 4 (10.5%) sera of males tested were positive. These results indicate the existence of R. equi in the horse populations in Sanliurfa and Diyarbakir Provinces. Similar infection rates were found for donkeys in Sanliurfa. This suggests the importance of serological surveys to diagnose R. equi infection in the region and to prevent the zoonotic risk.

  15. Seroepidemiological survey of Rhodococcus equi infection in asymptomatic horses and donkeys from southeast Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Tel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available n order to assess the level of Rhodococcus equi infection in southeast Turkey, 679 sera from healthy foals and adult horses and 78 sera from donkeys were tested by indirect ELISA using a R. equi reference strain (ATCC 33701 as antigen. Eighty (11.7 % sera from horses and 9 (11.5 % sera from donkeys with titres >0.85 were positive. The prevalence of seropositive horses in Sanliurfa Province was higher than in Diyarbakir Province; 56 (13.9 % horses in Sanliurfa Province and 24 (8.7 % horses in Diyarbakir Province were defined as seropositive. In Sanliurfa Province 14.5 % of female (n = 343 and 10.1 % of male (n = 59 horses tested were defined as seropositive, while in Diyarbakir Province more males (11.4 %, n = 114 were seropositive than females (6.7 %, n = 163. Horses 1 to 5 years of age were found to have the highest seropositivity rate in both provinces. A total of 78 sera from donkeys were investigated in Sanliurfa Province, of which 9 (11.5 % were positive by ELISA. Among the 9 positive sera, 6 (12.8 % were from donkeys 1-5 years old and 3 (13.6 % were from donkeys >5years of age. Nopositive sera were found in donkeys less than 1 year old. Five(12.5 % sera of females and 4(10.5 % sera of males tested were positive. These results indicate the existence of R. equi in the horse populations in Sanliurfa and Diyarbakir Provinces. Similar infection rates were found for donkeys in Sanliurfa. This suggests the importance of serological surveys to diagnose R. equi infection in the region and to prevent the zoonotic risk.

  16. Isolation and characterization of bacteria from mercury contaminated sites in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and assessment of methylmercury removal capability of a Pseudomonas putida V1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Lucélia; Giovanella, Patrícia; Gianello, Clésio; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Andreazza, Robson; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is one of the most dangerous heavy metal for living organisms that may be found in environment. Given the crescent industrialization of Brazil and considering that mercury is a residue of several industrial processes, there is an increasing need to encounter and develop remediation approaches of mercury contaminated sites. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize methylmercury resistant bacteria from soils and sludge sewage from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Sixteen bacteria were isolated from these contaminated sites and some isolates were highly resistant to methylmercury (>8.7 μM). All the isolates were identified by 16S rDNA. Pseudomonas putida V1 was able to volatilize approximately 90 % of methylmercury added to growth media and to resist to copper, lead, nickel, chromate, zinc, cobalt, manganese and barium. In the presence of high concentrations of methylmercury (12 μM), cell growth was limited, but P. putida V1 was still able to remove up to 29 % of this compound from culture medium. This bacterium removed an average of 77 % of methylmercury from culture medium with pH in the range 4.0-6.0. In addition, methylmercury was efficiently removed (>80 %) in temperature of 21-25 °C. Polymerase chain reactions indicated the presence of merA but not merB in P. putida V1. The growth and ability of P. putida V1 to remove methylmercury in a wide range of pH (4.0 and 8.0) and temperature (10-35 °C), its tolerance to other heavy metals and ability to grow in the presence of up to 11.5 μM of methylmercury, suggest this strain as a new potential resource for degrading methylmercury contaminated sites.

  17. Effect of milk fermentation by kefir grains and selected single strains of lactic acid bacteria on the survival of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuamule, C L S; Wiid, I J; van Helden, P D; Tanner, M; Witthuhn, R C

    2016-01-18

    Mycobacterium bovis that causes Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) can be transmitted to humans thought consumption of raw and raw fermented milk products from diseased animals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used in popular traditional milk products in Africa produce anti-microbial compounds that inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. M. bovis BCG is an attenuated non-pathogenic vaccine strain of M. bovis and the aim of the study was to determine the effect of the fermentation process on the survival of M. bovis BCG in milk. M. bovis BCG at concentrations of 6 log CFU/ml was added to products of kefir fermentation. The survival of M. bovis BCG was monitored at 12-h intervals for 72 h by enumerating viable cells on Middlebrook 7H10 agar plates enriched with 2% BD BACTEC PANTA™. M. bovis BCG was increasingly reduced in sterile kefir that was fermented for a period of 24h and longer. In the milk fermented with kefir grains, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei or Lactobacillus casei, the viability of M. bovis BCG was reduced by 0.4 logs after 24h and by 2 logs after 48 h of fermentation. No viable M. bovis BCG was detected after 60 h of fermentation. Results from this study show that long term fermentation under certain conditions may have the potential to inactivate M. bovis BCG present in the milk. However, to ensure safety of fermented milk in Africa, fermentation should be combined with other hurdle technologies such as boiling and milk pasteurisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomusiak A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Tomusiak,1 Magdalena Strus,1 Piotr B Heczko,1 Paweł Adamski,2 Grzegorz Stefański,3 Aleksandra Mikołajczyk-Cichońska,3 Magdalena Suda-Szczurek3 1Department of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 2Institute of Nature Conservation, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3IBSS BIOMED SA, Kraków, Poland Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. Patients and methods: The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4–6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag®, or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally. The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Results: Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits in both vaginal pH (P<0.05 and Nugent score (P<0.05, and a significant increase in the abundance of Lactobacillus between visit I and visits III and IV (P<0.05. Molecular typing revealed the presence of Lactobacillus strains originating from inVag in 82% of women taking the drug at

  19. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodegradation of Di-(2-ethylhexyl Phthalate by Rhodococcus ruber YC-YT1 in Contaminated Water and Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Di-(2-ethylehxyl phthalate (DEHP is one of the most broadly representative phthalic acid esters (PAEs used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC production, and is considered to be an endocrine-disrupting chemical. DEHP and its monoester metabolites are responsible for adverse effects on human health. An efficient DEHP-degrading bacterial strain Rhodococcus ruber YC-YT1, with super salt tolerance (0–12% NaCl, is the first DEHP-degrader isolated from marine plastic debris found in coastal saline seawater. Strain YC-YT1 completely degraded 100 mg/L DEHP within three days (pH 7.0, 30 °C. According to high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS analysis, DEHP was transformed by strain YC-YT1 into phthalate (PA via mono (2-ethylehxyl phthalate (MEHP, then PA was used for cell growth. Furthermore, YC-YT1 metabolized initial concentrations of DEHP ranging from 0.5 to 1000 mg/L. Especially, YC-YT1 degraded up to 60% of the 0.5 mg/L initial DEHP concentration. Moreover, compared with previous reports, strain YC-YT1 had the largest substrate spectrum, degrading up to 13 kinds of PAEs as well as diphenyl, p-nitrophenol, PA, benzoic acid, phenol, protocatechuic acid, salicylic acid, catechol, and 1,2,3,3-tetrachlorobenzene. The excellent environmental adaptability of strain YC-YT1 contributed to its ability to adjust its cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH so that 79.7–95.9% of DEHP-contaminated agricultural soil, river water, coastal sediment, and coastal seawater were remedied. These results demonstrate that R. ruber YC-YT1 has vast potential to bioremediate various DEHP-contaminated environments, especially in saline environments.

  1. Investigating on the fermentation behavior of six lactic acid bacteria strains in barley malt wort reveals limitation in key amino acids and buffer capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsogning, Sorelle Dongmo; Fischer, Susann; Becker, Thomas

    2018-08-01

    Understanding lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation behavior in malt wort is a milestone towards flavor improvement of lactic acid fermented malt beverages. Therefore, this study aims to outline deficiencies that may exist in malt wort fermentation. First, based on six LAB strains, cell viability and vitality were evaluated. Second, sugars, organic acids, amino acids, pH value and buffering capacity (BC) were monitored. Finally, the implication of key amino acids, fructose and wort BC on LAB growth was determined. Short growth phase coupled with prompt cell death and a decrease in metabolic activity was observed. Low wort BC caused rapid pH drop with lactic acid accumulation, which conversely increased the BC leading to less pH change at late-stage fermentation. Lactic acid content (≤3.9 g/L) was higher than the reported inhibitory concentration (1.8 g/L). Furthermore, sugars were still available but fructose and key amino acids lysine, arginine and glutamic acid were considerably exhausted (≤98%). Wort supplementations improved cell growth and viability leading to conclude that key amino acid depletion coupled with low BC limits LAB growth in malt wort. Then, a further increase in organic acid reduces LAB viability. This knowledge opens doors for LAB fermentation process optimization in malt wort. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and validation of polar RP-HPLC method for screening for ectoine high-yield strains in marine bacteria with green chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Jianwei; Wang, Sijia; Zhou, Guangmin; Chen, Danqing; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Hong

    2018-04-02

    A novel, green, rapid, and precise polar RP-HPLC method has been successfully developed and screened for ectoine high-yield strain in marine bacteria. Ectoine is a polar and extremely useful solute which allows microorganisms to survive in extreme environmental salinity. This paper describes a polar-HPLC method employed polar RP-C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) using pure water as the mobile phase and a column temperature of 30 °C, coupled with a flow rate at 1.0 mL/min and detected under a UV detector at wavelength of 210 nm. Our method validation demonstrates excellent linearity (R 2  = 0.9993), accuracy (100.55%), and a limit of detection LOQ and LOD of 0.372 and 0.123 μgmL -1 , respectively. These results clearly indicate that the developed polar RP-HPLC method for the separation and determination of ectoine is superior to earlier protocols.

  3. Production of glycolipidic bio surfactants by environment bacteria: diversity and physiological part; Production de biosurfactants glycolipidiques par les bacteries de l`environnement: diversite et role physiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arino, S

    1996-10-09

    About a hundred bacterial strains, isolated from soils, polluted or not by hydrocarbons, were tested for their capacity to excrete glycosides. The biggest productions were obtained for a soluble carbon source (glycerol) in a culture medium limited in the nitrogen source. In these conditions, 18 g/l of rhamnose lipids were produced by train Pseudomonas aeruginosa GL1 in a 200 h culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa GL1, Cellulomonas celulans SA43 and Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43060 were studied in detail. The bio-surfactants produced were identified respectively as rhamnose lipids, oligosaccharide lipids and trehalose lipids, using various original analytical methods. Sugars and fatty acids composing these glycolipids had been shown to be usual components of the outer part of the cell wall in these microbial species. Moreover, cell hydrophobicity of the producing bacteria varied in time during culture. These results showed that both the cell wall and the extracellular glycolipids take part in the process of hydrocarbon uptake in the polluted environments. As other bacteria of the same species from different origins present the same characteristics, it may be concluded that glycolipid excretion does not constitute a specific response for hydrocarbon assimilation. In fact, a more general physiological role of glycolipids, concerning modifications of hydrophobic interfaces between the producing bacteria and their surrounding environment, could explain the production of glycolipids, and could also be utilized in hydrocarbon uptake. (author)

  4. Hydrocarbon degradation potential and plant growth-promoting activity of culturable endophytic bacteria of Lotus corniculatus and Oenothera biennis from a long-term polluted site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Małgorzata; Cania, Barbara; Thijs, Sofie; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2017-08-01

    Many endophytic bacteria exert beneficial effects on their host, but still little is known about the bacteria associated with plants growing in areas heavily polluted by hydrocarbons. The aim of the study was characterization of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading endophytic bacteria associated with Lotus corniculatus L. and Oenothera biennis L. collected in long-term petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted site using culture-dependent and molecular approaches. A total of 26 hydrocarbon-degrading endophytes from these plants were isolated. Phylogenetic analyses classified the isolates into the phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The majority of strains belonged to the genera Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Rhodococcus. More than 90% of the isolates could grow on medium with diesel oil, approximately 20% could use n-hexadecane as a sole carbon and energy source. PCR analysis revealed that 40% of the isolates possessed the P450 gene encoding for cytochrome P450-type alkane hydroxylase (CYP153). In in vitro tests, all endophytic strains demonstrated a wide range of plant growth-promoting traits such as production of indole-3-acetic acid, hydrogen cyanide, siderophores, and phosphate solubilization. More than 40% of the bacteria carried the gene encoding for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (acdS). Our study shows that the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities in tested plants was different. The results revealed also that the investigated plants were colonized by endophytic bacteria possessing plant growth-promoting features and a clear potential to degrade hydrocarbons. The properties of isolated endophytes indicate that they have the high potential to improve phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted soils.

  5. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms of Virulence Plasmids in Rhodococcus equi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Shinji; Shoda, Masato; Sasaki, Yukako; Tsubaki, Shiro; Fortier, Guillaume; Pronost, Stephane; Rahal, Karim; Becu, Teotimo; Begg, Angela; Browning, Glenn; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Prescott, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Virulent Rhodococcus equi, which is a well-known cause of pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals, possesses a large plasmid encoding virulence-associated 15- to 17-kDa antigens. Foal and soil isolates from five countries—Argentina, Australia, Canada, France, and Japan—were investigated for the presence of 15- to 17-kDa antigens by colony blotting, using the monoclonal antibody 10G5, and the gene coding for 15- to 17-kDa antigens by PCR. Plasmid DNAs extracted from positive isolates were digested with restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII, and the digestion patterns that resulted divided the plasmids of virulent isolates into five closely related types. Three of the five types had already been reported in Canadian and Japanese isolates, and the two new types had been found in French and Japanese isolates. Therefore, we tentatively designated these five types 85-kb type I (pREAT701), 85-kb type II (a new type), 87-kb type I (EcoRI and BamHI type 2 [V. M. Nicholson and J. F. Prescott, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:738–740, 1997]), 87-kb type II (a new type), and 90-kb (pREL1) plasmids. The 85-kb type I plasmid was found in isolates from Argentina, Australia, Canada, and France. Plasmid 87-kb type I was isolated in specimens from Argentina, Canada, and France. The 85-kb type II plasmid appeared in isolates from France. On the other hand, plasmids 87-kb type II and 90-kb were found only in isolates from Japan. These results revealed geographic differences in the distribution of the virulence plasmids found in the five countries and suggested that the restriction fragment length polymorphism of virulence plasmids might be useful to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of virulent R. equi in the world. PMID:10488224

  6. Selective cultures for the isolation of biosurfactant producing bacteria: comparison of different combinations of environmental inocula and hydrophobic carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Patrícia M; Louvado, António; Oliveira, Vanessa; Coelho, Francisco J C R; Almeida, Adelaide; Gomes, Newton C M; Cunha, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The potential of estuarine microniches as reservoirs of biosurfactant-producing bacteria was evaluated by testing different combinations of inocula and hydrophobic carbon sources. Selective cultures using diesel, petroleum, or paraffin as hydrophobic carbon sources were prepared and inoculated with water from the surface microlayer, bulk sediments, and sediment of the rhizosphere of Halimione portulacoides. These inocula were compared regarding the frequency of biosurfactant-producing strains among selected isolates. The community structure of the selective cultures was profiled using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene fragments at the end of the incubation. The DGGE profiles corresponding to the communities established in selective cultures at the end of the incubation revealed that communities were different in terms of structural diversity. The highest diversity was observed in the selective cultures containing paraffin (H (') = 2.5). Isolates were obtained from the selective cultures (66) and tested for biosurfactant production by the atomized oil assay. Biosurfactant production was detected in 17 isolates identified as Microbacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Serratia. The combination of estuarine surface microlayer (SML) water as inoculum and diesel as carbon source seems promising for the isolation of surfactant-producing bacteria. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology to view the supplemental file.

  7. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Contains a Novel Degradation Pathway for Limonene

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Swarts, Henk J.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain DCL14, which is able to grow on limonene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from a freshwater sediment sample. This organism was identified as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis by chemotaxonomic and genetic studies. R. erythropolis DCL14 also assimilated the terpenes limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, carveol, carvone, and (−)-menthol, while perillyl alcohol was not utilized as a carbon and energy source. Induction tests with cells grown on limonene revealed that the oxygen consumption rates with limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and carveol were high. Limonene-induced cells of R. erythropolis DCL14 contained the following four novel enzymatic activities involved in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism: a flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADH-dependent limonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity, a cofactor-independent limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity, a dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent limonene-1,2-diol dehydrogenase activity, and an NADPH-dependent 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity. Product accumulation studies showed that (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1S,4R)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3R)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate were intermediates in the (4R)-limonene degradation pathway. The opposite enantiomers [(1R,2R,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1R,4S)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3S)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate] were found in the (4S)-limonene degradation pathway, while accumulation of (1R,2S,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol from (4S)-limonene was also observed. These results show that R. erythropolis DCL14 metabolizes both enantiomers of limonene via a novel degradation pathway that starts with epoxidation at the 1,2 double bond forming limonene-1,2-epoxide. This epoxide is subsequently converted to limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and 7-hydroxy-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone. This lactone spontaneously rearranges to form 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate. In

  8. A common soil flagellate (Cercomonas sp.) grows slowly when feeding on the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians in isolation, but does not discriminate against it in a mixed culture with Sphingopyxis witflariensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekfeldt, Jonas D S; Rønn, Regin

    2008-01-01

    Flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil. Because of their high growth rates, flagellate populations respond rapidly to changes in bacterial numbers. Previous results indicate that actinobacteria are generally less suitable than proteobacteria as food for flagellates. In this ......Flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil. Because of their high growth rates, flagellate populations respond rapidly to changes in bacterial numbers. Previous results indicate that actinobacteria are generally less suitable than proteobacteria as food for flagellates....... In this study, we investigated the growth of the flagellate Cercomonas sp. (ATCC 50334) on each of the two bacteria Sphingopyxis witflariensis (Alphaproteobacteria) and Rhodococcus fascians (actinobacteria) separately and in combination. The growth rate of the flagellate was lower and the lag phase was longer...

  9. Antibiotic sensitivity of bacterial strains isolated from newborn infants Sensibilidad a los antibióticos de bacterias aisladas de neonatos hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Uribe

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Eighty nine bacterial strains isolated from newborn infants hospitalized at a Special Care Unit in Medellin, Colombia, were studied. The sensitivity of each one was determined by the Minimallnhibitory Concentration method against 21 antibiotics; a high frequency of resistance was found toward gentamycin, netilmycin, oxacillin, penicillin G and ampicillin, that are often employed as initial therapy in newborn infants; on the other hand both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria exhibited high percentages of sensitivity against quinolones; aztreonam and third generation cephalosporins were also highly effective against Gram negative bacilli. On the basis of this new information the need to restate therapeutic conducts in the case of serious bacterial neonatal infections is emphasized.

    Se estudiaron 89 cepas bacterianas aisladas de neonatos hospitalizados en la sala de cuidados especiales de la Fundación Hospitalaria San Vicente de Paúl, de Medellín; a cada una se le determinó la sensibilidad frente a 21 antibióticos por el método de la concentración inhibitoria mínima (CIM; se halló una alta frecuencia de resistencia hacia la gentamicina, la netilmicina, la oxacilina y la ampicilina que se usan a menudo en esta institución como terapia inicial en las infecciones del recién nacido; por otra parte se demostraron altos porcentajes de sensibilidad hacia las quinolonas tanto de las bacterias gram positivas como de las gram negativas; contra estas últimas también fueron muy efectivos el aztreonam y las cefalosporinas de tercera generación. A la luz de esta nueva información se llama la atención hacia la necesidad de revaluar las normas de la antibioterapia en las infecciones graves del recién nacido.

  10. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a kidney transplant patient without initial pulmonary involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette C.; van Meurs, Matijs; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in solid organ transplant recipients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common finding. We report a case of a 42-year-old female kidney transplant recipient who developed multiple disseminated abscesses caused by R.

  11. Analysis of catRABC operon for catechol degradation from phenol-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Martin; Knoppová, Monika; Nešvera, Jan; Pátek, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 76, - (2007), s. 159-168 ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/04/0542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : rhodococcus erythropolis * catrabc operon * catechol degradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.475, year: 2007

  12. Rhodococcus equi infection after alemtuzumab therapy for T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, Jan J.; Sprenger, Herman G.; Van Assen, Sander; Leduc, Dominique; Daenen, Simon M.G.J.; Arends, Jan P.; van der Werf, Tjipke

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, mainly known from veterinary medicine as a pathogen in domestic animals, can also cause infections in immunocompromised humans, especially in those with defects in cellular immunity. Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, causes lymphocytopenia by eliminating CD52-positive

  13. Analysis of genome sequences from plant pathogenic Rhodococcus reveals genetic novelties in virulence loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of Gram-positive Actinobacteria cause economically important diseases to plants. Within the Rhodococcus genus, some members can cause growth deformities and persist as pathogens on a wide range of host plants. The current model predicts that phytopathogenic isolates require a cluster of thre...

  14. Rhodococcus erythropolis and Its γ-Lactone Catabolic Pathway: An Unusual Biocontrol System That Disrupts Pathogen Quorum Sensing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Latour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus erythropolis is an environmental Gram-positive Actinobacterium with a versatile metabolism involved in various bioconversions and degradations. Rhodococci are best known for their great potential in numerous decontamination and industrial processes. However, they can also prevent plant disease by disrupting quorum sensing-based communication of Gram-negative soft-rot bacteria, by degrading N-acyl-homoserine lactone signaling molecules. Such biocontrol activity results partly from the action of the γ-lactone catabolic pathway. This pathway is responsible for cleaving the lactone bond of a wide range of compounds comprising a γ-butyrolactone ring coupled to an alkyl or acyl chain. The aliphatic products of this hydrolysis are then activated and enter fatty acid metabolism. This short pathway is controlled by the presence of the γ-lactone, presumably sensed by a TetR-like transcriptional regulator, rather than the presence of the pathogen or the plant-host in the environment of the Rhodococci. Both the density and biocontrol activity of R. erythropolis may be boosted in crop systems. Treatment with a cheap γ-lactone stimulator, for example, the food flavoring γ-caprolactone, induces the activity in the biocontrol agent, R. erythropolis, of the pathway degrading signaling molecules; such treatments thus promote plant protection.

  15. Enrichment of beneficial bacteria in the skin microbiota of bats persisting with white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux-Labonté, Virginie; Simard, Anouk; Willis, Craig K R; Lapointe, François-Joseph

    2017-09-05

    Infectious diseases of wildlife are increasing worldwide with implications for conservation and human public health. The microbiota (i.e. microbial community living on or in a host) could influence wildlife disease resistance or tolerance. White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), has killed millions of hibernating North American bats since 2007. We characterized the skin microbiota of naïve, pre-WNS little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from three WNS-negative hibernation sites and persisting, previously exposed bats from three WNS-positive sites to test the hypothesis that the skin microbiota of bats shifts following WNS invasion. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing on 66 bats and 11 environmental samples, we found that hibernation site strongly influenced the composition and diversity of the skin microbiota. Bats from WNS-positive and WNS-negative sites differed in alpha and beta diversity, as well as in microbiota composition. Alpha diversity was reduced in persisting, WNS-positive bats, and the microbiota profile was enriched with particular taxa such Janthinobacterium, Micrococcaceae, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, and Rhodococcus. Some of these taxa are recognized for their antifungal activity, and specific strains of Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas are known to inhibit Pd growth. Composition of the microbial community in the hibernaculum environment and the community on bat skin was superficially similar but differed in relative abundance of some bacterial taxa. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Pd invasion leads to a shift in the skin microbiota of surviving bats and suggest the possibility that the microbiota plays a protective role for bats facing WNS. The detection of what appears to be enrichment of beneficial bacteria in the skin microbiota of persisting bats is a promising discovery for species re-establishment. Our findings highlight not only the potential value of management actions that

  16. Variación de la composición de ácidos grasos de membrana celular de Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r en respuesta a la temperatura y salinidad Variation in the composition of Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r cell membrane fatty acids in response to temperature and salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Pucci

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Los integrantes del género Rhodococcus son habitantes frecuentes y abundantes de áreas contaminadas con hidrocarburos y resisten la creciente salinidad que se presenta en la Patagonia central. Este género tiene buena capacidad de eliminar contaminantes hidrocarburos que constituyen el mayor contaminante de la región. En el presente trabajo se estudió la respuesta en la composición de sus ácidos grasos de una cepa aislada de un sistema de landfarming, ante la acción combinada de diferentes temperaturas y concentraciones salinas. La estrategia de la cepa Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r frente al incremento de temperatura, es el aumento del porcentaje de los ácidos grasos saturados totales (n:0; ácidos grasos ramificados en el carbono terminal con grupos oxidrilo en posición 2 (n:0 iso 2 OH y saturados con grupo metilo en carbono 10 (n:0 10 metil, a expensas de la disminución del porcentaje de los n:1 cis.The members of the genus Rhodococcus are frequent and abundant inhabitants of polluted areas with hydrocarbons and they resist the salinity present in the central Patagonia. This genus has good capacity to eliminate pollution produced by hydrocarbons that constitutes the biggest pollutant agent in the region. The present work studies the answer in the composition of its fatty acids under the combined action of the temperature and saline concentration of an isolated stump of a landfarming system. The strategy of Rhodococcus rodochrous strain GNP-OHP-38r in front of the thermal-osmotic stress is the increase of the percentage of the total saturated fatty acids (n:0; fatty acids branched in the terminal carbon with hidroxyl group in position 2 (n:0 iso 2 OH and saturated with group methyl in carbon 10 (n:0 10 metil when the temperature is increased. These acids increase while the percentage of n:1 cis decrease.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against antibiotic-resistant strains of the cell wall-free bacteria Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillitt, K L; Jenkins, R E; Spiller, O B; Beeton, M L

    2017-03-01

    The susceptibility of the cell wall-free bacterial pathogens Ureaplasma spp. to Manuka honey was examined. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Manuka honey for four Ureaplasma urealyticum and four Ureaplasma parvum isolates was determined. Sensitivity to honey was also compared to clinical isolates with resistance to tetracycline, macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Finally step-wise resistance training was utilized in an attempt to induce increased tolerance to honey. The MIC was dependent on the initial bacterial load with 7·5 and 18·0% w/v honey required to inhibit U. urealyticum at 1 and 10 6 colour changing units (CCU), respectively, and 4·8 and 15·3% w/v required to inhibit U. parvum at 1 and 10 6  CCU respectively. MIC values were consistently lower for U. parvum compared with U. urealyticum. Antimicrobial activity was seen against tetracycline-resistant, erythromycin-resistant and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates at 10 5  CCU. No resistance to honey was observed with 50 consecutive challenges at increasing concentrations of honey. This is the first report of the antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against a cell wall-free bacterial pathogen. The antimicrobial activity was retained against antibiotic-resistant strains and it was not possible to generate resistant mutants. Manuka honey is known to have a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, with the bacterial cell wall being suggested as a predominant site of action. This study has demonstrated that Manuka honey has activity against Ureaplasma spp., a genus of cell wall-free bacteria which are intrinsically resistant to many available antibiotics making treatment inherently difficult. This is the first report of the antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against a bacterial pathogen, in the absence of a cell well and opens scope for the use of components of Manuka honey as a therapeutic among Ureaplasma infections. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Expression control of nitrile hydratase and amidase genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis and substrate specificities of the enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucká, Lenka; Volkova, Olga; Pavlík, Adam; Kaplan, Ondřej; Kracík, Martin; Nešvera, Jan; Martínková, Ludmila; Pátek, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial amidases and nitrile hydratases can be used for the synthesis of various intermediates and products in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and for the bioremediation of toxic pollutants. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of the amidase and nitrile hydratase genes of Rhodococcus erythropolis and test the stereospecific nitrile hydratase and amidase activities on chiral cyanohydrins. The nucleotide sequences of the gene clusters containing the oxd (aldoxime dehydratase), ami (amidase), nha1, nha2 (subunits of the nitrile hydratase), nhr1, nhr2, nhr3 and nhr4 (putative regulatory proteins) genes of two R. erythropolis strains, A4 and CCM2595, were determined. All genes of both of the clusters are transcribed in the same direction. RT-PCR analysis, primer extension and promoter fusions with the gfp reporter gene showed that the ami, nha1 and nha2 genes of R. erythropolis A4 form an operon transcribed from the Pami promoter and an internal Pnha promoter. The activity of Pami was found to be weakly induced when the cells grew in the presence of acetonitrile, whereas the Pnha promoter was moderately induced by both the acetonitrile or acetamide used instead of the inorganic nitrogen source. However, R. erythropolis A4 cells showed no increase in amidase and nitrile hydratase activities in the presence of acetamide or acetonitrile in the medium. R. erythropolis A4 nitrile hydratase and amidase were found to be effective at hydrolysing cyanohydrins and 2-hydroxyamides, respectively.

  19. Effect of Tween 80 on 9a-steroid hydroxylating activity and ultrastructural characteristics of Rhodococcus sp. cells

    OpenAIRE

    Avramova , Tatyana; Spassova , Dimitrina; Mutafov , Sava; Momchilova , Svetlana; Boyadjieva , Lilyana; Damyanova , Boryana; Angelova , Blaga

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Studied is the effect of the non-ionic surfactant Tween 80 on the microbial transformation of 4-androstene- 3,17-dione into its 9a-hydroxy-derivative by resting Rhodococcus sp. cells. The surfactant was applied in the cultivation medium as an additional source of carbon, in the transformation reaction medium as a mediator of the steroid substrate solubility or was used for permeabilization of the glucose grown Rhodococcus sp. cells. Special attention is paid to the fac...

  20. Aerobic biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) by axenic bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan O; Wood, Thomas K; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2005-03-05

    The water contaminant N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a probable human carcinogen whose appearance in the environment is related to the release of rocket fuel and to chlorine-based disinfection of water and wastewater. Although this compound has been shown to be biodegradable, there is minimal information about the organisms capable of this degradation, and little is understood of the mechanisms or biochemistry involved. This study shows that bacteria expressing monooxygenase enzymes functionally similar to those demonstrated to degrade NDMA in eukaryotes have the capability to degrade NDMA. Specifically, induction of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) expressed by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, the propane monooxygenase (PMO) enzyme of Mycobacterium vaccae JOB-5, and the toluene 4-monooxygenases found in Ralstonia pickettii PKO1 and Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 resulted in NDMA degradation by these strains. In each of these cases, brief exposure to acetylene gas, a suicide substrate for certain monooxygenases, inhibited the degradation of NDMA. Further, Escherichia coli TG1/pBS(Kan) containing recombinant plasmids derived from the toluene monooxygenases found in strains PKO1 and KR1 mimicked the behavior of the parent strains. In contrast, M. trichosporium OB3b expressing the particulate form of MMO, Burkholderia cepacia G4 expressing the toluene 2-monooxygenase, and Pseudomonas putida mt-2 expressing the toluene sidechain monooxygenase were not capable of NDMA degradation. In addition, bacteria expressing aromatic dioxygenases were not capable of NDMA degradation. Finally, Rhodococcus sp. RR1 exhibited the ability to degrade NDMA by an unidentified, constitutively expressed enzyme that, unlike the confirmed monooxygenases, was not inhibited by acetylene exposure. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Diversity, metabolic properties and arsenic mobilization potential of indigenous bacteria in arsenic contaminated groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC) and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2)] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.). Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations suggest that

  2. Multidrug resistant bacteria isolated from septic arthritis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo G. Motta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Septic arthritis is a debilitating joint infectious disease of equines that requires early diagnosis and immediate therapeutic intervention to prevent degenerative effects on the articular cartilage, as well as loss of athletic ability and work performance of the animals. Few studies have investigated the etiological complexity of this disease, as well as multidrug resistance of isolates. In this study, 60 horses with arthritis had synovial fluid samples aseptically collected, and tested by microbiological culture and in vitro susceptibility test (disk diffusion using nine antimicrobials belonging to six different pharmacological groups. Bacteria were isolated in 45 (75.0% samples, as follows: Streptococcus equi subsp. equi (11=18.3%, Escherichia coli (9=15.0%, Staphylococcus aureus (6=10.0%, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (5=8.3%, Staphylococcus intermedius (2=3.3%, Proteus vulgaris (2=3.3%, Trueperella pyogenes (2=3.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2=3.3%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (1=1.7%, Rhodococcus equi (1=1.7%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (1=1.7%, Klebsiella oxytoca (1=1.7%, Nocardia asteroides (1=1.7%, and Enterobacter cloacae (1=1.7%. Ceftiofur was the most effective drug (>70% efficacy against the pathogens in the disk diffusion test. In contrast, high resistance rate (>70% resistance was observed to penicillin (42.2%, enrofloxacin (33.3%, and amikacin (31.2%. Eleven (24.4% isolates were resistant to three or more different pharmacological groups and were considered multidrug resistant strains. The present study emphasizes the etiological complexity of equine septic arthritis, and highlights the need to institute treatment based on the in vitro susceptibility pattern, due to the multidrug resistance of isolates. According to the available literature, this is the first report in Brazil on the investigation of the etiology. of the septic arthritis in a great number of horses associated with multidrug resistance of the isolates.

  3. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Brook I. Diseases caused by non-spore-forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  4. The effect of mutation on Rhodococcus equi virulence plasmid gene expression and mouse virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Prescott, John F

    2004-11-15

    An 81 kb virulence plasmid containing a pathogenicity island (PI) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals but its specific function in virulence and regulation of plasmid-encoded virulence genes is unclear. Using a LacZ selection marker developed for R. equi in this study, in combination with an apramycin resistance gene, an efficient two-stage homologous recombination targeted gene mutation procedure was used to mutate three virulence plasmid genes, a LysR regulatory gene homologue (ORF4), a ResD-like two-component response regulator homologue (ORF8), and a gene (ORF10) of unknown function that is highly expressed by R. equi inside macrophages, as well as the chromosomal gene operon, phoPR. Virulence testing by liver clearance after intravenous injection in mice showed that the ORF4 and ORF8 mutants were fully attenuated, that the phoPR mutant was hypervirulent, and that virulence of the ORF10 mutant remained unchanged. A virulence plasmid DNA microarray was used to compare the plasmid gene expression profile of each of the four gene-targeted mutants against the parental R. equi strain. Changes were limited to PI genes and gene induction was observed for all mutants, suggesting that expression of virulence plasmid genes is dominated by a negative regulatory network. The finding of attenuation of ORF4 and ORF8 mutants despite enhanced transcription of vapA suggests that factors other than VapA are important for full expression of virulence. ORF1, a putative Lsr antigen gene, was strongly and similarly induced in all mutants, implying a common regulatory pathway affecting this gene for all four mutated genes. ORF8 is apparently the centre of this common pathway. Two distinct highly correlated gene induction patterns were observed, that of the ORF4 and ORF8 mutants, and that of the ORF10 and phoPR mutants. The gene induction pattern distinguishing these two groups paralleled their virulence in mice.

  5. Isolation and characterization of Rhodococcus ruber CGMCC3090 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacterial strain was isolated from soil samples that had been polluted by nitrile compounds. This strain converts acrylonitrile to acrylamide with high activity. The nitrile hydrolysis activity was tested using eight substrates, including aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic (di)nitriles. All of the nitrile compounds were hydrolyzed ...

  6. Chemical Modification and Detoxification of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Toxin 2-Heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-Oxide by Environmental and Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierbach, Sven; Birmes, Franziska S; Letzel, Matthias C; Hennecke, Ulrich; Fetzner, Susanne

    2017-09-15

    2-Heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO), a major secondary metabolite and virulence factor produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, acts as a potent inhibitor of respiratory electron transfer and thereby affects host cells as well as microorganisms. In this study, we demonstrate the previously unknown capability of environmental and pathogenic bacteria to transform and detoxify this compound. Strains of Arthrobacter and Rhodococcus spp. as well as Staphylococcus aureus introduced a hydroxyl group at C-3 of HQNO, whereas Mycobacterium abscessus, M. fortuitum, and M. smegmatis performed an O-methylation, forming 2-heptyl-1-methoxy-4-oxoquinoline as the initial metabolite. Bacillus spp. produced the glycosylated derivative 2-heptyl-1-(β-d-glucopyranosydyl)-4-oxoquinoline. Assaying the effects of these metabolites on cellular respiration and on quinol oxidase activity of membrane fractions revealed that their EC 50 values were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of HQNO. Furthermore, cellular levels of reactive oxygen species were significantly lower in the presence of the metabolites than under the influence of HQNO. Therefore, the capacity to transform HQNO should lead to a competitive advantage against P. aeruginosa. Our findings contribute new insight into the metabolic diversity of bacteria and add another layer of complexity to the metabolic interactions which likely contribute to shaping polymicrobial communities comprising P. aeruginosa.

  7. Isolation and characterization of novel chitinolytic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkök, Sümeyra; Görmez, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    Chitin, a linear polymer of β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine units, is one of the most abundant biopolymers widely distributed in the marine and terrestrial environments. It is found as a structural component of insects, crustaceans and the cell walls of fungi. Chitinases, the enzymes degrading chitin by cleaving the β-(1-4) bond, have gained increased attention due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially for biocontrol of harmful insects and phytopathogenic fungi in agriculture. In the present study, 200 bacterial isolates from Western Anatolia Region of Turkey were screened for chitinolytic activity on agar media amended with colloidal chitin. Based on the chitin hydrolysis zone, 13 isolates were selected for further study. Bacterial isolates with the highest chitinase activity were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Arthrobacter oxydans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Brevibacillus reuszeri, Kocuria erythromyxa, Kocuria rosea, Novosphingobium capsulatum, Rhodococcus bratislaviensis, Rhodococcus fascians and Staphylococcus cohnii by MIS and BIOLOG systems. The next aims of the study are to compare the productivity of these bacteria quantitatively, to purify the enzyme from the most potent producer and to apply the pure enzyme for the fight against the phytopathogenic fungi and harmful insects.

  8. Biosurfactant Production by Rhodococcus Erythropolis and its Application to Oil Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Graziela Jardim; Ciapina, Elisa Mara Prioli; Gomes, Edelvio de Barros; Junior, Nei Pereira

    2010-01-01

    The influence of different nutrients on biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus erythropolis was investigated. Increasing the concentration of phosphate buffer from 30 up through 150 mmol/L stimulated an increase in biosurfactant production, which reached a maximum concentration of 285 mg/L in shaken flasks. Statistical analysis showed that glycerol, NaNO3, MgSO4 and yeast extract had significant effects on production. The results were confirmed in a batchwise bioreactor, and semi-growth-asso...

  9. Infection by rhodococcus fascians maintains cotyledons as a sink tissue for the pathogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dhandapani, P.; Song, J.; Novák, Ondřej; Jameson, P. E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 5 (2017), s. 841-852 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA MŠk LK21306 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Amino acid transporter * Apical dominance * Cell wall invertase * Cytokinin * Cytokinin oxidase/dehydro-genase * Pea * Pisum sativum L. * Rhodococcus fascians * Seed * Sink and source * Sucrose transporter * sweet Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  10. Evidence for an Inducible Nucleotide-Dependent Acetone Carboxylase in Rhodococcus rhodochrous B276

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Daniel D.; Ensign, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The metabolism of acetone was investigated in the actinomycete Rhodococcus rhodochrous (formerly Nocardia corallina) B276. Suspensions of acetone- and isopropanol-grown R. rhodochrous readily metabolized acetone. In contrast, R. rhodochrous cells cultured with glucose as the carbon source lacked the ability to metabolize acetone at the onset of the assay but gained the ability to do so in a time-dependent fashion. Chloramphenicol and rifampin prevented the time-dependent increase in this acti...

  11. Enrichment and Characterization of PCB-Degrading Bacteria as Potential Seed Cultures for Bioremediation of Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Hršak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of our study was to obtain seed cultures for enhancing the transformation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in contaminated soil of the transformer station in Zadar, Croatia, damaged during warfare activities in 1991. For enrichment, six soil samples were collected from different polluted areas and microcosm approach, stimulating the growth of biphenyl-degrading bacteria, was employed. Enrichment experiments resulted in the selection of two fast growing mixed cultures TSZ7 and AIR1, originating from the soil of the transformer station and the airport area, respectively. Both cultures showed significant PCB-degrading activity (56 to 60 % of PCB50 mixture was reduced after a two-week cultivation. Furthermore, the cultures displayed similar PCB-degrading competence and reduced di-to tetrachlorobiphenyls more effectively than penta- to hepta-chlorobiphenyls. Strain Z6, identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis, was found to be the only culture member showing PCB-transformation potential similar to that of the mixed culture TSZ7, from which it was isolated. Based on the metabolites identified in the assay with the single congener 2,4,4’-chlorobiphenyl, we proposed that the strain Z6 was able to use both the 2,3-and 3,4-dioxygenase pathways. Furthermore, the identified metabolites suggested that beside these pathways another unidentified pathway might also be active in strain Z6. Based on the obtained results, the culture TSZ7 and the strain Z6 were designated as potential seed cultures for bioremediation of the contaminated soil.

  12. Microbial biodiesel production from oil palm biomass hydrolysate using marine Rhodococcus sp. YHY01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Kim, Junyoung; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Hyun Joong; Jeon, Jong-Min; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-06-01

    The effect of various biomass derived inhibitors (i.e. furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (4-HB) and acetate) was investigated for fatty acid accumulation in Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01. Rhodococcus sp. YHY01 was able to utilize acetate, vanillin, and 4-HB for biomass production and fatty acid accumulation. The IC 50 value for furfural (3.1mM), HMF (3.2mM), vanillin (2.0mM), 4-HB (2.7mM) and acetate (3.7mM) was calculated. HMF and vanillin affect fatty acid composition and increase saturated fatty acid content. Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01 cultured with empty fruit bunch hydrolysate (EFBH) as the main carbon source resulted in enhanced biomass (20%) and fatty acid productivity (37%), in compression to glucose as a carbon source. Overall, this study showed the beneficial effects of inhibitory molecules on growth and fatty acid production, and support the idea of biomass hydrolysate utilization for biodiesel production by avoiding complex efforts to remove inhibitory compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Transformation of 2- and 4-cyanopyridines by free and immobilized cells of nitrile-hydrolyzing bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, Iu G; Vasil'ev, D M; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Iu; Demakov, V A

    2013-01-01

    The transformation dynamics of 2- and 4-cyanopyridines by cells suspended and adsorbed on inorganic carriers has been studied in the Rhodococcus ruber gt 1 strain possessing nitrile hydratase activity and the Pseudomonas fluorescens C2 strain containing nitrilase. It was shown that both nitrile hydratase and nitrilase activities of immobilized cells against 2-cyanopyridine were 1.5-4 times lower compared to 4-cyanopyridine and 1.6-2 times lower than the activities of free cells against 2-cyanpopyridine. The possibility of obtaining isonicotinic acid during the combined conversion of 4-cyanopyridine by a mixed suspension of R. ruber gt 1 cells with a high level of nitrile hydratase activity and R. erythropolis 11-2 cells with a pronounced activity of amidase has been shown. Immobilization of Rhodococcus cells on raw coal and Pseudomonas cells on china clay was shown to yield a heterogeneous biocatalyst for the efficient transformation of cyanopyridines into respective amides and carbonic acids.

  14. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh My Pham

    Full Text Available There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB degradation, we determined the concentration of

  15. [Physiological and biochemical characteristics and capacity for polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesis in a glucose-utilizing strain of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria, Ralstonia eutropha B8562].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volova, T G; Kozhevnikov, I V; Dolgopolova, Iu B; Trusova, M Iu; Kalacheva, G S; Aref'eva, Iu V

    2005-01-01

    The physiological, biochemical, genetic, and cultural characteristics of the glucose-utilizing mutant strain Ralstonia eutropha B8562 were investigated in comparison with the parent strain R. eutropha B5786. The morphological, cultural, and biochemical characteristics of strain R. eutropha B8562 were similar to those of strain R. eutropha B5786. Genetic analysis revealed differences between the 16S rRNA gene sequences of these strains. The growth characteristics of the mutant using glucose as the sole carbon and energy source were comparable with those of the parent strain grown on fructose. Strain B8562 was characterized by high yields of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from different carbon sources (CO2, fructose, and glucose). In batch culture with glucose under nitrogen limitation, PHA accumulation reached 90% of dry weight. In PHA, beta-hydroxybutyrate was predominant (over 99 mol %); beta-hydroxyvalerate (0.25-0.72 mol %) and beta-hydroxyhexanoate (0.008-1.5 mol %) were present as minor components. The strain has prospects as a PHA producer on glucose-containing media.

  16. Infecção pulmonar por "Rhodococcus equi": relato dos dois primeiros casos brasileiros Pulmonary Rhodococcus equi infection: report of the first two Brazilian cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIZ CARLOS SEVERO

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available O Rhodococcus equi, principal agente da rodococose, é um cocobacilo pleomórfico, gram-positivo e aeróbio, que infecta humanos por via inalatória ou transcutânea e se manifesta clinicamente como abscesso pulmonar. Relatam-se os dois primeiros casos brasileiros da doença. Ambos os pacientes eram imunocomprometidos e apresentavam quadro infeccioso pulmonar. O primeiro tinha AIDS e apresentava pneumonia cavitada em lobo superior esquerdo, que teve evolução fatal. O segundo tinha doença de Goodpasture, insuficiência renal crônica e fazia uso de corticosteróides. Apresentava uma lesão pulmonar escavada no lobo superior direito, que foi tratada com sulfametoxazol-trimetoprim, com resolução do processo.Rhodococcus equi, the principal agent of rhodococcosis, is a pleomorphic, gram-positive, aerobic coccus bacillus that infects humans by inhalation or through a transcutaneous route. It is clinically manifested as a pulmonary abscess. The first two Brazilian cases of rhodococcosis are reported on. Both patients were immunocompromised and showed pulmonary infection. The first patient had AIDS and cavitating pneumonia in the left upper lobe, that was fatal. The second case presented Goodpasture syndrome and was under chronic corticotherapy. He displayed a cavitating nodular lesion in the right upper lobe, that was successfully treated with sulfametoxazol-trimethoprim.

  17. Safety characterisation and inhibition of fungi and bacteria by a novel multiple enterocin-producing Enterococcus lactis 4CP3 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Braïek, Olfa; Cremonesi, Paola; Morandi, Stefano; Smaoui, Slim; Hani, Khaled; Ghrairi, Taoufik

    2018-03-07

    This study aims to characterise a potential bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacterial strain isolated from a raw pink shrimp (Palaemon serratus) and evaluate its safety aspect. The strain designated as 4CP3 was noted to display antibacterial activities (P enterocins A, B and P. To our knowledge, this feature is newly described for E. lactis strain isolated from raw shrimps. Regarding safety aspect of E. lactis 4CP3, it has been demonstrated that this strain was not haemolytic, gelatinase negative, sensitive to vancomycin, and free of common antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors. Therefore, it may be useful as a safe natural agent in preservation of foods or as a new probiotic strain in food and feed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  19. Assertiveness of meat-borne Lactococcus piscium strains and their potential for competitive exclusion of spoilage bacteria in situ and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgarth, M; Nani, M; Vogel, R F

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate intraspecies assertiveness of meat-borne Lactococcus piscium isolates, inhibitory effects on unwanted and harmful meat spoilers, and the prevalence on beef deliberately inoculated with Lc. piscium. Co-inoculation of Lc. piscium isolates and spoilers (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum, Carnobacterium divergens, Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis, Serratia liquefaciens, Hafnia alvei) were conducted in sterile meat simulation medium. Differentiation of Lc. piscium strains was carried out with colony-based RAPD-PCR. Selective cultivation was used to differentiate spoilers from Lc. piscium. Intraspecies assertiveness revealed Lc. piscium TMW2.1614 as most assertive strain. Co-inoculation of selected Lc. piscium strains caused substantial growth reduction of spoilers while the extent was strain- and spoiler dependent. Monitoring the microbiota on beef steaks deliberately inoculated with Lc. piscium revealed prevalence over the endogenous microbiota while maintaining a ripened sensory impression without undesired alterations. This study reveals Lc. piscium strains TMW2.1612/2.1614/2.1615 as highly competitive against spoilers in vitro while beef deliberately inoculated with these strains maintained acceptable organoleptics. Selected Lc. piscium strains exhibit high potential for application as bioprotective cultures for competitive exclusion on beef in order to extend minimum shelf life and enhance product safety of meat. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Barbey

    Full Text Available The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection.

  1. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics released from bone cement decreases the viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria : an in vitro study with clinical strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Geert T.; Neut, Danielle; Horn, Jim R. van; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are used for the permanent fixation of joint prostheses. Antibiotic-loaded cements significantly decrease the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the viability of bacteria derived from patients with a

  2. EVALUACIÓN DE LA BIOTRANSFORMACIÓN DE GERANIOL Y (R-(+-α-PINENO EMPLEANDO CÉLULAS DE Rhodococcus opacus DSM 44313

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JENNIFER PILAR ROJAS

    Full Text Available La alta biodisponibilidad de los monoterpenos los hace precursores promisorios en los procesos de biotransformación, mediante los que se producen compuestos de valor agregado que pueden considerarse naturales, debido a que se obtienen por métodos enzimáticos a partir de precursores aislados de la naturaleza. En el presente estudio se evaluó la biotransformación de geraniol y (R-(+-α-pineno empleando la cepa bacteriana Rhodococcus opacus DSM 44313, para ello se determinó la influencia del tiempo de crecimiento de la bacteria, tomando suspensiones celulares en la mitad y finalizando la fase exponencial. También se evaluaron tres tiempos de reacción (12, 24 y 48 h y el efecto de un cosolvente, agregando los sustratos puros y disueltos en etanol al 10%. A partir del geraniol se produjeron geranial, ácido geránico y 6-metil-5-hepten-2-ona, sólo cuando el sustrato se adicionó puro, y se formaron en mayor concentración cuando la bacteria estaba finalizando su fase de crecimiento exponencial. Con el (R-(+-α-pineno se produjo como compuesto principal el (R-(+-cis-verbenol, siendo mayor su concentración agregando el pineno disuelto en etanol, y cuando la bacteria se encontraba en la mitad de su fase de crecimiento exponencial. Los resultados indican que el comportamiento de la bacteria cambia según el sustrato adicionado, debido a las propiedades de cada monoterpeno, pero los compuestos obtenidos con ambos sustratos tienen importantes aplicaciones en las industrias farmacéutica, alimenticia y de perfumería

  3. Geno- and phenotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria and Bacillus spp. strains isolated from African indigenous fermented food products and their applications in the food and feed industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adimpong, David Bichala

    African indigenous fermented food products are characterized by complex and diverse groups of microorganisms and therefore offer a rich source for selection of microbial strains for various applications in the biotechnology and food bio-processing sectors. There is however, a global public health...... of these strains to assess their potential industrial applications. This Thesis provided strong evidence on a high level of genomic heterogeneity among members of the Lb. delbrueckii spp. for which a new subspecies was proposed (Appendix II). The data on antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the 3 Bacillus...... species strains (Appendix III) will enable regulatory and public health authorities to accurately proposevii antimicrobial breakpoint values for these species as this Thesis has provided evidence on the inadequacy of the antimicrobial breakpoint values recommended by EFSA for the Bacillus genus...

  4. Genome and Proteome Analysis of Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2: Elucidation of the 4,4´-Dithiodibutyric Acid Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Heba; Meinert, Christina; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf; Voigt, Birgit; Riedel, Katharina; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 has the extraordinary ability to utilize the xenobiotic 4,4´-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB). Cleavage of DTDB by the disulfide-reductase Nox, which is the only verified enzyme involved in DTDB-degradation, raised 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB). 4MB could act as building block of a novel polythioester with unknown properties. To completely unravel the catabolism of DTDB, the genome of R. erythropolis MI2 was sequenced, and subsequently the proteome was analyzed. The draft genome sequence consists of approximately 7.2 Mbp with an overall G+C content of 62.25% and 6,859 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome of strain MI2 is composed of three replicons: one chromosome and two megaplasmids with sizes of 6.45, 0.4 and 0.35 Mbp, respectively. When cells of strain MI2 were cultivated with DTDB as sole carbon source and compared to cells grown with succinate, several interesting proteins with significantly higher expression levels were identified using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A putative luciferase-like monooxygenase-class F420-dependent oxidoreductase (RERY_05640), which is encoded by one of the 126 monooxygenase-encoding genes of the MI2-genome, showed a 3-fold increased expression level. This monooxygenase could oxidize the intermediate 4MB into 4-oxo-4-sulfanylbutyric acid. Next, a desulfurization step, which forms succinic acid and volatile hydrogen sulfide, is proposed. One gene coding for a putative desulfhydrase (RERY_06500) was identified in the genome of strain MI2. However, the gene product was not recognized in the proteome analyses. But, a significant expression level with a ratio of up to 7.3 was determined for a putative sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (RERY_02710), which could also be involved in the abstraction of the sulfur group. As response to the toxicity of the intermediates, several stress response proteins were strongly expressed, including a superoxide dismutase (RERY_05600) and an osmotically induced

  5. Genome and Proteome Analysis of Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2: Elucidation of the 4,4´-Dithiodibutyric Acid Catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Khairy

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 has the extraordinary ability to utilize the xenobiotic 4,4´-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB. Cleavage of DTDB by the disulfide-reductase Nox, which is the only verified enzyme involved in DTDB-degradation, raised 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB. 4MB could act as building block of a novel polythioester with unknown properties. To completely unravel the catabolism of DTDB, the genome of R. erythropolis MI2 was sequenced, and subsequently the proteome was analyzed. The draft genome sequence consists of approximately 7.2 Mbp with an overall G+C content of 62.25% and 6,859 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome of strain MI2 is composed of three replicons: one chromosome and two megaplasmids with sizes of 6.45, 0.4 and 0.35 Mbp, respectively. When cells of strain MI2 were cultivated with DTDB as sole carbon source and compared to cells grown with succinate, several interesting proteins with significantly higher expression levels were identified using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A putative luciferase-like monooxygenase-class F420-dependent oxidoreductase (RERY_05640, which is encoded by one of the 126 monooxygenase-encoding genes of the MI2-genome, showed a 3-fold increased expression level. This monooxygenase could oxidize the intermediate 4MB into 4-oxo-4-sulfanylbutyric acid. Next, a desulfurization step, which forms succinic acid and volatile hydrogen sulfide, is proposed. One gene coding for a putative desulfhydrase (RERY_06500 was identified in the genome of strain MI2. However, the gene product was not recognized in the proteome analyses. But, a significant expression level with a ratio of up to 7.3 was determined for a putative sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (RERY_02710, which could also be involved in the abstraction of the sulfur group. As response to the toxicity of the intermediates, several stress response proteins were strongly expressed, including a superoxide dismutase (RERY_05600 and an

  6. Characterizations of purple non-sulfur bacteria isolated from paddy fields, and identification of strains with potential for plant growth-promotion, greenhouse gas mitigation and heavy metal bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakpirom, Jakkapan; Kantachote, Duangporn; Nunkaew, Tomorn; Khan, Eakalak

    2017-04-01

    This study was aimed at selecting purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) isolated from various paddy fields, including Cd- and Zn-contaminated paddy fields, based on their biofertilizer properties. Among 235 PNSB isolates, strain TN110 was most effective in plant growth-promoting substance (PGPS) production, releasing 3.2 mg/L of [Formula: see text] , 4.11 mg/L of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and 3.62 mg/L of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and reducing methane emission up to 80%. This strain had nifH, vnfG and anfG, which are the Mo, V and Fe nitrogenase genes encoded for key enzymes in nitrogen fixation under different conditions. This strain provided 84% and 55% removal of Cd and Zn, respectively. Another isolate, TN414, not only produced PGPS (1.30 mg/L of [Formula: see text] , 0.94 mg/L of ALA and 0.65 mg/L of IAA), but was also efficient in removing both Cd and Zn at 72% and 74%, respectively. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing, strain TN110 was identified as Rhodopseudomonas palustris, while strain TN414 was Rubrivivax gelatinosus. A combination of TN110 and TN414 could potentially provide a biofertilizer, which is a greener alternative to commercial/chemical fertilizers and an agent for bioremediation of heavy metals and greenhouse gas mitigation in paddy fields. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  7. Biodegradation of cyanide by acetonitrile-induced cells of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Ibrahim, Abdul Latif; Cass, Anthony E G

    2013-01-01

    A Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M isolate was shown to detoxify cyanide successfully, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic property in the bacterium which required no prior cyanide exposure for induction of this property. However, in order to promote growth, Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M was fully acclimatized to cyanide after 7 successive subcultures in 0.1 mM KCN for 30 days. To further shorten the lag phase and simultaneously increase the tolerance towards higher cyanide concentrations, the bacterium was induced with various nitrile compounds sharing a similar degradatory pathway to cyanide. Acetonitrile emerged as the most favored inducer and the induced cells were able to degrade 0.1 mM KCN almost completely within 18 h. With the addition of subsequent aliquots of 0.1 mM KCN a shorter period for complete removal of cyanide was required, which proved to be advantageous economically. Both resting cells and crude enzyme of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M were able to biodegrade cyanide to ammonia and formate without the formation of formamide, implying the identification of a simple hydrolytic cyanide degradation pathway involving the enzyme cyanidase. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Since the recent advancement in the application of biological methods in treating cyanide-bearing wastewater has been promising, the discovery of this new bacterium will add value by diversifying the existing microbial populations capable of cyanide detoxification.

  8. Population dynamics of bacteria associated with different strains of the pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus after inoculation in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, Mariana; Santos, Carla; Vasconcelos, Marta W

    2011-08-01

    For a long time it was thought that Bursaphelenchus xylophilus was the only agent of the pine wilt disease. Recently, it was discovered that there are bacteria associated with the nematodes that contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease, mainly through the release of toxins that promote the death of the pines. Among the species most commonly found, are bacteria belonging to the Bacillus, Pantoea, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas genera. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of inoculation of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) with four different nematode isolates, in the bacterial population of nematodes and trees, at different stages of disease progression. The monitoring of progression of disease symptoms was also recorded. Also, the identification of bacteria isolated from the xylem of trees and the surface of nematodes was performed by classical identification methods, by the API20E identification system and by sequencing of bacterial DNA. The results showed that for the symptoms progression, the most striking difference was observed for the pines inoculated with the avirulent isolate, C14-5, which led to a slower and less severe aggravation of symptoms than in pines inoculated with the virulent isolates. In general, it was found that bacterial population, inside the tree, increased with disease progression. A superior bacterial quantity was isolated from pines inoculated with the nematode isolates HF and 20, and, comparatively, few bacteria were isolated from pines inoculated with the avirulent isolate. The identification system API20E was insufficient in the identification of bacterial species; Enterobacter cloacae species was identified in 79% of the isolated bacterial colonies and seven of these colonies could not be identified by this method. Molecular identification methods, through bacterial DNA sequencing, allowed a more reliable identification: eleven different bacterial species within the Bacillus, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia

  9. Anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchloroethene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathepure, B Z; Nengu, J P; Boyd, S A

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we identified specific cultures of anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchlorethene (PCE). The bacteria that significantly dechlorinated PCE were strain DCB-1, an obligate anaerobe previously shown to dechlorinate chlorobenzoate, and two strains of Methanosarcina. The rate of PCE dechlorination by DCB-1 compared favorably with reported rates of trichloroethene bio-oxidation by methanotrophs. Even higher PCE dechlorination rates were achieved when DCB-1 was grown in a methanogenic consortium. PMID:3426224

  10. Expansion of a plasmid classification system for Gram-positive bacteria and determination of the diversity of plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus strains of human, animal, and food origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano, C.; Garcia-Migura, L.; Aspiroz, C.

    2012-01-01

    An expansion of a previously described plasmid classification was performed and used to reveal the plasmid content of a collection of 92 Staphylococcus aureus strains of different origins. rep genes of other genera were detected in Staphylococcus. S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) hybrid...

  11. Biotransformation of nitriles to amides using soluble and immobilized nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus erythropolis A4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubáč, David; Kaplan, Ondřej; Elišáková, Veronika; Pátek, Miroslav; Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Slámová, Kristýna; Tóthová, A.; Lemaire, M.; Gallienne, E.; Lutz-Wahl, S.; Fischer, L.; Kuzma, Marek; Pelantová, Helena; van Pelt, S.; Bolte, J.; Křen, Vladimír; Martínková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 50, 2-4 (2008), s. 107-113 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2267; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk OC 171 Grant - others:XE(XE) ESF COST D25/0002/02; CZ(CZ) D10-CZ25/06-07; CZ(CZ) D-25 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : rhodococcus erythropolis * nitrile hydratase * amidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.015, year: 2008

  12. Genetically engineered micro-organisms: Aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation genes from Rhodococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, K.

    1993-01-01

    DNA known to encode toluene biodegradation genes in Pseudomonas putida was used in Southern Blots to identify homologous DNA in the unrelated toluene degrading Actinomycete, Rhodococcus sp. ATCC 19070. Two strongly hybridizing EcoRI fragments of 2.3 kb and 2.7 kb respectively were cloned into E. coli. Sequence analysis of a 400 bp section of the 2.3 kb fragment demonstrated that it encodes proteins with similar amino acid sequences to the xylX and xylY genes of P. putida. These proteins are components of toluate oxygenase, the enzyme catalyzing the first step in the metabolism of benzoic acid

  13. Pulmonary Rhodococcus equi infection: report of the first two Brazilian cases

    OpenAIRE

    SEVERO, LUIZ CARLOS; RITTER, PATRICIA; PETRILLO, VICTOR FLÁVIO; DIAS, CÍCERO ARMÍDIO GOMES; PORTO, NELSON DA SILVA

    2001-01-01

    O Rhodococcus equi, principal agente da rodococose, é um cocobacilo pleomórfico, gram-positivo e aeróbio, que infecta humanos por via inalatória ou transcutânea e se manifesta clinicamente como abscesso pulmonar. Relatam-se os dois primeiros casos brasileiros da doença. Ambos os pacientes eram imunocomprometidos e apresentavam quadro infeccioso pulmonar. O primeiro tinha AIDS e apresentava pneumonia cavitada em lobo superior esquerdo, que teve evolução fatal. O segundo tinha doença de Goodpas...

  14. Pneumonia due to Rhodococcus equi in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri de França Bonilha

    Full Text Available The authors reported a lung infection by Rhodococcus equi in a 25 years-old male patient admitted to hospital with cough, dyspnea, fever, and previous diagnosis of pleural effusion. R. equi was isolated from pleural fluid and the patient acquired nosocomial infection by Acinetobacter baumannii, isolated from chest drain. The patient was treated with antibiotics. During hospitalization, he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma of precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma subtype in biopsy of pleura. After undergoing surgery for pulmonary decortication for drain empyema, the patient died due to septicemia.

  15. El género Rhodococcus. Una revisión didáctica

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, N; Sandoval, AH; Díaz-Corrales, F; Serrano, JA

    2004-01-01

    Los autores presentan una extensa revisión sobre el género Rhodococcus, grupo de microorganismos pertenecientes a la familia de los Actinomicetales. Se revisan aspectos relativos a la microbiología, taxonomía, citoquímica, patología, clínica y terapéutica de las afecciones que, como agentes patógenos, producen estos microorganismos, en especial en su papel de agentes productores de infecciones nosocomiales y oportunistas. Así mismo se revisan aspectos relativos a la importancia de estos micro...

  16. Use of mycelia as paths for the isolation of contaminant‐degrading bacteria from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuno, Shoko; Remer, Rita; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycelia of fungi and soil oomycetes have recently been found to act as effective paths boosting bacterial mobility and bioaccessibility of contaminants in vadose environments. In this study, we demonstrate that mycelia can be used for targeted separation and isolation of contaminant‐degrading bacteria from soil. In a ‘proof of concept’ study we developed a novel approach to isolate bacteria from contaminated soil using mycelia of the soil oomycete Pythium ultimum as translocation networks for bacteria and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon naphthalene (NAPH) as selective carbon source. NAPH‐degrading bacterial isolates were affiliated with the genera Xanthomonas, Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas. Except for Rhodococcus the NAPH‐degrading isolates exhibited significant motility as observed in standard swarming and swimming motility assays. All steps of the isolation procedures were followed by cultivation‐independent terminal 16S rRNA gene terminal fragment length polymorphism (T‐RFLP) analysis. Interestingly, a high similarity (63%) between both the cultivable NAPH‐degrading migrant and the cultivable parent soil bacterial community profiles was observed. This suggests that mycelial networks generally confer mobility to native, contaminant‐degrading soil bacteria. Targeted, mycelia‐based dispersal hence may have high potential for the isolation of bacteria with biotechnologically useful properties. PMID:22014110

  17. ANTILISTERIAL ACTYVITY OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM GILTHEAD BREAMS AND SEA BASSES FILLETS PACKAGED MAP AGAINST PRIMITIVE STRAINS OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barile

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis typically caused by ready-to-eat processed food that have a refrigerated shelf-life, but lightly preserved fish products also belong to a high-risk category. Aim of the work was to evaluate antimicrobial activity linked bacteriocin-producing of LAB isolated from gilthead breams and sea basses fillets packaged in modified atmospheres. Fifty-five LAB strains were screened against 21 strains of Listeria monocytogenes, 1 Listeria innocua held in the culture collection of Department of Zootechnical Sciences and Food Ispection (SIA and submitted to antagonistic activity using the spot on lawn and the agar well diffusion assay. Lactococcus lactis sub. lactis Sa31 was able to produce bacteriocin in agar and different broth medium. The bacteriocin man31 showed sensitivity to trypsin, pronase E and papain, inactivation at temperatures ≥ 100°C, bactericidal mode of action and antilisterial act, rapidly. The bacteriocin man31 caused a reduction of L. monocytogenes ½ c growth about log10 > 3 UFC/ml, when was applied on indicator strain at 20,480 AU/ml concentration, in vitro.

  18. Diversity and dynamic of lactic acid bacteria strains during aging of a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Mancini, Andrea; Santarelli, Marcela; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore diversity and dynamic of indigenous LAB strains associated with a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter such as PDO Grana Padano cheese. Samples of milk, curd, natural whey culture and cheeses (2nd, 6th, 9th and 13th months of ripening) were collected from 6 cheese factories in northern Italy. DNA was extracted from each sample and from 194 LAB isolates. tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP was applied to identify isolates. Strain diversity was assessed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR and RAPD(P1)-PCR. Finally, culture-independent LH-PCR (V1-V2 16S-rDNA), was considered to explore structure and dynamic of the microbiota. Grana Padano LAB were represented mainly by Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus helveticus and Pediococcus acidilactici, while the structure and dynamic of microbiota at different localities was specific. The strength of this work is to have focused the study on isolates coming from more than one cheese factories rather than a high number of isolates from one unique production. We provided a valuable insight into inter and intraspecies diversity of typical LAB strains during ripening of traditional PDO Grana Padano, contributing to the understanding of specific microbial ecosystem of this cheese. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics released from bone cement decreases the viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria: an in vitro study with clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, Geert T; Neut, Daniëlle; van Horn, Jim R; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2006-12-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are used for the permanent fixation of joint prostheses. Antibiotic-loaded cements significantly decrease the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the viability of bacteria derived from patients with a prosthesis-related infection could be further decreased when antibiotic release from bone cements was combined with application of pulsed ultrasound. Escherichia coli ATCC 10798, Staphylococcus aureus 7323, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS 7368 and CoNS 7391) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 5148 were grown planktonically in suspension and as a biofilm on three different bone cements: Palacos R without gentamicin as control, gentamicin-loaded Palacos R-G and gentamicin/clindamycin-loaded Copal. The viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria was measured in the absence and presence of pulsed ultrasound for 40 h. Ultrasound itself did not affect bacterial viability. However, application of pulsed ultrasound in combination with antibiotic release by antibiotic-loaded bone cements yielded a reduction of both planktonic and biofilm bacterial viability compared with antibiotic release without application of ultrasound. This study shows that antibiotic release in combination with ultrasound increases the antimicrobial efficacy further than antibiotic release alone against a variety of clinical isolates. Application of ultrasound in combination with antibiotic release in clinical practice could therefore lead to better prevention or treatment of prosthesis-related infections.

  20. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van der Geize

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551, ipdB (rv3552, fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP. Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  1. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  2. RP-HPLC/MS-APCI Analysis of Branched Chain TAG Prepared by Precursor-Directed Biosynthesis with Rhodococcus erythropolis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schreiberová, O.; Krulikovská, T.; Sigler, Karel; Čejková, A.; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 8 (2010), s. 743-756 ISSN 0024-4201 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * RP-HPLC/MS-APCI * Branched chain triacylglycerols Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2010

  3. Failure of pulmonary clearance of Rhodococcus equi infection in CD4+ T-lymphocyte-deficient transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanaly, S T; Hines, S A; Palmer, G H

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary clearance of Rhodococcus equi requires functional T lymphocytes. In this study, CD8+ T-lymphocyte-deficient transgenic mice cleared virulent R. equi from the lungs while infection in CD4+ T-lymphocyte-deficient transgenic mice persisted. Although both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells function early in pulmonary defense against R. equi, clearance is dependent on CD4+ T lymphocytes.

  4. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a novel monoterpene epsilon-lactone hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, van der C.J.B.; Werf, van der M.J.

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ε-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is

  5. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a novel monoterpene e-lactone hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, C.J.B. van der; Werf, M.J. van der

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ε-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is

  6. Steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of halopropane conversion by a Rhodococcus haloalkane dehalogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, T; Pikkemaat, MG; Kingma, Jacob; Dijk, J; Janssen, DB

    2003-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 (DhaA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of carbon-halogen bonds in a wide range of haloalkanes. We examined the steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of halopropane conversion by DhaA to illuminate mechanistic details of the

  7. Expression control of nitrile hydratase and amidase genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis and substrate specificities of the enzymes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rucká, Lenka; Volkova, Olga; Pavlík, Adam; Kaplan, Ondřej; Kracík, M.; Nešvera, Jan; Martínková, Ludmila; Pátek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 6 (2014), s. 1179-1190 ISSN 0003-6072 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * Amidase * Nitrile hydratase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2014

  8. Biocatalytic properties and structural analysis of eugenol oxidase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 : a versatile oxidative biocatalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thai; De Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Binda, Claudia; Rioz, Ana; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Eugenol oxidase (EUGO) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 was previously shown to convert only a limited set of phenolic compounds. In this study, we have explored the biocatalytic potential of this flavoprotein oxidase resulting in a broadened substrate scope and a deeper insight into its structural

  9. Structural basis for the substrate specificity and the absence of dehalogenation activity in 2-chloromuconate cycloisomerase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomytseva, Marina; Ferraroni, Marta; Chernykh, Alexey; Golovleva, Ludmila; Scozzafava, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    2-Chloromuconate cycloisomerase from the Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP (Rho-2-CMCI) is an enzyme of a modified ortho-pathway, in which 2-chlorophenol is degraded using 3-chlorocatechol as the central intermediate. In general, the chloromuconate cycloisomerases catalyze not only the cycloisomerization, but also the process of dehalogenation of the chloromuconate to dienelactone. However Rho-2-CMCI, unlike the homologous enzymes from the Gram-negative bacteria, is very specific for only one position of the chloride on the substrate chloromuconate. Furthermore, Rho-2-CMCI is not able to dehalogenate the 5-chloromuconolactone and therefore it cannot generate the dienelactone. The crystallographic structure of the homooctameric Rho-2-CMCI was solved by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the structure of chloromuconate cycloisomerase from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. The structure was analyzed and compared to the other already known structures of (chloro)muconate cycloisomerases. In addition to this, molecular docking calculations were carried out, which allowed us to determine the residues responsible for the high substrate specificity and the lack of dehalogenation activity of Rho-2-CMCI. Our studies highlight that a histidine, located in a loop that closes the active site cavity upon the binding of the substrate, could be related to the dehalogenation inability of Rho-2-CMCI and in general of the muconate cycloisomerases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. ANTAGONISTIC BACTERIA AGAINST SCHIZOPHYLLUM COMMUNE FR. IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTARJO DIKIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune Fr., is one of the important fungi, causes brown germ and seed rot of oil palm. Biodiversity of antagonistic bacteria from oil palm plantations in Peninsular Malaysia is expected to support in development of biopesticide. Isolation with liquid assay and screening antagonistic bacteria using dual culture assay were carried out in the bioexploration. A total of 265 bacterial isolates from plant parts of oil palm screened 52 antagonistic bacterial isolates against 5. commune. Bacterial isolates were identified by using Biolog* Identification System i.e. Bacillus macroccanus, B. thermoglucosidasius, Burkholderia cepacia, B. gladioli, B. multivorans, B pyrrocinia, B. spinosa, Corynebacterium agropyri, C. misitidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Microbacterium testaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Serratia ficaria, Serratia sp., S. marcescens, Staphylococcus sciuri, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia.

  11. Pathogenicity of Rhodococcus equi in mice, isolated from environment, human and horse clinical samples Patogenicidade atogenicidade em camundongos de isolados clí- clínicos, nicos, ambientais e humanos de Rhodococcus equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus M. Costa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen associated with bronchopneumonia, mesenteric lymphadenitis and enterocolitis in foals. Although R. equi is likely to be found in every horse-breeding farm, the clinical disease is unrecognized in most of them. Capsule components, equi factor, micolic acid and some products encoded by the large 85-90Kb plasmid were described as virulence factors. However, the pathogenesis of R. equi infections and the sensibility of foals are not completely understood. The aim of this study was evaluate the virulence of R. equi isolated from human, horses and environment for mices. Nine strains carrying the 85-90Kb plasmid isolated from foal clinical specimens, one from immunodeficient human patient and six plasmidless strains (four isolated from feces, one from pasture and one from immunodeficient human patient were inoculated in cyclophosphamide immunossuppressed mice. The pathological changes and viability of R. equi cells in the liver of mice was verified after the 3rd, 6th an 10th day after inoculation for horse and environmental isolates and for R. equi isolates from human patients on the 1st, 3rd and 6th day. During the necropsy procedures, infiltrate of macrophages and pyogranulomatous lesions were detected after the sixth pos-inoculation day in the liver and spleen. In horse isolates, only plasmid positive strains were virulent, but in human isolates both strains (plasmid positive e plasmid negative were virulent. Both groups of the immunossupressed mice inoculated with R. equi isolated from environment showed pathological changes. All R. equi strains were unable to kill non imunossuppressed mice.Rhodococ-cus equi é um patógeno intracelular facultativo associado com broncopneumonia, linfadenite mesentérica e enterocolite em potros. Apesar do patógeno ser amplamente distribuído no ambiente equino, a doença não é encontrada em todos os criatórios. Componentes capsulares, "fator equi",

  12. Rational evolution of the unusual Y-type oxyanion hole of Rhodococcus sp. CR53 lipase LipR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infanzón, Belén; Sotelo, Pablo H; Martínez, Josefina; Diaz, Pilar

    2018-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp CR-53 lipase LipR was the first characterized member of bacterial lipase family X. Interestingly, LipR displays some similarity with α/β-hydrolases of the C. antartica lipase A (CAL-A)-like superfamily (abH38), bearing a Y-type oxyanion hole, never found before among bacterial lipases. In order to explore this unusual Y-type oxyanion hole, and to improve LipR performance, two modification strategies based on site directed or saturation mutagenesis were addressed. Initially, a small library of mutants was designed to convert LipR Y-type oxyanion hole (YDS) into one closer to those most frequently found in bacteria (GGG(X)). However, activity was completely lost in all mutants obtained, indicating that the Y-type oxyanion hole of LipR is required for activity. A second approach was addressed to modify the two main oxyanion hole residues Tyr 110 and Asp 111 , previously described for CAL-A as the most relevant amino acids involved in stabilization of the enzyme-substrate complex. A saturation mutagenesis library was prepared for each residue (Tyr 110 and Asp 111 ), and activity of the resulting variants was assayed on different chain length substrates. No functional LipR variants could be obtained when Tyr 110 was replaced by any other amino acids, indicating that this is a crucial residue for catalysis. However, among the Asp 111 variants obtained, LipR D111G produced a functional enzyme. Interestingly, this LipR-YGS variant showed less activity than wild type LipR on short- or mid- chain substrates but displayed a 5.6-fold increased activity on long chain length substrates. Analysis of the 3D model and in silico docking studies of this enzyme variant suggest that substitution of Asp by Gly produces a wider entrance tunnel that would allow for a better and tight accommodation of larger substrates, thus justifying the experimental results obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PhenoLink - a web-tool for linking phenotype to ~omics data for bacteria: application to gene-trait matching for Lactobacillus plantarum strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayjanov Jumamurat R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Linking phenotypes to high-throughput molecular biology information generated by ~omics technologies allows revealing cellular mechanisms underlying an organism's phenotype. ~Omics datasets are often very large and noisy with many features (e.g., genes, metabolite abundances. Thus, associating phenotypes to ~omics data requires an approach that is robust to noise and can handle large and diverse data sets. Results We developed a web-tool PhenoLink (http://bamics2.cmbi.ru.nl/websoftware/phenolink/ that links phenotype to ~omics data sets using well-established as well new techniques. PhenoLink imputes missing values and preprocesses input data (i to decrease inherent noise in the data and (ii to counterbalance pitfalls of the Random Forest algorithm, on which feature (e.g., gene selection is based. Preprocessed data is used in feature (e.g., gene selection to identify relations to phenotypes. We applied PhenoLink to identify gene-phenotype relations based on the presence/absence of 2847 genes in 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains and phenotypic measurements of these strains in several experimental conditions, including growth on sugars and nitrogen-dioxide production. Genes were ranked based on their importance (predictive value to correctly predict the phenotype of a given strain. In addition to known gene to phenotype relations we also found novel relations. Conclusions PhenoLink is an easily accessible web-tool to facilitate identifying relations from large and often noisy phenotype and ~omics datasets. Visualization of links to phenotypes offered in PhenoLink allows prioritizing links, finding relations between features, finding relations between phenotypes, and identifying outliers in phenotype data. PhenoLink can be used to uncover phenotype links to a multitude of ~omics data, e.g., gene presence/absence (determined by e.g.: CGH or next-generation sequencing, gene expression (determined by e.g.: microarrays or RNA

  14. Cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-ketosteroid Delta(4)-(5 alpha)-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterwijk, Niels; Knol, Jan; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert; Dijkstra, Bauke

    2011-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid dehydrogenases are flavoproteins which play key roles in steroid ring degradation. The enzymes are abundantly present in actinobacteria, including the catabolic powerhouse Rhodococcus jostii and the pathogenic species R. equi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene for 3-ketosteroid

  15. Production, Purification, and Identification of Cholest-4-en-3-one Produced by Cholesterol Oxidase from Rhodococcus sp. in Aqueous/Organic Biphasic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke; Li, Wei; Song, Jianrui; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Cholest-4-en-3-one has positive uses against obesity, liver disease, and keratinization. It can be applied in the synthesis of steroid drugs as well. Most related studies are focused on preparation of cholest-4-en-3-one by using whole cells as catalysts, but production of high-quality cholest-4-en-3-one directly from cholesterol oxidase (COD) using an aqueous/organic two-phase system has been rarely explored. This study set up an enzymatic reaction system to produce cholest-4-en-3-one. We developed and optimized the enzymatic reaction system using COD from COX5-6 (a strain of Rhodococcus) instead of whole-cell biocatalyst. This not only simplifies and accelerates the production but also benefits the subsequent separation and purification process. Through extraction, washing, evaporation, column chromatography, and recrystallization, we got cholest-4-en-3-one with purity of 99.78%, which was identified by nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In addition, this optimized process of cholest-4-en-3-one production and purification can be easily scaled up for industrial production, which can largely decrease the cost and guarantee the purity of the product.

  16. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Mariea Gahan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted.

  17. Biochemical studies of amylase, lipase and protease in Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations fed with Vigna unguiculata grain cultivated with diazotrophic bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L B; Torres, É B; Nóbrega, R A S; Lopes, G N; Vogado, R F; Pavan, B E; Fernandes-Junior, P I

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic activity of homogenates of insects fed on grain of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.), cultivars grown with different nitrogen sources. For the experiment we used aliquots of the homogenate of 100 unsexed adult insects, emerged from 10 g of grain obtained from four cowpea cultivars: 'BRS Acauã', 'BRS Carijó', 'BRS Pujante', and 'BRS Tapaihum' grown under different regimes of nitrogen sources: mineral fertilizer, inoculation with strains of diazotrophs (BR 3267, BR 3262, BR 3299; INPA 03-11B, 03-84 UFLA, as well as the control (with soil nitrogen). The parameters evaluated were enzymatic activities of insect protease, amylase and lipase and the starch content of the grains. There were differences in the enzymatic activity of amylase, lipase and protease of insect homogenate according to the food source. A lower activity of the enzyme amylase from C. maculatus homogenate was observed when insects were fed grain of the cultivar BRS Carijó. A lower activity of lipase enzyme from C. maculatus homogenate was observed when the insects fed on grain from the interaction of the cultivar Tapaihum inoculated with BR 3262 diazotrophs. The lowest proteolytic activity was observed in homogenate of insects fed on interaction of 'BRS Carijó' inoculated with BR 3262 diazotrophs. Starch content correlated positively with the amylase activity of C. maculatus homogenate. The cultivar BRS Carijó had a different behavior from the other cultivars, according to the cluster analysis.

  18. Biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus erythropolis and its application to oil removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Jardim Pacheco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different nutrients on biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus erythropolis was investigated. Increasing the concentration of phosphate buffer from 30 up through 150 mmol/L stimulated an increase in biosurfactant production, which reached a maximum concentration of 285 mg/L in shaken flasks. Statistical analysis showed that glycerol, NaNO3,MgSO4 and yeast extract had significant effects on production. The results were confirmed in a batchwise bioreactor, and semi-growth-associated production was detected. Reduction in the surface tension, which indicates the presence of biosurfactant, reached a value of 38 mN/m at the end of 35 hours. Use of the produced biosurfactant for washing crude oil-contaminated soil showed that 2 and 4 times the critical micellar concentration (CMC were able to remove 97 and 99% of the oil, respectively, after 1 month of impregnation.

  19. Growth Kinetics of Rhodococcus Erythropolis IGTS8 on Thiophene and Dimethylsulphoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Temtamy, S.A.; Farahat, L.A.; Al-Shatnawi, D.F.; AI-Sayed, S.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfur oxides emissions through fossil fuel combustion posse environmental problems because these oxides are major cause of acid rain, which dissolve buildings, kills forests and poisons lakes. That is why world environmental regulations are becoming harder with respect to sulfur content in fossil fuels. The demand for new low-cost desulfurization technologies has led to renewed interest in bio desulfurization. In this work the growth kinetics of Rhodococcus Erythopolis IGTS8 have been studied on two model sulfur compounds that are found among other sulfur compounds in petroleum fractions. These are namely thiophene and dimethyl sulfoxide, DEMSO. Batch reactor and different substrate concentrations ranging between 1 and 8 gl -1 were used to study the growth kinetics. Growth on thiophene was shown to follow Monode kinetics with μ m ax =0.064 h -1 and K s = 2.8 gl -1 , on the other hand, growth on DEMSO was found to be substrate inhibited

  20. Identification and analysis of novel virulence-defective Rhodococcus fascians mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Cabecinhas, Adriana Sofia Silva

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians é uma actinomiceta fitopatogénica que induz uma doença, conhecida como irritação frondosa, caracterizada pela indução de múltiplos rebentos, numa vasta gama de plantas herbáceas dicotiledóneas. O principal factor de patogenicidade da bactéria é a produção de uma mistura de 6 citoquininas codificadas pelos genes do operão fas que está localizado num plasmídeo linear associado à virulência, pFiD188. Este trabalho teve como objectivo a análise de dois novos loci deste plasmí...

  1. Oligotrophic bacteria isolated from clinical materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, Y; Ihmori, M; Yamaguchi, J

    1995-01-01

    Oligotrophic bacteria (oligotrophs) are microorganisms that grow in extremely nutritionally deficient conditions in which the concentrations of organic substances are low. Many oligotrophic bacteria were isolated from clinical materials including urine, sputum, swabbings of the throat, vaginal discharges, and others. Seventy-seven strains of oligotrophic bacteria from 871 samples of clinical material were isolated. A relatively higher frequency of isolation of oligotrophic bacteria was shown ...

  2. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  3. Induction of leafy galls in Acacia mearnsii De Wild seedlings infected by Rhodococcus fascians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Quoirin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Plantlets of blackwattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild were inoculated with the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians and cultured in vitro. Leafy galls appeared at the cotyledonary nodes in 75% of the infected plants. The galls were separated from the plants and cultured on a medium containing three-quarters-strength MS salts (Murashige and Skoog, 1962, MS vitamins, 2% sucrose and an antibiotic (cephalothin, supplemented with or without 0.2% activated charcoal. Histological studies conducted from the sixth to the twenty-second day after plant infection revealed the presence of newly formed meristematic centers, first in the axillary region, then on the petioles and lamina of the leaflets around the apical meristem. Approximately 37% of the galls developed one shoot with both concentrations of cephalothin.Plantas recém germinadas de acácia negra (Acacia mearnsii De Wild. foram inoculadas com a bactéria Rhodococcus fascians e cultivadas in vitro. Galhas cobertas por folhas apareceram na altura do nó cotiledonar em 75% das plantas infectadas. As galhas foram separadas das plantas e cultivadas num meio de cultura contendo os sais do meio MS (Murashige e Skoog, 1962 reduzidos a 3/4, as vitaminas do mesmo meio, 2% de sacarose e um antibiótico (cefalotina, adicionado ou não de 0,2% de carvão ativo. Estudos histológicos realizados entre o sexto e o vigésimo segundo dia depois da inoculação, revelaram a presença de centros meristemáticos novos, primeiro nas regiões axilares, em seguida nos pecíolos e limbos dos folíolos ao redor do meristema apical. Aproximadamente 37% das galhas desenvolveram um broto na presença de cefalotina.

  4. Identificação diferencial de Rhodococcus equi e Dietzia maris em bubalinos Differential identification of Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia maris in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Viana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados 24 isolados bacterianos oriundos de leite e pele de búfalas (Bubalus bubalis, os quais foram previamente identificados como Rhodococcus equi com o auxílio de fenotipia concisa. Testes fenotípicos complementares e ferramentas moleculares foram utilizados com o objetivo de caracterizar esses isolados, bem como diferenciá-los de outros microrganismos intimamente relacionados. Observaram-se três fenótipos distintos, porém a identificação dos isolados foi inconclusiva. Apenas um dos isolados foi comprovado como sendo R. equi com a realização da PCR espécie-específica, sequenciamento e análise dos fragmentos de DNA. Os demais isolados só foram identificados pelo sequenciamento de fragmento do gene que codifica a região 16S do rRNA universal de bactérias, indicando tratar-se de Dietzia maris. O perfil de susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos revelou maior resistência dos isolados de D. maris para oxacilina (96% e rifampicina (87%. O isolado de R. equi apresentou resistência à amicacina, oxacilina, penicilina, rifampicina e tetraciclina. Alerta-se para o risco da incorreta identificação dos isolados baseados em testes fenotípicos concisos e para a necessidade de utilização de testes complementares para diferenciação entre R. equi e D. maris.Twenty-four bacterial isolates from milk and skin of buffalo females (Bubalus bubalis, which previously had been identified as Rhodococcus equi by using a restricted number of phenotypical tests for bacterial characterization, were analyzed. The goal of this study was to perform the characterization of these isolates, as well as the differentiation of other microorganisms closely related by using additional phenotypical tests and molecular tools. Based on the phenotypical results, three different biotypes were obtained. However, the identification of the isolates was inconclusive. Only one of the isolates was confirmed as R. equi by the PCR specifically for this species, as

  5. Biocatalytic Properties and Structural Analysis of Eugenol Oxidase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1: A Versatile Oxidative Biocatalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thai; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Binda, Claudia; Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eugenol oxidase (EUGO) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 had previously been shown to convert only a limited set of phenolic compounds. In this study, we have explored the biocatalytic potential of this flavoprotein oxidase, resulting in a broadened substrate scope and a deeper insight into its structural properties. In addition to the oxidation of vanillyl alcohol and the hydroxylation of eugenol, EUGO can efficiently catalyze the dehydrogenation of various phenolic ketones and the selec...

  6. Infecção por Rhodococcus em doente imunocompetente - a propósito de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O Rhodococcus equi raramente causa infecção no humano, sendo que a maioria dos casos descritos estão associados a doentes imunodeprimidos. Os autores apresentam o caso de um homem de 65 anos que foi admitido no serviço de urgência por agravamento da dispneia habitual, tosse e febre. Foi internado com o diagnóstico de sépsis com ponto de partida respiratório em pneumonia de focos múltiplos e peritonite. Medicado empiricamente com ceftriaxone, com melhoria clínica. Isolamento no líquido ascítico de Rhodococcus spp. Cumpriu 2 meses de antibioterapia com doxiciclina, com boa evolução clínica, analítica e radiológica. Os autores apresentam este caso dada a raridade da situação e pretendem realçar a necessidade de um elevado índice de suspeição para o diagnóstico da infecção por este agente em doentes imunocompetentes. Abstract: Rhodococcus equi rarely causes human infection, and most of the described cases are associated with immunosuppressed patients. The authors present a 65-year-old man who was admitted to the emergency department with worsening of dyspnoea, cough and fever. He was admitted with a diagnosis of sepsis with respiratory starting point in multiple foci pneumonia and peritonitis. He was medicated empirically with ceftriaxone, with clinical improvement. Isolation in the ascites fluid of Rhodococcus spp. He completed two months of antibiotic treatment with doxycycline, with clinical, analytical and radiological improvement. The authors present this case due to the rarity of the situation and highlight the need for a high index of suspicion for the infection diagnosis by this agent in immunocompetent patients.

  7. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  8. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  9. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  10. Screening and biological characteristics of fufenozide degrading bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenhao; Gong, Mingfu; Guan, Qinlan; Deng, Xia; Deng, Hongyan; Huang, Jiao

    2018-04-01

    Fufenozide was a novel pesticide for the control of Lepidoptera pests, which was highly toxic to silkworm. Fufenozide-contaminated soil samples were collected and the bacteria that degrade fufenozide were isolated and screened by selective medium. The colony characteristics, cell characteristics and degradation characteristics in different concentrations fufenozide of the fufenozide degrading bacteria were studied. The results indicated that seven strains of fufenozide degradeing bacteria, named as DDH01, DDH03, DDH04, DDH04, DDH05, DDH07 and DDH07 respectively, were isolated from soil contaminated with fufenozide. DDH01, DDH02, DDH04 and DDH05 of seven fufenozide degrading bacteria, was gram-positive bacteria, and DDH03, DDH06 and DDH07 was gram-negative bacteria. All of seven strains of fufenozide degrading bacteria were not spores, weeks flagella, rod-shaped bacteria. DDH06 and DDH07 had capsules, and the remaining five strains had not capsule. The colonies formed by seven strains of fufenozide degradation bacteria on beef extract peptone medium plate were milky white colonies with irregular edges, thinner lawn, smaller colony with smooth surface. The growth of 7 strains of fufenozide degradation bacteria was significantly affected by the concentration of fufenozide, All of 7 strains grown in the range from 0.00025 g/mL to 1 g/mL of 10% fufenozide suspension. DDH2 was the best among the 7 strains of fufenozide degrading bacteria grown in 10% fufenozide suspension medium.

  11. Isolation and identification of aerobic polychlorinated biphenyls degrading bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Fatemeh Nabavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify aerobic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs degrading bacteria. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in lab scale aerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor. Polyurethane foams were used as bio-carrier and synthetic wastewater was prepared with PCBs in transformer oil as the main substrate (20-700 μg/l and acetone as a solvent for PCBs as well as microelements. After achieving to adequate microbial population and acclimation of microorganisms to PCB compounds with high efficiency of PCB removal, identification of degrading microbial species was performed by 16s rRNA gene sequencing of isolated bacteria. Results: Gene sequencing results of the isolated bacteria showed that Rhodococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Pseudoxanthomonas spp., Agromyces spp., and Brevibacillus spp. were dominant PCB-degrading bacteria. Conclusion: PCB compounds can be degraded by some microorganisms under aerobic or anaerobic conditions or at least be reduced to low chlorinated congeners, despite their chemical stability and toxicity. Based on the results of the study, five bacterial species capable of degrading PCBs in transformer oil have been identified.

  12. Development of Chemical and Metabolite Sensors for Rhodococcus opacus PD630.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Drew M; Henson, William R; Moon, Tae Seok

    2017-10-20

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 is a nonmodel, Gram-positive bacterium that possesses desirable traits for biomass conversion, including consumption capabilities for lignocellulose-based sugars and toxic lignin-derived aromatic compounds, significant triacylglycerol accumulation, relatively rapid growth rate, and genetic tractability. However, few genetic elements have been directly characterized in R. opacus, limiting its application for lignocellulose bioconversion. Here, we report the characterization and development of genetic tools for tunable gene expression in R. opacus, including: (1) six fluorescent reporters for quantifying promoter output, (2) three chemically inducible promoters for variable gene expression, and (3) two classes of metabolite sensors derived from native R. opacus promoters that detect nitrogen levels or aromatic compounds. Using these tools, we also provide insights into native aromatic consumption pathways in R. opacus. Overall, this work expands the ability to control and characterize gene expression in R. opacus for future lignocellulose-based fuel and chemical production.

  13. Transcriptional Response of Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24 to Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Contaminated Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Puglisi, Edoardo

    2010-04-06

    We used a microarray targeting 3,524 genes to assess the transcriptional response of the actinomycete Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24 in minimal medium supplemented with various substrates (e. g., PCBs) and in both PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated sediment slurries. Relative to the reference condition (minimal medium supplemented with glucose), 408 genes were upregulated in the various treatments. In medium and in sediment, PCBs elicited the upregulation of a common set of 100 genes, including gene-encoding chaperones (groEL), a superoxide dismutase (sodA), alkyl hydroperoxide reductase protein C (ahpC), and a catalase/peroxidase (katG). Analysis of the R. aetherivorans I24 genome sequence identified orthologs of many of the genes in the canonical biphenyl pathway, but very few of these genes were upregulated in response to PCBs or biphenyl. This study is one of the first to use microarrays to assess the transcriptional response of a soil bacterium to a pollutant under conditions that more closely resemble the natural environment. Our results indicate that the transcriptional response of R. aetherivorans I24 to PCBs, in both medium and sediment, is primarily directed towards reducing oxidative stress, rather than catabolism. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Mathematic Modeling for Optimum Conditions on Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by the Aerobic Bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiujiang Yu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the degradation conditions of AFB1 by Rhodococcus erythropolis in liquid culture. The most important factors that influence the degradation, as identified by a two-level Plackett-Burman design with six variables, were temperature, pH, liquid volume, inoculum size, agitation speed and incubation time. Central composite design (CCD and response surface analysis were used to further investigate the interactions between these variables and to optimize the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis based on a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the optimal parameters were: temperature, 23.2 °C; pH, 7.17; liquid volume, 24.6 mL in 100-mL flask; inoculum size, 10%; agitation speed, 180 rpm; and incubation time, 81.9 h. Under these conditions, the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis could reach 95.8% in liquid culture, which was increased by about three times as compared to non-optimized conditions. The result by mathematic modeling has great potential for aflatoxin removal in industrial fermentation such as in food processing and ethanol production.

  15. Humoral immune responses of pregnant Guinea pigs Immunized with live attenuated Rhodococcus equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawlood Abass Ali Al- Graibawi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential to increase passive transfer of specific Rhodococcus equi (R.equi humoral immunity to newborn by preparturient vaccination of their dams was investigated in Pregnant Guinea pigs as a pilot study. Attenuated autogenous vaccine was prepared from a Congo red negative (CR- R.equi local isolate mixed with adjuvant (potassium alum sulphate, tested for sterility, safety and potency prior to vaccination .Two groups of pregnant G. pigs were used, the first group was vaccinated twice subcutaneously (S.C with the prepared vaccine at five and three weeks prior parturition, the second group was inoculated with adjuvant plus phosphate buffer saline (PBS twice s.c and kept as control. Offspring from the vaccinated dams had revealed high titers of specific R. equi antibody as detected by tube agglutination (TA and passive haemagglutination (PH test and showed protection against challenge dose. The results revealed that vaccination of pregnant G. pigs with the prepared attenuated vaccine was safe and efficient method to protect their offspring against experimental challenge with virulent R.equi. Vaccination was associated with increased humoral immune response in vaccinated group.

  16. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunogenicity of an electron beam inactivated Rhodococcus equi vaccine in neonatal foals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela I Bordin

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi. No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals.

  18. Rhodococcus equi venous catheter infection: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahleh Zeina

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that was initially isolated from horses and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans with impaired cellular immunity. However, this pathogen is underestimated as a challenging antagonist and is frequently considered to be a mere contaminant despite the potential for life-threatening infections. Most case reports have occurred in immunocompromised patients who have received organ transplants (for example kidney, heart, bone marrow or those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Infections often manifest as pulmonary involvement or soft tissue abscesses. Bacteremia related to R. equi infections of tunneled central venous catheters has rarely been described. Case presentation We report the case of a 63-year-old non-transplant recipient, non-HIV infected Caucasian woman with endometrial carcinoma who developed recurrent bloodstream infections and septic shock due to R. equi and ultimately required the removal of her port catheter, a subcutaneous implantable central venous catheter. We also review the medical literature related to human infections with R. equi. Conclusion R. equi should be considered a serious pathogen, not a contaminant, particularly in an immunocompromised patient who presents with a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. Counseling patients with central venous catheters who participate in activities involving exposure to domesticated animals is recommended.

  19. Nutrient starvation leading to triglyceride accumulation activates the Entner Doudoroff pathway in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Antonio; Villa, Juan A; Lanza, Val F; Lázaro, Beatriz; de la Cruz, Fernando; Alvarez, Héctor M; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2017-02-27

    Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and other actinobacteria accumulate triglycerides (TAG) under nutrient starvation. This property has an important biotechnological potential in the production of sustainable oils. To gain insight into the metabolic pathways involved in TAG accumulation, we analysed the transcriptome of R jostii RHA1 under nutrient-limiting conditions. We correlate these physiological conditions with significant changes in cell physiology. The main consequence was a global switch from catabolic to anabolic pathways. Interestingly, the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway was upregulated in detriment of the glycolysis or pentose phosphate pathways. ED induction was independent of the carbon source (either gluconate or glucose). Some of the diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes involved in the last step of the Kennedy pathway were also upregulated. A common feature of the promoter region of most upregulated genes was the presence of a consensus binding sequence for the cAMP-dependent CRP regulator. This is the first experimental observation of an ED shift under nutrient starvation conditions. Knowledge of this switch could help in the design of metabolomic approaches to optimize carbon derivation for single cell oil production.

  20. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  1. Characterization of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Some bacteria can use (per)chlorateas terminal electron acceptor for growth. These bacteria convert perchlorate via chlorate and chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. Oxygen formation in microbial respiration is unique. In this study two chlorate-reducing strains

  2. Identification of marine methanol-utilizing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, M; Iwaki, H; Kouno, K; Inui, T

    1980-01-01

    A taxonomical study of 65 marine methanol-utilizing bacteria is described. They were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rods with a polar flagellum and had marine bacterial properties and required vitamin B/sub 12/ for growth. All of them assimilated fructose in addition to C/sub 1/-compounds and produced acid oxidatively from fructose. Twenty-four strains assimilated only C/sub 1/-compounds. They were resistant to penicillin, oxytetracycline and 0/129 substance (Vibrio stat), and tolerant to 12% NaCl. Guanine-cytosine contents of deoxyribonucleic acid in typical strains fell in the range of 43.8 to 47.6%. Other morphological and physiological properties were almost the same as those of terrestrial methanol-utilizers. Bacteria in the first group (41 strains) were facultative methylotrophs and were divided into three subgroups by the assimilation of methylated amines, that is, subgroup I (30 strains) assimilated mono-, di- and tri-methylamine, subgroup II (9 strains) assimilated only mono-methylamine, the bacteria of subgroups I and II were named Alteromonas thalassomethanolica sp. nov. and subgroup III (2 strains) did not assimilate methylated amines, and was tentatively assigned as Alteromonas sp. The second group of bacteria (24 strains) was obligate methylotrophs, named Methylomonas thalassica sp. nov. and was divided into subgroup IV (15 strains) which assimilated mono-, di and tri-methylamine and subgroup V (9 strains) which assimilated mono-methylamine.

  3. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  4. vanO, a new glycopeptide resistance operon in environmental Rhodococcus equi isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudeta, Dereje Dadi; Moodley, Arshnee; Bortolaia, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    We describe sequence and gene organization of a new glycopeptide resistance operon (vanO) in Rhodococcus equi from soil. The vanO operon has low homology to enterococccal van operons and harbors a vanHOX cluster transcribed in opposite direction to the vanS-vanR regulatory system and comprised be...... between three open reading frames with unknown function. This finding has clinical interest since glycopeptides are used to treat R. equi infections and resistance has been reported in clinical isolates....

  5. Identification of genomic loci associated with Rhodococcus equi susceptibility in foals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole M McQueen

    Full Text Available Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of disease and death in foals. Although agent and environmental factors contribute to the incidence of this disease, the genetic factors influencing the clinical outcomes of R. equi pneumonia are ill-defined. Here, we performed independent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP- and copy number variant (CNV-based genome-wide association studies to identify genomic loci associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals. Foals at a large Quarter Horse breeding farm were categorized into 3 groups: 1 foals with R. equi pneumonia (clinical group [N = 43]; 2 foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary lesions that never developed clinical signs of pneumonia (subclinical group [N = 156]; and, 3 foals without clinical signs or ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia (unaffected group [N = 49]. From each group, 24 foals were randomly selected and used for independent SNP- and CNV-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The SNP-based GWAS identified a region on chromosome 26 that had moderate evidence of association with R. equi pneumonia when comparing clinical and subclinical foals. A joint analysis including all study foals revealed a 3- to 4-fold increase in odds of disease for a homozygous SNP within the associated region when comparing the clinical group with either of the other 2 groups of foals or their combination. The region contains the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 2 (TRPM2 gene, which is involved in neutrophil function. No associations were identified in the CNV-based GWAS. Collectively, these data identify a region on chromosome 26 associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals, providing evidence that genetic factors may indeed contribute to this important disease of foals.

  6. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate of Alginate Immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikvand, Peyman; Etemadifar, Zahra

    2014-03-01

    Sulfur oxides released from the burning of oil causes severe environmental pollution. The sulfur can be removed via the 4S pathway in biodesulfurization (BDS). Immobilization approaches have been developed to prevent cell contamination of oil during the BDS process. The encapsulation of Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 in calcium alginate beads was studied in order to enhance conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to 2-hydroxy biphenyl (2-HBP) as the final product. Also the effect of different factors on the BDS process was investigated. Calcium alginate capsules were prepared using peristaltic pumps with different needle sizes to control the beads sizes. Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry methods were used to study the distribution and viability of encapsulated cells, respectively. Two non-ionic surfactants and also nano Ƴ-Al2O3were used with the ratio of 0.5% (v/v) and 1:5 (v/v) respectively to investigate their BDS efficiency. In addition, the effect of different bead sizes and different concentrations of sodium alginate in BDS activity was studied. The 2% (w/v) sodium alginate beads with 1.5mm size were found to be the optimum for beads stability and efficient 2-HBP production. The viability of encapsulated cells decreased by 12% after 20 h of desulfurization, compared to free cells. Adding the non-ionic surfactants markedly enhanced the rate of BDS, because of increasing mass transfer of DBT to the gel matrix. In addition, Span 80 was more effective than Tween 80. The nanoƳ-Al2O3 particles could increase BDS rate by up to two-folds greater than that of the control beads. The nano Ƴ-Al2O3 can improve the immobilized biocatalyst for excellent efficiency of DBT desulfurization. Also the BDS activity can be enhanced by setting the other explained factors at optimum levels.

  7. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rhodococcus (R equi is an opportunistic, uncommon human pathogen that causes mainly infection in immunocompromised hosts. The disease is usually presented as subacute pneumonia that is mostly cavitary and sometimes bacteremic. Case report. We reported the extremly rare case of a 43-year-old woman with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who developed R. equi pulmonary infection after recieving multiple courses of chemotherapy. Secondary, the patient developed bacteremia, leading to sepsis and dissemination of R. equi infection in many extrapulmonary sites. At addmission the patient was febrile, tachypnoic, tachycardic, hypotensive, with facial edema, splenomegaly, positive meningeal signs, left hemiparesis and paraparesis. Laboratory data included erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR > 140 mm/h, C-reactive protein (CRP 143.0 mg/L, red blood cells (RBC 2.14 × 1012/L, whyite blood cells (WBC 2.8 × 109/L, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH 706 U/L, serum albumin 26 g/L, sodium 127 mmol/L and potassium 2.7 mmol/L. Blood culture and culture of sputum and empyema were positive for R. equi. Imaging studies demonstrated a large right cavitary pneumonia and abscess, empyema, pericarditis, mediastinal and intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy, brain and psoas abscesses, osteomyelitis and spondylodiscitis. The patient recovered completely after a 12-month treatment with combinations of parenteral and oral antibiotics (meropenem, vancomycin, teicoplanin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, macrolides etc, including drainage of abscesses and empyema. Eight years after completition of the treatment the patient was without recurrence of R. equi infection and lymphoma. Conclusion. Since the eradication od R. equi is very difficult, it is very important to make the diagnosis and initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy as soon as possible.

  8. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate of Alginate Immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis R1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikvand, Peyman; Etemadifar, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sulfur oxides released from the burning of oil causes severe environmental pollution. The sulfur can be removed via the 4S pathway in biodesulfurization (BDS). Immobilization approaches have been developed to prevent cell contamination of oil during the BDS process. Objectives: The encapsulation of Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 in calcium alginate beads was studied in order to enhance conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to 2-hydroxy biphenyl (2-HBP) as the final product. Also the effect of different factors on the BDS process was investigated. Materials and Methods: Calcium alginate capsules were prepared using peristaltic pumps with different needle sizes to control the beads sizes. Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry methods were used to study the distribution and viability of encapsulated cells, respectively. Two non-ionic surfactants and also nano Ƴ-Al2O3were used with the ratio of 0.5% (v/v) and 1:5 (v/v) respectively to investigate their BDS efficiency. In addition, the effect of different bead sizes and different concentrations of sodium alginate in BDS activity was studied. Results: The 2% (w/v) sodium alginate beads with 1.5mm size were found to be the optimum for beads stability and efficient 2-HBP production. The viability of encapsulated cells decreased by 12% after 20 h of desulfurization, compared to free cells. Adding the non-ionic surfactants markedly enhanced the rate of BDS, because of increasing mass transfer of DBT to the gel matrix. In addition, Span 80 was more effective than Tween 80. The nanoƳ-Al2O3 particles could increase BDS rate by up to two-folds greater than that of the control beads. Conclusions: The nano Ƴ-Al2O3 can improve the immobilized biocatalyst for excellent efficiency of DBT desulfurization. Also the BDS activity can be enhanced by setting the other explained factors at optimum levels. PMID:25147685

  9. Hydrolysis of nitriles by soil bacteria: variation with soil origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapheeha, O K L; Roux-van der Merwe, M P; Badenhorst, J; Chhiba, V; Bode, M L; Mathiba, K; Brady, D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore bacterial soil diversity for nitrile biocatalysts, in particular, those for hydrolysis of β-substituted nitriles, to the corresponding carboxamides and acids that may be incorporated into peptidomimetics. To achieve this, we needed to compare the efficiency of isolation methods and determine the influence of land use and geographical origin of the soil sample. Nitrile-utilizing bacteria were isolated from various soil environments across a 1000 km long transect of South Africa, including agricultural soil, a gold mine tailing dam and uncultivated soil. The substrate profile of these isolates was determined through element-limited growth studies on seven different aliphatic or aromatic nitriles. A subset of these organisms expressing broad substrate ranges was evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse β-substituted nitriles (3-amino-3-phenylpropionitrile and 3-hydroxy-4-phenoxybutyronitrile) and the active organisms were found to be Rhodococcus erythropolis from uncultivated soil and Rhodococcus rhodochrous from agricultural soils. The capacity for hydrolysis of β-substituted nitriles appears to reside almost exclusively in Rhodococci. Land use has a much greater effect on the biocatalysis substrate profile than geographical location. Enzymes are typically substrate specific in their catalytic reactions, and this means that a wide diversity of enzymes is required to provide a comprehensive biocatalysis toolbox. This paper shows that the microbial diversity of nitrile hydrolysis activity can be targeted according to land utilization. Nitrile biocatalysis is a green chemical method for the enzymatic production of amides and carboxylic acids that has industrial applications, such as in the synthesis of acrylamide and nicotinamide. The biocatalysts discovered in this study may be applied to the synthesis of peptidomimetics which are an important class of therapeutic compounds. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269 3-Ketosteroid 9 alpha-Hydroxylase, a Two-Component Iron-Sulfur-Containing Monooxygenase with Subtle Steroid Substrate Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusma, M.; Dijkhuizen, L.; van der Geize, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the biochemical characterization of a purified and reconstituted two-component 3-ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase (KSH). KSH of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269, consisting of a ferredoxin reductase (KshB) and a terminal oxygenase (KshA), was heterologously expressed in

  12. Rumen bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McSweeney, C.S.; Denman, S.E.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The rumen is the most extensively studied gut community and is characterized by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interactions. This complex, mixed microbial culture is comprised of prokaryote organisms including methane-producing archaebacteria, eukaryote organisms, such as ciliate and flagellate protozoa, anaerobic phycomycete fungi and bacteriophage. Bacteria are predominant (up to 10 11 viable cells per g comprising 200 species) but a variety of ciliate protozoa occur widely (10 4 -10 6 /g distributed over 25 genera). The anaerobic fungi are also widely distributed (zoospore population densities of 10 2 -10 4 /g distributed over 5 genera). The occurrence of bacteriophage is well documented (10 7 -10 9 particles/g). This section focuses primarily on the widely used methods for the cultivation and the enumeration of rumen microbes, especially bacteria, which grow under anaerobic conditions. Methods that can be used to measure hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, amylases and proteinases) are also described, along with cell harvesting and fractionation procedures. Brief reference is also made to fungi and protozoa, but detailed explanations for culturing and enumerating these microbes is presented in Chapters 2.4 and 2.5

  13. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    , representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying...... the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from...

  14. Microbiological studies on petroleum and natural gas. I. Determination of hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, H; Komagata, K

    1964-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria were isolated from oil-brine, soils etc. sampled in oil fields in Japan during 1956, and the following species were identified: Corynebacterium hydrocarboclastus nov. sp., 11 strains; Pseudomonas nitroreducens nov. sp., 1 strain; Pseudomonas maltophila Hugh and Ryschenkow, 5 strains: Brevibacterium lipolyticum (Huss) Breed, 2 strains; Pseudomonas desmolytica Gray and Thornton, 5 strains; Flavobacterium ferrugineum Sickles and Shaw, 1 strain; and Alcaligenes faecalis Chastellani and Chalmers, 1 strain. One difference between Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria was described on the basis of the ability of assimilating hydrocarbons.

  15. Isolation and Presumptive Identification of Adherent Epithelial Bacteria (“Epimural” Bacteria) from the Ovine Rumen Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Mead, Lorna J.; Jones, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred sixty-one strains of adherent bacteria were isolated under anaerobic conditions from four sites on the rumen epithelial surface of sheep fed hay or a hay-grain ration. Before isolation of bacteria, rumen tissue was washed six times in an anaerobic dilution solution, and viable bacteria suspended in the washings were counted. Calculation indicated that unattached bacteria would have been removed from the tissue by this procedure, but a slow and progressive release of attached bacte...

  16. Co-metabolic formation of substituted phenylacetic acids by styrene-degrading bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Oelschlägel

    2015-06-01

    The styrene-degrading strains Rhodococcus opacus 1CP, Pseudomonas fluorescens ST, and the novel isolates Sphingopyxis sp. Kp5.2 and Gordonia sp. CWB2 were investigated with respect to their applicability to co-metabolically produce substituted phenylacetic acids. Isolates were found to differ significantly in substrate tolerance and biotransformation yields. Especially, P. fluorescens ST was identified as a promising candidate for the production of several phenylacetic acids. The biotransformation of 4-chlorostyrene with cells of strain ST was shown to be stable over a period of more than 200 days and yielded about 38 mmolproduct gcelldryweight−1 after nearly 350 days. Moreover, 4-chloro-α-methylstyrene was predominantly converted to the (S-enantiomer of the acid with 40% enantiomeric excess.

  17. Evaluation of the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The probiotic-related characteristics of 55 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the faeces of 3 - 6 months old breast-fed infants were determined. The API 50 CH and SDS-PAGE techniques were employed to ascertain the identity of the isolated strains. The predominant species among the isolated strains were ...

  18. Effects of bovine milk lactoperoxidase system on some bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankaya, M; Sişecioğlu, M; Bariş, O; Güllüce, M; Ozdemir, H

    2010-01-01

    Bovine lactoperoxidase (LPO) was purified from skimmed milk using amberlite CG-50-H+ resin, CM sephadex C-50 ion-exchange chromatography, and sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. Lactoperoxidase was purified 20.45-fold with a yield of 28.8%. Purity of enzyme checked by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis method and a single band was observed. Km was 0.25 mM at 20 degrees C, Vmax value was 7.95 micromol/ml min at 20 degrees C (pH 6.0). Antibacterial study was done by disk diffusion method of Kir-by-Bauer using Mueller-Hinton agar medium with slight modification. Bovine LPO showed high antibacterial activity in 100 mM thiocyanate-100 mM H2O2 medium for some bacteria (Brevibacillus centrosaurus, B. choshinensis, B. lyticum, Cedecea davisae, Chryseobacterium indoltheticum, Clavibacter michiganense pv. insidiosum, Kocuria erythromyxa, K. kristinae, K. rosea, K. varians, Paenibacillus validus, Pseudomonas syringae pv. populans, Ralstonia pickettii, Rhodococcus wratislaviensis, Serratia fonticola, Streptomyces violaceusniger, Vibrio cholerae-nonO1) respectively, and compared with well known antibacterial substances (levofloxacin, netilmicin). LPO system has inhibition effects on all type bacteria and concentration is really important such as LPO-100 mM thiocyanate-100 mM H2O2 system was proposed as an effective agent against many factors causing several diseases.

  19. Characterization of biosurfactants produced by the oil-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis S67 at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, T M; Ponamoreva, O N; Nechaeva, I A; Petrikov, K V; Delegan, Ya A; Surin, A K; Linklater, D; Filonov, A E

    2018-01-04

    Production of trehalolipid biosurfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis S67 depending on the growth temperature was studied. R. erythropolis S67 produced glycolipid biosurfactants such as 2,3,4-succinoyl-octanoyl-decanoyl-2'-decanoyl trehalose and 2,3,4-succinoyl-dioctanoyl-2'-decanoyl trehalose during the growth in n-hexadecane medium at 26 and 10 °C, despite the different aggregate state of the hydrophobic substrate at low temperature. The surface tension of culture medium was found being reduced from 72 to 27 and 45 mN m -1 , respectively. Production of trehalolipid biosurfactants by R. erythropolis S67 at low temperature could be useful for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperatures by enhancing the bioremediation performance in cold regions.

  20. Pneumonia por Rhodococcus equi em doente VIH (+: A propósito de uma associação rara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Esteves

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A infecção humana por Rhodococcus equi, mesmo no contexto da infecção pelo VIH, é relativamente rara. Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de um indivíduo, infectado pelo VIH, que apresentava um quadro clínico e imagiológico compatível com pneumonia, cujos exames iniciais revelaram a presença de Pneumocystis jiroveci. Após realização de terapêutica específica, perante a manutenção do quadro clínico-imagiológico, procedeu-se à realização de novos exames complementares, tendo sido identificado a presença de Rhodococcus equi no lavado broncoalveolar. Com instituição de terapêutica dirigida a este agente, verificou--se progressiva melhoria clínica e imagiológica. Os autores efectuam uma revisão bibliográfica da pneumonia por Rhodococcus equi, salientando a raridade desta associação e a elevada sobrevida observada. Abstract: The human infection by Rhodococcus equi, even in the presence of HIV infection, remains a rare disease. The authors present a case report of pneumonia, occurring in a HIV (+ man. After identifying Pneumocystis jiroveci in the BAL, despite proper medication, the patient didn’t improve. Another BAL was performed and a Rhodoccus equi isolated. The therapeutic regimen was changed according to this finding and the patient improved. The authors make a review of the literature, focusing on the rarity of this association and the high survival observed. Palavras-chave: Rhodococcus equi, Pneumocystis jiroveci, VIH, Key-words: Rhodococcus equi, Pneumocystis jiroveci, HIV

  1. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  2. Kinetics of hydrocarbon extraction from oil shale using biosurfactant producing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddadin, Malik S.Y.; Abou Arqoub, Ansam A.; Abu Reesh, Ibrahim [Faculty of Graduate Studies, Jordan University, Queen Rania Street, Amman, 11942 (Jordan); Haddadin, Jamal [Faculty of Agriculture, Mutah University, P.O. Box 59, Mutah 61710 (Jordan)

    2009-04-15

    This study was done to extract hydrocarbon compounds from El-Lajjun oil shale using biosurfactant produced from two strains Rhodococcus erythropolis and Rhodococcus ruber. The results have shown that, optimal biosurfactant production was found using naphthalene and diesel as a carbon source for R. erthropolis and R. ruber, respectively. Optimum nitrogen concentration was 9 g/l and 7 g/l for R. erthropolis and R. ruber, respectively. Optimum K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} to KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} ratio, temperature, pH, and agitation speeds were 2:1, 37 C, 7 and 200 rpm. Under optimal conditions R. erthropolis and R. ruber produced 5.67 and 6.9 g/l biosurfactant, respectively. Maximum recovery of oil achieved with hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment was 25% and 26% at biosurfactant concentration of 8 g/l and 4 g/l for R. erthropolis and R. ruber, respectively. The extent desorption of hydrocarbons from the pre-treated oil shale by biosurfactant were inversely related to the concentration of high molecular weight hydrocarbons, asphaltenes compounds. Pre-treatment of oil shale with hydrogen peroxide produced better improvement in aromatic compounds extraction in comparison with improvement which resulted from demineralization of the oil shale. (author)

  3. Kinetics of hydrocarbon extraction from oil shale using biosurfactant producing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddadin, Malik S.Y.; Abou Arqoub, Ansam A.; Abu Reesh, Ibrahim; Haddadin, Jamal

    2009-01-01

    This study was done to extract hydrocarbon compounds from El-Lajjun oil shale using biosurfactant produced from two strains Rhodococcus erythropolis and Rhodococcus ruber. The results have shown that, optimal biosurfactant production was found using naphthalene and diesel as a carbon source for R. erthropolis and R. ruber, respectively. Optimum nitrogen concentration was 9 g/l and 7 g/l for R. erthropolis and R. ruber, respectively. Optimum K 2 HPO 4 to KH 2 PO 4 ratio, temperature, pH, and agitation speeds were 2:1, 37 deg. C, 7 and 200 rpm. Under optimal conditions R. erthropolis and R. ruber produced 5.67 and 6.9 g/l biosurfactant, respectively. Maximum recovery of oil achieved with hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment was 25% and 26% at biosurfactant concentration of 8 g/l and 4 g/l for R. erthropolis and R. ruber, respectively. The extent desorption of hydrocarbons from the pre-treated oil shale by biosurfactant were inversely related to the concentration of high molecular weight hydrocarbons, asphaltenes compounds. Pre- treatment of oil shale with hydrogen peroxide produced better improvement in aromatic compounds extraction in comparison with improvement which resulted from demineralization of the oil shale

  4. Occurrence of diverse alkane hydroxylase alkB genes in indigenous oil-degrading bacteria of Baltic Sea surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggor, Signe; Jõesaar, Merike; Vedler, Eve; Kiiker, Riinu; Pärnpuu, Liis; Heinaru, Ain

    2015-12-30

    Formation of specific oil degrading bacterial communities in diesel fuel, crude oil, heptane and hexadecane supplemented microcosms of the Baltic Sea surface water samples was revealed. The 475 sequences from constructed alkane hydroxylase alkB gene clone libraries were grouped into 30 OPFs. The two largest groups were most similar to Pedobacter sp. (245 from 475) and Limnobacter sp. (112 from 475) alkB gene sequences. From 56 alkane-degrading bacterial strains 41 belonged to the Pseudomonas spp. and 8 to the Rhodococcus spp. having redundant alkB genes. Together 68 alkB gene sequences were identified. These genes grouped into 20 OPFs, half of them being specific only to the isolated strains. Altogether 543 diverse alkB genes were characterized in the brackish Baltic Sea water; some of them representing novel lineages having very low sequence identities with corresponding genes of the reference strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Co-existence of Rhizobia and Diverse Non-rhizobial Bacteria in the Rhizosphere and Nodules of Dalbergia odorifera Seedlings Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Rhizobium multihospitium–Like and Burkholderia pyrrocinia–Like Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkun Lu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia induce root nodules and fix atmospheric N2 for most legume species in exchange for carbon. However, the diverse endophytic non-rhizobial bacteria in legume nodules that co-exist with rhizobia are often ignored because they are difficult to cultivate using routine cultivation approaches. To enhance our understanding of the incidence and diversity of legume–bacteria associations, a high-throughput sequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the bacterial community in the rhizospheres and root nodules of Dalbergia odorifera seedlings that were uninoculated or inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii H255, Rhizobium multihospitium–like HT221, or Burkholderia pyrrocinia–like H022238, in two growth media (nitrogen [N]-supplied soil or N-omitted potting mix. Seedlings inoculated with Bradyrhizobium had significantly more nodules than seedlings in the other inoculation conditions, regardless of growth media. Using the 15N natural abundance method, it was shown that the inoculated plants had significantly higher N2 fixation efficiency (48–57% and specific nodule activity [269–313 μg N mg−1 of dry weight (dwt nodule] compared to the uninoculated plants (203 μg N mg−1 dwt nodule. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that there was generally a higher bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere than in the nodules in the corresponding condition. Both rhizobial inoculation and media status significantly altered the bacterial communities in the rhizospheres and nodules (P < 0.05, with the exception of the inoculated soil rhizospheres. Regarding non-rhizobial bacteria, three genera, i.e., Lactococcus, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas, were consistently enriched in the rhizosphere and Bradyrhizobium, Chloroplast norank (which belongs to Cyanobacteria, and Lactococcus were commonly found in the nodules. In contrast, common rhizobial genera (including Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Burkholderia were only present in the nodules at low

  6. Inhibition spectrum studies of microthecin and other anhydrofructose derivatives using selected strains of Gram-positive and –negative bacteria, yeast and moulds, and investigation of the cytotoxicity of microthecin to malignant blood cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiskesund, R.; Thomas, L.V.; Schobert, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To prepare 1,5-anhydro-d-fructose (AF) derivatives, test their microbial inhibition spectrum, and to further examine the most effective AF derivative against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and malignant blood cell lines. Methods and Results: Microthecin and nine other AF derivatives were synthesized...... both GP and GN bacteria, including Ps. aeruginosa. Further tests with three malignant blood cell lines (Mutu, Ramos, Raji) and one normal cell line indicated that microthecin was a cell toxin, with a cell mortality >85% at 50 ppm. The other nine AF derivatives demonstrated low or no antimicrobial...... activity. Conclusions: Microthecin was active 100–2000 ppm against GP and GN bacteria including Ps. aeruginosa, but was inactive against yeasts and moulds. Microthecin was also a cytotoxin to some mammalian cell lines. Significance and Impact of the Study: Microthecin might have potential for development...

  7. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 DhaA mutant DhaA31 and its complex with 1,2,3-trichloropropane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lahoda, M.; Chaloupková, R.; Stsiapanava, A.; Damborský, J.; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 67, Part 3 (2011), s. 397-400 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : haloalkane dehalogenases * DhaA * Rhodococcus rhodochrous Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.506, year: 2011

  8. Differences in Rhodococcus equi Infections Based on Immune Status and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates in a Case Series of 12 Patients and Cases in the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ribes, Julie A.; Thornton, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual zoonotic pathogen that can cause life-threatening diseases in susceptible hosts. Twelve patients with R. equi infection in Kentucky were compared to 137 cases reported in the literature. Although lungs were the primary sites of infection in immunocompromised patients, extrapulmonary involvement only was more common in immunocompetent patients (P antibiotics, preferably selected from vancomycin, imipenem, clarithromycin/azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or cotrimoxazole. Local antibiograms should be checked prior to using cotrimoxazole due to developing resistance. PMID:27631004

  9. Characterization of Bacteria Isolation of Bacteria from Pinyon Rhizosphere,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty bacterial strains were isolated from pinyon rhizosphere and screened for biosurfactants production. Among them, six bacterial strains were selected for their potential to produce biosurfactants using two low cost wastes, crude glycerol and lactoserum, as raw material. Both wastes were useful for producing biosurfactants because of their high content in fat and carbohydrates. The six strains were identified by 16S rDNA with an identity percentage higher than 95%, three strains belonged to Enterobacter sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus pumilus and Rhizobium sp. All strains assayed were able to grow and showed halos around the colonies as evidence of biosurfactants production on Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide agar with crude glycerol and lactoserum as substrate. In a mineral salt liquid medium enriched with both wastes, the biosurfactants were produced and collected from free cell medium after 72 h incubation. The biosurfactants produced reduced the surface tension from 69 to 30 mN/m with an emulsification index of diesel at approximately 60%. The results suggest that biosurfactants produced by rhizosphere bacteria from pinyon have promising environmental applications.

  10. Identification of microbial carotenoids and isoprenoid quinones from Rhodococcus sp. B7740 and its stability in the presence of iron in model gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yashu; Xie, Bijun; Yang, Jifang; Chen, Jigang; Sun, Zhida

    2018-02-01

    Rhodococcus sp. B7740 is a newfound bacterium which was isolated from 25m deep seawater in the arctic. In this paper, Rhodococcus sp. B7740 was firstly discovered to produce abundant natural isoprenoids, including ubiquinone-4(UQ-4), 13 kinds of menaquinones, three rare aromatic carotenoids and more than one common carotenoid. These compounds were identified by UV-Visible, HPLC-APCI-MS/MS and HRMS spectra. Results demonstrated that Rhodococcus sp. B7740 might be a worthy source of natural isoprenoids especially for scarce aromatic carotenoids. Among them, isorenieratene with 528.3762Da (calculated for 528.3756Da, error: 1.1ppm), a carotenoid with aromatic ring, was purified by HSCCC. The stability of isorenieratene under the mimical gastric conditions was measured compared with common dietary carotenoids, β-carotene and lutein. Unlike β-carotene and lutein, isorenieratene exhibited rather stable in the presence of free iron or heme iron. Its high retention rate in gastrointestinal tract after ingestion indicates the benefits for health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Cold Marine Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ISAKSEN, MF; BAK, F.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected. Time course experiments showed constant sulfate reduction rates at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C, whereas the activity at 60 degrees C increased exponentially after a lag period of one day. Thermophilic, endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria, designated strain...... C to search for presence of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Detectable activity was initially only in the mesophilic range, but after a lag phase sulfate reduction by thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. No distinct activity of psychrophilic...... P60, were isolated and characterized as Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii. The temperature response of growth and respiration of strain P60 agreed well with the measured sulfate reduction at 50 degrees-70 degrees C. Bacteria similar to strain P60 could thus be responsible for the measured thermophilic...

  12. Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Cold Marine Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ISAKSEN, MF; BAK, F.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    C to search for presence of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Detectable activity was initially only in the mesophilic range, but after a lag phase sulfate reduction by thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. No distinct activity of psychrophilic...... sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected. Time course experiments showed constant sulfate reduction rates at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C, whereas the activity at 60 degrees C increased exponentially after a lag period of one day. Thermophilic, endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria, designated strain...... P60, were isolated and characterized as Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii. The temperature response of growth and respiration of strain P60 agreed well with the measured sulfate reduction at 50 degrees-70 degrees C. Bacteria similar to strain P60 could thus be responsible for the measured thermophilic...

  13. Production of L-Asparaginase by the marine luminous bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    Fortythree strains of luminous bacteria, belonging to 4 species, (Vibrio harveyi, V. fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. phosphoreum) isolated from different marine samples, were examined for the production of L-asparaginase. Presence...

  14. Screening of potential biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seawater represents a specific environment harboring complex bacterial community which is adapted to harsh conditions. Hence, biosurfactant produced by these bacteria under these conditions have interesting proprieties. The screening of biosurfactant producing strains isolated from seawater biofilm was investigated.

  15. The role of midgut symbiotic bacteria in resistance of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae) to organophosphate insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Aboozar; Vatandoost, Hassan; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Enayati, Ahmad Ali; Chavshin, Ali Reza

    2017-09-01

    In the current study, the effects of the presence of symbiotic bacteria on the activity of the enzymes involved in An. stephensi resistance to temephos are evaluated for the first time. Four different strains (I. susceptible strain, II. resistant strain, III. resistant strain + antibiotic, and IV. resistant strain + bacteria) were considered in order to determine the possible effects of the symbiotic bacteria on their hosts' resistance to temephos. The median values of all enzymes of susceptible strain were compared with those of other resistant strains. The results of this study indicated a direct relationship between the presence of bacteria in the symbiotic organs of An. stephensi and resistance to temephos. The profile of enzymatic activities in the resistant strain changed to a susceptible status after adding antibiotic. The resistance of An. stephensi to temephos could be completely broken artificially by removing their bacterial symbionts in a resistant population.

  16. [Application of anaerobic bacteria detection in oral and maxillofacial infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhen-ying; Lin, Qin; Meng, Yan-hong; He, Chun; Su, Jia-zeng; Peng, Xin

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of anaerobic bacteria in the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures from 61 specimens of pus from the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology were identified. The culture type was evaluated by API 20A kit and drug resistance test was performed by Etest method. The clinical data and antibacterial agents for the treatment of the 61 cases were collected, and the final outcomes were recorded. The bacteria cultures were isolated from all the specimens, with aerobic bacteria only in 6 cases (9.8%), anaerobic bacteria only in 7 cases (11.5%), and both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 48 cases (78.7%). There were 55 infected cases (90.2%) with anaerobic bacteria, and 81 anaerobic bacteria stains were isolated. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram positive anaerobic bacteria could be found in Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium and Pemphigus propionibacterium. No cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was detected in the above three Gram positive anaerobic bacteria. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram negative anaerobic bacteria could be detected in Porphyromonas and Prevotella. No metronidazole, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was found in the two Gram negative anaerobic bacteria. In the study, 48 patients with oral and maxillofacial infection were treated according to the results of drug resistance testing, and the clinical cure rate was 81.3%. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures are very common in most oral and maxillofacial infection patients. Anaerobic bacteria culture and drug resistance testing play an important role in clinical treatment.

  17. Physiological characteristics of bacteria isolated from water brines within permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, V.; Rivkina, E.; Laurinavichuis, K.; Pecheritsina, S.; Gilichinsky, D.

    2004-01-01

    In the Arctic there are lenses of overcooled water brines (cryopegs) sandwiched within permafrost marine sediments 100 120 thousand years old. We have investigated the physiological properties of the pure cultures of anaerobic Clostridium sp. strain 14D1 and two strains of aerobic bacteria Psychrobacter sp. isolated from these cryopegs. The structural and physiological characteristics of new bacteria from water brines have shown their ability to survive and develop under harsh conditions, such as subzero temperatures and high salinity.

  18. Isolation and Partial Characterization of Bacteria in an Anaerobic Consortium That Mineralizes 3-Chlorobenzoic Acid †

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Daniel R.; Tiedje, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A methanogenic consortium able to use 3-chlorobenzoic acid as its sole energy and carbon source was enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge. Seven bacteria were isolated from the consortium in mono- or coculture. They included: one dechlorinating bacterium (strain DCB-1), one benzoate-oxidizing bacterium (strain BZ-2), two butyrate-oxidizing bacteria (strains SF-1 and NSF-2), two H2-consuming methanogens (Methanospirillum hungatei PM-1 and Methanobacterium sp. strain PM-2), and a sulfate-reduci...

  19. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...

  20. Glass bead transformation method for gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2009-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive and reproducible transformation method was developed for Gram-positive bacteria. It was based on agitation of bacterial protoplasts with glass beads in the presence of DNA and polyethylene glycol. By using this method, introduction of pGK12 into protoplasts of several strains of Gram-positive bacteria was achieved.

  1. Hydrocarbon degradation potentials of bacteria isolated from spent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrocarbon degradation potentials of bacteria isolated from spent lubricating oil contaminated soil. ... This study has shown that resident bacteria strains in lubricating oil contaminated soils have potential application in the bioremediation of oil polluted sites and enhance the possibility of developing models and strategies ...

  2. Effects of supplementing lactic acid bacteria on fecal microbiota ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The results indicated that Lactobacillus plantarum strain L.p X3-2B increased fecal lactic acid bacteria(LAB) and Bifidobacterium while resisting the growth of harmful bacteria. Viable counts of LAB and Bifidobacterium reached 8 log cfu/mL after feeding for 14 days. Fecal pH in the control group was high in ...

  3. Bacteriocins and lactic acid bacteria - a minireview | Savadogo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation of various foods by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one of the oldest forms of biopreservation practised by mankind. Bacterial antagonism has been recognized for over a century but in recent years this phenomenon has received more scientific attention, particulary in the use of various strains of lactic acid bacteria.

  4. Selection of local extremophile lactic acid bacteria with high capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is related to the isolation and identification of strains of local thermophilic lactic acid bacteria belonging to the species, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. These bacteria can exist under extreme conditions of the digestive tract (acidity and high concentration of bile salts) and have a high ...

  5. Arsenic-tolerant plant-growth-promoting bacteria isolated from arsenic-polluted soils in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagol, Charlotte C; Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Kiyoon; Sundaram, Subbiah; Sa, Tongmin

    2014-01-01

    The Janghang smelter in Chungnam, South Korea started in 1936 was subsequently shutdown in 1989 due to heavy metal (loid) pollution concerns in the vicinity. Thus, there is a need for the soil in the area to be remediated to make it usable again especially for agricultural purposes. The present study was conducted to exploit the potential of arsenic (As)-tolerant bacteria thriving in the vicinity of the smelter-polluted soils to enhance phytoremediation of hazardous As. We studied the genetic and taxonomic diversity of 21 As-tolerant bacteria isolated from soils nearer to and away from the smelter. These isolates belonging to the genera Brevibacterium, Pseudomonas, Microbacterium, Rhodococcus, Rahnella, and Paenibacillus, could tolerate high concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) with the minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 3 to >20 mM for NaAsO2 and 140 to 310 mM NaH2AsO4 · 7H2O, respectively. All isolates exhibited As(V) reduction except Pseudomonas koreensis JS123, which exhibited both oxidation and reduction of As. Moreover, all the 21 isolates produced indole acetic acid (IAA), 13 isolates exhibited 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, 12 produced siderophore, 17 solubilized phosphate, and 13 were putative nitrogen fixers under in vitro conditions. Particularly, Rhodococcus aetherivorans JS2210, P. koreensis JS2214, and Pseudomonas sp. JS238 consistently increased root length of maize in the presence of 100 and 200 μM As(V). Possible utilization of these As-tolerant plant-growth-promoting bacteria can be a potential strategy in increasing the efficiency of phytoremediation in As-polluted soils.

  6. Alkaline phosphatase activity of rumen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1977-11-01

    Of the 54 strains of rumen bacteria examined for alkaline phosphatase (APase) production, 9 of 33 gram-negative strains and none of 21 gram-positive strains produced the enzyme. The APase of the cells of the three strains of Bacteroides ruminicola that produced significant amounts of the enzyme was located in the periplasmic area of the cell envelope, whereas the enzyme was located in the strains of Selenomonas ruminantium and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens was associated with the outer membrane. The localization of APase production in the cells of natural populations of rumen bacteria from hay-fed sheep was accomplished by reaction product deposition, and both the proportion of APase-producing bacteria and the location of the enzyme in the cell envelope of the producing cells could be determined. We suggest that this procedure is useful in detecting shifts in the bacterial population and the release of cell-bound APase that accompany feedlot bloat and other sequelae of dietary manipulation in ruminants.

  7. Fish skin bacteria: Colonial and cellular hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, N; Rosenberg, E

    1987-05-01

    Bacteria were desorbed from the skin of healthy, fast-swimming fish by several procedures, including brief exposure to sonic oscillation and treatment with nontoxic surface active agents. The surface properties of these bacteria were studied by measuring their adhesion to hexadecane, as well as by a newly developed, simple method for studying the hydrophobicity of bacterial lawns. This method, referred to as the "Direction of Spreading" (DOS) method, consists of recording the direction to which a water drop spreads when introduced at the border between bacterial lawns and other surfaces. Of the 13 fish skin isolates examined, two strains were as hydrophobic as polystyrene by the DOS method. Suspended cells of one of these strains adhered strongly to hexadecane (84%), whereas cells of the other strain adhered poorly (13%). Another strain which was almost as hydrophobic as polystyrene by the DOS method did not adhere to hexadecane at all. Similarly, lawns of three other strains were more hydrophobic than glass by the DOS method, but cell suspensions prepared from these colonies showed little or no adhesion to hexadecane. The high colonial but relatively low cellular hydrophobicity could be due to a hydrophobic slime that is removed during the suspension and washing procedures. The possibility that specific bacteria assist in fish locomotion by changing the surface properties of the fish skin and by producing drag-reducing polymers is discussed.

  8. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  9. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  10. Fermentation of D-Tagatose by Human Intestinal Bacteria and Dairy Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bertelsen, Hans; Andersen, Hans; Tvede, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A number of 174 normal or pathogenic human enteric bacteria and dairy lactic acid bacteria were screened for D-tagatose fermentation by incubation for 48 hours. Selection criteria for fermentation employed included a drop in pH below 5.5 and a distance to controls of more than 0.5. Only a few of the normal occurring enteric human bacteria were able to ferment D-tagatose, among those Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus strains. D-Tagatose fermentation seems to be comm...

  11. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  12. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  13. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  14. Crystals of DhaA mutants from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 diffracted to ultrahigh resolution: crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Koudelakova, Tana; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Pavlova, Martina; Damborsky, Jiri; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Three mutants of the haloalkane dehalogenase DhaA derived from R. rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 were crystallized and diffracted to ultrahigh resolution. The enzyme DhaA from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 belongs to the haloalkane dehalogenases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of haloalkanes to the corresponding alcohols. The haloalkane dehalogenase DhaA and its variants can be used to detoxify the industrial pollutant 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). Three mutants named DhaA04, DhaA14 and DhaA15 were constructed in order to study the importance of tunnels connecting the buried active site with the surrounding solvent to the enzymatic activity. All protein mutants were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of DhaA04 belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , while the crystals of the other two mutants DhaA14 and DhaA15 belonged to the triclinic space group P1. Native data sets were collected for the DhaA04, DhaA14 and DhaA15 mutants at beamline X11 of EMBL, DESY, Hamburg to the high resolutions of 1.30, 0.95 and 1.15 Å, respectively

  15. Crystals of DhaA mutants from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 diffracted to ultrahigh resolution: crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Koudelakova, Tana; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Pavlova, Martina; Damborsky, Jiri; Smatanova, Ivana Kuta

    2008-02-01

    The enzyme DhaA from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 belongs to the haloalkane dehalogenases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of haloalkanes to the corresponding alcohols. The haloalkane dehalogenase DhaA and its variants can be used to detoxify the industrial pollutant 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). Three mutants named DhaA04, DhaA14 and DhaA15 were constructed in order to study the importance of tunnels connecting the buried active site with the surrounding solvent to the enzymatic activity. All protein mutants were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of DhaA04 belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), while the crystals of the other two mutants DhaA14 and DhaA15 belonged to the triclinic space group P1. Native data sets were collected for the DhaA04, DhaA14 and DhaA15 mutants at beamline X11 of EMBL, DESY, Hamburg to the high resolutions of 1.30, 0.95 and 1.15 A, respectively.

  16. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  17. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-01-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution

  18. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  20. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanti, Venty, E-mail: venty@mipa.uns.ac.id; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta, Central Java 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  1. Functional characterization and stability improvement of a ‘thermophilic-like’ ene-reductase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika eRiedel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ene-reductases are widely applied for the asymmetric synthesis of relevant industrial chemicals. A novel ene-reductase OYERo2 was found within a set of 14 putative Old Yellow Enzymes (OYEs obtained by genome mining of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. Multiple sequence alignment suggested that the enzyme belongs to the group of ‘thermophilic-like’ OYEs. OYERo2 was produced in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. The enzyme is strongly NADPH dependent and uses non-covalently bound FMNH2 for the reduction of activated α,β-unsaturated alkenes. In the active form OYERo2 is a dimer. Optimal catalysis occurs at pH 7.3 and 37 °C. OYERo2 showed highest specific activities (4550 U mg-1 on maleimides, which are efficiently converted to the corresponding succinimides. The OYERo2-mediated reduction of prochiral alkenes afforded the (R-products with excellent optical purity (ee > 99%. OYERo2 is not as thermo-resistant as related OYEs. Introduction of a characteristic intermolecular salt bridge by site-specific mutagenesis raised the half-life of enzyme inactivation at 32 °C from 28 min to 87 min and improved the tolerance towards organic co-solvents. The suitability of OYERo2 for application in industrial biocatalysis is discussed.

  2. Optimization of biosurfactant production in soybean oil by rhodococcus rhodochrous and its utilization in remediation of cadmium-contaminated solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Andriani, Dewi

    2016-02-01

    Biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus rhodochrous in soybean oil was developed, where the effect of medium composition and fermentation time were evaluated. The optimum condition for biosurfactant production was achieved when a medium containing 30 g/L TSB (tryptic soy broth) and 20% v/v soybean oil was used as media with 7 days of fermentation. Biosurfactant was identified as glycolipids type biosurfactant which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 896 mg/L. The biosurfactant had oil in water emulsion type and was able to reduce the surface tension of palm oil about 52% which could stabilize the emulsion up to 12 days. The batch removal of cadmium metal ion by crude and partially purified biosurfactants have been examined from synthetic aqueous solution at pH 6. The results exhibited that the crude biosurfactant had a much better adsorption ability of Cd(II) than that of partially purified biosurfactant. However, it was found that there was no significant difference in the adsorption of Cd(II) with 5 and 10 minutes of contact time. The results indicated that the biosurfactant could be used in remediation of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous solution.

  3. Production of carotenoids and lipids by Rhodococcus opacus PD630 in batch and fed-batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanapimmetha, Anusith; Suwaleerat, Tharatron; Saisriyoot, Maythee; Chisti, Yusuf; Srinophakun, Penjit

    2017-01-01

    Production of carotenoids by Rhodococcus opacus PD630 is reported. A modified mineral salt medium formulated with glycerol as an inexpensive carbon source was used for the fermentation. Ammonium acetate was the nitrogen source. A dry cell mass concentration of nearly 5.4 g/L could be produced in shake flasks with a carotenoid concentration of 0.54 mg/L. In batch culture in a 5 L bioreactor, without pH control, the maximum dry biomass concentration was ~30 % lower than in shake flasks and the carotenoids concentration was 0.09 mg/L. Both the biomass concentration and the carotenoids concentration could be raised using a fed-batch operation with a feed mixture of ammonium acetate and acetic acid. With this strategy, the final biomass concentration was 8.2 g/L and the carotenoids concentration was 0.20 mg/L in a 10-day fermentation. A control of pH proved to be unnecessary for maximizing the production of carotenoids in this fermentation.

  4. Selection of biosurfactan/bioemulsifier-producing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Viramontes-Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are among the most persistent soil contaminants, and some hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms can produce biosurfactants to increase bioavailability and degradation. The aim of this work was to identify biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, and to evaluate their biosurfactant properties. The drop-collapse method and minimal agar added with a layer of combustoleo were used for screening, and positive strains were grown in liquid medium, and surface tension and emulsification index were determined in cell-free supernantant and cell suspension. A total of 324 bacterial strains were tested, and 17 were positive for the drop-collapse and hydrocarbon-layer agar methods. Most of the strains were Pseudomonas, except for three strains (Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Rhodococcus. Surface tension was similar in cell-free and cell suspension measurements, with values in the range of 58 to 26 (mN/m, and all formed stable emulsions with motor oil (76-93% E24. Considering the variety of molecular structures among microbial biosurfactants, they have different chemical properties that can be exploited commercially, for applications as diverse as bioremediation or degradable detergents.

  5. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  6. Probiotic bacteria: selective enumeration and survival in dairy foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N P

    2000-04-01

    A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp., and Lactobacillus casei. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. However, studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. In order to assess viability of probiotic bacteria, it is important to have a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. Viability of probiotic bacteria can be improved by appropriate selection of acid and bile resistant strains, use of oxygen impermeable containers, two-step fermentation, micro-encapsulation, stress adaptation, incorporation of micronutrients such as peptides and amino acids and by sonication of yogurt bacteria. This review will cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria in dairy foods.

  7. Antibacterial activity of soaps against daily encountered bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aims to check the antibacterial activity of various branded soaps against bacteria that are normally present in the environment. The proposed study includes selection of most common bacterial strains from the environment. Identification of bacterial strains was done by standard microbiological techniques, which ...

  8. Chitin elicitation of natural product production in marine bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    -negative bacteria (mainly Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio), we found that some strains were capable of producing antibacterial compounds when grown on chitin, an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine polymer found in the exoskeleton of zooplankton.2 A strain of Vibrio coralliilyticus solely produced the antibiotic andrimid,3...

  9. Identification of bacteria in drinking water with Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vossenberg, J.; Tervahauta, H.; Maquelin, K.; Blokker-Koopmans, C.H.W.; Uytewaal-Aaarts, M.; Kooij, D.; van Wezel, A.P.; van der Gaag, B.

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to discriminate between Legionella strains and between E. coli and coliform strains. The relationship between triplicate Raman spectra derived from Legionella bacteria was compared with that derived from a blind set of samples and amplified fragment length polymorphism

  10. Identification of Methyl Halide-Utilizing Genes in the Methyl Bromide-Utilizing Bacterial Strain IMB-1 Suggests a High Degree of Conservation of Methyl Halide-Specific Genes in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, C.A.; Warner, K.L.; Oremland, R.S.; Murrell, J.C.; McDonald, I.R.

    2001-01-01

    Strain IMB-1, an aerobic methylotrophic member of the alpha subgroup of the Proteobacteria, can grow with methyl bromide as a sole carbon and energy source. A single cmu gene cluster was identified in IMB-1 that contained six open reading frames: cmuC, cmuA, orf146, paaE, hutI, and partial metF. CmuA from IMB-1 has high sequence homology to the methyltransferase CmuA from Methylobacterium chloromethanicum and Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum and contains a C-terminal corrinoid-binding motif and an N-terminal methyl-transferase motif. However, cmuB, identified in M. chloromethanicum and H. chloromethanicum, was not detected in IMB-1.

  11. THE PHOTODYNAMIC EFFECT OF LED-MAGNETIC EXPOSURE TO PHOTOINACTIVATION OF AEROBIC PHOTOSYNTETIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryani Dyah Astuti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All photosynthetic bacteria have a major pigment of bacteriochlorophyl and accessor pigment e.g. the carotenoids, which both have an important role in photosynthesis process. This study aim to explore the exogenous organic photosensitizer from photosyntetic bacteria for photodynamic therapy application. This study is an experimental research aiming to test the potential illumination ofLED with wavelength 409, 430, 528 and 629 nm, and power optimization and time exposure LED-magnetic for optimum photo activation Rhodococcus growth. The reseach design use a factorial completely randomized design with factor ofpower and exposure time. The number ofbacterial colonies grown measure using ofTotal Plate Count (TPC methods. The result ofanova test shows that irradiation treatment with LED 409 nm, 430 nm, 528 nm and 629 nm significantly affects on bacterial colony growth. LED 409 nm exposure has the greatest potential to boost the growth ofbacterial colonies by 77%. LED exposure and the addition of1.8 mT magnetic field increases bacterial colony growth by 98%. Results of optimization of LED and magnetic fields show power 46 mW and a 40 minute (energy dose 110 J/cm2 optimum growth ofbacterial colonies increase by 184%. So LED and magnetic illumination has potentially increased the viability ofan aerob photosyntetic bacteria colonies.

  12. Iron minerals formed by dissimilatory iron-and sulfur reducing bacteria studied by Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Nazarova, K. A.; Koksharov, Yu. A.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Zero-field and in-field Moessbauer investigations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements to follow the kinetics of the iron mineral formation by thermophilic dissimilatory anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (strain Z-0001) and anaerobic alkaliphilic bacteria (strain Z-0531) were carried out.

  13. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    Substrates that contain high ammonia levels can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process and unstable biogas production. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of different ammonia levels on pure strains of (syntrophic acetate oxidizing) SAO bacteria and hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens. Two pure strains of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e: Methanoculleus bourgensis and Methanoculleus thermophiles) and two pure strains of SAO bacteria (i.e: Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) were inoculated under four different ammonia (0.26, 3, 5 and 7g NH4+-N......, the total incubation periods of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were significantly shorter compared to the SAO bacteria incubation periods. Thus, it seems that hydrogenotrophic methanogens could be equally, if not more, tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAO bacteria....

  14. Isolation and characterization of a new Pseudomonas-related strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % with Pseudomonas putida ()AB680847). The phylogenetic tree formed by 16S rDNA sequences from both strain SKDP-1 and its most related bacteria also proved strain SKDP-1 to be one member of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain SKDP-1 ...

  15. Intracellular bacteria: the origin of dinoflagellate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E S

    1990-01-01

    Dinoflagellate blooms of the same species have been registered either as toxic or nontoxic and, in the latter case, toxicity may be of different types. A hypothesis has been formulated according to which the bacteria having in some way taken part in the toxin formation are either inside the dinoflagellate cell or in the nutritive liquid. The presence of intracellular bacteria in those microorganisms has been studied mainly in material from cultures, a few from the sea, and several strains were isolated from different species. Experiments with crossed inoculations have shown that the bacterial strain from Gonyaulax tamarensis caused the cells of some other species to become toxic. From nontoxic clonal cultures of Prorocentrum balticum, Glenodinium foliaceum, and Gyrodinium instriatum, after inoculation of that bacterial strain, cultures were obtained whose cell extracts showed the same kind of toxicity as G. tamarensis. No toxic action could be found in the extracts of the bacterial cells form the assayed strains. The interference of intracellular bacteria in the metabolism of dinoflagellates must be the main cause of their toxicity.

  16. Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with toxic and non-toxic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with toxic and non-toxic strains of Alexandrium minutum. L Palacios, B Reguera, J Franco, I Marín. Abstract. Marine planktonic dinoflagellates are usually associated with bacteria, some of which seem to have a symbiotic relation with the dinoflagellate cells. The role of bacteria in ...

  17. Dimetilsulfóxido - DMSO no teste de sensibilidade microbiana in vitro em cepas de Rhodococcus equi isoladas de afecções pulmonares em potros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Márcio Garcia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparou-se a sensibilidade microbiana in vitro de isolados de Rhodococcus equi pelo teste padrão de difusão com discos, com o modificado, pela adição de 5% de dimetilsulfóxido-DMSO. Observou-se aumento da sensibilidade do R. equi no teste com DMSO, frente a aminoglicosídeos (canamicina, amicacina, estreptomicina e ao cloranfenicol, enquanto para a eritromicina e derivados ß-lactâmicos (penicilina G, cefalosporinas, amoxicilina, oxacilina, constatou-se redução da sensibilidade do agente.

  18. Multiplicity of 3-Ketosteroid-9 alpha-Hydroxylase Enzymes in Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM43269 for Specific Degradation of Different Classes of Steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Petrusma, Mirjan; Hessels, Gerda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The well-known large catabolic potential of rhodococci is greatly facilitated by an impressive gene multiplicity. This study reports on the multiplicity of kshA, encoding the oxygenase component of 3-ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in steroid catabolism. Five kshA homologues (kshA1 to kshA5) were previously identified in Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM43269. These KshA(DSM43269) homologues are distributed over several phylogenetic groups. The involvement of these KshA homologues in ...

  19. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  20. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria using FTIR Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Nalepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid bacteria have been identified at the genus level with the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Bacterial strains of the genera Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were analyzed since they deliver health benefits and are routinely used in the food processing industry. The correctness of bacterial identification by ANNs and FTIR was evaluated at two stages. At first stage, ANNs were tested based on the spectra of 66 reference bacterial strains. At second stage, the evaluation involved 286 spectra of bacterial strains isolated from food products, deposited in our laboratory collection, and identified by genus-specific PCR. ANNs were developed based on the spectra and their first derivatives. The most satisfactory results were reported for the probabilistic neural network, which was built using a combination of W5W4W3 spectral ranges. This network correctly identified the genus of 95 % of the lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid bacteria strains analyzed.

  1. Effect of temperature and pH on polygalacturonase production by pectinolytic bacteria Bacillus licheniformis strain GD2a in submerged medium from Raja Nangka (Musa paradisiaca var. formatypica) banana peel waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widowati, E.; Utami, R.; Mahadjoeno, E.; Saputro, G. P.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research were to determine the effect of temperature (45°C, 55°C, 65°C) and pH (5.0; 6.0; 7.0) on the increase of total cell count and polygalacturonase enzyme activity produced from raja nangka banana (Musa paradisiaca var. formatypica) peel waste by pectinolytic bacterial Bacillus licheniformis strain GD2a. This research applied two sample repetition and one analysis repetition. The result showed temperature and pH affect total cell count. The total cell count on 45°C and pH 7 recorded the highest number at 9.469 log cell/ml. Temperature and pH also affected pectin concentration at the end of fermentation. The lowest pectin concentration recorded at 45°C and pH 7 was 0.425 %. The highest enzyme activity recorded at 65°C and pH 7 was 0.204 U/ml. The highest enzyme protein concentration was recorded at 65°C and resulted as 0.310 mg/ml on pH 6. The highest specific activity was 19.527 U/mg at 65°C and pH 7. By this result, could be concluded that optimum condition process on polygalacturonase production was at 65°C and pH 7 because it gave highest enzyme activity result (0,204 U/ml).

  2. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  3. Effect of radiation decontamination on drug-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    More than 80% of food poisoning bacteria such as Salmonella are reported as antibiotic-resistant to at least one type antibiotic, and more than 50% as resistant to two or more. For the decontamination of food poisoning bacteria in foods, radiation resistibility on drug-resistant bacteria were investigated compared with drug-sensitive bacteria. Possibility on induction of drug-resistant mutation by radiation treatment was also investigated. For these studies, type strains of Escherichia coli S2, Salmonella enteritidis YK-2 and Staphylococcus aureus H12 were used to induce drug-resistant strains with penicillin G. From the study of radiation sensitivity on the drug-resistant strain induced from E. coli S2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.20 kGy compared with 0.25 kGy at parent strain. On S. enteritidis YK-2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.14 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.16 kGy at parent strain. D 10 value was also obtained to be 0.15 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.21 kGy at parent strain of St. aureus H12. Many isolates of E. coli 157:H7 or other type of E. coli from meats such as beef were resistant to penicillin G, and looked to be no relationship on radiation resistivities between drug-resistant strains and sensitive strains. On the study of radiation sensitivity on E. coli S2 at plate agars containing antibiotics, higher survival fractions were obtained at higher doses compared with normal plate agar. The reason of higher survival fractions at higher doses on plate agar containing antibiotics should be recovery of high rate of injured cells by the relay of cell division, and drug-resistant strains by mutation are hardly induced by irradiation. (author)

  4. INDUSTRIAL WASTE BIOCONVERSION INTO SURFACTANTS BY Rhodococcus erythropolis ІMV Ас-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ІMV В-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii ІMV В-7405

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to realize an alternative processing of toxic industrial waste into surfactants by strains Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 for remediation of environment. The studied strains were grown in liquid media containing such sources of carbon as waste (fried sunflower oil, technical glycerol (by-product of biodiesel production, and aromatic compounds. The synthesis of surfactants was evaluated by emulsification index, conditional concentration of surfactants and concentration of extracellular surfactants, which was determined gravimetrically after their extraction from supernatant by the mixture of methanol and chloroform. The concentration of oil in water and soil was analyzed by gravimetric method after extraction with hexane. It was shown that with increasing concentration of the inoculum up to 10−15% and two times increase of nitrogen source content in medium containing 7−8% (v/v of crude glycerol, concentration of surfactants synthesized by R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B 7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 was 3.4; 5.0 and 5.3 g/l, respectively, that is 1.6−1.7 times higher as compared with values on basal medium with the same content of substrate. The maximum concentration (3.9−4.3 g/l of surfactants synthesized by A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 on fried sunflower oil (4% was achieved by using the inoculum grown on refined oil. The ability of R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 to decompose aromatic compounds (phenol, naphthalene, toluene, hexachlorobenzene, benzoic and N-phenylanthranilic acid with simultaneous synthesis of extracellular metabolites with surface-active and emulsifying properties was established. In the presence of surfactants in the form of culture liquid (5−10%, the degree of degradation of complex oil with heavy metal (Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, 0.01−0.5 mmol

  5. [Diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in Daishan Saltern of East China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan-Dan; Li, Qian; Huang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Min

    2012-11-01

    Soil and saline water samples were collected from the Daishan Saltern of East China, and the halophilic bacteria were isolated and cultured by using selective media, aimed to investigate the diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in saltern environment. A total of 181 strains were isolated by culture-dependent method. Specific primers were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and archaea. The operation taxonomy units (OTUs) were determined by ARDRA method, and the representative strain of each OTU was sequenced. The phylogenetic position of all the isolated strains was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results showed that the isolated 181 strains displayed 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of which, 12 OTUs belonged to halophilic bacteria, and the others belonged to halophilic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there were 7 genera presented among the halophilic bacteria group, and 4 genera presented among the halophilic archaea group. The dominant halophilic strains were of Halomonas and Haloarcula, with 46.8% in halophilic bacteria and 49.1% in halophilic archaea group, respectively. Enzyme-producing analysis indicated that most strains displayed enzyme-producing activity, including the activities of producing amylase, proteinase and lipase, and the dominant strains capable of enzyme-producing were of Haloarcula. Our results showed that in the environment of Daishan Saltern, there existed a higher diversity of halophilic bacteria, being a source sink for screening enzyme-producing bacterial strains.

  6. Diastereoselective reduction of 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3(R)-[3-oxo-3-(4-fluorophenyl) -propyl]-4 (S)-(4-hydroxyphenyl)azetidin-2-one to Ezetimibe by the whole cell catalyst Rhodococcus fascians MO22

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyslíková, Eva; Babiak, P.; Marešová, Helena; Palyzová, Andrea; Hajíček, J.; Kyslík, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 67, 3-4 (2010), s. 266-270 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Biotransformation * Rhodococcus fascians MO22 * Ezetimibe Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2010

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia). Pasar Djumat Research Centre

    1976-10-01

    The differences of radiosensitivities among bacteria in addition to the dependence upon the species or strains also depends on the environmental condition during irradiation (temperature, medium, the presence of protective or sensitizing agents, the gas phase or atmosphere, and water activity, or degree of hydration) and on the effects of the environmental condition before and after irradiation treatment (temperature of incubation, age of culture and growth medium). In general, spores are more resistant to radiation than vegetatic bacteria, with the exception that a few cocci are the most radiation resistant bacteria (Micrococcus and Streptococcus). The application of ionizing radiation in the fields of microbiology supports the radiation sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products. In addition, microbiological aspects of food preservation, especially radurization, radicidation, and immunization studies by using irradiated microorganisms, are also important.

  8. Use of tritium-labeled PCBs for investigation of PCBs biodegradation by soil bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Takhtobiri, K.S.; Yadgarov, H.T.; Zinovev, P. V.; Abdukarimov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The method for tritium labelling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was developed. The strains of soil bacteria - destructors of chloro organic compounds was studied with the help of test-system based on the using of tritium-labeled PCBs. The strains of bacteria were grown on the agar synthetic medium and then were introduced into the synthetic medium containing tritium-labeled mixture of PCBs (commercial mark - SOVOL) as alone source of carbon. The samples were analysed after one and two months period of incubation. PCBs were extracted by hexane from fraction of bacteria and fraction of cultural medium and radioactivity was measured. The samples were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) with following radioautography. Additionally samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. It was found that all selected strains survived in the medium with PCBs as alone source of carbon and bacteria accumulated PCBs from cultural medium. Accumulation of PCBs by strains of bacteria was different. The TLC analysis detected additional compounds labeled by tritium, that prove the degradation of PCBs in presence of bacteria. The gas chromatography analysis of cultural medium and bacteria detected redistribution in the system and qualitative changes of PCBs in bacteria. The strains of bacteria also were grown in model condition on the soil with tritium labeled PCBs. We found that some strains effectively destroy PCBs with decreasing level of tritium label in the soil. The using of tritium labeled PCBs' allows to introduce precise quantitative characteristics for study of accumulation and biodegradation PCBs by soil bacteria strains. Developed test-system is very useful tool for selection of new strains of soil bacteria - destructors of PCBs

  9. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kanta; Konings, Wil N

    2003-12-31

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Megasphaera cerevisiae. They can spoil beer by turbidity, acidity and the production of unfavorable smell such as diacetyl or hydrogen sulfide. For the microbiological control, many advanced biotechnological techniques such as immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been applied in place of the conventional and time-consuming method of incubation on culture media. Subsequently, a method is needed to determine whether the detected bacterium is capable of growing in beer or not. In lactic acid bacteria, hop resistance is crucial for their ability to grow in beer. Hop compounds, mainly iso-alpha-acids in beer, have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. They act as ionophores which dissipate the pH gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane and reduce the proton motive force (pmf). Consequently, the pmf-dependent nutrient uptake is hampered, resulting in cell death. The hop-resistance mechanisms in lactic acid bacteria have been investigated. HorA was found to excrete hop compounds in an ATP-dependent manner from the cell membrane to outer medium. Additionally, increased proton pumping by the membrane bound H(+)-ATPase contributes to hop resistance. To energize such ATP-dependent transporters hop-resistant cells contain larger ATP pools than hop-sensitive cells. Furthermore, a pmf-dependent hop transporter was recently presented. Understanding the hop-resistance mechanisms has enabled the development of rapid methods to discriminate beer spoilage strains from nonspoilers. The horA-PCR method has been applied for bacterial control in breweries. Also, a discrimination method was developed based on ATP pool measurement in lactobacillus cells. However

  10. Isolation and characterization of chromium, mercury and cadmium resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, K.P.; Noor, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Ten heavy metal resistant strains were isolated from samples of soil, water and rhizosphere of plant Cynadon Dectylon of Kasur sector. Among these bacteria, four strains Cr-l, Cr- 2, Cr-3 and Cr-4 were showed the resistant to chromium up to 300 mg/L, two strains Cd-1 and Cd-2 resisted cadmium up to 100 mg/L, two strains Cd-3 and Cd-4 resisted cadmium up to 50 mg/L and two strains (Hg-l, Hg-2) were observed resistant to mercury up to 100 mg/L. Their morphological and colonial characteristics were investigated. The families of isolated bacteria are reported i.e. Azotobacteriaceae(C r-l), Enterobacteriacea(eC r-2, Cr-3, Cr-4, Hg-2) and Neisseriaceae(Cd-I, Cd-2, Cd-3, Cd-4, Hg-2). (author)

  11. Biodegradation of Mixed PAHs by PAH-Degrading Endophytic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhu Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria can promote plant growth, induce plant defence mechanisms, and increase plant resistance to organic contaminants. The aims of the present study were to isolate highly PAH-degrading endophytic bacteria from plants growing at PAH-contaminated sites and to evaluate the capabilities of these bacteria to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in vitro, which will be beneficial for re-colonizing target plants and reducing plant PAH residues through the inoculation of plants with endophytic bacteria. Two endophytic bacterial strains P1 (Stenotrophomonas sp. and P3 (Pseudomonas sp., which degraded more than 90% of phenanthrene (PHE within 7 days, were isolated from Conyza canadensis and Trifolium pretense L., respectively. Both strains could use naphthalene (NAP, PHE, fluorene (FLR, pyrene (PYR, and benzo(apyrene (B(aP as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Moreover, these bacteria reduced the contamination of mixed PAHs at high levels after inoculation for 7 days; strain P1 degraded 98.0% NAP, 83.1% FLR, 87.8% PHE, 14.4% PYR, and 1.6% B(aP, and strain P3 degraded 95.3% NAP, 87.9% FLR, 90.4% PHE, 6.9% PYR, and negligible B(aP. Notably, the biodegradation of PAHs could be promoted through additional carbon and nitrogen nutrients; therein, beef extract was suggested as the optimal co-substrate for the degradation of PAHs by these two strains (99.1% PHE was degraded within 7 days. Compared with strain P1, strain P3 has more potential for the use in the removal of PAHs from plant tissues. These results provide a novel perspective in the reduction of plant PAH residues in PAH-contaminated sites through inoculating plants with highly PAH-degrading endophytic bacteria.

  12. [Screening endophytic bacteria against plant-parasitic nematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shuang; Yan, Shuzhen; Chen, Shuanglin

    2011-03-01

    Plant-parasite nematode is one of the most important pathogens in plant. Our objective is to screen endophytic bacteria against plant-parasitic nematodes from plant. Endophytic bacteria were isolated and screened by testing their metabolite against Bursaphelenchus xylophilus in vitro. Those strains inhibiting B. xylophilus were selected to culture in liquid medium and fermentation conditions were optimized by orthogonal test. The stability of the antinematode substances was evaluated by various. In addition, four strains were identified by 16SrDNA sequence analysis. In total 13 strains of endophytic bacteria secreting antinematode metabolite were isolated from 6 species of plant. The supernatant of the fermentation broth of these endophytic bacteria gave 100% mortality of nematodes after treated as the follows: 1 ml each was mixed with 0.2 ml of the suspension of nematodes (2000 nematodes/ml) then incubated at 250C for 24 h, some of which could led to leakage or dissolution of nematodes. Among them, four strains, BCM2, SZ5, CCM7 and DP1, showed stronger activity than others. The supernatants diluted three times also gave not less than 95% mortality after 24 h treatment, and those from DP1 and SZ5 even gave 100% mortality. The fermentation conditions of the four strains were optimized and the antinematode activity grew up four times after optimization. The antinematode substances of these strains were found stable when treated with protease or heating or stored at 4 degrees C after 100 days, while instable when treated with acid or alkali. DP1 and CCM7 were identified to be Bacillus subtilis, while SZ5 and BCM2 to be Bacillus cereus. Endophytic bacteria secreting antinematode metabolite were found in economic crops. The metabolite of some strains showed strong and stable antinematode activity. Our results indicate the real potential of biocontrol by endophytic bacteria.

  13. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; te Velde, Anje A.; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria

  14. Modeling Political Populations with Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Chris; Liao, David

    2011-03-01

    Results from lattice-based simulations of micro-environments with heterogeneous nutrient resources reveal that competition between wild-type and GASP rpoS819 strains of E. Coli offers mutual benefit, particularly in nutrient deprived regions. Our computational model spatially maps bacteria populations and energy sources onto a set of 3D lattices that collectively resemble the topology of North America. By implementing Wright-Fishcer re- production into a probabilistic leap-frog scheme, we observe populations of wild-type and GASP rpoS819 cells compete for resources and, yet, aid each other's long term survival. The connection to how spatial political ideologies map in a similar way is discussed.

  15. Antioxidant Properties of Probiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Yanping; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Han; Mei, Xiaoqiang; Yu, Dongyou; Wang, Yibing; Li, Weifen

    2017-05-19

    Oxidative stress defines a condition in which the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in the cell is disturbed, resulting in DNA hydroxylation, protein denaturation, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis, ultimately compromising cells' viability. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects, and the consumption of probiotics alone or in food shows that strain-specific probiotics can present antioxidant activity and reduce damages caused by oxidation. However, the oxidation-resistant ability of probiotics, especially the underling mechanisms, is not properly understood. In this view, there is interest to figure out the antioxidant property of probiotics and summarize the mode of action of probiotic bacteria in antioxidation. Therefore, in the present paper, the antioxidant mechanisms of probiotics have been reviewed in terms of their ability to improve the antioxidant system and their ability to decrease radical generation. Since in recent years, oxidative stress has been associated with an altered gut microbiota, the effects of probiotics on intestinal flora composition are also elaborated.

  16. Use of thermophilic bacteria for bioremediation of petroleum contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maghrabi, I.M.A.; Bin Aqil, A.O.; Chaalal, O.; Islam, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Several strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 60--80 C. This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria for both in situ and ex situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminants. In a series of batch experiments, bacterial growth was observed using a computer image analyzer following a recently developed technique. These experiments showed clearly that the growth rate is enhanced in the presence of crude oil. This is coupled with a rapid degradation of the crude oil. These bacteria were found to be ideal for breaking down long-chain organic molecules at a temperature of 40 C, which is the typical ambient temperature of the Persian Gulf region. The same strains of bacteria are also capable of surviving in the presence of the saline environment that can prevail in both sea water and reservoir connate water. This observation prompted further investigation into the applicability of the bacteria in microbial enhanced oil recovery. In the United Arab Emirates, the reservoirs are typically at a temperature of around 85 C. Finally, the performance of the bacteria is tested in a newly developed bioreactor that uses continuous aeration through a transverse slotted pipe. This reactor also uses mixing without damaging the filamentous bacteria. In this process, the mechanisms of bioremediation are identified

  17. A preliminary study on the pathogenicity of Bacillus licheniformis bacteria in immunodepressed mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Jensen, N.E.; Giese, Steen Bjørck

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenicity of 13 strains of Bacillus licheniformis was studied in immunodepressed mice. The strains had been isolated from cases of bovine abortions (n=5), bovine feedstuffs (n=3), soil (n=l), and grain products (n=2). The origin of two strains was unknown. Groups of 10 mice were inoculated...... intravenously with B. licheniformis bacteria at doses from...

  18. Characterization and evaluation of catechol oxygenases by twelve bacteria, isolated from oil contaminated soils in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Tavakoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Catechol is a common intermediate compound in aromatic degradation process. Some microorganisms have this potentiality to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons by catechol dioxygenases to less toxic compounds with ability of entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the present study, the catechol oxygenase activity was measured for 12 crude oil degrader bacteria. Materials and methods: Catechol oxygenase activity of two enzymes includes catechol 1, 2 dioxygenase and catechol 2, 3 dioxygenase were determined using spectrophotometer at 260 nm and 375 nm, respectively. Results: The highest enzyme activity for catechol 1, 2 dioxygenase by Bacillus cereus UKMP-6G was (0.07 U/mL and about catechol 2, 3 dioxygenase was 0.031 U/mL by Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M during the first minute of incubation. Catechol 1, 2 dioxygenase and catechol 2, 3 dioxygenase followed the ortho and meta pathway, respectively. Discussion and conclusion: The enzyme assay results showed that among 12 examined bacteria, only R. ruber UKMP-5M has the ability to use meta pathway for degradation and produce 2-hydroxymuconic acid. The other isolates use ortho pathway and create cis, cis-muconic acid.

  19. Taxonomy of oxalotrophic Methylobacterium strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Nurettin; Kato, Yuko; Yilmaz, Ferah

    2008-10-01

    Most of the oxalotrophic bacteria are facultative methylotrophs and play important ecological roles in soil fertility and cycling of elements. This study gives a detailed picture of the taxonomy and diversity of these bacteria and provides new information about the taxonomical variability within the genus Methylobacterium. Twelve mesophilic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic oxalate-oxidizing strains were included in this work that had been previously isolated from the soil and some plant tissues by the potassium oxalate enrichment method. The isolates were characterized using biochemical tests, cellular lipid profiles, spectral characteristics of carotenoid pigments, G+C content of the DNA, and 16S rDNA sequencing. The taxonomic similarities among the strains were analyzed using the simple matching ( S SM) and Jaccard ( S J) coefficients, and the UPGMA clustering algorithm. The phylogenetic position of the strains was inferred by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequences. All isolates were Gram-negative, facultatively methylotrophic, oxidase and catalase positive, and required no growth factors. Based on the results of numerical taxonomy, the strains formed four closely related clusters sharing ≥85% similarity. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences demonstrated that oxalotrophic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic strains could be identified as members of the genus Methylobacterium. Except for M. variabile and M. aquaticum, all of the Methylobacterium type strains tested had the ability of oxalate utilization. Our results indicate that the capability of oxalate utilization seems to be an uncommon trait and could be used as a valuable taxonomic criterion for differentiation of Methylobacterium species.

  20. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacteria and plutonium in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, A.E.; Bowen, V.T.

    1978-01-01

    Microbes are important in geochemical cycling of many elements. Recent reports emphasize biogenous particulates and bacterial exometabolites as controlling oceanic distribution of plutonium. Bacteria perform oxidation/reduction reactions on metals such as mercury, nickel, lead, copper, and cadmium. Redox transformations or uptake of Pu by marine bacteria may well proceed by similar mechanisms. Profiles of water samples and sediment cores were obtained along the continental shelf off Nova Scotia and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Profiles of water samples, and sediment cores were obtained. Epifluorescent microscopy was used to view bacteria (from water or sediment) after concentration on membrane filters and staining with acridine orange. Radiochemical analyses measured Pu in sediments and water samples. Studies of 237 Pu uptake used a strain of Leucothrix mucor isolated from a macroalga. Enumeration shows bacteria to range 10 4 to 10 5 cells/ml in seawater or 10 7 to 10 8 cells/gram of sediment. These numbers are related to the levels and distrbution of Pu in the samples. In cultures of L. mucor amended with Pu atom concentrations approximating those present in open ocean environments, bacterial cells concentrated 237 Pu slower and to lower levels than did clay minerals, glass beads, or phytoplankton. These data further clarify the role of marine bacteria in Pu biogeochemistry

  2. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  3. Isolation of Biosurfactant Producing Bacteria from Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    A Tabatabaee, M Mazaheri Assadi, AA Noohi,VA Sajadian

    2005-01-01

    Biosurfactants or surface-active compounds are produced by microoaganisms. These molecules reduce surface tension both aqueous solutions and hydrocarbon mixtures. In this study, isolation and identification of biosurfactant producing bacteria were assessed. The potential application of these bacteria in petroleum industry was investigated. Samples (crude oil) were collected from oil wells and 45 strains were isolated. To confirm the ability of isolates in biosurfactant production, haemolysis ...

  4. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E

    2004-01-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines

  5. Assessment of Antibiotic Resistant Commensal Bacteria in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    mold Penicillium was able to inhibit the growth of some bacteria. (37). In 1928, a Brittish physician Alexander Fleming observed the similar...phenomenon. One of his bacterial plate cultures was contaminated with the blue-green mold Penicillium , and the bacterial colonies in close approximation to...sliced chicken lunchmeat, and the strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp . ART bacteria were isolated sporadically in 32 lunchmeat, which is

  6. Preliminary Study on Bacterial Pathogenic in Grouper Culture and Its Inhibitor Bacteria in Lampung Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hatmanti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of pathogenic bacteria and its inhibitor on grouper culture in some places of Lampung Bay had been carried out. Six strains of pathogenic bacteria and 28 strains of inhibitior bacteria were found in grouper and its habitat.  By inhibition test, 4 strains inhibited pathogenic bacteria were obtained. Inhibition test for Vibrio harveyi had also been performed using a bacterial collection of Marine Microbiology Laboratory of Research Center of Oceanography-LIPI.  The result showed that 3 strains could be used against bacterial infection. This study offers a positive prospect to prevent outbreak of bacterial diseases in grouper culture. Keywords: grouper culture, Lampung, inhibitor bacteria, pathogenic bacteria, inhibition test   ABSTRAK Penelitian penyakit bakterial dan bakteri penghambatnya pada budidaya ikan kerapu di beberapa tempat di perairan Teluk Lampung telah dilakukan. Enam strain bakteri patogen dan 28 strain bakteri penghambat telah berhasil diisolasi dari ikan kerapu dan habitat tempat hidupnya.  Dari hasil uji tantang (inhibition test yang dilakukan, diperoleh 4 strain bakteri penghambat yang mampu menekan pertumbuhan bakteri patogen. Selain itu, uji tantang terhadap bakteri patogen Vibrio harveyi, menggunakan bakteri penghambat koleksi Laboratorium Mikrobiologi Laut Puslit Oseanografi LIPI juga telah dilakukan.  Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa 3 strain bakteri mampu memberikan hambatan terhadap pertumbuhan Vibrio harveyi.  Studi ini memberikan prospek positif terhadap penanggulangan penyakit bakterial pada budidaya ikan kerapu. Kata kunci: budidaya kerapu, Lampung, bakteri penghambat, bakteri patogen, uji tantang

  7. [Isolation and identification of rumen bacteria for cellulolytic enzyme production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihemaiti, Maierhaba; Zhen, Fan; Li, Yuezhong; Aibaidoula, Gulisimayi; Yimit, Wusiman

    2013-05-04

    We screened aerobic bacteria with cellulolytic activity from ruminal fluid of sheep, cattle and camel in Xinjiang. Fresh ruminal fluid was inoculated on sterilized sodium carboxymethylcellulose agar plates. Highly cellulolytic aerobic bacteria were screened out by using Congo red staining and liquid secondary screening culture media. The combination of morphological and biochemical test with 16SrDNA sequence analysis were used to classify the strains. Enzymatic activities of four strains with strong cellulose-decomposing abilities were studied under different culture conditions. Out 84 isolated cellulolytic strains, 40 exhibited strong abilities in decomposing cellulose. They are including 37 Gram-negative isolates and 3 Gram-positive strains. Identification of these 40 strains shows that they belong to 11 species of 6 genera, 16 strains in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, 10 Ochrobactrum, 5 Sphingobacterium, 3 Microbacterium, 3 Paracoccus and 2 Pseudomonas. The results of the enzymatic studies of four strains with strong cellulolytic abilities indicates that the strains have the best enzyme producing property when straw powder was chosen as the carbon source; the pH at 5.5 -6.0 and temperature at 37 degrees C. The strains with highly cellulolytic abilities isolated from ruminal fluid show strong abilities in cellulose decomposition.

  8. [Experimental interaction of halophilic prokaryotes and opportunistic bacteria in brine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, E A; Nemtseva, N V

    2013-01-01

    Study the effect of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on preservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine. 17 strains of moderately halophilic bacteria and 2 strains of extremely halophilic archaea were isolated from continental hypersaline lake Razval of Sol-Iletsk area of Orenburg Region. Identification of pure cultures of prokaryotes was carried out taking into account their phenotype properties and based on determination of 16S RNA gene sequence. The effect of halophilic prokaryote on elimination of Escherichia coli from brine was evaluated during co-cultivation. Antagonistic activity of cell extracts of the studied microorganisms was evaluated by photometric method. A more prolonged preservation of an E. coli strain in brine in the presence of live cells of extremely halophilic archaea Halorubrum tebenquichense and moderately halophilic bacteria Marinococcus halophilus was established. Extracts of cells of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on the contrary displayed antagonistic activity. The protective effect of live cells of halophilic prokaryotes and antagonistic activity of their cell extracts change the period of conservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine that regulates inter-microbial interactions and changes the period of self-purification that reflects the sanitary condition of a hypersaline water body.

  9. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.

    2005-01-01

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  10. Do Bacteria Age?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacteria are thought to be examples of organisms that do not age. They divide by .... carry genetic material to the next generation through the process of reproduction; they are also .... molecules, and modified proteins. This report revealed that ...

  11. Social Behaviour in Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the recipient. • Social behaviours can be categorized according to the fitness ... is actually the flagella of symbiotic spirochete bacteria that helps it to swim around .... Normal population. Responsive switching. (Environmental stress). Stochastic.

  12. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  13. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Raimondi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-type lactobacilli cannot synthesize folate, generally require it for growth, and provide a negative contribution to folate levels in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus plantarum constitutes an exception among lactobacilli, since it is capable of folate production in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA and deserves to be used in animal trials to validate its ability to produce the vitamin in vivo. On the other hand, several folate-producing strains have been selected within the genus Bifidobacterium, with a great variability in the extent of vitamin released in the medium. Most of them belong to the species B. adolescentis and B. pseudocatenulatum, but few folate producing strains are found in the other species as well. Rats fed a probiotic formulation of folate-producing bifidobacteria exhibited increased plasma folate level, confirming that the vitamin is produced in vivo and absorbed. In a human trial, the same supplement raised folate concentration in feces. The use of folate-producing probiotic strains can be regarded as a new perspective in the specific use of probiotics. They could more efficiently confer protection against inflammation and cancer, both exerting the beneficial effects of probiotics and preventing the folate deficiency that is associated with premalignant changes in the colonic epithelia.

  14. Comparison of radiosensitivity of bacteria isolated from given radiation exposure history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.S.; Min, B.H.; Rhee, K.S.

    1974-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to identify and to compare the radiosensitivities of bacteria isolated from the sources of different radiation exposure histories. Among 10 strains isolated in this investigation, 4 strains of bacteria, Bacillus firmus, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus sphaericus were isolated from high- and low-radioactive sites simultaneously. Bacterial strains isolated from radioactive sources such as reactor and isotope production rooms were more resistant to irradiation than the microorganisms from medical products and laboratories, however, there was no significance in radiosensitivity in the same species of bacteria, even if they were isolated from different radiation exposure histories. (author)

  15. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Serrato, Rodrigo V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are...

  16. Anaerobic bacteria in wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyprowski, Marcin; Stobnicka-Kupiec, Agata; Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Anna; Bakal-Kijek, Aleksandra; Gołofit-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Górny, Rafał L

    2018-03-28

    The objective of this study was to assess exposure to anaerobic bacteria released into air from sewage and sludge at workplaces from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Samples of both sewage and sludge were collected at six sampling points and bioaerosol samples were additionally collected (with the use of a 6-stage Andersen impactor) at ten workplaces covering different stages of the technological process. Qualitative identification of all isolated strains was performed using the biochemical API 20A test. Additionally, the determination of Clostridium pathogens was carried out using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The average concentration of anaerobic bacteria in the sewage samples was 5.49 × 10 4 CFU/mL (GSD = 85.4) and in sludge-1.42 × 10 6 CFU/g (GSD = 5.1). In turn, the average airborne bacterial concentration was at the level of 50 CFU/m 3 (GSD = 5.83) and the highest bacterial contamination (4.06 × 10 3  CFU/m 3 ) was found in winter at the bar screens. In total, 16 bacterial species were determined, from which the predominant strains belonged to Actinomyces, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Propionibacterium and Peptostreptococcus genera. The analysis revealed that mechanical treatment processes were responsible for a substantial emission of anaerobic bacteria into the air. In both the sewage and air samples, Clostridium perfringens pathogen was identified. Anaerobic bacteria were widely present both in the sewage and in the air at workplaces from the WWTP, especially when the technological process was performed in closed spaces. Anaerobic bacteria formed small aggregates with both wastewater droplets and dust particles of sewage sludge origin and as such may be responsible for adverse health outcomes in exposed workers.

  17. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  18. Adhesion of some probiotic and dairy Lactobacillus strains to Caco-2 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomola, E M; Salminen, S J

    1998-05-05

    The adhesion of 12 different Lactobacillus strains was studied using Caco-2 cell line as an in vitro model for intestinal epithelium. Some of the strains tested have been used as probiotics, and most of them are used in the dairy and food industry. Human and bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 cell cultures was quantitated using radiolabelled bacteria. The adherence of bacteria was also observed microscopically after Gram staining. Viability of bacteria prior to adhesion was verified using flow cytometry. Among the tested strains, L. casei (Fyos) was the most adhesive strain and L. casei var. rhamnosus (Lactophilus) was the least adhesive strain, approximately 14 and 3% of the added bacteria adhered to Caco-2 cell cultures, respectively. The corresponding values for positive and negative control E. coli strains were 14 and 4%, respectively. The Lactobacillus strains tested could not be divided into distinctly adhesive or non-adhesive strains, since there was a continuation of adhesion rates. The four most adhesive strains were L. casei (Fyos), L. acidophilus 1 (LC1), L. rhamnosus LC-705 and Lactobacillus GG (ATCC 53103). No significant differences in the percentage adhesion were observed between these strains. Adhesion of all the strains was dependent on the number of bacteria used, since an approximately constant number of Caco-2 cells was used, indicating that the Caco-2 cell binding sites were not saturated. Viability of bacteria was high since approximately 90% of the bacteria were viable with the exception of L. acidophilus 1 which was 74% viable. Microscopic evaluations agreed with the radiolabelled binding as evidenced by observing more bacteria in Gram-stained preparations of good adhering strains compared to poorly adhering strains.

  19. Characterization and monitoring of selected rhizobial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... Fax: +66-44-216345. fixing symbiosis with bacteria known as rhizobia. ... Rhizobial strains were cultured on Yeast-Malt extract agar contain- ing bromthymol blue ... Colony form-ing was observed every day as well as the ...

  20. Preliminary characterization of slow growing rhizobial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMPAQ

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... strains had a very slow growth rate in yeast malt (YM) agar medium, forming colonies less than 1 mm in ... dominant genus of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria ... Single colonies were picked up and checked for purity by.

  1. Physiological and genetics studies of highly radiation-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenon of radiation resistance was studied using micrococci and Moraxella-Acinetobacter capable of surviving very high doses of gamma radiation which were isolated from foods. Physiological age, or growth phase, was found to be an important factor in making comparisons of radiation-resistance among different bacteria and their mutants. Radiation-resistant bacteria were highly resistant to the lethal effect of nitrosoguanidine used for mutagenesis. Studies of relative resistance of radiation-resistant bacteria, radiation-sensitive mutants, and nonradiation-resistant bacteria to killing by different chemical mutagens did not reveal a correlation between the traits of radiation resistance and mutagen resistance among different strains. Comparisons of plasmid profiles of radiation-resistant bacteria and selected radiation-sensitive mutants suggested the possibility that plasmids may carry genes involved in radiation resistance

  2. Natural soil reservoirs for human pathogenic and fecal indicator bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiroli, Maria L; Falkinham, Joseph; Favre-Bonte, Sabine; Nazaret, Sylvie; Piveteau, Pascal; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Delaquis, Pascal; Hartmann, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Soils receive inputs of human pathogenic and indicator bacteria through land application of animal manures or sewage sludge, and inputs by wildlife. Soil is an extremely heterogeneous substrate and contains meso- and macrofauna that may be reservoirs for bacteria of human health concern. The ability to detect and quantify bacteria of human health concern is important in risk assessments and in evaluating the efficacy of agricultural soil management practices that are protective of crop quality and protective of adjacent water resources. The present chapter describes the distribution of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in soils. Methods for detecting and quantifying soilborne bacteria including extraction, enrichment using immunomagnetic capture, culturing, molecular detection and deep sequencing of metagenomic DNA to detect pathogens are overviewed. Methods for strain phenotypic and genotypic characterization are presented, as well as how comparison with clinical isolates can inform the potential for human health risk.

  3. Characterization of Eight Kinds of Marine Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H.; Pan, H.; Zhang, W.; Wu, L. F.; Xiao, T.

    2017-12-01

    Eight marine magnetotactic bacteria were isolated from intertidal sediments. Six of them are magnetococci (RO-1, RO-2, RO-3, RO-4, SC-1 and SC-2), and two of them are manetospirilla (SH-1 and HH-1). Strain RO-1, RO-2, RO-3, and RO-4 were from Lake Yuehu, Rongcheng (the Yellow Sea). Strain SC-1, SC-2 and SH-1 were from Sanya (the South China Sea). Strain HH-1 was from Huiquan Bay, Qingdao (the Yellow Sea). Magnetosomes arranged in a disorganized cluster in RO-1 and RO-4, two chains in SC-2, and in one chain in others. All the magnetosome crystals were prismatic magnetites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they all belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria. Strain RO-1, RO-2, RO-3, RO-4, SC-2 and SH-1 are novel cultured magnetotactic bacteria.

  4. Production of Bioethanol From Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.

    2006-01-01

    and xylose and to tolerate the inhibitory compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is therefore apparent. Several thermophilic anaerobic xylan degrading bacteria from our culture collection (EMB group at BioCentrum-DTU) have been screened for a potential ethanol producer from hemicellulose...... hydrolysates, and out of the screening test, one particular strain (A10) was selected for the best performance. The strain was morphologically and physiologically characterized as Thermoanaerobacter mathranii strain A10. Unlike other thermophilic anaerobic bacteria, the wild-type strain Thermoanaerobacter...... Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 was further studied. The experiments were carried out in a continuous immobilized reactor system (a fluidized bed reactor), which is likely to be the process design configuration for xylose fermentation in a Danish biorefinery concept for production of fuel ethanol. The immobilization...

  5. Dual Two-Component Regulatory Systems Are Involved in Aromatic Compound Degradation in a Polychlorinated-Biphenyl Degrader, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Hisashi; Shimodaira, Jun; Yukawa, Kiyoshi; Hara, Naho; Kasai, Daisuke; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Masai, Eiji; Fukuda, Masao

    2010-01-01

    A Gram-positive polychlorinated-biphenyl (PCB) degrader, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, degrades PCBs by cometabolism with biphenyl. A two-component BphS1T1 system encoded by bphS1 and bphT1 (formerly bphS and bphT) is responsible for the transcription induction of the five gene clusters, bphAaAbAcAdC1B1, etbAa1Ab1CbphD1, etbAa2Ab2AcD2, etbAdbphB2, and etbD1, which constitute multiple enzyme systems for biphenyl/PCB degradation. The bphS2 and bphT2 genes, which encode BphS2 and BphT2, virtually ide...

  6. Biodegradation of Endosulfan by Mixed Bacteria Culture Strains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nwokem et al.

    environment through various activities (Qureshi et al., 2009). Pesticide exposure ... Although extensive research on the use of bioremediation as a means of detoxifying ..... Pesticide, Chlorpyrifos.3 Biotechnology.;3:137–142. Kumar, K., Devi ...

  7. Heavy metal resistance by two bacteria strains isolated from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(26), pp. ... College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai, China. ... supplied potential bacterial materials for tailing bioremediation in the future.

  8. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata Epiphytic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Horta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC. Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%, Alteromonas sp. (12.82%, Shewanella sp. (12.26%, Serratia sp. (2.56%, Citricoccus sp. (2.56%, Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%, Ruegeria sp. (2.56% and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%. Six (15.38% of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.. Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  9. Antioxidant and antimicrobial potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, André; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Fino, Nádia; Silva, Joana; Fernandez, Sara; Rodrigues, Américo; Pedrosa, Rui

    2014-03-24

    Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1) extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%), Alteromonas sp. (12.82%), Shewanella sp. (12.26%), Serratia sp. (2.56%), Citricoccus sp. (2.56%), Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%), Ruegeria sp. (2.56%) and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%). Six (15.38%) of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis) was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.). Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  10. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolates from horses in Poland: pVapA characteristics and plasmid new variant, 85-kb type V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Takai, Shinji; Chrobak-Chmiel, Dorota; Kizerwetter-Świda, Magdalena; Feret, Małgorzata; Gawryś, Marta; Witkowski, Maciej; Kita, Jerzy

    2017-01-26

    Rhodococcus equi is one of the most significant bacterial pathogens affecting foals up to 6 months of age worldwide. Rhodococcosis is present in Poland however information about molecular characterization of R. equi isolates is scarce. This study describes molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi infection on 13 horse breeding farms in Poland between 2001 and 2012. Samples were collected by tracheobronchial aspiration from pneumonic foals or during necropsy. The R. equi isolates were genotyped by plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Totally, 58 R. equi isolates were investigated. One isolate lost its plasmid. Among the 57 VapA-positive isolates, 48 contained 85-kb type I plasmid (82.8%), 8 contained 87-kb type I plasmid (13.8%). One isolate (1.7%) had a unique restriction cleavage pattern and the 2nd fragment of EcoRI digests of this plasmid DNA was about 2600 bases smaller than that of the 85 kb type I. This new plasmid variant was designated as the "85-kb type V". Among the 58 isolates typeable with VspI-PFGE, ten PFGE clusters were detected. The majority of foals were infected mostly with isolates of low genetic diversity. Most of clinical isolates of R. equi from foals in Poland contain pVapA 85-kb type I and 87-kb type I similarly to the other European countries and the United States. However, the new variant of pVapA 85-kb type V was identified. The chromosomal variability was detected among some of the investigated isolates and the presence of farm-specific isolates might be possible.

  11. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  12. Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alifano, P.; Tala, A.; Tredici, S. M.; Nassisi, V.; Siciliano, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

  13. [New antibiotics produced by Bacillus subtilis strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanicheva, I A; Kozlov, D G; Efimenko, T A; Zenkova, V A; Kastrukha, G S; Reznikova, M I; Korolev, A M; Borshchevskaia, L N; Tarasova, O D; Sineokiĭ, S P; Efremenkova, O V

    2014-01-01

    Two Bacillus subtilis strains isolated from the fruiting body of a basidiomycete fungus Pholiota squarrosa exhibited a broad range of antibacterial activity, including those against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus INA 00761 (MRSA) and Leuconostoc mes6nteroides VKPM B-4177 resistant to glycopep-> tide antibiotics, as well as antifungal activity. The strains were identified as belonging to the "B. subtilis" com- plex based on their morphological and physiological characteristics, as well as by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments. Both strains (INA 01085 and INA 01086) produced insignificant amounts of polyene antibiotics (hexaen and pentaen, respectively). Strain INA 01086 produced also a cyclic polypeptide antibiotic containing Asp, Gly, Leu, Pro, Tyr, Thr, Trp, and Phe, while the antibiotic of strain INA 01085 contained, apart from these, two unidentified nonproteinaceous amino acids. Both polypeptide antibiotics were new compounds efficient against gram-positive bacteria and able to override the natural bacterial antibiotic resistance.

  14. Metabolic plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2013-05-15

    Isoprenoids are a large family of compounds synthesized by all free-living organisms. In most bacteria, the common precursors of all isoprenoids are produced by the MEP (methylerythritol 4-phosphate) pathway. The MEP pathway is absent from archaea, fungi and animals (including humans), which synthesize their isoprenoid precursors using the completely unrelated MVA (mevalonate) pathway. Because the MEP pathway is essential in most bacterial pathogens (as well as in the malaria parasites), it has been proposed as a promising new target for the development of novel anti-infective agents. However, bacteria show a remarkable plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis that should be taken into account when targeting this metabolic pathway for the development of new antibiotics. For example, a few bacteria use the MVA pathway instead of the MEP pathway, whereas others possess the two full pathways, and some parasitic strains lack both the MVA and the MEP pathways (probably because they obtain their isoprenoids from host cells). Moreover, alternative enzymes and metabolic intermediates to those of the canonical MVA or MEP pathways exist in some organisms. Recent work has also shown that resistance to a block of the first steps of the MEP pathway can easily be developed because several enzymes unrelated to isoprenoid biosynthesis can produce pathway intermediates upon spontaneous mutations. In the present review, we discuss the major advances in our knowledge of the biochemical toolbox exploited by bacteria to synthesize the universal precursors for their essential isoprenoids.

  15. APPLICATION OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA AND RHODOCOCCUS SP. BY BIODEGRADATION OF PAH(S, PCB(S AND NEL SOIL SAMPLES FROM THE HAZARDOUS WASTE DUMP IN POZĎÁTKY (CZECH REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Kucerova

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the project was a laboratory check of biodegradation of soil samples contaminated by PAH(s, PCB(s and NEL from the hazardous waste dump in the Pozďátky locality. For the laboratory check, pure bacterial cultures of Rhodococcus sp. and Pseudomonas putida have been used. It is apparent from the laboratory experiments results that after one-month bacterial leaching, applying the bacterium of Rhodococcus sp. there is a 83 % removal of NEL, a 79 % removal of PAH(s and a 14 % removal of PCB(s. Applying a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida there is a 87 % removal of NEL, a 81 % removal of PAH(s and a 14 % removal of PCB(s.

  16. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic

  17. Response of planktonic bacteria of New Calabar River to zinc stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Response of planktonic bacteria of New Calabar River to zinc stress. ... The result of the in vitro study indicated that the bacterial strains are sensitive to Zn2+ stress. Therefore, Zn2+ contamination would ... Featuring journals from 32 Countries:.

  18. Bacteria abundance and diversity of different life stages of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), revealed by bacteria culture-dependent and PCR-DGGE methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Li; Pan, Qin-Jian; Tian, Hong-Gang; Douglas, Angela E; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2015-03-01

    Microbial abundance and diversity of different life stages (fourth instar larvae, pupae and adults) of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L., collected from field and reared in laboratory, were investigated using bacteria culture-dependent method and PCR-DGGE analysis based on the sequence of bacteria 16S rRNA V3 region gene. A large quantity of bacteria was found in all life stages of P. xylostella. Field population had higher quantity of bacteria than laboratory population, and larval gut had higher quantity than pupae and adults. Culturable bacteria differed in different life stages of P. xylostella. Twenty-five different bacterial strains were identified in total, among them 20 strains were presented in larval gut, only 8 strains in pupae and 14 strains in adults were detected. Firmicutes bacteria, Bacillus sp., were the most dominant species in every life stage. 15 distinct bands were obtained from DGGE electrophoresis gel. The sequences blasted in GenBank database showed these bacteria belonged to six different genera. Phylogenetic analysis showed the sequences of the bacteria belonged to the Actinobacteri, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Serratia sp. in Proteobacteria was the most abundant species in larval gut. In pupae, unculturable bacteria were the most dominant species, and unculturable bacteria and Serratia sp. were the most dominant species in adults. Our study suggested that a combination of molecular and traditional culturing methods can be effectively used to analyze and to determine the diversity of gut microflora. These known bacteria may play important roles in development of P. xylostella. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. [Characteristics of Lactobacillus strains contained in pharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, W; Bucholc, B; Wójcik, B

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which are components of drugs administered orally in cases of intestinal disturbances, or antibiotic--related diarrhea. Biochemical properties, growth behavior, bile tolerance, and survival at low pH of six LAB strains (four strains L. rhamnosus and two L. acidophilus) were studied. The survival at low pH was determined in MRS broth (Difco) acidified to pH 1; 2; 3; and 4. Bile tolerance was tested on MRS broth with 0.3% oxgall (Difco). Between tested strains differences in ability to grow at low pH and survival in bile were observed. Only 0.01% inoculum of all examined strains survived at pH 1. Differences between strains in survival at low pH (pH 2 and pH 3) and tolerance of bile were observed. However, after 2 h incubation at pH 4, 100% of strains stayed alive. Examined strains demonstrated good 3% bile tolerance. All strains met the criteria for probiotic strains: ability to survive at pH 3 and in the presence of bile.

  20. Amerindian Helicobacter pylori strains go extinct, as european strains expand their host range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G Domínguez-Bello

    Full Text Available We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori strains would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes of 131 strains: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all strains that had been cultured from Africans were African strains (hpAfrica1, all from Spanish were European (hpEurope and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed strains: hspAmerind and hpEurope strains had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori strains were hspAmerind. Strains hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination. The lower genetic structure in hpEurope strains is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian strains might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian strains may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts.

  1. Amylase activity of a starch degrading bacteria isolated from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Starch degrading bacteria are most important for industries such as food, fermentation, textile and paper. Thus isolating and manipulating pure culture from various waste materials has manifold importance for various biotechnology industries. In the present investigation a bacterial strain was isolated from soil sample ...

  2. Isolation and screening of lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In aquaculture probiotic feeding could play a crucial role in developing microbial control strategies, since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and the fear of antibiotic resistance. In this study, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains from the intestinal tissue of African catfish Clarias ...

  3. Identification of exopolysaccharides-producing lactic acid bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spacer region between 16S and 23 S rRNA genes of thirteen lactic acid bacteria strains from Burkina Faso fermented milk samples were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Streptococcus thermophilus, Pediococcus spp, ...

  4. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning; Spillum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    in systems relying on colorimetry or turbidometry (such as Vitek-2, Phoenix, MicroScan WalkAway). The objective was to examine an automated image analysis algorithm for quantification of filamentous bacteria using the 3D digital microscopy imaging system, oCelloScope. Results Three E. coli strains displaying...

  5. Psychrotrophic bacteria isolated from -20°C freezer | Ahmad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three psychrotrophic bacteria, morpho-physiologically, identified as Bacillus subtilis MRLBA7, Bacillus licheniformis MRLBA8 and Bacillus megaterium MRLBA9 were isolated from -20°C freezer of the Microbiology Research Laboratory (MRL), Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan. These strains were able to grow ...

  6. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS...

  7. Effect of low-frequency magnetic fields on bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strašák, Luděk; Fojt, Lukáš; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2006), s. 170 ISSN 0006-9248. [XXIX. Dni Lekárskej Biofyziky. 16.05.2006-18.05.2006, Bratislava] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : magnetic field * bacteria * strain Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Antimicrobial properties of probiotic bacteria from various sources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The probiotic potentials of lactic acid bacteria species isolated from various food sources (nono, ugba, ogiri, kunun-zaki and ogi) were studied. The predominant species among the isolated strains were Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Streptococcus ...

  9. Differentiation studies of predominant lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve isolates known as weakly amylolytic lactic acid bacteria were isolated from different time during growol fermentation, a cassava based product from Indonesia. Differentiation tests of these strains were performed using molecular and phenotypic characterization. 16S subunit of the ribosomal RNA and phenylalanyl ...

  10. Natural occurrence and pathogenicity of Xanthomonas bacteria on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to verify the presence of Xanthomonas bacteria on plants growing in and around enset gardens in South and Southwest Ethiopia, and to elucidate the pathogenicity of Xcm strains to cultivated and wild plants. Several economical and ornamental plants were assessed for wilting in South and ...

  11. Isolation of naphthalene-degrading bacteria from tropical marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W.-Q.; Tay, J.-H.; Maszenan, A.M.; Tay, S.T.-L.

    2003-01-01

    Oil pollution is a major environmental concern in many countries, and this has led to a concerted effort in studying the feasibility of using oil-degrading bacteria for bioremediation. Although many oil-degrading bacteria have been isolated from different environments, environmental conditions can impose a selection pressure on the types of bacteria that can reside in a particular environment. This study reports the successful isolation of two indigenous naphthalene-degrading bacteria from oil-contaminated tropical marine sediments by enrichment culture. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 were characterized using an extensive range of biochemical tests. The 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) sequence analysis was also performed for the two strains. Their naphthalene degradation capabilities were determined using gas chromatography and DAPI counting of bacterial cells. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 are phenotypically and phylogenetically different from each other, and belong to the genera Staphylococcus and Micrococcus, respectively. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 has maximal specific growth rates (μ max ) of 0.082±0.008 and 0.30±0.02 per hour, respectively, and half-saturation constants (K s ) of 0.79±0.10 and 2.52±0.32 mg per litre, respectively. These physiological and growth studies are useful in assessing the potential of these indigenous isolates for in situ or ex situ naphthalene pollutant bioremediation in tropical marine environments. (author)

  12. In vitro screening of soil bacteria for inhibiting phytopathogenic fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At present, the greatest interest resides with the development and application of specific biocontrol agent for the control of diseases on plant and this form the focus of this work. Several soil bacteria were evaluated in vitro for their effectiveness on the basis of their ability to suppress fungi in plate inhibition assays. 51 strains ...

  13. Repressive efficacy of lactic acid bacteria against the human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) namely Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIM 2287, Lactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2085, Lactobacillus helveticus NCIM 2126 and Lactococcus lactis NCIM 2114 were procured from the National Chemical Laboratory (NCL) Pune, India. These LAB cells were individually (107 cfu/ml) ...

  14. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Algerian arid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity and density of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Algerian raw goats\\' milk in arid zones were studied by determination of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics. 206 lactic acid bacterial strains were isolated, with 115 of them belonging to lactic acid cocci and others to the genus, ...

  15. Screening of bacteria for antagonistic activity against phytopathogens of avocados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria and fungi were isolated from the bark of the avocado tree (Persea americana) located in southern Florida. The bacterial strains were subsequently assayed for antagonism activity against Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt in avocados. The screen identified no isolates that ...

  16. How Fitness Reduced, Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria Survive and Spread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    More than 30% of E. coli strains sampled from pig farms in Denmark over the last five years were resistant to the commonly used antimicrobial tetracycline. This raises a number of questions: How is this high level sustained if resistant bacteria have reduced growth rates? Given that there are mul...

  17. Molecular diversity of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Pasinler hot spring (Erzurum, Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    ADIGÜZEL, Ahmet; İNAN, Kadriye; ŞAHİN, Fikrettin; ARASOĞLU, Tulin; GÜLLÜCE, Medine

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Pasinler hot spring, Erzurum, Turkey. Fatty acid profiles, BOX PCR fingerprints, and 16S rDNA sequence data were used for the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of thermophilic bacteria. Totally 9 different bacterial strains were selected based on morphological, physiological, and biochemical tests. These strains were characterized by molecular tests includi...

  18. Computation by Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    that under well-sturred but stressed conditions the “cheater” strain will replace the wild-type strain. Does the same extinction process occur in a...increased by cohabitation, extinction does NOT occur! This can be seen most dramatically in Fig. 1, which shows how the “cooper- ators” and “cheaters” (a...Bacterial Computation III: Solving the Problems of Topological Forcing Fly traps and bee escapes have been used historically for clearing buildings of

  19. Interaction of bacteria-feeding soil flagellates and Pseudomonas spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Ekelund, Flemming; Johansen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas strains may be used as alternatives to fungicides as some of them produce secondary metabolites, which can inhibit growth of plant pathogenic fungi. Increased knowledge of non-target effects of the antagonistic bacteria on other soil organisms as well as of the survival and predation...... resistance of the antagonistic bacteria is necessary for risk assessment and increased performance of antagonistic bacteria as biological control agents. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the difference between Pseudomonas spp. with respect to their predation resistance to and effects...... on the three different and common soil flagellates Bodo caudatus, Cercomonas longicauda, and Neocercomonas jutlandica. Two antagonistic Pseudomonas: Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and P. fluorescens DR54 and two positive control strains: P. fluorescens DSM 50090T and Pseudomonas chlororaphis ATCC 43928 were...

  20. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on periodontopathic and cariogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Oh, Jong-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Lee, Seok-Woo; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Choi, Nam-Ki; Kim, Seon-Mi

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between Lactobacillus reuteri, a probiotic bacterium, and oral pathogenic bacteria have not been studied adequately. This study examined the effects of L. reuteri on the proliferation of periodontopathic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia, and on the formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Human-derived L. reuteri strains (KCTC 3594 and KCTC 3678) and rat-derived L. reuteri KCTC 3679 were used. All strains exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the growth of periodontopathic bacteria and the formation of S. mutans biofilms. These antibacterial activities of L. reuteri were attributed to the production of organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, and a bacteriocin-like compound. Reuterin, an antimicrobial factor, was produced only by L. reuteri KCTC 3594. In addition, L. reuteri inhibited the production of methyl mercaptan by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis. Overall, these results suggest that L. reuteri may be useful as a probiotic agent for improving oral health.