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Sample records for bacteria rhodobacter sphaeroides

  1. Skin Anti-Aging Activities of Bacteriochlorophyll a from Photosynthetic Bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Young; Yim, Tae Bin; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the anti-aging skin effects of bacteriochlorophyll a isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides are first reported, with notably low cytotoxicity in the range of 1% to 14% in adding 0.00078 (% (w/w)) of the extracts, compared with the normal growth of both human dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte cells without any treatment as a control. The highest production of procollagen from human fibroblast cells (CCD-986sk) was observed as 221.7 ng/ml with 0.001 (% (w/w)) of bacteriochlorophyll a, whereas 150 and 200 ng/ml of procollagen production resulted from addition of 0.001 (% (w/w)) of the photosynthetic bacteria. The bacteriochlorophylla- induced TNF-α production increased to 63.8%, which was lower secretion from HaCaT cells than that from addition of 0.00005 (% (w/w)) of bacteriochlorophyll a. Additionally, bacteriochlorophyll a upregulated the expression of genes related to skin anti-aging (i.e., keratin 10, involucrin, transglutaminase-1, and MMPs), by up to 4-15 times those of the control. However, crude extracts from R. sphaeroides did not enhance the expression level of these genes. Bacteriochlorophyll a showed higher antioxidant activity of 63.8% in DPPH free radical scavenging than those of water, ethanol, and 70% ethanol extracts (14.0%, 57.2%, and 12.6%, respectively). It was also shown that the high antioxidant activity could be attributed to the skin anti-aging effect of bacteriochlorophyll a, although R. sphaeroides itself would not exhibit significant anti-aging activities.

  2. In vitro assessment of gastrointestinal viability of two photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the potential of two photosynthetic bacteria (PSB), Rhodopseudomonas palustris HZ0301 and Rhodobacter sphaeroides HZ0302, as probiotics in aquaculture. The viability of HZ0301 and HZ0302 in simulated gastric transit conditions (pH 2.0, pH 3.0 and pH 4.0 gastric juices) and in simulated small intestinal transit conditions (pH 8.0, with or without 0.3% bile salts) was tested. The effects of HZ0301 and HZ0302 on the viability and permeability of intestinal epithelial cell in primary culture of tilapias, Oreochromis nilotica, were also detected. All the treatments were determined with three replicates. The simulated gastric transit tolerance of HZ0301 and HZ0302 strains was pH-dependent and correspondingly showed lower viability at pH 2.0 after 180 min compared with pH 3.0 and pH 4.0. Both HZ0301 and HZ0302 were tolerant to simulated small intestine transit with or without bile salts in our research. Moreover, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) among three treatments including the control and the groups treated with HZ0301 or HZ0302 both in intestinal epithelial cell viability and membrane permeability, showing no cell damage. In summary, this study demonstrated that HZ0301 and HZ0302 had high capacity of upper gastrointestinal transit tolerance and were relatively safe for intestinal epithelial cells of tilapias.

  3. Transient grating spectroscopy in photosynthetic purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugisaki, Mitsuru, E-mail: mitsuru@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST-JST and Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fujiwara, Masazumi; Fujii, Ritsuko [CREST-JST and Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nakagawa, Katsunori; Nango, Mamoru [CREST-JST and Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, IBLS, University of Glasgow, 126 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, Hideki [CREST-JST and Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The vibronic coherence of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes has been investigated by means of transient grating spectroscopy using sub 20 fs optical pulses. In the present work, we focus our attention on the LH2 antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 because the information about their structure investigated by the electron and atomic force microscopy is available and the electric levels of pigments are well resolved, resulting in clear absorption spectrum. The vibronic coherent oscillations with a period of a few tens of femtoseconds have been clearly observed. We found that the temporal change of the coherent oscillations reflects the vibrational relaxation in the ground state. Calculations based on the Brownian oscillator model were performed under the impulsive excitation limit. The spectral density has been determined from the Raman measurement of spheroidene. Good agreement between the calculation and the experimental results has been achieved in the linear absorption spectrum and transient grating signal, which strongly supports the validity of our model.

  4. The architecture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Simon; Nevo, Reinat; Liu, Lu-Ning; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Charuvi, Dana; Boudier, Thomas; Prima, Valerie; Hubert, Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Reich, Ziv

    2014-08-01

    The chromatophores of Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides represent a minimal bio-energetic system, which efficiently converts light energy into usable chemical energy. Despite extensive studies, several issues pertaining to the morphology and molecular architecture of this elemental energy conversion system remain controversial or unknown. To tackle these issues, we combined electron microscope tomography, immuno-electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We found that the intracellular Rb. sphaeroides chromatophores form a continuous reticulum rather than existing as discrete vesicles. We also found that the cytochrome bc1 complex localizes to fragile chromatophore regions, which most likely constitute the tubular structures that interconnect the vesicles in the reticulum. In contrast, the peripheral light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) is preferentially hexagonally packed within the convex vesicular regions of the membrane network. Based on these observations, we propose that the bc1 complexes are in the inter-vesicular regions and surrounded by reaction center (RC) core complexes, which in turn are bounded by arrays of peripheral antenna complexes. This arrangement affords rapid cycling of electrons between the core and bc1 complexes while maintaining efficient excitation energy transfer from LH2 domains to the RCs.

  5. A KDP-LIKE, HIGH-AFFINITY, K+-TRANSLOCATING ATPASE IS EXPRESSED DURING GROWTH OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES IN LOW POTASSIUM MEDIA - DISTRIBUTION OF THIS K+-ATPASE AMONG PURPLE NONSULFUR PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ABEE, T; HELLINGWERF, KJ; BAKKER, EP; SIEBERS, A; KONINGS, WN

    1992-01-01

    Cells of the purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides express a high-affinity K+ uptake system when grown in media with low K+ concentrations. Antibodies against the catalytic KdpB protein or the whole KdpABC complex of Escherichia coli cross-react with a 70.0 kDa R. sphaeroides protein

  6. Bioremediation of lead contaminated soil with Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Weihua; Jia, Yingying; Lu, Lin; Fan, Wenhong

    2016-08-01

    Bioremediation with microorganisms is a promising technique for heavy metal contaminated soil. Rhodobacter sphaeroides was previously isolated from oil field injection water and used for bioremediation of lead (Pb) contaminated soil in the present study. Based on the investigation of the optimum culturing conditions and the tolerance to Pb, we employed the microorganism for the remediation of Pb contaminated soil simulated at different contamination levels. It was found that the optimum temperature, pH, and inoculum size for R. sphaeroides is 30-35 °C, 7, and 2 × 10(8) mL(-1), respectively. Rhodobacter sphaeroides did not remove the Pb from soil but did change its speciation. During the bioremediation process, more available fractions were transformed to less accessible and inert fractions; in particular, the exchangeable phase was dramatically decreased while the residual phase was substantially increased. A wheat seedling growing experiment showed that Pb phytoavailability was reduced in amended soils. Results inferred that the main mechanism by which R. sphaeroides treats Pb contaminated soil is the precipitation formation of inert compounds, including lead sulfate and lead sulfide. Although the Pb bioremediation efficiency on wheat was not very high (14.78% root and 24.01% in leaf), R. sphaeroides remains a promising alternative for Pb remediation in contaminated soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation, Identification of Bacillus Thuringiensis/Cereus and Its Enhancement on Protein Wastewater Treatment by Rhodobacter Sphaeroides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuli Liu; Guangming Zhang; Jie Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In order to enhance the degrading protein capability of purple non⁃sulfur bacteria ( PNSB), an effective strain, L2, was used to co⁃culture with Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC17023. The effects of added strain on protein removal of R. sphaeroides were investigated. Results showed that strain L2, being identified as Bacillus thuringiensis/cereus, had a high potential for producing protease with a production of 295 U/mL. The optimal B. thuringiensis/cereus ( 40 μL ) could significantly increase protein degradation of R. sphaeroides. Protein removal and biomass production were improved by 483% and 67%, respectively. R. sphaeroides/total biomass production was more than 95%. Theoretical analysis revealed that R. sphaeroides syntrophically interacted with B. thuringiensis/cereus. Protein degradation of B. thuringiensis/cereus provided small molecule substrates ( VFAs) for R. sphaeroides growth and cells materials synthesis.

  8. Gene co-expression network analysis in Rhodobacter capsulatus and application to comparative expression analysis of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Castillo, Lourdes; Mercer, Ryan; Gurinovich, Anastasia; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.; Westbye, Alexander; Beatty, J. T.; Lang, Andrew S.

    2014-08-28

    The genus Rhodobacter contains purple nonsulfur bacteria found mostly in freshwater environments. Representative strains of two Rhodobacter species, R. capsulatus and R. sphaeroides, have had their genomes fully sequenced and both have been the subject of transcriptional profiling studies. Gene co-expression networks can be used to identify modules of genes with similar expression profiles. Functional analysis of gene modules can then associate co-expressed genes with biological pathways, and network statistics can determine the degree of module preservation in related networks. In this paper, we constructed an R. capsulatus gene co-expression network, performed functional analysis of identified gene modules, and investigated preservation of these modules in R. capsulatus proteomics data and in R. sphaeroides transcriptomics data. Results: The analysis identified 40 gene co-expression modules in R. capsulatus. Investigation of the module gene contents and expression profiles revealed patterns that were validated based on previous studies supporting the biological relevance of these modules. We identified two R. capsulatus gene modules preserved in the protein abundance data. We also identified several gene modules preserved between both Rhodobacter species, which indicate that these cellular processes are conserved between the species and are candidates for functional information transfer between species. Many gene modules were non-preserved, providing insight into processes that differentiate the two species. In addition, using Local Network Similarity (LNS), a recently proposed metric for expression divergence, we assessed the expression conservation of between-species pairs of orthologs, and within-species gene-protein expression profiles. Conclusions: Our analyses provide new sources of information for functional annotation in R. capsulatus because uncharacterized genes in modules are now connected with groups of genes that constitute a joint functional

  9. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 under intense irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krujatz, Felix; Härtel, Paul; Helbig, Karsten; Haufe, Nora; Thierfelder, Simone; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal hydrogen production conditions using growing cultures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 the effects of varying the reactor's volumetric power input (0.01-1.4kWm(-3)) and irradiation intensity (5-2500Wm(-2)) were investigated in batch and continuous production modes. Irradiation intensity had a greater effect on hydrogen production than volumetric power input. Hydrogen production and photofermentative biomass formation were maximized by irradiation at 2250Wm(-2) with a volumetric power input of 0.55kWm(-3). The bacterial dry weight (2.64gL(-1)) and rate of hydrogen production (195mLL(-1)h(-1)) achieved under these conditions were greater than any that have previously been reported for batch-mode hydrogen production by R. sphaeroides. Continuous mode experiments (D=0.1h(-1)) yielded a bacterial dry weight, hydrogen production rate, productivity and hydrogen yield of 2.35±0.18gL(-1), 165±6.2mLL(-1)h(-1), 3.96LL(-1)d(-1) and 36.6%, respectively.

  10. Effect of changes in the composition of cellular fatty acids on membrane fluidity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui-Jin; Lee, Jeong K

    2015-02-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition is important for metabolic plasticity in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We explored the effects of changing the cellular ratio of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) to saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in R. sphaeroides by overexpressing several key fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes through the use of expression plasmid pRK415. Bacteria containing the plasmid pRKfabI1 with the fabI1 gene that encodes enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase showed a reduction in the cellular UFA to SFA ratio from 4 (80% UFA) to 2 (65% UFA) and had decreased membrane fluidity and reduced cell growth. Additionally, the ratio of UFA to SFA of the chromatophore vesicles from pRKfabI1 -containing cells was similarly lowered, and the cell had decreased levels of light-harvesting complexes, but no change in intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) content or photosynthetic (PS) gene expression. Both inhibition of enoyl- ACP reductase with diazaborine and addition of exogenous UFA restored membrane fluidity, cell growth, and the UFA to SFA ratio to wild-type levels in this strain. R. sphaeroides containing the pRKfabB plasmid with the fabB gene that encodes the enzyme β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase I exhibited an increased UFA to SFA ratio from 4 (80% UFA) to 9 (90% UFA), but showed no change in membrane fluidity or growth rate relative to control cells. Thus, membrane fluidity in R. sphaeroides remains fairly unchanged when membrane UFA levels are between 80% and 90%, whereas membrane fluidity, cell growth, and cellular composition are affected when UFA levels are below 80%.

  11. Kinetics of biological hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koku, Harun; Eroglu, I. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Gunduz, U.; Yucel, M. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biology; Turker, L. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2003-04-01

    The kinetics and the effects of various parameters on hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001 were investigated in a batch column photobioreactor. In particular, the effect of the inoculum age and the implementation of a light-dark cycle illumination scheme for emulating natural sunlight have been investigated in detail. The possibility of using yeast extract to replace the rather expensive vitamin mixture in the medium was also studied. The results show that hydrogen production is decreased when the initially inoculated bacteria have a high culture age. Exposure of the bacterial culture to light-dark cycles increased the amount of hydrogen compared to continuous illumination, all other parameters remaining the same. Similarly, the use of yeast extract to replace the vitamins increased the growth and hydrogen production rates, however, with a slight reduction in the total amount of gas produced and the hydrogen fraction in the evolved gas. (Author)

  12. Phosphoribulokinase mediates nitrogenase-induced carbon dioxide fixation gene repression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    In many organisms there is a balance between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. These observations extend to the nitrogen-fixing, nonsulfur purple bacteria, which have the classic family of P(II) regulators that coordinate signals of carbon and nitrogen status to regulate nitrogen metabolism. Curiously, these organisms also possess a reverse mechanism to regulate carbon metabolism based on cellular nitrogen status. In this work, studies in Rhodobacter sphaeroides firmly established that the activity of the enzyme that catalyses nitrogen fixation, nitrogenase, induces a signal that leads to repression of genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway. Additionally, genetic and metabolomic experiments revealed that NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase is an intermediate in the signalling pathway. Thus, nitrogenase activity appears to be linked to cbb gene repression through phosphoribulokinase. PMID:26306848

  13. SPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF THE ELECTROCHROMICALLY ACTIVE CAROTENOIDS OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES IN CHROMATOPHORES AND RECONSTITUTED LIPOSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CRIELAARD, W; VANMOURIK, F; VANGRONDELLE, R; KONINGS, WN; HELLINGWERF, KJ

    1992-01-01

    Reaction centers with both light harvesting complexes I and II (B875 and B800/850; i.e., RCLH(I)LH(II) complexes) have been isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. These complexes have been incorporated into liposomes made from lipids purified from Escherichia coli. The electrochromic bandshift of ca

  14. Hydrogen production by co-cultures of Lactobacillus and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro [Department of General Education, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Tokumoto, Masaru; Aihara, Yasuyuki; Oku, Masayo; Kohno, Hideki [Department of Applied Molecular Chemistry, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Izumi-cho, Chiba 275-8575 (Japan); Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun [Research Institute for Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Nakoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Tomiyama, Masamitsu [Genetic Diversity Department, National Institute of Agrobiological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC13953, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. Glucose was converted to hydrogen gas in a yield of 7.1mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions. (author)

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF A BINDING PROTEIN-DEPENDENT GLUTAMATE TRANSPORT-SYSTEM OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (K-t of 1.2 mu M), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein wa

  16. Characterization of a Binding Protein-Dependent Glutamate Transport System of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (Kt of 1.2 µM), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein was i

  17. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  18. The Rhodobacter sphaeroides flagellar motor is a variable-speed rotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, H L; Lawther, H; Armitage, J P

    1997-06-02

    The rotation rate of the unidirectional stop/start motor of Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using computerised motion analysis of tethered cells. The R. sphaeroides motor was found to have a variable rotation rate compared to the virtually constant-speed motor of wild-type and CheR mutant (smooth swimming) Escherichia coli. In addition, the dynamics of the R. sphaeroides motor during stopping was analysed with no consistent correlation behaviour. The motor could go from full rotation to stop, or stop to full rotation within one video frame, i.e. 0.02 s, but it could also slow down into a stop or restart slowly, taking up to 0.25 s. The R. sphaeroides motor under chemokinetic stimulation was also analysed and was found to show increased torque generation and reduced variation in rotation rate.

  19. Color-Sensitive Motility and Methanol Release Responses in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    OpenAIRE

    Kort, Remco; Crielaard, Wim; Spudich, John L.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2000-01-01

    Blue-light-induced repellent and demethylation responses, characteristic of behavioral adaptation, were observed in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. They were analyzed by computer-assisted motion analysis and through the release of volatile tritiated compounds from [methyl-3H]methionine-labeled cells, respectively. Increases in the stop frequency and the rate of methanol release were induced by exposure of cells to repellent light signals, such as an increase in blue- and a decrease in infrared-light...

  20. Feasibility of biohydrogen production from tofu wastewater with glutamine auxotrophic mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, G.H.; Wang, L.; Kang, Z.H. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, 1239 Siping road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2010-12-15

    NH{sub 4}{sup +}, which is normally the integrant in organic wastewater, such as Tofu wastewater, is an inhibitor to hydrogen production by anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium. In order to release inhibition of NH{sub 4}{sup +} to biohydrogen generation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a glutamine auxotrophic mutant R. sphaeroides TJ-0803 was obtained by mutagenizing with ethyl methane sulfonate. The mutant could generate biohydrogen efficiently in the medium with high NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration, because the inhibition of NH{sub 4}{sup +} to nitrogenase was released. Under suitable conditions, TJ-0803 could effectively produce biohydrogen from tofu wastewater, which commonly containing 50-60 mg L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and the generation rate was increased by more than 100% compared with that from wild-type R. sphaeroides. (author)

  1. The Extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Inhibits Melanogenesis through the MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hsun Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing hyperpigmentation has been a big issue for years. Even though pigmentation is a normal mechanism protecting skin from UV-causing DNA damage and oxidative stress, it is still an aesthetic problem for many people. Bacteria can produce some compounds in response to their environment. These compounds are widely used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. Some probiotics have immunomodulatory activities and modulate the symptoms of several diseases. Previously, we found that the extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Lycogen™ inhibited nitric oxide production and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression in activated macrophages. In this study, we sought to investigate an anti-melanogenic signaling pathway in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH-treated B16F10 melanoma cells and zebrafish. Treatment with Lycogen™ inhibited the cellular melanin contents and expression of melanogenesis-related protein, including microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF and tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Moreover, Lycogen™ reduced phosphorylation of MEK/ERK without affecting phosphorylation of p38. Meanwhile, Lycogen™ decreased zebrafish melanin expression in a dose-dependent manner. These findings establish Lycogen™ as a new target in melanogenesis and suggest a mechanism of action through the ERK signaling pathway. Our results suggested that Lycogen™ may have potential cosmetic usage in the future.

  2. Oxygen-insensitive synthesis of the photosynthetic membranes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: a mutant histidine kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Eraso, J M; Kaplan, S

    1995-01-01

    Two new loci, prrB and prrC, involved in the positive regulation of photosynthesis gene expression in response to anaerobiosis, have been identified in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. prrB encodes a sensor histidine kinase that is responsive to the removal of oxygen and functions through the response regulator PrrA. Inactivation of prrB results in a substantial reduction of photosynthetic spectral complexes as well as in the inability of cells to grow photosynthetically at low to medium light intens...

  3. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  4. Transient grating spectroscopy and the calorimetry of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Micah John

    2001-07-01

    Enormous numbers and varieties of experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanisms of photosynthesis. Within the last twenty years, a host of new studies were enabled by the techniques of ultrafast laser spectroscopy. This work continues to explore the exchange of energy on the picosecond and even the femtosecond regime. Yet in even the relatively simple and determined structure of the photosynthetic centers in the bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the mechanisms and energetics are unclear. The early events in photosynthesis allow energy trapping through resonance energy transfer and charge separation, in what appears to be a mixture of classical and quantum mechanical motion with strong interactions with the surrounding environment. The technique of transient thermal grating spectroscopy offers unique insight into the mechanisms of energy relaxation in photosynthesis. A pair of laser pulse are tuned to the excitation wavelength and crossed inside the sample. The resulting pattern of interference drives excitation and the subsequent relaxation forms a density grating which diffracts a time-delayed third beam. Thus the energies and the rates of motion may be discerned. The peripheral light harvesting antenna (LH2) is composed of polypeptides that coordinate rings of bacteriochlorophyll. Upon excitation, energy migrates around the ring until intra-ring transfer may take place. Samples of LH2 were purified and studied. While characteristic times of energy release were determined, a volume change due to solvent interaction was found as well. In the membrane spanning protein known as the reaction center, the energy of the light harvesting rings is ultimately transferred to a pair of chlorophyll. From here, the energy is localized onto an electron, which rapidly (picoseconds) transfers to other active pigments. Samples of wild-type and the mutated (M)214H reaction centers were purified and examined. By studying the temperature dependence of the signals, the

  5. Experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 49419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberoglu, Halil; Pilon, Laurent [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of this study is to experimentally measure the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing microorganisms. Special attention is paid to the filamentous cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U and the unicellular purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 49419 two of the widely studied photobiological hydrogen producers. The extinction and absorption coefficients are measured in the spectral range from 300 to 1300 nm using a spectrophotometer with and without an integrating sphere. Moreover, a nephelometer has been constructed to measure the scattering phase function of the microorganisms at 632.8 nm. The data are used to recover the mass specific absorption, scattering, and extinction cross-sections, the single scattering albedo, and the scattering phase function of the microorganisms. The scattering phase functions of both microorganisms were peaked strongly in the forward direction as expected from their size parameter and shape. The results reported in this study can be used with the radiative transport equation (RTE) to accurately predict and optimize light transport in photobioreactors for photobiological hydrogen production. Finally, the results show that absorption cross-sections of A. variabilis and R. sphaeroides have peaks that do not overlap but rather enlarge the spectral width of the absorption cross-section of a potential symbiotic culture promising more efficient utilization of solar radiation from light transfer point of view. (author)

  6. Effect of Photo-Oxidation on Energy Transfer in Light Harvesting Complex (LH2) from Rhodobacter Sphaeroides 601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kang-Jun; LIU Wei-Min; YAN Yong-Li; DONG Zhi-Wei; LIU Yuan; XU Chun-He; QIAN Shi-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the photo-oxidation of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) in peripheral light harvesting complexes (LH2) from rhodobacter sphaeroides by using the steady absorption and the femtosecond pump-probe measurement, to realize the detailed dynamics of LH2 in the presence of photo-oxidation.

  7. Glutamate transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is mediated by a novel binding protein-dependent secondary transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; Heide, Tiemen van der; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on glutamate as sole carbon and nitrogen source can be restored by the addition of millimolar amounts of Na+. Uptake of glutamate (Kt of 0.2 µM) by the mutant strictly requires Na+ (Km of 25 mM) and is inhibited by

  8. Transient dynamic phenotypes as criteria for model discrimination: fold-change detection in Rhodobacter sphaeroides chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Ingalls, Brian; Sontag, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides shares many similarities with that of Escherichia coli. It exhibits robust adaptation and has several homologues of the latter's chemotaxis proteins. Recent theoretical results have correctly predicted that the E. coli output behaviour is unchanged under scaling of its ligand input signal; this property is known as fold-change detection (FCD). In the light of recent experimental results suggesting that R. sphaeroides may also show FCD, we present theoretical assumptions on the R. sphaeroides chemosensory dynamics that can be shown to yield FCD behaviour. Furthermore, it is shown that these assumptions make FCD a property of this system that is robust to structural and parametric variations in the chemotaxis pathway, in agreement with experimental results. We construct and examine models of the full chemotaxis pathway that satisfy these assumptions and reproduce experimental time-series data from earlier studies. We then propose experiments in which models satisfying our theoretical assumptions predict robust FCD behaviour where earlier models do not. In this way, we illustrate how transient dynamic phenotypes such as FCD can be used for the purposes of discriminating between models that reproduce the same experimental time-series data.

  9. Advancing Rhodobacter sphaeroides as a platform for expression of functional membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbakan, Mustafa; Curtis, Brandon S; Nixon, B Tracy; Kumar, Manish; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein overexpression is often hindered by toxic effects on the expression host, limiting achievable volumetric productivity. Moreover, protein structure and function may be impaired due to inclusion body formation and proteolytic degradation. To address these challenges, we employed the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides for expression of challenging membrane proteins including human aquaporin 9 (hAQP9), human tight junction protein occludin (Occ), Escherichia coli toxin peptide GhoT, cellulose synthase enzyme complex (BcsAB) of R. sphaeroides and cytochrome-cy (Cyt-cy) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Titers of 47 mg/L for Cyt-cy, 7.5 mg/L for Occ, 1.5 mg/L for BcsAB and 0.5 mg/L for hAQP9 were achieved from affinity purification. While purification of GhoT was not successful, transformants displayed a distinct growth phenotype that correlated with GhoT expression. We also evaluated the functionality of these proteins by performing water transport studies for hAQP9, peroxidase activity for cytochrome-cy, and in vitro cellulose synthesis activity assay for BcsAB. While previous studies with Rhodobacter have utilized oxygen-limited semi-aerobic growth for membrane protein expression, substantial titer improvements are achieved as a result of a 3-fold increase in biomass yield using the anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth regime, which utilizes the strong native puc promoter. This versatile platform is shown to enable recovery of a wide variety of difficult-to-express membrane proteins in functional form.

  10. Spin-torch experiment on reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the physico-chemical process by which plants, algae and photosynthetic bacteria use light energy to drive the synthesis of organic compounds. Light-induced electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) is highly efficient, having a quantum yield close to unity. In RCs

  11. Expression of the gltP gene of Escherichia coli in a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides restores chemotaxis to glutamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; van der Heide, T.; Tolner, B; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides is chemotactic to glutamate and most other amino acids. In Escherichia coli, chemotaxis involves a membrane-bound sensor that either binds the amino acid directly or interacts with the binding protein loaded with the amino acid. In R. sphaeroides, chemotaxis is thought to req

  12. Hydrogen production from tofu wastewater by Rhodobacter sphaeroides immobilized in agar gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuh, H. [Utsunomiya Univ., Tochigi (Japan). Agricultural Faculty; National Inst. of Bioscience and Human Technology, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, Tomoo; Tsygankov, A.A.; Asada, Yasuo; Miyake, Jun [National Inst. of Bioscience and Human Technology, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Hydrogen production from the wastewater of tofu factory was examined by using anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides immobilized in agar gels. The maximum rate of hydrogen production observed from the wastewater was 2.l l h(-1) m(2) gel which was even slightly higher than that from a glucose medium (as control). The hydrogen production lasted up to 50 h. The yield of hydrogen was 1.9 ml/ml wastewater or 0.24 ml/mg carbohydrates contained in the wastewater. This yield corresponds to 53% or 65% of that from the glucose medium, according to the different expressions of the yield The TOC (total organic carbon) removal ratio in 85 h reached 41% which was comparable to that from the glucose medium. The immobilization protected the bacterium from the inhibitory effect of ammonium ion. (Author)

  13. Influence of pigment substitution on the electrochemical properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 reaction centers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU; YOnglong(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Deisenhofer. J., Epp, O.. Miki, K. et al., Structure of the protein subunits in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis at 3A resolution, Nature, 1985, 318: 618-624.[2]Marcus, R. A., Election transfer reaction in chemistry: Theory and experiment (Nobel lecture), Angewandte Chemie, 1993,32: 1111-1121.[3]Woodbury, N. W., Becker, M., Middendorf, D. et al., Picosecond kinetics of the initial photochemical electron-transfer reaction in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers, Biochemistry, 1985, 24 (26): 7516-7521.[4]Scheer, H., Struck, A., Bacterial reaction centers with modified tetrapyrrole chromophores, in The Photosynthetic Reaction Center (Ⅰ) (eds. Deisenhofer, J., Norris, J.), San Diego: Academic Press, 1993, 157-192.[5]Meyer, M., Scheer, H., Reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 containing C-3 acetyl and vinyl (bacterio)pheophytines at sites HA,B, Photosynth. Res., 1995, 44: 55-65.[6]Schmidt, S., Arlt, T., Hamm, P. et al., Energetics of the primary electron transfer reaction revealed by ultrafast spectroscopy on modified bacterial reaction centers, Chem. Phys. Lett., 1994, 223: 116-120.[7]Kennis, J. T. M., Shkuropatov, A. Y., Van Stokkum, I. H. M. et al., Formation of a long-lived P+BA- state in plant pheophytin-exchanged reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 at low temperature, Biochemistry, 1997, 36:16231-16238.[8]Tasayco, M. L., Carey, J., Ordered self-assembly of polypeptide fragments to form native like dimeric trp repressor, Science. 1992, 255: 594-597.[9]Kong, J. L., Lu, Z. Q., Lvov, Y. M. et al., Direct electrochemistry of cofactor redox sites in a bacterial photosynthetic reaction center protein, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1998, 120 (29): 7371-7372.[10]Nassar, A. E. F., Bobbitt, J. M., Stuart, J. M. et al., Catalytic reduction of organohalide pollutants by myoglobin in a biomembrane-like surfactant film, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1995, 117: 10986-10993.[11]Zeng, X. H., Wu, Y

  14. Proteomic characterization of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 photosynthetic membrane: Identification of New Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Callister, Stephen J.; Tavano, Christine; Donohue, Timothy; Lipton, Mary S.; Kaplan, Samuel

    2007-10-01

    The intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) system develops, upon induction, as a structure dedicated to the major events of bacterial photosynthesis, including harvesting light energy, primary charge separation, and electron transport. In this study, multi-chromatographic methods coupled with fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer, combined with subcellular fractionation, was applied to an investigation of the supramolecular composition of the native photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. A complete proteomic profile of the intracytoplasmic membranes was obtained and the results showed that the intracytoplasmic membranes are mainly composed of four photosynthetic membrane protein complexes, including light harvesting complexes I and II, the reaction center and cytochrome bc1, as well as two new membrane protein components, an unknown protein (RSP1760) and a possible alkane hydroxylase. Proteins necessary for various cellular functions, such as ATP synthesis, respiratory components, ABC transporters, protein translocation, and other proteins with unknown functions were also identified in association with the intracytoplasmic membranes. This study opens a new perspective on the characterization and understanding of the photosynthetic supramolecular complexes of R. sphaeroides, and their internal interactions as well as interactions with other proteins inside or outside the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  15. Comparison of aerobic and photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, Stephen J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Dominguez, Migual; Tavano, Christine; Monroe, Matthew E.; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-07-05

    Proteomes from aerobic and photosynthetic grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 cell cultures were characterized using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with an accurate mass and elution time (AMT) tag approach. Roughly 8000 high quality peptides were detected that represented 1,445 gene products and 34% of the predicted proteins. The identified proteins corresponded primarily to open reading frames (ORFs) contained within the two chromosomal elements of this bacterium, but a significant number were also observed from ORFs associated with 5 naturally occurring plasmids. Data mining of peptides revealed a number of proteins uniquely detected within the photosynthetic cell culture. Proteins observed in both aerobic respiratory and photosynthetic grown cultures were analyzed semi-quantitatively by comparing their estimated abundances to provide insights into bioenergetic models for aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. Additional emphasis was placed on gene products annotated as hypothetical to gain information as to their potential roles within these two growth conditions. Where possible, transcriptome data for R. sphaeroides obtained under the same culture conditions were compared with these results. This comparative study demonstrated the applicability of the AMT tag approach for high-throughput proteomic analyses of pathways associated with the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  16. Role of the Irr protein in the regulation of iron metabolism in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Peuser

    Full Text Available In Rhizobia the Irr protein is an important regulator for iron-dependent gene expression. We studied the role of the Irr homolog RSP_3179 in the photosynthetic alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. While Irr had little effect on growth under iron-limiting or non-limiting conditions its deletion resulted in increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen. This correlates with an elevated expression of katE for catalase in the Irr mutant compared to the wild type under non-stress conditions. Transcriptome studies revealed that Irr affects the expression of genes for iron metabolism, but also has some influence on genes involved in stress response, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, transport, and photosynthesis. Most genes showed higher expression levels in the wild type than in the mutant under normal growth conditions indicating an activator function of Irr. Irr was however not required to activate genes of the iron metabolism in response to iron limitation, which showed even stronger induction in the absence of Irr. This was also true for genes mbfA and ccpA, which were verified as direct targets for Irr. Our results suggest that in R. sphaeroides Irr diminishes the strong induction of genes for iron metabolism under iron starvation.

  17. Assembly of functional photosystem complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids from the spirilloxanthin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuang C; Mothersole, David J; Dilbeck, Preston; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Pu; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Grayson, Katie J; Jackson, Philip J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Li, Ying; Holten, Dewey; Neil Hunter, C

    2015-02-01

    Carotenoids protect the photosynthetic apparatus against harmful radicals arising from the presence of both light and oxygen. They also act as accessory pigments for harvesting solar energy, and are required for stable assembly of many light-harvesting complexes. In the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides phytoene desaturase (CrtI) catalyses three sequential desaturations of the colourless carotenoid phytoene, extending the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, N, from three to nine and producing the yellow carotenoid neurosporene; subsequent modifications produce the yellow/red carotenoids spheroidene/spheroidenone (N=10/11). Genomic crtI replacements were used to swap the native three-step Rba. sphaeroides CrtI for the four-step Pantoea agglomerans enzyme, which re-routed carotenoid biosynthesis and culminated in the production of 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin under semi-aerobic conditions. The new carotenoid pathway was elucidated using a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Premature termination of this new pathway by inactivating crtC or crtD produced strains with lycopene or rhodopin as major carotenoids. All of the spirilloxanthin series carotenoids are accepted by the assembly pathways for LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX complexes. The efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer for 2,2'-diketo-spirilloxanthin (15 conjugated CC bonds; N=15) in LH2 complexes is low, at 35%. High energy transfer efficiencies were obtained for neurosporene (N=9; 94%), spheroidene (N=10; 96%) and spheroidenone (N=11; 95%), whereas intermediate values were measured for lycopene (N=11; 64%), rhodopin (N=11; 62%) and spirilloxanthin (N=13; 39%). The variety and stability of these novel Rba. sphaeroides antenna complexes make them useful experimental models for investigating the energy transfer dynamics of carotenoids in bacterial photosynthesis.

  18. Extract from a mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides as an enriched carotenoid source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chiang Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The extract Lycogen™ from the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (WL-APD911 has attracted significant attention because of its promising potential as a bioactive mixture, attributed in part to its anti-inflammatory properties and anti-oxidative activity. Objective: This study aims to investigate the components of Lycogen™ and its anti-inflammatory properties and anti-oxidative activity. Design and results: The mutant strain R. sphaeroides (WL-APD911 whose carotenoid 1,2-hydratase gene has been altered by chemical mutagenesis was used for the production of a new carotenoid. The strain was grown at 30°C on Luria–Bertani (LB agar plates. After a 4-day culture period, the mutant strain displayed a 3.5-fold increase in carotenoid content, relative to the wild type. In the DPPH test, Lycogen™ showed more potent anti-oxidative activity than lycopene from the wild-type strain. Primary skin irritation test with hamsters showed no irritation response in hamster skins after 30 days of treatment with 0.2% Lycogen™. Chemical investigations of Lycogen™ using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR 1H, 13C, and COSY/DQCOSY spectra have identified spheroidenone and methoxyneurosporene. Quantitative analysis of these identified compounds based on spectral intensities indicates that spheroidenone and methoxyneurosporene are major components (approximately 1:1; very small quantities of other derivatives are also present in the sample. Conclusions: In this study, we identified the major carotenoid compounds contained in Lycogen™, including spheroidenone and methoxyneurosporene by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy analysis. The carotenoid content of this mutant strain of R. sphaeroides was 3.5-fold higher than that in normal strain. Furthermore, Lycogen™ from the mutant strain is more potent than lycopene from the wild-type strain and does not cause irritation in hamster skins. These findings suggest that this mutant strain has the

  19. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    OpenAIRE

    Grayson, K.J.; Faries, K.M.; Huang, X.; Qian, P.; Dilbeck, P.; Martin, E.C.; Hitchcock, A; Vasilev, C.; Yuen, J.M.; Niedzwiedzki, D.M.; Leggett, G.J; Holten, D; Kirmaier, C; Hunter, C N

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy...

  20. Hydrogen gas production by combined systems of Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 and Halobacterium salinarum in a photobioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabut, Baker; El-Kahlout, Kamal [Department of Biochemistry, School of Science, IUG, Gaza (PS); Yuecel, Meral [Department of Biology, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Guenduez, Ufuk; Tuerker, Lemi [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Eroglu, Inci [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 is a photosynthetic non-sulfur bacterium which produces hydrogen from organic compounds under anaerobic conditions. Halobacterium salinarum is an archaeon and lives under extremely halophilic conditions (4M NaCl). H. salinarum contains a retinal protein bacteriorhodopsin in its purple membrane which acts as a light-driven proton pump. In this study the Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 culture was combined with different amounts of packed cells of H. salinarum S9 or isolated purple membrane fragments in order to increase the photofermentative hydrogen gas production. The packed cells of H. salinarum have the ability to pump protons upon illumination due to the presence of bacteriorhodopsin. The proton gradient produced may be used for the formation of ATP or protons may be used for H{sub 2} production by R. sphaeroides. Similar to intact cells purple membrane fragments may also form vesicles around certain ions and may act like closed systems. The hydrogen production experiments were carried out using 400ml water-jacketed-glass column stirred photobioreactors. In combined systems 10-200nmol of bacteriorhodopsin was used. Hydrogen gas production was enhanced by four- to sixfold in combined systems of H. salinarum packed cells with R. sphaeroides O.U.001 cell. Stirring both increased the total gas produced and enhanced the rate of hydrogen production. The light energy conversion efficiency was increased from 0.6% to 2.25% in combined systems. (author)

  1. Modeling the light- and redox-dependent interaction of PpsR/AppA in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rakesh; Flockerzi, Dietrich; Hauser, Marcus J B; Straube, Ronny

    2011-05-18

    Facultative photosynthetic bacteria switch their energy generation mechanism from respiration to photosynthesis depending on oxygen tension and light. Part of this transition is mediated by the aerobic transcriptional repressor PpsR. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the repressive action of PpsR is antagonized by the redox- and blue-light-sensitive flavoprotein AppA which results in a unique phenotype: the repression of photosynthesis genes at intermediate oxygen levels and high light intensity, which is believed to reduce the risk of photooxidative stress. To analyze the underlying mechanism we developed a simple mathematical model based on the AppA-dependent reduction of a disulfide bond in PpsR and the light-sensitive complex formation between the reduced forms of AppA and PpsR. A steady-state analysis shows that high light repression can indeed occur at intermediate oxygen levels if PpsR is reduced on a faster timescale than AppA and if the electron transfer from AppA to PpsR is effectively irreversible. The model further predicts that if AppA copy numbers exceed those of PpsR by at least a factor of two, the transition from aerobic to anaerobic growth mode can occur via a bistable regime. We provide necessary conditions for the emergence of bistability and discuss possible experimental verifications.

  2. 5-Aminolevulinate production by Escherichia coli containing the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Werf, M.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Zeikus, J.G. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)]|[MBI International, Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA gene codes for 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent condensation of succinyl coenzyme A and glycine-forming ALA. The R. sphaeroides hemA gene in the pUC18/19 vector system was transformed into Escherichia coli. The effects of both genetic and physiological factors on the expression of ALA synthase and the production of ALA were studied. ALA synthase activity levels were maximal when hemA had the same transcription direction as the lac promoter. The distance between the lac promoter and hemA affected the expression of ALA synthase on different growth substrates. The E. coli host strain used had an enormous effect on the ALA synthase activity level and on the production of ALA, with E. coli DH1 being best suited. The ALA synthase activity level was also dependent on the carbon source. Succinate, L-malate, fumarate, and L-aspartate gave the highest levels of ALA synthase activity, while the use of lactose as a carbon source resulted in a repression of ALA synthase. After growth on succinate, ALA synthase represented {approx}5% of total cellular protein. The ALA synthase activity level was also dependent on the pH of the medium, with maximal activity occurring at pH 6.5. ALA production by whole cells was limited by the availability of glycine, and the addition of 2 g of glycine per liter to the growth medium increased the production of ALA fivefold, to 2.25 mM. In recombinant E. coli extracts, up to 22 mM ALA was produced from succinate, glycine, and ATP. 58 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Influence of pigment substitution on the electrochemical properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 reaction centers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹永龙; 赵杰权; 陈志龙; 孔继烈; 曾小华; 徐春和

    2001-01-01

    With the help of pigment substitution, self-assembled monolayer film and square wave voltammetry, the influence of pigment substitution on the electrochemical properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 reaction centers was investigated. Results showed that the charge separation could also be driven by externally electric field, similar to the primary photochemical reaction in purple bacterial reaction center. On the surface of Au electrode, a self-assembled monolayer film (the RC-PDDA-DMSA film) was made up of 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), poly-dimeth-yldiallylammonium chloride (PDDA) and reaction center (RC). When square wave voltammetry was used to study the RC-PDDA-DMSA film, four redox pairs in the photochemical reaction of RC were observed by changing frequency. With nonlinear fitting, the standard potential of P/P+ and the corresponding electrode reaction rate constant were determined to be 0.522 V and 13.04 S-1, respectively. It was found that the redox peak at -0.02 V changed greatly when bacteriopheophytin was substituted by plant pheophytin in the reaction center. Further studies indicated that this change resulted from the decrease in electron transfer rate between Bphe-/Bphe (Phe-/Phe) and QA-/QA after pigment substitution. After investigations of spectra and electrochemical properties of different RCs and comparisons of different function groups of pigments, it was indicated that the phytyl tail, similar to other substituted groups of pheophytin, affected the efficiencies of pigment substitution.

  4. Replacement of bacteriopheophytin in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides RS601 with plant pheophytin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the presence of acetone and an excess of exogenous plant pheophytins,bacteriopheophytins in the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides RS601 were replaced by pheophytins at sites HA and HB,when incubated at 43.5℃ for more than 15 min.The substitution of bacteriopheophytins in the reaction centers was 50% and 71% with incubation of 15 and 60 min,respectively.In the absorption spectra of pheophytin-replaced reaction centers (Phe RCs),bands assigned to the transition moments QX (537 nm) and QY (758 nm) of bacteriopheophytin disappeared,and three distinct bands assigned to the transition moments QX (509/542 nm) and QY (674 nm) of pheophytin appeared instead.Compared to that of the control reaction centers,the photochemical activities of Phe RCs are 78% and 71% of control,with the incubation time of 15 and 60 min.Differences might exist between the redox properties of Phe RC and of native reaction centers,but the substitution is significant,and the new system is available for further studies.

  5. Replacement of bacteriopheophytin in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides RS601 with plant pheophytin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾小华; 吴永强; 沈允钢; 徐春和

    2000-01-01

    In the presence of acetone and an excess of exogenous plant pheophytins, bacterio-pheophytins in the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides RS601 were replaced by pheophytins at sites HA and HB, when incubated at 43.5℃ for more than 15 min. The substitution of bacteriopheophytins in the reaction centers was 50% and 71% with incubation of 15 and 60 min, respectively. In the absorption spectra of pheophytin-replaced reaction centers (Phe RCs), bands assigned to the transition moments Qx (537 nm) and QY (758 nm) of bacteriopheophytin disappeared, and three distinct bands assigned to the transition moments Qx (509/542 nm) and QY (674 nm) of pheophytin appeared instead. Compared to that of the control reaction centers, the photochemical activities of Phe RCs are 78% and 71% of control, with the incubation time of 15 and 60 min. Differences might exist between the redox properties of Phe RC and of native reaction centers, but the substitution is significant, and the new system is available for further

  6. Acquirement and characterization of a carotenoid mutant (GM309) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan; ZHANG Wei; WU Yongqiang; XU Chunhe

    2004-01-01

    A green mutant was obtained among the chemically induced mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 (RS601) and named GM309. A blue shift of 20 nm of the carotenoid absorption spectrum was found in the light-harvesting complex II (LH2) of GM309. Different from LH2 of RS601, it was found that the carotenoids in GM309-LH2 changed to be neurosporene by mutation. Neurosporene lacks a conjugate double bond, compared with the spheroidene in RS601-LH2 which has ten conjugate double bonds. As shown by absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy, the overall structure of GM309-LH2 is little affected by this change. From fluorescence emission spectra, it is found that GM309-LH2 can transfer energy from carotenoids to Bchl-B850 without any change in efficiency. But the efficiency of energy transfer from B800 to B850 in GM309-LH2 is decreased to be 42% of that of the native. This work would provide a novel method to investigate the mechanism of excitation energy transfer in LH2.

  7. An Extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Reduces Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Wei Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is used as a treatment for various types of solid tumors. Renal injury severely limits the use of cisplatin. Renal cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation contribute to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Previously, we found that an extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Lycogen™ inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and the production of nitric oxide in activated macrophages in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis model. Here, we evaluated the effect of Lycogen™, a potent anti-inflammatory agent, in mice with cisplatin-induced renal injury. We found that attenuated renal injury correlated with decreased apoptosis due to a reduction in caspase-3 expression in renal cells. Oral administration of Lycogen™ significantly reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in mice with renal injury. Lycogen™ reduces renal dysfunction in mice with cisplatin-induced renal injury. The protective effects of the treatment included blockage of the cisplatin-induced elevation in serum urea nitrogen and creatinine. Meanwhile, Lycogen™ attenuated body weight loss and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with renal injury. We propose that Lycogen™ exerts anti-inflammatory activities that represent a promising strategy for the treatment of cisplatin-induced renal injury.

  8. Modification of galactitol dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides D for immobilization on polycrystalline gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberger, P; Gajdzik, J; Natter, H; Wenz, G; Giffhorn, F; Kohring, G W; Hempelmann, R

    2009-10-20

    Galactitol dehydrogenase (GatDH) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes in the presence of oxidized beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) the interconversion of various multivalent aliphatic alcohols to the corresponding ketones. The recombinant GatDH was provided with an N-terminal His(6)-tag to which distally up to three cysteine residues were attached. This protein construct maintained nearly full enzymatic activity, and it could be covalently immobilized via thiol bonds onto the surface of a gold electrode. Binding of GatDH onto the gold electrode was verified by SPR measurements, and residual enzyme activity was measured by cyclic voltammetry using 1,2-hexanediol as substrate, the cofactor NAD(+) and the redox mediator CTFM (4-carboxy-2,5,7-trinitrofluorenyliden-malonnitrile) in solute form. The results demonstrate the possibility of a directed functional immobilization of proteins on gold surfaces, which represents a proof-of-concept for the development of reactors for electrochemical synthon preparation using dehydrogenases.

  9. Brewery wastewaters in photobiological hydrogen generation in presence of Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, K.; Waligorska, M.; Laniecki, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001 (concentration of inoculum-0.36 g dry wt/l) and brewery wastewaters were applied in photobiogeneration of hydrogen under illumination of 116 W/m{sup 2}. The best results were obtained with filtered wastewaters sterilized at 120 C for 20 min and maximal concentration of waste in medium equal 10% v/v. The main product in generated biogas was hydrogen (90%). After sterilization the amount of generated hydrogen was tripled (from 0.76 to 2.2 l H{sub 2}/l medium), whereas waste concentration of 10% v/v resulted in the best substrate yield (0.22 l H{sub 2}/l of waste). Under these conditions the amount of generated hydrogen was 2.24 l H{sub 2}/l medium and light conversion efficiency reached value of 1.7%. The modified Gompertz equations served in modeling of the kinetics of the studied process. (author)

  10. ChrR positively regulates transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, B A; Donohue, T J

    1995-04-01

    Transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c2 gene (cycA) is negatively regulated by both the presence of oxygen and intermediates in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. A mutation responsible for uncoupling cycA transcription from tetrapyrrole availability was localized to a gene (chrR) that encodes a 357-amino-acid protein. Analysis of a defined chrR null mutation indicated that this protein positively regulated cycA transcription. From this and other results, it appeared that the positive action of ChrR on cycA transcription is blocked by altering the availability of either heme or some intermediate in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. A single missense mutation which substitutes an Arg for a Cys at residue 182 of ChrR (C182R) was shown to be necessary and sufficient for the increased cycA transcription seen in the mutant strain Chr4. Thus, it appears that this C182R substitution generated an altered-function form of ChrR. In addition, by analyzing cycA transcription in delta ChrR strains, we showed that ChrR was not required for increased cycA transcription under anaerobic conditions. Instead, our results indicated that ChrR and the response regulator PrrA (J. M. Eraso and S. Kaplan, J. Bacteriol. 176:32-43, 1994) functioned independently at the upstream cycA promoter that is activated under anaerobic conditions.

  11. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 in a flat plate solar bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eroglu, Inci; Tabanoglu, Altan; Eroglu, Ela [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Guenduez, Ufuk; Yuecel, Meral [Department of Biology, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-01-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 can produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions and illumination. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of an 8 l flat plate solar bioreactor operating in outdoor conditions. Different organic acids were used as carbon sources (malate, lactate and acetate) and olive mill waste water was used as a sole substrate source. The consumption and the production of the organic acids were determined by HPLC. The accumulation of by-products, such as poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and carotenoid, throughout the course of hydrogen production was determined. The hydrogen production rate was highest (0.01 l/l/h) when malate was the carbon source. Formate was observed as the fermentation end product. Acetate resulted in low hydrogen gas production and high PHB accumulation. When acetate was used as the carbon source, butyrate was produced as a result of fermentation. Promising amounts of PHB and caretenoid were accumulated during hydrogen production from diluted olive mill wastewater. (author)

  12. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil by Rhodobacter sphaeroides biofertilizer and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Haihua; Luo, Jinxue; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Shengjun; Bai, Zhihui; Huang, Zhanbin

    2015-09-01

    Bio-augmentation is a promising technique for remediation of polluted soils. This study aimed to evaluate the bio-augmentation effect of Rhodobacter sphaeroides biofertilizer (RBF) on the bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contaminated soil. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted over a period of 120 days, three methods for enhancing bio-augmentation were tested on TPH contaminated soils, including single addition RBF, planting, and combining of RBF and three crop species, such as wheat (W), cabbage (C) and spinach (S), respectively. The results demonstrated that the best removal of TPH from contaminated soil in the RBF bio-augmentation rhizosphere soils was found to be 46.2%, 65.4%, 67.5% for W+RBF, C+RBF, S+RBF rhizosphere soils respectively. RBF supply impacted on the microbial community diversity (phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA) and the activity of soil enzymes, such as dehydrogenase (DH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and urease (UR). There were significant difference among the soil only containing crude oil (CK), W, C and S rhizosphere soils and RBF bio-augmentation soils. Moreover, the changes were significantly distinct depended on crops species. It was concluded that the RBF is a valuable material for improving effect of remediation of TPH polluted soils.

  13. Transcriptional Activation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Cytochrome c2 Gene P2 Promoter by the Response Regulator PrrA

    OpenAIRE

    Comolli, James C; Carl, Audrey J.; Hall, Christine; Donohue, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Anoxygenic photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a member of the α subclass of the class Proteobacteria, requires the response regulator PrrA. PrrA and the sensor kinase PrrB are part of a two-component signaling pathway that influences a wide range of processes under oxygen-limited conditions. In this work we characterized the pathway of transcription activation by PrrB and PrrA by purifying these proteins, analyzing them in vitro, and characterizing a mutant PrrA protein in vivo...

  14. Mutational analysis of the C-terminal domain of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides response regulator PrrA

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Denise F.; Stenzel, Rachelle A.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides response regulator PrrA directly activates transcription of genes necessary for energy conservation at low O2 tensions and under anaerobic conditions. It is proposed that PrrA homologues contain a C-terminal DNA-binding domain (PrrA-CTD) that lacks significant amino acid sequence similarity to those found in other response regulators. To test this hypothesis, single amino acid substitutions were created at 12 residues in the PrrA-CTD. These mutant PrrA proteins wer...

  15. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.winkler@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR{sub Q-PAS1}) and two (PpsR{sub N-Q-PAS1}) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR{sub ΔHTH}) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR{sub ΔHTH} structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that

  16. Characterization of ‘Pinky’ Strain Grown in Culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26.1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yan; XIE Jing; KOYAMA Yasushi; LI Shi-hao; WANG En-si; HOU A-li

    2013-01-01

    In the process of cultivating Rhodobater sphaeroides R26.1,some of which turned from blue to pink due to the irradiation of a beam of leaking white light.The mutant strains were named ‘pinky’ strains,which were cultivated in the red light and in the dark for a comparative study.It turned out that the strains did not grow in the dark,so they might be photosynthetic bacteria.The electronic absorption spectrum of the ‘pinky’ strains was measured,which shows they contained two main photosynthetic pigments,carotenoids(Cars) and bacteriochlorophylls(BChls).And then they were extracted and analyzed.It proves that Bchls included Bchl a and Bchl a'.Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were exploited to determine the chemical structure of Cars.The results indicate that there were seven kinds of Cars,including lycopene,rhodopin,anhydrorhodovibrin,3,4-dihydroanhydrorhodovibrin,3,3,4-dihydrospirilloxanthin,3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin and spirilloxanthin.Based on the above results,it was found that most identified Cars formed via spirilloxanthin biosynthesis pathway.The analyzed results of 16S rRNA gene show that the homology of ‘pinky’ strains with Rhodopseudomonas palusteris was 99%.Rhodopseudomonas palusteris has been cultivated in our laboratory.Because of its strong vitality,it did not become extinct with so many years passing.When Rhodobater sphaeroides R26.1 was cultivated,it got rejuvenated under the appropriate conditions and caused Rhodobater sphaeroides R26.1 to be contaminated.

  17. The nature of the lower excited state of the special pair of bacterial photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter Sphaeroides and the dynamics of primary charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashin, N. V.; Shchupak, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of the structure in the ground and lower singlet excited states and the vibrations (in the ground state) of special pair P of photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria (RCPb) Rhodobacter Sphaeroides, consisting of two bacteriochlorophyll molecules PA and PB, have been carried out. It is shown that excitation of the special pair is followed by fast relaxation dynamics, accompanied by the transformation of the initial P* state into the P A δ+ P B δ- state (δ ~ 0.5) with charge separation. This behavior is due to the presence of several nonplanar vibrations with participation of the acetyl group of macrocycle PB in the nuclear wave packet on the potential surface of the P* state; these vibrations facilitate destabilization of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the macrocycle PA and formation of the P A δ+ P B δ- state. The structural transformations in the P* state are due to its linking character in the contact region of the acetyl group-containing pyrrole rings of PA and PB. The transition from the P* state to specifically the P A δ+ P B δ- state is related to the fact that the acetyl group PA is involved in the intermolecular hydrogen bond with amino acid residue HisL168; for this reason, this group and the pyrrole ring linked with it can hardly participate in structural transformations. The electronic matrix element H12 of the electron transfer from the special pair in the P A δ+ P B δ- state to a molecule of accessory bacteriochlorophyll BA greatly exceeds that for the transfer to BB. This circumstance and the fact that the P A δ+ P B δ- state is energetically more favorable than the P* state facilitate the preferred directionality of the electron transfer in RCPb Rhodobacter Sphaeroides with participation of the cofactors located in its subunit L.

  18. Enhancement of phototrophic hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides ZX-5 using a novel strategy - shaking and extra-light supplementation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xu; Wang, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Si-Liang; Chu, Ju; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Ming-Zhi; Zhuang, Ying-Ping [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, P.O. Box 329, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2009-12-15

    Biohydrogen has gained attention due to its potential as a sustainable alternative to conventional methods for hydrogen production. In this study, the effect of light intensity as well as cultivation method (standing- and shaking-culture) on the cell growth and hydrogen production of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ZX-5 were investigated in 38-ml anaerobic photobioreactor with RCVBN medium. Thus, a novel shaking and extra-light supplementation (SELS) approach was developed to enhance the phototrophic H{sub 2} production by R. sphaeroides ZX-5 using malate as the sole carbon source. The optimum illumination condition for shaking-culture by strain ZX-5 increased to 7000-8000 lux, markedly higher than that for standing-culture (4000-5000 lux). Under shaking and elevated illumination (7000-8000 lux), the culture was effective in promoting photo-H{sub 2} production, resulting in a 59% and 56% increase of the maximum and average hydrogen production rate, respectively, in comparison with the culture under standing and 4000-5000 lux conditions. The highest hydrogen-producing rate of 165.9 ml H{sub 2}/l h was observed under the application of SELS approach. To our knowledge, this record is currently the highest hydrogen production rate of non-immobilized purple non-sulphur (PNS) bacteria. This optimal performance of photo-H{sub 2} production using SELS approach is a favorable choice of sustainable and economically feasible strategy to improve phototrophic H{sub 2} production efficiency. (author)

  19. Structural characterization of the B800-850 and B875 light-harvesting antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Arjen F.; Visschers, Ronald W.; Calkoen, Florentine; Grondelle, Rienk van; Bruggen, Ernst F.J. van; Boekema, Egbert J.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and aggregation behavior of B800-850 (LHII) and B875 (LHI) antenna complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides were studied by electron microscopy. Single molecular projections (top views and side views) of isolated particles were analyzed. The B800-850 complexes, isolated as 150 kDa particle

  20. Identification of key residues that confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS activity at horse TLR4/MD-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Irvine

    Full Text Available The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly

  1. Biocontrol activity and patulin-removal effects of Bacillus subtilis, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Agrobacterium tumefaciens against Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yuan, Y; Liu, B; Zhang, Z; Yue, T

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the biocontrol potential of Bacillus subtilis CICC 10034, Rhodobacter sphaeroides CGMCC 1.2182 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens CGMCC 1.2554 against patulin (PAT)-producer Penicillium expansum and their ability to remove PAT. Bacillus subtilis effectively inhibited P. expansum both on apples and in in vitro experiments, which reduced the rot diameter on apples by 38% compared with the control. The reduction was followed by those induced by A. tumefaciens (27·63%) and R. sphaeroides (23·67%). None of the cell-free supernatant (CFS) was able to prevent pathogen growth. Three antagonists could suppress PAT production by P. expansum on apples by 98·5, 93·7 and 94·99% after treatment with B. subtilis, R. sphaeroides and A. tumefaciens respectively. In addition, the three strains led to a 0·56-1·47 log CFU g(-1) reduction in colony number of P. expansum on apples. Survival of antagonists on apple wounds revealed their tolerance to PAT. Furthermore, both live and autoclaved cells of three strains efficiently adsorbed artificially spiked PAT from medium. The selected antagonists could be applied before harvesting to control apple infection by PAT-producing fungi and also during processing to act as PAT detoxifiers. Since little information related to the capability of R. sphaeroides and A. tumefaciens to inhibit P. expansum is currently available, the results of this study provide some new perspectives to the biocontrol field. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Direct Visualization of Exciton Reequilibration in the LH1 and LH2 Complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by Multipulse Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, Thomas A.; Vengris, Mikas; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hunter, C. Neil; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the excited states of the light-harvesting complexes LH1 and LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are governed, mainly, by the excitonic nature of these ring-systems. In a pump-dump-probe experiment, the first pulse promotes LH1 or LH2 to its excited state and the second pulse dumps a portion of the excited state. By selective dumping, we can disentangle the dynamics normally hidden in the excited-state manifold. We find that by using this multiple-excitation technique we can visualize a 400-fs reequilibration reflecting relaxation between the two lowest exciton states that cannot be directly explored by conventional pump-probe. An oscillatory feature is observed within the exciton reequilibration, which is attributed to a coherent motion of a vibrational wavepacket with a period of ∼150 fs. Our disordered exciton model allows a quantitative interpretation of the observed reequilibration processes occurring in these antennas. PMID:21539791

  3. Direct Visualization of Exciton Reequilibration in the LH1 and LH2 Complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by Multipulse Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, Thomas A. Cohen [Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vengris, Mikas [Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania); Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I. [A.N. Belozersky Inst. of Physico-Chemical Biology, Moscow State Univ. (Russia); Cogdell, Richard J. [Microbial Photosynthesis Laboratory, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hunter, C. Neil [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Univ. of Sheffield, (United Kingdom); van Grondelle, Rienk [Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the excited states of the light-harvesting complexes LH1 and LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are governed, mainly, by the excitonic nature of these ring-systems. In a pump-dump-probe experiment, the first pulse promotes LH1 or LH2 to its excited state and the second pulse dumps a portion of the excited state. By selective dumping, we can disentangle the dynamics normally hidden in the excited-state manifold. We find that by using this multiple-excitation technique we can visualize a 400-fs reequilibration reflecting relaxation between the two lowest exciton states that cannot be directly explored by conventional pump-probe. An oscillatory feature is observed within the exciton reequilibration, which is attributed to a coherent motion of a vibrational wavepacket with a period of ~150 fs. Our disordered exciton model allows a quantitative interpretation of the observed reequilibration processes occurring in these antennas.

  4. Biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate co-production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides from Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, A; Sandhya, M; Ponnusami, V

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of coupled biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides using Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake was studied under dark and photo fermentation conditions. The utilization of a non-edible acidic oil cake (C. inophyllum), and exploitation of a modified minimal salt media led to reduction in the cost of media. Cost of fermentation is reduced by implementation of alternate dark-photo fermentative periods and through the use of a co-culture consisting of a dark fermentative (E. aerogenes) and a photo fermentative (R. sphaeroides) bacterium. The biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate produced were 7.95 L H2/L media and 10.73 g/L media, respectively, under alternate dark and photo fermentation and were 3.23 L H2/L media and 5.6g/L media, respectively under complete dark fermentation. The characteristics of the oil cake and alternate dark (16 h) and photo (8h) fermentative conditions were found to be supportive in producing high biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) yield.

  5. Photobiological transformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millerick, Kayleigh A; Johnston, Juliet T; Finneran, Kevin T

    2016-09-01

    Pump-and-treat strategies for groundwater containing explosives may be necessary when the contaminated water approaches sensitive receptors. This project investigated bacterial photosynthesis as a strategy for ex situ treatment, using light as the primary energy source to facilitate RDX transformation. The objective was to characterize the ability of photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides (strain ATCC(®) 17023 ™) to transform the high-energy explosive RDX. R. sphaeroides transformed 30 μM RDX within 40 h under light conditions; RDX was not fully transformed in the dark (non-photosynthetic conditions), suggesting that photosynthetic electron transfer was the primary mechanism. Experiments with RDX demonstrated that succinate and malate were the most effective electron donors for photosynthesis, but glycerol was also utilized as a photosynthetic electron donor. RDX was transformed irrespective of the presence of carbon dioxide. The electron shuttling compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) increased transformation kinetics in the absence of CO2, when the cells had excess NADPH that needed to be re-oxidized because there was limited CO2 for carbon fixation. When CO2 was added, the cells generated more biomass, and AQDS had no stimulatory effect. End products indicated that RDX carbon became CO2, biomass, and a soluble, uncharacterized aqueous metabolite, determined using (14)C-labeled RDX. These data are the first to suggest that photobiological explosives transformation is possible and will provide a framework for which phototrophy can be used in environmental restoration of explosives contaminated water. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Local electrostatic field induced by the carotenoid bound to the reaction center of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Madoka; Hashimoto, Hideki; Gardiner, Alastair T; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2005-01-20

    Electroabsorption (EA) spectra were recorded in the region of the reaction center (RC) Qy absorption bands of bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriopheophytin, to investigate the effect of carotenoid (Car) on the electrostatic environment of the RCs of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides. Two different RCs were prepared from Rb. sphaeroides strain R26.1 (R26.1-RC); R26.1 RC lacking Car and a reconstituted RC (R26.1-RC+ Car) prepared by incorporating a synthetic Car (3,4-dihydrospheroidene). Although there were no detectable differences between these two RCs in their near infrared (NIR) absorption spectra at 79 and 293 K, or in their EA spectra at 79 K, significant differences were detected in their EA spectra at 293 K. Three nonlinear optical parameters of each RC were determined in order to evaluate quantitatively these differences; transition dipole-moment polarizability and hyperpolarizability (D factor), the change in polarizability upon photoexcitation (Deltaalpha), and the change in dipole-moment upon photoexcitation (Deltamu). The value of D or Deltaalpha determined for each absorption band of the two RC samples showed similar values at 77 or 293 K. However, the Deltamu values of the special pair Bchls (P) and the monomer Bchls absorption bands showed significant differences between the two RCs at 293 K. X-ray crystallography of the two RCs has revealed that a single molecule of the solubilizing detergent LDAO occupies part of the carotenoid binding site in the absence of a carotenoid. The difference in the value of Deltamu therefore represents the differential effect of the detergent LDAO and the carotenoid on P. The change of electrostatic field around P induced by the presence of Car was determined to be 1.7 x 10(5) [V/cm], corresponding to a approximately 10% change in the electrostatic field around P.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 production in a 150-l reactor by a mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kien, Nguyen Ba; Kong, In-Soo; Lee, Min-Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2010-05-01

    For the commercial production of CoQ(10), batch-type fermentations were attempted in a 150-l fermenter using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides. Optimum temperature and initial aeration rate were found to be 30 degrees C and 2 vvm, respectively. Under optimum fermentation conditions, the maximum value of specific CoQ(10) content was achieved reproducibly as 6.34 mg/g DCW after 24 h, with 3.02 g/l of DCW. During the fermentation, aeration shift (from the adequate aeration at the early growth phase to the limited aeration in active cellular metabolism) was a key factor in CoQ(10) production for scale-up. A higher value of the specific CoQ(10) content (8.12 mg/g DCW) was achieved in fed-batch fermentation and comparable to those produced by the pilot-scale fed-batch fermentations of A. tumefaciens, which indicated that the mutant strain of R. sphaeroides used in this study was a potential high CoQ(10) producer. This is the first detailed study to demonstrate a pilot-scale production of CoQ(10) using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides.

  8. Augmenting light coverage for photosynthesis through YFP-enhanced charge separation at the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Katie J.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Huang, Xia; Qian, Pu; Dilbeck, Preston; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Yuen, Jonathan M.; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Leggett, Graham J.; Holten, Dewey; Kirmaier, Christine; Neil Hunter, C.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis uses a limited range of the solar spectrum, so enhancing spectral coverage could improve the efficiency of light capture. Here, we show that a hybrid reaction centre (RC)/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) complex accelerates photosynthetic growth in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The structure of the RC/YFP-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) complex shows the position of YFP attachment to the RC-H subunit, on the cytoplasmic side of the RC complex. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of whole cells and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of purified RC/YFP complexes show that the YFP-RC intermolecular distance and spectral overlap between the emission of YFP and the visible-region (QX) absorption bands of the RC allow energy transfer via a Förster mechanism, with an efficiency of 40+/-10%. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing spectral coverage for harvesting light using non-native genetically-encoded light-absorbers, thereby augmenting energy transfer and trapping in photosynthesis.

  9. Orientation of the Q{sub y} optical transition moment of bacteriopheophytin in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klenina, I.B.; Borovykh, I.V.; Shkuropatov, A.Ya.; Gast, P.; Proskuryakov, I.I

    2003-11-01

    Time-resolved cw EPR measurements of the Rhodobacter (Rb) sphaeroides R-26 reaction center primary donor triplet state excited with plane-polarised light are reported. The pigment composition of the reaction center was chemically modified, so that the bacteriopheophytin molecule in the cofactor branch which is inactive towards electron transfer was replaced by plant pheophytin a. This enabled selective excitation of the bacteriopheophytin and pheophytin molecules, and provided conditions for a high-quality magnetophotoselection study. For the first time, orientation of the Q{sub y} optical transition dipole moment relative to the molecular frame of the bacteriopheophytin in the active cofactor branch is determined. Of the four orientations allowed by magnetophotoselection, one was chosen as the most plausible. The corresponding Q{sub y} vector is tilted from the bacteriopheophytin tetrapyrrole plane by 15 deg. , and projects onto this plane almost on the y-molecular axis. It is suggested that the deviation of the vector from the molecular plane results from an interaction of bacteriopheophytin with the neighbouring molecule of accessory bacteriochlorophyll.

  10. Concomitant biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from dark fermentation effluents by adapted Rhodobacter sphaeroides and mixed photofermentative cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Anish; Valentino, Serena; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed at investigating concomitant production of biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by photofermentation (PF) using dark fermentation effluents (DFE). An adapted culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides AV1b (pH 6.5, 24±2°C) achieved H2 and PHB yields of 256 (±2) NmLH2/g Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and 273.8mgPHB/gCOD (32.5±3% of the dry cells weight (DCW)), respectively. When a diluted (1:2) DFE medium was applied to the adapted pure and mixed photofermentative culture, the respective H2 yields were 164.0 (±12) and 71.3 (±6) NmLH2/gCOD and the PHB yields were 212.1 (±105.2) and 50.7 (±2.7) mgPHB/gCOD added, corresponding to 24 (±0.7) and 6.3 (±0) % DCW, respectively. The concomitant H2 and PHB production from the PF process gave a good DFE post treatment achieving up to 80% COD removal from the initial DFE.

  11. Optimization of Biomass and 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC17023 via Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Jianzheng; Li, Xiangkun; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Microbial 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) produced from wastewater is considered as potential renewable energy. However, many hurdles are needed to be overcome such as the regulation of key influencing factors on ALA yield. Biomass and ALA production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides was optimized using response surface methodology. The culturing medium was artificial volatile fatty acids wastewater. Three additives were optimized, namely succinate and glycine that are precursors of ALA biosynthesis, and D-glucose that is an inhibitor of ALA dehydratase. The optimal conditions were achieved by analyzing the response surface plots. Statistical analysis showed that succinate at 8.56 mmol/L, glycine at 5.06 mmol/L, and D-glucose at 7.82 mmol/L were the best conditions. Under these optimal conditions, the highest biomass production and ALA yield of 3.55 g/L and 5.49 mg/g-biomass were achieved. Subsequent verification experiments at optimal values had the maximum biomass production of 3.41 ± 0.002 g/L and ALA yield of 5.78 ± 0.08 mg/g-biomass.

  12. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  13. Acetate-dependent photoheterotrophic growth and the differential requirement for the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna, Rick; Tabita, F Robert; Alber, Birgit E

    2011-02-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-deletion strain 16 was capable of photoheterotrophic growth with acetate, while Rhodopseudomonas palustris RubisCO-deletion strain 2040 could not grow under these conditions. The reason for this difference lies in the fact that Rba. sphaeroides and Rps. palustris use different pathways for acetate assimilation, the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway, and glyoxylate-bypass cycle, respectively. The ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway is distinct from the glyoxylate cycle as one molecule of CO(2) and one molecule of HCO(3) (-) per three molecules of acetyl-CoA are co-assimilated to form two malate molecules. The glyoxylate cycle directly converts two acetyl-CoA molecules to malate. Each pathway, therefore, also dictates at what point, CO(2) and reductant are consumed, thereby determining the requirement for the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle.

  14. Whole-genome shotgun optical mapping of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4. 1 and its use for whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shou, S. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Kvikstad, E. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Kile, A. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Severin, J. [Whole-genome shotgun optical mapping of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4. 1 and its use for whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly; Forrest, D. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Runnheim, R. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Churas, C. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Hickman, J. W. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Mackenzie, C. [University of Texas–Houston Medical School; Choudhary, M. [University of Texas–Houston Medical School; Donohue, T. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Kaplan, S. [University of Texas–Houston Medical School; Schwartz, D. C. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison

    2003-09-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is a facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium with tremendous metabolic diversity, which has significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular genetics of photosynthesis, photoheterotrophy, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation, taxis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. To further understand this remarkable bacterium, and to accelerate an ongoing sequencing project, two whole-genome restriction maps (EcoRI and HindIII) of R. sphaeroides strain 2.4.1 were constructed using shotgun optical mapping. The approach directly mapped genomic DNA by the random mapping of single molecules. The two maps were used to facilitate sequence assembly by providing an optical scaffold for high-resolution alignment and verification of sequence contigs. Our results show that such maps facilitated the closure of sequence gaps by the early detection of nascent sequence contigs during the course of the whole-genome shotgun sequencing process.

  15. Effect of the mutation of carotenoids on the dynamics of energy transfer in light- harvesting complexes (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wei-Min; Liu Yuan; Liu Rang-Jun; Yan Yong-Li; Guo Li-Jun; Xu Chun-He; Qian Shi-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Energy transfers in two kinds of peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RS) 601 are studied by using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy with tunable laser wavelength at room temperature. These two complexes are native LH2 (RS601) and green carotenoid mutated LH2 (GM309). The obtained results demonstrate that, compared with spheroidenes with ten conjugated double bonds in native RS601, carotenoid in GM309 containing neurosporenes with nine conjugated double bonds can lead to a reduction in energy transfer rate in the B800-to-B850 band and the disturbance in the energy relaxation processes within the excitonic B850 band.

  16. Chemotactic Control of the Two Flagellar Systems of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Is Mediated by Different Sets of CheY and FliM Proteins▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Ana Martínez; Ballado, Teresa; de la Mora, Javier; Poggio, Sebastian; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2007-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides expresses two different flagellar systems, a subpolar flagellum (fla1) and multiple polar flagella (fla2). These structures are encoded by different sets of flagellar genes. The chemotactic control of the subpolar flagellum (fla1) is mediated by three of the six different CheY proteins (CheY6, CheY4, or CheY3). We show evidence that CheY1, CheY2, and CheY5 control the chemotactic behavior mediated by fla2 flagella and that RSP6099 encodes the fla2 FliM protein. PMID:17890312

  17. PucC and LhaA direct efficient assembly of the light-harvesting complexes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothersole, David; Jackson, Philip J.; Vasilev, Cvetelin

    2016-01-01

    interactions between pigments newly arriving from BchG and nascent proteins within the SecYEG-SecDF-YajC-YidC assembly machinery, thereby co-ordinating pigment delivery, the co-translational insertion of LH polypeptides and their folding and assembly to form photosynthetic complexes.......The mature architecture of the photosynthetic membrane of the purple phototroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been characterised to a level where an atomic-level membrane model is available, but the roles of the putative assembly proteins LhaA and PucC in establishing this architecture are unknown...

  18. Complementation of a reaction center-deficient Rhodobacter sphaeroides pufLMX deletion strain in trans with pufBALM does not restore the photosynthesis-positive phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Farchaus, J W; Gruenberg, H.; Oesterhelt, D.

    1990-01-01

    The puf operon in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is composed of the genes for the photosynthetic reaction center L and M subunits, light-harvesting antenna complex I, and one other open reading frame termed pufX. Complementation of a reaction center-deficient, photosynthetically incompetent pufLMX deletion strain in trans with a fragment containing the entire puf operon, including pufX and an additional 1,100 base pairs of DNA downstream of pufX, restored the reaction center and the photosynthesis-p...

  19. Quinone (QB) reduction by B-branch electron transfer in mutant bacterial reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: quantum efficiency and X-ray structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M L; Chang, C; Xu, Q; Abresch, E C; Axelrod, H L; Feher, G; Okamura, M Y

    2005-05-10

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from purple bacteria converts light into chemical energy. Although the RC shows two nearly structurally symmetric branches, A and B, light-induced electron transfer in the native RC occurs almost exclusively along the A-branch to a primary quinone electron acceptor Q(A). Subsequent electron and proton transfer to a mobile quinone molecule Q(B) converts it to a quinol, Q(B)H(2). We report the construction and characterization of a series of mutants in Rhodobacter sphaeroides designed to reduce Q(B) via the B-branch. The quantum efficiency to Q(B) via the B-branch Phi(B) ranged from 0.4% in an RC containing the single mutation Ala-M260 --> Trp to 5% in a quintuple mutant which includes in addition three mutations to inhibit transfer along the A-branch (Gly-M203 --> Asp, Tyr-M210 --> Phe, Leu-M214 --> His) and one to promote transfer along the B-branch (Phe-L181 --> Tyr). Comparing the value of 0.4% for Phi(B) obtained in the AW(M260) mutant, which lacks Q(A), to the 100% quantum efficiency for Phi(A) along the A-branch in the native RC, we obtain a ratio for A-branch to B-branch electron transfer of 250:1. We determined the structure of the most effective (quintuple) mutant RC at 2.25 A (R-factor = 19.6%). The Q(A) site did not contain a quinone but was occupied by the side chain of Trp-M260 and a Cl(-). In this structure a nonfunctional quinone was found to occupy a new site near M258 and M268. The implications of this work to trap intermediate states are discussed.

  20. Uniform designation for genes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway of bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabita, F. Robert; Gibson, Janet L.; Bowien, Botho; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Meijer, Wilhelmus

    1992-01-01

    Structural and regulatory genes encoding enzymes and proteins of the reductive pentose phosphate pathway have been isolated from a number of bacteria recently. In the phototroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and in two chemoautotrophic bacteria, Alcaligenes eutrophus and Xanthobacter flavus, these genes

  1. New insights into the photochemistry of carotenoid spheroidenone in light-harvesting complex 2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Martin, Elizabeth C; Bocian, David F; Hunter, C Neil; Holten, Dewey

    2017-03-01

    Light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the semi-aerobically grown purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied using optical (static and time-resolved) and resonance Raman spectroscopies. This antenna complex comprises bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a and the carotenoid spheroidenone, a ketolated derivative of spheroidene. The results indicate that the spheroidenone-LH2 complex contains two spectral forms of the carotenoid: (1) a minor, "blue" form with an S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) spectral origin band at 522 nm, shifted from the position in organic media simply by the high polarizability of the binding site, and (2) the major, "red" form with the origin band at 562 nm that is associated with a pool of pigments that more strongly interact with protein residues, most likely via hydrogen bonding. Application of targeted modeling of excited-state decay pathways after carotenoid excitation suggests that the high (92%) carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in this LH2 system, relative to LH2 complexes binding carotenoids with comparable double-bond conjugation lengths, derives mainly from resonance energy transfer from spheroidenone S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) state to BChl a via the Qx state of the latter, accounting for 60% of the total transfer. The elevated S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) → Qx transfer efficiency is apparently associated with substantially decreased energy gap (increased spectral overlap) between the virtual S2 (1(1)B u(+) ) → S0 (1(1)A g(-) ) carotenoid emission and Qx absorption of BChl a. This reduced energetic gap is the ultimate consequence of strong carotenoid-protein interactions, including the inferred hydrogen bonding.

  2. Role of phospholipids of subunit III in the regulation of structural rearrangements in cytochrome c oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnajjar, Khadijeh S; Cvetkov, Teresa; Prochaska, Lawrence

    2015-02-03

    Subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase possesses structural domains that contain conserved phospholipid binding sites. Mutations within these domains induce a loss of phospholipid binding, coinciding with decreased electron transfer activity. Functional and structural roles for phospholipids in the enzyme from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been investigated. Upon the removal of intrinsic lipids using phospholipase A2, electron transfer activity was decreased 30-50%. Moreover, the delipidated enzyme exhibited turnover-induced, suicide inactivation, which was reversed by the addition of exogenous lipids, most specifically by cardiolipin. Cardiolipin exhibited two sites of interaction with the delipidated enzyme, a high-affinity site (Km = 0.14 μM) and a low-affinity site (Km = 26 μM). Subunit I of the delipidated enzyme exhibited a faster digestion rate when it was treated with α-chymotrypsin compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that lipid removal induces a conformational change to expose the digestion sites further. Upon reaction of subunit III of the enzyme with a fluorophore (AEDANS), fluorescence anisotropy showed an increased rotational rate of the fluorophore in the absence of lipids, indicating increased flexibility of subunit III within the enzyme's tertiary structure. Additionally, Förster resonance energy transfer between AEDANS and a fluorescently labeled cardiolipin revealed that cardiolipin binds in the v-shaped cleft of subunit III in the delipidated enzyme and that it moves closer to the active site in subunit I upon a change in the redox state of the enzyme. In conclusion, these results show that the phospholipids regulate events occurring during electron transfer activity by maintaining the structural integrity of the enzyme at the active site.

  3. Genome-enabled analysis of the utilization of taurine as sole source of carbon or of nitrogen by Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denger, Karin; Smits, Theo H M; Cook, Alasdair M

    2006-11-01

    A degradative pathway for taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonate) in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 was proposed by Brüggemann et al. (2004) (Microbiology 150, 805-816) on the basis of a partial genome sequence. In the present study, R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 was found to grow exponentially with taurine as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. When taurine was the sole source of nitrogen in succinate-salts medium, the taurine was rapidly degraded, and most of the organic nitrogen was excreted as the ammonium ion, which was then utilized for growth. Most of the enzymes involved in dissimilation, taurine dehydrogenase (TDH), sulfoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase (Xsc) and phosphate acetyltransferase (Pta), were found to be inducible, and evidence for transcription of the corresponding genes (tauXY, xsc and pta), as well as of tauKLM, encoding the postulated TRAP transporter for taurine, and of tauZ, encoding the sulfate exporter, was obtained by reverse-transcription PCR. An additional branch of the pathway, observed by Novak et al. (2004) (Microbiology 150, 1881-1891) in R. sphaeroides TAU3, involves taurine : pyruvate aminotransferase (Tpa) and a presumptive ABC transporter (NsbABC). No evidence for a significant role of this pathway, or of the corresponding alanine dehydrogenase (Ald), was obtained for R. sphaeroides 2.4.1. The anaplerotic pathway needed under these conditions in R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 seems to involve malyl-CoA lyase, which was synthesized inducibly, and not malate synthase (GlcB), whose presumed gene was not transcribed under these conditions.

  4. The cobinamide amidohydrolase (cobyric acid-forming) CbiZ enzyme: A critical activity of the cobamide remodeling system of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael J.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The chemical structures of cobamides (cobalamin [Cbl]-like compounds) are the same, except for the lower ligand, which in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) is 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), and in adenosylpseudocobalamin (AdopseudoCbl) is adenine. Why the lower ligand of cobamides varies and what the mechanism of lower ligand replacement is are long-standing questions in the field of B12 biosynthesis. Work reported here uncovers the strategy used by the photosynthetic α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to procure the cobamide it needs to grow on acetate as a carbon and energy source. On the basis of genetic and biochemical evidence we conclude that, in R. sphaeroides, the activity of the cobyric acid-producing amidohydrolase CbiZ enzyme is essential for the conversion of AdopseudoCbl into AdoCbl, the cobamide needed for the catabolism of acetate. The CbiZ enzyme uses AdopseudoCbl as a substrate, but not AdoCbl. Implications of these findings for cobamide remodeling in R. sphaeroides and in other CbiZ-containing microorganisms are discussed. PMID:19889098

  5. The cobinamide amidohydrolase (cobyric acid-forming) CbiZ enzyme: a critical activity of the cobamide remodelling system of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael J; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2009-12-01

    The chemical structures of cobamides [cobalamin (Cbl)-like compounds] are the same, except for the lower ligand, which in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) is 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, and in adenosylpseudocobalamin (AdopseudoCbl) is adenine. Why the lower ligand of cobamides varies and what the mechanism of lower ligand replacement is are long-standing questions in the field of B(12) biosynthesis. Work reported here uncovers the strategy used by the photosynthetic alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to procure the cobamide it needs to grow on acetate as a carbon and energy source. On the basis of genetic and biochemical evidence we conclude that, in R. sphaeroides, the activity of the cobyric acid-producing amidohydrolase CbiZ enzyme is essential for the conversion of AdopseudoCbl into AdoCbl, the cobamide needed for the catabolism of acetate. The CbiZ enzyme uses AdopseudoCbl as a substrate, but not AdoCbl. Implications of these findings for cobamide remodelling in R. sphaeroides and in other CbiZ-containing microorganisms are discussed.

  6. Cardiolipin Deficiency in Rhodobacter sphaeroides Alters the Lipid Profile of Membranes and of Crystallized Cytochrome Oxidase, but Structure and Function Are Maintained

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xi; Tamot, Banita; Hiser, Carrie; Reid, Gavin E.; Benning, Christoph; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh (MSU)

    2012-05-08

    Many recent studies highlight the importance of lipids in membrane proteins, including in the formation of well-ordered crystals. To examine the effect of changes in one lipid, cardiolipin, on the lipid profile and the production, function, and crystallization of an intrinsic membrane protein, cytochrome c oxidase, we mutated the cardiolipin synthase (cls) gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, causing a >90% reduction in cardiolipin content in vivo and selective changes in the abundances of other lipids. Under these conditions, a fully native cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was produced, as indicated by its activity, spectral properties, and crystal characteristics. Analysis by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) revealed that the cardiolipin level in CcO crystals, as in the membranes, was greatly decreased. Lipid species present in the crystals were directly analyzed for the first time using MS/MS, documenting their identities and fatty acid chain composition. The fatty acid content of cardiolipin in R. sphaeroides CcO (predominantly 18:1) differs from that in mammalian CcO (18:2). In contrast to the cardiolipin dependence of mammalian CcO activity, major depletion of cardiolipin in R. sphaeroides did not impact any aspect of CcO structure or behavior, suggesting a greater tolerance of interchange of cardiolipin with other lipids in this bacterial system.

  7. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M

    2016-06-23

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC═C + NC═O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids.

  8. Growth characteristics and hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides using various amino acids as nitrogen sources and their combinations with carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielyan, Lilit; Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen [Department of Biophysics, Biological Faculty, Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2010-11-15

    Some amino acids (alanine, asparagine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tyrosine) were used as nitrogen sources in combination with carbon sources (succinate and malate) to study growth properties and H{sub 2} production by purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides strains A-10 and D-3. Both strains produced H{sub 2} in succinate-glutamate and malate-glutamate media. Succinate was a better carbon source than malate. In comparison with strain D-3, strain A-10 was able to utilize proline, alanine or tyrosine as nitrogen sources in succinate medium and to produce H{sub 2}. Both strains were unable to produce H{sub 2} in the presence of asparagine or glycine as nitrogen sources. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, the F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase inhibitor, led to marked inhibition of H{sub 2} production activity of R. sphaeroides. The results suggest that the R. sphaeroides cells growth can be achieved by the use of a large diversity of substrates but only some of them can increase the H{sub 2} production rate. (author)

  9. Light-harvesting complex 1 stabilizes P+QB- charge separation in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Dezi, Manuela; Rebecchi, Alberto; Mallardi, Antonia; Palazzo, Gerardo; Melandri, Bruno Andrea; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2004-11-09

    The kinetics of charge recombination following photoexcitation by a laser pulse have been analyzed in the reaction center-light harvesting complex 1 (RC-LH1) purified from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In RC-LH1 core complexes isolated from photosynthetically grown cells P(+)Q(B)(-) recombines with an average rate constant, k approximately 0.3 s(-1), more than three times smaller than that measured in RC deprived of the LH1 (k approximately 1 s(-1)). A comparable, slowed recombination kinetics is observed in RC-LH1 complexes purified from a pufX-deleted strain. Slowing of the charge recombination kinetics is even more pronounced in RC-LH1 complexes isolated from wild-type semiaerobically grown cells (k approximately 0.2 s(-1)). Since the kinetics of P(+)Q(A)(-) recombination is unaffected by the presence of the antenna, the P(+)Q(B)(-) state appears to be energetically stabilized in core complexes. Determinations of the ubiquinone-10 (UQ(10)) complement associated with the purified RC-LH1 complexes always yield UQ(10)/RC ratios larger than 10. These quinone molecules are functionally coupled to the RC-LH1 complex, as judged from the extent of exogenous cytochrome c(2) rapidly oxidized under continuous light excitation. Analysis of P(+)Q(B)(-) recombination, based on a kinetic model which considers fast quinone equilibrium at the Q(B) binding site, indicates that the slowing down of charge recombination kinetics observed in RC-LH1 complexes cannot be explained solely by a quinone concentration effect and suggests that stabilization of the light-induced charge separation is predominantly due to interaction of the Q(B) site with the LH1 complex. The high UQ(10) complements detected in RC-LH1 core complexes, but not in purified light-harvesting complex 2 and in RC, are proposed to reflect an in vivo heterogeneity in the distribution of the quinone pool within the chromatophore bilayer.

  10. Use of new strains of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and a modified simple culture medium to increase yield and facilitate purification of the reaction centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, D; Saer, R G; Madden, J D; Beatty, J T

    2014-05-01

    A new gene expression system was developed in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, replacing a pRK415-based system used previously. The broad host-range IPTG-inducible plasmid pIND4 was used to create the plasmid pIND4-RC1 for expression of the puhA and pufQBALMX genes, encoding the reaction centre (RC) and light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) proteins. The strain R. sphaeroides ΔRCLH was used to make a knockout of the rshI restriction endonuclease gene, enabling electroporation of DNA into the bacterium; a subsequent knockout of ppsR was made, creating the strain R. sphaeroides RCx lacking this oxygen-sensing repressor of the photosynthesis gene cluster. Using pIND4-RC1, LH1 levels were increased by a factor of about 8 over pRS1 per cell in cultures grown semi-aerobically. In addition, the ppsR knockout allowed for photosynthetic pigment-protein complex synthesis in the presence of high concentrations of molecular oxygen; here, LH1 levels per cell increased by 20 % when grown under high aeration conditions. A new medium (called RLB) is the E. coli medium LB supplemented with MgCl2 and CaCl2, which was found to increase growth rates and final cell culture densities, with an increase of 30 % of LH1 per cell detected in R. sphaeroides RCx(pIND4-RC1) grown in RLB versus LB medium. Furthermore, cell density was about three times greater in RLB compared to semi-aerobic conditions. The combination of all the modifications resulted in an increase of LH1 and RC per mL of culture volume by approximately 35-fold, and a decrease in the length of culture incubation time from about 5 days to ~36 h.

  11. Femtosecond Dynamics of Energy Transfer in Native B800-B850 and B800-Released LH2 Complexes of Rhodobacter Sphaeroides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟民; 朱荣毅; 夏辰安; 刘源; 徐春和; 钱士雄

    2003-01-01

    Two kinds of antenna complexes LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, wild type RS601 and the removal of B800 pigments (B800-released), were used in our experiment. These two LH2 complexes show quite different behaviour in absorption and femtosecond dynamics. By using the femtosecond pump-probe technique, the energy transfer processes occurring in two complexes were studied. Because of removing the B800 pigment from the LH2 in B800-released LH2 complex, the energy transfer between the B800 to B850 pigment was completely eliminated,while the pure internal energy transfer within the exciton states of B850 pigment could be carefully investigated.The results show that, at B800 absorption band, B800-released LH2 obviously shows a dominated transient absorption different from the photobleaching observed in RS601; while at the B850 band, these two complexes show similar photobleaching behaviour.

  12. Structural and preliminary molecular dynamics studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and its mutant form L(M196)H + H(M202)L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyashtorny, V. G.; Fufina, T. Yu.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Shuvalov, V. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    Pigment-protein interactions are responsible for the high efficiency of the light-energy transfer and conversion in photosynthesis. The reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the most convenient model for studying the mechanisms of primary processes of photosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to study the effect of the protein environment of electron-transfer cofactors on the optical properties, stability, pigment composition, and functional activity of RC. The preliminary analysis of RC was performed by computer simulation of the amino acid substitutions L(M196)H + H(M202)L at the pigment-protein interface and by estimating the stability of the threedimensional structure of the mutant RC by the molecular dynamics method. The doubly mutated reaction center was overexpressed, purified, and crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of this mutant was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the molecular dynamics model.

  13. Functional importance of a pair of conserved glutamic acid residues and of Ca(2+) binding in the cbb(3)-type oxygen reductases from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hanlin; Han, Huazhi; Roh, Jung H; Hemp, James; Hosler, Jonathan P; Gennis, Robert B

    2012-09-18

    The cbb(3)-type cytochrome c oxidases are members of the family of heme-copper proton pumping respiratory oxygen reductases. The structure of the cbb(3)-type oxidase from Pseudomonas stutzeri reveals that, in addition to the six redox-active metal centers (two b-type hemes, three c-type hemes, and Cu(B)), the enzyme also contains at least one Ca(2+). The calcium bridges two propionate carboxyls at the interface between the low-spin heme b and the active-site heme b(3) and, in addition, is ligated to a serine in subunit CcoO and by a glutamate in subunit CcoN. The glutamate that is ligated to Ca(2+) is one of a pair of glutamic acid residues that has previously been suggested to be part of a proton exit pathway for pumped protons. In this work, mutations of these glutamates are investigated in the cbb(3)-type oxidases from Vibrio cholerae and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Metal analysis shows that each of these wild-type enzymes contains Ca(2+). Mutations of the glutamate expected to ligate the Ca(2+) in each of these enzymes (E126 in V. cholerae and E180 in R. sphaeroides) result in a loss of activity as well as a loss of Ca(2+). Mutations of the nearby glutamate (E129 in V. cholerae and E183 in R. sphaeroides) also resulted in a loss of oxidase activity and a loss of Ca(2+). It is concluded that the Ca(2+) is essential for assembly of the fully functional enzyme and that neither of the glutamates is likely to be part of a pathway for pumped protons within the cbb(3)-type oxygen reductases. A more likely role for these glutamates is the maintenance of the structural integrity of the active conformation of the enzyme.

  14. Continuous Cultivation of Photosynthetic Bacteria for Fatty Acids Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations.At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4....... sphaeroides was around 35% of dry cell weight, mainly composed of vaccenic acid (C18:1, omega-7)....

  15. Functional characteristics of spirilloxanthin and keto-bearing Analogues in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with a genetically modified carotenoid synthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Hunter, C Neil

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes from a genetically modified strain of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Carotenoid synthesis in the Rba. sphaeroides strain was engineered to redirect carotenoid production away from spheroidene into the spirilloxanthin synthesis pathway. The strain assembles LH2 antennas with substantial amounts of spirilloxanthin (total double-bond conjugation length N=13) if grown anaerobically and of keto-bearing long-chain analogs [2-ketoanhydrorhodovibrin (N=13), 2-ketospirilloxanthin (N=14) and 2,2'-diketospirilloxanthin (N=15)] if grown semi-aerobically (with ratios that depend on growth conditions). We present the photophysical, electronic, and vibrational properties of these carotenoids, both isolated in organic media and assembled within LH2 complexes. Measurements of excited-state energy transfer to the array of excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules (B850) show that the mean lifetime of the first singlet excited state (S1) of the long-chain (N≥13) carotenoids does not change appreciably between organic media and the protein environment. In each case, the S1 state appears to lie lower in energy than that of B850. The energy-transfer yield is ~0.4 in LH2 (from the strain grown aerobically or semi-aerobically), which is less than half that achieved for LH2 that contains short-chain (N≤11) analogues. Collectively, the results suggest that the S1 excited state of the long-chain (N≥13) carotenoids participates little if at all in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer, which occurs predominantly via the carotenoid S2 excited state in these antennas.

  16. Functional assembly of the foreign carotenoid lycopene into the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, achieved by replacement of the native 3-step phytoene desaturase with its 4-step counterpart from Erwinia herbicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Asua, Guillermo; Cogdell, Richard J; Hunter, C Neil

    2002-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms synthesize a diverse range of carotenoids. These pigments are important for the assembly, function and stability of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, and they are used to quench harmful radicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was used as a model system to explore the origin of carotenoid diversity. Replacing the native 3-step phytoene desaturase (CrtI) with the 4-step enzyme from Erwinia herbicola results in significant flux down the spirilloxanthin pathway for the first time in Rb. sphaeroides. In Rb. sphaeroides, the completion of four desaturations to lycopene by the Erwinia CrtI appears to require the absence of CrtC and, in a crtC background, even the native 3-step enzyme can synthesize a significant amount (13%) of lycopene, in addition to the expected neurosporene. We suggest that the CrtC hydroxylase can intervene in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by phytoene desaturase. We investigated the properties of the lycopene-synthesizing strain of Rb. sphaeroides. In the LH2 light-harvesting complex, lycopene transfers absorbed light energy to the bacteriochlorophylls with an efficiency of 54%, which compares favourably with other LH2 complexes that contain carotenoids with 11 conjugated double bonds. Thus, lycopene can join the assembly pathway for photosynthetic complexes in Rb. sphaeroides, and can perform its role as an energy donor to bacteriochlorophylls.

  17. Chronic Exposure to Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Extract Lycogen™ Prevents UVA-Induced Malondialdehyde Accumulation and Procollagen I Down-Regulation in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Hsiu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available UVA contributes to the pathogenesis of skin aging by downregulation of procollagen I content and induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-associated responses. Application of antioxidants such as lycopene has been demonstrated as a convenient way to achieve protection against skin aging. Lycogen™, derived from the extracts of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, exerts several biological effects similar to that of lycopene whereas most of its anti-aging efficacy remains uncertain. In this study, we attempted to examine whether Lycogen™ could suppress malondialdehyde (MDA accumulation and restore downregulated procollagen I expression induced by UVA exposure. In human dermal fibroblasts Hs68 cells, UVA repressed cell viability and decreased procollagen I protein content accompanied with the induction of MMP-1 and MDA accumulation. Remarkably, incubation with 50 µM Lycogen™ for 24 h ameliorated UVA-induced cell death and restored UVA-induced downregulation of procollagen in a dose-related manner. Lycogen™ treatment also prevented the UVA-induced MMP-1 upregulation and intracellular MDA generation in Hs68 cells. Activation of NFκB levels, one of the downstream events induced by UVA irradiation and MMP-1 induction, were also prevented by Lycogen™ administration. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Lycogen™ may be an alternative agent that prevents UVA-induced skin aging and could be used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications.

  18. Effects of the cryptochrome CryB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides on global gene expression in the dark or blue light or in the presence of singlet oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühwirth, Sebastian; Teich, Kristin; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Several regulators are controlling the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Among the proteins affecting photosynthesis gene expression is the blue light photoreceptor cryptochrome CryB. This study addresses the effect of CryB on global gene expression. The data reveal that CryB does not only influence photosynthesis gene expression but also genes for the non-photosynthetic energy metabolism like citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition several genes involved in RNA processing and in transcriptional regulation are affected by a cryB deletion. Although CryB was shown to undergo a photocycle it does not only affect gene expression in response to blue light illumination but also in response to singlet oxygen stress conditions. While there is a large overlap in these responses, some CryB-dependent effects are specific for blue-light or photooxidative stress. In addition to protein-coding genes some genes for sRNAs show CryB-dependent expression. These findings give new insight into the function of bacterial cryptochromes and demonstrate for the first time a function in the oxidative stress response.

  19. Eukaryotic behaviour of a prokaryotic energy-transducing membrane: fully detached vesicular organelles arise by budding from the Rhodobacter sphaeroides intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    A major feature that distinguishes prokaryotic organisms from eukaryotes is their less complex internal structure, in which all membrane-associated functions are thought to be present within a continuous lipid-protein bilayer, rather than with distinct organelles. Contrary to this notion, as described by Tucker and co-workers in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, the application of cryo-electron tomography to the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized ultrastructural complexity within the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) housing the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition to distinguishing invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) and interconnected vesicular structures still attached to the CM, a eukaryote-like ICM budding process was revealed, which results in the formation of fully detached vesicular structures. These bacterial organelles are able to carry out both the light-harvesting and light-driven energy transduction activities necessary for the cells to assume a photosynthetic lifestyle. Their formation is shown to represent the final stage in a membrane invagination and growth process, originating with small CM indentations, which after cell disruption give rise to a membrane fraction that can be separated from mature ICM vesicles by rate-zone sedimentation.

  20. Light induced EPR spectra of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides at 80K: Evidence for reduction of QB by B-branch electron transfer in native reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M. L; Isaacson, R. A.; Abresch, E. C.; Okamura, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides capture solar energy by electron transfer from primary donor, D, to quinone acceptor, QB, through the active A-branch of electron acceptors, but not the inactive B-branch. The light induced EPR spectrum from native RCs that had Fe2+ replaced by Zn2+ was investigated at cryogenic temperature (80K, 35 GHz). In addition to the light induced signal due to formation of D+•QA−• observed previously, a small fraction (~5%) of the signal displayed very different characteristics: (1) The signal was absent in RCs in which the QB was displaced by the inhibitor stigmatellin. (2) Its decay time (τ=6 s) was the same as observed for D+•QB−• in mutant RCs lacking QA, which is significantly slower than for D+•QA−• (τ=30 ms). (3) Its EPR spectrum was identical to that of D+•QB−•. (4) The quantum efficiency for forming the major component of the signal was the same as that found for mutant RCs lacking QA (Φ =0.2%) and was temperature independent. These results are explained by direct photochemical reduction of QB via B-branch electron transfer in a small fraction of native RCs. PMID:18163156

  1. Comparison of H{sub 2} accumulation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131 and its uptake hydrogenase and PHB synthase deficient mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Baek, Jin-Sook [Biomass Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong K. [Department of Life Science, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131 and its mutant strain lacking uptake hydrogenase (Hup{sup -}) and PHB synthase (Phb{sup -}) have been studied on H{sub 2} production and cell growth under different culture conditions. Both strains started producing H{sub 2} from the middle of the logarithmic growth phase and continued until the cell concentration leveled out. The rates of H{sub 2} production were 1.32 and 3.34ml H{sub 2}/mg-dcw for the wild-type and Hup{sup -}/Phb{sup -} mutant strain, respectively, at the optimum conditions. Malate and lactate were better carbon sources than starch, sucrose or glycerol. Approximately 60% of acetic acid was degraded in 48h by the wild-type strain and pH increased to 9.4. However, the Hup{sup -}/Phb{sup -} mutant strain did not grow well and degraded only 19% of acetic acid. The pH ranges of 7.0 were the optimum for the cell growth and pH 7.5 for the H{sub 2} production. Both strains grew and produced hydrogen under the irradiance of 12-120W/m{sup 2}, but cell growth was inhibited over 400W/m{sup 2}. (author)

  2. The Photoheterotrophic Growth of Bacteriochlorophyll Synthase-Deficient Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Is Restored by I44F Mutant Chlorophyll Synthase of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui-Jin; Kim, Hyeonjun; Lee, Jeong K

    2016-05-28

    Chlorophyll synthase (ChlG) and bacteriochlorophyll synthase (BchG) have a high degree of substrate specificity. The BchG mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, BG1 strain, is photosynthetically incompetent. When BG1 harboring chlG of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was cultured photoheterotrophically, colonies arose at a frequency of approximately 10(-8). All the suppressor mutants were determined to have the same mutational change, ChlGI44F. The mutated enzyme ChlGI44F showed BchG activity. Remarkably, BchGF28I, which has the substitution of F at the corresponding 28(th) residue to I, showed ChlG activity. The Km values of ChlGI44F and BchGF28I for their original substrates, chlorophyllide (Chlide) a and bacteriochlorophyllide (Bchlide) a, respectively, were not affected by the mutations, but the Km values of ChlGI44F and BchGF28I for the new substrates Bchlide a and Chlide a, respectively, were more than 10-fold larger than those for their original substrates, suggesting the lower affinities for new substrates. Taken together, I44 and F28 are important for the substrate specificities of ChlG and BchG, respectively. The BchG activity of ChlGI44F and the ChlG activity of BchGF28I further suggest that ChlG and BchG are evolutionarily related enzymes.

  3. Effects of ammonium ion, acetate and aerobic conditions on hydrogen production and expression levels of nitrogenase genes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkoese, Sevilay; Guenduez, Ufuk; Yuecel, Meral [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biological Sciences, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    In the present study, expression levels of nitrogenase encoding nifH and control genes nifA and prrA were examined at different physiological conditions in Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001. In addition to variations in expression levels, changes in hydrogen production and growth were also investigated in response to different concentrations of ammonium source, acetate and aerobic conditions. In the present study, increasing concentration of ammonium chloride was found to be caused decrease in hydrogen production. Glutamate containing medium had the capacity for higher hydrogen production. Hydrogen production was observed even in aerobic conditions. The expression levels of nifH and nifA genes decreased with the increasing concentrations of ammonium chloride. Although the expression of nifA was present in the highest concentrations of NH{sub 4}Cl under anaerobic conditions, no expression was observed under aerobic conditions of the same culture conditions. This was likely due to transcriptional level inhibition of nitrogenase in the presence of ammonium ion. Negative correlation was observed between the expression levels of prrA gene and its target, nifA gene. (author)

  4. Effects of the cryptochrome CryB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides on global gene expression in the dark or blue light or in the presence of singlet oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Frühwirth

    Full Text Available Several regulators are controlling the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Among the proteins affecting photosynthesis gene expression is the blue light photoreceptor cryptochrome CryB. This study addresses the effect of CryB on global gene expression. The data reveal that CryB does not only influence photosynthesis gene expression but also genes for the non-photosynthetic energy metabolism like citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition several genes involved in RNA processing and in transcriptional regulation are affected by a cryB deletion. Although CryB was shown to undergo a photocycle it does not only affect gene expression in response to blue light illumination but also in response to singlet oxygen stress conditions. While there is a large overlap in these responses, some CryB-dependent effects are specific for blue-light or photooxidative stress. In addition to protein-coding genes some genes for sRNAs show CryB-dependent expression. These findings give new insight into the function of bacterial cryptochromes and demonstrate for the first time a function in the oxidative stress response.

  5. Coproporphyrin Excretion and Low Thiol Levels Caused by Point Mutation in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides S-Adenosylmethionine Synthetase Gene ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaty, Monique; Adryanczyk, Géraldine; Roustan, Chloë; Cuiné, Stephan; Lamouroux, Christine; Pignol, David

    2010-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL-106 was found to excrete a large amount of a red compound identified as coproporphyrin III, an intermediate in bacteriochlorophyll and heme synthesis. The mutant, named PORF, is able to grow under phototrophic conditions but has low levels of intracellular cysteine and glutathione and overexpresses the cysteine synthase CysK. The expression of molybdoenzymes such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate reductases is also affected under certain growth conditions. Excretion of coproporphyrin and overexpression of CysK are not directly related but were both found to be consequences of a diminished synthesis of the key metabolite S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The wild-type phenotype is restored when the gene metK encoding SAM synthetase is supplied in trans. The metK gene in the mutant strain has a mutation leading to a single amino acid change (H145Y) in the encoded protein. This point mutation is responsible for a 70% decrease in intracellular SAM content which probably affects the activities of numerous SAM-dependent enzymes such as coproporphyrinogen oxidase (HemN); uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase (CobA), which is involved in siroheme synthesis; and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein A (MoaA). We propose a model showing that the attenuation of the activities of SAM-dependent enzymes in the mutant could be responsible for the coproporphyrin excretion, the low cysteine and glutathione contents, and the decrease in DMSO and nitrate reductase activities. PMID:20038586

  6. Role of the global transcriptional regulator PrrA in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1: combined transcriptome and proteome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Zeng, Xiaohua; Callister, Stephen J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Kaplan, Samuel

    2008-07-01

    The PrrBA two-component regulatory system is a major global regulator in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. In this study we have compared the transcriptome and proteome profiles of the wild type (WT) and mutant PrrA2 cells grown anaerobically, in the dark, with DMSO as electron acceptor. Approximately 25% of the genes present in the genome are PrrA-regulated, at the transcriptional level, either directly or indirectly, by ≥ 2-fold relative to wild type. The genes affected are widespread throughout all COG functional categories, with previously unsuspected “metabolic” genes affected when in the PrrA mutant background. PrrA was found to act both as an activator and a repressor of transcription, with more genes being repressed in the presence of PrrA (9:5 ratio). An analysis of the genes encoding the 1,536 peptides detected through our chromatographic study, which corresponds to 36% coverage of the genome, revealed that approximately 20% of the genes encoding these proteins were positively regulated, whereas approximately 32% were negatively regulated by PrrA, which is in excellent agreement with the percentages obtained for the whole genomic transcriptome profile. In addition, comparison of the transcriptome and proteome mean parameter values chosen between WT and PrrA2 showed good qualitative agreement, indicating that transcript regulation paralleled the corresponding protein abundance, although not one for one. The microarray analysis was validated by direct mRNA measurement of randomly selected, both positively and negatively regulated genes. lacZ transcriptional and kan translational fusions enabled us to map putative PrrA binding sites, as well as revealing potential gene targets for indirect regulation by PrrA.

  7. Trapped Conformational States of Semiquinone (D+•QB−•) Formed by B-Branch Electron Transfer at Low Temperature in Rhodobacter sphaeroides Reaction Centers‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M. L.; Flores, M.; Isaacson, R.; Chang, C.; Abresch, E. C.; Selvaduray, P.; Okamura, M.Y.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides captures light energy by electron transfer between quinones QA and QB, involving a conformational gating step. In this work, conformational states of D+•QB−• were trapped (80K) and studied using EPR spectroscopy in mutant RCs that lack QA in which QB was reduced by the bacteriopheophytin along the B-branch. In mutant RCs frozen in the dark, a light induced EPR signal due to D+•QB−• formed in 30% of the sample with low quantum yield (0.2%–20%) and decayed in 6 s. A small signal with similar characteristics was also observed in native RCs. In contrast, the EPR signal due to D+QB− in mutant RCs illuminated while freezing formed in ~ 95% of the sample that did not decay (τ >107s) at 80K. In all samples, the observed g-values were the same (g=2.0026) indicating that all active QB−• was located in a proximal conformation coupled with the non-heme Fe2+. We propose that before electron transfer at 80K, the majority (~70%) of QB, structurally located in the distal site, cannot be stably reduced, while the minor (~30%) active configurations are in the proximal site. The large difference in the lifetimes of the un-relaxed and relaxed D+•QB−• states is attributed to relaxation of protein residues and internal water molecules that stabilize D+•QB−•. These results demonstrate energetically significant conformational changes involved in stabilizing the D+•QB−• state. The unrelaxed and relaxed states can be considered to be the initial and final states along the reaction coordinate for conformationally-gated electron transfer. PMID:17115698

  8. An isotope-edited FTIR investigation of the role of Ser-L223 in binding quinone (QB) and semiquinone (QB-) in the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabedryk, Eliane; Paddock, Mark L; Okamura, Melvin Y; Breton, Jacques

    2005-11-08

    In the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions occur at the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site. Several nearby residues are important for both binding and redox chemistry involved in the light-induced conversion from Q(B) to quinol Q(B)H(2). Ser-L223 is one of the functionally important residues located near Q(B). To obtain information on the interaction between Ser-L223 and Q(B) and Q(B)(-), isotope-edited Q(B)(-)/Q(B) FTIR difference spectra were measured in a mutant RC in which Ser-L223 is replaced with Ala and compared to the native RC. The isotope-edited IR fingerprint spectra for the C=O [see text] and C=C [see text] modes of Q(B) (Q(B)(-)) in the mutant are essentially the same as those of the native RC. These findings indicate that highly equivalent interactions of Q(B) and Q(B)(-) with the protein occur in both native and mutant RCs. The simplest explanation of these results is that Ser-L223 is not hydrogen bonded to Q(B) or Q(B)(-) but presumably forms a hydrogen bond to a nearby acid group, preferentially Asp-L213. The rotation of the Ser OH proton from Asp-L213 to Q(B)(-) is expected to be an important step in the proton transfer to the reduced quinone. In addition, the reduced quinone remains firmly bound, indicating that other distinct hydrogen bonds are more important for stabilizing Q(B)(-). Implications on the design features of the Q(B) binding site are discussed.

  9. Conformational gating of the electron transfer reaction QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅ in bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides determined by a driving force assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graige, M. S.; Feher, G.; Okamura, M. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of the electron transfer reaction, QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅, was studied in isolated reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by replacing the native Q10 in the QA binding site with quinones having different redox potentials. These substitutions are expected to change the intrinsic electron transfer rate by changing the redox free energy (i.e., driving force) for electron transfer without affecting other events that may be associated with the electron transfer (e.g., protein dynamics or protonation). The electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB was measured by three independent methods: a functional assay involving cytochrome c2 to measure the rate of QA−⋅ oxidation, optical kinetic spectroscopy to measure changes in semiquinone absorption, and kinetic near-IR spectroscopy to measure electrochromic shifts that occur in response to electron transfer. The results show that the rate of the observed electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB does not change as the redox free energy for electron transfer is varied over a range of 150 meV. The strong temperature dependence of the observed rate rules out the possibility that the reaction is activationless. We conclude, therefore, that the independence of the observed rate on the driving force for electron transfer is due to conformational gating, that is, the rate limiting step is a conformational change required before electron transfer. This change is proposed to be the movement, controlled kinetically either by protein dynamics or intermolecular interactions, of QB by ≈5 Å as observed in the x-ray studies of Stowell et al. [Stowell, M. H. B., McPhillips, T. M., Rees, D. C., Soltis, S. M., Abresch, E. & Feher, G. (1997) Science 276, 812–816]. PMID:9751725

  10. Trapped conformational states of semiquinone (D+*QB-*) formed by B-branch electron transfer at low temperature in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M L; Flores, M; Isaacson, R; Chang, C; Abresch, E C; Selvaduray, P; Okamura, M Y

    2006-11-28

    The reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides captures light energy by electron transfer between quinones QA and QB, involving a conformational gating step. In this work, conformational states of D+*QB-* were trapped (80 K) and studied using EPR spectroscopy in native and mutant RCs that lack QA in which QB was reduced by the bacteriopheophytin along the B-branch. In mutant RCs frozen in the dark, a light induced EPR signal due to D+*QB-* formed in 30% of the sample with low quantum yield (0.2%-20%) and decayed in 6 s. A small signal with similar characteristics was also observed in native RCs. In contrast, the EPR signal due to D+*QB-* in mutant RCs illuminated while freezing formed in approximately 95% of the sample did not decay (tau >107 s) at 80 K (also observed in the native RC). In all samples, the observed g-values were the same (g = 2.0026), indicating that all active QB-*'s were located in a proximal conformation coupled with the nonheme Fe2+. We propose that before electron transfer at 80 K, the majority (approximately 70%) of QB, structurally located in the distal site, was not stably reducible, whereas the minority (approximately 30%) of active configurations was in the proximal site. The large difference in the lifetimes of the unrelaxed and relaxed D+*QB-* states is attributed to the relaxation of protein residues and internal water molecules that stabilize D+*QB-*. These results demonstrate energetically significant conformational changes involved in stabilizing the D+*QB-* state. The unrelaxed and relaxed states can be considered to be the initial and final states along the reaction coordinate for conformationally gated electron transfer.

  11. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M](+•)) and negative ([M](-•)) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R. I.; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a ( BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M]+•) and negative ([M]-•) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward.

  13. Partial steps of charge translocation in the nonpumping N139L mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase with a blocked D-channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Zhu, Jiapeng; Gennis, Robert B; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2010-04-13

    The N139L substitution in the D-channel of cytochrome oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides results in an approximately 15-fold decrease in the turnover number and a loss of proton pumping. Time-resolved absorption and electrometric assays of the F --> O transition in the N139L mutant oxidase result in three major findings. (1) Oxidation of the reduced enzyme by O(2) shows approximately 200-fold inhibition of the F --> O step (k approximately 2 s(-1) at pH 8) which is not compatible with enzyme turnover ( approximately 30 s(-1)). Presumably, an abnormal intermediate F(deprotonated) is formed under these conditions, one proton-deficient relative to a normal F state. In contrast, the F --> O transition in N139L oxidase induced by single-electron photoreduction of intermediate F, generated by reaction of the oxidized enzyme with H(2)O(2), decelerates to an extent compatible with enzyme turnover. (2) In the N139L mutant, the protonic phase of Deltapsi generation coupled to the flash-induced F --> O transition greatly decreases in rate and magnitude and can be assigned to the movement of a proton from E286 to the binuclear site, required for reduction of heme a(3) from the Fe(4+) horizontal lineO(2-) state to the Fe(3+)-OH(-) state. Electrogenic reprotonation of E286 from the inner aqueous phase is missing from the F --> O step in the mutant. (3) In the N139L mutant, the KCN-insensitive rapid electrogenic phase may be composed of two components with lifetimes of approximately 10 and approximately 40 mus and a magnitude ratio of approximately 3:2. The 10 mus phase matches vectorial electron transfer from Cu(A) to heme a, whereas the 40 mus component is assigned to intraprotein proton displacement across approximately 20% of the membrane dielectric thickness. This proton displacement might be triggered by rotation of the charged K362 side chain coupled to heme a reduction. The two components of the rapid electrogenic phase have been resolved subsequently with other D

  14. Heterologous Production of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center and Light Harvesting 1 Complexes of the Thermophile Thermochromatium tepidum in the Mesophile Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermal Stability of a Hybrid Core Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, D; Huang, V; Beatty, J T

    2017-10-15

    The photosynthetic complexes of the thermophile Thermochromatium tepidum are of considerable interest in biohybrid solar cell applications because of the ability of thermophilic proteins to tolerate elevated temperatures. Synthetic operons encoding reaction center (RC) and light harvesting 1 (LH1) pigment-protein complexes of T. tepidum were expressed in the mesophile Rhodobacter sphaeroides The T. tepidum RC (TRC) was assembled and was found to be functional with the addition of menadione to populate the QA pocket. The production of T. tepidum LH1 (TLH1) was increased by selection of a phototrophy-capable mutant after UV irradiation mutagenesis, which yielded a hybrid RC-TLH1 core complex consisting of the R. sphaeroides RC and T. tepidum TLH1, confirmed by the absorbance peak of TLH1 at 915 nm. Affinity chromatography partial purification and subsequent sucrose gradient analysis of the hybrid RC-TLH1 core complex indicated that this core complex assembled as a monomer. Furthermore, the RC-TLH1 hybrid core complex was more tolerant of a temperature of 70°C than the R. sphaeroides RC-LH1 core complexes in both the dimeric and monomeric forms; after 1 h, the hybrid complex retained 58% of the initial starting value, compared to values of 11% and 53% for the R. sphaeroides RC-LH1 dimer and monomer forms, respectively.IMPORTANCE This work is important because it is a new approach to bioengineering of photosynthesis proteins for potential use in biophotovoltaic solar energy capture. The work establishes a proof of principle for future biohybrid solar cell applications. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Spectral Diffusion and Electron-Phonon Coupling of the B800 BChl a Molecules in LH2 Complexes from Three Different Species of Purple Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, J.; Gabrielsen, M.; Oellerich, S.; Michel, H.; van Heel, M.; Cogdell, R.J.; Köhler, J.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the spectral diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling of B800 bacteriochlorophyll a molecules in the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 for three different species of purple bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum molischianum, and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. We come to the conclusion that B800 binding pockets for Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are rather similar with respect to the polarity of the protein environment but that the packaging of the αβ-polypeptides seems to be less tight in Rb. sphaeroides with respect to the other two species. PMID:19883604

  16. 浑球红细菌(Rhodobacter sphaeroides)中氢化酶正调节基因hupR的克隆及功能分析%Isolation and Analysis of hupR Gene Required for the Expression of Hydrogenase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐冬青; 吴永强

    2001-01-01

    Cosmid 1 containing the hup genes isolated from the photosynthetic b acterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied. The hupR gene from cosmid 1 was cl oned and sequenced (EMBL accession number AJ243734). It encoded a 54.031 kD prot ein homologous to transcriptional regulators belonging to the superfamily of two -component regulatory systems. The HupR protein was overexpressed in Escheric hia coli in the form of His6-tagged HupR. The cloned hupR gene could res tore hydrog enase activity in R. Sphaeroides hupR mutants and activate hupSL gene transcription.%从光合细菌Rhodobacter sphaeroides基因文库中分离出含有氢化酶基因簇(hup)的粘粒cosmid 1后, 亚克隆了R. sphaeroides的氢化酶调节基因hupR, 测定了hupR的核苷酸序列, 并完成了氢化酶基因簇的部分物理图谱. 实验结果表明, hupR基因全长1 476 bp, 编码的HupR蛋白分子量约为54.031 kD (EMBL接受号: AJ243734). 与R. capsulatus中HupR相比, 同源性高达73%. 同源性比较结果表明, 它属于双组分调节系统中受体蛋白. hupR基因在E. coli中进行了体外表达, 纯化后测定得到的HupR蛋白的分子量大小与hupR基因推测的分子量大小一致. 通过双交换, 将卡那霉素抗性基因插入hupR基因, 获得丧失氢化酶活性的hupR-的突变株, KR5和KR7. hupS∷lacZ融合基因在野生型中的转录表达量是在该突变株中的7~9倍. 将hupR基因置于弱启动子pfru下游, 构建了质粒pNRC3, 并将其导入hupR-的突变株, 可使突变株重新获得氢化酶活性. 以上结果说明, HupR蛋白对氢化酶的转录表达起着正调节作用. 在HupR蛋白的磷酸化区域进行定点和缺失突变, 不影响HupR激活氢化酶基因的表达, 推测HupR蛋白是在非磷酸化的状态下起调节作用的.

  17. Formation of charge separated state P+OA- and triplet state 3P at low temperature in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R-26) reaction centers in which bacteriopheophytin a is replaced by plant pheophytin a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkuropatov Aya; Proskuryakov, I I; Shkuropatova, V A; Zvereva, M G; Shuvalov, V A

    1994-09-05

    Low temperature optical and photochemical properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R-26) reaction centers, in which bacteriopheophytin a has been replaced by plant pheophytin a, are reported. Modified reaction centers preserve the ability for photoinduced electron transfer from the primary electron donor P to the primary quinone acceptor QA at 80K. The triplet state ESR signal of modified reaction centers with prereduced QA at 10K shows an electron spin polarization pattern and ZFS parameters analogous to those for the triplet state 3P in non-treated reaction centers. It was found that at low temperature both P+QA- and 3P states are formed via a precursor radical pair P+I- in which I is the introduced plant pheophytin molecule. This shows that acceptor systems of bacterial and plant (photosystem II) reaction centers are mutually replacable in structural and functional aspects.

  18. Relationship of proton motive force and the F(0)F (1)-ATPase with bio-hydrogen production activity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: effects of diphenylene iodonium, hydrogenase inhibitor, and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Gabrielyan, Lilit; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-08-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC 6521 was able to produce bio-hydrogen (H(2)) in anaerobic conditions under illumination. In this study the effects of the hydrogenase inhibitor-diphenylene iodonium (Ph(2)I) and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) on growth characteristics and H(2) production by R. sphaeroides were investigated. The results point out the concentration dependent DMSO effect: in the presence of 10 mM DMSO H(2) yield was ~6 fold lower than that of the control. The bacterium was unable to produce H(2) in the presence of Ph(2)I. In order to examine the mediatory role of proton motive force (∆p) or the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides, the effects of Ph(2)I and DMSO on ∆p and its components (membrane potential (∆ψ) and transmembrane pH gradient), and ATPase activity were determined. In these conditions ∆ψ was of -98 mV and the reversed ∆pH was +30 mV, resulting in ∆p of -68 mV. Ph(2)I decreased ∆ψ in concentrations of 20 μM and higher; lower concentrations of Ph(2)I as DMSO had no valuable effect on ∆ψ. The R. sphaeroides membrane vesicles demonstrated significant ATPase activity sensitive to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The 10-20 μM Ph(2)I did not affect the ATPase activity, whereas 40 μM Ph(2)I caused a marked inhibition (~2 fold) in ATPase activity. The obtained results provide novel evidence on the involvement of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides. Moreover, these data indicate the role of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in ∆p generation. In addition, DMSO might increase an interaction of nitrogenase with CO(2), decreasing nitrogenase activity and affecting H(2) production.

  19. Effect of co-substrate on production of poly-β- hydroxybutyrate (PHB and copolymer PHBV from newly identified mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides U7 cultivated under aerobic-dark condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemarajt Kemavongse

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic bacterial mutant strain U7 was identified using both classical and molecular (16S rDNA techniques to be Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The glutamate-acetate (GA medium containing sodium acetate and sodium glutamate as carbon and nitrogen sources was used for production of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB from R. sphaeroides U7 cultivated under aerobic-dark condition (200 rpm at 37oC. Effect of auxiliary carbon sources (propionate and valerate and concentrations (molar ratio of 40/0, 40/20, 40/40 and 40/80 on copolymer production were studied. Both combinations of acetate with valerate and acetate with propionate were found to induce the accumulation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate-co-β-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV within the cell. Acetate with propionate in the molar ratio of 40/40 gave the highest poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA content (77.68%, followed by acetate with valerate at the same molar ratio (77.42%. Although their polymer contents were similar, the presence of 40 mM valerate gave more than 4 times higher hydroxyvalerate (HV fraction (84.77% than in the presence of 40 mM propionate (19.12% HV fraction.

  20. The functional importance of a pair of conserved glutamic acid residues and of Ca2+ binding in the cbb3–type oxygen reductases from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hanlin; Han, Huazhi; Roh, Jung H.; Hemp, James; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Gennis, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    The cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases are members of the heme-copper proton pumping respiratory oxygen reductases. The structure of the cbb3-type oxidase from Pseudomonas stutzeri reveals that, in addition to the six redox-active metal centers (two hemes b, three hemes c and CuB), the enzyme also contains at least one Ca2+. The calcium bridges two propionate carboxyls at the interface between the low-spin heme b and the active-site heme b3 and, in addition, is ligated to a serine in subunit CcoO and by a glutamate in CcoN. The glutamate that is ligated to Ca2+ is one of a pair of glutamic acid residues that has previously been suggested to be part of a proton exit pathway for pumped protons. In the current work, mutants in these glutamates are investigated in the cbb3-type oxidases from Vibrio cholerae and from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Metal analysis shows that each of these wild type enzymes contains Ca2+. Mutations of the glutamate expected to ligate the Ca2+ in each of these enzymes (E126 in V. cholerae; E180 in R. sphaeroides) result in the loss of activity as well as loss of Ca2+. Mutations in the nearby glutamate (E129 in V. cholerae; E183 in R. sphaeroides) also resulted in loss of oxidase activity and loss of Ca2+. It is concluded that the Ca2+ is essential for assembly of the fully functional enzyme and that neither of the glutamates is likely to be part of a pathway for pumped protons within the cbb3-type oxygen reductases. A more likely role for these glutamates is the maintenance of the structural integrity of the active conformation of the enzyme. PMID:22913716

  1. Application of the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach to the Proteome Analysis of Sub-cellular Fractions Obtained from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 Aerobic and Photosynthetic Cell Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, Stephen J.; Dominguez, Migual; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Tavano, Christine; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-08-04

    Abstract The high-throughput accurate mass and time tag (AMT) proteomic approach was utilized to characterize the proteomes for cytoplasm, cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane fractions from aerobic and photosynthetic cultures of the gram-nagtive bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. In addition, we analyzed the proteins within purified chromatophore fractions that house the photosynthetic apparatus from photosynthetically grown cells. In total, 8300 peptides were identified with high confidence from at least one sub-cellular fraction from either cell culture. These peptides were derived from 1514 genes or 35% percent of proteins predicted to be encoded by the genome. A significant number of these proteins were detected within a single sub-cellular fraction and their localization was compared to in-silico predictions. However, the majority of proteins were observed in multiple sub-cellular fractions, and the most likely sub-cellular localization for these proteins was investigated using a Z-score analysis of peptide abundance along with clustering techniques. Good (81%) agreement was observed between the experimental results and in-silico predictions. The AMT tag approach provides localization evidence for those proteins that have no predicted localization information, those annotated as putative proteins, and/or for those proteins annotated as hypothetical and conserved hypothetical.

  2. Oligomerization and enzyme activity analysis on inorganic pyrophosphatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides%球形红细菌无机焦磷酸酶的寡聚化及酶活性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈果果; 孙梅好

    2016-01-01

    球形红细菌(Rhodobacter sphaeroides)是一种重要的微生物资源,其无机焦磷酸酶(PPase)属于Ⅱ型可溶性焦磷酸酶.通过原核表达和纯化,得到了正常型RsPPase和突变型RsPPasemono,进一步进行了寡聚化和酶活性分析.结果表明:突变型RsPPasemono为单聚体,在钴离子存在条件下会导致谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(glutathione sulfotransferase,GST)标签进行蛋白酶切,且去标签后的RsPPasemono催化效率较高(Kcat/Km(PPi)=12.64L·μmol-1·min-1),相对于RsPPase-GST提高了12倍;在无钴离子存在条件下仍能进行蛋白酶切,且保持催化效率(Kcat/Km(PPi) =0.34 L·μmol-1·min-1).

  3. Application of the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach to the Proteome Analysis of Sub-cellular Fractions Obtained from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. Aerobic and Photosynthetic Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Stephen J.; Dominguez, Miguel A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Tavano, Christine L.; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy J.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    The high-throughput accurate mass and time (AMT) tag proteomic approach was utilized to characterize the proteomes for cytoplasm, cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane fractions from aerobic and photosynthetic cultures of the gram-nagtive bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. In addition, we analyzed the proteins within purified chromatophore fractions that house the photosynthetic apparatus from photosynthetically grown cells. In total, 8300 peptides were identified with high confidence from at least one subcellular fraction from either cell culture. These peptides were derived from 1514 genes or 35% percent of proteins predicted to be encoded by the genome. A significant number of these proteins were detected within a single subcellular fraction and their localization was compared to in silico predictions. However, the majority of proteins were observed in multiple subcellular fractions, and the most likely subcellular localization for these proteins was investigated using a Z-score analysis of estimated protein abundance along with clustering techniques. Good (81%) agreement was observed between the experimental results and in silico predictions. The AMT tag approach provides localization evidence for those proteins that have no predicted localization information, those annotated as putative proteins, and/or for those proteins annotated as hypothetical and conserved hypothetical. PMID:16889416

  4. Catalytically-relevant electron transfer between two hemes bL in the hybrid cytochrome bc1-like complex containing a fusion of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and capsulatus cytochromes b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla, Monika; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2013-06-01

    To address mechanistic questions about the functioning of dimeric cytochrome bc1 new genetic approaches have recently been developed. They were specifically designed to enable construction of asymmetrically-mutated variants suitable for functional studies. One approach exploited a fusion of two cytochromes b that replaced the separate subunits in the dimer. The fusion protein, built from two copies of the same cytochrome b of purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, served as a template to create a series of asymmetrically-mutated cytochrome bc1-like complexes (B-B) which, through kinetic studies, disclosed several important principles of dimer engineering. Here, we report on construction of another fusion protein complex that adds a new tool to investigate dimeric function of the enzyme through the asymmetrically mutated forms of the protein. This complex (BS-B) contains a hybrid protein that combines two different cytochromes b: one coming from R. capsulatus and the other - from a closely related species, R. sphaeroides. With this new fusion we addressed a still controversial issue of electron transfer between the two hemes bL in the core of dimer. Kinetic data obtained with a series of BS-B variants provided new evidence confirming the previously reported observations that electron transfer between those two hemes occurs on a millisecond timescale, thus is a catalytically-relevant event. Both types of the fusion complexes (B-B and BS-B) consistently implicate that the heme-bL-bL bridge forms an electronic connection available for inter-monomer electron transfer in cytochrome bc1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rhodobacter megalophilus sp. nov., a phototroph from the Indian Himalayas possessing a wide temperature range for growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunasri, K; Venkata Ramana, V; Spröer, C; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2008-08-01

    Two strains of phototrophic, purple non-sulfur bacteria capable of growing at low temperatures (5 degrees C) were isolated from the Himalayas. The two strains showed positive phototaxis and grew over a relatively wide temperature range (5-40 degrees C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain JA194T clustered with members of the genus Rhodobacter. Strain JA194T showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158T (99 %). However, DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between Rba. sphaeroides DSM 158T and strain JA194T revealed a level of relatedness of only 67 %. The DNA base composition of strain JA194T was 66.67 mol% G+C (by HPLC). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, morphological, physiological, Fourier transform infrared fingerprinting and DNA-DNA hybridization studies, strain JA194T (=KCTC 5602T =JCM 14598T) is sufficiently different from other Rhodobacter species to merit its description as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Rhodobacter megalophilus sp. nov. is proposed.

  6. Steady-state FTIR spectra of the photoreduction of QA and QB in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers provide evidence against the presence of a proposed transient electron acceptor X between the two quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jacques

    2007-04-17

    In the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, two ubiquinone molecules, QA and QB, play a pivotal role in the conversion of light energy into chemical free energy by coupling electron transfer to proton uptake. In native RCs, the transfer of an electron from QA to QB takes place in the time range of 5-200 micros. On the basis of time-resolved FTIR step-scan measurements in native RCs, a new and unconventional mechanism has been proposed in which QB- formation precedes QA- oxidation [Remy, A., and Gerwert, K. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 637-644]. The IR signature of the proposed transient intermediary electron acceptor (denoted X) operating between QA and QB has been recently measured by the rapid-scan technique in the DN(L210) mutant RCs, in which the QA to QB electron transfer is slowed 8-fold compared to that in native RCs. This IR signature has been reported as a difference spectrum involving states X+, X, QA, and QA- [Hermes, S., et al. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 13741-13749]. Here, we report the steady-state FTIR difference spectra of the photoreduction of either QA or QB measured in both native and DN(L210) mutant RCs in the presence of potassium ferrocyanide. In these spectra, the CN stretching marker modes of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide allow the extent of the redox reactions to be quantitatively compared and are used for a precise normalization of the QA-/QA and QB-/QB difference spectra. The calculated QA- QB/QA QB- double-difference spectrum in DN(L210) mutant RCs is closely equivalent to the reported QA- X+/QA X spectrum in the rapid-scan measurement. We therefore conclude that species X+ and X are spectrally indistinguishable from QB and QB-, respectively. Further comparison of the QA- QB/QA QB- double-difference spectra in native and DN(L210) RCs also allows the possibility that QB- formation precedes QA- reoxidation to be ruled out for native RCs.

  7. Prokaryotic Expression, Purification and Preliminary Analysis on Inorganic Pyrophosphatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides%球形红细菌无机焦磷酸酶的原核表达、纯化及初步分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄园波; 王艳兴; 戴梦瑶; 马建辉; 孙梅好

    2013-01-01

    无机焦磷酸酶(inorganic pyrophosphatase,PPase)水解在许多生物大分子的生物合成过程中产生焦磷酸并释放能量,形成的热力学拉力可促进合成反应的进行.球形红细菌(Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1)无机焦磷酸酶(RsPPase)属于Ⅱ型可溶性焦磷酸酶,钴离子对于其活性的维持具有重要的功能,而其活性调控及其表达对细菌生长的影响尚未报道.研究克隆、原核表达纯化RsPPase.结果发现,钴离子会导致谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(glutathione sulfotransferase,GST)标签不能进行蛋白酶切,且融合蛋白GST-PPase水解焦磷酸的催化效率较低(Km/kcat=2.0×104 mol/(L·s));在球形红细菌胞内表达大肠杆菌焦磷酸酶(Km/kcat=5.5×107 mol/(L·s))没有影响细菌的生长,暗示球形红细菌胞内PPase活性足够高.通过对其结构的模拟推测,在钴离子存在的情况下为闭合构象,GST标签的存在可能影响PPase羧基端结构域的运动,而影响其结合底物和释放产物的能力;在钴离子不存在的情况下为开放构象,GST标签具有较大的自由度,可暴露蛋白酶识别位点酶切产生无标签RsPPase.

  8. Hydrogen production from starch by co-culture of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides in one step hybrid dark- and photofermentation in repeated fed-batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrodnik, R; Łaniecki, M

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen production from starch by a co-culture hybrid dark and photofermentation under repeated fed-batch conditions at different organic loading rates (OLR) was studied. Effective cooperation between bacteria in co-culture during initial days was observed at controlled pH 7.0. However, at pH above 6.5 dark fermentation phase was redirected from H2 formation towards production of formic acid, lactic acid and ethanol (which are not coupled with hydrogen production) with simultaneous lower starch removal efficiency. This resulted in decrease in the hydrogen production rate. The highest H2 production in co-culture process (3.23LH2/Lmedium - after 11days) was achieved at OLR of 1.5gstarch/L/day, and it was twofold higher than for dark fermentation process (1.59LH2/Lmedium). The highest H2 yield in the co-culture (2.62molH2/molhexose) was obtained at the OLR of 0.375gstarch/L/day. Different pH requirements of bacteria were proven to be a key limitation in co-culture system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Regulation of Photosynthetic Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Nonsulfur Purple Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabita, Fred Robert [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanism by which a transcriptional activator protein affects CO2 fixation (cbb) gene expression in nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria, with special emphasis to Rhodobacter sphaeroides and with comparison to Rhodopseudomonas palustris. These studies culminated in several publications which indicated that additional regulators interact with the master regulator CbbR in both R. sphaeroides and R. palustris. In addition, the interactive control of the carbon and nitrogen assimilatory pathways was studied and unique regulatory signals were discovered.

  10. State estimation of a batch hydrogen production process using the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, Jamila; Magnin, Jean-Pierre [Grenoble University, LEPMI, UMR 5631 (CNRS-INPG-UJF), Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico chimie des Materiaux et Interfaces, BP 75, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres (France); Flaus, Jean-Marie; Adrot, Olivier [Grenoble University, G-SCOP UMR 272 (CNRS-INPG-UJF), Laboratoire des Sciences pour la Conception, l' Optimisation et la Production, 46, avenue Felix Viallet, 38031 Grenoble (France); Willison, John C. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Metaux (UMR 5249 CEA-CNRS-UJF), iRTSV/LCBM, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2010-10-15

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the states of an anaerobic photosynthetic process used for biohydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The process is described by a non-linear, time-discrete model and the state estimation is solved using an observer based on the Moving-Horizon State Estimation Method (MHSE). This approach is based on the minimization of a criterion (a non-linear function), in this case, the difference between the estimated output and the measured output of the system over a considered time horizon, where the solution is computed by using a numerical interval method. The observer was successfully applied to hydrogen production by R. capsulatus strain B10 in a batch process. (author)

  11. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus Hup{sup -} strain on acetate in continuous panel photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo Androga, Dominic; Ozgur, Ebru; Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Guenduez, Ufuk [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biology

    2010-07-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production from organic acids occurs in the presence of light and under anaerobic conditions. Stable and optimized operation of the photobioreactors is the most challenging task in the photofermentation process. The aim of this study was to achieve a stable and high hydrogen production on acetate, using the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus Hup{sup -} (uptake hydrogenase deleted strain) in continuous panel photobioreactors. An indoor experiment with continuous illumination (1500-2500 lux, corresponding to 101-169 W/m{sup 2}) and controlled temperature was carried out in a 8 L panel photobioreactor. A modified form of basal culture media containing 40 mM of acetate and 2 mM of glutamate with a feeding rate of 0.8 L/day was used. Stable hydrogen productivity of 0.7 mmol H{sub 2}/l{sub c}.h was obtained, however, biomass decreased during the continuous operation. Further indoor experiments with a biomass recycle and different feed compositions were carried out to optimise the feed composition for a stable biomass and hydrogen production. The highest hydrogen productivity of 0.8 mmol H{sub 2}/l{sub c}.h and yield of 88% was obtained in the 40 mM/ 4 mM acetate/glutamate continuously fed photobioreactor for a period of 21 days. (orig.)

  12. Electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy supports the suggested coordination of two histidine ligands to the Rieske Fe-S centers of the cytochrome b sub 6 f complex of spinach and the cytochrome bc sub 1 complexes of Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26, and bovine heart mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, R.D.; Sauer, K.; Klein, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Knaff, D.B.; Kriauciunas, A. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock (USA)); Yu, Changan; Yu, Linda (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA)); Malkin, R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1991-02-19

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments performed on the Rieske Fe-S clusters of the cytochrome b{sub 6}f complex of spinach chloroplasts and of the cytochrome bc{sub 1} complexes of Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26, and bovine heart mitochondria show modulation components resulting from two distinct classes of {sup 14}N ligands. At the g = 1.92 region of the Rieske EPR spectrum of the cytochrome b{sub 6}f complex, the measured hyperfine couplings for the two classes of coupled nitrogens are A{sub 1} = 4.6 MHz and A{sub 2} = 3.8 MHz. Similar couplings are observed for the Rieske centers in the three cytochrome bc{sub 1} complexes. These ESEEM results indicate a nitrogen coordination environment for these Rieske Fe-S centers that is similar to that of the Fe-S cluster of a bacterial dioxygenase enzyme with two coordinated histidine ligands. The Rieske Fe-S cluster lacks modulation components from a weakly coupled peptide nitrogen observed in water-soluble spinach ferredoxin. Treatment with the quinone analogue inhibitor DBMIB causes a shift in the Rieske EPR spectrum to g = 1.95 with no alteration in the magnetic couplings to the two nitrogen atoms. However, the ESEEM pattern of the DBMIB-altered Rieske EPR signal shows evidence of an additional weakly coupled nitrogen similar to that observed in the spinach ferrodoxin ESEEM patterns.

  13. Continuous Cultivation of Photosynthetic Bacteria for Fatty Acids Production

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations.At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4 d, cell concentration continuously increased from 0.97 g dcw/L to 2.05 g dcw/L as lactate concentration increased from 30 mM to 60 mM. At 70 mM, however, cell concentration fluctuated with incomple...

  14. The study of photo-induced ultrafast dynamics in light-harvesting complex LH2 of purple bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-min; YAN Yong-li; LIU Kang-jun; XU Chun-he; QIAN Shi-xiong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,we introduce the photo-induced ultrafast dynamics taking place in the peripheral light harvesting antenna LH2 from purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides by using absorption,fluorescence emission and ultrafast spectroscopic techniques.Three kinds of LH2 sampies,pH treated LH2 (complete removal of B800 pigments),carotenoid mutated LH2 (GM 309) and electrochemical oxidation treated LH2 were used in comparison with native LH2 to investigate the mechanism of photo-induced ultrafast energy transfer within the LH2 complex.

  15. Rhodobacter capsulatus nifA1 Promoter: High-GC −10 Regions in High-GC Bacteria and the Basis for Their Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Cynthia L.; Tandon, Animesh; Kranz, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    It was previously shown that the Rhodobacter capsulatus NtrC enhancer-binding protein activates the R. capsulatus housekeeping RNA polymerase but not the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase at the nifA1 promoter. We have tested the hypothesis that this activity is due to the high G+C content of the −10 sequence. A comparative analysis of R. capsulatus and other α-proteobacterial promoters with known transcription start sites suggests that the G+C content of the −10 region is higher than that for ...

  16. Improved hydrogen production by coupled systems of hydrogenase negative photosynthetic bacteria and fermentative bacteria in reverse micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anita [Centre for Biotechnology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Misra, Krishna [Indo-Russian Center for Bioinformatics, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad 211011 (India)

    2008-11-15

    Significant improvement in biological hydrogen production is achieved by the use of coupled bacterial cells in reverse micellar systems. Two coupled systems (a) Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009/Citrobacter Y19, and (b) Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1/Citrobacter Y19 bacteria have been immobilized separately in aqueous pool of the reverse micelles fabricated by various surfactants (AOT, CBAC and SDS) and apolar organic solvents (benzene and isooctane). The gene for uptake hydrogenase enzyme has been manipulated further for hydrogen generation. Mutants deficient in uptake hydrogenase (Hup{sup -}) were obtained from R. palustris CGA009 and R. sphaeroides 2.4.1, and entrapped with Citrobacter Y19 in the reverse micellar systems. More than two fold increase in hydrogen production was obtained by the use of Hup{sup -} mutants instead of wild-type photosynthetic bacteria together with Citrobacter Y19. Addition of sodium dithionite, a reducing agent to AOT/H{sub 2}O/isooctane reverse micellar system with the coupled systems of wild-type photosynthetic bacteria and fermentative bacterium Y19 effected similar increase in hydrogen production rate as it is obtained by the use of mutants. CBAC/H{sub 2}O/isooctane reverse micellar system is used for the first time for hydrogen production and is as promising as AOT/H{sub 2}O/isooctane reverse micellar system. All reverse micellar systems of coupled bacterial cultures gave encouraging hydrogen production (rate as well as yield) compared to uncoupled bacterial culture. (author)

  17. Mechanisms for hydrogen production by different bacteria during mixed-acid and photo-fermentation and perspectives of hydrogen production biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trchounian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    H2 has a great potential as an ecologically-clean, renewable and capable fuel. It can be mainly produced via hydrogenases (Hyd) by different bacteria, especially Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The operation direction and activity of multiple Hyd enzymes in E. coli during mixed-acid fermentation might determine H2 production; some metabolic cross-talk between Hyd enzymes is proposed. Manipulating the activity of different Hyd enzymes is an effective way to enhance H2 production by E. coli in biotechnology. Moreover, a novel approach would be the use of glycerol as feedstock in fermentation processes leading to H2 production. Mixed carbon (sugar and glycerol) utilization studies enlarge the kind of organic wastes used in biotechnology. During photo-fermentation under limited nitrogen conditions, H2 production by Rh. sphaeroides is observed when carbon and nitrogen sources are supplemented. The relationship of H2 production with H(+) transport across the membrane and membrane-associated ATPase activity is shown. On the other hand, combination of carbon sources (succinate, malate) with different nitrogen sources (yeast extract, glutamate, glycine) as well as different metal (Fe, Ni, Mg) ions might regulate H2 production. All these can enhance H2 production yield by Rh. sphaeroides in biotechnology Finally, two of these bacteria might be combined to develop and consequently to optimize two stages of H2 production biotechnology with high efficiency transformation of different organic sources.

  18. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5' Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5' UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5' UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5' UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5' UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae.

  19. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5’ Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5’ UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5’ UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5’ UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5’ UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. PMID:27802301

  20. Continuous cultivation of photosynthetic bacteria for fatty acids production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations. At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4d, cell concentration continuously increased from 0.97 g dcw/L to 2.05 g dcw/L as lactate concentration increased from 30 mM to 60mM. At 70 mM, however, cell concentration fluctuated with incomplete substrate degradation. By installing a membrane unit to CFSTR, a stable performance was observed under much higher substrate loading (lactate 100mM and HRT 1.5d). A maximum cell concentration of 16.2g dcw/L, cell productivity of 1.9 g dcw/L/d, and FA productivity of 665 mg FA/L/d were attained, and these values were comparable with those achieved using microalgae. The FA content of R. sphaeroides was around 35% of dry cell weight, mainly composed of vaccenic acid (C18:1, omega-7).

  1. Kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase from R. sphaeroides initiated by direct electron transfer followed by tr-SEIRAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Christoph; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L C

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy (tr-SEIRAS) has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The enzyme was converted electrochemically into the fully reduced state. Thereafter, in the presence of oxygen, the potential was switched to open circuit potential (OCP). Under these conditions, the enzyme is free to undergo enzymatic oxidation in the absence of an external electric field. Tr-SEIRAS was performed using the step-scan technique, triggered by periodic potential pulses switching between - 800mV and OCP. Single bands were resolved in a broad band in the amide I region using phase sensitive detection. Amplitudes of these bands were analyzed as a function of time. Time constants in the ms time scale were considered in terms of conformational changes of the protein secondary structures associated with the enzymatic turnover of the protein.

  2. Molecular Mechanism of Solar Energy Harvesting by Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria%紫色光合细菌捕获太阳能的分子机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万能; 陈国平; 胡宗利; 李尽哲; 何帅

    2011-01-01

    光合作用是地球上最重要的化学反应,生物体通过它捕获太阳能,转为化学能供生长繁殖需要.光合细菌是地球上最早出现的具有原始光能合成体系的微生物,其光合反应中心是一个由多种色素分子与蛋白质以非共价键方式结合的、具有特定构象的色素-蛋白复合体-光反应中心RC(Reaction center)和LH(Light Harvesting),光能通过电荷分离及电子转移反应转化为化学能,其效率是当前人工模拟远远不能及的.本文综述了紫色光合细菌捕获太阳能的分子结构、作用机理的研究进展,并结合作者在R.sphaeroides LHII蛋白组份同源及异源基因表达方面的研究结果进行相应的分析,明确了Rhodobacter sphaeroides基因组中同源基因puc2BA的表达特点和功能,Rhodovulum sulfidophilum pucsBA与R.sphaeroides pufBA能够同时在R.sphaeroides中表达,能同时形成LHII和LHI,并具有能量传递功能.%Photosynthesis is arguably the most important biological process, by it organisms harvest solar energy and transfer it into chemical energy for growth and reproduction.The photosynthetic bacteria are the earliest microbe with photosynthesis found on earth.The photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria is a nanometric assembly in the intracytoplasmic membranes and consists of pigment-protein complexes, the photosynthetic RC (Reaction center) and LH (Light harvesting).The primary processes of photosynthesis involve absorption of photons by LH complexes, transfer of excitation energy from the LH complexes to the photosynthetic RC, where the primary energy conversion takes place.The researches on molecular structure and mechanism of purple photosynthetic bacteria harvesting solar energy were summarized.Molecular biology techniques and spectroscopic analysis were applied to research the expression and function of puc2BA and pucsBA by the authors, and it was concluded that the puc2BA gene was normally expressed in Rhodobacter

  3. Interaction and Synergism of Microbial Fuel Cell Bacteria within Methanogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David

    2004-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production from waste biomass has both terrestrial and Martian advanced life support applications. On earth, biological hydrogen production is being explored as a greenhouse neutral form of clean and efficient energy. In a permanently enclosed space habitat, carbon loop closure is required to reduce mission costs. Plants are grown to revitalize oxygen supply and are consumed by habitat inhabitants. Unharvested portions must then be recycled for reuse in the habitat. Several biological degradation techniques exist, but one process, biophotolysis, can be used to produce hydrogen from inedible plant biomass. This process is two-stage, with one stage using dark fermentation to convert plant wastes into organic acids. The second stage, photofermentation, uses photoheterotrophic purple non-sulfur bacteria with the addition of light to turn the organic acids into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Such a system can prove useful as a co-generation scheme, providing some of the energy needed to power a larger primary carbon recovery system, such as composting. Since butyrate is expected as one of the major inputs into photofermentation, a characterization study was conducted with the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides SCJ, a novel photoheterotrophic non-sulfur purple bacteria, to examine hydrogen production performance at 10 mM-100 mM butyrate concentrations. As butyrate levels increased, hydrogen production increased up to 25 mM, and then decreased and ceased by 100 mM. Additionally, lag phase increased with butyrate concentration, possibly indicating some product inhibition. Maximal substrate conversion efficiency was 8.0%; maximal light efficiency was 0.89%; and maximal hydrogen production rate was 7.7 Umol/mg/cdw/hr (173 ul/mg cdw/hr). These values were either consistent or lower than expected from literature.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of puf interposon mutagenesis on carotenoid biosynthesis in Rubrivivax gelatinosus. A new gene organization in purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchane, S; Picaud, M; Vernotte, C; Reiss-Husson, F; Astier, C

    1997-01-17

    Rubrivivax gelatinosus mutants affected in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathways were created by interposon mutagenesis within the puf operon. Genetic and biochemical analysis of several constructed mutants suggest that at least crtC is localized downstream of the puf operon and that it is cotranscribed with this operon. Sequence analysis confirmed the genetic data and showed the presence of crtD and crtC genes downstream of the puf operon, a localization different from that known for other purple bacteria. Inactivation of the crtD gene indicated that the two crt genes are cotranscribed and that they are involved not only in the hydroxyspheroidene biosynthesis pathway as in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and R. capsulatus, but also in the spirilloxanthin biosynthesis pathway. Carotenoid genes implicated in the spirilloxanthin biosynthesis pathway were thus identified for the first time. Furthermore, analysis of carotenoid synthesis in the mutants gave genetic evidence that crtD and crtC genes are cotranscribed with the puf operon using the oxygen-regulated puf promoter.

  5. Paepalanthus sphaeroides, a new species of Eriocaulaceae from the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trovó, M.; Echternacht, L.; Sano, P.T.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and illustrate Paepalanthus sphaeroides (Eriocaulaceae, Paepalanthoideae) from the Mantiqueira Range in South-eastern Brazil and compare it with the morphologically most similar species: Paepalanthus aequalis and Paepalanthus eriophaeus. Paepalanthus sphaeroides has unique membranaceous

  6. Metabolic network modeling of redox balancing and biohydrogen production in purple nonsulfur bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grammel Hartmut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB are facultative photosynthetic bacteria and exhibit an extremely versatile metabolism. A central focus of research on PNSB dealt with the elucidation of mechanisms by which they manage to balance cellular redox under diverse conditions, in particular under photoheterotrophic growth. Results Given the complexity of the central metabolism of PNSB, metabolic modeling becomes crucial for an integrated analysis of the accumulated biological knowledge. We reconstructed a stoichiometric model capturing the central metabolism of three important representatives of PNSB (Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Using flux variability analysis, the model reveals key metabolic constraints related to redox homeostasis in these bacteria. With the help of the model we can (i give quantitative explanations for non-intuitive, partially species-specific phenomena of photoheterotrophic growth of PNSB, (ii reproduce various quantitative experimental data, and (iii formulate several new hypotheses. For example, model analysis of photoheterotrophic growth reveals that - despite a large number of utilizable catabolic pathways - substrate-specific biomass and CO2 yields are fixed constraints, irrespective of the assumption of optimal growth. Furthermore, our model explains quantitatively why a CO2 fixing pathway such as the Calvin cycle is required by PNSB for many substrates (even if CO2 is released. We also analyze the role of other pathways potentially involved in redox metabolism and how they affect quantitatively the required capacity of the Calvin cycle. Our model also enables us to discriminate between different acetate assimilation pathways that were proposed recently for R. sphaeroides and R. rubrum, both lacking the isocitrate lyase. Finally, we demonstrate the value of the metabolic model also for potential biotechnological applications: we examine the theoretical

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-05-26

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described.

  8. Evolution of taxis responses in virtual bacteria: non-adaptive dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Goldstein

    2008-05-01

    mediating taxis responses provide an explanation for experimental observations made in mutant strains of E. coli and in wild-type Rhodobacter sphaeroides that could not be explained with standard models. We speculate that such dynamics exist in other bacteria as well and play a role linking the metabolic state of the cell and the taxis response. The simplicity of mechanisms mediating such dynamics makes them a candidate precursor of more complex taxis responses involving adaptation. This study suggests a strong link between stimulus conditions during evolution and evolved pathway dynamics. When evolution was simulated under conditions of scarce and fluctuating stimulus conditions, the evolved pathway contained features of both adaptive and non-adaptive dynamics, suggesting that these two types of dynamics can have different advantages under distinct environmental circumstances.

  9. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  10. Cytochrome c2-independent respiratory growth of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Daldal, F

    1988-01-01

    To assess the role of cytochrome c2 as a respiratory electron carrier, we obtained a double mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus defective in cytochrome c2 and in the quinol oxidase260. This mutant was able to grow chemoheterotrophically, indicating that an electron pathway independent of cytochrome c2 was functional between the ubiquinol:cytochrome c2 oxidoreductase and the cytochrome oxidase410.

  11. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  12. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850∗ states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs. PMID:26373989

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of Hydrogen Production Metabolism of Rhodobacter capsulatus under Temperature Stress by Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muazzez Gürgan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen is a clean and renewable form of hydrogen, which can be produced by photosynthetic bacteria in outdoor large-scale photobioreactors using sunlight. In this study, the transcriptional response of Rhodobacter capsulatus to cold (4 °C and heat (42 °C stress was studied using microarrays. Bacteria were grown in 30/2 acetate/glutamate medium at 30 °C for 48 h under continuous illumination. Then, cold and heat stresses were applied for two and six hours. Growth and hydrogen production were impaired under both stress conditions. Microarray chips for R. capsulatus were custom designed by Affymetrix (GeneChip®. TR_RCH2a520699F. The numbers of significantly changed genes were 328 and 293 out of 3685 genes under cold and heat stress, respectively. Our results indicate that temperature stress greatly affects the hydrogen production metabolisms of R. capsulatus. Specifically, the expression of genes that participate in nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis and the electron transport system were induced by cold stress, while decreased by heat stress. Heat stress also resulted in down regulation of genes related to cell envelope, transporter and binding proteins. Transcriptome analysis and physiological results were consistent with each other. The results presented here may aid clarification of the genetic mechanisms for hydrogen production in purple non-sulfur (PNS bacteria under temperature stress.

  14. Photomixotrophic growth of Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 on ferrous iron

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the role iron oxidation plays in the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. This organism is unable to grow photoautotrophically on unchelated ferrous iron [Fe(II)] despite its ability to oxidize chelated Fe(II). This apparent paradox was partly resolved by the discovery that SB1003 can grow photoheterotrophically on the photochemical breakdown products of certain ferric iron–ligand complexes, yet whether it could concomitantly benefit from the oxid...

  15. Study on the prescription simplification of the compound Danshen transformed by the mixed photosynthetic bacteria%简化混合光合细菌转化复方丹参制剂处方

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦娟; 杨飞; 赵建滨; 杨官娥; 王慧敏; 张肇铭

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究简化混合光合细菌转化复方丹参制剂(Ⅳ)处方.方法:用高脂饲料建立高脂血症大鼠模型,以血脂康为阳性对照,比较丹参提取液(Ⅰ)、球形红细菌转化丹参制剂(Ⅱ)、球形红细菌(Ⅲ)及Ⅳ血脂、抗氧化能力和血液流变学指标.结果:Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅳ组能显著降低高脂血症大鼠血清总胆固醇、甘油三脂、低密度脂蛋白水平( P<0.01,P<0.05),Ⅱ、Ⅲ组能显著提高高密度脂蛋白水平(P<0.05);Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ能显著提高高脂血症大鼠谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶活力(P<0.01),Ⅰ-Ⅲ组能显著提高超氧化物歧化酶活力(P<0.01),Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅳ组能显著降低丙二醛水平( P<0.01,P<0.05);Ⅰ-Ⅲ组能显著降低不同切变率下全血黏度(P<0.01),Ⅱ-Ⅳ组能有效降低血浆黏度(P<0.01),Ⅰ-Ⅳ组能有效降低红细胞压积(P<0.01).结论:Ⅱ综合降脂作用优于Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ,可以作为混合光合细菌转化复方丹参制剂(Ⅳ)的简化处方.%Objective: To simplify the preparation prescription of the compound Danshen transformed by the mixed photosynthetic bacteria. Method: High-fat rat model was set up by feeding the high fat fodder. Xuezhikang as positive control, to compare the blood lipids, antioxidant capacity and hemorheology of Danshen extract liquid (I), Danshen transformed by Rhodobacter sphaeroides preparation (II), Rhodobacter sphaeroides culture solution (DI) and the compound Danshen transformed by the mixed photosynthetic bacteria preparation (IV) between them. Result: I, II, IV could significantly reduce the serum TC, TG, LDL-C levels (/><0.01), I-IV could significantly reduce the hematocrit (P<0.01). Conclusion: Comprehensive lowering lipids efficiency of II was superior to the other I, III, IV. II could be used as the simplified preparation of the IV.

  16. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent fructose-specific phosphotransferase system in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides : Distribution of EIIFru over the membranes of phototrophically grown Rps. sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.; Hoeve-Duurkens, Ria H. ten; Robillard, George T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of the fructose carrier over the membranes of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides was studied in cells grown under light saturation and light limitation. Three types of membranes were isolated after disruption of the cells in a French press. All three types were present in the cells grown

  17. Long-term biological hydrogen production by agar immobilized Rhodobacter capsulatus in a sequential batch photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkahlout, Kamal; Alipour, Siamak; Eroglu, Inci; Gunduz, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral

    2017-04-01

    In this study, agar immobilization technique was employed for biological hydrogen production using Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710 (wild type) and YO3 (hup-mutant) strains in sequential batch process. Different agar and glutamate concentrations were tested with defined nutrient medium. Agar concentration 4% (w/v) and 4 mM glutamate were selected for bacterial immobilization in terms of rate and longevity of hydrogen production. Acetate concentration was increased from 40 to 60-100 and 60 mM gave best results with both bacterial strains immobilized in 4% (w/v) agar. Cell concentration was increased from 2.5 to 5 mg dcw mL(-1) agar and it was found that increasing cell concentration of wild-type strain caused decrease in yield and productivity while these parameters improved by increasing cell concentration of mutant strain. Also, the hydrogen production time has extended from 17 days up to 60 days according to the process conditions and parameters. Hydrogen production by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria is a convenient technology for hydrogen production as it enables to produce hydrogen with high organic acid concentrations comparing to suspended cultures. Besides, immobilization increases the stability of the system and allowed sequential batch operation for long-term application.

  18. Coenzyme binding and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin/flavodoxin NADP(H) oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Ana; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Goñi, Guillermina; Medina, Milagros; Hermoso, Juan A; Carrillo, Néstor; Cortez, Néstor

    2009-02-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases catalyse the reversible hydride/electron exchange between NADP(H) and ferredoxin/flavodoxin, comprising a structurally defined family of flavoenzymes with two distinct subclasses. Those present in Gram-negative bacteria (FPRs) display turnover numbers of 1-5 s(-1) while the homologues of cyanobacteria and plants (FNRs) developed a 100-fold activity increase. We investigated nucleotide interactions and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus FPR comparing them to those reported for FNRs. NADP(H) binding proceeds as in FNRs with stacking of the nicotinamide on the flavin, which resulted in formation of charge-transfer complexes prior to hydride exchange. The affinity of FPR for both NADP(H) and 2'-P-AMP was 100-fold lower than that of FNRs. The crystal structure of FPR in complex with 2'-P-AMP and NADP(+) allowed modelling of the adenosine ring system bound to the protein, whereas the nicotinamide portion was either not visible or protruding toward solvent in different obtained crystals. Stabilising contacts with the active site residues are different in the two reductase classes. We conclude that evolution to higher activities in FNRs was partially favoured by modification of NADP(H) binding in the initial complexes through changes in the active site residues involved in stabilisation of the adenosine portion of the nucleotide and in the mobile C-terminus of FPR.

  19. Proton transfer from the bulk to the bound ubiquinone QB of the reaction center in chromatophores of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Retarded conveyance by neutral water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopta, Oksana A.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Junge, Wolfgang; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of proton transfer from the bulk into the membrane protein interior was studied. The light-induced reduction of a bound ubiquinone molecule QB by the photosynthetic reaction center is accompanied by proton trapping. We used kinetic spectroscopy to measure (i) the electron transfer to QB (at 450 nm), (ii) the electrogenic proton delivery from the surface to the QB site (by electrochromic carotenoid response at 524 nm), and (iii) the disappearance of protons from the bulk solution (by pH indicators). The electron transfer to QB− and the proton-related electrogenesis proceeded with the same time constant of ≈100 μs (at pH 6.2), whereas the alkalinization in the bulk was distinctly delayed (τ ≈ 400 μs). We investigated the latter reaction as a function of the pH indicator concentration, the added pH buffers, and the temperature. The results led us to the following conclusions: (i) proton transfer from the surface-located acidic groups into the QB site followed the reduction of QB without measurable delay; (ii) the reprotonation of these surface groups by pH indicators and hydronium ions was impeded, supposedly, because of their slow diffusion in the surface water layer; and (iii) as a result, the protons were slowly donated by neutral water to refill the proton vacancies at the surface. It is conceivable that the same mechanism accounts for the delayed relaxation of the surface pH changes into the bulk observed previously with bacteriorhodopsin membranes and thylakoids. Concerning the coupling between proton pumps in bioenergetic membranes, our results imply a tendency for the transient confinement of protons at the membrane surface. PMID:10557290

  20. Photoprotection Mechanism of Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex from Purple Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Horibe, Tomoko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2016-02-11

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting apparatus efficiently capture sunlight and transfer the energy to reaction centers, while they safely dissipate excess energy to surrounding environments for a protection of their organisms. In this study, we performed pump-probe spectroscopic measurements with a temporal window ranging from femtosecond to submillisecond on the purple bacterial antenna complex LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 to clarify its photoprotection functions. The observed excited state dynamics in the time range from subnanosecond to microsecond exhibits that the triplet-triplet excitation energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll a to carotenoid takes place with a time constant of 16.7 ns. Furthermore, ultrafast spectroscopic data suggests that a molecular assembly of bacteriochlorophyll a in LH2 efficiently suppresses a generation of triple bacteriochlorophyll a.

  1. Atomic force microscopy of bacterial photosynthetic systems: a new model for native membrane organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahatyrova, Svetlana

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to investigate the supramolecular architecture of a photosynthetic membrane from Rhodobacter sphaeroides purple bacteria cells. This is extremely timely, since we now know all of the structures of photosynthetic pigment-protein LH and RC complexes, ATP-synthase and b

  2. Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a DNA-guided nuclease that targets cognate DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swarts, D.C.; Hegge, J.W.; Hinojo, Ismael; Shiimori, Masami; Ellis, Michael A.; Dumrongkulraksa, Justin; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Oost, Van Der John

    2015-01-01

    Functions of prokaryotic Argonautes (pAgo) have long remained elusive. Recently, Argonautes of the bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermus thermophilus were demonstrated to be involved in host defense. The Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PfAgo) belongs to a different branch in

  3. Effects of the Medium Composition on the Components of the Electrochemical Proton Gradient in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, Paul A.M.; Hellingwerf, K; Lolkema, Juke S.; Friedberg, Ilan; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude and composition of the proton motive force (Δµ~H+) has been measured in chromatophores and whole cells of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides as a function of the ionic composition of the buffer in which the energy-transducing membranes are suspended. Measurements with the flow-dialysis techn

  4. Energy Coupling of Facilitated Transport of Inorganic Ions in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingwerf, K; Friedberg, Ilan; Lolkema, Juke S.; Michels, Paul A.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1982-01-01

    Within the scope of a study on the effects of changes in medium composition on the proton motive force in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides, the energy coupling of sodium, phosphate, and potassium (rubidium) transport was investigated. Sodium was transported via an electroneutral exchange system against

  5. Effects of the Medium Composition on the Components of the Electrochemical Proton Gradient in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, Paul A.M.; Hellingwerf, K; Lolkema, Juke S.; Friedberg, Ilan; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude and composition of the proton motive force (Δµ~H+) has been measured in chromatophores and whole cells of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides as a function of the ionic composition of the buffer in which the energy-transducing membranes are suspended. Measurements with the flow-dialysis techn

  6. Analysis of the puc Operon Promoter from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, David G.; Bauer, Carl E.

    1998-01-01

    Expression of the Rhodobacter capsulatus puc operon, which codes for structural polypeptides of the light-harvesting-II peripheral antenna complex, is highly regulated in response to alterations in oxygen tension and light intensity. To obtain an understanding of the puc promoter region we report the high-resolution 5′ mapping of the puc mRNA transcriptional start site and DNA sequence analysis of the puc upstream regulatory sequence (pucURS). A ς70-type promoter sequence was identified (pucP1) which has a high degree of sequence similarity with carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis promoters. Inspection of the DNA sequence also indicated the presence of two CrtJ and four integration host factor (IHF) binding sites. Transcriptional fusions of the pucURS fused to lacZ also confirmed that puc promoter activity is regulated by the transcriptional regulators IHF, CrtJ, and RegA. Gel retardation analysis using cell extracts indicates that mutations in IHF and RegA disrupt protein binding to DNA fragments containing the pucURS. PMID:9696778

  7. Photomixotrophic growth of Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 on ferrous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, S H; Newman, D K

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the role iron oxidation plays in the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. This organism is unable to grow photoautotrophically on unchelated ferrous iron [Fe(II)] despite its ability to oxidize chelated Fe(II). This apparent paradox was partly resolved by the discovery that SB1003 can grow photoheterotrophically on the photochemical breakdown products of certain ferric iron-ligand complexes, yet whether it could concomitantly benefit from the oxidation of Fe(II) to fix CO(2) was unknown. Here, we examine carbon fixation by stable isotope labeling of the inorganic carbon pool in cultures growing phototrophically on acetate with and without Fe(II). We show that R. capsulatus SB1003, an organism formally thought incapable of phototrophic growth on Fe(II), can actually harness the reducing power of this substrate and grow photomixotrophically, deriving carbon both from organic sources and from fixation of inorganic carbon. This suggests the possibility of a wider occurrence of photoferrotrophy than previously assumed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. "Paraffin wax-overlay of pour plate", a method for the isolation and enumeration of purple non-sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archana, A; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V; Arunasri, K

    2004-12-01

    A modification of pour plate technique with an overlay of wax was used for isolation and enumeration of purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) with equal efficiency as that of agar shake culture. The total count of PNSB ranged from 10(5)-10(8) CFU g dry soil(-1) and belonged to the genera of Rhodobacter, Rhodopseudomonas, Rhodocista and Rubrivivax.

  9. Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing, an excellent candidate producer for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zongjie; Li, Dunhai; Li, Yanhui; Wang, Zhicong; Xiao, Yuan; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding; Hu, Chunxiang; Liu, Qifang

    2011-11-01

    Some phytoplankton can be regarded as possible candidates in the establishment of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for some intrinsic characteristics, the first characteristic is that they should grow rapidly, secondly, they should be able to endure some stress factors and develop some corresponding adaptive strategies; also it is very important that they could provide food rich in nutritious protein and vitamins for the crew; the last but not the least is they can also fulfill the other main functions of CELSS, including supplying oxygen, removing carbon dioxide and recycling the metabolic waste. According to these characteristics, Nostoc sphaeroides, a potential healthy food in China, was selected as the potential producer in CELSS. It was found that the oxygen average evolution rate of this algae is about 150 μmol O 2 mg -1 h -1, and the size of them are ranged from 2 to 20 mm. Also it can be cultured with high population density, which indicated that the potential productivity of Nostoc sphaeroides is higher than other algae in limited volume. We measured the nutrient contents of the cyanobacterium and concluded it was a good food for the crew. Based on above advantages, Nostoc sphaeroides was assumed to a suitable phytoplankton for the establishment of Controlled Ecological Life Support System. We plan to develop suitable bioreactor with the cyanobacterium for supplying oxygen and food in future space missions.

  10. Colony development and physiological characterization of the edible blue-green alga, Nostoc sphaeroides (Nostocaceae, Cyanophyta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongyang Deng; Qiang Hu; Fan Lu; Guoxiang Liu; Zhengyu Hu

    2008-01-01

    The edible blue-green alga,Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing,is able to form microcolorties and spherical macrocolonies.It has been used as a potent herbal medicine and dietary supplement for centuries because of its nutraceutical and pharmacological benefits.However,lim-ited information is available on the development of the spherical macrocolonies and the environmental factors that affect their structure.This report described the morphogenesis of N.Sphaeroides from single trichomes to macrocolonies.During the process,most structural features of macrocolonies of various sizes were dense maculas,rings,the compact core and the formation of liquid core;and the filaments within the macrocolonies showed different lengths and arrays depending on the sizes of macrocolonies.Meanwhile temperature and light intensity also strongly affected the internal structure of macrocolonies.As microcolonies further increased in size to form 30 mm mac-rocolonies,the colonies differentiated into distinct outer,middle and inner layers.The filaments of the outer layer showed higher max-imum photosynthetic rates,higher light saturation point,and higher photosynthetic efficiency than those of the inner layer;whereas the filaments of the inner layer had a higher content of chlorophyll a and phycobiliproteins than those of the outer layer.The results obtained in this study were important for the mass cultivation of N.Sphaeroides as a nutraceutical product.

  11. Inactivation of Mg Chelatase during Transition from Anaerobic to Aerobic Growth in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    OpenAIRE

    Willows, Robert D.; Lake, Vanessa; Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Beale, Samuel I.

    2003-01-01

    The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus can adapt from an anaerobic photosynthetic mode of growth to aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. As this adaptation occurs, the cells must rapidly halt bacteriochlorophyll synthesis to prevent phototoxic tetrapyrroles from accumulating, while still allowing heme synthesis to continue. A likely control point is Mg chelatase, the enzyme that diverts protoporphyrin IX from heme biosynthesis toward the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic ...

  12. Electrochemical determination of hydrogen peroxide using Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c peroxidase at a gold electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wael, K.; Buschop, H.; Heering, H.A.; De Smet, L.; Van Beeumen, J.; Devreese, B.; Adriaens, A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the redox behaviour of horse heart cytochrome c (HHC) and Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c peroxidase (RcCCP) at a gold electrode modified with 4,4′-bipyridyl. RcCCP shows no additional oxidation or reduction peaks compared to the electrochemistry of only HHC, which indicates that it

  13. Effect of a magnetic field on recombination fluorescence of a number of photosynthesizing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voznyak, V.M.; Elfimov, E.I.; Proskuryakov, I.I.

    1978-10-01

    A brief survey is initially presented of the transformation of the energy of an electron exitant into chemical energy of separated charges in a photosynthesing body, a transformation which occurs in the reaction centers (RC) of that body. The RC consists of 3 protein units, 4 molecules of bacteriochlorophyl (BCh), 2 molecules of bacteriotheophite (BTh) and an Fe-quinone complex. The primary reaction of photoinduced separators of charges occurs between BCh and BTh. Products formed have been discussed by several authors and the effect of a magnetic field has already been demonstrated. This present article studies photosynthesizing bacteria and the effect of a magnetic field on the yield of fluorescin. Bacteria studied include Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides (a wild strain); Rhodospirillum rubrum; and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. Changes in the strength of a magnetic field are portrayed graphically, and a discussion is presented of the physical chemistry of the reactions involved.

  14. Carotenogenesis gene cluster and phytoene desaturase catalyzing both three- and four-step desaturations from Rhodobacter azotoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinhua; Lu, Lili; Yin, Lijie; Xie, Shen; Xiao, Min

    2012-08-01

    A carotenogenesis gene cluster from the purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter azotoformans CGMCC 6086 was cloned. A total of eight carotenogenesis genes ( crtA , crtI , crtB , tspO , crtC , crtD , crtE , and crtF ) were located in two separate regions within the genome, a 4.9 kb region containing four clustered genes of crtAIB - tspO and a 5.3 kb region containing four clustered genes of crtCDEF . The organization was unusual for a carotenogenesis gene cluster in purple photosynthetic bacteria. A gene encoding phytoene desaturase ( CrtI ) from Rba. azotoformans was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant CrtI could catalyze both three- and four-step desaturations of phytoene to produce neurosporene and lycopene, and the relative contents of neurosporene and lycopene formed by CrtI were approximately 23% and 75%, respectively. Even small amounts of five-step desaturated 3,4-didehydrolycopene could be produced by CrtI . This product pattern was novel because CrtI produced only neurosporene leading to spheroidene pathway in the cells of Rba. azotoformans. In the in vitro reaction, the relative content of lycopene in desaturated products increased from 19.6% to 62.5% when phytoene reduced from 2.6 to 0.13 μM. The results revealed that the product pattern of CrtI might be affected by the kinetics.

  15. Purification and assays of Rhodobacter capsulatus RegB-RegA two-component signal transduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swem, Lee R; Swem, Danielle L; Wu, Jiang; Bauer, Carl E

    2007-01-01

    Two-component signal-transduction systems, composed of a histidine-sensor kinase and a DNA-binding response regulator, allow bacteria to detect environmental changes and adjust cellular physiology to live more efficiently in a broad distribution of niches. Although many two-component signal-transduction systems are known, a limited number of signals that stimulate these systems have been discovered. This chapter describes the purification and characterization of the predominant two-component signal-transduction system utilized by Rhodobacter capsulatus, a nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacterium. Specifically, we explain the overexpression, detergent solubilization, and purification of the full-length membrane-spanning histidine-sensor kinase RegB. We also provide a method to measure autophosphorylation of RegB and discern the effect of its signal molecule, ubiquinone, on autophosphorylation levels. In addition we describe the overexpression and purification of the cognate response regulator RegA and a technique used to visualize the phosphotransfer reaction from RegB to RegA.

  16. 光合细菌对土壤中呋喃丹的生物降解%Characterization of Biodegradation for Carbofuran Pesticides in Soils by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白红娟; 肖根林; 贾万利

    2013-01-01

    以一株降解呋喃丹的光合细菌球形红细菌(Rhodobacter sphaeroides)H菌株为材料,考察了其在实验室模拟条件下降解土壤中呋喃丹的影响因素及其动力学过程.结果表明,该菌降解呋喃丹的最适条件为:温度30℃,pH=7.0,接种量107个/g.在最适条件下,H菌株对初始质量浓度为5.0~25 mg/kg呋喃丹的降解反应均符合一级动力学特征.可以将其应用于呋喃丹污染土壤的生物修复.

  17. Effects of light intensity and quality on phycobiliprotein accumulation in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Lu, Fan; Bi, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyu

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effects of light intensity and quality on the growth and phycobiliproteins (PBP) accumulation in Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing (N. sphaeroides). Dry weights, dry matter, protein, chlorophyll and PBP contents were higher under 90 μmol m(-2) s(-1) than under other intensities (both higher and lower). Phycocyanin and allophycocyanin increased with light intensity while phycoerythrin decreased. Fresh weights, protein and PBP contents increased at the highest rates under blue light. Red light resulted in higher values of dry matter, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a. White light at 90 μmol m(-2) s(-1) or blue light 30 μmol m(-2) s(-1) were optimal for the growth and phycobiliprotein accumulation in N. sphaeroides.

  18. 葛仙米表层结构的扫描电子显微镜观察%Obsevation for Epidermal Ultrastructure of Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing under Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉

    2009-01-01

    [Objective]The experiment aimed to explore a new way for observing surface structure of Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing. [Method] The scanning electron microscope was used to observe the epidermal ultrastructure of wild and cultured Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing. [Result] The epidermis of wild and cultured Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing showed mixture structure of fibril colloid which was reticular arranged. The difference between wild and cultured Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing was that the outer epidermis of cultured Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing had trichome distribution but the wild Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing did not has such distribution. The obsevation results of under smaller than 10 μm by scanning electron microscope was touched thick and showed many folds and distortions.[Conclusion] The scanning electron microscope was an effective way to study development of Nostoc sphaeroides Kutzing colony and it was worth popularizing.

  19. Embryonic, Larval, and Early Juvenile Development of the Tropical Sea Urchin, Salmacis sphaeroides (Echinodermata: Echinoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aminur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmacis sphaeroides (Linnaeus, 1758 is one of the regular echinoids, occuring in the warm Indo-West Pacific, including Johor Straits, between Malaysia and Singapore. In order to investigate the developmental basis of morphological changes in embryos and larvae, we documented the ontogeny of S. sphaeroides in laboratory condition. Gametes were obtained from adult individuals by 0.5 M KCl injection into the coelomic cavity. Fertilization rate at limited sperm concentration (10−5 dilution was 96.6±1.4% and the resulting embryos were reared at 24°C. First cleavage (2-cell, 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell, 32-cell, and multicell (Morulla stages were achieved 01.12, 02.03, 02.28, 02.51, 03.12, and 03.32 h postfertilization. Ciliated blastulae with a mean length of 174.72±4.43 μm hatched 08.45 h after sperm entry. The gastrulae formed 16.15 h postfertilization and the archenteron elongated constantly while ectodermal red-pigmented cells migrated synchronously to the apical plate. Pluteus larva started to feed unicellular algae in 2 d, grew continuously, and finally attained metamorphic competence in 35 d after fertilization. Metamorphosis took approximately 1 h 30 min from attachment to the complete resorption of larval tissues and the development of complete juvenile structure with adult spines, extended tubefeet and well-developed pedicellaria, the whole event of which usually took place within 1 d postsettlement. This study represents the first successful investigation on embryonic, larval, and early juvenile development of S. sphaeroides. The findings would greatly be helpful towards the understanding of ontogeny and life-history strategies, which will facilitate us to develop the breeding, seed production, and culture techniques of sea urchins in captive condition.

  20. First Insights into the Genome Sequence of the Strictly Anaerobic Homoacetogenic Sporomusa sphaeroides Strain E (DSM 2875)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, Genis Andrés Castillo; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Sporomusa sphaeroides strain E (DSM 2875), a strict anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium. It is able to grow autotrophically on different one-carbon compounds. The strain possesses several genes of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a single chromosome (4.98 Mb). PMID:28336590

  1. Isolation of a Rhodobacter capsulatus mutant that lacks c-type cytochromes and excretes porphyrins.

    OpenAIRE

    Biel, S W; Biel, A J

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodobacter capsulatus mutant lacking cytochrome oxidase activity was isolated by Tn5 mutagenesis. Difference spectroscopy of crude extracts and extracted c-type cytochromes demonstrated that this mutant completely lacked all c-type cytochromes. The strain did, however, synthesize normal amounts of b-type cytochromes and nonheme iron. This mutant also excreted large amounts of coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin and synthesized reduced amounts of bacteriochlorophyll, suggesting a link between...

  2. Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz, a candidate producer par excellence for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hao, Zongjie; Liu, Yongding

    A lot of aquatic organisms could be regarded as suitable candidates par excellence in the establishment of CELSS, since they are relatively easy and fast to grow and resistant to changes in environmental condition as well as providing nutritious, protein-and vitamin-rich foods for the crew, which can fulfill the main functions of CELSS, including supplying oxygen, water and food, removing carbon dioxide and making daily life waste reusable. Our labotory has developed mass culture of Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz, which is one of traditional healthy food in China and. The oxygen evolution rate of the cyanobacterium is about 150 molO2.mg-1.h-1, and it usually grows into colony with size between 2-20mm, which is easy to be harvested. It also can be cultured with high density, which show that the productivity of the cyanobacterium in limited volume is higher than other microalgae. We had measured the nutrient content of the cyanobacterium and developed some Chinese Dishes and Soups with Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz, which showed that it was a good food for crew. Using remote sensing technique, we also investigated its growth in Closed System under microgravity by SHENZHOU-2 spacecraft in January 2001. We plan to develop suitable bioreactor with the cyanobacterium for supplying oxygen and food to crew in future.

  3. Photoregulated or Energy Dependent Process of Hormogonia Differentiation in Nostoc sphaeroides Kützing (Cyanobacterium)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dun-Hai LI; Lan-Zhou CHEN; Gen-Bao LI; Gao-Hong WANG; Li-Rong SONG; Yong-Ding LIU

    2005-01-01

    Hormogonium, which was thought to play an important role in the dispersal and survival of these microorganisms in their natural habitats, is a distinguishable developmental stage of heterocystous cyanobacteria. The present study examined the effects of different light conditions and sugars on the of hormogonia was light dependent in the absence of sugar, but that close to 100% of cyanobacteria differentiated to hormogonia in the presence of glucose or sucrose, irrespective of the light conditions. This differentiation was inhibited, even in the presence of sugars, upon application of an inhibitor of respiration.Following the testing of different sugars, the effects of different lights were examined. It was found that 5-10 μmol.m-2.s-1 photon flux density was optimal for hormogonia differentiation. One hundred percent differentiation was obtained with white light irradiation, in contrast with irradiation with green light (80%differentiation) and red light (0-10% differentiation). Although they showed different efficiencies in induc ing hormogonia differentiation in N. sphaeroides, the green and red radiation did not display antagonistic effects. When the additional aspect of time dependence was investigated through the application of different light radiations and an inhibitor of protein synthesis, it was found that the initial 6 h of the differentiation process was crucial for hormogonia differentiation. Taken together, these results show that hormogonia differentiation in N. sphaeroides is either a photoregulated or an energy dependent process.

  4. Malate dehydrogenase in phototrophic purple bacteria: purification, molecular weight, and quaternary structure.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The citric acid cycle enzyme malate dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity from the nonsulfur purple bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodomicrobium vannielii, and Rhodocyclus purpureus. Malate dehydrogenase was purified from each species by either a single- or a two-step protocol: triazine dye affinity chromatography was the key step in purification of malate dehydrogenase in all cases. Purification of malate dehydrogenase resulted in a 130- to 240-fold increase in ...

  5. Rhodobacter changlensis sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, phototrophic alphaproteobacterium from the Himalayas of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, P; Srinivas, T N R; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2007-11-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, oval to rod-shaped, psychrotolerant, phototrophic, purple non-sulfur bacterium (designated strain JA139T) was isolated from a snow sample from Changla Pass in the Indian Himalayas. Strain JA139T had vesicular-type intracytoplasmic membrane structures and contained bacteriochlorophyll a and most probably spheroidene-like carotenoids. Biotin, niacin and thiamine were required for growth of strain JA139T. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain clustered with species of the genus Rhodobacter but was distinctly separate from all recognized members of the family Rhodobacteraceae. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic differences observed between strain JA139T and recognized Rhodobacter species, strain JA139T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus, for which the name Rhodobacter changlensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JA139T (=DSM 18774T=CCUG 53722T=JCM 14338T).

  6. Removal of the effect of ammonium on the regulation of nitrogenase enzyme in Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM1710 for improved hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekgoez, Guelsah; Guenduez, Ufuk [Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Biology; Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rakhely, Gabor [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2010-07-01

    Photofermentative biohydrogen production by purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria is a renewable and clean way of producing hydrogen. Hydrogen production by PNS bacteria, Rhodobacter capsulatus, is mediated mainly by nitrogenases, which primarily fix molecular nitrogen to ammonium and produce hydrogen as byproduct. The reaction catalyzed by nitrogenases requires a lot of energy. Hence, there is a complex regulation on nitrogenase enzyme complex, consequently, on hydrogen production. Whenever ammonium, which is the end product of nitrogen fixation reaction, is found in the environment, hydrogen production stops. GlnB and GlnK proteins are the critical regulatory proteins in ammonium dependent regulation of the nitrogenase gene expression. In this study, the aim is to release the ammonium regulation on nitrogenase enzyme by inactivating glnB and glnK genes. For this purpose, relevant recombinant vectors were constructed; R.capsulatus glnB- strain was obtained. The double R.capsulatus glnB{sup -}glnK{sup -} strain, able to produce hydrogen independent of ammonium concentration of the environment is to be obtained. (orig.)

  7. The mechanisms of protection of antioxidants on Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G. H.

    UV radiation is one of space harmful factor for earth organisms in space exploration In the present work we studied on the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides K u tz Cyanobacteria and the effects of exogenous antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation It was found that UV-B radiation decreased the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacterium but promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II PSII and exogenous antioxidant sodium nitroprusside SNP N-acetylcysteine NAC had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation The activity of SOD Superoxide Dismutase EC 1 15 1 1 CAT Catalase EC 1 11 1 6 POD Peroxidase EC 1 11 1 7 and content of MDA and ASC were improved by 0 5mM and 1mM SNP but 0 1mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxide system Exogenous NAC addition decreased the activity of SOD POD CAT and the content MDA and ASC but exogenous NAC addition increased the content of GSH The results suggested that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms in which SNP maybe play double roles as sources of reactive free radicals or ROS scavengers in formation of algae s protection of PSII under UV-B radiation while NAC does function as antioxidant reagent or precursor of glutathione which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation Keyword antioxidant system exogenous or endogenous antioxidant Nostoc sphaeroides photosynthesis UV-B radiation

  8. The effect of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sevinc, Pelin [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biotechnology; Guenduez, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus is a purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium which can produce hydrogen by photofermentation on acetate and lactate. Hydrogen productivity depends on several parameters such as medium composition, pH, light intensity and temperature. In the present study, the effects of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production were investigated. The cell growth curve has been fitted to the logistic model and hydrogen productivity was interpreted by Modified Gompertz Equation. The maximum productivity was obtained at 30 C and light intensity of 4000 lux. (orig.)

  9. Microbial photodegradation of aminoarenes. Metabolism of 2-amino-4-nitrophenol by Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, C P; Blasco, R; Castillo, F

    1998-03-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus photoreduces 2,4-dinitrophenol to 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, which is further metabolized by an aerobic pathway that is also light-dependent. The catabolism of 2-amino-4-nitrophenol requires O2 and the presence of alternative carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources, preferably acetate and ammonium. Rhodobacter capsulatus B10, a bacterium unable to assimilate nitrate, releases negligible amounts of nitrite when growing with 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, thus suggesting that an oxygenase, nitrite-producing activity is not involved in the metabolization of the compound. The diazotrophic growth of R. capsulatus increases in the presence of 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, but growth with ammonium is clearly inhibited by the compound. Mutant strains of R. capsulatus B10, which are affected in nifHDK, nifR1, or nifR4 genes, unable to fix dinitrogen, do not grow with 2-amino-4-nitrophenol as the sole N source. This indicates that the compound cannot be used as a N source. The nif mutants degrade 2-amino-4-nitrophenol to the same extent as the wild-type in the presence of ammonium. The compound is not used as a C source by the bacterium, either. Aromatic stable intermediates, such as 2,4-diaminophenol or 4-nitrocatechol, are not detectable in microaerobic cultures of R. capsulatus growing with 2,4-dinitrophenol or 2-amino-4-nitrophenol.

  10. The kinetic model for slow photoinduced electron transport in the reaction centers of purple bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdenko, T. V.; Barabash, Y. M.; Knox, P. P.; Seifullina, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    The present work is related to the investigation of slow kinetics of electron transport in the reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Experimental data on the absorption kinetics of aqueous solutions of reaction centers at different modes of photoexcitation are given. It is shown that the kinetics of oxidation and reduction of RCs are well described by the sum of three exponential functions. This allows to suggest a two-level kinetic model for electron transport in the RC as a system of four electron-conformational states which correspond to three balance differential equations combined with state equation. The solution of inverse problem made it possible to obtain the rate constant values in kinetic equations for different times and intensities of exciting light. Analysis of rate constant values in different modes of RC excitation allowed to suggest that two mechanisms of structural changes are involved in RC photo-oxidation. One mechanism leads to the increment of the rate of electron return, another one—to its drop. Structural changes were found out to occur in the RCs under incident light. After light was turned off, the reduction of RCs was determined by the second mechanism.

  11. Potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus Grown in Anaerobic-Light or Aerobic-Dark Conditions as Bioremediation Agent for Biological Wastewater Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Costa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of microorganisms to clean up wastewater provides a cheaper alternative to the conventional treatment plant. The efficiency of this method can be improved by the choice of microorganism with the potential of removing contaminants. One such group is photosynthetic bacteria. Rhodobacter capsulatus is a purple non-sulfur bacterium (PNSB found to be capable of different metabolic activities depending on the environmental conditions. Cell growth in different media and conditions was tested, obtaining a concentration of about 108 CFU/mL under aerobic-dark and 109 CFU/mL under anaerobic-light conditions. The biomass was then used as a bioremediation agent for denitrification and nitrification of municipal wastewater to evaluate the potential to be employed as an additive in biological wastewater treatment. Inoculating a sample of mixed liquor withdrawn from the municipal wastewater treatment plant with R. capsulatus grown in aerobic-dark and anaerobic-light conditions caused a significant decrease of N-NO3 (>95%, N-NH3 (70% and SCOD (soluble chemical oxygen demand (>69%, independent of the growth conditions. A preliminary evaluation of costs indicated that R. capsulatus grown in aerobic-dark conditions could be more convenient for industrial application.

  12. Ultrafast excitation relaxation in light-harvesting complex LH2 from Rb.sphaeroides 601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lijun; LIU Yuan; LIU Weimin; GUO Junhua; XU Chunhe; QIAN Shixiong

    2004-01-01

    The energy relaxation and kinetic evolution of transient spectra of bacteriochloro- phylls (BChls) in light-harvesting complex LH2 from Rb. Sphaeroides 601 were investigated using femtosecond pump-probe technique. Upon 783 nm excitation, the energy at B800 BChls experiences an intramolecular redistribution with 0.35 ps time constant before transferring to B850 BChls. With tuning the excitation wavelength, the dynamical evolution of excited BChls was clearly observed, which indicates an obvious competition between the ground state bleaching and excited state absorption (ESA) of BChls involved and an isosbestic point near 818 nm, and also demonstrates that from the lower electronic excited state of B800 BChls to the higher excitonic state of B850 BChls is an efficient routine for energy transfer. The excitation energy in higher excitonic states of B850 BChls relaxes rapidly to the next lowest excitonic state by interconversion, delocalization to adjacent molecular, populating the lowest excitonic state and the change of molecular conformation.

  13. Ultrafast excitation relaxation in light-harvesting complex LH2 from Rb. sphaeroides 601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Lijun; LIU; Yuan; LIU; Weimin; GUO; Junhua; XU; Chunhe

    2004-01-01

    The energy relaxation and kinetic evolution of transient spectra of bacteriochloro- phylls (BChls) in light-harvesting complex LH2 from Rb. Sphaeroides 601 were investigated using femtosecond pump-probe technique. Upon 783 nm excitation, the energy at B800 BChls experiences an intramolecular redistribution with 0.35 ps time constant before transferring to B850 BChls. With tuning the excitation wavelength, the dynamical evolution of excited BChls was clearly observed, which indicates an obvious competition between the ground state bleaching and excited state absorption (ESA) of BChls involved and an isosbestic point near 818 nm, and also demonstrates that from the lower electronic excited state of B800 BChls to the higher excitonic state of B850 BChls is an efficient routine for energy transfer. The excitation energy in higher excitonic states of B850 BChls relaxes rapidly to the next lowest excitonic state by interconversion, delocalization to adjacent molecular, populating the lowest excitonic state and the change of molecular conformation.

  14. ENDOR Spectroscopy Reveals A Light Induced Movement of the H-Bond from Ser-L223 Upon Forming the Semiquinone (QB−•) in Reaction Centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M. L.; Flores, M.; Isaacson, R.; Chang, C.; Abresch, E. C.; Okamura, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Proton ENDOR spectroscopy was used to monitor local conformational changes in bacterial reaction centers (RC) associated with the electron transfer reaction DQB → D+•QB−• using mutant RCs capable of photo-reducing QB at cryogenic temperatures. The charge separated state D+•QB−• was studied in mutant RCs formed by either (i) illuminating at low temperature (77K) a sample frozen in the dark (ground state protein conformation) or (ii) illuminating at room temperature prior to and during the freezing (charge separated state protein conformation). The charge recombination rates from the two states differed greatly (>106 fold) as shown previously, indicating a structural change (Paddock et al (2006) Biochemistry 45, 14032 - 14042). ENDOR spectra of QB−• from both samples (35 GHz, 77K) showed three nearly identical sets of hyperfine couplings due to exchangeable protons that were similar to those for QB−• in native RCs indicating that in all RCs, QB−• was located at the proximal position near the metal site. In contrast, one set of H-bond couplings was observed only in the sample frozen under illumination in which the protein can relax prior to freezing. This H-bond was assigned to an interaction between the Ser-L223 hydroxyl and QB−• based on its absence in Ser L223 → Ala mutant RCs. The Ser-L223 hydroxyl H-bond was also observed in the native RCs frozen under illumination. Thus, part of the protein relaxation in response to light induced charge separation involves the formation of an H-bond between the OH group of Ser-L223 and the anionic semiquinone QB−•. This proton movement serves to stabilize the charge separated state and facilitate proton transfer to reduced QB. PMID:17590017

  15. Effects of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on Cadmiun Accumulations of Wheat Seedlligs under Cadmium Stress%球形红细菌对镉胁迫下小麦幼苗镉积累的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭凌; 张肇铭; 张峰; 芦冬涛

    2007-01-01

    为了研究光合细菌球形红细菌菌悬液对镉胁迫下小麦幼苗镉积累的影响.运用三因素交叉分组随机设计,通过水培试验,研究了球形红细菌菌悬液对小麦幼苗生长过程中培养液Cd2+浓度的影响,以及球形红细菌菌悬液与Cd2+复合处理对小麦幼苗茎叶和根系镉积累量的影响.培养液中Cd2+浓度随培养时间的延长而降低,在小麦幼苗生长初期降低幅度较大;茎叶和根系镉积累量既随培养液Cd2+浓度增加而增加,也随培养时间的延长而增加,在第7~10天镉积累量的增长幅度最大,且根系镉积累量>茎叶镉积累量;施用球形红细菌菌悬液后培养液Cd2+浓度以及小麦幼苗茎叶和根系中镉积累量比对照分别降低了1.9%~49.9%、12.3%~58.1%和8.3%~53.9%.该研究为光合细菌的进一步开发利用提供了理论基础.

  16. Bioproduction of hydrogen by Rhodobacter capsulatus KU002 isolated from leather industry effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merugu, Ramchander; Girisham, S.; Reddy, S.M. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Kakatiya University, Warangal (India)

    2010-09-15

    A preliminary study on photoproduction of hydrogen by Rhodobacter capsulatus KU002 isolated from leather industry effluents under different cultural conditions with various carbon and nitrogen sources was investigated. Hydrogen production was measured using a Gas chromatograph. Lactate promoted more amounts of hydrogen production under anaerobic light conditions and aerobic light conditions. Cumulative hydrogen production by the organism was recorded at various time intervals. Incubation period of 120 h was optimum for production of hydrogen. pH 7.0 {+-} 0.2 was optimum for production of hydrogen by growing cells, while pH 7.5 {+-} 0.26 for resting cells. L-cystine was a good nitrogen source for production of hydrogen. Growing cells produced more amount of hydrogen than resting cells. Glutamine was a poor nitrogen source for hydrogen production by Rb. capsulatus. Significance of the above results in the presence of existing literature is discussed. (author)

  17. A structural role of the carotenoid in the light-harvesting II protein of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdo, J; Fernandez-Cabrera, C; Ramirez, J M

    1993-03-01

    The membrane-linked light-harvesting II protein (LHII) of Rhodobacter capsulatus was partly depleted of carotenoids by selective extraction with light petroleum. Carotenoid removal was accompanied by bleaching of the Qy(S1<--S0) absorption band of bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) a near 800 nm, by a bathochromic shift and a broadening of the other Bchl Qy band at 850 nm, and by the formation of a weak Qy band of dissociated Bchl near 770 nm. The changes in the 800 and 850 nm bands seemed to reflect alterations in only those Bchl molecules that had lost their associated carotenoids, firstly, because the extent of the changes was closely correlated to the degree of carotenoid extraction, and, secondly, because the residual fraction of carotenoid-containing LHII, which could be almost quantitatively recovered from the membrane after detergent solubilization and ion-exchange chromatography, showed an unmodified LHII absorption spectrum. The Bchl responsible for the shifted 850 nm band remained bound to protein, since its visible (Qx) transition seemed to retain the induced optical activity of the native bound pigment. Besides, the shifted Bchl could act as an efficient acceptor of singlet excitation energy from the pigments of the intact LHII fraction. The close similarity between the spectroscopic Bchl changes that accompany carotenoid extraction and the differential spectral features of carotenoidless LHII of Rhodobacter mutants, previously reported, strongly suggests that the direct cause of the spectral modifications is the absence of carotenoid and not any independent effect of the experimental manipulation of the membrane. Several interpretations of the structural changes that underlie the observed spectral changes are possible. The simplest one is to assume that carotenoid removal elicits an alteration in the angle between the Qy transition moments of two strongly interacting Bchl molecules.

  18. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: uncovering general features of nitrogen-fixation (nif)-flavodoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A

    2013-01-09

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50's loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as "short-chain" with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the "long-chain" with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  19. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: Uncovering General Features of Nitrogen-fixation (nif-Flavodoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Pérez-Dorado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50’s loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as “short-chain” with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the “long-chain” with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  20. Hypocholesterolemic effect of Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing, an edible blue-green alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Heather E; Blobaum, Kara R; Jesch, Elliot D; Ku, Chai Siah; Park, Young-Ki; Lu, Fan; Carr, Timothy P; Lee, Ji-Young

    2009-10-01

    Intake of an edible blue-green alga Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (N. Commune) has been shown to lower plasma total cholesterol concentration, but the mechanisms behind the hypocholesterolemic effect have not been elucidated. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effect of N. commune in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed the AIN-93 M diet supplemented with 0 or 5% (wt/wt) dried N. Commune for 4 weeks. Lipid levels in the plasma and liver, intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal sterol excretion were measured. Expression of hepatic and intestinal genes involved in cholesterol metabolism was evaluated by quantitative realtime PCR. N. commune supplementation significantly reduced total plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by approximately 20% compared to controls. Intestinal cholesterol absorption was significantly decreased, while fecal neutral sterol output was significantly increased in N. commune-fed mice. mRNA levels of the cholesterol transporters such as Niemann Pick C1 Like 1, scavenger receptor class B type 1, ATP-binding cassette transporters G5 and A1 in small intestine were not significantly different between two groups. Hepatic lipid contents including total cholesterol, triglyceride and free cholesterol in N. commune-fed mice were not significantly altered. However, the expression of cholesterol modulating genes including sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase were significantly increased in mice fed N. commune. N. commune supplementation exerted a hypocholesterolemic effect in mice, largely in part, by reducing intestinal cholesterol absorption and promoting fecal neutral sterol excretion.

  1. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent fructose-specific phosphotransferase system in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides : Energetics of the phosphoryl group transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate to fructose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.; Hoeve-Duurkens, Ria H. ten; Robillard, George T.

    1986-01-01

    Energy coupling to fructose transport in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides is achieved by phosphorylation of the membrane-spanning fructose-specific carrier protein, EIIFru. The phosphoryl group of phosphoenolpyruvate is transferred to EIIFru via the cytoplasmic component SF (soluble factor). The standar

  2. The Transmembrane Electrical Potential in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides Determined from the Distribution of Tetraphenylphosphonium after Correction for Its Binding to Cell Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.; Abbing, Arend; Hellingwerf, K; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1983-01-01

    The membrane potential was determined in intact cells of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides from the distribution of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (Ph4P+) after correction for probe binding to cell components. The concentration of Ph4P+ in the external medium of the cells was recorded with

  3. Dynamics of Antagonistic Potency of Rhodobacter capsulatus PG Lipopolysaccharide against Endotoxin-Induced Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, D S; Serov, D A; Zubova, S V; Grachev, S V; Prokhorenko, I R

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of antagonistic potency of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG on the synthesis of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IFN-γ) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, IL-1Ra) cytokines induced by highly stimulatory endotoxins from Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica have been studied. Using human whole blood, we have shown that R. capsulatus PG LPS inhibited most pronouncedly the endotoxin-induced synthesis of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 during the first 6 h after endotoxin challenge. Similarly, the endotoxin-induced release of IFN-γ was abolished by R. capsulatus PG LPS as well (24 h). In contrast to the above-mentioned cytokines, the relatively weak antagonistic activity of R. capsulatus PG LPS against endotoxin-triggered production of IL-6 and IL-8 was revealed. Since R. capsulatus PG LPS displays more potent antagonistic activity against deleterious effects of S. enterica LPS than those of E. coli LPS in the cases of such cytokines as IL-1β (6 and 24 h), IL-6 and IL-8 (4 h), we conclude that the effectiveness of protective action of antagonist is mostly determined by the primary lipid A structure of the employed agonist.

  4. Potential use of thermophilic dark fermentation effluents in photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgura, E.; Afsar, N.; Eroglu, I. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); De Vrije, T.; Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Yucel, M.; Gunduz, U. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biology, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Biological hydrogen production by a sequential operation of dark and photofermentation is a promising route to produce hydrogen. The possibility of using renewable resources, like biomass and agro-industrial wastes, provides a dual effect of sustainability in biohydrogen production and simultaneous waste removal. In this study, photofermentative hydrogen production on effluents of thermophilic dark fermentations on glucose, potato steam peels (PSP) hydrolysate and molasses was investigated in indoor, batch operated bioreactors. An extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was used in the dark fermentation step, and Rhodobacter capsulatus (DSM1710) was used in the photofermentation step. Addition of buffer, Fe and Mo to dark fermentor effluents (DFEs) improved the overall efficiency of hydrogen production. The initial acetate concentration in the DFE needed to be adjusted to 30-40 mM by dilution to increase the yield of hydrogen in batch light-supported fermentations. The thermophilic DFEs are suitable for photofermentative hydrogen production, provided that they are supplemented with buffer and nutrients. The overall hydrogen yield of the two-step fermentations was higher than the yield of single step dark fermentations.

  5. A Rhodobacter capsulatus member of a universal permease family imports molybdate and other oxyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisin, Jonathan; Müller, Alexandra; Pfänder, Yvonne; Leimkühler, Silke; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2010-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an important trace element that is toxic at high concentrations. To resolve the mechanisms underlying Mo toxicity, Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants tolerant to high Mo concentrations were isolated by random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. The insertion sites of six independent isolates mapped within the same gene predicted to code for a permease of unknown function located in the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth under Mo-replete conditions, the wild-type strain accumulated considerably more Mo than the permease mutant. For mutants defective for the permease, the high-affinity molybdate importer ModABC, or both transporters, in vivo Mo-dependent nitrogenase (Mo-nitrogenase) activities at different Mo concentrations suggested that ModABC and the permease import molybdate in nanomolar and micromolar ranges, respectively. Like the permease mutants, a mutant defective for ATP sulfurylase tolerated high Mo concentrations, suggesting that ATP sulfurylase is the main target of Mo inhibition in R. capsulatus. Sulfate-dependent growth of a double mutant defective for the permease and the high-affinity sulfate importer CysTWA was reduced compared to those of the single mutants, implying that the permease plays an important role in sulfate uptake. In addition, permease mutants tolerated higher tungstate and vanadate concentrations than the wild type, suggesting that the permease acts as a general oxyanion importer. We propose to call this permease PerO (for oxyanion permease). It is the first reported bacterial molybdate transporter outside the ABC transporter family.

  6. Purification and activities of the Rhodobacter capsulatus RpoN (sigma N) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, W; Missailidis, S; Austin, S; Moore, M; Drake, A; Buck, M

    1996-07-01

    The rpoN-encoded sigma factors (sigma N) are a distinct class of bacterial sigma factors, with no obvious homology to the major sigma 70 class. The sigma N-containing RNA polymerase holoenzyme functions in enhancer-dependent transcription to allow expression of positively controlled genes. We have purified the Rhodobacter capsulatus sigma N protein, which is distinctive in lacking an acidic region implicated in the melting of promoter DNA by the Escherichia coll sigma N holoenzyme, and may represent a minor subclass of sigma N proteins. Assays of promoter recognition and holoenzyme formation and function showed that the purified R. capsulatus sigma N protein is distinct in activity compared to the enteric proteins, but retains the broad functions described for these proteins. As first described for the Klebsiella pneumoniae protein, promoter recognition in the absence of core RNA polymerase was detected, but contact of certain promoter bases by the R. capsulatus sigma N protein and its response to core RNA polymerase was clearly different from that determined for the K. pneumoniae and E. coli proteins. Results are discussed in the context of a requirement to modulate the activity of the DNA-binding surfaces of sigma N to regulate sigma N function. Circular dichroism was used to evaluate the structure of the R. capsulatus protein and revealed differences in the tertiary signals as compared to the K. pneumoniae protein, some of which are attributable to the DNA-binding domain of sigma N.

  7. Modelling of hydrogen production in batch cultures of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, Jamila; Magnin, Jean-Pierre [Grenoble Institute of Technology, LEPMI, UMR 5631 (CNRS-INPG-UJF), BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Flaus, Jean-Marie; Adrot, Olivier [Grenoble Institute of Technology, Laboratoire des sciences pour la conception, l' optimisation et la production, 46, avenue Felix Viallet, 38031 Grenoble (France); Willison, John C. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Metaux (UMR 5249 CEA-CNRS-UJF), iRTSV/LCBM, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble (France); Zlatev, Roumen [Autonomous University of Baja California, Institute of Engineering, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    The photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, produces hydrogen under nitrogen-limited, anaerobic, photosynthetic culture conditions, using various carbon substrates. In the present study, the relationship between light intensity and hydrogen production has been modelled in order to predict both the rate of hydrogen production and the amount of hydrogen produced at a given time during batch cultures of R. capsulatus. The experimental data were obtained by investigating the effect of different light intensities (6000-50,000 lux) on hydrogen-producing cultures of R. capsulatus grown in a batch photobioreactor, using lactate as carbon and hydrogen source. The rate of hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity in a manner that was described by a static Baly model, modified to include the square of the light intensity. In agreement with previous studies, the kinetics of substrate utilization and growth of R. capsulatus was represented by the classical Monod or Michaelis-Menten model. When combined with a dynamic Leudekong-Piret model, the amount of hydrogen produced as a function of time was effectively predicted. These results will be useful for the automatization and control of bioprocesses for the photoproduction of hydrogen. (author)

  8. Improving the hydrogen production capacity of Rhodobacter capsulatus by genetically modifying redox balancing pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztuerk, Yavuz [TUEBITAK Research Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Gebze Kocaeli (Turkey); Goekce, Abdulmecit [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Genetics; Guergan, Muazzez; Yuecel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biology

    2010-07-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, balancing the oxidation-reduction potential (redox-balance) is maintained via a number of inter-dependent regulatory mechanisms that enable these organisms to accommodate divergent growth modes. In order to maintain redox homeostasis, this bacterium possesses regulatory mechanisms functioning as electron sinks affecting the oxidation-reduction state of the ubiquinone pool. Under the photoheterotrophic growth conditions with reduced carbon sources, the excess reducing equivalents are primarily consumed via the reduction of CO{sub 2} through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway or by the reduction of protons into hydrogen with the use of dinitrogenase enzyme system. In this study, our aim was to develop strategies to funnel the excess reducing equivalents to nitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production by blocking the carbon-fixation pathway. To realize this purpose, CO{sub 2} fixation was blocked by inactivating the Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) of CBB pathway in wild type (MT1131), uptake-hydrogenase (YO3) and cyt cbb{sub 3} oxidase deficient (YO4) strains. The hydrogen production capacity of newly generated strains deficient in the Calvin-Benson-Bassham pathway were analyzed and compared with wild type strains. The results indicated that, the hydrogen production efficiency and capacity of R. capsulatus was further improved by directing the excess reducing equivalents to dinitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production. (orig.)

  9. Field evidence for the potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus as Biofertilizer for flooded rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal-Eldin, Hosny; Elbanna, Khaled

    2011-02-01

    In a previous study, we evaluated the effects of inoculating rice plants with the phototrophic purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc) on growth and yield of rice in pots and lysimeter experiments and the results obtained have been highly encouraging. In this study, we carried out two field experiments: one in the experimental farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, Fayoum University, and the second in a farmer's field in Kafr El-sheikh, to assess the effects of Rc on growth and yield of rice in comparison and in combination with chemical nitrogen fertilizer (CNF) and farmyard manure. The results indicated that both biological and grain yields in all the Rc inoculated treatments were significantly higher than those in the uninoculated corresponding treatments in both fields. With regard to grain yield, the major factor for determining the effectiveness of any agricultural treatment, inoculation with Rc in combination with 50% of the recommended CNF rate gave a grain yield that was statistically equivalent to that obtained with 100% of the recommended CNF rate. These results provide a clear evidence for the potential of Rc as biofertilizer for flooded rice under field conditions.

  10. Temperature dependent LH1→RC energy transfer in purple bacteria Tch. tepidum with shiftable LH1-Qy band: A natural system to investigate thermally activated energy transfer in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-04-01

    The native LH1-RC complex of the purple bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum has an ultra-red LH1-Qy absorption at 915nm, which can shift to 893 and 882nm by means of chemical modifications. These unique complexes are a good natural system to investigate the thermally activated energy transfer process, with the donor energies different while the other factors (such as the acceptor energy, special pair at 890nm, and the distance/relative orientation between the donor and acceptor) remain the same. The native B915-RC, B893-RC and B882-RC complexes, as well as the LH1-RC complex of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides were studied by temperature-dependent time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The energy transfer time constants, kET(-1), are 65, 45, 46 and 45ps at room temperature while 225, 58, 85, 33ps at 77K for the B915-RC, B893-RC, B882-RC and Rba. sphaeroides LH1-RC, respectively. The dependences of kET on temperature have different trends. The reorganization energies are determined to be 70, 290, 200 and 45cm(-1), respectively, by fitting kET vs temperature using Marcus equation. The activation energies are 200, 60, 115 and 20cm(-1), respectively. The influences of the structure (the arrangement of the 32 BChl a molecules) on kET are discussed based on these results, to reveal how the B915-RC complex accomplishes its energy transfer function with a large uphill energy of 290cm(-1).

  11. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: Uncovering General Features of Nitrogen-fixation (nif)-Flavodoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Inmaculada Pérez-Dorado; Ana Bortolotti; Néstor Cortez; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50’s loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including...

  12. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (FdVI) is essential for growth of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Armengaud, J.; Meyer, C.; Jouanneau, Y

    1997-01-01

    The physiological function of Rhodobacter capsulatus FdVI, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, was investigated by the cloning, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis of its structural gene, called fdxE. The DNA region surrounding fdxE was mapped, and the nucleotide sequence of a 4.2-kb fragment was determined. fdxE is preceded by a sequence that is very similar to a sigma54 recognition site and is followed by a putative transcription stop signal, suggesting that fdxE forms a separate cistron. Two open readin...

  13. Identification and mapping of nitrogen fixation genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus: duplication of a nifA-nifB region.

    OpenAIRE

    Klipp, W; Masepohl, B; Pühler, A.

    1988-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants unable to fix nitrogen were isolated by random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. The Tn5 insertion sites of 30 Nif- mutants were mapped within three unlinked chromosomal regions designated A, B, and C. The majority of Tn5 insertions (21 mutants) map within nif region A, characterized by two ClaI fragments of 2.5 and 25 kilobases (kb). The 17-kb ClaI fragment of nif region B contains six nif::Tn5 insertions, and the three remaining mutations are located on a 32-kb ClaI...

  14. Optimizing multi-step B-side charge separation in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Kressel, Lucas L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dylla, Nicholas P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wander, Marc J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanson, Deborah K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Holten, Dewey [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Laible, Philip D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kirmaier, Christine [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Using high-throughput methods for mutagenesis, protein isolation and charge-separation functionality, we have assayed 40 Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center (RC) mutants for their P+ QB- yield (P is a dimer of bacteriochlorophylls and Q is a ubiquinone) as produced using the normally inactive B-side cofactors BB and HB (where B is a bacteriochlorophyll and H is a bacteriopheophytin). Two sets of mutants explore all possible residues at M131 (M polypeptide, native residue Val near HB) in tandem with either a fixed His or a fixed Asn at L181 (L polypeptide, native residue Phe near BB). A third set of mutants explores all possible residues at L181 with a fixed Glu at M131 that can form a hydrogen bond to HB. For each set of mutants, the results of a rapid millisecond screening assay that probes the yield of P+ QB- are compared among that set and to the other mutants reported here or previously. For a subset of eight mutants, the rate constants and yields of the individual B-side electron transfer processes are determined via transient absorption measurements spanning 100 fs to 50 μs. The resulting ranking of mutants for their yield of P+ QB- from ultrafast experiments is in good agreement with that obtained from the millisecond screening assay, further validating the efficient, high-throughput screen for B-side transmembrane charge separation. Results from mutants that individually show progress toward optimization of P+ HB- → P+ QB- electron transfer or initial P* → P+ HB- conversion highlight unmet challenges of optimizing both processes simultaneously.

  15. Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Brucale, Marco [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Gianuario [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Lanzi, Massimiliano [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna (Italy); Mezzi, Alessio [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Bologna (Italy); Zannoni, Davide [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tellurite is reduced by R. capsulatus as cytosolic tellurium nanoprecipitates TeNPs. • Lawsone allows R. capsulatus to produce extracellular TeNPs. • Extracellular TeNPs production depends on the carbon source used for cells growth. • Both lawsone concentration and the incubation time determine the TeNPs size. • Extracellular TeNPs are coated with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). - Abstract: The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te{sup 0} nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1 mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600–700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te{sup 0} to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  16. Coordinated, long-range, solid substrate movement of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher John Shelswell

    Full Text Available The long-range movement of Rhodobacter capsulatus cells in the glass-agar interstitial region of borosilicate Petri plates was found to be due to a subset of the cells inoculated into plates. The macroscopic appearance of plates indicated that a small group of cells moved in a coordinated manner to form a visible satellite cluster of cells. Satellite clusters were initially separated from the point of inoculation by the absence of visible cell density, but after 20 to 24 hours this space was colonized by cells apparently shed from a group of cells moving away from the point of inoculation. Cell movements consisted of flagellum-independent and flagellum-dependent motility contributions. Flagellum-independent movement occurred at an early stage, such that satellite clusters formed after 12 to 24 hours. Subsequently, after 24 to 32 hours, a flagellum-dependent dispersal of cells became visible, extending laterally outward from a line of flagellum-independent motility. These modes of taxis were found in several environmental isolates and in a variety of mutants, including a strain deficient in the production of the R. capsulatus acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal. Although there was great variability in the direction of movement in illuminated plates, cells were predisposed to move toward broad spectrum white light. This predisposition was increased by the use of square plates, and a statistical analysis indicated that R. capsulatus is capable of genuine phototaxis. Therefore, the variability in the direction of cell movement was attributed to optical effects on light waves passing through the plate material and agar medium.

  17. Degradation of p-nitrophenol by the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, M D; Blasco, R; Caballero, F J; Castillo, F

    1998-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus detoxified p-nitrophenol and 4-nitrocatechol. The bacterium tolerated moderate concentrations of p-nitrophenol (up to 0.5 mM) and degraded it under light at an optimal O2 pressure of 20 kPa. The bacterium did not metabolize the xenobiotic in the dark or under strictly anoxic conditions or high O2 pressure. Bacterial growth with acetate in the presence of p-nitrophenol took place with the simultaneous release of nonstoichiometric amounts of 4-nitrocatechol, which can also be degraded by the bacterium. Crude extracts from R. capsulatus produced 4-nitrocatechol from p-nitrophenol upon the addition of NAD(P)H, although at a very low rate. A constitutive catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase activity yielding cis,cis-muconate was also detected in crude extracts of R. capsulatus. Further degradation of 4-nitrocatechol included both nitrite- and CO2-releasing steps since: (1) a strain of R. capsulatus (B10) unable to assimilate nitrate and nitrite released nitrite into the medium when grown with p-nitrophenol or 4-nitrocatechol, and the nitrite concentration was stoichiometric with the 4-nitrocatechol degraded, and (2) cultures of R. capsulatus growing microaerobically produced low amounts of 14CO2 from radiolabeled p-nitrophenol. The radioactivity was also incorporated into cellular compounds from cells grown with uniformly labeled 14C-p-nitrophenol. From these results we concluded that the xenobiotic is used as a carbon source by R. capsulatus, but that only the strain able to assimilate nitrite (E1F1) can use p-nitrophenol as a nitrogen source.

  18. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight bch'' genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  19. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight ``bch`` genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  20. Reprint of “Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Brucale, Marco [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Gianuario [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Lanzi, Massimiliano [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna (Italy); Mezzi, Alessio [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Bologna (Italy); Zannoni, Davide [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Tellurite is reduced by R. capsulatus as cytosolic tellurium nanoprecipitates TeNPs. • Lawsone allows R. capsulatus to produce extracellular TeNPs. • Extracellular TeNPs production depends on the carbon source used for cells growth. • Both lawsone concentration and the incubation time determine the TeNPs size. • Extracellular TeNPs are coated with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). - Abstract: The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te{sup 0} nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1 mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600–700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te{sup 0} to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  1. Reduction of chalcogen oxyanions and generation of nanoprecipitates by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Baccolini, Chiara; Francia, Francesco [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Sabatino, Piera [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna (Italy); Turner, Raymond J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Zannoni, Davide, E-mail: davide.zannoni@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • R. capsulatus cells produce extracellular chalcogens nanoprecipitates when lawsone is present. • Lawsone acts as a redox mediator from reducing equivalents to tellurite and selenite. • Nanoprecipitates production depends on carbon source and requires metabolically active cells. • Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0} nanoprecipitates are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. - Abstract: The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is characterized in its interaction with the toxic oxyanions tellurite (Te{sup IV}) and selenite (Se{sup IV}) by a highly variable level of resistance that is dependent on the growth mode making this bacterium an ideal organism for the study of the microbial interaction with chalcogens. As we have reported in the past, while the oxyanion tellurite is taken up by R. capsulatus cells via acetate permease and it is reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm in the form of splinter-like black intracellular deposits no clear mechanism was described for Se{sup 0} precipitation. Here, we present the first report on the biotransformation of tellurium and selenium oxyanions into extracellular Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0}nanoprecipitates (NPs) by anaerobic photosynthetically growing cultures of R. capsulatus as a function of exogenously added redox-mediator lawsone, i.e. 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. The NPs formation was dependent on the carbon source used for the bacterial growth and the rate of chalcogen reduction was constant at different lawsone concentrations, in line with a catalytic role for the redox mediator. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis demonstrated the Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0} nature of the nanoparticles.

  2. Exploration of the hydrogen producing potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus chemostat cultures: The application of deceleration-stat and gradient-stat methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, S.; Breukelen, van F.R.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the dependency of the volumetric hydrogen production rate of ammonium-limited Rhodobacter capsulatus chemostat cultures on their imposed biomass concentration and dilution rate was investigated. A deceleration-stat experiment was performed by lowering the dilution rate from 1.0 d-1 to

  3. Exploration of the hydrogen producing potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus chemostat cultures: The application of deceleration-stat and gradient-stat methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, S.; Breukelen, van F.R.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the dependency of the volumetric hydrogen production rate of ammonium-limited Rhodobacter capsulatus chemostat cultures on their imposed biomass concentration and dilution rate was investigated. A deceleration-stat experiment was performed by lowering the dilution rate from 1.0 d-1 to

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  5. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  6. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  7. Genetic and biochemical characterization of carotenoid biosynthesis mutants of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, G A; Schmidt, A; Sandmann, G; Hearst, J E

    1990-05-15

    We have used genetic and biochemical techniques to study carotenoid biosynthesis (crt) mutants of Rhodobacter capsulatus, a purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium. All nine identified crt genes are located within the 46-kilobase pair photosynthesis gene cluster, and eight of the crt genes form a subcluster. We have studied the operon structure of the crt gene cluster using transposon Tn5.7 mutants. The Tn5.7 insertion sites in 10 mutants have been mapped to high resolution (25-267 base pairs) by Southern hybridization. Two insertions each map within the coding regions of the crtA, crtC, crtE, and crtF genes, and one insertion lies within the crtI gene. The insertion in crtI is not polar on the downstream crtB gene, suggesting that crtI and crtB may form two separate operons. Another insertion located in the 5' noncoding region between the divergent crtA and crtI genes has no effect on wild-type pigmentation and apparently lies between the promoters for these operons. A Tn5.7 mutation in the 3' region of crtA yields a bacteriochlorophyll-minus phenotype, while a 5' insertion affects only carotenoid biosynthesis. Regulatory signals for transcription of a downstream operon required for bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis may thus overlap the coding region of crtA. We also present the first evidence for the functions of the crtB, crtE, and crtJ gene products using a new in vitro assay for the incorporation of [14C]isopentenyl pyrophosphate into carotenoid precursors and phytoene in cell-free extracts. Extracts from a crtE mutant accumulate [14C]prephytoene pyrophosphate, while those from crtB and crtJ mutants accumulate [14C]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. We therefore propose that CrtE is the phytoene synthetase and that CrtB, and possibly CrtJ, are components of the prephytoene pyrophosphate synthetase.

  8. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    , Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  9. Effect of uncoupler on assembly pathway for pigment-binding protein of bacterial photosynthetic membranes. [Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierstein, R.; Drews, G.

    1986-10-01

    The uncoupler carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used to investigate membrane protein assembly in the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. As found for Escherichia coli and mitochondrial proteins, assembly across the bacterial photosynthetic membranes was sensitive to CCCP. At uncoupler concentrations which were sufficient to block the export of the periplasmic cytochrome c/sub 2/ and an outer membrane protein, the integration of pigment-binding protein into the photosynthetic apparatus was abolished. The unassembled protein was detected on the inner surface of the intracytoplasmic membrane. After inactivation of CCCP, accumulated protein continued insertion into the membrane. The data suggest that after binding to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane (i), translocation of protein into a transmembrane orientation takes place (ii), which is a prerequisite for the formation of a functional pigment-protein complex (iii).

  10. Loss of the Response Regulator CtrA Causes Pleiotropic Effects on Gene Expression but Does Not Affect Growth Phase Regulation in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, Ryan; Callister, Stephen J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Strnad, Hynek; Paces, Vaclav; Beatty, J. T.; Lang, Andrew S.

    2010-06-01

    The purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been extensively studied for its diverse metabolic capabilities, as well as for its production of a Gene Transfer Agent (RcGTA). Production of RcGTA requires the response regulator protein CtrA. We have used whole genome transcript and whole cell proteome analyses of wild type and ctrA mutant cultures to completely characterize the regulatory role of CtrA in R. capsulatus.

  11. The response of antioxidant systems in Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation and the protective effects of exogenous antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hu, Chunxiang; Li, Dunhai; Zhang, Delu; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Kun; Liu, Yongding

    UV radiation is one of many harmful factors found in space that are detrimental to organisms on earth in space exploration. In the present work, we examined the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides Kütz (Cyanobacterium) and the effects of exogenously applied antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation. It was found that UV-B radiation promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II (PSII) and exogenously applied antioxidant: sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) and content of MDA (malondialdehyde) and ASC (ascorbate) were improved by 0.5 mM and 1 mM SNP, but 0.1 mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxidant system. Addition of exogenous NAC decreased the activity of SOD, POD, CAT and the content MDA and ASC. In contrast, exogenously applied NAC increased GSH content. The results suggest that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms: SNP may play double roles as both sources of reactive free radicals as well as ROS scavengers in mediating the protective role of PSII on algae under UV-B radiation. On the other hand, NAC functions as an antioxidant or precursor of glutathione, which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation.

  12. Photobiological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Y; Miyake, J

    1999-01-01

    The principles and recent progress in the research and development of photobiological hydrogen production are reviewed. Cyanobacteria produce hydrogen gas using nitrogenase and/or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenases in cyanobacteria occurs under in the dark under anaerobic conditions by degradation of intracellular glycogen. In vitro and in vivo coupling of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic system with a clostridial hydrogenase via cyanobacterial ferredoxin was demonstrated in the presence of light. Genetic transformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum was successful; the active enzyme was expressed in PCC7942. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Coculture of Rhodobacter and Clostriudium was applied for hydrogen production from glucose. A mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV whose light-harvesting proteins were altered was obtained by UV irradiation. Hydrogen productivity by the mutant was improved when irradiated with monochromatic light of some wavelengths. The development of photobioreactors for hydrogen production is also reviewed.

  13. Rhizosphere Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Feoktistova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the analysis of modern literature data on rhizosphere bacteria and their role in plant life. The structure of rhizosphere has been characterized. The role of plants as the centers of formation of microbial communities has been shown. Data on the main groups of microorganisms inhabiting the rhizosphere have been provided. The associative relationship between rhizobacteria and partner plants has been investigated. The modern concept of holobiont defined as the whole host plant organism and microorganisms associated with it has been reviewed. The role of rhizobacteria in the processes of nitrogen fixation has been discussed in detail. The mechanisms of direct stimulation of plant growth by biosynthesis of phytohormones, improvement of phosphorus and nitrogen nutrition, increase in resistance to stress, and stimulation mediated by antagonism against pathogenic microorganisms have been analyzed. The criteria for selection of rhizobacteria for practical purposes have been discussed.

  14. Reverse micelles as suitable microreactor for increased biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Anjana [Nanotechnology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Centre of Biotechnology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Pandey, Ashutosh [Centre of Energy Studies, MNNIT, Allahabad 211004 (India)

    2008-01-15

    Reverse micelles have been shown to act as efficient microreactors for enzymic reactions and whole cell entrapment in organic (non-aqueous) media wherein the reactants are protected from denaturation by the surrounding organic solvent. These micelles are thermodynamically stable, micrometer sized water droplets dispersed in an organic phase by a surfactant. It has been observed that when whole cells of photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides or Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1) are entrapped inside these reverse micelles, the H{sub 2} production enhanced from 25 to 35 folds. That is, 1.71mmol(mgprotein){sup -1}h{sup -1} in case of R. sphaeroides which is 25 fold higher in benzene-sodium lauryl sulfate reverse micelles. Whereas, in case of R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 the H{sub 2} production was increased by 35 fold within AOT-isooctane reverse micelles i.e. 11.5mmol(mgprotein){sup -1}h{sup -1}. The observations indicate that the entrapment of whole cells of microbes within reverse micelles provides a novel and efficient technique to produce hydrogen by the inexhaustible biological route. The two microorganisms R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 (a photosynthetic bacteria) and Citrobacter Y19 (a facultative anaerobic bacteria) together are also entrapped within AOT-isooctane and H{sub 2} production was measured i.e. 69mmol(mgprotein){sup -1}h{sup -1}. The nitrogenase enzyme responsible for hydrogen production by R. sphaeroides/R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 cells is oxygen sensitive, and very well protected within reverse micelles by the use of combined approach of two cells (R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 and Citrobacter Y19). In this case glucose present in the medium of Citrobacter Y19 serves double roles in enhancing the sustained production rate of hydrogen. Firstly, it quenches the free O{sub 2}liberated as a side product of reaction catalyzed by nitrogenase, which is O{sub 2} labile. Secondly, organic acid produced by this reaction is utilized by the Citrobacter Y19 as organic substrate in

  15. Yeast Two-Hybrid Studies on Interaction of Proteins Involved in Regulation of Nitrogen Fixation in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlowski, Alice; Riedel, Kai-Uwe; Klipp, Werner; Dreiskemper, Petra; Groß, Silke; Bierhoff, Holger; Drepper, Thomas; Masepohl, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus contains two PII-like proteins, GlnB and GlnK, which play central roles in controlling the synthesis and activity of nitrogenase in response to ammonium availability. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid system to probe interactions between these PII-like proteins and proteins known to be involved in regulating nitrogen fixation. Analysis of defined protein pairs demonstrated the following interactions: GlnB-NtrB, GlnB-NifA1, GlnB-NifA2, GlnB-DraT, GlnK-NifA1, GlnK-NifA2, ...

  16. Die Rolle der P II -Proteine GlnB und GlnK bei der Regulation des Stickstoff-Metabolismus in dem phototrophen Purpurbakterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Das phototrophe Purpurbakterium Rhodobacter capsulatus ist in der Lage über eine Molybdän-Nitrogenase (nif-codiert) oder eine alternative Heterometall-freie Nitrogenase (anf-codiert) atmosphärischen Stickstoff zu fixieren. Die Expression und die Aktivität beider Nitrogenase-Systeme wird über die Stickstoffverfügbarkeit auf drei Ebenen reguliert. 1. die Regulation der Transkription der nif- und anf-spezifischen Transkriptionsaktivatoren NifA1, NifA2 und AnfA. 2. die Regulation i...

  17. Hydrogen gas production by fermentation from various organic wastewater using Clostridium butyricum NCIB 9576 and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides E15-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young Sue; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Rye, Hye Yeon; Lee, In Gu; Kim, Mi Sun [Biomass Research Team, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    Anaerobic fermentation using Clostidium butyricum NCIB 9576, and phto-fermentation using Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides E15-1 were studied for the production of hydrogen from Makkoli, fruits (orange and apple, watermelon and melon) and Tofu wastewaters. From the Makkoli wastewater, which contained 0.94 g/liter sugars and 2.74 g/liter solubel starch, approximately 49 mM H{sub 2}/liter wastewater was produced during the initial 18h of the anaerobic fermentation with pH control between 6.5-7.0. Several organic acids such as butyric acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid and ethanol were also produced. From watermelon and melon wastewater, which contained 43 g/liter sugars, generated about approximately 71 mM H{sub 2}/liter wastewater was produced during the initial 24h of the anaerobic fermentation. Tofu wastewater, pH 6.5, containing 12.6 g/liter soluble starch and 0.74 g/liter sugars, generated about 30mM H{sub 2}/liter wastewater, along with some organic acids, during the initial 24 h of anaerobic fermentation. Makkoli and Tofu wastewaters as substrates for the photo-fermentation by Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides E15-1 produced approximately 37.9 and 22.2 {mu}M H{sub 2}/ml wastewaters, respectively for 9 days of incubation under the average of 9,000010,000 lux illumination at the surface of reactor using tungsten halogen lamps. Orange and apple wastewater, which contained 93.4 g/l produced approximately 13.1 {mu}M H{sub 2}/ml wastewater only for 2 days of photo-fermentation and the growth of Rhodopseudomonas spnaeroides E15-1 and hydrogen production were stopped. 22 refs, 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. The reductive half-reaction of xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus: the role of Glu232 in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James; Reschke, Stefan; Cao, Hongnan; Leimkühler, Silke; Hille, Russ

    2014-11-14

    The kinetic properties of an E232Q variant of the xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus have been examined to ascertain whether Glu(232) in wild-type enzyme is protonated or unprotonated in the course of catalysis at neutral pH. We find that kred, the limiting rate constant for reduction at high [xanthine], is significantly compromised in the variant, a result that is inconsistent with Glu(232) being neutral in the active site of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the pH dependence of both kred and kred/Kd from reductive half-reaction experiments between wild-type and enzyme and the E232Q variant suggests that the ionized Glu(232) of wild-type enzyme plays an important role in catalysis by discriminating against the monoanionic form of substrate, effectively increasing the pKa of substrate by two pH units and ensuring that at physiological pH the neutral form of substrate predominates in the Michaelis complex. A kinetic isotope study of the wild-type R. capsulatus enzyme indicates that, as previously determined for the bovine and chicken enzymes, product release is principally rate-limiting in catalysis. The disparity in rate constants for the chemical step of the reaction and product release, however, is not as great in the bacterial enzyme as compared with the vertebrate forms. The results indicate that the bacterial and bovine enzymes catalyze the chemical step of the reaction to the same degree and that the faster turnover observed with the bacterial enzyme is due to a faster rate constant for product release than is seen with the vertebrate enzyme.

  19. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  20. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, David Allen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  1. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Regulates the Gene Transfer Agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Represses Transcription of the Signal Transduction Protein CckA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinski, Kevin S.; Brimacombe, Cedric A.; Westbye, Alexander B.; Ding, Hao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA) is a genetic exchange element that combines central aspects of bacteriophage-mediated transduction and natural transformation. RcGTA particles resemble a small double-stranded DNA bacteriophage, package random ∼4-kb fragments of the producing cell genome, and are released from a subpopulation (5-fold in the lexA mutant, and a lexA cckA double mutant was found to have the same phenotype as a ΔcckA single mutant in terms of RcGTA production. The data indicate that LexA is required for RcGTA production and maximal recipient capability and that the RcGTA-deficient phenotype of the lexA mutant is largely due to the overexpression of cckA. IMPORTANCE This work describes an unusual phenotype of a lexA mutant of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus in respect to the phage transduction-like genetic exchange carried out by the R. capsulatus gene transfer agent (RcGTA). Instead of the expected SOS response characteristic of prophage induction, this lexA mutation not only abolishes the production of RcGTA particles but also impairs the ability of cells to receive RcGTA-borne genes. The data show that, despite an apparent evolutionary relationship to lambdoid phages, the regulation of RcGTA gene expression differs radically. PMID:26833411

  2. Hydrogen production as a novel process of wastewater treatment - studies on tofu wastewater with entrapped R. sphaeroides and mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heguang Zhu [Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). Inst. of Environmental Science; Ueda, Shunsaku [Utsunomiya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Biological Productive Science; Asada, Yasio [Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). College of Science and Technology; Miyake, Jun [National Inst. for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Attention is focusing on hydrogen production from wastewater, not only because hydrogen is a clean energy but also because it can be a process for wastewater treatment. In this paper, the characteristics of biological hydrogen production as a process of wastewater treatment is discussed by a comparison with methane production. The hydrogen production from tofu wastewater by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and its potential for wastewater treatment are reported. The possibility of co-cultivation with heterotrophic anaerobic bacteria was also investigated. As a solution to overcome the repressive effect of NH{sub 4}{sup +} on hydrogen production by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, a study was done using glutamine auxotroph which was obtained by chemical mutagenesis. To confirm that the mutation had occurred in DNA molecular level, the glutamine synthetase gene was cloned and sequenced. (Author)

  3. Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Light Harvesting Complex 1 of R. Sphaeroides by Solid State NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Ann E [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Studies of the structure and dynamics of a light harvesting complex from photosynthetic bacteria are described. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance methods, we explored the idea that optical properties are modulated via a conformational switch in the BChl chromophores, in a way that provides benefits for the efficiency of energy conversion.

  4. 硫酸酯化修饰葛仙米多糖工艺研究%Sulfation Modification of Polysaccharide Extracted from Nostoc sphaeroides Ktzing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉婷; 谭姚; 莫开菊

    2011-01-01

    The orthogonal array design method was used to optimize three reaction conditions,including esterification reagent,temperature and reaction time,for the sulfation of crude polysaccharides extracted from Nostoc sphaeroides Ku..tzing by water extraction and subsequent alcohol precipitation.Besides,FTIR spectroscopic analysis was carried out to identify the structural difference of Nostoc sphaeroides Ku..tzing polysaccharides as a result of the sulfation reaction,and a correlation analysis was done between FTIR A1261/A1418 and degree of substitution(DS) of sulfated polysaccharides,as determined by the barium chloride-gelation method.The optimal sulfation reaction conditions were found to be: 1:4 chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine as esterification reagent for 6 h reaction at 70 ℃.Under the optimal sulfation conditions,the DS of the final products was 1.042.Meanwhile,the sulfated polysaccharide obtained revealed typical sulfated functional groups.The correlation coefficient between FTIR A1261/A1418 and DS of sulfated Nostoc sphaeroides Ku..tzing polysaccharides was 0.974.Therefore,infrared spectroscopy can be used to characterize the structural difference of sulfated polysaccharides and quantify the DS of sulfate groups.%采用氯磺酸-吡啶法合成硫酸酯化葛仙米多糖,利用正交设计对酯化试剂比例、反应温度及反应时间进行优化。通过傅里叶红外光谱分析酯化前后的结构差异,氯化钡-明胶比浊法测定取代度,并分析红外光谱法与取代度之间的相关性。结果表明:葛仙米多糖硫酸酯化修饰的最佳条件为V(氯磺酸)与V(吡啶)比例1:4、反应温度70℃、反应时间6h,此条件下取代度达到1.042;红外光谱分析表明,硫酸酯化后的葛仙米多糖具有硫酸酯键的特征吸收峰,其吸光度比值A1261/A1418与化学方法所测得的硫酸酯化取代度的相关系数达到0.974。红外光谱不仅可以表征硫酸酯化多

  5. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Organization and Evolution of the Biological Response to Singlet Oxygen Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Yann S.; Landick, Robert; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of atmospheric oxygen from photosynthetic activity led to the evolution of aerobic respiration and responses to the resulting reactive oxygen species. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a photosynthetic α-proteobacterium, a transcriptional response to the reactive oxygen species singlet oxygen (1O2) is controlled by the group IV σ factor σE and the anti-σ factor ChrR. In this study, we integrated various large datasets to identify genes within the 1O2 stress response that contain σE-dependent promoters both within R. sphaeroides and across the bacterial phylogeny. Transcript pattern clustering and a σE-binding sequence model were used to predict candidate promoters that respond to 1O2 stress in R. sphaeroides. These candidate promoters were experimentally validated to nine R. sphaeroides σE-dependent promoters that control the transcription of 15 1O2-activated genes. Knowledge of the R. sphaeroides response to 1O2 and its regulator σE–ChrR was combined with large-scale phylogenetic and sequence analyses to predict the existence of a core set of approximately eight conserved σE-dependent genes in α-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria. The bacteria predicted to contain this conserved response to 1O2 include photosynthetic species, as well as free-living and symbiotic/pathogenic nonphotosynthetic species. Our analysis also predicts that the response to 1O2 evolved within the time frame of the accumulation of atmospheric molecular oxygen on this planet. PMID:18723027

  7. The diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946-4746 m. While the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium, and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis, and Stappia were found to be PAH degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these bacteria have been identified in this context. In summary, this report revealed significant diversity among the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea water column. These bacteria may play a role in PAH removal in deep-sea environments.

  8. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  9. Comparison of different mixed cultures for bio-hydrogen production from ground wheat starch by combined dark and light fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmihci, Serpil; Kargi, Fikret

    2010-04-01

    Composition of the mixed culture was varied in combined dark-light fermentation of wheat powder starch in order to improve hydrogen gas formation rate and yield. Heat-treated anaerobic sludge and pure culture of Clostridium beijerinckii (DSMZ 791T) were combined with two different light fermentation bacteria of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RS-NRRL and RS-RV) in order to select a more suitable mixture resulting in high hydrogen yield and formation rate. A combination of the anaerobic sludge and RS-NRRL yielded the highest cumulative hydrogen (CHF = 140 ml), the highest yield (0.36 mol H2 mol(-1) glucose) and specific hydrogen formation rate (2.5 ml H2 g(-1) biomass h(-1)). During dark fermentation (70 h) hydrogen was produced simultaneously by the dark and light fermentation bacteria using glucose from hydrolyzed starch. However, only light fermentation bacteria produced hydrogen from VFA's derived from dark fermentation after a long adaptation period.

  10. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  11. In vitro and in vivo safety assessment of edible blue-green algae, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing and Spirulina plantensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Cassada, David A.; Snow, Daniel D.; Rogers, Douglas G.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) have been consumed as food and herbal medicine for centuries. However, safety for their consumption has not been well investigated. This study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro and in vivo toxicity of cultivated Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP). Neither NO nor SP contained detectable levels of microcystin (MC)-LA, MC-RR, MC-LW and MC-LR by LC/MS/MS. Cell viability remained ~70-80% when HepG2 cells were incubated with 0-500 μg/ml of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water-extractable fractions of NO and SP. Four-week-old male and female C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93G/M diet supplemented with 0, 2.5% or 5% of NO and SP (wt/wt) for 6 months. For both genders, BGA-rich diets did not induce noticeable abnormality in weight gain and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations except a significant increase in plasma ALT levels by 2.5% NO supplementation in male mice at 6 month. Histopathological analysis of livers, however, indicated that BGA did not cause significant liver damage compared with controls. In conclusion, our results suggest that NO and SP are free of MC and the long-term dietary supplementation of up to 5% of the BGA may be consumed without evident toxic side-effects. PMID:21473896

  12. Lipid extract of Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kutzing, a blue-green alga, inhibits the activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Heather E; Blobaum, Kara R; Park, Young-Ki; Ehlers, Sarah J; Lu, Fan; Lee, Ji-Young

    2008-03-01

    Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (N. commune), a blue-green alga, has been used as both a food ingredient and in medicine for centuries. To determine the effect of N. commune on cholesterol metabolism, N. commune lipid extract was incubated at increasing concentrations (25-100 mg/L) with HepG2 cells, a human hepatoma cell line. The addition of N. commune lipid extract markedly reduced mRNA abundance of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) and LDL receptor (LDLR) (P commune lipid extract confirmed the inhibitory role of N. commune in cholesterol synthesis (P commune lipid extract, expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) was assessed. Whereas mRNA for SREBP-2 remained unchanged, SREBP-2 mature protein was reduced by N. commune (P commune lipid extract also decreased SREBP-1 mature protein by approximately 30% (P commune lipid extract inhibits the maturation process of both SREBP-1 and -2, resulting in a decrease in expression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism.

  13. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  14. Hydrogen production by hup(-) mutant and wild-type strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus from dark fermentation effluent of sugar beet thick juice in batch and continuous photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, Basar; Gürgan, Muazzez; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Yücel, Meral; Eroglu, Inci

    2015-10-01

    Photofermentative production of hydrogen is a promising and sustainable process; however, it should be coupled to dark fermentation to become cost effective. In order to integrate dark fermentation and photofermentation, the suitability of dark fermenter effluents for the photofermentative hydrogen production must be demonstrated. In this study, thermophilic dark fermenter effluent (DFE) of sugar beet thick juice was used as a substrate in photofermentation process to compare wild-type and uptake hydrogenase-deficient (hup (-)) mutant strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus by means of hydrogen production and biomass growth. The tests were conducted in small-scale (50 mL) batch and large-scale (4 L) continuous photobioreactors in indoor conditions under continuous illumination. In small scale batch conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 0.92 gdcw/L c and 1.50 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 34 % and 31 %, hydrogen productivities were 0.49 mmol/(L c·h) and 0.26 mmol/(Lc·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. In large-scale continuous conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 1.44 gdcw/L c and 1.87 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 48 and 46 %, and hydrogen productivities were 1.01 mmol/(L c·h) and 1.05 mmol/(L c·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. Our results showed that Rhodobacter capsulatus hup (-) cells reached to a lower maximum cell concentration but their hydrogen yield and productivity were in the same range or superior compared to the wild-type cells in both batch and continuous operating modes. The maximum biomass concentration, yield and productivity of hydrogen were higher in continuous mode compared to the batch mode with both bacterial strains.

  15. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion.

  16. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  17. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.S. Kwakman; A.A. te Velde; L. de Boer; D. Speijer; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S.A.J. Zaat

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria t

  18. Metallization of bacteria cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎向锋; 李雅芹; 蔡军; 张德远

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria cells with different standard shapes are well suited for use as templates for the fabrication of magnetic and electrically conductive microstructures. In this paper, metallization of bacteria cells is demonstrated by an electroless deposition technique of nickel-phosphorus initiated by colloid palladium-tin catalyst on the surfaces of Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus. The activated and metallized bacteria cells have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that both Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus had no deformation in shape after metallization; the metallized films deposited on the surfaces of bacteria cells are homogeneous in thickness and noncrystalline in phase structure. The kinetics of colloid palladium-tin solution and electroless plating on bacteria cells is discussed.

  19. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  20. The Diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze eShao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ( PAH-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR. After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene, 9 nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946 m to 4746 m. PAH degradation occurred to all components of the mixture, but when using a single PAH as the sole carbon and energy source, only phenanthrene can be degraded obviously. This indicates the cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene with phenanthreneWhile the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. More than half of the isolates (34 of 51 isolates were confirmed to have the ability to grow with the PAH mixture By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis and Stappia were found to

  1. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  2. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.

    2005-01-01

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  3. Synergistic dark and photo-fermentation continuous system for hydrogen production from molasses by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated synergistic dark and photo-fermentation using continuous fermentation system (CFS). The system relies on connecting several fermenters from bottom of one to top culture level of the next in a manner that allows for delaying movement of the substrate and thus for its full consumption. While H2 was collected, CFS allowed for moving liquid byproducts toward the outlet and hence continuous productivity. CFS could be efficiently used for: (1) Continuous dark and photo-fermentation H2 production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Rhodobacter capsulatus producing 5.65moleH2mole(-1) hexose; (2) Continuous dark-fermentation synergistic H2, acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) production by C. acetobutylicum which produced per mole hexose, 2.43mol H2 along with 73.08g ABE (3) Continuous H2 and methane production by C. acetobutylicum and bacterial sludge producing, per mole hexose, 1.64mol pure H2 and 2.56mol CH4 mixed with 0.37mol H2·The hydraulic retention time (HRT) for whole system was short where organic acids produced in dark-fermentation in first fermenter were synergistically utilized for H2 production by R. capsulatus in subsequent fermenters. CFS is suitable for fast-digestible sugars but not lignocelluloses or other hard-digestible organics, requiring prolonged HRT, unless such polymeric organics were hydrolyzed prior to fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dietary Karaya Saponin and Rhodobacter capsulatus Exert Hypocholesterolemic Effects by Suppression of Hepatic Cholesterol Synthesis and Promotion of Bile Acid Synthesis in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Afrose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the hypolipidemic action of karaya saponin or Rhodobacter (R. capsulatus. A total of 40 laying hens (20-week-old were assigned into four dietary treatment groups and fed a basal diet (as a control or basal diets supplemented with either karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, or both for 60 days. The level of serum low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in the serum, liver, and egg yolk were reduced by all the supplementations (<.05. Liver bile acid concentration and fecal concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and bile acid were simultaneously increased by the supplementation of karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, and the combination of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus (<.05. The supplementation of karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, and the combination of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus suppressed the incorporation of 14C from 1-14C-palmitic acid into the fractions of total lipids, phospholipids, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol in the liver in vitro (<.05. These findings suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effects of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus are caused by the suppression of the cholesterol synthesis and the promotion of cholesterol catabolism in the liver.

  5. The ccoNOQP gene cluster codes for a cb-type cytochrome oxidase that functions in aerobic respiration of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöny-Meyer, L; Beck, C; Preisig, O; Hennecke, H

    1994-11-01

    The genes for a new type of a haem-copper cytochrome oxidase were cloned from Rhodobacter capsulatus strain 37b4, using the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixNOQP gene region as a hybridizing probe. Four genes, probably organized in an operon (ccoNOQP), were identified; their products share extensive amino acid sequence similarity with the FixN, O, Q and P proteins that have recently been shown to be the subunits of a cb-type oxidase. CcoN is a b-type cytochrome, CcoO and CcoP are membrane-bound mono- and dihaem c-type cytochromes and CcoQ is a small membrane protein of unknown function. Genes for a similar oxidase are also present in other non-rhizobial bacterial species such as Azotobacter vinelandii, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as revealed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. A ccoN mutant was constructed whose phenotype, in combination with the structural information on the gene products, provides evidence that the CcoNOQP oxidase is a cytochrome c oxidase of the cb type, which supports aerobic respiration in R. capsulatus and which is probably identical to the cbb3-type oxidase that was recently purified from a different strain of the same species. Mutant analysis also showed that this oxidase has no influence on photosynthetic growth and nitrogen-fixation activity.

  6. Effect of light-dark cycles on hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by a photoheterotrophic culture and Rhodobacter capsulatus using a dark fermentation effluent as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel Corona, Virginia; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Revah, Sergio; Morales, Marcia

    2017-02-01

    A Rhodobacter capsulatus strain and a photoheterotrophic culture (IZT) were cultivated to produce hydrogen under different light-dark cycles. A dark fermentation effluent (DFE) was used as substrate. It was found that IZT culture had an average cumulative hydrogen production (Paccum H2) of 1300±43mLH2L(-1) under continuous illumination and light-dark cycles of 30 or 60min. In contrast, R. capsulatus reduced its Paccum H2 by 20% under 30:30min light-dark cycles, but tripled its poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) content (308±2mgPHB gdw(-1)) compared to continuous illumination. The highest PHB content by IZT culture was 178±10mgPHB gdw(-1) under 15:15min light-dark cycles. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the IZT culture was mainly composed of Rhodopseudomonas palustris identified with high nucleotide similarity (99%). The evaluated cultures might be used for hydrogen and PHB production. They might provide energy savings by using light-dark cycles and DFE valorization.

  7. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vassoler Serrato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2 is transformed into ammonia (NH3 by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS, anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  8. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  9. Dimeric carotenoid interaction in the light-harvesting antenna of purple phototrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdo, J; Lozano, R M; Fernandez-Cabrera, C; Ramirez, J M

    1991-03-15

    The carotenoid content of intracytoplasmic membrane vesicles isolated from purple phototrophic bacteria was reduced to a variable extent by mild extraction with light petroleum. Using preparations obtained from Rhodobacter capsulatus strains that contained the Light Harvesting System I (LHI) complex as the only major photosynthetic holochrome, it was shown that the visible circular dichroism of the carotenoids increased with the square of the membrane carotenoid content, as expected from being caused by dimeric exciton interaction. No chirality resulting from twists of the individual planar chromophore was detected. Therefore the contribution to carotenoid optical activity of non-degenerate interactions with bacteriochlorophyll or the apoprotein does not appear to be significant. The broadening of the absorption band of the bound pigment, caused by the splitting of the monomer transition, was demonstrated in membrane vesicles of both Rb, capsulatus and Rhodospirillum rubrum as a decrease of the fine structure of the band. Furthermore, the dimeric organization of the carotenoid pigments in the bacterial LHI complex accounted for the observed quantitative relationship between the fine structure of the band and the carotenoid content of the membrane.

  10. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  11. Heterologous production of two unusual acyclic carotenoids, 1,1'-dihydroxy-3,4-didehydrolycopene and 1-hydroxy-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene by combination of the crtC and crtD genes from Rhodobacter and Rubrivivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Sabine; Takaichi, Shinichi; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2002-07-17

    Acyclic hydroxy carotenoids were produced from lycopene and 3,4-didehydrolycopene in Escherichia coli by combining different carotenogenic genes including the carotene hydratase gene crtC and the carotene 3,4-desaturase gene crtD. The genes originated either from Rhodobacter species or Rubrivivax gelatinosus. It was shown that the product of crtD from Rubrivivax unlike the one from Rhodobacter is able to convert 1-HO-3,4-didehydrolycopene to 1-HO-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene (=3,4,3',4'-tetradehydro-1,2-dihydro-psi,psi-caroten-1-ol). Thus, only when the desaturase from Rubrivivax is expressed can this novel carotenoid be obtained. In the presence of crtC from Rubrivivax, another carotenoid 1,1'-(HO)(2)-3,4-didehydrolycopene (=3,4-didehydrolycopene-1,2,1',2'-tetrahydro-psi,psi-caroten-1,1'-diol) not found in a non-transgenic organism before is formed in E. coli. Its accumulation under these conditions and its absence when crtC from Rubrivivax is replaced by the corresponding gene from Rhodobacter is discussed. The function of the different crtC and crtD genes in the pathway leading to the individual carotenoids is outlined. Since 1,1'-(HO)(2)-3,4-didehydrolycopene could not be produced in substantial amounts and 1-HO-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene has not been described before, their structural characteristics were determined for the definite assignment of their identity. This included spectral properties, determination of relative molecular mass as well as the number of hydroxy groups by mass spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy for 1,1'-(HO)(2)-3,4-didehydrolycopene.

  12. Open reading frame 5 (ORF5), encoding a ferredoxinlike protein, and nifQ are cotranscribed with nifE, nifN, nifX, and ORF4 in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Vivian, C; Hennecke, S; Pühler, A.; Klipp, W

    1989-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis of a 1,600-base-pair fragment located downstream of nifENX in nif region A of Rhodobacter capsulatus revealed two additional open reading frames (ORFs): ORF5, encoding a ferredoxinlike protein, and nifQ. The ferredoxinlike gene product contained two cysteine motifs, typical of ferredoxins coordinating two 4Fe-4S clusters, but the distance between these two motifs was unusual for low-molecular-weight ferredoxins. The R. capsulatus nifQ gene product shared a high degree of...

  13. The Effects of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on Cholesterol Metabolism, Egg Production and Quality Parameters during the Late Laying Periods in Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, Anushka; Ingale, S L; Lee, S H; Kim, J S; Lohakare, J D; Chae, B J; Kwon, I K

    2013-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on egg-yolk and serum cholesterol, egg production and quality parameters during the late laying periods in hens. A total of 160 Hy-Line Brown layers (54 wk-old) were randomly allotted to 4 treatment groups on the basis of laying performance. Each treatment had 4 replicates with 10 birds each (40 birds per treatment). Two hens were confined individually with cage size 35×35×40 cm and each 10 birds (5 cages) shared a common feed trough between them forming one experimental unit. Dietary treatments were; basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15% R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Experimental diets were fed in meal form for 56 d. Dietary supplementation of increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 reduced (linear, phens fed a diet supplemented with increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 had increased (linear; p0.05) on feed intake of laying hens. At d 28 and 56, breaking strength and yolk colour of eggs were linearly improved (phens fed dietary increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Dietary treatment had no effects (linear or quadratic; p>0.05) on albumin height, shell thickness and shell weight at any period of experiment. These results indicate that dietary supplementation of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 has the potential to improve the laying hen performance and lead to the development of low cholesterol eggs during late laying period in Hy-Line Brown hens.

  14. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  15. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  16. Mycophagous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Soil microorganisms evolved several strategies to compete for limited nutrients in soil. Bacteria of the genus Collimonas developed a way to exploit fungi as a source of organic nutrients. This strategy has been termed “mycophagy&r

  17. Modeling chemotaxis reveals the role of reversed phosphotransfer and a bi-functional kinase-phosphatase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Tindall

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how multiple signals are integrated in living cells to produce a balanced response is a major challenge in biology. Two-component signal transduction pathways, such as bacterial chemotaxis, comprise histidine protein kinases (HPKs and response regulators (RRs. These are used to sense and respond to changes in the environment. Rhodobacter sphaeroides has a complex chemosensory network with two signaling clusters, each containing a HPK, CheA. Here we demonstrate, using a mathematical model, how the outputs of the two signaling clusters may be integrated. We use our mathematical model supported by experimental data to predict that: (1 the main RR controlling flagellar rotation, CheY(6, aided by its specific phosphatase, the bifunctional kinase CheA(3, acts as a phosphate sink for the other RRs; and (2 a phosphorelay pathway involving CheB(2 connects the cytoplasmic cluster kinase CheA(3 with the polar localised kinase CheA(2, and allows CheA(3-P to phosphorylate non-cognate chemotaxis RRs. These two mechanisms enable the bifunctional kinase/phosphatase activity of CheA(3 to integrate and tune the sensory output of each signaling cluster to produce a balanced response. The signal integration mechanisms identified here may be widely used by other bacteria, since like R. sphaeroides, over 50% of chemotactic bacteria have multiple cheA homologues and need to integrate signals from different sources.

  18. Photoinduced ESR signals from the primary electron donors in deuterated highly /sup 13/C enriched photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Norris, J.R.; Crespi, H.L.; Harper, J.

    1981-12-16

    In purple photosynthetic bacteria such as Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides the oxidized primary donar P865/sup +/ exhibits a single Gaussian ESR signal posessing a line width that is narrowed by 1/%2 relative to that of monomeric BChl a/sup +/ in vitro. Data show that P700/sup +/ from the green plant photosystem I donor is a single oxidized Chl a type macrocycle. New data confirm that P865/sup +/ is a dimer of a BChl a type macrocycle. A method that accounts for the entire spin is needed in order to count the number of spins per macrocycle. The solution to this problem is to make each carbon atom of the ..pi.. system over which the electron is distributed magnetic resonance active. This requires that each position in the ..pi.. framework be highly enriched in /sup 13/C. Under these conditions the total ESR line width is the sum of the hyperfine lines due to each carbon atom of the ..pi.. system. Data indicate that the spin in P700/sup +/ is located on only one Chl a type macrocycle whereas that of P865/sup +/ is shared between two BChl a type macrocycles. (MWF)

  19. Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162067.html Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria? Study in New York City found most of ... keypads in New York City were covered in bacteria, researchers reported, with most of the microbes coming ...

  20. Exopolysaccharides from Marine Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Zhenming; FANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives,textiles, pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria,including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  1. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  2. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  3. South-Seeking Magnetic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kirschvink, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria, originally discovered by Blakemore (1975), are by far the most convincing and abundant example of magnetically sensitive organisms in existence. Their magnetite crystals passively align the bacteria with the earth's magnetic field like a 3-dimensional compass (Frankel et al. 1979). These microaerophilic bacteria normally live in the soupy, oxygen-poor mud/water transition zone in many freshwater and marine environments. If the mud is disturbed so that the bacteria are ...

  4. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the fre...

  5. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  6. Non-Growth-Associated Demethylation of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate by (Homo)acetogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Michael; Hansen, Theo A.

    2001-01-01

    The demethylation of the algal osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) to methylthiopropionate (MTPA) by (homo)acetogenic bacteria was studied. Five Eubacterium limosum strains (including the type strain), Sporomusa ovata DSM 2662T, Sporomusa sphaeroides DSM 2875T, and Acetobacterium woodii DSM 1030T were shown to demethylate DMSP stoichiometrically to MTPA. The (homo)acetogenic fermentation based on this demethylation did not result in any significant increase in biomass. The analogous demethylation of glycine betaine to dimethylglycine does support growth of acetogens. In batch cultures of E. limosum PM31 DMSP and glycine betaine were demethylated simultaneously. In mixed substrates experiments with fructose-DMSP or methanol-DMSP, DMSP was used rapidly but only after exhaustion of the fructose or the methanol. In steady-state fructose-limited chemostat cultures (at a dilution rate of 0.03 h−1) with DMSP as a second reservoir substrate, DMSP was biotransformed to MTPA but this did not result in higher biomass values than in cultures without DMSP; cells from such cultures demethylated DMSP at rates of approximately 50 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1, both after growth in the presence of DMSP and after growth in its absence. In cell extracts of glycine betaine-grown strain PM31, DMSP demethylation activities of 21 to 24 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 were detected with tetrahydrofolate as a methyl acceptor; the activities seen with glycine betaine were approximately 10-fold lower. A speculative explanation for the demethylation of DMSP without an obvious benefit for the organism is that the DMSP-demethylating activity is catalyzed by the glycine betaine-demethylating enzyme and that a transport-related factor, in particular a higher energy demand for DMSP transport across the cytoplasmic membrane than for glycine betaine transport, may reduce the overall ATP yield of the fermentation to virtually zero. PMID:11133459

  7. Functional assignment of gene AAC16202.1 from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003: new insights into the bacterial SDR sorbitol dehydrogenases family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Carvajal, Agustín; García-García, María Inmaculada; Sánchez-Carrón, Guiomar; García-Carmona, Francisco; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) constitute one of the largest enzyme superfamilies with over 60,000 non-redundant sequences in the database, many of which need a correct functional assignment. Among them, the gene AAC16202.1 (NCBI) from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 has been assigned in Uniprot both as a sorbitol dehydrogenase (#D5AUY1) and, as an N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase (#O66112), both enzymes being of biotechnological interest. When the gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3)pLys, the purified enzyme was not active toward N-acetyl-d-mannosamine, whereas it was active toward d-sorbitol and d-fructose. However, the relative activities toward xylitol and l-iditol (0.45 and 6.9%, respectively) were low compared with that toward d-sorbitol. Thus, the enzyme could be considered sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) with very low activity toward xylitol, which could increase its biotechnological interest for determining sorbitol without the unspecific cross-determination of added xylitol in food and pharma compositions. The tetrameric enzyme (120 kDa) showed similar catalytic efficiency (2.2 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)) to other sorbitol dehydrogenases for d-sorbitol, with an optimum pH of 9.0 and an optimum temperature of 37 °C. The enzyme was also more thermostable than other reported SDH, ammonium sulfate being the best stabilizer in this respect, increasing the melting temperature (T(m)) up to 52.9 °C. The enzyme can also be considered as a new member of the Zn(2+) independent SDH family since no effect on activity was detected in the presence of divalent cations or chelating agents. Finally, its in silico analysis enabled the specific conserved sequence blocks that are the fingerprints of bacterial sorbitol dehydrogenases and mainly located at C-terminal of the protein, to be determined for the first time. This knowledge will facilitate future data curation of present databases and a better functional assignment of newly described

  8. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated

  9. Characterization of a nif-regulated flavoprotein (FprA) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Redox properties and molecular interaction with a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouanneau, Y; Meyer, C; Asso, M; Guigliarelli, B; Willison, J C

    2000-02-01

    A flavoprotein from Rhodobacter capsulatus was purified as a recombinant (His)6-tag fusion from an Escherichia coli clone over-expressing the fprA structural gene. The FprA protein is a homodimer containing one molecule of FMN per 48-kDa monomer. Reduction of the flavoprotein by dithionite showed biphasic kinetics, starting with a fast step of semiquinone (SQ) formation, and followed by a slow reduction of the SQ. This SQ was in the anionic form as shown by EPR and optical spectroscopies. Spectrophotometric titration gave a midpoint redox potential for the oxidized/SQ couple of Em1 = +20 mV (pH 8.0), whereas the SQ/hydroquinone couple could not be titrated due to the thermodynamic instability of SQ associated with its slow reduction process. The inability to detect the intermediate form, SQ, upon oxidative titration confirmed this instability and led to an estimate of Em2 - Em1 of > 80 mV. The reduction of SQ by dithionite was significantly accelerated when the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin FdIV was used as redox mediator. The midpoint redox potential of this ferredoxin was determined to be -275 +/- 2 mV at pH 7.5, consistent with FdIV serving as electron donor to FprA in vivo. FdIV and FprA were found to cross-react when incubated together with the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, giving a covalent complex with an Mr of approximately 60 000. Formation of this complex was unaffected by the redox states of the two proteins. Other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins, including FdV and FdVI from R. capsulatus, were ineffective as electron carriers to FprA, and cross-reacted poorly with the flavoprotein. The possible function of FprA with regard to nitrogen fixation was investigated using an fprA-deleted mutant. Although nitrogenase activity was significantly reduced in the mutant compared with the wild-type strain, nitrogen fixation was apparently unaffected by the fprA deletion even under iron limitation or microaerobic conditions.

  10. Bacteria counting method based on polyaniline/bacteria thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhihua, Li; Xuetao, Hu; Jiyong, Shi; Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Xucheng, Zhou; Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid; Holmes, Mel; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-07-15

    A simple and rapid bacteria counting method based on polyaniline (PANI)/bacteria thin film was proposed. Since the negative effects of immobilized bacteria on the deposition of PANI on glass carbon electrode (GCE), PANI/bacteria thin films containing decreased amount of PANI would be obtained when increasing the bacteria concentration. The prepared PANI/bacteria film was characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique to provide quantitative index for the determination of the bacteria count, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was also performed to further investigate the difference in the PANI/bacteria films. Good linear relationship of the peak currents of the CVs and the log total count of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) could be established using the equation Y=-30.413X+272.560 (R(2)=0.982) over the range of 5.3×10(4) to 5.3×10(8)CFUmL(-1), which also showed acceptable stability, reproducibility and switchable ability. The proposed method was feasible for simple and rapid counting of bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  12. Biohydrogen production by isolated halotolerant photosynthetic bacteria using long-wavelength light-emitting diode (LW-LED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoshi, Yasunori; Oki, Yukinori; Nakano, Issei; Fujimoto, Aya [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Takahashi, Hirokazu [Environmental Business DivisionDaiki Ataka Engineering Co. Ltd., 2-1-9 Nishiku-Urihori, Osaka 550-0012 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Biohydrogen is expected as one of the alternative energy to fossil fuel. In this study, halotolerant photosynthetic hydrogen producing bacteria (ht-PHB) were isolated from a sediment of tideland, and hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) production by isolated ht-PHB from mixed short-chain fatty acids (SFAs) using a long-wavelength light emitting diode (LW-LED) was investigated. The isolated ht-PHB grow on a culture containing three kinds of SFAs (lactic acid, acetic acid, butyric acid) and produced H{sub 2} with their complete consumption at NaCl concentration in the 0-3% range in the light of tungsten lamp. The isolated ht-PHB was phylogenetically identified as Rhodobacter sp. KUPB1. The KUPB1 showed well growth and H{sub 2} production even under LW-LED light irradiation, indicating that LW-LED is quite useful as an energy-saving light source for photosynthetic H{sub 2} production. (author)

  13. Brotes germinados y bacterias

    OpenAIRE

    García Olmedo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Ante la confusión y el revuelo asociados al último incidente causado por una cepa de la bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) en Alemania, tal vez no esté de más esta carta para recordar y actualizar escritos míos anteriores aparecidos en Revista de Libros sobre los riesgos alimentarios en general y sobre los peligros de dicho microorganismo en particular. 1 . Aunque es cierto que la proporción de cepas peligrosas de E. coli es quizás inferior a la de delincuentes entre los humanos, exi...

  14. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny.

  15. Chemical communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  16. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Effect of Spray Freeze Drying on Antioxidant Activity of Phycocyprotein from Nostoc sphaeroides KUting%喷雾冷冻干燥对葛仙米藻胆蛋白抗氧化特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程超; 朱玉婷; 田瑞; 汪兴平; 潘思轶

    2012-01-01

    研究喷雾冷冻干燥对葛仙米藻胆蛋白抗氧化特性的影响,并与冷冻干燥技术进行比较。主要测定ABTS+·、铁还原抗氧化能力(FRAP)、对羟自由基(·OH)清除作用和H2O2诱导的脂质过氧化的抑制作用,结果发现,喷雾冷冻干燥(SFD)对葛仙米藻胆蛋白的抗氧化特性有一定的影响,在基于电子转移和氢原子转移的抗氧化测定方法中,SFD与冷冻干燥(FD)制备的样品差异不明显,但在基于活性氧自由基清除的测定方法中,SFD显著优于FD。表明SFD非常适合于高活性成分的干燥。%In this study, the effect of spray freeze drying on the antioxidant activity of phycobiliprotein fromNostoc sphaeroides KUting was studied and compared with that of common freeze drying. The scavenging effect of phycobiliprotein on ABTS+· and hydroxyl radicals (·OH), H2O2-induced lipid peroxidation and ferric-ion reducing power (FRAP) were evaluated. The results indicated that spray freeze drying method had obvious effect on antioxidant activity of phycobiliprotein from Nostoc sphaeroides Kuting. The samples dried by two different methods showed no significant difference in the antioxidant activity determined based on electron transfer and hydrogen atom transfer. The free radical scavenging activity of the sample dried by spray freeze drying method was markedly higher than that of the sample dried by common freeze drying method. These data suggest that spray freeze drying is more suitable for drying active substances.

  18. Light-field-characterization in a continuous hydrogen-producing photobioreactor by optical simulation and computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krujatz, Felix; Illing, Rico; Krautwer, Tobias; Liao, Jing; Helbig, Karsten; Goy, Katharina; Opitz, Jörg; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-12-01

    Externally illuminated photobioreactors (PBRs) are widely used in studies on the use of phototrophic microorganisms as sources of bioenergy and other photobiotechnology research. In this work, straightforward simulation techniques were used to describe effects of varying fluid flow conditions in a continuous hydrogen-producing PBR on the rate of photofermentative hydrogen production (rH2 ) by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158. A ZEMAX optical ray tracing simulation was performed to quantify the illumination intensity reaching the interior of the cylindrical PBR vessel. 24.2% of the emitted energy was lost through optical effects, or did not reach the PBR surface. In a dense culture of continuously producing bacteria during chemostatic cultivation, the illumination intensity became completely attenuated within the first centimeter of the PBR radius as described by an empirical three-parametric model implemented in Mathcad. The bacterial movement in chemostatic steady-state conditions was influenced by varying the fluid Reynolds number. The "Computational Fluid Dynamics" and "Particle Tracing" tools of COMSOL Multiphysics were used to visualize the fluid flow pattern and cellular trajectories through well-illuminated zones near the PBR periphery and dark zones in the center of the PBR. A moderate turbulence (Reynolds number = 12,600) and fluctuating illumination of 1.5 Hz were found to yield the highest continuous rH2 by R. sphaeroides DSM 158 (170.5 mL L(-1) h(-1) ) in this study.

  19. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria...... with bacteria, and the cytokine pattern induced by specific bacteria resembled the pattern induced in MoDC, except for TNF-alpha and IL-6, which were induced in response to different bacteria in blood DC/monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Autologous NK cells produced IFN-gamma when cultured with blood DC......, monocytes and monocyte-derived DC and IL-12-inducing bacteria, whereas only DC induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic T cells. In vitro-generated DC is a commonly used model of tissue DC, but they differ in certain aspects from intestinal DC, which are in direct contact with the intestinal microbiota...

  20. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...

  1. Bacteria transport under unsaturated conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gargiulo, Grazia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the bacteria transport behaviour in different conditions using an unsaturated porous media. A column based system able to keep the unsaturated conditions was designed and developed to perform the experiments. Two bacteria strains Deinococcus radiodurans and Rhodococcus rhodochrous strongly different in hydrophobicity were employed. During the experiments the bacteria concentration in the outflow was continuously on-line measured and after the experiment the c...

  2. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H 2 production: A Model System for Optimizing H 2 Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wecker, Matt S. A. [GeneBiologics, LLC, Boulder Colorado; Beaton, Stephen E. [United States Air Force Academy, Department of Chemistry, Colorado Springs Colorado; Chado, Robert A. [United States Air Force Academy, Department of Chemistry, Colorado Springs Colorado; Ghirardi, Maria L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, MS 3313, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401

    2016-08-23

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system (Ghirardi et al. 2009). Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. This model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.

  3. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  4. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  5. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  6. GenBank blastx search result: AK061856 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061856 001-040-G03 AF018073.1 Rhodobacter sphaeroides operon regulator (smoC), periplasmic sorbitol...-binding protein (smoE), sorbitol/mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoF), sorbitol.../mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoG), sorbitol/mannitol transport ATP-binding transport protein (smoK), sorbitol

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK243491 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243491 J100073O14 M86823.1 RCANIFA Rhodobacter sphaeroides ORF1, complete cds; nif...U gene, complete cds; nifS gene, complete cds; nifV gene, complete cds; nifW gene, complete cds; rponN gene, partial cds. BCT 2e-36 1 ...

  8. GenBank blastx search result: AK287500 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287500 J043034C21 M86823.1 RCANIFA Rhodobacter sphaeroides ORF1, complete cds; nif...U gene, complete cds; nifS gene, complete cds; nifV gene, complete cds; nifW gene, complete cds; rponN gene, partial cds. BCT 7e-11 0 ...

  9. On the signaling mechanism and the absence of photoreversibility in the AppA BLUF domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toh, K.C.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Hendriks, J.; Alexandre, M.T.A.; Arents, J.C.; Avila Perez, M.; van Grondelle, R.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2008-01-01

    The flavoprotein AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides contains an N-terminal, FAD-binding BLUF photoreceptor domain. Upon illumination, the AppA BLUF domain forms a signaling state that is characterized by red-shifted absorbance by 10 nm, a state known as AppA(RED). We have applied ultrafast spectrosco

  10. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel;

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...

  11. GenBank blastx search result: AK111944 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111944 001-022-C09 AF016236.1 Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO/TMAO-sensor kinase (dorS), DMSO.../TMAO-response regulator (dorR), DMSO/TMAO-cytochrome c-containing subunit (dorC), DMSO-membrane protein (dorB), and DMSO

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK058791 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058791 001-002-F06 M86823.1 Rhodobacter sphaeroides ORF1, complete cds; nifU gene, complete... cds; nifS gene, complete cds; nifV gene, complete cds; nifW gene, complete cds; rponN gene, partial cds.|BCT BCT 3e-13 +3 ...

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK059171 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059171 001-023-F01 M86823.1 Rhodobacter sphaeroides ORF1, complete cds; nifU gene, complete... cds; nifS gene, complete cds; nifV gene, complete cds; nifW gene, complete cds; rponN gene, partial cds.|BCT BCT 2e-66 +3 ...

  14. On the Role of Aromatic Side Chains in the Photoactivation of BLUF Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gauden, M.; Grinstead, J.S.; Laan, W.; Stokkum, I.H.M.; Avila-Perez, M.; Toh, K.C.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R.; van Grondelle, R.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    BLUF (blue-light sensing using FAD) domain proteins are a novel group of blue-light sensing receptors found in many microorganisms. The role of the aromatic side chains Y21 and W104, which are in close vicinity to the FAD cofactor in the AppA BLUF domain from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, is investigated

  15. The phylogenetic relationships of Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis and Brevundimonas species and their taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, L I; Cox, T L; Beckenham, T B

    1999-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the species of Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis and Brevundimonas were studied by comparison of their 16S rDNA sequences. The analysis of almost complete sequences confirmed the early evolutionary divergence of the freshwater and marine species of Caulobacter reported previously [Stahl, D. A., Key, R., Flesher, B. & Smit, J. (1992). J Bacteriol 174, 2193-2198]. The freshwater species formed two distinct clusters. One cluster contained the species Caulobacter bacteroides, Caulobacter crescentus, Caulobacter fusiformis and Caulobacter henricii. C. bacteroides and C. fusiformis are very closely related (sequence identity 99.8%). The second cluster was not exclusive and contained the specis Caulobacter intermedius, Caulobacter subvibrioides and Caulobacter variabilis, as well as Brevundimonas diminuta and Brevundimonas vesicularis. The marine species Caulobacter halobacteroides and Caulobacter maris were very closely related, with a sequence identity of 99.7%. These two species were most closely but distantly related to the marine hyphal/budding bacteria Hyphomonas jannaschiana and Hirschia baltica, which formed a deep phylogenetic line with Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodobacter capsulatus. Caulobacter leidyia is unrelated to the other species of Caulobacter and belongs to the alpha-4 subclass of the Proteobacteria, forming a distinct cluster with Asticcacaulis excentricus and Asticcacaulis biprosthecium. The taxonomic implications of the polyphyletic nature of the genus Caulobacter and the absence of a type culture for the type species of the genus Caulobacter vibrioides, are discussed.

  16. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Ecophysiology of the anammox bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, Mustafa Boran

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor. These bacteria are the key players in the global nitrogen cycle, responsible for the most of nitrogen production in natural ecosystems. The anammox process is also a cost-effecti

  18. Money and transmission of bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gedik, H.; Voss, T.A.; Voss, A.

    2013-01-01

    Money is one of the most frequently passed items in the world. The aim of this study was to ascertain the survival status of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Vancomycin- Resistant Enterococci (VRE) on banknotes from different countries and the transmission of bacteria

  19. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...... with a highly variable speed of 0.50.3 ms1 (meanstandard deviation) and time between reversals of 155108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic......-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment....

  20. Commensal ocular bacteria degrade mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M; Harris, A; Lumb, R; Powell, K

    2002-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity in tears prevents infection while maintaining a commensal bacterial population. The relation between mucin and commensal bacteria was assessed to determine whether commensals possess mucinolytic activity, how degradation depends on mucin integrity, and whether mucins affect bacterial replication. Bacteria were sampled from healthy eyes and contact lenses from asymptomatic wearers. Intracellular mucins were extracted and purified from cadaver conjunctivas, and surface mucins from extended wear contact lenses. After exposure to bacteria, changes in mucin hydrodynamic volume (proteolytic cleavage) and subunit charge (oligosaccharide degradation) were assayed by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. The effect of mucin on bacterial replication was followed for up to 24 hours from the end of incubation with purified ocular mucins. Ocular bacteria decreased the hydrodynamic volume of intracellular and contact lens adherent mucins, irrespective of glycosylation density. A decrease in mucin sialylation was observed after exposure to commensal bacteria. Subunit charge distributions were generally shifted to lesser negative charge, consistent with loss of charged epitopes. Subunits with high negative charge, observed after digesting lightly adhering contact lens mucins with bacteria, suggest preferential cleavage sites in the mucin molecule. The presence of purified ocular mucin in the medium inhibited bacterial growth. Bacteria in the healthy ocular surface possess mucinolytic activity on both intact and surface processed mucins, targeted to discrete sites in the mucin molecule. Inhibition of bacterial growth by ocular mucins can be seen as part of the mucosal control of microbiota.

  1. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We

  2. Motility of Electric Cable Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces with a highly variable speed of 0.5 ± 0.3 μm s−1 (mean ± standard deviation) and time between reversals of 155 ± 108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed ...

  3. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and

  4. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Mega

  5. Sewage-pollution indicator bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Rodrigues, V.; Alwares, E.; Rodrigues, C.; Baksh, R.; Jayan, S.; Mohandass, C.

    Spatial distribution and annual cycle of sewage pollution indicator (total coliforms and total fecal coliforms) and human pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis) in water and sediment samples in the Mandovi and Zuari...

  6. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  7. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  8. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  9. Geobiology of Marine Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Coast. Shelf Sci., 45:769-788. [38] Overmann, J. and H. van Gemerden. 2000. Microbial interactions involving sulfur bacteria: implications for the...1998) Organic acids in the rhizosphere : a critical review. Plant and Soil 205: 25-44. J0rgensen BB, Kuenen JG, Cohen Y (1979) Microbial ...my advisor Katrina Edwards for taking a chance on someone who initially knew nothing about magnetotactic bacteria, microbial ecology, or microbiology

  10. A comparative effect of 3 disinfectants on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The disinfection effect of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in circulating cooling water was studied. The results of the test indicated that high purity chlorine dioxide was the most effective biocide in the 3 disinfectants, and with a dosage of 0.5mg/L, chlorine dioxide could obtain perfect effect. High purity chloride dioxide could have the excellent effect with the pH value of 6 to 10, and could keep it within 72 h. Chlorine and their mixture couldn't reach the effect of chlorine dioxide.

  11. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Youngblood, T. [Frisby Technologies, Aiken, SC (United States); Lamothe, D. [American Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States). Ordnance/Explosives Environmental Services Div.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  12. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  13. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage.

  14. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  15. Expression of Uptake Hydrogenase and Molybdenum Nitrogenase in Rhodobacter capsulatus Is Coregulated by the RegB-RegA Two-Component Regulatory System

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Purple photosynthetic bacteria are capable of generating cellular energy from several sources, including photosynthesis, respiration, and H2 oxidation. Under nutrient-limiting conditions, cellular energy can be used to assimilate carbon and nitrogen. This study provides the first evidence of a molecular link for the coregulation of nitrogenase and hydrogenase biosynthesis in an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium. We demonstrated that molybdenum nitrogenase biosynthesis is under the control o...

  16. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations.

  17. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  18. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bacteria in latex paint were demonstrated.

  20. Adaptation, Bacteria and Maxwell's Demons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galajda, Peter; Keymer, Juan E.; Austin, Robert H.

    2007-03-01

    We propose a method to study the adaptation of bacterial populations with an asymmetric wall of Maxwell Demon openings. A Maxwell Demon opening is a funnel which is easier to enter than to leave. The interaction of swimming cells with such a Maxwell Demon Wall results in a population density separation, in apparent (but not real) violation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, as we will show. Bacteria can be exposed to spatial challenges in order to move to e. g. higher food levels. The question we address in these experiments is: do the bacteria adapt and overcome the Maxwell Demon Wall?

  1. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  2. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...

  3. ENDOSPORES OF THERMOPHILIC FERMENTATIVE BACTERIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volpi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    solely based on endospores of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which presumably constitute only a small fraction of the total thermophilic endospore community reaching cold environments. My PhD project developed an experimental framework for using thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) to trace...

  4. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  5. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  6. Deodorant bacteria; Des bacteries desodorisantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanlo, J.L. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 30 - Ales (France)

    1998-02-01

    Purifying bacteria: if this concept is not new, its application to gases cleansing has only been developed recently. This method allows to eliminate the volatile organic compounds and the gaseous effluents odors which come from industrial sites. Three bioreactors types exist at the present time. Their principles are explained. (O.M.) 6 refs.

  7. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  8. Photoreceptor proteins from purple bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.; van der Horst, M.A.; Chua, T.K.; Ávila Pérez, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.; Alexandre, M.T.A.; Groot, M.-L.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Hunter, C.N.; Daldal, F.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Beatty, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Purple bacteria contain representatives of four of the six main families of photoreceptor proteins: phytochromes, BLUF domain containing proteins, xanthopsins (i.e., photoactive yellow proteins), and phototropins (containing one or more light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains). Most of them have a

  9. Synthetic Biology in Streptomyces Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer . Genome sequencing has revealed that

  10. SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IN STREPTOMYCES BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Voigt, C

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer. Genome sequencing has revealed that t

  11. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  12. Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162249.html Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria Study of Washington farm workers finds alterations persist ... News) -- Pesticide exposure may change the makeup of bacteria in the mouths of farm workers, a new ...

  13. Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160769.html Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria Infections, diarrhea and vomiting are possible consequences, FDA ... products can harbor several species of potentially harmful bacteria, researchers warn. Two types in particular -- Bacillus licheniformis ...

  14. Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163401.html Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk Bad 'bugs' tied ... Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain types of bacteria in a pregnant woman's cervix and vagina can ...

  15. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsimring, L S; Aranson, I S; Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Shochet, O; Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is explained as being due the variation of the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a non-motile phase.

  16. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  17. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  18. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  19. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  20. Compartmentalization of bacteria in microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Judith; Heunis, Tiaan; Harmzen, Elrika; Dicks, Leon M T; Meuldijk, Jan; Klumperman, Bert

    2014-12-18

    Lactobacillus plantarum strain 423 was encapsulated in hollow poly(organosiloxane) microcapsules by templating water-in-oil Pickering emulsion droplets via the interfacial reaction of alkylchlorosilanes. The bacteria were suspended in growth medium or buffer to protect the cells against pH changes during the interfacial reactions with alkylchlorosilanes. The results of this work open up novel avenues for the encapsulation of microbial cells.

  1. Endocytosis of Viruses and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, Pascale; Helenius, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Of the many pathogens that infect humans and animals, a large number use cells of the host organism as protected sites for replication. To reach the relevant intracellular compartments, they take advantage of the endocytosis machinery and exploit the network of endocytic organelles for penetration into the cytosol or as sites of replication. In this review, we discuss the endocytic entry processes used by viruses and bacteria and compare the strategies used by these dissimilar classes of pathogens. PMID:25085912

  2. Characterization of Mediterranean Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of motile prokaryotes that are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats and cosmopolitan in distribution. In this study, we collected magnetotactic bacteria from the Mediterranean Sea. A remarkable diversity of morphotypes was observed, including muiticellular types that seemed to differ from those previously found in North and South America. Another interesting organism was one with magnetosomes arranged in a six-stranded bundle which occupied one third of the cell width. The magnetosome bundle was evident even under optic microscopy. These cells were connected together and swam as a linear entire unit. Magnetosomes did not always align up to form a straight linear chain. A chain composed of rectangle magnetosomes bent at a position with an oval crystal. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the crystal at the pivotal position suggested uncompleted formation of the crystal. This is the first report of Mediterranean magnetotactic bacteria, which should be useful for studies of biogeochemical cycling and geohistory of the Mediterranean Sea.

  3. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in common that

  4. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  5. Ecology of mycophagous collimonas bacteria in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höppener-Ogawa, Sachie

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Collimonas consist of soil bacteria that can grow at expense of living fungal hyphae i.e. they are mycophagous. This PhD studies deals with the ecology of mycophagous bacteria in soil using collimonads as model organisms. Collimonads were found to be widely distribut

  6. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  7. Current strategies for improving food bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, O P; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Novel concepts and methodologies are emerging that hold great promise for the directed improvement of food-related bacteria, specifically lactic acid bacteria. Also, the battle against food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria can now be fought more effectively. Here we describe recent advances in micro

  8. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic bact

  9. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  10. Arsenic metabolism in purple nonsulfur bacteria%紫色非硫细菌的砷代谢机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕常江; 赵春贵; 杨素萍; 曲音波

    2012-01-01

    [目的]系统阐述紫色非硫细菌(PNSB)砷代谢机制和砷代谢基因簇的进化关系.[方法]通过生物信息学方法分析了PNSB砷代谢基因簇的分布、组成、排布方式.采用UV-Vis和HPLC-ICP-MS方法,研究了3个PNSB种类对砷的抗性、砷形态及价态的转化、砷在细胞中的积累和分布以及磷酸盐对As细胞毒性的影响.[结果]砷基因簇分析表明:已公布全基因组序列的17个PNSB菌株基因组中均含有以ars operon为核心的砷代谢基因簇,由1-4个操纵子组成,主要含有与细胞质砷还原和砷甲基化代谢相关的基因,但基因的组成和排列方式因种和菌株而异,尤其是arsM和两类进化来源不同的arsC.实验结果表明:光照厌氧条件下,3个PNSB种类对As(V)和As(Ⅲ)均具有抗性,As(V)和As(Ⅲ)均能进入细胞 ;在胞内As(V)能够还原为As(Ⅲ)并被排出胞外,但不能将As(Ⅲ)氧化为As(V),也未检测到甲基砷化物 ;磷酸盐浓度升高,能够抑制As(V)进入细胞,降低As(V)对细胞的毒性,而不能抑制As(Ⅲ)进入细胞.[结论]PNSB砷代谢机制主体为细胞质As(V)还原,也还有砷甲基化途径.通过对砷代谢基因簇结构多样性特点和进化方式分析,提出了与Rosen不同的ars operon进化途径.这对深入开展PNSB砷代谢和基因之间的相互作用研究奠定基础.%To elucidate the arsenic metabolic pathway of purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB). [Methods] We investigated the distribution within their genomes, organization, composition, arrangement, core genes and coding proteins of arsenic gene clusters found in complete genome from 17 strains of PNSB by comparing the genomes analysis, and studied the arsenic metabolism in 3 members of PNSB under anaerobic conditions by UV-Vis and HPLC-ICP-MS. [Results] Arsenate reduction and arsenite methylation pathways mediated by ars operon are the dominating arsenic metabolic processes. The arsenic gene clusters differ vastly in composition and

  11. 草甘膦对可食用蓝藻葛仙米生长和生理的影响%EFFECTS OF ACUTE GLYPHOSATE EXPOSURE ON THE GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY OF NOSTOC SPHAEROIDES, AN EDIBLE CYANOBACTERIUM OF PADDY RICE FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮祚禧; Murray T.Brown

    2008-01-01

    The productivity of Nostoc sphaeroides,an edible cyanobacterium found in paddy rice fields has declined in recent years. It may relate to the increased application of agricultural herbicides. To assess the impact of glyphosate exposure(0.15,0.30,0.45 and 0.6 mmol/L Gly acid) ,the effects on colony size,dry biomass accumulation,chlorophyll a fluorescence (Fv/Fm) and chlorophyll a biosynthesis were investigated over an 8d period. All parameters were significantly inhibited in a concentration used and time dependent way. After 2d exposure to 0. 15 mmol/L Gly colonies were approximately 15% smaller than the controls. After 4d exposure,chlorophyll a content and Fv/Fm were affected by the highest concentration used(0.6 mmol/L Gly). By the 8d, chlorophyll biosynthesis and Fv/Fm were significantly inhibited by concentrations greater than 0.15 and 0.3 mmol/L Gly, respectively. The 8d relative growth rates ( RGRs), calculated for dry biomass, were significantly affected by all glyphosate treatments,there was a 60% reduction at 0.15 mmol/L Gly and negative RGRs at higher concentrations indicate a loss of biomass. Exposure to 0. 6 mmol/L Gly was lethal with loss of colony integrity,bleaching of pigments and no photosynthetic activity by 8d. These results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of toxicity and the potential implications for the long term sustainability of the N. sphaeroides resource.%葛仙米(N.sphaeroides)的产量和产地面积逐年减少,这可能与当地广泛使用除草剂草甘膦有关.为此,本文测定了不同浓度(0.15、0.30、0.45、0.6mmol/L)的草甘膦处理的葛仙米的颗粒大小、干重、叶绿素荧光、叶绿素浓度.所有测量参数与浓度和时间显著相关:0.15mmol/L处理组的颗粒直径较对照组小15%(2d后);叶绿素a浓度和最大量子产率(Fv/Fm)在最高浓度组(0.6mmol/L)4d后开始受到影响;第8天,相对生长速率(以干重计算,大于0.15mmol/L)、光合作用活性(大于0.3mmol

  12. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  13. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. DMTB: the magnetotactic bacteria database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of interest in biogeomagnetism, rock magnetism, microbiology, biomineralization, and advanced magnetic materials because of their ability to synthesize highly ordered intracellular nano-sized magnetic minerals, magnetite or greigite. Great strides for MTB studies have been made in the past few decades. More than 600 articles concerning MTB have been published. These rapidly growing data are stimulating cross disciplinary studies in such field as biogeomagnetism. We have compiled the first online database for MTB, i.e., Database of Magnestotactic Bacteria (DMTB, http://database.biomnsl.com). It contains useful information of 16S rRNA gene sequences, oligonucleotides, and magnetic properties of MTB, and corresponding ecological metadata of sampling sites. The 16S rRNA gene sequences are collected from the GenBank database, while all other data are collected from the scientific literature. Rock magnetic properties for both uncultivated and cultivated MTB species are also included. In the DMTB database, data are accessible through four main interfaces: Site Sort, Phylo Sort, Oligonucleotides, and Magnetic Properties. References in each entry serve as links to specific pages within public databases. The online comprehensive DMTB will provide a very useful data resource for researchers from various disciplines, e.g., microbiology, rock magnetism and paleomagnetism, biogeomagnetism, magnetic material sciences and others.

  15. Mitochondria are not captive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Ajith; Kurland, Charles G

    2017-12-07

    Lynn Sagan's conjecture (1967) that three of the fundamental organelles observed in eukaryote cells, specifically mitochondria, plastids and flagella were once free-living primitive (prokaryotic) cells was accepted after considerable opposition. Even though the idea was swiftly refuted for the specific case of origins of flagella in eukaryotes, the symbiosis model in general was accepted for decades as a realistic hypothesis to describe the endosymbiotic origins of eukaryotes. However, a systematic analysis of the origins of the mitochondrial proteome based on empirical genome evolution models now indicates that 97% of modern mitochondrial protein domains as well their homologues in bacteria and archaea were present in the universal common ancestor (UCA) of the modern tree of life (ToL). These protein domains are universal modular building blocks of modern genes and genomes, each of which is identified by a unique tertiary structure and a specific biochemical function as well as a characteristic sequence profile. Further, phylogeny reconstructed from genome-scale evolution models reveals that Eukaryotes and Akaryotes (archaea and bacteria) descend independently from UCA. That is to say, Eukaryotes and Akaryotes are both primordial lineages that evolved in parallel. Finally, there is no indication of massive inter-lineage exchange of coding sequences during the descent of the two lineages. Accordingly, we suggest that the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome was autogenic (endogenic) and not endosymbiotic (exogenic). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The mycorrhiza helper bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P; Garbaye, J; Tarkka, M

    2007-01-01

    In natural conditions, mycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by complex microbial communities, which modulate the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, the focus is on the so-called mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB). This concept is revisited, and the distinction is made between the helper bacteria, which assist mycorrhiza formation, and those that interact positively with the functioning of the symbiosis. After considering some examples of MHB from the literature, the ecological and evolutionary implications of the relationships of MHB with mycorrhizal fungi are discussed. The question of the specificity of the MHB effect is addressed, and an assessment is made of progress in understanding the mechanisms of the MHB effect, which has been made possible through the development of genomics. Finally, clear evidence is presented suggesting that some MHB promote the functioning of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. This is illustrated for three critical functions of practical significance: nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, and protection of plants against root pathogens. The review concludes with discussion of future research priorities regarding the potentially very fruitful concept of MHB.

  17. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  18. Serological studies on chloridazon-degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layh, G; Böhm, R; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1983-01-01

    Agglutination tests and immunofluorescence tests with antisera against four strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria revealed the serological uniformity of a group of 22 chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains. No serological relationship could be found between chloridazon-degrading bacteria and representatives of other Gram-negative bacteria. This was demonstrated by agglutination tests, including testing of the antiserum against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and by immunofluorescence tests, including testing of the sera against Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains. The tests were performed with 31 representatives of different Gram-negative bacteria, and with 22 strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria as antigens. Differences in the extent of agglutination reactions and antibody titres among chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains together with cross-adsorption xperiments, suggest a rough classification of chloridazon-degrading bacteria into two subgroups. On the basis of immunofluorescence data, a linkage-map was worked out to represent serological relationships in the group of chloridazon-degrading strains.

  19. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A.; Schjærff, Mette

    2010-01-01

    of coryneform bacteria was 16% among 55 cases of canine otitis externa examined at the Danish hospital during 2007. In contrast, detectable levels of coryneform bacteria were not demonstrated in samples from the acustic meatus of 35 dogs with apparently healthy ears, attending the hospital during the same year......This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total...... of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10...

  20. Endophytic bacteria in Coffea arabica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Fernando E; Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Posada, Francisco; Buyer, Jeffrey S

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-seven culturable endophytic bacterial isolates in 19 genera were obtained from coffee plants collected in Colombia (n = 67), Hawaii (n = 17), and Mexico (n = 3). Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were isolated, with a greater percentage (68%) being Gram negative. Tissues yielding bacterial endophytes included adult plant leaves, various parts of the berry (e.g., crown, pulp, peduncle and seed), and leaves, stems, and roots of seedlings. Some of the bacteria also occurred as epiphytes. The highest number of bacteria among the berry tissues sampled was isolated from the seed, and includes Bacillus , Burkholderia , Clavibacter , Curtobacterium , Escherichia , Micrococcus , Pantoea , Pseudomonas , Serratia , and Stenotrophomonas . This is the first survey of the endophytic bacteria diversity in various coffee tissues, and the first study reporting endophytic bacteria in coffee seeds. The possible role for these bacteria in the biology of the coffee plant remains unknown.

  1. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  2. Proton transfer in ba(3) cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Adelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory heme-copper oxidases catalyze reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, linking this process to transmembrane proton pumping. These oxidases have been classified according to the architecture, location and number of proton pathways. Most structural and functional studies to date have been performed on the A-class oxidases, which includes those that are found in the inner mitochondrial membrane and bacteria such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Paracoccus denitrificans (aa(3)-type oxidases in these bacteria). These oxidases pump protons with a stoichiometry of one proton per electron transferred to the catalytic site. The bacterial A-class oxidases use two proton pathways (denoted by letters D and K, respectively), for the transfer of protons to the catalytic site, and protons that are pumped across the membrane. The B-type oxidases such as, for example, the ba(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus, pump protons with a lower stoichiometry of 0.5 H(+)/electron and use only one proton pathway for the transfer of all protons. This pathway overlaps in space with the K pathway in the A class oxidases without showing any sequence homology though. Here, we review the functional properties of the A- and the B-class ba(3) oxidases with a focus on mechanisms of proton transfer and pumping. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The PufX quinone channel enables the light-harvesting 1 antenna to bind more carotenoids for light collection and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, John D; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil

    2017-02-01

    Photosynthesis in some phototrophic bacteria requires the PufX component of the reaction centre-light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) complex, which creates a pore for quinone/quinol (Q/QH2 ) exchange across the LH1 barrier surrounding the RC. However, photosynthetic bacteria such as Thermochromatium (T.) tepidum do not require PufX because there are fewer carotenoid binding sites, which creates multiple pores in the LH1 ring for Q/QH2 exchange. We show that an αTrp-24 →Phe alteration of the Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides LH1 antenna impairs carotenoid binding and allows photosynthetic growth in the absence of PufX. We propose that acquisition of PufX and confining Q/QH2 traffic to a pore adjacent to the RC QB site is an evolutionary upgrade that allows increased LH1 carotenoid content for enhanced light absorption and photoprotection. © 2017 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Overall energy conversion efficiency of a photosynthetic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-08-26

    The chromatophore of purple bacteria is an intracellular spherical vesicle that exists in numerous copies in the cell and that efficiently converts sunlight into ATP synthesis, operating typically under low light conditions. Building on an atomic-level structural model of a low-light-adapted chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we investigate the cooperation between more than a hundred protein complexes in the vesicle. The steady-state ATP production rate as a function of incident light intensity is determined after identifying quinol turnover at the cytochrome bc1 complex (cytb⁢c1) as rate limiting and assuming that the quinone/quinol pool of about 900 molecules acts in a quasi-stationary state. For an illumination condition equivalent to 1% of full sunlight, the vesicle exhibits an ATP production rate of 82 ATP molecules/s. The energy conversion efficiency of ATP synthesis at illuminations corresponding to 1%-5% of full sunlight is calculated to be 0.12-0.04, respectively. The vesicle stoichiometry, evolutionarily adapted to the low light intensities in the habitat of purple bacteria, is suboptimal for steady-state ATP turnover for the benefit of protection against over-illumination.

  5. Culture Studies of Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects Associated with Nitrate Assimilation and Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Granger, J.; Lehmann, M. F.; Difiore, P. J.; Tortell, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    The isotope effects of nitrate-consuming reactions such as nitrate assimilation and denitrification are potential indicators of the physiological state of the organisms carrying out these reactions. Moreover, an understanding of these isotope effects is needed to use the stable isotopes to investigate the fluxes associated with these reactions in modern and ancient environments. We have used batch cultures to investigate the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of (1) nitrate assimilation by eukaryotic and prokaryotic algae and by heterotrophic bacteria, and (2) nitrate reduction by denitrifying bacteria. We observe intra- and inter-specific variation in isotope effect amplitudes and, in the case of denitrifiers, indications of isotope effect decreases during individual nitrate drawdown experiments. However, the measured N and O isotope effect ratio is close to 1 for all studied organisms, with the exception of an unusual denitrifier (Rhodobacter sphaeroides) that possesses only periplasmic (non-respiratory) nitrate reductase. This observation and other findings are consistent with nitrate reductase being the predominant source of isotope fractionation and with most isotope effect amplitude variability arising from variable degrees to which nitrate imported into the cell is reduced versus effluxed back into the environment; the more efflux, the more complete the expression of the fractionation imparted by nitrate reduction. If this is the case, then isotope effect amplitudes in the field should be related to physiological conditions in the environment, a prediction that, we argue, is supported by recent studies of (1) nitrate assimilation in the polar ocean and (2) denitrification in sediment porewaters.

  6. The role of pH control on biohydrogen production by single stage hybrid dark- and photo-fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrodnik, R; Laniecki, M

    2015-10-01

    The role of pH control on biohydrogen production by co-culture of dark-fermentative Clostridium acetobutylicum and photofermentative Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied. Single stage dark fermentation, photofermentation and hybrid co-culture systems were studied at different values of controlled and uncontrolled pH. Increasing pH during dark fermentation resulted in lower hydrogen production rate (HPR) and longer lag time for both controlled and uncontrolled conditions. However, it only slightly affected cumulative H2 volume. Results have shown that pH control at pH 7.5 increased photofermentative hydrogen production from 0.966 to 2.502 L H2/L(medium) when compared to uncontrolled process. Fixed pH value has proven to be an important control strategy also for the hybrid process and resulted in obtaining balanced co-culture of dark and photofermentative bacteria. Control of pH at 7.0 was found optimum for bacteria cooperation in the co-culture what resulted in obtaining 2.533 L H2/L(medium) and H2 yield of 6.22 mol H2/mol glucose.

  7. Overall energy conversion efficiency of a photosynthetic vesicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The chromatophore of purple bacteria is an intracellular spherical vesicle that exists in numerous copies in the cell and that efficiently converts sunlight into ATP synthesis, operating typically under low light conditions. Building on an atomic-level structural model of a low-light-adapted chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we investigate the cooperation between more than a hundred protein complexes in the vesicle. The steady-state ATP production rate as a function of incident light intensity is determined after identifying quinol turnover at the cytochrome bc1 complex (cytb⁢c1) as rate limiting and assuming that the quinone/quinol pool of about 900 molecules acts in a quasi-stationary state. For an illumination condition equivalent to 1% of full sunlight, the vesicle exhibits an ATP production rate of 82 ATP molecules/s. The energy conversion efficiency of ATP synthesis at illuminations corresponding to 1%–5% of full sunlight is calculated to be 0.12–0.04, respectively. The vesicle stoichiometry, evolutionarily adapted to the low light intensities in the habitat of purple bacteria, is suboptimal for steady-state ATP turnover for the benefit of protection against over-illumination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09541.001 PMID:27564854

  8. Survival of soil bacteria during prolonged desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination was made of the kinds and numbers of bacteria surviving when two soils were maintained in the laboratory under dry conditions for more than half a year. Certain non-spore-forming bacteria were found to survive in the dry condition for long periods. A higher percentage of drought-tolerant than drought-sensitive bacteria was able to grow at low water activities. When they were grown in media with high salt concentrations, bacteria generally became more tolerant of prolonged drought and they persisted longer. The percent of cells in a bacterial population that remained viable when exposed to drought stress varied with the stage of growth.

  9. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment...

  10. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A; Schjærff, Mette; Kania, Stephen A; Frank, Linda A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2010-10-26

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10 cases). Small colony variants of this species were also observed. Other coryneform isolates were identified as Corynebacterium amycolatum (3 cases), Corynebacterium freneyi (2 cases) and an Arcanobacterium-like species (1 case). The coryneform bacteria were in all cases isolated together with other bacteria, mainly Staphylococcus pseudintermedius alone (n=5) or in combination with Malassezia pachydermatis (n=5). Some coryneform isolates displayed resistance to fusidic acid or enrofloxacin, two antimicrobial agents commonly used for the treatment of otitis externa in dogs. The frequency of isolation of coryneform bacteria was 16% among 55 cases of canine otitis externa examined at the Danish hospital during 2007. In contrast, detectable levels of coryneform bacteria were not demonstrated in samples from the acustic meatus of 35 dogs with apparently healthy ears, attending the hospital during the same year. On basis of the current knowledge, these coryneform bacteria should be regarded as potential secondary pathogens able to proliferate in the environment of an inflamed ear canal.

  11. Single Bacteria as Turing Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Julia; Zang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In Allan Turing's famous 1950 paper on Computing Machinery and Intelligence, he started with the provocative statement: ``I propose to consider the question, `Can machines think?' This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms `machine' and `think'.'' In our own work on exploring the way that organisms respond to stress and evolve, it seems at times as if they come to remarkably fast solutions to problems, indicating some sort of very clever computational machinery. I'll discuss how it would appear that bacteria can indeed create a form of a Turing Machine, the first example of a computer, and how they might use this algorithm to do rapid evolution to solve a genomics problem.

  12. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  13. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jeremy H; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  14. Mitochondria: a target for bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Elodie; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Arnould, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed strategies to detect and eradicate infections. The innate immune system, which is the first line of defence against invading pathogens, relies on the recognition of molecular patterns conserved among pathogens. Pathogen associated molecular pattern binding to pattern recognition receptor triggers the activation of several signalling pathways leading to the establishment of a pro-inflammatory state required to control the infection. In addition, pathogens evolved to subvert those responses (with passive and active strategies) allowing their entry and persistence in the host cells and tissues. Indeed, several bacteria actively manipulate immune system or interfere with the cell fate for their own benefit. One can imagine that bacterial effectors can potentially manipulate every single organelle in the cell. However, the multiple functions fulfilled by mitochondria especially their involvement in the regulation of innate immune response, make mitochondria a target of choice for bacterial pathogens as they are not only a key component of the central metabolism through ATP production and synthesis of various biomolecules but they also take part to cell signalling through ROS production and control of calcium homeostasis as well as the control of cell survival/programmed cell death. Furthermore, considering that mitochondria derived from an ancestral bacterial endosymbiosis, it is not surprising that a special connection does exist between this organelle and bacteria. In this review, we will discuss different mitochondrial functions that are affected during bacterial infection as well as different strategies developed by bacterial pathogens to subvert functions related to calcium homeostasis, maintenance of redox status and mitochondrial morphology.

  15. Progress in Research of Bacteria Fertilizer Strengthening Resistance of Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria fertilizer is used most widely among all kinds of microbial fertilizers. We summarize the research headway of bacteria fertilizer. It mainly focuses on bacteria fertilizer improving the stress resistance of plant. Then we can offer basis to research and exploit bacteria fertilizer. These bacteria include azotobacter, photosynthetic bacteria, Bacillus mucilaginosus siliceous, phosphorus bacteria, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR), effective microorganism(EM).

  16. Characterization of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Some bacteria can use (per)chlorateas terminal electron acceptor for growth. These bacteria convert perchlorate via chlorate and chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. Oxygen formation in microbial respiration is unique. In this study two chlorate-reducing strains belo

  17. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  18. Rock-degrading endophytic bacteria in cacti

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Esther Puente; Ching Y. Li; Yoav Bashan

    2009-01-01

    A plant-bacterium association of the cardon cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) and endophytic bacteria promotes establishment of seedlings and growth on igneous rocks without soil. These bacteria weather several rock types and minerals, unbind significant amounts of useful minerals for plants from the rocks, fix in vitro N2. produce...

  19. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  20. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  1. Symbiosis: Gut Bacteria Manipulate Host Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuval, Boaz

    2017-08-07

    Bacteria resident in the gut of Drosophila modify the fly's innate chemosensory responses to nutritional stimuli. In effect, the gut microbiome compels the host to forage on food patches that favour particular assemblages of bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion

  3. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  4. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  5. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Resuscitation effects of catalase on airborne bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Marthi, B; Shaffer, B. T.; Lighthart, B; Ganio, L

    1991-01-01

    Catalase incorporation into enumeration media caused a significant increase (greater than 63%) in the colony-forming abilities of airborne bacteria. Incubation for 30 to 60 min of airborne bacteria in collection fluid containing catalase caused a greater than 95% increase in colony-forming ability. However, catalase did not have any effects on enumeration at high relative humidities (80 to 90%).

  7. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  8. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion art

  9. GenBank blastx search result: AK243680 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243680 J100090I20 AF018073.1 AF018073 Rhodobacter sphaeroides operon regulator (smoC), periplasmic sorbito...l-binding protein (smoE), sorbitol/mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoF), sorbitol.../mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoG), sorbitol/mannitol transport ATP-binding transport protein (smoK), sorbit...ol dehydrogenase (smoS), mannitol dehydrogenase (mtlK),

  10. GenBank blastx search result: AK240874 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240874 J065025K09 AF018073.1 AF018073 Rhodobacter sphaeroides operon regulator (smoC), periplasmic sorbito...l-binding protein (smoE), sorbitol/mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoF), sorbitol.../mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoG), sorbitol/mannitol transport ATP-binding transport protein (smoK), sorbit...ol dehydrogenase (smoS), mannitol dehydrogenase (mtlK),

  11. GenBank blastx search result: AK241729 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241729 J065199L10 AF018073.1 AF018073 Rhodobacter sphaeroides operon regulator (smoC), periplasmic sorbito...l-binding protein (smoE), sorbitol/mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoF), sorbitol.../mannitol transport inner membrane protein (smoG), sorbitol/mannitol transport ATP-binding transport protein (smoK), sorbit...ol dehydrogenase (smoS), mannitol dehydrogenase (mtlK),

  12. Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Steven C Almo; Jonathan V Sweedler; Matthew P Jacobson; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catab...

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK289073 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289073 J090094I16 AF016236.1 AF016236 Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO/TMAO-sensor kinase (dorS), DMSO.../TMAO-response regulator (dorR), DMSO/TMAO-cytochrome c-containing subunit (dorC), DMSO-mem...brane protein (dorB), and DMSO/TMAO-reductase (dorA) genes, complete cds. BCT 0.0 0 ...

  14. Mapping lipid and detergent molecules at the surface of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Richard J; Gardiner, Alastair T; Roszak, Aleksander W; Stončius, Sigitas; Kočovský, Pavel; Isaacs, Neil W

    2011-06-01

    Electron-density maps for the crystal structures of membrane proteins often show features suggesting binding of lipids and/or detergent molecules on the hydrophobic surface, but usually it is difficult to identify the bound molecules. In our studies, heavy-atom-labelled phospholipids and detergents have been used to unequivocally identify these binding sites at the surfaces of test membrane proteins, the reaction centres from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis. The generality of this method is discussed in the present article.

  15. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  16. Bacteria dispersal by hitchhiking on zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dziallas, Claudia; Leunert, Franziska;

    2010-01-01

    and nonpathogenic bacteria has shown that direct association with zooplankton has significant influences on the bacteria's physiology and ecology. We used stratified migration columns to study vertical dispersal of hitchhiking bacteria through migrating zooplankton across a density gradient that was otherwise...... impenetrable for bacteria in both upward and downward directions (conveyor-belt hypothesis). The strength of our experiments is to permit quantitative estimation of transport and release of associated bacteria: vertical migration of Daphnia magna yielded an average dispersal rate of 1.3 x 10(5) x cells x...... Daphnia(-1) x migration cycle(-1) for the lake bacterium Brevundimonas sp. Bidirectional vertical dispersal by migrating D. magna was also shown for two other bacterial species, albeit at lower rates. The prediction that diurnally migrating zooplankton acquire different attached bacterial communities from...

  17. Hydrocarbon Degrading Bacteria: Isolation and Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Indah Sutiknowati

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available There is little information how to identify hydrocarbon degrading bacteria for bioremediation of marine oil spills. We have used gravel which contaminated oil mousse from Beach Simulator Tank, in Marine Biotechnology Institute, Kamaishi, Japan, and grown on enrichment culture. Biostimulation with nutrients (N and P was done to analyze biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds: Naphthalene, Phenanthrene, Trichlorodibenzofuran and Benzo[a]pyrene. Community of bacteria from enrichment culture was determined by DGGE. Isolating and screening the bacteria on inorganic medium contain hydrocarbon compounds and determination of bacteria by DAPI (number of cells and CFU. DNA was extracted from colonies of bacteria and sequence determination of the 16S rDNA was amplified by primers U515f and U1492r. Twenty nine strains had been sequence and have similarity about 90-99% to their closest taxa by homology Blast search and few of them have suspected as new species.

  18. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  19. Chryseobacterium indologenes, novel mannanase-producing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surachai Rattanasuk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mannanase is a mannan degrading enzyme which is produced by microorganisms, including bacteria. This enzyme can be used in many industrial processes as well as for improving the quality of animal feeds. The aim of the present study was toscreen and characterize the mannanase-producing bacteria. Two genera of bacteria were isolated from Thai soil samples,fermented coconut, and fertilizer. Screening was carried out on agar plates containing mannan stained with iodine solution.The bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence, biochemical test and morphology, respectively. The mannanase activity was determined by zymogram and DNS method. Two strains of bacteria with mannanase activity were identified as Bacillus and Chryseobacterium. This is the first report of mannanase-producing Chryseobacterium.

  20. Hyphae colonizing bacteria associated with Penicillium bilaii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghodsalavi, Behnoushsadat

    shown that mycorrhizal helper bacteria presenting in mycorrhizal fungi could stimulate fungal growth, promote establishment of root-fungus symbiosis and enhance plant production. But it is unknown if the comparable relationship exist between the non-mycorrhizal fungus P. bilaii and its hyphae associated...... bacteria. In the current PhD thesis, we assumed that hyphae-associated microbiome of P. bilaii might harbor helper bacteria with ability to improve fungal growth and P solubilization performance. Therefore, we aimed to isolate bacteria associated with the P. bilaii hyphae and identify the fungal growth...... stimulating bacteria with the perspective of promoting efficiency of Jumpstart in soil – plant system. For this purpose, most of the work within the current project was carried out by development of suitable model systems by mimicking the natural soil habitat to reach to the reliable performance in soil...

  1. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  2. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  3. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alix M Denoncourt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  4. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoncourt, Alix M; Paquet, Valérie E; Charette, Steve J

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  5. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Raimondi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-type lactobacilli cannot synthesize folate, generally require it for growth, and provide a negative contribution to folate levels in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus plantarum constitutes an exception among lactobacilli, since it is capable of folate production in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA and deserves to be used in animal trials to validate its ability to produce the vitamin in vivo. On the other hand, several folate-producing strains have been selected within the genus Bifidobacterium, with a great variability in the extent of vitamin released in the medium. Most of them belong to the species B. adolescentis and B. pseudocatenulatum, but few folate producing strains are found in the other species as well. Rats fed a probiotic formulation of folate-producing bifidobacteria exhibited increased plasma folate level, confirming that the vitamin is produced in vivo and absorbed. In a human trial, the same supplement raised folate concentration in feces. The use of folate-producing probiotic strains can be regarded as a new perspective in the specific use of probiotics. They could more efficiently confer protection against inflammation and cancer, both exerting the beneficial effects of probiotics and preventing the folate deficiency that is associated with premalignant changes in the colonic epithelia.

  6. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Lefèvre

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4 and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  7. Light scattering by marine heterotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Quinones, Renato A.

    1992-01-01

    Mie theory is applied to estimate scattering by polydispersions of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and a simple expression is derived for the bacterial scattering coefficient. The error incurred in deriving bacterial optical properties by use of the van de Hulst approximations is computed. The scattering properties of natural bacterial assemblages in three marine environments, Georges Bank, Northeast Channel, and Sargasso Sea, are assessed by applying Mie theory to field data on bacterial size and abundance. Results are used to examine the potential contribution of bacteria to the scattering properties of seawater. The utility of using pigment data to predict the magnitude of scattering by bacteria is discussed.

  8. Do symbiotic bacteria subvert host immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lora V

    2009-05-01

    The mammalian intestine is home to dense and complex indigenous bacterial communities. Most of these bacteria establish beneficial symbiotic relationships with their hosts, making important contributions to host metabolism and digestive efficiency. The vast numbers of intestinal bacteria and their proximity to host tissues raise the question of how symbiotic host-bacterial relationships are established without eliciting potentially harmful immune responses. In light of the varied ways in which pathogenic bacteria manipulate host immunity, this Opinion article explores the role of immune suppression, subversion and evasion in the establishment of symbiotic host-bacterial associations.

  9. The Microworld of Marine-Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1995-01-01

    Microsensor studies show that the marine environment in the size scale of bacteria is physically and chemically very different from the macroenvironment. The microbial world of the sediment-water interface is thus dominated by water viscosity and steep diffusion gradients. Because of the diverse...... metabolism types, bacteria in the mostly anoxic sea floor play an important role in the major element cycles of the ocean. The communities of giant, filamentous sulfur bacteria that live in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents or along the Pacific coast of South America are presented here as examples....

  10. Anaerobic bacteria, the colon and colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, W E

    1980-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria constitute more than 90% of the bacteria in the colon. An anaerobic environment is needed to maintain their growth and the production of short-chain fatty acids by these bacteria from carbohydrates. Short-chain fatty acids are rapidly absorbed and essential for metabolic as well as functional welfare of the colonic mucosa. The importance of these acids in water absorption and in the patogenesis of colitis is discussed in relation to the concept of "energy deficiency diseases" of the colonic mucosa.

  11. The Microworld of Marine-Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1995-01-01

    Microsensor studies show that the marine environment in the size scale of bacteria is physically and chemically very different from the macroenvironment. The microbial world of the sediment-water interface is thus dominated by water viscosity and steep diffusion gradients. Because of the diverse...... metabolism types, bacteria in the mostly anoxic sea floor play an important role in the major element cycles of the ocean. The communities of giant, filamentous sulfur bacteria that live in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents or along the Pacific coast of South America are presented here as examples....

  12. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carn

  13. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  14. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... Bioluminescence is the chemical emission of light by organisms (Lang and Lange, ... (TNT) – contaminated soils by two different erated comp- .... Effect of phosphate levels on growth of bioluminescent bacteria. Phosphate ...

  15. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA FROM THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xx

    Key words: Drosophila melanogaster, gut-bacteria, larval development, Lysinibacillus sp. P-011 .... each test, 50 1st instar larvae and three replications were used. All the tests ..... molecules are produced by the blood-sucking insect Stomoxys.

  16. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  17. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T.; Altermann, E.; Arigoni, F.; Bolotin, A.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Cano, R.; Chaillou, S.; Deutscher, J.; Gasson, M.; Guchte, van de M.; Guzzo, J.; Hartke, A.; Hawkins, T.; Hols, P.; Hutkins, R.; Kleerebezem, M.; Kok, J.; Kuipers, O.; Lubbers, M.; Maguin, E.; McKay, L.; Mills, D.; Nauta, A.; Overbeek, R.; Pel, H.; Pridmore, D.; Saier, M.; Sinderen, van D.; Sorokin, A.; Steele, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Vos, de W.; Weimer, B.; Zagorec, M.; Siezen, R.

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, nvironmental habitat, and its role in

  18. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T; Altermann, E; Arigoni, F; Bolotin, A; Breidt, F; Broadbent, J; Cano, R; Chaillou, S; Deutscher, J; Gasson, M; van de Guchte, M; Guzzo, J; Hartke, A; Hawkins, T; Hols, P; Hutkins, R; Kleerebezem, M; Kok, J; Kuipers, O; Maguin, E; McKay, L; Mills, D; Nauta, A; Overbeek, R; Pel, H; Pridmore, D; Saier, M; van Sinderen, D; Sorokin, A; Steele, J; O'Sullivan, D; de Vos, W; Weimer, B; Zagorec, M; Siezen, R

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, environmental habitat, and its role in

  19. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  20. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment...... and particularly higher organisms, covering a variety of functions ranging from pathogenic to symbiotic interactions. The detailed knowledge of these bacterial communication systems has opened completely new perspectives for controlling undesired microbial activities....

  1. Protection of probiotic bacteria in synbiotic matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probiotics, like Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, when encapsulated with prebiotic fibers such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), inulin (I) and pectic-oligosaccharides (POS), formed a synbiotic matrix system that protected the bacteria ...

  2. Distribution of phytopathogenic bacteria in infested seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of phytopathogenic bacteria representing five host-pathogen combinations were assessed to determine if there was a mathematical relationship common across seedborne bacterial diseases. Bacterial populations were estimated from naturally-infested seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peppe...

  3. Preparation of genomic DNA from bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Lefkothea-Vasiliki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this protocol is the isolation of bulk cellular DNA from bacteria (alternatively see Preparation of genomic DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Isolation of Genomic DNA from Mammalian Cells protocols). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Do bacteria, not fish, produce 'fish kairomone'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringelberg, J.; Van Gool, E.

    1998-01-01

    Fish-associated chemicals enhance phototactic downward swimming in Daphnia. If perch were treated with the antibiotic ampicillin, this enhancement was significantly decreased. Therefore, not fish, but bacteria associated with fish, seem to produce this kairomone. [KEYWORDS: Diel vertical migration;

  5. Lactic acid bacteria: microbiological and functional aspects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lahtinen, Sampo

    2012-01-01

    "Updated with the substantial progress made in lactic acid and bacteria research since the third edition, this fourth volume discusses improved insights in genetics and new molecular biological techniques...

  6. Quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hong; SONG Zhijun; Niels HФIBY; Michael GIVSKOV

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community,and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS).Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal molecules.Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread.These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment and particularly higher organisms,covering a variety of functions ranging from pathogenic to symbiotic interactions.The detailed knowledge of these bacterial communication systems has opened completely new perspectives for controlling undesired microbial activities.

  7. T cell polarizing properties of probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberi, Chiara; Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-12-01

    Different commensal bacteria employed as probiotics have been shown to be endowed with immunomodulatory properties and to actively interact with antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. In particular, different strains of probiotic bacteria may induce the secretion of a discrete cytokine profile able to induce divergent T cell polarization. Here, we briefly review current knowledge regarding the effects of different species and strains of probiotic bacteria on T cell polarization. Given that the loss of intestinal homeostasis is frequently associated with an aberrant T cell polarization profile, a comprehensive knowledge of the immunomodulatory potential of these bacteria is crucial for their employment in the management of human immune-mediated pathologies, such as allergies or inflammatory bowel diseases.

  8. Distribution of urease producing bacteria in the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    higher proportion of bacteria associated with the caecal wall. (63%) were facultative .... Of even more importance is the role that the domestic rabbit can and ... Until more is known about digestion of plant foods in the monogastric herbivore ...

  9. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Health and Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reports demonstrating the health promoting effects of ... therapy. In 1908, élie Metchinkoff, proposed that the acid-producing organisms (lactic acid bacteria) ... Phage resistance aids in .... In a study conducted [29] in children aged 3 it was found.

  10. Ecology: Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-11

    Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide.

  11. The antibiotics relo in bacteria resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; CESUMAR

    2007-01-01

    The paper explains how antibiotics help us to combat bacteriosis, and also presents a brief historical report about the emergence of the antibiotic era with the discovery of penicillin. It introduces the problem of bacteria resistance, and brings the concept of antibiotics and its that produce these substance, and brings the concept of antibiotics and its main function. It questions about the self-defense of the organisms that produce these substances. relates the bacteria structures attacked...

  12. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  13. How do bacteria tune translation efficiency?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gene-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial proteins are translated with precisely determined rates to meet cellular demand. In contrast, efforts to express recombinant proteins in bacteria are often met with large unpredictability in their levels of translation. The disconnect between translation of natural and synthetic mRNA stems from the lack of understanding of the strategy used by bacteria to tune translation efficiency. The development of array-based oligonucleotide synthesis and ribosome profiling provides new approac...

  14. ORAL BACTERIA AND SYSTEMS DISEASES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Moromi Nakata, Hilda; Profesor Principal de Microbiología, jefe de la sección de C. Dinámicas. D.A. Ciencia Básicas. Miembro permanente del Instituto de Investigaciones Estomatológicas de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima. Perú.

    2014-01-01

    In order to show a global vision of oral bacteria in systemic diseases, it is important to analyze the presence and consequences of these microorganisms in relation with: bacteremia, endocarditis, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, bacterial pneumonia, neonatal weight, nefritis, arthritis, dermatitis and diabetes mellitus, reaching conclusions for each one of them. Con el objeto de presentar una visión general de la bacterias orales en los procesos sistémicos, se analiza la p...

  15. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  16. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    J Nowroozi; M Mirzaii; M. Norouzi

    2004-01-01

    Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and...

  17. Ecology: Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide.......Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide....

  18. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nowroozi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and concentrated cell free culture after treatment with α-amylase, lysozyme and trypsin was determined. The isolated bacteria were Lacto. plantarum, Lacto delbruekii, Lacto. acidophilus, Lacto. brevis. The isolated bacteria had strong activity against indicator strains. The antibacterial activity was stable at 100ºC for 10 min and at 56ºC for 30 min, but activity was lost after autoclaving. The maximum production of plantaricin was obtained at 25 - 30ºC at pH 6.5. Because, lactobacilli that used to process sausage fermentation are producing antimicrobial activity with heat stability bacteriocin, so, these bacteria may be considered to be a healthy probiotic diet. Lactobacilli originally isolated from meat products are the best condidates as probiotic bacteria to improve the microbiological safety of these foods.

  19. Tyramine and phenylethylamine biosynthesis by food bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Angela; De las Rivas, Blanca; Landete, José María; Tabera, Laura; Muñoz, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Tyramine poisoning is caused by the ingestion of food containing high levels of tyramine, a biogenic amine. Any foods containing free tyrosine are subject to tyramine formation if poor sanitation and low quality foods are used or if the food is subject to temperature abuse or extended storage time. Tyramine is generated by decarboxylation of the tyrosine through tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) enzymes derived from the bacteria present in the food. Bacterial TDC have been only unequivocally identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in lactic acid bacteria. Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent TDC encoding genes (tyrDC) appeared flanked by a similar genetic organization in several species of lactic acid bacteria, suggesting a common origin by a single mobile genetic element. Bacterial TDC are also able to decarboxylate phenylalanine to produce phenylethylamine (PEA), another biogenic amine. The molecular knowledge of the genes involved in tyramine production has led to the development of molecular methods for the detection of bacteria able to produce tyramine and PEA. These rapid and simple methods could be used for the analysis of the ability to form tyramine by bacteria in order to evaluate the potential risk of tyramine biosynthesis in food products.

  20. Mimicking Seawater For Culturing Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, Anita Mac; Sonnenschein, Eva; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum as solidif......Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum...... as solidifying agents, and enumerated bacteria from seawater and algal exudates. We tested if culturability could be influenced by addition of quorum sensing signals (AHLs). All plates were incubated at 15°C. Bacterial counts (CFU/g) from algal exudates from brown algae were highest on media containing algal...... polymers. In general, bacteria isolated from algal exudates preferred more rich media than bacteria isolated from seawater. Overall, culturability ranged from 0.01 to 0.8% as compared to total cell count. Substitution of agar with gellan gum increased the culturability of seawater bacteria approximately...

  1. Evidence for high-pressure-induced rupture of hydrogen bonds in LH2 photosynthetic antenna pigment-protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangur, L; Leiger, K; Freiberg, A [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, Tartu 51014 (Estonia)

    2008-07-15

    The bacteriochlorophyll a-containing LH2 light harvesting complex is an integral membrane protein that catalyzes the photosynthetic process in purple photosynthetic bacteria. The LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides show characteristic strong absorbance at 800 and 850 nm due to the bacteriochlorophyll a molecules confined in two separate areas of the protein. Using these cofactors as intrinsic probes to monitor changes in membrane protein structure, we investigate the response to high hydrostatic pressure up to 2.1 GPa of LH2 complexes embedded into natural membrane environment or extracted with detergent. We demonstrate that high pressure does induce significant alterations to the tertiary structure of the protein in proximity of the protein-bound bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, including breakage of the hydrogen bond they are involved in. The membrane-embedded complexes appear more resilient to damaging effects of the compression than the complexes extracted into detergent environment. This difference has tentatively been explained by more compact structure of the membrane-embedded complexes.

  2. Efficiency of light harvesting in a photosynthetic bacterium adapted to different levels of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Chenchiliyan, Manoop; Jalviste, Erko; Timney, John A; Hunter, C Neil; Freiberg, Arvi

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we use the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to find out how the acclimation of photosynthetic apparatus to growth conditions influences the rates of energy migration toward the reaction center traps and the efficiency of charge separation at the reaction centers. To answer these questions we measured the spectral and picosecond kinetic fluorescence responses as a function of excitation intensity in membranes prepared from cells grown under different illumination conditions. A kinetic model analysis yielded the microscopic rate constants that characterize the energy transfer and trapping inside the photosynthetic unit as well as the dependence of exciton trapping efficiency on the ratio of the peripheral LH2 and core LH1 antenna complexes, and on the wavelength of the excitation light. A high quantum efficiency of trapping over 80% was observed in most cases, which decreased toward shorter excitation wavelengths within the near infrared absorption band. At a fixed excitation wavelength the efficiency declines with the LH2/LH1 ratio. From the perspective of the ecological habitat of the bacteria the higher population of peripheral antenna facilitates growth under dim light even though the energy trapping is slower in low light adapted membranes. The similar values for the trapping efficiencies in all samples imply a robust photosynthetic apparatus that functions effectively at a variety of light intensities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Atomic-level structural and functional model of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih K; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-10-02

    The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple photosynthetic bacteria consists of a network of bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes that absorb solar energy for eventual conversion to ATP. Because of its remarkable simplicity, the PSU can serve as a prototype for studies of cellular organelles. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides the PSU forms spherical invaginations of the inner membrane, approximately 70 nm in diameter, composed mostly of light-harvesting complexes, LH1 and LH2, and reaction centers (RCs). Atomic force microscopy studies of the intracytoplasmic membrane have revealed the overall spatial organization of the PSU. In the present study these atomic force microscopy data were used to construct three-dimensional models of an entire membrane vesicle at the atomic level by using the known structure of the LH2 complex and a structural model of the dimeric RC-LH1 complex. Two models depict vesicles consisting of 9 or 18 dimeric RC-LH1 complexes and 144 or 101 LH2 complexes, representing a total of 3,879 or 4,464 bacteriochlorophylls, respectively. The in silico reconstructions permit a detailed description of light absorption and electronic excitation migration, including computation of a 50-ps excitation lifetime and a 95% quantum efficiency for one of the model membranes, and demonstration of excitation sharing within the closely packed RC-LH1 dimer arrays.

  4. Effects of starch loading rate on performance of combined fed-batch fermentation of ground wheat for bio-hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmihci, Serpil; Kargi, Fikret [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    Ground wheat powder solution (10 g L{sup -1}) was subjected to combined dark and light fermentations for bio-hydrogen production by fed-batch operation. A mixture of heat treated anaerobic sludge (AN) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides-NRRL (RS-NRRL) were used as the mixed culture of dark and light fermentation bacteria with an initial dark/light biomass ratio of 1/2. Effects of wheat starch loading rate on the rate and yield of bio-hydrogen formation were investigated. The highest cumulative hydrogen formation (CHF = 3460 ml), hydrogen yield (201 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} starch) and formation rate (18.1 ml h{sup -1}) were obtained with a starch loading rate of 80.4 mg S h{sup -1}. Complete starch hydrolysis and glucose fermentation were achieved within 96 h of fed-batch operation producing volatile fatty acids (VFA) and H{sub 2}. Fermentation of VFAs by photo-fermentation for bio-hydrogen production was most effective at starch loading rate of 80.4 mg S h{sup -1}. Hydrogen formation by combined fermentation took place by a fast dark fermentation followed by a rather slow light fermentation after a lag period. (author)

  5. Construction and validation of an atomic model for bacterial TSPO from electron microscopy density, evolutionary constraints, and biochemical and biophysical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsen, Konrad; Vaitinadapoule, Aurore; Ostuni, Mariano A; Etchebest, Catherine; Lacapere, Jean-Jacques

    2015-02-01

    The 18 kDa protein TSPO is a highly conserved transmembrane protein found in bacteria, yeast, animals and plants. TSPO is involved in a wide range of physiological functions, among which the transport of several molecules. The atomic structure of monomeric ligand-bound mouse TSPO in detergent has been published recently. A previously published low-resolution structure of Rhodobacter sphaeroides TSPO, obtained from tubular crystals with lipids and observed in cryo-electron microscopy, revealed an oligomeric structure without any ligand. We analyze this electron microscopy density in view of available biochemical and biophysical data, building a matching atomic model for the monomer and then the entire crystal. We compare its intra- and inter-molecular contacts with those predicted by amino acid covariation in TSPO proteins from evolutionary sequence analysis. The arrangement of the five transmembrane helices in a monomer of our model is different from that observed for the mouse TSPO. We analyze possible ligand binding sites for protoporphyrin, for the high-affinity ligand PK 11195, and for cholesterol in TSPO monomers and/or oligomers, and we discuss possible functional implications.

  6. RpoH2 sigma factor controls the photooxidative stress response in a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rai, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Shukla, Mansi; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria normally harbour multiple copies of the heat shock sigma factor (known as σ(32), σ(H) or RpoH). Azospirillum brasilense, a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, harbours five copies of rpoH genes, one of which is an rpoH2 homologue. The genes around the rpoH2 locus in A. brasilense show synteny with that found in rhizobia. The rpoH2 of A. brasilense was able to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. Inactivation of rpoH2 in A. brasilense results in increased sensitivity to methylene blue and to triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC). Exposure of A. brasilense to TTC and the singlet oxygen-generating agent methylene blue induced several-fold higher expression of rpoH2. Comparison of the proteome of A. brasilense with its rpoH2 deletion mutant and with an A. brasilense strain overexpressing rpoH2 revealed chaperone GroEL, elongation factors (Ef-Tu and EF-G), peptidyl prolyl isomerase, and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase as the major proteins whose expression was controlled by RpoH2. Here, we show that the RpoH2 sigma factor-controlled photooxidative stress response in A. brasilense is similar to that in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but that RpoH2 is not involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal in A. brasilense.

  7. Bacterial bioremediation of selenium oxyanions using a dynamic flow bioreactor and headspace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, S.L.; Chasteen, T.G. [Sam Houston State Univ., Huntsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stalder, V.; Bachofen, R. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. of Plant Biology

    1995-12-31

    The volatile products of the biological reduction and methylation of selenium`s most common oxyanions, selenate and selenite, were determined using capillary gas chromatography and fluorine-induced chemiluminescence detection. Dimethyl selenide and dimethyl diselenide were detected in the headspace above cultures of bacteria resistant to this metalloid using static and dynamic headspace sampling techniques. Fluorine-induced chemiluminescence detection was applied to determine the relative concentrations of the organosulfur and organoselenium species released over many days of culture growth at a controlled temperature and purge rate. A selenium-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens K27, and a phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 were exposed to SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and the cultures` headspaces were examined over a period of several days for volatile selenium-containing products. The results show that the relative production of the volatile species over time depicts a pattern generally independent of the growth phase in the case of the phototrophic bacterium; the concentrations of metabolic dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl selenide determined in static headspace were highest after the microbe had been in stationary phase for 4 days.

  8. Antioxidant activity of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Fino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associated bacteria living on macroalgae surfaces are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites with biological activities. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius and the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbent capacity (ORAC. The extracts with higher antioxidant activity were tested on MCF-7 and HepG-2 cell lines in oxidative stress conditions induced by H2O2 at 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, respectively. In total were isolated 21 Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria and identified as Vibrio sp. (28.57%, Shewanella sp. (23.81%, Pseudoalteromonas sp. (19.05%, Bacillus sp. (9.52% and Halomonas sp. (9.52%. Two (9.52% of them presented less than 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match. The epiphytic bacteria with the most antioxidant potential evaluated by ORAC and DPPH methods were Sp2, Sp12, Sp23, Sp25 and Sp27. The strain Sp4 show high antioxidant activity in all antioxidant methods (ORAC, DPPH and TPC. In oxidative stress conditions on MCF-7 cell line, the extracts of bacteria (1mg.ml-1: 24hours Sp4 (16.15%, Sp25 (17.95% and Sp27 (10.65% prevented the cell death induced by H2O2. In the HepG-2 cell line was the extracts of Sp2 (9.01%, Sp4 (11.21%, Sp12 (7.20% and Sp23 (8.81% bacteria that high prevented the oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria can be an interesting and excellent source of marine natural compounds with antioxidant activity.

  9. Nanotextile membranes for bacteria Escherichia coli capturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Lev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes an experimental study dealing with the possibility of nanotextile materials usa­ge for microbiologically contaminated water filtration. The aim of the study is to verify filtration ability of different nanotextile materials and evaluate the possibilities of practical usage. Good detention ability of these materials in the air filtration is the presumption for nanotextile to be used for bacteria filtration from a liquid. High nanotextile porosity with the nanotextile pores dimensions smaller than a bacteria size predicates the possibility of a successful usage of these materials. For the experiment were used materials made from electrospinning nanofibres under the label PA612, PUR1, PUR2 s PUR3 on the supporting unwoven textiles (viscose and PP. As a model simulation of the microbial contamination, bacteria Escherichia coli was chosen. Contaminated water was filtered during the overpressure activity of 105Pa on the input side of the filter from the mentioned material. After three-day incubation on the nutrient medium, cultures found in the samples before and after filtration were compared. In the filtrated water, bacteria E. coli were indicated, which did not verify the theoretical presumptions about an absolut bacteria detention. However, used materials caught at least 94% of bacteria in case of material PUR1 and up to 99,996% in case of material PUR2. These results predict the possibility of producing effective nanotextile filters for microbiologically contaminated water filtration.Recommendation: For the production of materials with better filtrating qualities, experiments need to be done, enabling better understanding of the bacteria detention mechanisms on the nanotextile material, and parameters of the used materials that influence the filtrating abilities need to be verified.

  10. [Spectrum and susceptibility of preoperative conjunctival bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rubio, M E; Cuesta-Rodríguez, T; Urcelay-Segura, J L; Cortés-Valdés, C

    2013-12-01

    To describe the conjunctival bacterial spectrum of our patients undergoing intraocular surgery and their antibiotic sensitivity during the study period. A retrospective study of preoperative conjunctival culture of patients consecutively scheduled for intraocular surgery from 21 February 2011 to 1 April 2013. Specimens were directly seeded onto blood-agar and MacConkey-agar (aerobiosis incubation, 2 days), and on chocolate-agar (6% CO2 incubation, 7 days). The identified bacteria were divided into 3 groups according to their origin; the bacteria susceptibility tests were performed on those more pathogenic and on some of the less pathogenic when more than 5 colonies were isolated. The sensitivity of the exigent growing bacteria was obtained with disk diffusion technique, and for of the non-exigent bacteria by determining their minimum inhibitory concentration. The Epidat 3.1 program was used for statistical calculations. A total of 13,203 bacteria were identified in 6,051 cultures, with 88.7% being typical colonizers of conjunctiva (group 1), 8.8% typical of airways (group 2), and the remaining 2.5% of undetermined origin (group 3). 530 cultures (8.8%) were sterile. The sensitivity of group 1 was: 99% vancomycin, 95% rifampicin, 87% chloramphenicol, 76% tetracycline. Levels of co-trimoxazole, aminoglycosides, quinolones, β-lactams and macrolides decreased since 2007. The group 2 was very sensitive to chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate. In group 3, to levofloxacin 93%, ciprofloxacin 89%, tobramycin 76%, but ceftazidime 53% and cefuroxime 29% decreased. None of the tested antibiotics could eradicate all possible conjunctival bacteria. Bacteria living permanently on the conjunctiva (group 1) have achieved higher resistance than the eventual colonizers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Flagellated ectosymbiotic bacteria propel a eucaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, S L

    1982-09-01

    A devescovinid flagellate from termites exhibits rapid gliding movements only when in close contact with other cells or with a substrate. Locomotion is powered not by the cell's own flagella nor by its remarkable rotary axostyle, but by the flagella of thousands of rod bacteria which live on its surface. That the ectosymbiotic bacteria actually propel the protozoan was shown by the following: (a) the bacteria, which lie in specialized pockets of the host membrane, bear typical procaryotic flagella on their exposed surface; (b) gliding continues when the devescovinid's own flagella and rotary axostyle are inactivated; (c) agents which inhibit bacterial flagellar motility, but not the protozoan's motile systems, stop gliding movements; (d) isolated vesicles derived from the surface of the devescovinid rotate at speeds dependent on the number of rod bacteria still attached; (e) individual rod bacteria can move independently over the surface of compressed cells; and (f) wave propagation by the flagellar bundles of the ectosymbiotic bacteria is visualized directly by video-enhanced polarization microscopy. Proximity to solid boundaries may be required to align the flagellar bundles of adjacent bacteria in the same direction, and/or to increase their propulsive efficiency (wall effect). This motility-linked symbiosis resembles the association of locomotory spirochetes with the Australian termite flagellate Mixotricha (Cleveland, L. R., and A. V. Grimstone, 1964, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci., 159:668-686), except that in our case propulsion is provided by bacterial flagella themselves. Since bacterial flagella rotate, an additional novelty of this system is that the surface bearing the procaryotic rotary motors is turned by the eucaryotic rotary motor within.

  12. Learning from bacteria about natural information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2009-10-01

    Under natural growth conditions, bacteria live in complex hierarchical communities. To conduct complex cooperative behaviors, bacteria utilize sophisticated communication to the extent that their chemical language includes semantic and even pragmatic aspects. I describe how complex colony forms (patterns) emerge through the communication-based interplay between individual bacteria and the colony. Individual cells assume newly co-generated traits and abilities that are not prestored in the genetic information of the cells, that is, not all the information required for efficient responses to all environmental conditions is stored. To solve newly encountered problems, they assess the problem via collective sensing, recall stored information of past experience, and then execute distributed information processing of the 10(9)-10(12) bacteria in the colony--transforming the colony into a "super-brain." I show illuminating examples of swarming intelligence of live bacteria in which they solve optimization problems that are beyond what human beings can solve. This will lead to a discussion about the special nature of bacterial computational principles compared to Turing algorithm computational principles, in particular about the role of distributed information processing.

  13. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  14. COMPETITION BETWEEN ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND COLORLESS SULFUR BACTERIA IN A MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; VANDENENDE, FP; SCHAUB, BEM; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1992-01-01

    The populations of chemolithoautotrophic (colorless) sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were enumerated in a marine microbial mat. The highest population densities were found in the 0-5 mm layer of the mat: 2.0 X 10(9) cells CM-3 sediment, and 4.0 X 10(7) cells cm-3 sediment for th

  15. COMPETITION BETWEEN ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND COLORLESS SULFUR BACTERIA IN A MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; VANDENENDE, FP; SCHAUB, BEM; VANGEMERDEN, H

    The populations of chemolithoautotrophic (colorless) sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were enumerated in a marine microbial mat. The highest population densities were found in the 0-5 mm layer of the mat: 2.0 X 10(9) cells CM-3 sediment, and 4.0 X 10(7) cells cm-3 sediment for

  16. Fossil bacteria in Xuanlong iron ore deposits of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yongding; SONG Haiming; SHEN Jiying

    2004-01-01

    Discovered in Early Proterozoic Xuanlong iron ore deposits are six genera of fossil iron bacteria, i. e. sphere (coenobium of) rod-shaped (monomer) Naumanniella, ellipsoid elliptical Ochrobium, sphere spherical Siderocapsa and chain spherical Siderococcus, chain rod-shaped Leptothrix and Lieskeella, and six genera of fossil blue bacteria, namely sphere spherical Gloeocapsa, Synechocystis and Globobacter, chain spherical Anabaena and Nostoc, and constrictive septate tubular Nodularia. The biomineralized monomers and coenobia of the two categories of bacteria, together with hematite plates made up the bacteria pelletal, bacteria silky,bacteria fibrous and clasty bacteria pelletal textural lamina. The bacteria pelletal laminae combined with other bacteria laminae to make up oncolite, stromatolite and laminate. The precipitation of iron oxide was accelerated due to iron and blue bacteria cohabiting on microbial film or mat. The Xuanlong iron ore deposits are microbial binding ore deposits of ocean source.

  17. Studies on ultrasmall bacteria in relation to the presence of bacteria in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Fawaz; Wainwright, Milton; Alabri, Khalid; Alharbi, Sulamain A.

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies confirm that bacteria exist in the stratosphere. It is generally assumed that these bacteria are exiting from Earth, although it is possible that some are incoming from space. Most stratospheric bacterial isolates belong to the spore-forming genus Bacillus, although non-spore formers have also been isolated. Theoretically, the smaller a bacterium is, the more likely it is to be carried from Earth to the stratosphere. Ultrasmall bacteria have been frequently isolated from Earth environments, but not yet from the stratosphere. This is an anomalous situation, since we would expect such small bacteria to be over represented in the stratosphere-microflora. Here, we show that ultrasmall bacteria are present in the environment on Earth (i.e. in seawater and rainwater) and discuss the paradox of why they have not been isolated from the stratosphere.

  18. High Life Expectancy of Bacteria on Lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernava, Tomislav; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Self-sustaining lichen symbioses potentially can become very old, sometimes even thousands of years in nature. In the joint structures, algal partners are sheltered between fungal structures that are externally colonized by bacterial communities. With this arrangement lichens survive long periods of drought, and lichen thalli can be revitalized even after decades of dry storage in a herbarium. To study the effects of long-term ex situ storage on viability of indigenous bacterial communities we comparatively studied herbarium-stored material of the lung lichen, Lobaria pulmonaria. We discovered that a significant fraction of the lichen-associated bacterial community survives herbarium storage of nearly 80 years, and living bacteria can still be found in even older material. As the bacteria reside in the upper surface layers of the lichen material, we argue that the extracellular polysaccharides of lichens contribute to superior life expectancy of bacteria. Deeper understanding of underlying mechanisms could provide novel possibilities for biotechnological applications.

  19. Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria in biopolymeric system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Tanzina; Khan, Avik; Khan, Ruhul A; Riedl, Bernard; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria is generally used to enhance the viability during processing, and also for the target delivery in gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics are used with the fermented dairy products, pharmaceutical products, and health supplements. They play a great role in maintaining human health. The survival of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal system is questionable. In order to protect the viability of the probiotic bacteria, several types of biopolymers such as alginate, chitosan, gelatin, whey protein isolate, cellulose derivatives are used for encapsulation and several methods of encapsulation such as spray drying, extrusion, emulsion have been reported. This review focuses on the method of encapsulation and the use of different biopolymeric system for encapsulation of probiotics.

  20. [Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilková, Andrea; Sepova, Hana Kinová; Bilka, Frantisek; Balázová, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria comprise several genera of gram-positive bacteria that are known for the production of structurally different antimicrobial substances. Among them, bacteriocins are nowadays in the centre of scientific interest. Bacteriocins, proteinaceous antimicrobial substances, are produced ribosomally and have usually a narrow spectrum of bacterial growth inhibition. According to their structure and the target of their activity, they are divided into four classes, although there are some suggestions for a renewed classification. The most interesting and usable class are lantibiotics. They comprise the most widely commercially used and well examined bacteriocin, nisin. The non-pathogenic character of lactic acid bacteria is advantageous for using their bacteriocins in food preservation as well as in feed supplements or in veterinary medicine.

  1. Inorganic nanoparticles engineered to attack bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen P; Wang, Lei; Benicewicz, Brian C; Decho, Alan W

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics were once the golden bullet to constrain infectious bacteria. However, the rapid and continuing emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) among infectious microbial pathogens has questioned the future utility of antibiotics. This dilemma has recently fueled the marriage of the disparate fields of nanochemistry and antibiotics. Nanoparticles and other types of nanomaterials have been extensively developed for drug delivery to eukaryotic cells. However, bacteria have very different cellular architectures than eukaryotic cells. This review addresses the chemistry of nanoparticle-based antibiotic carriers, and how their technical capabilities are now being re-engineered to attack, kill, but also non-lethally manipulate the physiologies of bacteria. This review also discusses the surface functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles with small ligand molecules, polymers, and charged moieties to achieve drug loading and controllable release.

  2. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-juan WANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However, the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq has been identified as a likely global regulator involved in the bacteria response to this environment. In addition, microgravity effects on bacterial pathogenicity may threaten astronauts' health. The present paper will focus on microgravity-induced alterations of pathogenicity and relative mechanism in various opportunistic pathogens.

  3. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  4. Monitoring of environmental pollutants by bioluminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, Stefano; Ferri, Elida Nora; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Maiolini, Elisabetta

    2008-02-04

    This review deals with the applications of bioluminescent bacteria to the environmental analyses, published during the years 2000-2007. The ecotoxicological assessment, by bioassays, of the environmental risks and the luminescent approaches are reported. The review includes a brief introduction to the characteristics and applications of bioassays, a description of the characteristics and applications of natural bioluminescent bacteria (BLB), and a collection of the main applications to organic and inorganic pollutants. The light-emitting genetically modified bacteria applications, as well as the bioluminescent immobilized systems and biosensors are outlined. Considerations about commercially available BLB and BLB catalogues are also reported. Most of the environmental applications, here mentioned, of luminescent organisms are on wastewater, seawater, surface and ground water, tap water, soil and sediments, air. Comparison to other bioindicators and bioassay has been also made. Various tables have been inserted, to make easier to take a rapid glance at all possible references concerning the topic of specific interest.

  5. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  6. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B; Christensen, Torben R

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over......-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence...... that this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability....

  8. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  9. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; David Morando; Slomp, Anje M.; Betsy van de Belt-Gritter; Amarnath Maitra; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-...

  10. Bacteriocins From Lactic Acid Bacteria: Interest For Food Products Biopreservation

    OpenAIRE

    Dortu, C.; Thonart, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: interest for food products biopreservation. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are low molecular weight antimicrobial peptides. They have inhibitory activity against the bacteria that are closed related to the producer strains and a narrow inhibitory spectrum. Nevertheless, most of them have activity against some food-born pathogenic bacteria as Listeria monocytogenes. The application of bacteriocins or bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacteria in ...

  11. Biodegradation of Complex Bacteria on Phenolic Derivatives in River Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANG-HUA LU; CHAO WANG; ZHE SUN

    2009-01-01

    Objective To isolate, incubate, and identify 4-chlorophenol-degrading complex bacteria, determine the tolerance of these bacteria to phenolic derivatives and study their synergetic metabolism as well as the aboriginal microbes and co-metabolic degradation of mixed chlorophenols in river water. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicants. Biodegradability of phenolic derivatives was determined by adding 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria in river water. Results The complex bacteria were identified as Mycopiana, Alcaligenes, Pseudvmonas, and Flavobacterium. The domesticated complex bacteria were more tolerant to phenolic derivatives than the aboriginal bacteria from Qinhuai River. The biodegradability of chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols under various aquatic conditions was determined and compared. The complex bacteria exhibited a higher metabolic efficiency on chemicals than the aboriginal microbes, and the final removal rate of phenolic derivatives was increased at least by 55% when the complex bacteria were added into river water. The metabolic relationship between dominant mixed bacteria and river bacteria was studied. Conclusion The complex bacteria domesticated by 4-chlorophenol can grow and be metabolized to take other chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols as the sole carbon and energy source. There is a synergetic metabolism of most compounds between the aboriginal microbes in river water and the domesticated complex bacteria. 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria can co-metabolize various chlorophenols in river water.

  12. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  13. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  14. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Fatty acid composition of selected prosthecate bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R N; Schmidt, J M

    1976-10-11

    The cellular fatty acid composition of 14 strains of Caulobacter speices and types, two species of Prosthecomicrobium, and two species of Asticcacaulis was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. In most of these bacteria, the major fatty acids were octadecenoic acid (C18:1), hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0). Some cyclopropane and branched chain fatty acids were detected in addition to the straight chained acids. Hydroxytetradecanoic acid was an important component of P.enhydrum but significant amounts of hydroxy acids were not detected in other prosthecate bacteria examined.

  16. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  17. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kanta; Konings, Wil N

    2003-12-31

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Megasphaera cerevisiae. They can spoil beer by turbidity, acidity and the production of unfavorable smell such as diacetyl or hydrogen sulfide. For the microbiological control, many advanced biotechnological techniques such as immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been applied in place of the conventional and time-consuming method of incubation on culture media. Subsequently, a method is needed to determine whether the detected bacterium is capable of growing in beer or not. In lactic acid bacteria, hop resistance is crucial for their ability to grow in beer. Hop compounds, mainly iso-alpha-acids in beer, have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. They act as ionophores which dissipate the pH gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane and reduce the proton motive force (pmf). Consequently, the pmf-dependent nutrient uptake is hampered, resulting in cell death. The hop-resistance mechanisms in lactic acid bacteria have been investigated. HorA was found to excrete hop compounds in an ATP-dependent manner from the cell membrane to outer medium. Additionally, increased proton pumping by the membrane bound H(+)-ATPase contributes to hop resistance. To energize such ATP-dependent transporters hop-resistant cells contain larger ATP pools than hop-sensitive cells. Furthermore, a pmf-dependent hop transporter was recently presented. Understanding the hop-resistance mechanisms has enabled the development of rapid methods to discriminate beer spoilage strains from nonspoilers. The horA-PCR method has been applied for bacterial control in breweries. Also, a discrimination method was developed based on ATP pool measurement in lactobacillus cells. However

  18. Instabilities in the Swimming of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Emily; Lauga, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Peritrichously flagellated bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtillis, have flagella randomly distributed over their body. These flagella rotate to generate a pushing force that causes the cell to swim body first. For changes in direction these flagella return to their randomly distributed state where the flagella point in many different directions. The main observed state of swimming peritrichously flagellated bacteria however is one where all their flagella gathered or bundled at one end of the body. In this work we address this problem from the point of view of fluid-structure interactions and show theoretically and numerically how the conformation of flagella depends on the mechanics of the cell.

  19. DNA Barcoding on Bacteria: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Lebonah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are omnipotent and they can be found everywhere. The study of bacterial pathogens has been happening from olden days to prevent epidemics, food spoilage, losses in agricultural production, and loss of lives. Modern techniques in DNA based species identification are considered. So, there is a need to acquire simple and quick identification technique. Hence, this review article covers the efficacy of DNA barcoding of bacteria. Routine DNA barcoding involves the production of PCR amplicons from particular regions to sequence them and these sequence data are used to identify or “barcode” that organism to make a distinction from other species.

  20. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.