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Sample records for bacteria including helicobacter

  1. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    husted, Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Olsen, Susanne N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The equine glandular stomach is commonly affected by erosion and ulceration. The aim of this study was to assess whether bacteria, including Helicobacter, could be involved in the aetiology of gastric glandular lesions seen in horses. Results: Stomach lesions, as well as normal...... by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal...... faecium. The Enterococcus were found colonising the mucosal surface, while E. fergusonii organisms were also demonstrated intraepithelial. Conclusion: Gastric Helicobacter spp. could not be verified as being involved in lesions of the glandular stomach of the horse. Since E. fergusonii has been described...

  2. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Susanne N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine glandular stomach is commonly affected by erosion and ulceration. The aim of this study was to assess whether bacteria, including Helicobacter, could be involved in the aetiology of gastric glandular lesions seen in horses. Results Stomach lesions, as well as normal appearing mucosa were obtained from horses slaughtered for human consumption. All samples were tested for urease activity using the Pyloritek® assay, while mucosal bacterial content was evaluated using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation. In selected sub samples, bacteria characterisation was pursued further by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal samples, clones with 99% similarities to Lactobacillus salivarius and Sarcina ventriculi were found. Escherichia like bacterium clones and Enterococcus clones were demonstrated in one focal erosion. Based on a phylogenetic tree these clones had 100% similarity to Escherichia fergusonii and Enterococcus faecium. The Enterococcus were found colonising the mucosal surface, while E. fergusonii organisms were also demonstrated intraepithelial. Conclusion Gastric Helicobacter spp. could not be verified as being involved in lesions of the glandular stomach of the horse. Since E. fergusonii has been described as an emerging pathogen in both humans and animals, the finding of this bacterium in gastric erosion warrants further clarification to whether gastric infection with this type bacterium is important for horses.

  3. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    husted, Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Olsen, Susanne N.

    2010-01-01

    by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal...

  4. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase gene is present in most Helicobacter species including gastric non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters obtained from Japanese patients.

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    Kawakubo, Masatomo; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Nakayama, Jun; Akamatsu, Taiji; Katsuyama, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Sagara, Junji

    2018-02-01

    Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPHs) besides H. pylori infect human stomachs and cause chronic gastritis and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Cholesteryl-α-glucosides have been identified as unique glycolipids present in H. pylori and some Helicobacter species. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of cholesteryl-α-glucosides, plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity of H. pylori. Therefore, it is important to examine αCgTs of NHPHs. Six gastric NHPHs were isolated from Japanese patients and maintained in mouse stomachs. The αCgT genes were amplified by PCR and inverse PCR. We retrieved the αCgT genes of other Helicobacter species by BLAST searches in GenBank. αCgT genes were present in most Helicobacter species and in all Japanese isolates examined. However, we could find no candidate gene for αCgT in the whole genome of Helicobacter cinaedi and several enterohepatic species. Phylogenic analysis demonstrated that the αCgT genes of all Japanese isolates show high similarities to that of a zoonotic group of gastric NHPHs including Helicobacter suis, Helicobacter heilmannii, and Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Of 6 Japanese isolates, the αCgT genes of 4 isolates were identical to that of H. suis, and that of another 2 isolates were similar to that of H. heilmannii and H. ailurogastricus. All gastric NHPHs examined showed presence of αCgT genes, indicating that αCgT may be beneficial for these helicobacters to infect human and possibly animal stomachs. Our study indicated that NHPHs could be classified into 2 groups, NHPHs with αCgT genes and NHPHs without αCgT genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria: a systematic review

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    Emanuel Dias-Jácome

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Results: Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis. However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Conclusions: Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any of different microorganisms.

  6. Natural Gastric Infection with Helicobacter pylori in Monkeys: A Model for Spiral Bacteria Infection in Humans

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    1994-01-01

    Schoenknecht FD. Campytobacter pyloni isolated of H. pyfon from human faeces . Lancet 1992:340:1194-1195. from the stomachg of the monkey Maca nemestnina. J Clin...Helicobacter pylori in Monkeys: A Model for Spiral Bacteria Infection in Humans ANDRE DUBOIS,*’t NANCY FIALA,*’` LILLIE M. HEMAN-ACKAH,% E. SUSAN DRAZEK...model for Helicobacter pyloi Infection In humans . The of this infection has been primarily based on identifica- aim of this study was to examine the

  7. Helicobacter bilis Infection Alters Mucosal Bacteria and Modulates Colitis Development in Defined Microbiota Mice.

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    Atherly, Todd; Mosher, Curtis; Wang, Chong; Hostetter, Jesse; Proctor, Alexandra; Brand, Meghan W; Phillips, Gregory J; Wannemuehler, Michael; Jergens, Albert E

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter bilis infection of C3H/HeN mice harboring the altered Schaedler flora (ASF) triggers progressive immune responsiveness and the development of colitis. We sought to investigate temporal alterations in community structure of a defined (ASF-colonized) microbiota in normal and inflamed murine intestines and to correlate microbiota changes to histopathologic lesions. The colonic mucosal microbiota of healthy mice and ASF mice colonized with H. bilis for 3, 6, or 12 weeks were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA genes of total bacteria, group-specific organisms, and individual ASF bacterial species. Microbial profiling of ASF and H. bilis abundance was performed on cecal contents. Helicobacter bilis-colonized mice developed colitis associated with temporal changes in composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiota. The number of total bacteria, ASF519, and helicobacter-positive bacteria were increased (P attachment, or by invasion, and this interaction is differentially expressed over time.

  8. Co-occurrence of Helicobacter pylori with faecal bacteria in Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Overwhelming evidence implicates Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) as an etiologic agent of gastrointestinal diseases including gastric cancer. The mode of transmission of this pathogen remains poorly understood. Objective: This investigation is to establish the presence of H. pylori in the waters of the Nairobi ...

  9. Co-occurrence of Helicobacter pylori with faecal bacteria in Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Overwhelming evidence implicates Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) as an etiologic agent of gastrointestinal diseas- es including gastric cancer. The mode of transmission of this pathogen ..... Socioeconomic status is often a surrogate marker for the level of sanitary and hygienic practices, and it is a major variable ...

  10. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of fermented milk with lactic acid bacteria.

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    Lin, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Chi-Rei; Fang, Tony J; Guo, Jiun-Ting; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2011-06-01

    Ten strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were investigated for their anti-Helicobacter pylori effects. The bactericidal activity and organic acid content in spent culture supernatants (SCS) from fermented milk were measured. In addition, the exclusion effect of SCS against H. pylori infection of human gastric epithelial AGS cells was assayed. Three LAB strains, LY1, LY5 and IF22, showed better anti-Helicobacter effects than the other strains. There were no significant differences in the bactericidal activity of LAB strains between original SCS, artificial SCS and SCS treated by heating or protease digestion. However, neutralised SCS lost this activity. These results suggest that the anti-H. pylori activity of SCS may be related to the concentration of organic acids and the pH value but not to protein components. In the AGS cell culture test, both fermented LY5-SCS and artificial LY5-SCS significantly reduced H. pylori infection and urease activity (P < 0.05). In this study, in vitro methods were used to screen potential probiotics with anti-H. pylori activity. This may provide an excellent and rapid system for studying probiotics in the functional food and dairy industries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

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    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  12. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  13. An evaluation of selected oral health indicators and cariogenic bacteria titer in patients with Helicobacter pylori.

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    Urban, Jakub; Koszowski, Rafał; Płachetka, Anna; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Studies based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques indicate that Helicobacter pylori can be constantly or temporarily present in the oral cavity in virulent or non-virulent form. Streptococcus mutans exerts a strong inhibitory effect on H. pylori. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and virulence of H. pylori in the oral cavity and the correlation of these factors with oral health and cariogenic bacteria titer. The study involved 108 adults who were positive in urease tests for H. pylori presence in the gastric mucosa. Group I consisted of 50 patients with positive saliva tests using PCR for the presence of H. pylori DNA, while group II comprised 58 patients with negative tests. The research material consisted of saliva and dental plaque. To determine the density of S. mutans and Lactobacillus, commercially available S. mutans and LB sets were used. H. pylori DNA was found in the oral cavities of 46% of the patients who had tested positive in urease tests for the presence of these bacteria in the stomach. Among those who tested positive for the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity, virulent strains were identified in 16% of the patients. Approximal plaque index (API) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were found to be significantly higher in patients with confirmed H. pylori in the oral cavity. This group also had a smaller number of S. mutans colonies. H. pylori is found more often in patients with poor oral hygiene. Oral sanitation and hygiene instructions should be considered relevant as a complement to eradication therapy.

  14. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Norn, Svend

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  15. In the Aftermath of Helicobacter pylori: Other Helicobacters Rising Up to Become the Next Gastric Epidemic?

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    Øverby, Anders; Yamagata Murayama, Somay; Matsui, Hidenori; Nakamura, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Non-Helicobacter pylori-Helicobacters including H. suis, H. heilmanniisensu stricto and H. felis comprise a group of bacteria that may inhabit the stomach of humans and animals. Human gastric infection has been associated with gastritis, ulcer, MALT lymphoma and cancer. Although the fastidious nature of these organisms has hampered their research, recent advancements in in vitro cultivation and recent reports on in vivo models and prevalence studies in humans suggest this group of bacteria to be of more clinical significance than earlier believed. The present review discusses their history, microbiology and relevance to human health. © 2016 Japanese Gastroenterological Association Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Characterization and Antibacterial Activity Against Helicobacter pylori of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Thai Fermented Rice Noodle.

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    Techo, Sujitra; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2018-01-23

    A total of 32 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Khanom-jeen, a Thai traditional fermented rice noodle. They belonged to the genus Leuconostoc (Ln), Lactobacillus (Lb), Enterococcus (E), Lactococcus (Lc), and Weissella (W), based on their phenotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The strains were identified as Ln. pseudomesenteroides (group 1, two strains), Ln. citreum (group 2, three strains), Ln. lactis (group 3, three strains), Lb. paracasei subsp. tolerans (group 4, two strains), E. faecium (group 5, three strains), Lc. lactis subsp. lactis (group 6, one strain), W. confusa (group 7, six strains), Lb. fermentum (group 8, seven strains), and Lb. plantarum subsp. plantarum and Lb. pentosus (group 9, five strains). Fifteen strains exhibited the inhibitory activity against Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates by spot-on-lawn method. Lb. fermentum P43-01 resisted to bile acids showed the broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against H. pylori strains MS83 and BK364. These antagonistic effects were associated with proteinaceous compounds which are sensitive to α-chymotrypsin and pepsin. Results indicated that production of bacteriocin-like substances of selected strain might be the significant mechanism that exerted the inhibition on H. pylori. A potential strain could be used as probiotics in alternative or adjunctive therapy for a patient suffering from H. pylori infection.

  17. Auranofin and N-heterocyclic carbene gold-analogs are potent inhibitor/span>s of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori.

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    Owings, Joshua P; McNair, Nina N; Mui, Yiu Fung; Gustafsson, Tomas N; Holmgren, Arne; Contel, Maria; Goldberg, Joanna B; Mead, Jan R

    2016-07-01

    Auranofin is an FDA-approved gold-containing compound used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent reports of antimicrobial activity against protozoa and bacteria indicate that auranofin targets the reductive enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). We evaluated auranofin as well as five auranofin analogs containing N-heterocyclic carbenes (instead of the triethylphosphane present in auranofin) and five gold-carbene controls for their ability to inhibit or kill Helicobacter pylori in vitro Auranofin completely inhibited bacterial growth at 1.2 μM. Purified H. pylori TrxR was inhibited by auranofin in a cell-free assay (IC50 ∼88 nM). The most active gold(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene compounds exhibited MICs comparable to auranofin against H. pylori (2 μM), while also exhibiting lower toxicities for human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293T cells). Median toxic concentrations (TC50) were 13-20-fold higher compared to auranofin indicating that they were less cytotoxic. The N-heterocyclic carbene analogs maybe well tolerated, but further evaluation is needed in vivo Finally, auranofin was synergistic with the antibiotic amoxicillin, suggesting that targeting both the reductive enzyme TrxR and cell wall synthesis may be effective against H. pylori infections. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Zoonotic potential of Helicobacter spp.

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    Irena Mladenova-Hristova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Helicobacter contains more than 35 species. Helicobacter pylori is the most important in terms of human health. Discovery of these helicobacters gives opportunity to understand the relationship between these bacteria which colonise the animal and human gut and their effect on the host. Infection with Helicobacter spp. and the associated diseases in their hosts allow us to study the pathogenic mechanisms. The potential zoonotic pathway for the transmission of Helicobacter spp. and epidemiology of this genus, deserve more attention to these emerging pathogens.

  19. Comparison Between Sequential Therapy and Modified Bismuth-Included Quadruple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Chinese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuhong; Tan, Pengsheng; Song, Lianying; Lu, Zhanying

    To compare the efficacy and safety of sequential therapy and modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy as a first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication in China. The patients were randomized to receive sequential therapy [n = 90; rabeprazole (20 mg twice daily) and amoxicillin (1 g twice daily) for 5 days, followed by rabeprazole (20 mg twice daily), tinidazole (500 mg twice daily) plus clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily) for another 5 days] or modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy [n = 109; rabeprazole (20 mg twice daily), levofloxacin hydrochloride (400 mg twice daily), clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily), and colloidal bismuth pectin (200 mg 3 times a day) for 7 days]. A follow-up urea breath test was applied 4 weeks later. A total of 199 patients were diagnosed with H. pylori infection. The intention-to-treat and per-protocol (PP) eradication rates were 91.7% and 92.6%, respectively, in the modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy group, and 74.4% and 76.1%, respectively, in the sequential therapy group. The eradication rates were significantly higher in the modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy group, compared with the sequential therapy group (P = 0.001 for intention to treat and P = 0.001 for PP). Adverse effects were reported by patients from both groups, but the difference did not reach significant level (P = 0.280). The modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy seemed to be superior to the sequential therapy as the first-line regimen for H. pylori eradication in Chinese patients.

  20. Taxonomy of Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter and related bacteria: current status, future prospects and immediate concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.

    2001-01-01

    systematics, there remain a number of important issues concerning the classification of various campylobacterial taxa that require careful consideration. Ultimately, these issues are relevant to many working in the field of applied microbiology, including clinicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists...

  1. Helicobacter pylori

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    Angol, Denish Calmax; Ocama, Ponsiano; Ayazika Kirabo, Tess; Okeng, Alfred; Najjingo, Irene; Bwanga, Freddie

    2017-01-01

    Around 70-90% of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is due to Helicobacter pylori and requires treatment with antimicrobials to which these bacteria are susceptible. Common H. pylori diagnostic tests do not provide drug susceptibility data. Using the GenoType HelicoDR PCR test designed for gastric biopsies for simultaneous detection of H. pylori and its resistance to clarithromycin (CLA)/fluoroquinolones (FLQ), we present evidence for stool as an optional test specimen and also provide data on prevalence of H. pylori resistance to CLA and FLQ in Uganda. Stool from 142 symptomatic PUD patients at three hospitals in Kampala was screened for H. pylori using a rapid antigen test. The GenoType HelicoDR test was run on all H. pylori antigen positives to determine PCR positivity and resistance to CLA/FLQ. Thirty-one samples (22%) were H. pylori antigen positive, and 21 (68%) of these were H. pylori PCR positive. Six of the 21 (29%) were resistant to CLA and eight to FLQ (42%), while two gave invalid FLQ resistance results. Stool is a possible specimen for the GenoType HelicoDR test for rapid detection of H. pylori and drug resistance. In Uganda, Helicobacter pylori is highly resistant to CLA and FLQ.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...... in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  3. Toxicity of tetracyclines and tetracycline degradation products to environmentally relevant bacteria, including selected tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Sørensen, B.; Sengeløv, G.; Tjørnelund, J.

    2002-01-01

    solution were theoretically identified at various environmental conditions, such as pH, presence of chelating, metals, and fight. Their potency was assessed on sludge bacteria, tetracycline-sensitive soil bacteria, and tetracycline-resistant strains. Several of the degradation products had potency...

  4. Oxidative and nitrosative stress defences of Helicobacter and Campylobacter species that counteract mammalian immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Annika; Stintzi, Alain; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter and Campylobacter species are Gram-negative microaerophilic host-associated heterotrophic bacteria that invade the digestive tract of humans and animals. Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in humans, while Helicobacter pylori is ubiquitous in over half of the world's population causing gastric and duodenal ulcers. The colonisation of the gastrointestinal system by Helicobacter and Campylobacter relies on numerous cellular defences to sense the host environment and respond to adverse conditions, including those imposed by the host immunity. An important antimicrobial tool of the mammalian innate immune system is the generation of harmful oxidative and nitrosative stresses to which pathogens are exposed during phagocytosis. This review summarises the regulators, detoxifying enzymes and subversion mechanisms of Helicobacter and Campylobacter that ultimately promote the successful infection of humans.

  5. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tomomi; Takeshita, Eri; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hara, Megumi; Akutagawa, Kayo; Sakata, Natsuko; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Matsunaga, Keiji; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Shirai, Shinpei; Ito, Yoichiro; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Kusano, Motoyasu; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on the upper gastrointestinal symptoms of relatively healthy Japanese subjects. A total of 3,005 subjects (male/female: 1,549/1,456) undergoing medical health checkups were enrolled in the present study, at five hospitals in Saga, Japan, from January to December 2013. They had no significant findings following upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All subjects completed a questionnaire that addressed a frequency scale for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The questionnaire comprised seven questions regarding reflux symptoms and seven regarding acid-related dyspepsia, which were answered with a score based on the frequency of symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection was identified by a rapid urease test and/or H. pylori antibody titer, and an eradication history was confirmed by the subjects' medical records. Helicobacter pylori infection was positive in 894 subjects out of 3,005 (29.8%). Eradication of Helicobacter pylori was successfully achieved in 440 subjects of 458 treated. Helicobacter pylori infection had no influence on the acid-related dyspepsia evaluated by the questionnaire, whereas the mean reflux score was relatively high in the Helicobacter pylori native negative subjects compared to Helicobacter pylori native positive. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori and time span after the eradication had no effect on the upper gastrointestinal symptoms evaluated by the questionnaire. Helicobacter pylori infection and history of eradication did not affect acid-related dyspepsia symptoms in Japanese healthy subjects.

  6. Beverages obtained from soda fountain machines in the U.S. contain microorganisms, including coliform bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amy S; Godard, Renee D; Belling, Carolyn; Kasza, Victoria; Beach, Rebecca L

    2010-01-31

    Ninety beverages of three types (sugar sodas, diet sodas and water) were obtained from 20 self-service and 10 personnel-dispensed soda fountains, analyzed for microbial contamination, and evaluated with respect to U.S. drinking water regulations. A follow-up study compared the concentration and composition of microbial populations in 27 beverages collected from 9 soda fountain machines in the morning as well as in the afternoon. Ice dispensed from these machines was also examined for microbial contamination. While none of the ice samples exceeded U.S. drinking water standards, coliform bacteria was detected in 48% of the beverages and 20% had a heterotrophic plate count greater than 500cfu/ml. Statistical analyses revealed no difference in levels of microbial contamination between beverage types or between those dispensed from self-service and personnel-dispensed soda fountains. More than 11% of the beverages analyzed contained Escherichia coli and over 17% contained Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Other opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms isolated from the beverages included species of Klebsiella, Staphylococcus, Stenotrophomonas, Candida, and Serratia. Most of the identified bacteria showed resistance to one or more of the 11 antibiotics tested. These findings suggest that soda fountain machines may harbor persistent communities of potentially pathogenic microorganisms which may contribute to episodic gastric distress in the general population and could pose a more significant health risk to immunocompromised individuals. These findings have important public health implications and signal the need for regulations enforcing hygienic practices associated with these beverage dispensers. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Children: A Contribution to Get Insight into the Virulence of the Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoriano, Inês; Saraiva-Pava, Kathy D.; Rocha-Gonçalves, Alexandra; Santos, Andrea; Lopes, Ana I.; Oleastro, Mónica; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA “on” status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence factors. PMID

  8. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children: a contribution to get insight into the virulence of the bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Vitoriano

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA "on" status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence

  9. Canine glaucoma and Helicobacter spp. infection: a possible relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Zacarias Junior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ocular system in domestic animals is very complex and delicate, and composed for the eyeball and ocular adnexal. Disorders that affect the balance between production and outflow of aqueous humor can result in variations in intraocular pressure and glaucoma. Syndrome glaucomatous presents approximately 0.5% incidence in dogs and is a leading cause of blindness, eye pain and surgeries for enucleation. The secondary glaucoma are frequent and result of uveitis by bacteria of the genus Brucella, Leptospira, Ehrlichia, and other etiologic agents. In humans, the bacteria of the genus Helicobacter has attracted the attention of ophthalmologists because potentially operate in the pathogenesis of several eye problems, including glaucoma. In dogs, there are no studies that correlate the origin of glaucoma or secondary uveitis to bacteria of the genus Helicobacter. Whereas uveitis with unknown cause in dogs is very common and proven association between bacteria of the genus Helicobacter and this condition in humans, increases the importance of studies that evaluate these aspects also in pets, helping the understanding of pathogenesis and resulting in proposing therapeutic protocols most effective for glaucoma patients.

  10. [Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjøller, M

    1990-01-01

    Ever since 1983 when Marshall & Warren succeeded in cultivating Helicobacter pylori (HP) (previously known as Campylobacter pylori) a high incidence thereof has been demonstrated in patients with ulcers and non-ulcerous dyspepsia. Helicobacter pylori is easily diagnosed via microscopy, cultivation and serological tests. The bacterium may be treated with antibiotics or the ulcer drug bismuth subcitrate (De-Nol). The pathogenetic role of HP is not clear. Some studies have shown a lower recurrence rate of duodenal ulcers after treatment addressed to Helicobacter pylori with the ulcer drug De-Nol, which suggests that HP plays a role in the onset of recurrence in cases of ulcus duodeni.

  11. Hallazgo de la bacteria Helicobacter pylori en agua de consumo humano y su relación con la incidencia de cáncer gástrico en Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Montero Campos, Virginia; Masís Meléndez, Federico; López Cascante, Gustavo; Hernández Soto, Alejandro; Barboza Rojas, Karina; Orozco Gutiérrez, Jimena; Camacho Sandoval, Jorge; García Santamaría, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) es una bacteria que se considera, presente en la mitad de la población humana y es un problema de salud pública a escala mundial. Puede evadir la respuesta inmune que provoca y permanecer durante toda la vida en el humano que la hospeda, sin producir enfermedad; sin embargo, bajo condiciones no bien establecidas en algunas personas, esta relación puede cursar provocando diferentes patologías: gastritis, úlceras, linfoma MALT de células B y cáncer gástrico. La i...

  12. Development of a BALB/c mouse model of Helicobacter pylori infection with fresh and frozen bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M A Rabelo-Gonçalves

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental model for H. pylori infection was established by intragastrically challenging BALB/c mice with 1 ml (10(8 CFU/ml of suspension for two consecutive days. Animals were divided into three groups. GA: mice inoculated with fresh bacteria; GB: mice inoculated with frozen bacteria, and GC: mice inoculated with brucella broth (control group. Animals were killed at 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 60 days pi and fragments of stomach and duodenum were collected, paraffin embedded and stained by hematoxylin-eosin and Giemsa. The results showed that challenged mice exhibited mild duodenitis and gastritis. In group GA, infiltration in the duodenum was lymphoplasmacytic until day 35; in group GB, it was lymphomonocytic for 60 days pi. In the stomach, H. pylori induced lymphomonocytic infiltration that was present from days 7 to 60 in group GA. In group GB, it was only present from days 14 to 35. In conclusion, our data suggested that freezing altered pathogenic properties of H. pylori and probably inhibited expression of bacterial antigens and consequently the establishment and maintenance of infection. Although the animals developed mild duodenitis and gastritis, the BALB/c mouse is not susceptible to developing peptic ulcers during H. pylori infection

  13. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Offor, E; Obiorah, C C

    2018-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related atrophic gastritis transits through a sequential pathway of intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia to gastric cancer. Gastroscopy offers early detection, treatment and surveillance of gastric cancer. This study aims to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection and evaluate precancerous lesions (PCLs) of the stomach. This is a case controlled study of patients with dyspepsia undergoing gastroscopy at a referral endoscopy facility in Port Harcourt metropolis of Nigeria. The variables studied included demographics, clinical, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. Statistical analysis of data was done using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 20.0. (Armonk, NY, USA). A total of 104 patients were included in the study. Age ranged from 20 to 80 years (mean 47.1 ± 14.4 years); 56 were males and 48 were females. H. pylori were detected in 40 (38.5%) mucosal biopsies. The prevalence of PCLs was: chronic atrophic gastritis 6.7% (7 cases); intestinal metaplasia 2.9% (3 cases); and dysplasia 5.8% (6 cases). There was no statistical significance in sex distribution of PCLs (P = 0.245). There is a low prevalence of H. pylori in this metropolitan population. Mandatory multiple topographically targeted biopsies, even with normal mucosal appearance, at gastroscopy in addition to surveillance of PCL are recommended for early detection of gastric cancer.

  14. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are a common cause of digestive illnesses, including gastritis (the irritation and inflammation of the stomach lining), peptic ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach, small intestine, or esophagus) , and even stomach cancer later in life. These bacteria are found worldwide, ...

  15. Helicobacter urease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... The urease of the human pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, is essential for pathogenesis. The ammonia produced by the enzyme neutralizes stomach acid; thereby modifying its environment. The dodecameric enzyme complex has high affinity for its substrate, urea. We compared urease sequences and ...

  16. Influence exerted by helicobacter pylori on regulatory t-cells differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.V. Matveichev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimating risks of infections induced by gram-negative Helicobacter pylori, is a vital problem for healthcare due to wide spread of the agent and wide range of induced pathologies which include malignant neoplasms in gastrointestinal tract. The agent is prone to long-term chronic persistence despite its "fragility" and its being greatly demanding to culturing conditions. The persistence issue is of special interest here as it is related to data on Helicobacter pylori capability to change immune response in infected people inducing suppressive regulatory immune reactions which are more favorable for the agent, both in stomach and in a whole body. Our research goal was to estimate Helicobacter pylori capability to induce differentiation of regulatory CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ human T-cells as basic mediators of immune response regulation under direct contact between bacteria and T-cells without any participation of most professional antigen-presenting cells. Our research objects were clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori and T-lymphocytes samples taken from people who didn't have Helicobacter pylori-infection in their case history; isolates and samples were jointly cultivated in vitro. We applied cytofluorometry to estimate changes in regulatory T-cells content. We detected that if T-lymphocytes and Helicobacter pylori were jointly cultivated during 18 hours in ratios from 1:10 to 1:50, regulatory T-cells content in cultures increased 2.12 times on average. This effects doesn't require any dendritic cells in a culture and obviously affects T-lymphocytes which are originally committed to regulatory T-cells in their development. Also, in our opinion, influence exerted on regulatory T-cells differentiation is a specific feature of Helicobacter pylori.

  17. Hopanoid-producing bacteria in the Red Sea include the major marine nitrite-oxidizers

    KAUST Repository

    Kharbush, Jenan J

    2018-04-10

    Hopanoids, including the extended side chain-containing bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), are bacterial lipids found abundantly in the geological record and across Earth\\'s surface environments. However, the physiological roles of this biomarker remain uncertain, limiting interpretation of their presence in current and past environments. Recent work investigating the diversity and distribution of hopanoid producers in the marine environment implicated low-oxygen regions as important loci of hopanoid production, and data from marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) suggested that the dominant hopanoid producers in these environments are nitrite-utilizing organisms, revealing a potential connection between hopanoid production and the marine nitrogen cycle. Here we use metagenomic data from the Red Sea to investigate the ecology of hopanoid producers in an environmental setting that is biogeochemically distinct from those investigated previously. The distributions of hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation genes in the Red Sea are closely correlated, and the majority of hopanoid producers are taxonomically affiliated with the major marine nitrite oxidizers, Nitrospinae and Nitrospirae. These results suggest that the relationship between hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation is conserved across varying biogeochemical conditions in dark ocean microbial ecosystems.

  18. The role of strain heterogeneity in Helicobacter pylori colonisation, virulence and host adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Grubman, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable ability of Helicobacter pylori to colonise the mammalian gastric mucosa is facilitated by conserved strategies that promote strain diversification, allowing the bacteria to continually adapt to changing conditions encountered in this harsh niche. These mechanisms include rapid mutation, highly developed recombination pathways and an abundance of genes that can be regulated by slipped-strand mispairing, which all contribute to the ability of H. pylori to elicit vastly different ...

  19. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D.; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit ad...

  20. Hallazgo de la bacteria Helicobacter pylori en agua de consumo humano y su relación con la incidencia de cáncer gástrico en Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Montero Campos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori es una bacteria que se considera, presente en la mitad de la población humana y es un problema de salud pública a escala mundial. Puede evadir la respuesta inmune que provoca y permanecer durante toda la vida en el humano que la hospeda, sin producir enfermedad; sin embargo, bajo condiciones no bien establecidas en algunas personas, esta relación puede cursar provocando diferentes patologías: gastritis, úlceras, linfoma MALT de células B y cáncer gástrico. La infección ocurre mayormente en países en vías de desarrollo y estrechamente relacionado con factores socioeconómicos.Con respecto al origen, las investigaciones de Helicobacter pylori generalmente se han realizado a partir de muestras directas o indirectas de pacientes humanos. Sin embargo, pocos trabajos en el mundo dan cuenta de su hallazgo en agua y menos en agua de consumo de una población.Para la presente investigación se analizó un total de 122 muestras de agua de consumo de la población de 20 cantones escogidos de zonas de alta y baja incidencia de cáncer gástrico de Costa Rica, donde ya es reconocida en el mundo su alta incidencia, según información estadística del Registro Nacional de Tumores. Se logró el cultivo e identificación molecular de Helicobacter pylori en el 40% de las muestras de agua de las zonas de alta incidencia de cáncer gástrico y enel 7% de las muestras de las zonas de baja incidencia.La investigación mostró una comparación estadística que correlaciona la incidencia de cáncer gástrico con factores geomorfológicos y físico químicos de los suelos donde nace el agua de consumo de las poblaciones de ambas zonas.

  1. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  2. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The elicitation step of nickel allergy is promoted in mice by microbe-related substances, including some from oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Kinbara, Masayuki; Funayama, Hiromi; Takada, Haruhiko; Sugawara, Shunji; Endo, Yasuo

    2011-11-01

    Microbial components activate the host's innate immunity via interactions with molecules including TLRs and NODs. We previously reported that in mice (i) Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; TLR4 agonist) promotes Ni-allergy even in T-cell-deficient mice, (ii) E. coli LPS reduces the minimum allergy-inducing concentrations of Ni at both the sensitization and elicitation steps, and (iii) various microbe-related substances promote sensitization to Ni. Here, we examined the effects of microbe-related substances at the elicitation step. Mice (except for TLR4-mutated C3H/HeJ mice) were sensitized to Ni by intraperitoneal injection of NiCl(2) + E. coli LPS. Ten days later their ear-pinnas were challenged with 1 μM NiCl(2) with or without a test substance. Although NiCl(2) alone at this concentration does not induce Ni-allergy, its combination with the following substances induced Ni-allergy in BALB/c mice: LPS preparations from oral gram-negative bacteria (Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis), a mannan preparation from a fungus (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and synthetic NOD2 and TLR2 agonists. The effect of the mannan preparation was small in C3H/HeJ mice (sensitized with NiCl(2) + the P. intermedia preparation). The P. intermedia preparation promoted Ni-allergy in C3H/HeJ and nude mice, but not in mice deficient in either TLR2 or histidine decarboxylase. Intragingival injection of the P. intermedia preparation and later challenge with NiCl(2) alone to ear-pinnas also promoted Ni-allergy. These results indicate that (i) in Ni-allergy, a microbial milieu or innate immunity is important at the elicitation step, too, and (ii) some oral bacteria may promote Ni-allergy via TLR2-stimulant(s) production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Helicobacter pylori: its discovery and relevance for medicine Helicobacter pylori: su descubrimiento e importancia en la medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Pajares

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1979, Warren was first to observe these bacteria in an inflamed gastric epithelium, and subsequently in peptic ulcer-associated gastritis. In 1981, Marshall starts his research and cultivates the bacteria, performs prospective studies, and administers therapy regimens using antibiotics and bismuth salts. The organism was designated Campylobacter-like after its similarity with said genus. In 1984, Marshall manages to meet Koch's postulates using self-inoculation by ingesting a bacterial culture, which resulted in gastritis that was then treated and cured with bismuth salts and metronidazole. The Gastroenterological Society of Australia rejected the abstract with preliminary data. In 1983, "The Lancet" published such data in two brief letters with the same heading, with each being signed by one of these two researchers. Cooperating with microbiologists they classify the new bacteria within the Helicobacter genus as the pylori species. Gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently considered infectious diseases. Their diagnosis and therapy include bacterial detection methods and antibiotics, respectively. In addition, a causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori and both gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma has been established, and its association with some extra-digestive conditions has been suggested.

  5. Isolation, structural elucidation and in vitro activity of 2-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline against environmental relevant bacteria, including tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Sengeløv, Gitte; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    i.d., 5 microm), and the mobile phase contained methanol-water (27:73 (v/v)) with 0.08 M formic acid added. The flow rate was 9.0 ml/min. It was possible to isolate few milligram ADOTC in a day. The compound was unambiguously identified using NMR and MS-MS. The anti-microbial activity against...... activated sludge bacteria was determined giving a potency of only 3% of that of OTC. With tetracycline-resistant bacteria, no anti-microbial activity was observed, indicating a mode of action similar to that of OTC....

  6. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections.

  7. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin, a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum, Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Reiter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H2O2 using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus, including multi-drug resistant (MDR strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH. Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  8. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin), a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum), Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Jana; Levina, Natalja; van der Linden, Mark; Gruhlke, Martin; Martin, Christian; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2017-10-12

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate) synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure) by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H₂O₂ using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas , Streptococcus , and Staphylococcus , including multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH). Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  9. An Antimicrobial Metabolite from Bacillus sp.: Significant activity against pathogenic bacteria including multidrug-resistant clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJAY GHOSH CHALASANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the cell free modified trypticase soya broth (pH 7.4+0.2 of Bacillus subtilis URID 12.1 showed significant antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The partially purified antimicrobial molecule was found to be resistant to extremes of pH and temperatures and also to higher concentrations of trypsin and proteinase K. The antimicrobial molecule was purified by a three-step method that included reverse-phased high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values were determined for 11 species of bacteria using a microbroth dilution technique. The HPLC-purified fraction showed the MICs ranging from 0.5 to 1 µg/ml for methicillin and vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MVRSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE strains. The molecular mass of the antimicrobial compound was determined to be 842.37 Da. The same antimicrobial fraction showed negligible haemolytic activity against human red blood cells even at a concentration as high as 100µg/ml. Because of its significant antimicrobial activity at low MIC values coupled with its non-haemolytic property, it may prove to be a novel antimicrobial lead molecule.

  10. Gastric microbiome of Indian patients with Helicobacter pylori infection, and their interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anubhav; Pereira, Verima; Saxena, Shruti; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Anbumani, D; Bag, Satyabrata; Das, Bhabatosh; Nair, G Balakrish; Abraham, Philip; Mande, Sharmila S

    2017-11-13

    The gastric microbiome is suspected to have a role in the causation of diseases by Helicobacter pylori. Reports on their relative abundance vis-à-vis H. pylori are available from various ethnic and geographic groups, but little is known about their interaction patterns. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy samples from the gastric antrum and corpus of 39 patients with suspected H. pylori infection were collected and microbiomes were analyzed by 16S rDNA profiling. Four groups of samples were identified, which harbored Helicobacter as well as a diverse group of bacteria including Lactobacillus, Halomonas and Prevotella. There was a negative association between the microbiome diversity and Helicobacter abundance. Network analyses showed that Helicobacter had negative interactions with members of the gastric microbiome, while other microbes interacted positively with each other, showing a higher tendency towards intra-cluster co-occurrence/co-operation. Cross-geographic comparisons suggested the presence of region-specific microbial abundance profiles. We report the microbial diversity, abundance variation and interaction patterns of the gastric microbiota of Indian patients with H. pylori infection and present a comparison of the same with the gastric microbial ecology in samples from different geographic regions. Such microbial abundance profiles and microbial interactions can help in understanding the pathophysiology of gastric ailments and can thus help in development of new strategies to curb it.

  11. Evaluation of a liquid urease test (LUT) for detection of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, H; Salmen, S; Dolfo, W; Sotolongo, Asmiria; Petrosino, Pierina; Donis, J; Berrueta, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a rapid diagnostic urease test to demonstrate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the Endoscopy room. 200 consecutive patients referred to gastroscopy for different indications, were included in this study. One antral biopsy sample was obtained to be immersed in our test. The same sample was used for histological evaluation, considered to be the gold standard method for diagnose of Helicobacter pylori infection. 135 patients (67.5%) were found positives and 65 patients (32.5%) were negatives in our test. 128 patients (64%) showed Helicobacter pylori on histological examination. Our test showed a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 88.1%, and positive and negative predictive values of 95% and 80% respectively. A remarkable correlation between density of Helicobacter pylori and reading time was also observed, where a high density of the bacteria reduced the reaction time in this liquid test. Furthermore, an overall accuracy of 90% was shown, which is comparable with other available commercial tests. LUT is easy to handle, cost effective and fast, with a high positive predictive value.

  12. Isolation, structural elucidation and in vitro activity of 2-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline against environmental relevant bacteria, including tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Sengeløv, Gitte; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    2-Acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline (ADOTC) is a major impurity of oxytetracycline (OTC) produced as a side product during fermentation. ADOTC was isolated from OTC and other impurities using preparative HPLC. The preparative column was an Xterra MS. C-18 chromatographic column (100 mm x 19...... turn W., 5 mum), and the mobile phase contained methanol-water (27:73 (v/v)) with 0.08 M formic acid added. The flow rate was 9.0 ml/min. It was possible to isolate few milligram ADOTC in a day. The compound was unambiguously identified using NMR and MS-MS. The anti-microbial activity against activated...... sludge bacteria was deter-mined giving a potency of only 3% of that of OTC. With tetracycline-resistant bacteria, no anti-microbial activity was observed, indicating a mode of action similar to that of OTC....

  13. Helicobacter pylori: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, M G

    1990-01-01

    The recent isolation and classification of the spiral gastric bacteria Helicobacter pylori has led to an explosion of worldwide research. The data strongly suggest that H. pylori is the causative agent for type-B active chronic gastritis. The role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer awaits clarification, and, more importantly, potential treatment regimens need clear documentation and further detailed research. The past decade has revealed many intriguing facts about H. pylori infection. If, during the 1990s, eradication of H. pylori by means of appropriate and safe medication can lead to the control and prevention of gastroduodenal disease, then major clinical and economic benefits can be anticipated.

  14. Misidentifying helicobacters: the Helicobacter cinaedi example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, P.; Harrington, C.S.; Jalava, K.

    2000-01-01

    Whole-cell protein electrophoresis and biochemical examination by means of a panel of 64 tests were used to identify 14 putative helicobacters to the species level. The results were confirmed by means of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and were used to discuss misidentification of helicobacters...... based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data. The data indicated that comparison of near-complete 16S ribosomal DNA sequences does not always provide conclusive evidence for species level identification and may prove highly misleading. The data also indicated that "Helicobacter westmeadii" is a junior synonym...

  15. Helicobacter pylori-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shoumin; Soutto, Mohammed; Chen, Zheng; Peng, DunFa; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Krishna, Uma S; Belkhiri, Abbes; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard; El-Rifai, Wael

    2017-05-01

    DARPP-32 is a frequently amplified and overexpressed gene that promotes several oncogenic functions in gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection, proinflammatory NF-κB activation and regulation of DARPP-32. The study used in vivo and in vitro experiments. Luciferase reporter, quantitative real-time PCR, immunoblot, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), cell viability, H. pylori infection, tissue microarrays and immunohistochemical assays were used. Our results indicated that H. pylori infection increased the DARPP-32 mRNA and protein levels in gastric cancer cell lines and gastric mucosa of mice. H. pylori infection increased the activity of NF-κB reporter and p-NF-κB (S536) protein level in vitro and in vivo . To investigate the transcriptional regulation of DARPP-32, we cloned a 3019 bp of the DARPP-32 promoter into the luciferase reporter (pGL3-Luc). Both H. pylori infection and tumour necrosis factor-α treatment induced DARPP-32 reporter activity (ppylori infection counteracted H. pylori -induced cell death through activation of serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (AKT), as determined by ATP-Glo and clonogenic survival assays. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated a significant positive correlation between NF-κB and DARPP-32 expression levels in gastric cancer tissues (r 2 =0.43, ppylori infection and activation of NF-κB provides a link between infection, inflammation and gastric tumourigenesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    with age. The route of infection is unknown but faecal-oral infection is probable. Correlation between the presence of HP and the occurrence of symptoms is poor in the individual patient. The bacteria can be demonstrated histologically, cytologically, by culture, by the urease test, by the urease...

  17. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host. PMID:28652651

  18. Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy Itzel; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos Felipe; Romero, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a successful pathogen that can persist in the stomach of an infected person for their entire life. It provokes chronic gastric inflammation that leads to the development of serious gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is known that these ailments can be avoided if the infection by the bacteria can be prevented or eradicated. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available. However, these therapies have several inherent problems, including the appearance of resistance to the antibiotics used and associated adverse effects, the risk of re-infection and the high cost of antibiotic therapy. The delay in developing a vaccine to prevent or eradicate the infection has furthered research into new therapeutic approaches. This review summarises the most relevant recent studies on vaccine development and new treatments using natural resources such as plants, probiotics and nutraceuticals. In addition, novel alternatives based on microorganisms, peptides, polysaccharides, and intragastric violet light irradiation are presented. Alternative therapies have not been effective in eradicating the bacteria but have been shown to maintain low bacterial levels. Nevertheless, some of them are useful in preventing the adverse effects of antibiotics, modulating the immune response, gastroprotection, and the general promotion of health. Therefore, those agents can be used as adjuvants of allopathic anti-H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:24587621

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    AbstrakFaktor risiko infeksi Helicobacter pylori adalah tinggal di negara berkembang, kondisi sosial ekonomi yang rendah, jumlah anggota keluarga yang banyak, etnik dan genetik. Tatalaksana dan diagnosis Helicobacter pylori belum memuaskan karena adanya resistensi antibiotik pada pasien Helicobacter pylori. Kami melaporkan seorang pasien perempuan usia 8 tahun 6 bulan yang terinfeksi Helicobacter pylori. Diagnosis ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis, pemeriksaan fisik, dan hasil laboratorium. Pa...

  20. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Alexander; Langner, Cosima; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Habendorf, Wiebke; Weigt, Jochen; Venerito, Marino; Tammer, Ina; Schlüter, Dirk; Schlaermann, Philipp; Meyer, Thomas F; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) CagA antibodies in H. pylori infected subjects and to identify potential histopathological and bacterial factors related to H. pylori CagA-immune response. Systematic data to H. pylori isolates, blood samples, gastric biopsies for histological and molecular analyses were available from 99 prospectively recruited subjects. Serological profile (anti- H. pylori , anti-CagA) was correlated with H. pylori isolates ( cagA , EPIYA, vacA s/m genotype), histology (Sydney classification) and mucosal interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein expression. Selected H. pylori strains were assessed for H. pylori CagA protein expression and IL-8 induction in co-cultivation model with AGS cells. Thirty point three percent of microbiologically confirmed H. pylori infected patients were seropositive for CagA. Majority of H. pylori isolates were cagA gene positive (93.9%) with following vacA polymorphisms: 42.4% vacA s1m1 , 23.2% s1m2 and 34.3% s2m2 . Anti-CagA-IgG seropositivity was strongly associated with atrophic gastritis, increased mucosal inflammation according to the Sydney score, IL-8 and cagA mRNA expression. VacA s and m polymorphisms were the major determinants for positive ( vacA s1m1) or negative ( vacA s2m2) anti-CagA serological immune response, which also correlated with the in vitro inflammatory potential in AGS cells. In vitro co-cultivation of representative H. pylori strains with AGS cells confirmed functional CagA translocation, which showed only partial correlation with CagA seropositivity in patients, supporting vacA as major co-determinant of the immune response. Serological immune response to H. pylori cagA + strain in H. pylori infected patients is strongly associated with vacA polymorphism, suggesting the crucial role of bacterial factors in immune and clinical phenotype of the infection.

  1. Individual Patterns of Complexity in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiota, Including Predator Bacteria, over a 1-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Caballero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF lung microbiota composition has recently been redefined by the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS tools, identifying, among others, previously undescribed anaerobic and uncultivable bacteria. In the present study, we monitored the fluctuations of this ecosystem in 15 CF patients during a 1-year follow-up period, describing for the first time, as far as we know, the presence of predator bacteria in the CF lung microbiome. In addition, a new computational model was developed to ascertain the hypothetical ecological repercussions of a prey-predator interaction in CF lung microbial communities. Fifteen adult CF patients, stratified according to their pulmonary function into mild (n = 5, moderate (n = 9, and severe (n = 1 disease, were recruited at the CF unit of the Ramááóíóóóñóíéíóíúááóón y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain. Each patient contributed three or four induced sputum samples during a 1-year follow-up period. Lung microbiota composition was determined by both cultivation and NGS techniques and was compared with the patients’ clinical variables. Results revealed a particular microbiota composition for each patient that was maintained during the study period, although some fluctuations were detected without any clinical correlation. For the first time, Bdellovibrio and Vampirovibrio predator bacteria were shown in CF lung microbiota and reduced-genome bacterial parasites of the phylum Parcubacteria were also consistently detected. The newly designed computational model allows us to hypothesize that inoculation of predators into the pulmonary microbiome might contribute to the control of chronic colonization by CF pathogens in early colonization stages.

  2. Individual Patterns of Complexity in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiota, Including Predator Bacteria, over a 1-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios Caballero, Juan; Vida, Rafael; Cobo, Marta; Máiz, Luis; Suárez, Lucrecia; Galeano, Javier; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Del Campo, Rosa

    2017-09-26

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung microbiota composition has recently been redefined by the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) tools, identifying, among others, previously undescribed anaerobic and uncultivable bacteria. In the present study, we monitored the fluctuations of this ecosystem in 15 CF patients during a 1-year follow-up period, describing for the first time, as far as we know, the presence of predator bacteria in the CF lung microbiome. In addition, a new computational model was developed to ascertain the hypothetical ecological repercussions of a prey-predator interaction in CF lung microbial communities. Fifteen adult CF patients, stratified according to their pulmonary function into mild ( n = 5), moderate ( n = 9), and severe ( n = 1) disease, were recruited at the CF unit of the Ramón y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain). Each patient contributed three or four induced sputum samples during a 1-year follow-up period. Lung microbiota composition was determined by both cultivation and NGS techniques and was compared with the patients' clinical variables. Results revealed a particular microbiota composition for each patient that was maintained during the study period, although some fluctuations were detected without any clinical correlation. For the first time, Bdellovibrio and Vampirovibrio predator bacteria were shown in CF lung microbiota and reduced-genome bacterial parasites of the phylum Parcubacteria were also consistently detected. The newly designed computational model allows us to hypothesize that inoculation of predators into the pulmonary microbiome might contribute to the control of chronic colonization by CF pathogens in early colonization stages. IMPORTANCE The application of NGS to sequential samples of CF patients demonstrated the complexity of the organisms present in the lung (156 species) and the constancy of basic individual colonization patterns, although some differences between samples from the same patient were

  3. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  5. In vitro antibacterial and chemical properties of essential oils including native plants from Brazil against pathogenic and resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Probst, Isabella da Silva; Andrade, Bruna Fernanda Murbach Teles; Alves, Fernanda Cristina Bérgamo; Albano, Mariana; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Doyama, Julio Toshimi; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Fernandes Júnior, Ary

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobials products from plants have increased in importance due to the therapeutic potential in the treatment of infectious diseases. Therefore, we aimed to examine the chemical characterisation (GC-MS) of essential oils (EO) from seven plants and measure antibacterial activities against bacterial strains isolated from clinical human specimens (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and sensitive (MSSA), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium) and foods (Salmonella Enteritidis). Assays were performed using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and MIC90%) (mg/mL) by agar dilution and time kill curve methods (log CFU/mL) to aiming synergism between EO. EO chemical analysis showed a predominance of terpenes and its derivatives. The highest antibacterial activities were with Cinnamomun zeylanicum (0.25 mg/mL on almost bacteria tested) and Caryophyllus aromaticus EO (2.40 mg/mL on Salmonella Enteritidis), and the lowest activity was with Eugenia uniflora (from 50.80 mg/mL against MSSA to 92.40 mg/mL against both Salmonella sources and P. aeruginosa) EO. The time kill curve assays revealed the occurrence of bactericide synergism in combinations of C. aromaticus and C. zeylanicum with Rosmarinus. officinalis. Thus, the antibacterial activities of the EO were large and this can also be explained by complex chemical composition of the oils tested in this study and the synergistic effect of these EO, yet requires further investigation because these interactions between the various chemical compounds can increase or reduce (antagonism effect) the inhibitory effect of essential oils against bacterial strains.

  6. Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, B.A.; Fishman, E.K.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Jones, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the CT scans of patients with Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori) infection and histologic gastritis reviewed to determine if the inflammatory changes can mimic the CT appearance of gastric neoplasm. Records were obtained of 288 consecutive cases of biopsy-confirmed. Helicobacter pylori gastritis, spanning a 21-month period from July 1988 to March 1990. Abdominal CT scans had been performed in 70 of these cases and were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Seven of the 70 cases of confirmed Helicobacter pylori gastritis were suggestive of malignancy on CT

  7. Recommended minimal standards for describing new species of the genus Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewhirst, F.E.; Fox, J.G.; On, S.L.W.

    2000-01-01

    The International Committee of Systematic Bacteriology Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Campylobacter and related bacteria has agreed in principle on minimum requirements for the description of new species of the genus Helicobacter. These requirements include the recommendation that the description...... of a putative new species or subspecies be based on examination of at least five strains in order to provide a measure of phenotypic and genotypic variation. Recommendations for required phenotypic and molecular data are presented. The requirements are consistent with the polyphasic approach to bacterial...

  8. A Biotin Biosynthesis Gene Restricted to Helicobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Jia, Jia; Cronan, John E.

    2016-01-01

    In most bacteria the last step in synthesis of the pimelate moiety of biotin is cleavage of the ester bond of pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester. The paradigm cleavage enzyme is Escherichia coli BioH which together with the BioC methyltransferase allows synthesis of the pimelate moiety by a modified fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. Analyses of the extant bacterial genomes showed that bioH is absent from many bioC-containing bacteria and is replaced by other genes. Helicobacter pylori lacks a gene encoding a homologue of the known pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester cleavage enzymes suggesting that it encodes a novel enzyme that cleaves this intermediate. We isolated the H. pylori gene encoding this enzyme, bioV, by complementation of an E. coli bioH deletion strain. Purified BioV cleaved the physiological substrate, pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester to pimeloyl-ACP by use of a catalytic triad, each member of which was essential for activity. The role of BioV in biotin biosynthesis was demonstrated using a reconstituted in vitro desthiobiotin synthesis system. BioV homologues seem the sole pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester esterase present in the Helicobacter species and their occurrence only in H. pylori and close relatives provide a target for development of drugs to specifically treat Helicobacter infections. PMID:26868423

  9. Helicobacter hepaticus Induces an Inflammatory Response in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus can lead to chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in certain strains of mice. Until now the pathogenic role of Helicobacter species on human liver tissue is still not clarified though Helicobacter species identification in human liver cancer was successful in case controlled studies. Therefore we established an in vitro model to investigate the interaction of primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with Helicobacter hepaticus. Successful co-culturing of PHH with Helicobacter hepaticus was confirmed by visualization of motile bacteria by two-photon-microscopy. Isolated human monocytes were stimulated with PHH conditioned media. Changes in mRNA expression of acute phase cytokines and proteins in PHH and stimulated monocytes were determined by Real-time PCR. Furthermore, cytokines and proteins were analyzed in PHH culture supernatants by ELISA. Co-cultivation with Helicobacter hepaticus induced mRNA expression of Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in PHH (pmedia (p<0.05). An increase of Cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression was observed, with a concomitant increase of prostaglandin E2 concentration in PHH supernatants at 24 and 48 h (p<0.05). In contrast, at day 7 of co-culture, no persistent elevation of cytokine mRNA could be detected. High expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on PHH cell membranes after co-culture was shown by two-photon-microscopy and confirmed by flow-cytomety. Finally, expression of Cytochrome P450 3A4 and albumin mRNA were downregulated, indicating an impairment of hepatocyte synthesis function by Helicobacter hepaticus presence. This is the first in vitro model demonstrating a pathogenic effect of a Helicobacter spp. on human liver cells, resulting in an inflammatory response with increased synthesis of inflammatory mediators and consecutive monocyte activation. PMID:24932686

  10. Paf-acether synthesis by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denizot, Y; Sobhani, I; Rambaud, J C; Lewin, M; Thomas, Y; Benveniste, J

    1990-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that Helicobacter pylori may play a role in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal ulcers in man but direct evidence of mucosal injury by this microorganism is still lacking. Paf-acether (paf) causes a number of disorders including ischaemic bowel necrosis and gastroduodenal ulceration. Since paf is produced by Escherichia coli, we investigated whether it could be synthesised by H pylori. Five H pylori isolates were collected from antral biopsy specimens from patients with gastritis and duodenal ulcer and cultured with selective antibiotics. Colonies obtained from both blood agar and brucella broth medium were used. Paf was determined by platelet aggregation assay after ethanolic extraction and subsequent purification by high performance liquid chromatography. Paf was detected in H pylori in blood agar plates (680 (390) pg paf/1 x 10(6) organisms) but not in bacteria cultured on brucella broth medium. Supplementation of the latter medium with lyso paf and acetyl-CoA, two paf precursors present in high amounts in the mammalian intestine, induced paf production in three of five isolates. The platelet aggregating material extracted from H pylori exhibited biological and physiochemical characteristics identical to those of paf released from eukaryotic cells. These findings suggest that H pylori may add to the local production of paf in inflamed gastric mucosa.

  11. Protection against Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial infections by garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivam, G P

    2001-03-01

    Louis Pasteur was the first to describe the antibacterial effect of onion and garlic juices. Historically, garlic has been used worldwide to fight bacterial infections. Allium vegetables, particularly garlic (Allium sativum L.) exhibit a broad antibiotic spectrum against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Noteworthy results published include the following: 1) raw juice of garlic was found to be effective against many common pathogenic bacteria-intestinal bacteria, which are responsible for diarrhea in humans and animals; 2) garlic is effective even against those strains that have become resistant to antibiotics; 3) the combination of garlic with antibiotics leads to partial or total synergism; 4) complete lack of resistance has been observed repeatedly; 5) even toxin production by microorganisms is prevented by garlic. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterium implicated in the etiology of stomach cancer and ulcers. The incidence of stomach cancer is lower in populations with a high intake of allium vegetables. We have demonstrated in vitro that H. pylori is susceptible to garlic extract at a fairly moderate concentration. Even some antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains are susceptible to garlic. Clinical trials are necessary to explore the possibility of using garlic as a low-cost remedy for eradicating H. pylori.

  12. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load...... and cytokines which may improve knowledge concerning the outcome of gastric diseases caused by H. pylori. Antral biopsies from 42 dyspeptic patients including 27 H. pylori-positive and 15 H. pylori-negative patients were tested for apoptotic activity by the TUNEL assay, and immuno-histochemically for p53...... and the proliferative marker Ki-67. H. pylori infection, bacteria load and inflammatory activity were associated with increased cell turnover as judged by enhanced activities of TUNEL, p53 and Ki-67. Only p53 was significantly correlated to IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-10. The H. pylori-positive state was furthermore...

  13. Impact of Helicobacter Pylori on Mucus Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Jonathan; Keates, Sarah; Kelly, Ciaran; Turner, Bradley; Bansil, Rama; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that the viscoelastic properties of gastric mucin are crucial to the protection of the lining of the stomach against its own acidic secretions and other agents. Helicobacter Pylori, a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that dwells in the mucus layer of approximately 50% of the world's population is a class I carcinogen and is associated with gastric ulcers and severe gastritis. The structural damage to the mucus layer caused by H. Pylori is an important aspect of infection with this bacteria. We are examining the impact of H. Pylori on mucin and mucus rheology quantitatively using a combination of dynamic light scattering and multiple particle tracking experiments. Video microscopy data will also be presented on the motility of this bacteria in mucin at different pH and in other viscoelastic gels.

  14. [Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal antirheumatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherak, O; Hirschl, A M; Nemec, H; Amann, B; Kolarz, G; Thumb, N

    1990-08-03

    The frequency of occurrence of Helicobacter pylori in the antral mucosa was investigated prospectively in a group of 66 patients (17 men, 49 women, mean age 58 +/- 8.4 years) who had been treated with nonsteroidal anti-rheumatic drugs and 33 controls (14 men, 19 women, mean age 60.7 +/- 6.6 years) who had not received these drugs. In the first group the indication for gastroscopy was ingestion of nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs for at least 8 weeks, irrespective of dyspeptic symptoms (present in 25 patients), while in the second group the reason for endoscopy was either clinical symptoms (n = 18) or the presence of blood in the faeces. Helicobacter pylori was demonstrated by culture in 36 out of the 66 patients who had received nonsteroidal antirheumatics (54.5%); these comprised 24 out of 46 patients (52.2%) with chronic inactive gastritis and 12 out of 15 patients (80%) with chronic active gastritis. In the control group H. pylori was detected by culture in 22 out of 33 patients (66.7%); these included 11 out of 19 patients (57.9%) with chronic inactive gastritis and 11 out of 12 patients (91.7%) with chronic active gastritis. H. pylori was not demonstrated in any of the seven patients who had histologically normal gastric mucosa. In both groups there was significant correlation between demonstration of the microorganism and severity of inflammation. There is hence no evidence that nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs have any influence on the colonisation of the antral mucosa by Helicobacter pylori.

  15. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  16. Who ate whom? Adaptive Helicobacter genomic changes that accompanied a host jump from early humans to large felines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection of humans is so old that its population genetic structure reflects that of ancient human migrations. A closely related species, Helicobacter acinonychis, is specific for large felines, including cheetahs, lions, and tigers, whereas hosts more closely related to humans harbor more distantly related Helicobacter species. This observation suggests a jump between host species. But who ate whom and when did it happen? In order to resolve this question, we determined the genomic sequence of H. acinonychis strain Sheeba and compared it to genomes from H. pylori. The conserved core genes between the genomes are so similar that the host jump probably occurred within the last 200,000 (range 50,000-400,000 years. However, the Sheeba genome also possesses unique features that indicate the direction of the host jump, namely from early humans to cats. Sheeba possesses an unusually large number of highly fragmented genes, many encoding outer membrane proteins, which may have been destroyed in order to bypass deleterious responses from the feline host immune system. In addition, the few Sheeba-specific genes that were found include a cluster of genes encoding sialylation of the bacterial cell surface carbohydrates, which were imported by horizontal genetic exchange and might also help to evade host immune defenses. These results provide a genomic basis for elucidating molecular events that allow bacteria to adapt to novel animal hosts.

  17. A comparative study of clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di; Guan, Wen-bin; Wang, Jian-dong; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Wei; Quan, Zhi-wei

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been isolated from 10%-20% of human chronic cholecystitis specimens but the characteristics of "Helicobacter pylori positive cholecystitis" remains unclear. This study aims to compare the clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa. Three hundred and twenty-six chronic cholecystitis patients were divided into two groups according to whether Helicobacter pylori could be detected by culture, staining or PCR for Helicobacter 16s rRNA gene in gallbladder mucosa. Positive samples were sequenced for Helicobacter pylori-specific identification. Clinical parameters as well as pathological characteristics including some premalignant lesions and the expression levels of iNOS and ROS in gallbladder were compared between the two groups. Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa was detected in 20.55% of cholecystitis patients. These patients had a higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (p = 0.001), more histories of chronic gastritis (p = 0.005), gastric ulcer (p = 0.042), duodenal ulcer (p = 0.026) and higher presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach as compared to patients without Helicobacter pylori infection in the gallbladder mucosa. Helicobacter pylori 16s rRNA in gallbladder and gastric-duodenal mucosa from the same individual patient had identical sequences. Also, higher incidences of adenomyomatosis (p = 0.012), metaplasia (p = 0.022) and higher enhanced expressions of iNOS and ROS were detected in Helicobacter pylori infected gallbladder mucosa (p<0.05). Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori existed in stomach. Helicobacter pylori is also correlated with gallbladder premalignant lesions including metaplasia and adenomyomatosis. The potential mechanism might be related with higher ROS/RNS production but needs further investigation.

  18. A comparative study of clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been isolated from 10%-20% of human chronic cholecystitis specimens but the characteristics of "Helicobacter pylori positive cholecystitis" remains unclear. This study aims to compare the clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa. METHODS: Three hundred and twenty-six chronic cholecystitis patients were divided into two groups according to whether Helicobacter pylori could be detected by culture, staining or PCR for Helicobacter 16s rRNA gene in gallbladder mucosa. Positive samples were sequenced for Helicobacter pylori-specific identification. Clinical parameters as well as pathological characteristics including some premalignant lesions and the expression levels of iNOS and ROS in gallbladder were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa was detected in 20.55% of cholecystitis patients. These patients had a higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (p = 0.001, more histories of chronic gastritis (p = 0.005, gastric ulcer (p = 0.042, duodenal ulcer (p = 0.026 and higher presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach as compared to patients without Helicobacter pylori infection in the gallbladder mucosa. Helicobacter pylori 16s rRNA in gallbladder and gastric-duodenal mucosa from the same individual patient had identical sequences. Also, higher incidences of adenomyomatosis (p = 0.012, metaplasia (p = 0.022 and higher enhanced expressions of iNOS and ROS were detected in Helicobacter pylori infected gallbladder mucosa (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori existed in stomach. Helicobacter pylori is also correlated with gallbladder premalignant lesions including metaplasia and adenomyomatosis. The potential mechanism might be related with higher ROS

  19. Evidence of Zoonotic Transmission of Helicobacter canis Between Sheep and Human Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Maha A; Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Seleem, Aya

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter species are newly emerging bacteria with great public implications but till now its epidemiology is not fully understood; so, this study was conducted to investigate the possible role of ruminants in the epidemiology of these pathogens. For this purpose, fecal samples were collected from 149 animals (76 sheep, 33 goats, 21 cattle, and 19 buffaloes) and stool specimens from 10 animal caretakers in intimate contact with the examined animals. All samples were examined for the presence of Helicobacter species through detection of Helicobacter genus specific 16S rRNA using PCR. Then, all positive Helicobacter spp. amplicons were sequenced to recognize their species through BLAST analysis at GenBank. The overall prevalence of Helicobacter spp. was 14.8% while the distribution among the different animals was 26.3%, 3%, 4.8%, and 0% in sheep, goats, cattle, and buffaloes respectively. Helicobacter canis was the predominant species and detected only in sheep (21%) and goats (3%). Moreover, Helicobacter winghamensis and Helicobacter canadensis were also detected in sheep but not in other animals, whereas the only positive bovine sample was identified as Helicobacter bovis. On the other hand, 4 out of 10 humans were positive for Helicobacter spp. and all sequences were identified as H. canis. The sequences identity matrix and phylogenetic analysis of H. canis sequences from humans and sheep contacts revealed that one human sequence was identical to that of sheep and making sister group clade, which prove the zoonotic transmission of this pathogen between sheep and human contacts. However, our findings highlight sheep as a potential reservoir for H. canis, further researches are needed to address the potential role of sheep in the food-borne transmission of such emerging pathogen.

  20. [Antibacterial actin of vinegar against food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Part 2). Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on bactericidal activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entani, E; Asai, M; Tsujihata, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Ohta, M

    1997-05-01

    Bactericidal effects of various kinds of AWASEZU (processed vinegar, 2.5% acidity) on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other bacteria were examined. the order of bactericidal activities was NIHAIZU (3.5% NaCl was added) > SANBA-IZU (3.5% NaCl and 10% sucrose were added) > plain vinegar (spirit vinegar) > AMAZU (10% sucrose was added). This indicates that their activities were enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride and suppressed by the addition of sugar. On the other hand, when soy sauce was used instead of sodium chloride, the order of bactericidal activities was plain vinegar > AMAZU > NIHAIZU > SANBAIZU. This is mainly because their activities were suppressed by the increase in the pH value. The effect of sodium chloride (0.01-15%) and temperature (10-50 degrees C) on bactericidal activities against E. coli O157:H7 in spirit vinegar (0.5-2.5% acidity) was further examined. When vinegar was used in combination with sodium chloride, predominant synergism on the bactericidal activity was observed. Their activities were markedly enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride in proportion to the concentration. In addition to this, at higher temperatures spirit vinegar killed bacteria much more rapidly. It should be noted that the bactericidal activity of spirit vinegar was extremely enhanced by the combined use of the addition of sodium chloride and the rise of temperature. For example, in 2.5% acidity vinegar, the time required for 3 log decrease in viable cell numbers at 20 degrees C was shortened to 1/140-fold by the addition of 5% sodium chloride, shortened to 1/51-fold by the rise of the reaction temperature at 40 degrees C, and shortened to 1/830-fold; 0.89 minutes by both the addition of 5% sodium chloride and the rise of temperature at 40 degrees C. In order to propose the methods to prevent food poisoning by bacterial infection, bactericidal activities of vinegar solution containing sodium chloride on cooking tools and

  1. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Helicobacter pylori: Helicobacter pylori gastritis--a novel distinct disease entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Mori, Hideki

    2015-10-01

    A global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been developed. Topics discussed include whether dyspepsia caused by H. pylori infection is separate from functional dyspepsia or not, the evaluation method for H. pylori-induced gastritis, eradication therapy for H. pylori gastritis to prevent gastric carcinogenesis and management after H. pylori eradication.

  3. Association of mast cells with helicobacter pylori infection in the antral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR KC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate consisting of neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Helicobacter pylori lead to mast cell degranulation and release of active chemical compounds in in-vitro conditions. The objective of this study was to find out the association of mast cell density and Helicobacter pylori in the antral mucosa of the stomach. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 endoscopic biopsies were included in the study. In addition to routine Hematoxylin and Eosin stained slides, Giemsa stain was done in each case for the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori and mast cell density in the gastric mucosa. Results: Out of 150 gastric biopsies with histopathological diagnosis of chronic gastritis, 36 cases (24% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. In the antral mucosa, mast cell density was significantly higher in the Helicobacter pylori-positive group than in the Helicobacter pylori-negative group (P<0.01. Conclusion: Mast cells may play a role in the development of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Keywords: Gastritis; Mast Cell; Helicobacter pylori DOI: 10.3126/jpn.v1i1.4448 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2011 Vol.1, 34-36

  4. Human lactoferrin increases Helicobacter pylori internalisation into AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coray, Dorien S; Heinemann, Jack A; Tyrer, Peter C; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori has high global infection rates and can cause other undesirable clinical manifestations such as duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric cancer (GC). Frequencies of re-infection after therapeutic clearance and rates of DU versus GC vary geographically and differ markedly between developed and developing countries, which suggests additional factors may be involved. The possibility that, in vivo, lactoferrin (Lf) may play a subtle role in modulating micronutrient availability or bacterial internalisation with implications for disease etiology is considered. Lf is an iron binding protein produced in mammals that has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. Some bacteria that regularly colonise mammalian hosts have adapted to living in high Lf environments and we investigated if this included the gastric pathogen H. pylori. We found that H. pylori was able to use iron from fully iron-saturated human Lf (hLf) whereas partially iron-saturated hLf (apo) did not increase H. pylori growth. Instead, apo-hLf increased adherence to and internalisation of bacteria into cultured epithelial cells. By increasing internalisation, we speculate that apo-human lactoferrin may contribute to H. pylori's ability to persistence in the human stomach, an observation that potentially has implications for the risk of H. pylori-associated disease.

  5. [Prevalence of seropositividad to antibodies IgG and IgM against Helicobacter pylori in the medical residents of the University Hospital of Puebla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza Yado, María de los Angeles; López García, Aída Inés; Paz Martínez, David; Galindo García, José Arturo; Cuevas Acuña, María Tula; Papaqui Tapia, Sergio; Arana Muñoz, Oswaldo; Pérez Fernández, María Susana

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, curved, microaerophilic, oxidase, catalase and urease positive bacillus. It lives in the gastric mucosa, and is the main etiological agent of peptic ulcer, and of atrophic and multifocal gastritis. It is associated with extraintestinal, vascular, autoimmune and cutaneous diseases. The infection by this bacteria causes a chronic inflammatory process related with the sensibilization of mast cells, which increases the incidence of allergic diseases. To estimate the seropositivity prevalence of IgG and IgM antibodies against Helicobacter pylori in medical resident personnel. A transversal, descriptive and observational study was carried out in medical residents of the Hospital Universitario de Puebla. Serum levels of IgG and IgM antibodies against Helicobacter pylori were determined by chemiluminescence. Data were analyzed applying descriptive statistics, such as: frequency, central tendency and dispersion measures. 57 residents were included, 54.4% were men. The mean age was 28.4 (SD 2.9). Seropositivity prevalence of IgG and IgM antibodies was 24.6 and 33.3%, respectively. Combined seropositivity prevalence of IgG and IgM was of 43.9%. Seropositivity prevalence of IgG and IgM antibodies against Helicobacter pylori in the medical resident personnel of the Hospital Universitario de Puebla was similar to the reported in the general population. This estimation might be considered a reference to other epidemiological and clinical studies such as those pretending to evaluate and demonstrate the relationship between infection by Helicobacter pylori and other entities, even allergies.

  6. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: polymerase chain reaction for Helicobacter DNA is a valuable tool to elucidate the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, S; Zsikla, V; Frank, A; Willi, N; Cathomas, G

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis has been increasingly reported. Molecular techniques as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may detect bacterial DNA in histologically negative gastritis. To evaluate of Helicobacter PCR in gastric biopsies for the daily diagnostics of Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Over a 5-year period, routine biopsies with chronic gastritis reminiscent of Helicobacter infection, but negative by histology, were tested by using a H. pylori specific PCR. Subsequently, PCR-negative samples were re-evaluated using PCR for other Helicobacter species. Of the 9184 gastric biopsies, 339 (3.7%) with histological-negative gastritis and adequate material were forwarded to PCR analysis for H. pylori and 146 (43.1%) revealed a positive result. In 193 H. pylori DNA-negative biopsies, re-analysis using PCR primers for other Helicobacter species, revealed further 23 (11.9%) positive biopsies, including 4 (2.1%) biopsies with H. heilmannii sensu lato. PCR-positive biopsies showed a higher overall inflammatory score, more lymphoid follicles/aggregates and neutrophils (P gastritis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  8. Determinación de Helicobacter spp., en úlceras gástricas en caballos

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona, José; Paredes, Enrique; Fernández, Heriberto

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo. Determinar la presencia de Helicobacter spp., en úlceras gástricas en caballos. Materiales y métodos. Se utilizaron 40 caballos, 28 machos y 12 hembras, (4-17, años). Se analizó en forma descriptiva la frecuencia de presentación de bacterias tipo Helicobacter spp., mediante las pruebas de ureasa (TU), tinción de Gram directo (GD) y tinción de Whartin Starry (WS), las bacterias se identificaron por su morfología y por su actividad sobre urea. Se consideraron las variables del total ...

  9. Extragastric Diseases and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Francesco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Polyzos, Stergios A; Kountouras, Jannis

    2015-09-01

    The extragastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection still remain a very strong topic throughout the H. pylori world. Indeed, H. pylori may interfere with many biological processes, both inside and outside of the stomach, possibly influencing or determining the occurrence of many diseases outside of the stomach. While its role in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and sideropenic anemia has already been recognized, emerging evidence suggests that H. pylori may increase the risk of acute coronary syndrome, contribute to insulin resistance and be associated with neurodegenerative, respiratory, and other miscellaneous disorders previously associated with other conditions. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been hypothesized, including the induction of a low-grade inflammatory state and the occurrence of molecular mimicry mechanisms. This review summarizes the results of the most relevant studies published on this topic in the last year. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. HELICOBACTER PYLORI PREVALENCE IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: results from a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan LASA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Some previously published studies have suggested an inverse relationship between celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori, raising the possibility of the protective role Helicobacter pylori could have against celiac disease development. Nevertheless, this association is inconclusive. Objectives To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in celiac subjects. Methods Between January 2013 and June 2014, patients over 18 years old undergoing upper endoscopy who required both gastric and duodenal biopsies were included for analysis. Enrolled subjects were divided in two groups: those with a diagnosis of celiac disease and those without a celiac disease diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence was compared between groups. Among celiac patients, endoscopic markers of villous atrophy as well as histological damage severity were compared between those with and without Helicobacter pylori infection. Results Overall, 312 patients were enrolled. Seventy two of them had a diagnosis of celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence among celiac disease patients was 12.5%, compared to 30% in non-celiac patients [OR=0.33 (0.15-0.71]. There was not a significant difference in terms of the severity of villous atrophy in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection compared to those without it. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of endoscopic markers in those Helicobacter pylori-negative celiac subjects. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori infection seems to be less frequent in celiac patients; among those celiac subjects with concomitant Helicobacter pylori infection, histological damage degree and presence of endoscopic markers suggesting villous atrophy seem to be similar to those without Helicobacter pylori infection.

  11. Helicobacter pylori y dispepsia, un problema de salud comunitario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual

    2002-06-01

    manufacturing transnationals which make huge earnings from trading of proton pump blockers and antibiotics that are included in any Helicobacter pylori infection eradication therapy. The relief of dispeptic symptoms as a result of the eradication treatment has not been demonstrated yet. The application of Helicobacter eradication therapy to patients with non-ulcer dispepsia remains to be a dilemma, and thus, it should not be systematically indicated.

  12. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  13. [Helicobacter infections of man and of domestic carnivores: comparative data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoindre, P; Chevalier, M; Peyrol, S; Boude, M; Labigne, A; Lamouliatte, H; Pilet, C

    1997-03-18

    The role of Helicobacter pylori in generating of the chronic gastritis and in the maintaining of the gastroduodenal ulcerous disease, has been a major medical discovery of these past years in human gastroenterology. More recently in Man, studies have showed that the gastric tumours (adenocarcinoma, lymphoma) are epidemiologically associated with the H. pylori infection. Although the H. pylori infection is the one of the most frequent in the word, the epidemiologic and ecologic aspects of this infections are still not very well known. Thanks to phylogenic studies using the new molecular biology techniques and to fundamental experimental studies, we know more about helicobacteria in domestic carnivores as well as their morphologic characteristic, their taxonomia and more importantly details concerning their ecological niche. Few clinical studies have been made to this day, but the ones that have been undertaken are interesting in confirming the extensive prevalence of Helicobacter infections in domestic carnivores and in underlining their role in the genesis of the inflammatory gastropathies observed in these species. Recent observations have demonstrated the ubiquitous character of these helicobacteria by showing their presence in the stomach of man, dogs and cats. This ubiquitous character has led some scientists to consider the potential zoonotic risk of the human infection by Helicobacter heilmannii, felis or pylori. Finally, the Helicobacter infection of animals seems to be an interesting model not only in the study of the affections caused by these bacteria, but also in the elaboration of a future vaccine against the H. pylori infection in man.

  14. DETECTION OF ENTEROHEPATIC AND GASTRIC HELICOBACTER SPP. IN WILD CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES) AND WESTERN LOWLAND GORILLAS (GORILLA GORILLA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flahou, B.; Modrý, David; Pomajbíková, K.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Smet, J.; Ducatelle, R.; Pasmans, F.; Sa, R.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 16, S1 (2011), s. 141 ISSN 1083-4389. [24th International Workshop on Helicobacter and Related Bacteria in Chronic Digestive Inflammation and Gastric Cancer. 11.09.2011-13.09.2011, Dublin] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : wild primates * gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters * Africa Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine

  15. Helicobacter pylori colonization in infants and its relation to childhood morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizami, S.Q.; Bhutta, Z.A.; Weaver, L.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is universally reported from all over the world including both developed and developing countries. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Pakistan is unknown. Although a few studies have been done in adults, there are no studies looking at the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization especially in children. In addition, a number of symptoms such as nonspecific abdominal pain, diarrhea and malnutrition etc. are attributed to it though most cases of Helicobacter pylori colonization remain asymptomatic. The association between Helicobacter pylori and gastrointestinal symptoms however, remains controversial. Hence in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, its time of acquisition and to look at its correlation with diarrhea-associated morbidity, we proposed to do the present study. In this study we will look for the evidence of Helicobacter colonization in infants with the non-invasive techniques using 13 C urea breath test and stool ELISA for Helicobacter pylori every at three month interval in a cohort of infants from a periurban community in Karachi Pakistan. (author)

  16. Dual role of Helicobacter and Campylobacter species in IBD: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Lee, Way Seah; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a comprehensive global systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and IBD. As bacterial antigen cross-reactivity has been postulated to be involved in this association, published data on enterohepatic Helicobacter spp (EHS) and Campylobacter spp and IBD was also analysed. Electronic databases were searched up to July 2015 for all case-control studies on H. pylori infection/EHS/Campylobacter spp and IBD. Pooled ORs (P-OR) and 95% CIs were obtained using the random effects model. Heterogeneity, sensitivity and stratified analyses were performed. Analyses comprising patients with Crohn's disease (CD), UC and IBD unclassified (IBDU), showed a consistent negative association between gastric H. pylori infection and IBD (P-OR: 0.43, p value Campylobacter spp, in particular C. concisus (P-OR: 3.76, p value=0.006) and C. showae (P-OR: 2.39, p value=0.027), increase IBD risk. H. pylori infection is negatively associated with IBD regardless of ethnicity, age, H. pylori detection methods and previous use of aminosalicylates and corticosteroids. Antibiotics influenced the magnitude of this association. Closely related bacteria including EHS and Campylobacter spp increase the risk of IBD. These results infer that H. pylori might exert an immunomodulatory effect in IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of some Vietnamese medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Dung, Pham Phuong; Nhi, Nguyen Vang Thi Yen; Hoang, Nguyen van Minh; Hieu, Tran Trung

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infectious bacteria. The infection is highly associated with a number of the most important disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including gastritis, duodenitis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer. In addition, widespread use of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance. Metabolites of plants, particularly higher plants, have been suggested as alternative potential sources for antibacterial products due to their safe. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial activities of crude ethanolic extracts of seventeen Vietnamese medicinal plants toward one reference strain and three clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori using broth micro-dilution bioassay. The antibacterial activities of these extracts were also compared with those of seven antibiotics, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole. The extracts of Ampelopsis cantoniensis and Cleistocalyx operculatus showed highest antibacterial activity with MIC (MBC) values of 0.31 - 0.97 (2.5 - 5) mg/mL, followed by the extracts of Hedyotis diffusa and Ardisia silvestris with MIC (MBC) values of 1.04 - 1.94 (7.5 - 10) mg/mL. The remaining plant extracts exhibited moderate, low and very low or no active to the H. pylori strains. Further studies are needed to determine the active compounds from the extracts that showed high antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  18. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori levels in soil samples from public playgrounds in Spain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Leonardo Martín; Codony, Francesc; López Leyton, Daniela; Fittipaldi, Mariana; Adrados, Bárbara; Morató, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are ubiquitous Gram-negative bacteria with a high estimated level of infection in the world populations, but a majority of the infected persons are asymptomatic. This pathogen has been classified by the World Health Organization as a class I carcinogen and recognized as the causal agent of most peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis that might lead to stomach cancer. Although not all the transmission pathways of these bacteria into humans have been properly identified, enough data have suggested that the oral-oral or fecal-oral ones are the main infection routes. Helicobacter pylori have been detected in non-treated water and in drinking water, which suggested that water might be an important infection source. As childhood is the critical period of infection, the aim of the present work was to examine the presence of Helicobacter pylori in soil samples from public playing areas of Spanish parks. PMID:20043349

  19. A novel insight into the oxidoreductase activity of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Roszczenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The formation of a disulfide bond between two cysteine residues stabilizes protein structure. Although we now have a good understanding of the Escherichia coli disulfide formation system, the machineries at work in other bacteria, including pathogens, are poorly characterized. Thus, the objective of this work was to improve our understanding of the disulfide formation machinery of Helicobacter pylori, a leading cause of ulcers and a risk factor for stomach cancer worldwide. METHODS AND RESULTS: The protein HP0231 from H. pylori, a structural counterpart of E. coli DsbG, is the focus of this research. Its function was clarified by using a combination of biochemical, microbiological and genetic approaches. In particular, we determined the biochemical properties of HP0231 as well as its redox state in H. pylori cells. CONCLUSION: Altogether our results show that HP0231 is an oxidoreductase that catalyzes disulfide bond formation in the periplasm. We propose to call it HpDsbA.

  20. Identification of unusual Campylobacter-like isolates from poultry products as Helicobacter pullorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H.I.; Corry, J.E.L.; On, Stephen L.W.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-six unclassified Campylobacter-like strains previously isolated from 15 chicken carcasses and caecal contents, together with two more strains isolated from chicken faeces on a different occasion, were identified as Helicobacter pullorum using various phenotypic identification methods. API...... Campy identification kits and a 16-test identification scheme developed for campylobacters failed to identify these bacteria, or identified them as Campylobacter spp. Eighteen strains (including the two isolated on a different occasion) were chosen for examination using a more comprehensive......%) suggests that routine isolation and identification methods should be amended to enable a thorough evaluation of its role in human gastroenteritis and avian hepatitis. Some phenotypic characters useful in identifying poultry campylobacteria are presented which could be utilized, along with other technique...

  1. Microbiological aspects of Helicobacter pylori (Campylobacter pylori).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C S; Armstrong, J A

    1990-01-01

    The human gastric pathogen Campylobacter pylori has recently been reclassified as Helicobacter pylori, and a related spiral bacterium found in the stomach of ferrets has been designated Helicobacter mustelae. The general microbiological features of Helicobacter pylori are delineated here, with details of phenotypic differences between Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter mustelae; comparisons are made with Wolinella succinogenes and Campylobacter jejuni. The Helicobacter organisms possess an external glycocalyx which can be visualised by electron microscopy, and which may be involved in bacterial adherence. The finding of soluble and cell-associated haemagglutinins of Helicobacter pylori is reported. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in clinical specimens, susceptibility of the organism to antibacterial agents, and other aspects of practical and clinical significance are briefly reviewed.

  2. IL10 single nucleotide polymorphisms are related to upregulation of constitutive IL-10 production and susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Shirleide; Marques, Cintia Rodrigues; Silva, Thiago Magalhães; Costa, Ryan Santos; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza Maria; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Barnes, Kathleen Carole; Figueiredo, Camila Alexandrina

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, likely due to the extensive inflammation in the stomach mucosa caused by these bacteria. Many studies have reported an association between IL10 polymorphisms, the risk of gastric cancer, and IL-10 production. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between IL10 genetic variants, Helicobacter pylori infection, and IL-10 production by peripheral blood leukocytes in children. We genotyped a total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL10 in 1259 children aged 4-11 years living in a poor urban area in Salvador, Brazil, using TaqMan probe based, 5' nuclease assay minor groove binder chemistry. Association tests were performed by logistic regression for Helicobacter pylori infection and linear regression for IL-10 spontaneous production (whole-blood cultures) including sex, age, and principal components for informative ancestry markers as covariates, using PLINK. Our results shown that IL10 single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800896 (OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.11-2.39), rs3024491 (OR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.14-2.57), rs1878672 (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.19-2.68), and rs3024496 (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.05-2.08) were positively associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with spontaneous production of IL-10 in culture, of which three (rs1800896 and rs1878672, p = .04; rs3024491, p = .01) were strongly associated with infection by Helicobacter pylori. Our results indicate that IL10 variants rs1800896, rs3024491, rs1878672, and rs3024496 are more consistently associated with the presence of anti-H. pylori IgG by inducing increased production of IL-10. Further studies are underway to elucidate the role of additional genetic variants and to investigate their impact on the occurrence of gastric cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A population genetics pedigree perspective on the transmission of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delport, Wayne; Cunningham, Michael; Olivier, Brenda; Preisig, Oliver; van der Merwe, Schalk W.

    2006-01-01

    The inference of transmission pathways for medicinally important bacteria is important to our understanding of pathogens. Here we report analyses of transmission in Helicobacter pylori, a major carcinogen. Our study is novel in that the focal community comprises detailed family pedigrees and has a

  4. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered from some Iranian food items. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Conclusion: The presence of similar genotypes in H. pylori strains of foods and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated foods may be the source of bacteria ...

  5. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shymaa Enany

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ, clarithromycin (CLR, tetracycline (TET, and amoxicillin (AMX by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach.

  6. The Immune Battle Against Helicobacter pylori Infection: NO Offense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Alain P.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a successful pathogen of the human stomach. Despite a vigorous immune response by the gastric mucosa, the bacterium survives in its ecological niche, thus favoring diseases ranging from chronic gastritis to adenocarcinoma. The current literature demonstrates that high-output of nitric oxide (NO) production by the inducible enzyme NO synthase-2 (NOS2) plays major functions in host defense against bacterial infections. However, pathogens have elaborated several strategies to counteract the deleterious effects of NO; this includes inhibition of host NO synthesis and transcriptional regulation in response to reactive nitrogen species allowing the bacteria to face the nitrosative stress. Moreover, NO is also a critical mediator of inflammation and carcinogenesis. In this context, we review the recent findings on the expression of NOS2 in H. pylori-infected gastric tissues and epithelial cells, the role of NO in H. pylori-related diseases and H. pylori gene expression, and the mechanisms whereby H. pylori regulates NO synthesis by host cells. PMID:26916789

  7. An Overview of Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foegeding, Nora J.; Caston, Rhonda R.; McClain, Mark S.; Ohi, Melanie D.; Cover, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The VacA toxin secreted by Helicobacter pylori enhances the ability of the bacteria to colonize the stomach and contributes to the pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma and peptic ulcer disease. The amino acid sequence and structure of VacA are unrelated to corresponding features of other known bacterial toxins. VacA is classified as a pore-forming toxin, and many of its effects on host cells are attributed to formation of channels in intracellular sites. The most extensively studied VacA activity is its capacity to stimulate vacuole formation, but the toxin has many additional effects on host cells. Multiple cell types are susceptible to VacA, including gastric epithelial cells, parietal cells, T cells, and other types of immune cells. This review focuses on the wide range of VacA actions that are detectable in vitro, as well as actions of VacA in vivo that are relevant for H. pylori colonization of the stomach and development of gastric disease. PMID:27271669

  8. Enrichment of Probiotic Yogurt with Broccoli Sprout Extract and its Effect on Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Sadeghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Antibiotic consumption is the main way to cure infection induced by Helicobacter pylori. On the other hand, antibiotics have side effects on human body. So, finding an efficient way to replace antibiotic consumption seems necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of broccoli sprout extract on the viability of probiotic bacteria and yogurt’s physicochemical properties, and examine the synergistic effect of this extract with probiotics on Helicobacter pylori growth inhibition.Material and Methods: Four levels of broccoli sprout extract (22.5, 45, 90 and 180 mg ml-1 were prepared and their effect on probiotic yogurt samples was examined. Moreover, their anti- Helicobacter pylori effect was determined.Results and Conclusion: The research results revealed that Broccoli sprout extract did not have any inhibitory effect on Bifidobacterium lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The variations in acidity of the samples were not significant during storage. A positive correlation was observed between broccoli sprout extract concentration and syneresis. The findings showed the synergistic effect of broccoli sprout extract and probiotics on Helicobacter pylori growth inhibition. Therefore, using broccoli sprout extract and probiotic bacteria, we can produce a yogurt that is effective on the growth inhibition of Helicobacter pylori.Conflict of interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

  9. Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Yalda; Dieye, Yakhya; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

  10. Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

  11. Are probiotics useful in Helicobacter pylori eradication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Matjaž; Orel, Rok

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered an etiologic factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Therapeutic schemes to eradicate the bacteria are based on double antibiotic therapy and proton pump inhibitor. Despite many therapeutic improvements in H. pylori eradication treatment, it is still associated with high infection rate also in developed countries. Bacterial resistance and adverse events occurrence are among most frequent causes for anti- H. pylori treatment failure. Several studies have reported that certain probiotic strains can exhibit inhibitory activity against H. pylori bacteria. In addition, some probiotic strains can reduce the occurrence of side effects due to antibiotic therapy and consequently increase the H. pylori eradication rate. The results of the prospective double-blind placebo-controlled studies suggest that specific probiotics, such as S. boulardii and L. johnsonni La1 probably can diminish the bacterial load, but not completely eradicate the H. pylori bacteria. Furthermore, it seems that supplementation with S. boulardii is a useful concomitant therapy in the standard H. pylori eradication treatment protocol and most probably increases eradication rate. L. reuteri is equally effective, but more positive studies are needed. Finally, probiotic strains, such as S. boulardii, L. reuteri and L. GG, decrease gastrointestinal antibiotic associated adverse effects. PMID:26457024

  12. Development of novel pH-sensitive thiolated chitosan/PMLA nanoparticles for amoxicillin delivery to treat Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad; Dong, Quan-Jiang; Raja, Mazhar Ali; Zeenat, Shah; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2018-02-01

    The cysteine conjugated chitosan/PMLA multifunctional nanoparticles were synthesized as targeted Nano-drug delivery system to eradicate Helicobacter pylori. Helicobacter pylori specifically express urea transport protein on its membrane to carrying urea to the cytoplasm urease to supply ammonia that protects bacteria in the acid environment of the stomach. The clinical suitability of topical antimicrobial agents is required to get rid of Helicobacter pylori inside the inflamed basal region. In this work, cysteine conjugated chitosan derivative, Cys-CS for their mucoadhesive and anticoagulant properties was designed and synthesized, for the preparation of multifunctional nanoparticles. The technique turned into optimized to prepare Cys-CS/PMLA nanoparticles for encapsulation of amoxicillin. The results showed that amoxicillin-Cys-CS/PMLA nanoparticles exhibit favorable pH-sensitive properties that could procrastinate the release of amoxicillin at gastric acid and allow the drug to deliver and target to Helicobacter pylori at its survival region efficiently. In comparison with unmodified amoxicillin-chitosan/PMLA nanoparticles, effective inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth was observed for amoxicillin-Cys-CS/PMLA nanoparticles. These results indicate that the multifunctional amoxicillin-loaded nanoparticles have great potential for the effective treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection. They can also be used as pharmacologically powerful nanocarriers for oral targeted delivery of different therapeutic drugs to treat Helicobacter pylori. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters detected in the stomach of humans comprise several naturally occurring Helicobacter species in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, Margo; Pasmans, Frank; Flahou, Bram; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2009-04-01

    Besides the well-known gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, other Helicobacter species with a spiral morphology have been detected in a minority of human patients who have undergone gastroscopy. The very fastidious nature of these non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH) makes their in vitro isolation difficult. These organisms have been designated 'Helicobacter heilmannii'. However, sequencing of several genes detected in NHPH-infected tissues has shown that the 'H. heilmannii' group comprises at least five different Helicobacter species, all of them known to colonize the stomach of animals. Recent investigations have indicated that Helicobacter suis is the most prevalent NHPH species in human. This species has only recently been isolated in vitro from porcine stomach mucosa. Other NHPH that colonize the human stomach are Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, Helicobacter salomonis and 'Candidatus Helicobacter heilmannii'. In numerous case reports of human gastric NHPH infections, no substantial information is available about the species status of the infecting strain, making it difficult to link the species with certain pathologies. This review aims to clarify the complex nomenclature of NHPH species associated with human gastric disease and their possible animal origin. It is proposed to use the term 'gastric NHPH' to designate gastric spirals that are morphologically different from H. pylori when no identification is available at the species level. Species designations should be reserved for those situations in which the species is defined.

  14. Review: Impact of Helicobacter pylori on Alzheimer's disease: What do we know so far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulberis, Michael; Kotronis, Georgios; Thomann, Robert; Polyzos, Stergios A; Boziki, Marina; Gialamprinou, Dimitra; Deretzi, Georgia; Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Kountouras, Jannis

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori has changed radically gastroenterologic world, offering a new concept in patients' management. Over time, more medical data gave rise to diverse distant, extragastric manifestations and interactions of the "new" discovered bacterium. Special interest appeared within the field of neurodegenerative diseases and particularly Alzheimer's disease, as the latter and Helicobacter pylori infection are associated with a large public health burden and Alzheimer's disease ranks as the leading cause of disability. However, the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and Alzheimer's disease remains uncertain. We performed a narrative review regarding a possible connection between Helicobacter pylori and Alzheimer's disease. All accessible relevant (pre)clinical studies written in English were included. Both affected pathologies were briefly analyzed, and relevant studies are discussed, trying to focus on the possible pathogenetic role of this bacterium in Alzheimer's disease. Data stemming from both epidemiologic studies and animal experiments seem to be rather encouraging, tending to confirm the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori infection might influence the course of Alzheimer's disease pleiotropically. Possible main mechanisms may include the bacterium's access to the brain via the oral-nasal-olfactory pathway or by circulating monocytes (infected with Helicobacter pylori due to defective autophagy) through disrupted blood-brain barrier, thereby possibly triggering neurodegeneration. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori infection might influence the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. However, further large-scale randomized controlled trials are mandatory to clarify a possible favorable effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology, before the recommendation of short-term and cost-effective therapeutic regimens against Helicobacter pylori-related Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  15. The efficacy of sequential therapy in eradication of Helicobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication rates of standard triple, sequential and quadruple therapies including claritromycin regimes in this study. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 patients with dyspeptic symptoms were enrolled to the study. The patients were randomized to four groups of treatment protocols.

  16. Seroprevalance of Helicobacter pylori amongst anti retroviral naive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives: HIV Infection at any stage alters patients' immunity. The pattern of several diseases including incidence and prevalence has changed due to the HIV pandemic. Infections, infestations and malignancies present more frequently and often in an unusual pattern. Helicobacter pylori is the main cause ...

  17. Helicobacter pylori and gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffeld, R J; Willems, I; Flendrig, J A; Arends, J W

    1990-12-01

    A retrospective study was performed on gastric carcinomas to establish the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric epithelium adjacent to the tumour. A total of 105 carcinomas were studied. The overall prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 59%. The prevalence in different age cohorts from patients with gastric carcinoma was compared with that in patients suffering from non-ulcer dyspepsia and, based on serological testing, with that in healthy blood donors. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in cancer patients aged 41-50 and 51-60 was significantly higher than in blood donors. No difference was seen in comparison with non-ulcer dyspepsia patients. The presence of Helicobacter pylori showed an inverse correlation with the extent of intestinal metaplasia. The intestinal type of carcinoma was associated with a higher bacterial load than the diffuse type. These data suggest that the presence of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa could play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma, especially in the young age group.

  18. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  19. 3rd Brazilian consensus on Helicobacter pylori 3º Consenso Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.Os avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Segundo Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 2004, em São Paulo, justificam este terceiro consenso. O evento foi organizado pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, departamento da Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia, tendo sido realizado em Bento Gonçalves, RS, nos dias 12 a 15 de abril de 2011. Contou com a participação de 30 delegados provenientes das cinco regiões brasileiras e um convidado internacional, incluindo gastroenterologistas

  20. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  1. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Helicobacter hepaticus hefA gene is involved in resistance to amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Clara; Stoof, Jeroen; Breijer, Simone; Kusters, Johannes G; Kuipers, Ernst J; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal infections with pathogenic Helicobacter species are commonly treated with combination therapies, which often include amoxicillin. Although this treatment is effective for eradication of Helicobacter pylori, the few existing reports are less clear about antibiotic susceptibility of other Helicobacter species. In this study we have determined the susceptibility of gastric and enterohepatic Helicobacter species to amoxicillin, and have investigated the mechanism of amoxicillin resistance in Helicobacter hepaticus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial compounds was determined by E-test and agar/broth dilution assays. The hefA gene of H. hepaticus was inactivated by insertion of a chloramphenicol resistance gene. Transcription was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Three gastric Helicobacter species (H. pylori, H. mustelae, and H. acinonychis) were susceptible to amoxicillin (MIC resistant to amoxicillin (MIC of 8, 16, and 6-64 mg/L, respectively). There was no detectable beta-lactamase activity in H. hepaticus, and inhibition of beta-lactamases did not change the MIC of amoxicillin of H. hepaticus. A H. hepaticus hefA (hh0224) mutant, encoding a TolC-component of a putative efflux system, resulted in loss of amoxicillin resistance (MIC 0.25 mg/L), and also resulted in increased sensitivity to bile acids. Finally, transcription of the hefA gene was not responsive to amoxicillin, but induced by bile acids. Rodents are frequently colonized by a variety of enterohepatic Helicobacter species, and this may affect their global health status and intestinal inflammatory responses. Animal facilities should have treatment strategies for Helicobacter infections, and hence resistance of enterohepatic Helicobacter species to amoxicillin should be considered when designing eradication programs.

  3. Influence of activated charcoal, porcine gastric mucin and beta-cyclodextrin on the morphology and growth of intestinal and gastric Helicobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneera, Jalal; Moran, Anthony P; Hynes, Sean O; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Al-Soud, Waleed abu; Wadström, Torkel

    2002-03-01

    Bile-tolerant Helicobacter spp. are emerging human and animal pathogens. However, due to their fastidious nature, which requires nutrient-rich complex media to grow, infection with these bacteria may be underestimated. The accumulation of toxic metabolites in cultures may be one of the main obstacles for successful culture of these organisms. The present study examined various potential growth-enhancing substances for Helicobacter spp. and, furthermore, how they may affect spiral to coccoid conversion. Five Helicobacter spp. were cultured on agar and in broth media supplemented with activated charcoal, beta-cyclodextrin, or porcine gastric mucin. Growth was determined by estimating the numbers of colony-forming units and colony diameter, as well as bacterial cell mass. Coccoid transformation was estimated every 24 h by both Gram and acridine-orange staining. Activated charcoal was superior in supporting growth and increased cell mass on agar and in broth media. beta-Cyclodextrin delayed spiral to coccoid conversion by Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter canis, whereas activated charcoal delayed the conversion to coccoid forms of Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter bilis. The progression to coccoid forms by Helicobacter pullorum on agar media was not influenced by any growth supplement. The spiral to coccoid conversion was more rapid in broth media than on agar media. The growth enhancement observed is probably related to the capacity of activated charcoal to remove toxic compounds in culture media.

  4. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velin, Dominique; Straubinger, Kathrin; Gerhard, Markus

    2016-09-01

    The tight control of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the stomach mucosa during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is of prime importance for the bacteria to persist and for the host to prevent inflammation-driven diseases. This review summarizes recent data on the roles of innate and adaptive immune responses during H. pylori/host interactions. In addition, the latest preclinical developments of H. pylori vaccines are discussed with a special focus on the clinical trial reported by Zeng et al., who provided evidence that oral vaccination significantly reduces the acquisition of natural H. pylori infection in children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. DVC-FISH and PMA-qPCR techniques to assess the survival of Helicobacter pylori inside Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Mesonero, Laura; Moreno, Yolanda; Alonso, José Luis; Ferrús, M Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous microorganisms commonly found in water. They can act as Trojan Horses for some amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB). Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria, suggested to be transmitted through water, which could belong to the ARB group. In this work, a co-culture assay of H. pylori and Acanthamoeba castellanii, one of the most common FLA, was carried out to identify the presence and survival of viable and potentially infective forms of the bacteria internalized by the amoeba. Molecular techniques including FISH, DVC-FISH, qPCR and PMA-qPCR were used to detect the presence of internalized and viable H. pylori. After 24 h in co-culture and disinfection treatment to kill extra-amoebic bacteria, viable H. pylori cells were observed inside A. castellanii. When PMA-qPCR was applied to the co-culture samples, only DNA from internalized H. pylori cells was detected, whereas qPCR amplified total DNA from the sample. By the combined DVC-FISH method, the viability of H. pylori cells in A. castellanii was observed. Both specific techniques provided evidence, for the first time, that the pathogen is able to survive chlorination treatment in occurrence with A. castellanii and could be very useful methods for performing further studies in environmental samples. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. POTENTIAL IN VITRO ANTI-HELICOBACTER ACTIVITY OF BACTERIOCIN AND BACTERIOCIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS PRODUCED BY LACTOBACILLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Ramadan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed for screening of the potential activity of lactic acid bacteria against Helicobacter pylori and other enteropathogenic organisms. A total of 40 samples including natural cow milk and fresh infant stools were tested for the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Of these samples, 73 lactic acid bacterial isolates were recovered on MRS agar medium using the streak-plate method. Isolates inducing probiotic effect were tested under microaerophilic conditions against standard cultures of H. pylori, Esherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. The data obtained showed that five isolates of lactic acid bacteria were able to produce bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like compounds. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that five isolates belonged to Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus plantarum in addition to other lactic acid bacteria. The most effective isolate (LAB1 showed a marked large inhibition zone against H. pylori. The bacteriocin or bacteriocin like compound(s produced by lactobacilli were further analyzed and characterized. We can conclude that probiotics might be useful in the prophylaxis or as co-therapy for treatment of H. pylori infections.

  7. Helicobacter pylori y enfermedad péptica ulcerosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Padrón Pérez

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión dirigida a los médicos de la familia sobre la relación del Helicobacter pylori y la enfermedad péptica ulcerosa. Se incluyen datos epidemiológicos y métodos diagnósticos de la infección. El papel de Helicobacter pylori en la génesis de las recidivas ulcerosas y la significativa disminución de las recurrencias posterior a la erradicación con la terapia antimicrobiana, son aspectos abordados en el presente trabajo. La inmunización como arma de prevención y tratamiento sería un importante logro que se menciona como una futura alternativa para combatir la úlcera asociada a la infecciónA review on the connection of Helicobacter pylori with peptic ulcer disease was made for the family physicians. Epidemiological data and diagnostic methods were included. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the genesis of ulcer relapses and the significant reduction of recurrences after the erradication with antimicrobial therapy are approached in the present paper. Immunization as an instrument of prevention and treatment would be an important achievement that is mentioned as a future alternative to fight ulcer associated with the infection

  8. Are Helicobacter pylori and other Helicobacter species infection associated with human biliary lithiasis? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Wei; Mohamed, Sayid Omar; Ogbomo, Henry; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Yingbin; Quan, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence intervals for odds ratio was calculated. Quantitative assessment of heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test with significance set at P value 0.10 and was measured using I(2) statistic. Eighteen studies published between 1998 and 2011 were finally eligible for meta-analysis. H. pylori, H. bilis, H. hepaticus, H. pullorum and H. ganmani were studied. With heterogeneity (I(2) = 69.5%, Plithiasis group. Higher prevalence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients were reported by studies from East Asia, South Asia and South America. Evidences supporting the higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients could be found by PCR for detecting 16s rRNA in bile, 26 kDa protein gene in biliary tissue and immunohistochemistry. Using multiple detection tests could increase the detection rate of H. pylori. Our meta-analysis suggests a trend of higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients than control group and this trend was significant in the regions with higher prevalence of this agent. Evidences supporting the association between Helicobacter and cholelithiasis could be found by using different tests but the gold standard for the identification of these bacteria in biliary system has yet to be established. Considering obvious heterogeneity, a large multi-center study will facilitate us to further clarify the association between the Helicobacter infection and cholelithiasis.

  9. A novel synthetic peptide from a tomato defensin exhibits antibacterial activities against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigano, M M; Romanelli, A; Fulgione, A; Nocerino, N; D'Agostino, N; Avitabile, C; Frusciante, L; Barone, A; Capuano, F; Capparelli, R

    2012-12-01

    Defensins are a class of cysteine-rich proteins, which exert broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. In this work, we used a bioinformatic approach to identify putative defensins in the tomato genome. Fifteen proteins had a mature peptide that includes the well-conserved tetradisulfide array. We selected a representative member of the tomato defensin family; we chemically synthesized its γ-motif and tested its antimicrobial activity. Here, we demonstrate that the synthetic peptide exhibits potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus A170, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Listeria monocytogenes, and Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi, Escherichia coli, and Helicobacter pylori. In addition, the synthetic peptide shows minimal (<5%) hemolytic activity and absence of cytotoxic effects against THP-1 cells. Finally, SolyC exerts an anti-inflammatory activity in vitro, as it downregulates the level of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  11. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000

  12. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  13. Ultrastructural patterns of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Caselli, M; Aleotti, A; Boldrini, P; Ruina, M; Alvisi, V

    1993-01-01

    Ultrastructural morphology of the bacterial bodies was studied in 40 Helicobacter pylori positive cases. Two bacterial patterns were identified, which were associated with different modes of contact with the epithelial cells and possibly with different stages of the natural history of the infection.

  14. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  15. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with duodenal ulcer were followed up longitudinally for 2 years after initial ulcer healing. Endoscopy including biopsy of the antral mucosa was performed every 3rd month and whenever clinical symptoms of relapse occurred. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in the biopsy...... specimens was scored as 0 (none), 1 (sporadic occurrence), 2 (clusters), and 3 (numerous bacteria found diffusely in the mucus layer). The incidence rates of ulcer relapse per patient-month, grouped in accordance with these scores, were (with 95% confidence intervals) 0.073 (0.048-0.111), 0.083 (0.......052-0.133), 0.123 (0.096-0.157), and 0.069 (0.041-0.116), respectively. No significant differences in incidence rates across H. pylori scores were observed when taking into account the observation period after healing of the first ulcer, number of ulcer recurrence (1st, 2nd, 3rd), sex, age, smoking habits, peak...

  17. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  18. Helicobacter pylori susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy differ in the maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar, Andreja N; Skvarc, Miha; Tepes, Bojan; Kos, Janko; Ihan, Alojz

    2013-12-01

    The natural course of Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as the success of antibiotic eradication is determined by the immune response to bacteria. The aim of the study is to investigate how different Helicobacter pylori isolates influence the dendritic cells maturation and antigen-presenting function in order to elucidate the differences between Helicobacter pylori strains, isolated from the patients with successful antibiotic eradication therapy or repeated eradication failure. Dendritic cells maturation and antigen presentation were monitored by flow cytometry analysis of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory molecules expression, and by determining cytokine secretion. Dendritic cells stimulated with Helicobacter pylori isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure expressed less human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), CD86, TLR-2, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy; the latter expressed lower production of IL-10. Polymyxin B inhibition of lipopolysaccharide reduces IL-8 secretion in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy. The differences in IL-8 secretion between both groups are lipopolysaccharide dependent, while the differences in secretion of IL-10 remain unchanged after lipopolysaccharide inhibition. Inhibitor of cathepsin X Mab 2F12 reduced the secretion of IL-6, and the secretion was significantly lower in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure. Helicobacter pylori strains, susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy, differ in their capability to induce DCs maturation and antigen-presenting function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... black stools, or bloody vomit or vomit that looks like coffee grounds. H. pylori testing may also be ordered when a person has completed a regimen of prescribed antibiotics to confirm that the H. pylori bacteria have been eliminated. A follow-up test is ...

  20. Effect of frequent consumption of a Lactobacillus casei-containing milk drink in Helicobacter pylori-colonized subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, A.; Kuipers, E. J.; Bosschaert, M. A. R.; Pot, R. G. J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.; Kusters, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported inhibitory effects of lactic acid bacteria on bacterial pathogens. AIM: To test whether a drink containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth. METHODS: The in vitro growth inhibition of H. pylori was studied when L. casei

  1. Effect of frequent consumption of a Lactobacillus casei-containing milk drink in Helicobacter pylori-colonized subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, A.; Kuipers, E.J.; Bosschaert, MA; Pot, RG; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.; Kusters, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported inhibitory effects of lactic acid bacteria on bacterial pathogens. AIM: To test whether a drink containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth. METHODS: The in vitro growth inhibition of H. pylori was studied when L. casei

  2. Consequences of introducing requirements for tanks prepared for solar heating in the building regulations including examinations of bacteria risks; Konsekvenser ved solvarmeforberedte beholdere i bygningsreglementet herunder undersoegelse af risici for bakteriegener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellehauge, K.; Kaersgaard, K. [Teknologisk Inst., SolEnergiCentret, Taastrup (Denmark); Bagh, L. [Teknologisk Inst., Miljoedivisionen (Denmark)

    2000-07-01

    A larger dissemination of solar heating units must be expected, if requirements for tanks prepared for solar heating are introduced in the building regulations. However, this may have effects, which have to be discussed beforehand, just as it has to be decided how the regulations can be put into practice. 1) The aim is to examine and discuss the consequences of introducing requirements for tanks prepared for solar heating in the building regulations including connections with other legislation, potential, consequences for the building services sector and proposals for rules in the building regulations (exceptions etc.) 2) Furthermore, the aim is to explain the risk of bacteria in tanks prepared for solar heating according to existing or new additional studies. It must be explained whether tanks prepared for solar heating will result in an increased number of bacteria in the water compared to traditional hot water tanks and - if possible - whether the change is caused by the increased volume of the tank (the water stays in the tank for a longer period) or changed temperature conditions which favours growth of bacteria at a certain incubation temperature. (EHS)

  3. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  4. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  5. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  6. Helicobacter pylori's unconventional role in health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion S Dorer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, that is resident in the human stomach and causes chronic disease (peptic ulcer and gastric cancer was radical on many levels. Whereas the mouth and the colon were both known to host a large number of microorganisms, collectively referred to as the microbiome, the stomach was thought to be a virtual Sahara desert for microbes because of its high acidity. We now know that H. pylori is one of many species of bacteria that live in the stomach, although H. pylori seems to dominate this community. H. pylori does not behave as a classical bacterial pathogen: disease is not solely mediated by production of toxins, although certain H. pylori genes, including those that encode exotoxins, increase the risk of disease development. Instead, disease seems to result from a complex interaction between the bacterium, the host, and the environment. Furthermore, H. pylori was the first bacterium observed to behave as a carcinogen. The innate and adaptive immune defenses of the host, combined with factors in the environment of the stomach, apparently drive a continuously high rate of genomic variation in H. pylori. Studies of this genetic diversity in strains isolated from various locations across the globe show that H. pylori has coevolved with humans throughout our history. This long association has given rise not only to disease, but also to possible protective effects, particularly with respect to diseases of the esophagus. Given this complex relationship with human health, eradication of H. pylori in nonsymptomatic individuals may not be the best course of action. The story of H. pylori teaches us to look more deeply at our resident microbiome and the complexity of its interactions, both in this complex population and within our own tissues, to gain a better understanding of health and disease.

  7. The role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheh, Alexander; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori overturned the conventional dogma that the stomach was a sterile organ and that pH values pylori are an etiological agent associated with gastritis, hypochlorhydria, duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. It is now appreciated that the human stomach supports a bacterial community with possibly 100s of bacterial species that influence stomach homeostasis. Other bacteria colonizing the stomach may also influence H. pylori-associated gastric pathogenesis by creating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and modulating inflammatory responses. In this review, we summarize the available literature concerning the gastric microbiota in humans, mice, and Mongolian gerbils. We also discuss the gastric perturbations, many involving H. pylori, that facilitate the colonization by bacteria from other compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, and identify risk factors known to affect gastric homeostasis that contribute to changes in the microbiota. PMID:23962822

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferritin...... in 1987/1988. The examination included a detailed questionnaire on medical history and lifestyle factors, a 7-day food record, and blood samples. Infection with H. pylori was measured serologically by ELISA and Westernblot. RESULTS: In total, 39.2% of 1806 persons aged 18 to 89 yr included in the study...... were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log...

  9. Helicobacter, Inflammation, and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection leads to long-lasting chronic inflammation and represents the most common risk factor underlying gastric cancer. Recently, new insights into the mechanisms through which H. pylori and mucosal inflammation lead to cancer development have emerged. H. pylori virulence factors, in particular specific CagA genotypes, represent main factors in gastric cancer, inducing altered intracellular signaling in epithelial cells. The chronic nature of H. pylori infection appears to relate to the VacA virulence factor and Th17/Treg mechanisms. A role of H. pylori infection in epigenetic and microRNA deregulation has been shown. Mutation of the epithelial cell genome, a hallmark of cancer, was demonstrated to accumulate in H. pylori infected stomach partly due to inadequate DNA repair. Gastric stem cells were shown to be targets of oxidative injury in the Helicobacter-inflammatory milieu. Recent advances emphasizing the contribution of bacterial factors, inflammatory mediators, and the host epithelial response in gastric carcinogenesis are reviewed.

  10. Seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, E; Mentis, A; Spiliadis, C; Sophianos, D; Stergiatou, I; Skandalis, N; Weir, D M

    1990-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is strongly associated with chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. As the prevalence of H. pylori infection in southern European populations is not known, a serological survey of 1069 samples from three different age groups in the Greek population was carried out with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to these bacteria. The antigen was an ultracentrifuged supernate of whole cell sonicates of 5 isolates of H. pylori assessed by electrophoresis and by immunoblotting with negative and positive sera. The sensitivity of the test was 97.43% and the specificity 100% for IgG antibodies; IgA and IgM antibodies to the antigen preparation were not found. Antibodies to H. pylori were detected among 39.4% of children aged 1-10 years, 67.1% of recruits (20-27 years) and 70% of blood donors (20-50 years). The prevalence of antibodies did not differ with sex in each of the age groups. The proportion of individuals with antibodies to H. pylori was higher in the younger age groups than those reported for similar age groups in western Europe.

  11. Intrafamilial clustering of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumm, B; Perez-Perez, G I; Blaser, M J; Sherman, P M

    1990-02-08

    Colonization of the gastric antrum by Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori) has been associated with primary gastritis. We determined the frequency of colonization by H. pylori in gastric-antrum biopsy specimens from 93 children undergoing gastroscopy for the evaluation of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. We also determined H. pylori IgG antibody levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in coded serum samples from these children, family members, and control subjects of comparable ages. Among 27 children with primary, or unexplained, gastritis, H. pylori was identified by silver staining in 24 biopsy specimens and by culture in 22; specific antibodies were present in 23 children (96 percent). Three children with unexplained gastritis had no evidence of H. pylori in the antrum, nor did any of 13 children with secondary gastritis or any of 53 children with normal antral histologic features; specific antibodies were present in only 1 of these 69 children. H. pylori antibody was detected in 25 of 34 parents of colonized children, but in only 8 of 33 parents of noncolonized children (P less than 0.001). Of 22 siblings of children colonized by H. pylori, 18 had specific antibodies, as compared with only 5 of 37 controls (P less than 0.001). We conclude that H. pylori-specific IgG antibodies are associated with bacterial colonization of the gastric antrum by this organism. The intrafamilial clustering of H. pylori infection suggests that there may be person-to-person spread of these bacteria.

  12. [Helicobacter pylori and gastro-duodenal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, L; Fiocca, R; Perego, M; De Giacomo, C; Trespi, E; Alvisi, C; Turpini, R; Solcia, E

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (HP) were found in 878 (73%) of 1205 patients undergoing upper G-I endoscopy with multiple biopsies for gastroduodenal diseases. HP were present in similar percentages among patients with active (89%) or healed (81%) peptic ulcer as well as in non ulcerous dyspeptics affected with gastritis (85%). 96% of active chronic gastritis were infected by HP as compared with 55% of quiescent gastritis. Antral gastritis was more frequently active in patients with ulcer diseases (76%) than in dyspeptic and asyntomatic patients (50%). Healed gastric and duodenal ulcers showed decreased incidence of active antral gastritis (69) as compared with active ulcers. Conversely body gastritis was more frequently active in healed (37%) than in overt (18%) duodenal ulcers. 95 histologically normal stomachs as well as 9 cases exhibiting type A gastritis were devoid of HP. High rates of infection were found in 610 cases of chronic gastritis without atrophy as well as in 151 atrophic antral (type B) gastritis. Cytoplasmic vacuolization and swelling of foveolar-superficial cells with adhering bacteria, micropapillae and microerosions were commonly found in HP-infected mucosa. In 16 of 19 children with type B chronic gastritis antibacterial therapy eradicated HP. This was followed by resolution or striking improvement of gastritis and disappearance of epithelial lesions.

  13. Specific cellular immune response in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Krejsek, J; Nozicka, Z; Bures, J

    1990-12-01

    The leukocyte migration inhibition test was performed in 39 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and in 38 patients without such infection. The culture of Helicobacter pylori was used as antigen. A highly significant inhibitory effect on leukocyte migration was found in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection. The results can be taken as proof of a systemic immune response to helicobacters at the cellular level in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  14. Vitamin B6 Is Required for Full Motility and Virulence in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Grubman, Alexandra; Phillips, Alexandra; Thibonnier, Marie; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria; Johnson, Chad; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Radcliff, Fiona J.; Ecobichon, Chantal; Labigne, Agn?s; de Reuse, Hilde; Mendz, George L.; Ferrero, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of how Helicobacter pylori causes disease, the factors that allow this pathogen to persist in the stomach have not yet been fully characterized. To identify new virulence factors in H.?pylori, we generated low-infectivity variants of a mouse-colonizing H.?pylori strain using the classical technique of in vitro attenuation. The resulting variants and their highly infectious progenitor bacteria were then analyzed by global gene expression profiling. ...

  15. The first cases of Helicobacter pylori (Campylobacter pylori) reported from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, F; Rivera, P; Sigarán, M F; Aguilar-Ortiz, M; Miranda, J; Rodríguez-Jenkins, O; Murillo, M

    1990-11-01

    Two gastric antrum biopsies of each of 92 consecutive patients undergoing gastroendoscopy were studied. The first biopsy was cultured for Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori. The second specimen was fixed and processed for histopathological analysis. The bacteria were isolated from 34 (81%) of 42 patients with nonspecific chronic gastritis, 19 (90%) of 21 cases of duodenal or gastric peptic ulcer, and from 3 (23%) of 13 normal patients. The overall frequency of isolation was 62 (67%) of the 92 cases.

  16. The immunohistochemical demonstration of Helicobacter pylori in rectal ectopia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrigan, Mark Anthony

    2009-08-01

    The finding of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is rare, with less than 40 reported cases in the literature. A condition of unknown etiology, several hypotheses exist including infectious and congenital. We report a case of ectopic gastric tissue in the rectum of a 47-year-old female, and her subsequent clinical course. Furthermore for the first time, we present immunohistologic evidence of the presence of Helicobacter pylori in rectal ectopic gastric tissue.

  17. Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, D P; Barakat, M H; Tungekar, M F; Painchaud, S M; Adlouni, M; Kern, K; Malhas, L

    1990-12-01

    Two hundred and four patients, mainly Arabs, attending for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at the gastroenterology clinic in Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Kuwait, were examined for evidence of infection with Helicobacter pylori and associated inflammation. Biopsy specimens of antrum, body, and duodenum; gastric juice; and antral mucosal brushings were investigated by microbiological, cytological, and histopathological methods. Clinical conditions diagnosed at endoscopy included gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenitis and duodenal ulcer, but half the patients had endoscopically normal gastric and duodenal mucosae. H pylori was detected by one or more of the procedures in at least one specimen from 197 (96.6%) of the patients. Histological and cytological analysis showed equal sensitivity, but bacteriological culture was less reliable. The proportion of positive cases was high, compared with other reported series, which may have been accounted for by the variety of diagnostic techniques used in this study, the selected population (all with gastrointestinal symptoms) or genetic or environmental predisposing factors peculiar to the sample population.

  18. Helicobacter pylori: Basic Mechanisms to Clinical Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its rediscovery 10 years ago, Helicobacter pylori has reshaped our thinking about the course of peptic ulcer disease. Our approach to the patient with a duodenal ulcer has become one of attempting eradication therapy at the time of first diagnosis, in the hope of curing the ulcer disease. Gastric and duodenal ulceration are only two of the manifestations of this chronic antral infection; other complications of H pylori include gastritis, gastric cancer and possible maltomas. Therapy of H pylori infection is complicated and involves dual therapy with an antibiotic plus a protein pump inhibitor, such as omeprazole 20 mg bid plus amoxicillin 1 g bid for two weeks, triple or quadruple therapy with bismuth, two antibiotics and an H2-receptor antagonist. Vaccination against H pylori is on the far horizon.

  19. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evolution of Helicobacter: Acquisition by Gastric Species of Two Histidine-Rich Proteins Essential for Colonization.

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    Daniel Vinella

    2015-12-01

    and Hpn-2 by gastric Helicobacter species constituted a decisive evolutionary event to allow Helicobacter to colonize the hostile gastric environment, in which no other bacteria persistently thrives. This acquisition was key for the emergence of one of the most successful bacterial pathogens, H. pylori.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTIPLE-LOCUS VARIABLE NUMBER OF TANDEM REPEAT ANALYSIS (MLVA FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI AND ITS APPLICATION TO HELICOBACTER PYLORI ISOLATES FROM ROSTOV REGION,RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin VM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stomach infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the second most common infectious disease of humans. The severe pathological consequences of this infection include gastric and duodenal ulcer disease, the development of gastric mucosal atrophy, gastric carcinoma, and, more rarely, malignant tumors of the lymphoma. H. pylori infections cause very high morbidity and mortality and are of particular concern in developing countries, where H. pylori prevalences as high as 90% have been reported. The population of H. pylori shows a high genomic variability among isolates. And the polymorphism of repeat-units of genomics had participated the important process of evolution. A variety of molecular typing tools have been developed to access genetic relatedness in H. pylori isolates. However, there is still no standard genotyping system of this bacterium. The MLVA (Multi-Locus of Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis method is useful for performing phylogenetic analysis and is widely used in bacteria genotyping; however, there's little application in H. pylori analysis. This article is the first application of the MLVA method to investigate H. pylori isolates in Russia. MLVA of 4 VNTR loci with high discrimination power based on 10 candidates were performed on a collection of 22 strains of H. pylori which originated from Rostov region of Russia. This method provides a starting point on which improvements to the method and comparisons to other techniques can be made.

  2. PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN PATIENTS WITH DYSPEPSIA UNDERGOING UPPER GASTRO INTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Ajay Babu K

    2017-12-01

    diagnosis. Rapid urease test and Giemsa staining were conducted on endoscopy biopsy specimens and Helicobacter pylori positivity was based on either Rapid urease test and/or histopathological examination was positive. From the present study it is evident that, there was no specific symptom attributable to H. pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is more common in males than females. Helicobacter pylori is consistently associated with peptic ulcer disease than non-ulcer dyspepsia, which is in broad agreement with the studies done earlier. Thus we conclude that, Helicobacter pylori infection may have a role in the aetiopathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. There appears to be no significant association between Helicobacter pylori infection and dyspeptic cases with normal endoscopy. This finding does not exclude the possibility that a small undefined subset of infected individuals will have symptoms induced by the infection, but only large randomized trials will be able to establish this. Hence, we recommend eradication of the bacteria only in patients positive for the bacterium, who have peptic ulceration. We believe in, Peter C Robin’s dictum: “If a person with peptic ulcer disease is shown to have Helicobacter pylori, then eradication is indicated”.

  3. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori cells and their surface components to HeLa cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchère, J L; Blaser, M J

    1990-12-01

    Four Helicobacter pylori strains were used to develop in vitro methods to assess adherence to HeLa cells. Using direct detection by microscopy, adhesion scores increased with the initial bacteria-to-cell ratio. The urease method assessed H. pylori bound to HeLa cells by their urease activity. The percentage of the original inoculum adhering to HeLa cells remained constant for initial ratios from 10(2) to 10(5) bacteria per cell. An ELISA using anti-H. pylori serum assessed whole bacteria or components bound to HeLa cell fractions. By all three methods, the four H. pylori strains were adherent to HeLa cells or membranes whereas Campylobacter fetus and Providencia control strains were not. The adherence of H. pylori whole cells decreased following extraction with saline, water, or glycine buffer and most of the superficial adhering material (SAM) was present in the saline or water extracts. SAM bound better to HeLa membranes than to calf fetuin or bovine serum albumin (BSA); binding was inhibited by preincubation of SAM with HeLa membranes but not with fetuin or BSA or by pretreatment of HeLa membranes with neuraminidase. These data indicate that SAM has a specific receptor on the HeLa cell membranes. By gel exclusion chromatography of bacterial extracts, the most adherent components were found in the fractions which also contained the highest urease activity; these fractions included urease subunit antigens. We conclude that adherence of H. pylori can be assessed by microtiter assays and involves bacterial surface material which co-purifies with urease and is different from the N-acetyl-neuraminyl-lactose binding hemagglutinin.

  4. Detection of Helicobacter species in the gastrointestinal tract of ringtail possum and koala: possible influence of diet, on the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldham, Thosaporn; Rose, Karrie; O'Rourke, Jani; Neilan, Brett A; Dalton, Helen; Lee, Adrian; Mitchell, Hazel

    2013-10-25

    The presence of Helicobacter spp. was examined in the liver and in different regions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) including the stomach, 3 cm above ileum, ileum, caecum, colon and rectum of 10 ringtail possums (RTPs) and 3 koalas using a combination of microscopy, culture and PCR. Helicobacter was detected in the distal end of the GIT of 7 of 10 RTPs by direct PCR and in all (10/10) RTPs by nested PCR. Five 'S' shaped isolates with bipolar sheathed flagella were isolated from the lower bowel of 3 of the 10 RTPs. 16S rRNA sequence analysis of these 5 isolates confirmed them as potentially novel Helicobacter species. No Helicobacter species were cultured from the koalas, however Helicobacter DNA was detected, in the majority of liver and/or stomach samples of the three koalas and in the colonic region of one koala, using nested PCR. The 16S rRNA gene was sequenced directly from DNA extracted from the homogenised livers and mucus scrapings of the stomach from koala 1 and were confirmed to be Helicobacter species. Based on histopathological examination of sections from the liver and intestine no evidence of infection could be related to the presence of helicobacters in either the RTP or koala. Based on our results, it is possible that diet may influence the detection of Helicobacter species; however this required further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An evaluation of the Oxoid Biochemical Identification System Campy rapid screening test for Campylobacteraceae and Helicobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoosain, N; Lastovica, A J

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the Oxoid Biochemical Identification System (OBIS) Campy test (ID0800M) against Campylobacter; Arcobacter; and other micro-organisms, with similar colonial morphology, for the detection of l-alanine aminopeptidase (l-ALA). The KOH and l-ALA (OBIS and Fluka) tests were carried out on every isolate. The procedures were followed as indicated in the OBIS and Fluka kit instructions. A total of 146 strains of 19 species of Campylobacter, seven strains of Arcobacter butzleri, four Arcobacter butzleri-like strains, 42 strains of 10 species of Helicobacter, 96 Gram-negative and 49 Gram-positive clinical isolates were tested. As expected, Campylobacter and Arcobacter strains were negative, while other Gram-negative bacteria were positive for the l-ALA test. An unexpected finding was that Helicobacter strains, although Gram-negative, were all negative for the l-ALA tests suggesting the absence of l-ALA within this genus. This is a novel finding. The absence of l-ALA was confirmed upon comparison with the available full genomic sequences of Helicobacter on the NCBI database. The OBIS Campy (ID0800M) test kit proved to be rapid and accurate for the presumptive characterization of Campylobacter and Arcobacter. A novel finding was that Helicobacter species also did not have the l-ALA enzyme. The OBIS kit will be useful in diagnostic laboratories for the presumptive diagnosis of Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter strains.

  6. Histologic characteristics of Campylobacter pylori (Helicobacter pylori) mediated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, E; Kemp, J; Westblom, T U; Chaffin, J; Foster, A M

    1990-01-01

    One hundred-nineteen specimens were reviewed to determine whether or not there were histologic changes specific for Campylobacter pylori (CP), (Helicobacter pylori) mediated gastritis. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Brown-Hopp, and Wright-Giemsa stained sections were examined independently by two pathologists for (a) the presence of acute cryptitis, (b) percent and degree of crypt involvement, and (c) spectrum of inflammatory cells within the lamina propriae. The amount of mucus was quantified on the Periodic Acid Schift (PAS)-Alcian Blue stain sections. Changes in the character of the mucus were noted by using both the PAS-Alcian Blue and the High Iron Diamine-Alcian Blue. A positive specimen for Campylobacter pylori (CP+), (Helicobacter pylori) was defined as one in which curved or spiral shaped microbes were identified on Wright-Giemsa and Brown-Hopp stain. Seventy-eight specimens were CP+ and 41 CP-. Statistically significant histologic findings included the extent and degree of superficial cryptitis and the preponderance of plasma cells in CP+ cases. These findings confirm aspects seen in an animal model and suggest that there is an histologic pattern consistent with C. pylori (Helicobacter pylori) mediated gastritis.

  7. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  8. Immune subversion by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldari, Cosima T; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Telford, John L

    2005-04-01

    To maintain prolonged colonization of the human gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori must avoid both innate and adaptive immune responses. During its long coexistence with humans, it has evolved complex strategies to maintain a mild inflammation of the gastric epithelium while limiting the extent of immune effector activity. Severe disease, associated with bacterial colonization, might reflect loss of this control. Several mechanisms and the bacterial factors involved in immune subversion have, in recent years, been elucidated, thus opening the possibility of a better understanding of the pathogenicity of this microorganism.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  10. [Frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic urticaria of Puebla University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Acuña, María Tula; López García, Aída I; Paz Martínez, David; Galindo García, José Arturo; Papaqui Tapia, Sergio; Garza Yado, María de los Angeles; Arana Muñoz, Oswaldo; Palacios Flores, Cecilio; Pérez Fernández, Susana

    2006-01-01

    Chronic urticaria may be continuous or recurrent according to its form of appearance. Within the diseases associated to chronic urticaria there are mycosis, parasitism and bacterial infections where Helicobacter pylori stands out. This has been related to the allergic diseases promoting a Th2 response. To determine the frequency of infection caused by Helicobacter pylori in patients with chronic urticaria of the allergic and clinical immunology service of the Puebla University Hospital. A descriptive, cross-sectional, prolective and observational study was made in adult patients, between 18 and 60 years old, with diagnosis of chronic urticaria. Inhalated and food skin prick test were made to all the patients. The infection by Helicobacter pylori was documented by serology, fecal antigen, endoscopy with fast test of urease and histological study. Descriptive statistics was implemented such as frequency, percentage, central tendency and dispersion measures. 30 patients were included; 83.3% were women. The average age was 37.8 years (SD 13.2). The most frequent type of chronic urticaria was the persistent one, representing 56.7%. The frequency of positivism of IgG antibodies against Helicobacter pylori represented the 60.0%, for IgM 33.3% and for fecal antigen 60.0%, the combined IgG, IgM, fecal antigen, fast test of ureasa and histological study was of 83%. The high frequency of infection caused by Helicobacter pylori in the patient with chronic urticaria suggests a possible role in its etiopathogeny, extending the therapeutic possibilities.

  11. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity and Stool Antigen in Patients With Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinan Karadeniz, R.; Ozdegirmenci, Ozlem; Metin Altay, M.; Solaroglu, Ayse; Dilbaz, Serdar; Hızel, Nedret; Haberal, Ali

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate whether Helicobacter pylori is an etiologic factor in hyperemesis gravidarum. Thirty one patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and twenty nine pregnant controls without hyperemesis gravidarum were included in this prospective study. All pregnant women were examined both for Helicobacter pylori serum immunoglobulin G antibodies (HpIgG Ab), showing chronic infection, and Helicobacter pylori stool antigens (HpSA), showing active gastrointestinal colonization. Chi-square and Student t tests were used accordingly for statistical analysis. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity was 67.7% in the patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and 79.3% in the control group (χ2 = 1.02, P = .31). HpSA was detected in 22.6% of patients with hyperemesis gravidarum, whereas 6.9% of patients in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant (χ2 = 2.89, P = .08). In this study, no relation was found between Helicobacter pylori and hyperemesis gravidarum. The low social status of women in both groups could be one of the reasons for the high prevalence of Hp infection. PMID:17093356

  12. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity and Stool Antigen in Patients With Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate whether Helicobacter pylori is an etiologic factor in hyperemesis gravidarum. Thirty one patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and twenty nine pregnant controls without hyperemesis gravidarum were included in this prospective study. All pregnant women were examined both for Helicobacter pylori serum immunoglobulin G antibodies (HpIgG Ab, showing chronic infection, and Helicobacter pylori stool antigens (HpSA, showing active gastrointestinal colonization. Chi-square and Student t tests were used accordingly for statistical analysis. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity was 67.7% in the patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and 79.3% in the control group ( χ 2 =1.02,P=.31 . HpSA was detected in 22.6% of patients with hyperemesis gravidarum, whereas 6.9% of patients in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant ( χ 2 =2.89,P=.08 . In this study, no relation was found between Helicobacter pylori and hyperemesis gravidarum. The low social status of women in both groups could be one of the reasons for the high prevalence of Hp infection.

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Associated Gastritis Increases Risk of Colorectal Polyps: a Hospital Based-Cross-Sectional Study in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are common in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. The present study aimed to determine any correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and colorectal polyps in the Thai population. A total of 303 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy with colonoscopy for investigation of chronic abdominal pain participated in this study from November 2014 to October 2015. A diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis was made if the bacteria were seen on histopathological examination and a rapid urease test was positive. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. Patient demographic data were analyzed for correlations. The prevalence of colorectal polyps was 77 (25.4%), lesions being found more frequently in Helicobacter pylori infected patients than non-infected subjects [38.4% vs. 12.5%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 2.26 (1.32 - 3.86), p gastritis were at high risk of having adenomas featuring dysplasia [OR (95% CI): 1.15 (1.16 - 7.99); P = 0.02]. There was no varaition in location of polyps, age group, sex and gastric lesions with respect to Helicobacter pylori status. This study showed that Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps, especially adenomas with dysplasia in the Thai population. Patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis may benefit from concurrent colonoscopy for diagnosis of colorectal polyps as a preventive and early treatment for colorectal cancer.

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  15. Are Helicobacter pylori and other Helicobacter species infection associated with human biliary lithiasis? A meta-analysis.

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    Di Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence intervals for odds ratio was calculated. Quantitative assessment of heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test with significance set at P value 0.10 and was measured using I(2 statistic. Eighteen studies published between 1998 and 2011 were finally eligible for meta-analysis. H. pylori, H. bilis, H. hepaticus, H. pullorum and H. ganmani were studied. With heterogeneity (I(2 = 69.5%, P<0.0001, significantly higher pooled infection rates of H. pylori (OR: 2.59, 35.82% versus 26.75%, P = 0.01 and H. hepaticus (OR: 3.13, 31.30% versus 12.12%, P = 0.02 were observed in lithiasis group. Higher prevalence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients were reported by studies from East Asia, South Asia and South America. Evidences supporting the higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients could be found by PCR for detecting 16s rRNA in bile, 26 kDa protein gene in biliary tissue and immunohistochemistry. Using multiple detection tests could increase the detection rate of H. pylori. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our meta-analysis suggests a trend of higher presence of H. pylori in cholelithiasis patients than control group and this trend was significant in the regions with higher prevalence of this agent. Evidences supporting the association between Helicobacter and cholelithiasis could be found by using different tests but the gold standard for the identification of these bacteria in biliary system has yet to be established. Considering obvious

  16. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndromes with probiotics: Comparison with conventional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoos, Y.; Brunser, O.; Lawson, F.; Muzeke, A.; Ndjaye, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    It is stated that in developing countries a high rate of Helicobacter pylori infection among newborns and young children occurs. It is further assumed that this incidence may lead to inhibition of defense mechanism (inhibition of acid secretion) against bacteria, per orally ingested. This may result in excessive colonisation of the small intestine by bacteria. This situation may become a major cause for chronic malnutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This project aims at determining the occurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children at young age. It is aimed also at tracing the relationship between the Helicobacter pylori infection and the state of undernourishment. Finally it is aimed at comparing the usefulness of pre-/probiotics as anti-infection treatment. The methods used to demonstrate above mentioned parameters are based on stable isotopes, 13 CO 2 and H 2 breath tests mainly. To assess nutritional status and progress in growth conventional anthropometric techniques will be used, complementary to the results obtained by stable isotopes. It is put forward that the use of pre-/probiotics, instead of antibiotics, will suppress upper gastrointestinal infection and restore the intestinal cell capacity to assimilate all food ingredients. (author)

  17. A Novel Assay for Easy and Rapid Quantification of Helicobacter pylori Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skindersoe, Mette E; Rasmussen, Lone; Andersen, Leif P; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2015-06-01

    Reducing adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastric epithelial cells could be a new way to counteract infections with this organism. We here present a novel method for quantification of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to cells. Helicobacter pylori is allowed to adhere to AGS or MKN45g cells in a 96-well microtiter plate. Then wells are added saponin, which lyses the cells without affecting the bacteria. After addition of alamarBlue(®) (resazurin) and 1- to 2-hour incubation, fluorescence measurements can be used to quantify the number of adherent bacteria. By use of the method, we demonstrate that adhesion of both a sabA and babA deletion mutant of H. pylori is significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The method offers a number of applications and may be used to compare the adherence potential of different strains of H. pylori to either cells or different materials or to screen for potential anti-adhesive compounds. The results presented here suggest that this easy and reproducible assay is well suited for quantitative investigation of H. pylori adhesion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

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    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  19. Coadaptation of Helicobacter pylori and humans: ancient history, modern implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, John C; Blaser, Martin J

    2009-09-01

    Humans have been colonized by Helicobacter pylori for at least 50,000 years and probably throughout their evolution. H. pylori has adapted to humans, colonizing children and persisting throughout life. Most strains possess factors that subtly modulate the host environment, increasing the risk of peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and possibly other diseases. H. pylori genes encoding these and other factors rapidly evolve through mutation and recombination, changing the bacteria-host interaction. Although immune and physiologic responses to H. pylori also contribute to pathogenesis, humans have evolved in concert with the bacterium, and its recent absence throughout the life of many individuals has led to new human physiological changes. These may have contributed to recent increases in esophageal adenocarcinoma and, more speculatively, other modern diseases.

  20. Helicobacter pylori colonization critically depends on postprandial gastric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, Roland; Azevedo-Vethacke, Marina; Groll, Claudia; Garten, Désirée; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sören

    2012-01-01

    The risk of Helicobacter pylori infection is highest in childhood, but the colonization process of the stomach mucosa is poorly understood. We used anesthetized Mongolian gerbils to study the initial stages of H. pylori colonization. Prandial and postprandial gastric conditions characteristic of humans of different ages were simulated. The fraction of bacteria that reached the deep mucus layer varied strongly with the modelled postprandial conditions. Colonization success was weak with fast gastric reacidification typical of adults. The efficiency of deep mucus entry was also low with a slow pH decrease as seen in pH profiles simulating the situation in babies. Initial colonization was most efficient under conditions simulating the postprandial reacidification and pepsin activation profiles in young children. In conclusion, initial H. pylori colonization depends on age-related gastric physiology, providing evidence from an in vivo infection model that suggests an explanation why the bacterium is predominantly acquired in early childhood. PMID:23251780

  1. Relationship between Chlamydia pneumonia and helicobacter pylori with atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali Pooria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pooria A1, Maasoomi M2, Rafiee E3, Rezaee M4, Sabzi F5, Hossain Zadegan H6, Salehi M7, Mozaffari P8 1. Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 3. Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology 4. Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 5. Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 6. Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 7. Bsc in Nursing, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 8. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and midwifery, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of deaths in the developed countries and causes one million mortalities per year in the USA. Smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, stress, and low activity are known to be the causes of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study is to confirm the relationship between chlamydia pneumonia (Cpn, as well as helicobacter pylori (Hp and atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: In this analytical case-control study two groups of patients were studied. The first group including 30 patients over 30 years old with coronary artery disease were operated using coronary artery bypass graft. The control group included 30 persons assessed with angiography and having normal coronary arteries. The data were collected and analyzed using statistical methods. Results: The two groups were similar in terms of IgA and IgG anti-Cpn, and IgG anti- Hp but they were statistically different concerning IgA anti-Hp which had more positive cases in the case group in comparison with the

  2. Vacuoles of Candida yeast as a specialized niche for Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavoshi, Farideh; Saniee, Parastoo

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are resistant to hostile gastric environments and antibiotic therapy, reflecting the possibility that they are protected by an ecological niche, such as inside the vacuoles of human epithelial and immune cells. Candida yeast may also provide such an alternative niche, as fluorescently labeled H. pylori were observed as fast-moving and viable bacterium-like bodies inside the vacuoles of gastric, oral, vaginal and foodborne Candida yeasts. In addition, H. pylori-specific genes and proteins were detected in samples extracted from these yeasts. The H. pylori present within these yeasts produce peroxiredoxin and thiol peroxidase, providing the ability to detoxify oxygen metabolites formed in immune cells. Furthermore, these bacteria produce urease and VacA, two virulence determinants of H. pylori that influence phago-lysosome fusion and bacterial survival in macrophages. Microscopic observations of H. pylori cells in new generations of yeasts along with amplification of H. pylori-specific genes from consecutive generations indicate that new yeasts can inherit the intracellular H. pylori as part of their vacuolar content. Accordingly, it is proposed that yeast vacuoles serve as a sophisticated niche that protects H. pylori against the environmental stresses and provides essential nutrients, including ergosterol, for its growth and multiplication. This intracellular establishment inside the yeast vacuole likely occurred long ago, leading to the adaptation of H. pylori to persist in phagocytic cells. The presence of these bacteria within yeasts, including foodborne yeasts, along with the vertical transmission of yeasts from mother to neonate, provide explanations for the persistence and propagation of H. pylori in the human population. This Topic Highlight reviews and discusses recent evidence regarding the evolutionary adaptation of H. pylori to thrive in host cell vacuoles.

  3. HELICOBACTER PYLORI GROWTH INHIBITION BY SUBSTANCE PRODUCED PSEUDOMONAS BY AEROGINOSA: IN VTRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A FAZELI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of H.pylori against metronidazole is increasingly appeared in reports of investigators of gastric infections. So that, seeking to find more effective anti-helicobacter drugs is a necessity. In this study, inhibitory effect of the P. aeroginosa-produced substance on H. pylori growth was determined using two methods, Cross-streak and Well-diffusion Only two out of 37 P. aeroginosa isalates were able to inhibit H. pylori growth which one of them was chosen for further investigation. Its antibacterial activity was tested on 31 isolates of H. pylori consisting 27 metrondazole-sensitive and 4 metronidazole-resistant isolates. The inhibitory substance was enable to kill both metrondazole-sensitive and resistant isolates of H. pylori. The substance could also inhibit the of several other bacteria including E.coli, Salmonella sp., Klebsiella sp., S. aureus and a gram positive bacilli. While the inhibitory effect of the substance had no change at 40c for 30 days, its effect substantially reduced by treating at 600c for 15 minutes. Treatment of substance at 600c (30 min. 80?c and 100?c (15 & 30min, and freezing (-20?c and melting (37?c inactivated its inhibitory effect completely. Treatment with trips in also could inactivate it. Thus P. aeroginosa-produced substance, probably is a protein and may be classified in bacteriocin group.

  4. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Culturable Bacterial Microbiota of the Stomach of Helicobacter pylori Positive and Negative Gastric Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  6. [Histopathologic changes associated with the presence of Helicobacter pylori in antral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Portugal, J; Cordero, M; de Luis, J M; Rodríguez-Rincón, M T; Paz Bouza, J; Pérez García, E

    1990-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram negative bacteria which has recently been associated to tissular changes of the upper digestive tract, however, the causal role has not yet been determined. Of 150 patients studied, 63 had tissular changes associated to Helicobacter pylori (Hp), 8 had Hp without tissular related changes (of whom 3 suffered bulbar ulcus and 1 gastric ulcus); the rest of the patients had hiatus hernia associated to distal esophagitis or pyloric stenosis; and only one patient was found to have normal tissue. A clear associated to distal esophagitis or pyloric stenosis; and only one patient was found to have normal tissue. A clear association between Hp and chronic or atrophic gastritis was determined, but no association was found between Hp and gastric cancer.

  7. Helicobacter pylori : the causative agent of peptic ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines Helicobacter pylori as an organism and as the causative agent of peptic ulcers. The review also examined the classification of ulcers, ... Elimination of Helicobacter pylori by treatment with antibiotics in peptic ulcer patients resulted in the healing of the ulcer. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infections is ...

  8. Receptores tipo Toll, patogénesis y respuesta inmune a Helicobacter pylori Toll-like receptors, pathogenesis and immune response to Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Angélica Sánchez-Zauco; Silvia Giono-Cerezo; Carmen Maldonado-Bernal

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori coloniza el epitelio gástrico y la mayoría de las personas infectadas es asintomática, de 10 al 20% desarrolla gastritis atrófica, úlcera péptica, y menos de 3% genera cáncer gástrico. Estas patologías están determinadas por la relación entre los factores de virulencia de la bacteria y los factores del hospedero como predisposición genética y respuesta inmune. La inmunidad innata, representada principalmente por los receptores tipo Toll y tipo Nod, reconocen a sus ligandos...

  9. Manipulation of Probiotics Fermentation of Yogurt by Cinnamon and Licorice: Effects on Yogurt Formation and Inhibition of Helicobacter Pylori Growth in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    S. Behrad; M.Y. Yusof; K. L. Goh; A.S. Baba

    2009-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria especially Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium exert suppressive effect on Helicobacter pylori. Cinnamon and licorice have been traditionally used for the treatment of gastric ulcer. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of herbs on yogurt fermentation, the level of probiotic bacteria in yogurt during 28 days storage and the effect of herbal yogurt on the growth of H. pylori in vitro. Cinnamon or licorice was mixed with milk and the mixture was ferme...

  10. Dual-coated lactic acid bacteria: an emerging innovative technology in the field of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are living micro-organisms that do not naturally have shelf life, and normally are weakly protected against the digestive action of the GI tract. A new dual coating technology has been developed in an effort to maximize survival, that is, to be able to reach the intestine alive and in sufficient numbers to confer the beneficial health effects on the host. Dual-coating of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is the result of fourth-generation coating technology for the protection of these bacteria at least 100-fold or greater than the uncoated LAB. This innovative technique involves a first pH-dependent protein layer that protects bacteria from gastric acid and bile salt, and a second polysaccharide matrix that protects bacteria from external factors, such as humidity, temperature and pressure, as well as the digestive action during the passage through the GI tract. Dual-coated probiotic formulation is applicable to different therapeutic areas, including irritable bowel syndrome, atopic dermatitis, acute diarrhea, chronic constipation, Helicobacter pylori eradication, and prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. An updated review of the efficacy of doubly coated probiotic strains for improving bacterial survival in the intestinal tract and its consequent clinical benefits in humans is here presented.

  11. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandre; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Prestes, Manoel Alberto; Costa, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa. The raised erosion and mucosa in mosaic in the body

  12. Blue light for infectious diseases: Propionibacterium acnes, Helicobacter pylori, and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Gupta, Asheesh; Murray, Clinton K.; Vrahas, Mark S.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Blue light, particularly in the wavelength range of 405–470 nm, has attracted increasing attention due to its intrinsic antimicrobial effect without the addition of exogenous photosensitizers. In addition, it is commonly accepted that blue light is much less detrimental to mammalian cells than ultraviolet irradiation, which is another light-based antimicrobial approach being investigated. In this review, we discussed the blue light sensing systems in microbial cells, antimicrobial efficacy of blue light, the mechanism of antimicrobial effect of blue light, the effects of blue light on mammalian cells, and the effects of blue light on wound healing. It has been reported that blue light can regulate multi-cellular behavior involving cell-to-cell communication via blue light receptors in bacteria, and inhibit biofilm formation and subsequently potentiate light inactivation. At higher radiant exposures, blue light exhibits a broad-spectrum antimicrobial effect against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Blue light therapy is a clinically accepted approach for Propionibacterium acnes infections. Clinical trials have also been conducted to investigate the use of blue light for Helicobacter pylori stomach infections and have shown promising results. Studies on blue light inactivation of important wound pathogenic bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have also been reported. The mechanism of blue light inactivation of P. acnes, H. pylori, and some oral bacteria is the photo-excitation of intracellular porphyrins and the subsequent production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. Although it may be the case that the mechanism of blue light inactivation of wound pathogens (e.g., S. aureus, P. aeruginosa) is the same as that of P. acnes, this hypothesis has not been rigorously tested. Limited and discordant results have been reported regarding the effects of blue light on mammalian cells and wound healing. Under certain wavelengths

  13. [Human chronic gastritis associated with non-Helicobacter pylori spiral organisms (Gastrospirillum hominis). Four cases and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fléjou, J F; Diomandé, I; Molas, G; Goldfain, D; Rotenberg, A; Florent, M; Potet, F

    1990-01-01

    Four cases of human active chronic gastritis associated with Gastrospirillum hominis, a recently described spiral shaped organism are presented. These 4 cases originated from a series of 1976 consecutive gastric biopsies, i.e. a prevalence of 0.25 percent in our material, are compared with Helicobacter pylori prevalence of 45 percent. Histopathological findings were chronic active gastritis with mild or no atrophy. Electron microscopy showed spiral bacteria with terminal flagellae, identical to those previously described in the literature. These bacteria have not yet been cultured; similar organisms are found in many animal species, and it seems that they do not provoke gastric inflammation. Gastrospirillum hominis could be responsible for cases of Helicobacter pylori negative chronic gastritis in man, but its pathogenicity remains to be demonstrated.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  15. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  16. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kazanowska-Dygdała

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients. The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  17. Rosacea is associated with Helicobacter pylori: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, A-H R; Egeberg, A; Gideonsson, R; Weinstock, L B; Thyssen, E P; Thyssen, J P

    2017-12-01

    Rosacea is a common skin disease characterized by facial erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. Helicobacter pylori infection has been suggested to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of rosacea. To systematically review and meta-analyse the relationship between rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori. A literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Data extraction and analyses were performed on descriptive data. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Random-effects models with DerSimonian-Laird methods were utilized to estimate pooled odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Heterogeneity of results was assessed using I² statistics. A total of 454 articles were identified and 42 full-text articles were chosen for further review. Fourteen studies were included in the quantitative meta-analysis, comprising a total of 928 rosacea patients and 1527 controls. The overall association between Helicobacter pylori infection and rosacea was non-significant (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.00-2.84, P = 0.052), but analysis restricted to C-urea breath test showed a significant association (OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.92-5.07, P rosacea symptoms was assessed in seven studies, but without significant effect (RR 1.28, 95% CI 0.98-1.67, P = 0.069). This meta-analysis found weak associations between rosacea and Helicobacter pylori infection as well as an effect of Helicobacter pylori therapy on rosacea symptoms, albeit that these did not reach statistical significance. Whether a pathogenic link between the two conditions exists, or whether Helicobacter pylori infection represents a proxy for other factors remains unknown. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chuan; Yamada, Nobutaka; Wu, Yun-Lin; Wen, Min; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Matsukura, Norio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer.

  20. The Relationship between Oral Hygiene Index and Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Positivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Önder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Helicobacter pylori (HP is a bacterial patho­gen that leads to gastroduodenal inflammation, gastric and duodenal ulcer and atrophic gastritis. Colonization of bacteria can be shown by using rapid-urease test during endoscopy. There are conflicting data about the route of transmission and reservoir. It’s thought to be transmitted primarily by oral route. Many studies showed results sup­porting that the presence of bacteria in dental plaques has effects on gastric colonization and eradication. There are data about the potential inhibitory effect of oral flora on HP. We aimed to analyze the association of simplified oral hygiene index -a possible representation of a healthy oral flora- with HP positivity. Methods: Patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy for symptoms of dyspepsia were as­sessed by a dentist for the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI. Patients were classified as good, poor and bad groups based on oral hygiene index scale. Pre-pyloric biopsy materials were assessed using rapid-urease test. Oral hygiene indexes were analyzed retrospectively, groups were compared for HP positivity. Results: 66 patients (30 females, 45.5% were included. Mean age of patients was 34.17±14.7 years. 11 (16.7%, 29 (43.9% and 26 (39.4% patients were classified as in good, poor and bad hygiene index groups, respectively. In patients with good OHI gastric HP positivity was less frequent. Conclusion: Decreased frequency in gastric HP may be observed with maintaining an ideal oral hygiene.

  1. Increased Outer Membrane Vesicle Formation in a Helicobacter pylori tolB Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lorinda; Praszkier, Judyta; Hutton, Melanie L; Steer, David; Ramm, Georg; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria; Ferrero, Richard L

    2015-08-01

    Multiple studies have established the importance of the tol-pal gene cluster in bacterial cell membrane integrity and outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in Escherichia coli. In contrast, the functions of Tol-Pal proteins in pathogenic organisms, including those of the Epsilonproteobacteria, remain poorly if at all defined. The aim of this study was to characterize the roles of two key components of the Tol-Pal system, TolB and Pal, in OMV formation in the pathogenic bacterium, Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori ΔtolB, Δpal and ΔtolBpal mutants, as well as complemented strains, were generated and assessed for changes in morphology and OMV production by scanning electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), respectively. The protein content and pro-inflammatory properties of OMVs were determined by mass spectroscopy and interleukin-8 (IL-8) ELISA on culture supernatants from OMV-stimulated cells, respectively. H. pylori ΔtolB and Δpal bacteria exhibited aberrant cell morphology and/or flagella biosynthesis. Importantly, the disruption of H. pylori tolB but not pal resulted in a significant increase in OMV production. The OMVs from H. pylori ΔtolB and Δpal bacteria harbored many of the major outer membrane and virulence proteins observed in wild-type (WT) OMVs. Interestingly, ΔtolB, Δpal and ΔtolBpal OMVs induced significantly higher levels of IL-8 production by host cells, compared with WT OMVs. This work demonstrates that TolB and Pal are important for membrane integrity in H. pylori. Moreover, it shows how H. pylori tolB-pal genes may be manipulated to develop "hypervesiculating" strains for vaccine purposes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Helicobacter ganmani sp nov., a urease-negative anaerobe isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, B.R.; O'Rourke, J.L.; Vandamme, P.

    2001-01-01

    and found to be identical to one another. H. rodentium was the most closely related species in terms of 16S rDNA sequence similarity (98.2%). Numerical analysis of whole-cell proteins by SDS-PAGE for nine isolates was carried out with a comparison to all known Helicobacter species, including newly...

  3. Occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter in reptiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Kik, Marja; Timmerman, Arjen J; Severs, Tim T; Kusters, Johannes G; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species have been isolated from many vertebrate hosts, including birds, mammals, and reptiles. Multiple studies have focused on the prevalence of these Epsilonproteobacteria genera in avian and mammalian species. However, little focus has been given to the

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on Multi-Drug Resistant Helicobacter pylori Isolated From Gastric Biopsies

    OpenAIRE

    Fozieh Jahani Moghadam; Tahereh Navidifar; Mansour Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Garlic (Allium sativum L.) exhibit a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity against both gram negative and gram-positive bacteria. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main factor in peptic and duodenal ulcer diseases. Some strains of H. pylori have becom eresistant to the current antibiotics. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the antibacterial effects of garlic on H. pylori. Materials and Methods: The gastric biopsies were inoculated on ...

  5. Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori populations to gastric carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Quan-Jiang; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Wang, Li-Li; Xin, Yong-Ning; Jiang, Man; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects half of the human population. The infection is associated with chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and peptic ulcers. It is also a major risk factor for gastric cancer. Phylogenetic analysis of global strains reveals there are seven populations of H. pylori, including hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, hpEastAsia, hpEurope, hpNEAfrica, hpAsia2 and hpSahul. These populations are consistent with their geographical origins, and ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection in Canada's arctic: searching for the solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Justin; Goodman, Karen; Munday, Rachel; Heavner, Karen; Huntington, Janis; Morse, John; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander; Fedorak, Richard N; Corriveau, Andre; Bailey, Robert J

    2008-11-01

    The Canadian North Helicobacter pylori (CANHelp) working group is a team composed of investigators, health officials and community leaders from Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The group's initial goals are to investigate the impact of H pylori infection on Canada's Arctic communities; subsequent goals include identifying treatment strategies that are effective in this region and developing recommendations for health policy aimed at management of H pylori infection. The team's investigations have begun with the Aklavik H pylori Project in the Aboriginal community of Aklavik, Northwest Territories.

  7. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  8. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  9. Phylogenomics of ColombianHelicobacter pyloriisolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Escobar, Andrés Julián; Trujillo, Esperanza; Acevedo, Orlando; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    During the Spanish colonisation of South America, African slaves and Europeans arrived in the continent with their corresponding load of pathogens, including Helicobacter pylori . Colombian strains have been clustered with the hpEurope population and with the hspWestAfrica subpopulation in multilocus sequence typing (MLST) studies. However, ancestry studies have revealed the presence of population components specific to H. pylori in Colombia. The aim of this study was to perform a thorough phylogenomic analysis to describe the evolution of the Colombian urban H. pylori isolates. A total of 115 genomes of H. pylori were sequenced with Illumina technology from H. pylori isolates obtained in Colombia in a region of high risk for gastric cancer. The genomes were assembled, annotated and underwent phylogenomic analysis with 36 reference strains. Additionally, population differentiation analyses were performed for two bacterial genes. The phylogenetic tree revealed clustering of the Colombian strains with hspWestAfrica and hpEurope, along with three clades formed exclusively by Colombian strains, suggesting the presence of independent evolutionary lines for Colombia. Additionally, the nucleotide diversity of horB and vacA genes from Colombian isolates was lower than in the reference strains and showed a significant genetic differentiation supporting the hypothesis of independent clades with recent evolution. The presence of specific lineages suggest the existence of an hspColombia subtype that emerged from a small and relatively isolated ancestral population that accompanied crossbreeding of human population in Colombia.

  10. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    It is accepted that the success of Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment using standard triple therapy is declining. Resistance, particularly to clarithromycin, has been shown in numerous countries to be rising to a level where the use of standard triple therapy in its current form may no longer be justified. The two major factors influencing resistance are prior exposure to the antibiotic and compliance with therapy. Regimes based on bismuth and levofloxacin, which had previously been mainly second-line options, are now emerging as superior first-line options. Trials of sequential and concomitant therapies are also showing the usefulness of these treatments in different populations. Options for third and subsequent line therapies include furazolidone and rifabutin-based regimes. Susceptibility testing should be performed to maintain accurate data on resistance levels, and has also clinical utility in difficult to eradicate cases. None of these, however, will be successful unless compliance is improved upon. If compliance is assured and eradication confirmation pursued, it has been repeatedly illustrated that near full eradication is achievable.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  12. METHODS FOR DETECTING BACTERIA USING POLYMER MATERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Grinsven Bart Robert, Nicolaas; Cleij, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A method for characterizing bacteria includes passing a liquid containing an analyte comprising a first bacteria and a second bacteria over and in contact with a polymer material on a substrate. The polymer material is formulated to bind to the first bacteria, and the first bacteria binds to the

  13. Countermeasures to Antibiotics Crisis: a Global Priority List of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria for Research and Development of New Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On 27 Feb., 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO announced the first list of important antibiotic-resistant bacteria (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/bacteria-antibiotics-needed/en/, which tremendously threat human-being’s health. This list included 12 kinds of bacteria that were categorized into three priority tiers: Critical, High and Medium. In the first tier, Critical, three Gram negative bacteria were included: Acinetobacter baumannii with carbapenem-resistant, Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbapenem-resistant; and Enterobacteriaceae with carbapenem-resistant, the third generation cephalosporin-resistant. In the second tier, High, six bacteria were suggested: Enterococcus faecium with vancomycin-resistant, Staphylococcus aureus with methicillin-resistant, vancomycin intermediate and resistant, Helicobacter pylori with clarithromycin-resistant, Campylobacter with fluoroquinolone-resistant, Salmonella spp. with fluoroquinolone-resistant, Neisseria gonorrhoeae with the third generation cephalosporin-resistant, fluoroquinolone-resistant. In the third tier, Medium, three bacteria were listed: Streptococcus pneumonia with penicillin-non-susceptible, Haemophilus influenza with ampicillin-resistant, and Shigella spp. with fluoroquinolone-resistant. This list was proposed by an expert panel, chaired by Dr. E. Tacconelli from Infectious Diseases, DZIF Center, Tübingen University, Germany and Dr. N. Magrini from EMP Department of WHO. This proposal recommended some key steps to countermeasure the challenges posed by multi-drug- and extensively drug-resistant bacteria, including research and development of new classes of antibiotics for the paediatric population, for preventing cross- and co-resistance to existing classes of antibiotics, and for oral formulations for community-acquired diseases with a high morbidity burden. This list will guide our future research and development of new antibiotics in future.

  14. Rosacea is associated with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A-H R; Egeberg, A; Gideonsson, R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common skin disease characterized by facial erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. Helicobacter pylori infection has been suggested to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of rosacea. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and meta-analyse the relationship between...... rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori. METHODS: A literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Data extraction and analyses were performed on descriptive data. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Random-effects models with Der...... in the quantitative meta-analysis, comprising a total of 928 rosacea patients and 1527 controls. The overall association between Helicobacter pylori infection and rosacea was non-significant (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.00-2.84, P = 0.052), but analysis restricted to C-urea breath test showed a significant association (OR 3...

  15. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and

  16. Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Karen; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Andersen, Leif Percival

    2017-01-01

    response is known to play a very important part. Understanding the mechanisms involved in maintaining control over the immune and inflammatory response is therefore extremely important. Vaccines against H. pylori have remained elusive but are desperately needed for the prevention of gastric carcinogenesis...

  17. [INFLUENCE OF DIET IN PRIMARY PREVENTION OF GASTRIC CANCER, IN PATIENTS INFECTED WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Martín, Raquel; Matía Cubillo, Ángel

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main risk factor for developing gastric cancer, with the influence of genetic, toxic and dietary factors. It is the fourth most common cancer and the second most deadly worldwide, so its prevention is important specially focusing on dietary habits, to be approached from the primary care setting. Evaluate the influence of diet on the primary prevention of gastric cancer in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection. Systematic review, the keywords "Helicobacter pylori", "diet" and "stomach neoplasms" were previously selected from the DeCS and MeSH structured vocabulary. Sources of primary and secondary databases were consulted, limits were established. H. pylori infection and dietary factors may act synergistically in the development of gastric cancer and some cooking practices. Dietary factors may increase the risk of gastric cancer like the high consumption of salt, salty foods, saturated fat, red and processed meats, while fruits and vegetables may be considered as a protective factor, especially the high consumption of Allium and the cruciferous family. The lifestyle and dietary habits may influence the development of gastric cancer, especially in patients with H. pylori infection. Decreasing consumption of salty, processed, smoked or pickled foods, red meat and saturated fat, avoiding toxins, and carrying out a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, in addition to eradicating the bacteria, can be considered the most effective preventive strategy against the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  18. Gastric Helicobacter-like Organisms in Stray Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Erginsoy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten adult domestic shorthaired stray cats (Felis catus were investigated for the presence and localization of different species of gastric Helicobacter-like organisms (GHLOs using Warthin-Starry silver staining, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM; the severity and distribution of lesions in different regions of the stomach were assessed in HE-stained sections. GHLOs were present in all areas of the stomach in all of 10 cats. Three morphologically different types of spiral-shaped bacteria were demonstrated; in silver-stained sections, H. pylori like organisms (HPLO were easily differentiated from other GHLOs. Eight of the cats had H. heilmannii-like organisms (HHLOs and one cat had HPLO. Mixed H. heilmannii and H. felis infection was seen in only one cat. GHLO infection was associated with a mild to severe gastritis in 8 of 10 cats. GHLOs colonized the cardia, corpus and antrum in similar density. The most striking histopathological changes consisted of accumulation of lymphocytes and neutrophilic granulocytes, fibrosis of the lamina propria mucosae, lymphoid follicles and lymphocytic infiltrates. There was no obvious relation between the degree of colonization by GHLOs and the extent of histopathological changes. GHLOs were present on the mucosal surface, in the lumen of gastric glands, and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells. These findings indicate that immunohistochemistry and silver staining are useful for detecting GHLO infections, particularly with different Helicobacter species present. Stray cats are frequently colonized by HHLOs without any significant correlation between the degree of infection and gastritis score; in contrast HPLOs and HFLOs infections are not very common.

  19. Diversity of zoonotic enterohepatic Helicobacter species and detection of a putative novel gastric Helicobacter species in wild and wild-born captive chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flahou, B.; Modrý, David; Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Smet, A.; Ducatelle, R.; Pasmans, F.; Sá, R. M.; Todd, A.; Hashimoto, C.; Mulama, M.; Kiang, J.; Rossi, M.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 174, 1-2 (2014), s. 186-194 ISSN 0378-1135 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Enterohepatic Helicobacter species * Gastric Helicobacter species * Helicobacter cinaedi * 'Candidatus Helicobacter homininae' * Chimpanzee * Gorilla Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.511, year: 2014

  20. Diversity of zoonotic enterohepatic Helicobacter species and detection of a putative novel gastric Helicobacter species in wild and wild-born captive chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flahou, B.; Modrý, D.; Pomajbíková, K.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Smet, A.; Ducatelle, R.; Pasmans, F.; Sá, R. M.; Todd, A.; Hashimoto, C.; Mulama, M.; Kiang, J.; Rossi, M.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 174, 1-2 (2014), s. 186-194 ISSN 0378-1135 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Enterohepatic Helicobacter species * Gastric Helicobacter species * Helicobacter cinaedi * Candidatus Helicobacter homininae * Chimpanzee * Gorilla Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.511, year: 2014

  1. Development of a Mouse Model of Helicobacter pylori Infection that Mimics Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Marta; Arico, Beatrice; Burroni, Daniela; Figura, Natale; Rappuoli, Rino; Ghiara, Paolo

    1995-03-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. The pathogenesis of H. pylori infection in vivo was studied by adapting fresh clinical isolates of bacteria to colonize the stomachs of mice. A gastric pathology resembling human disease was observed in infections with cytotoxin-producing strains but not with noncytotoxic strains. Oral immunization with purified H. pylori antigens protected mice from bacterial infection. This mouse model will allow the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against H. pylori infection in humans.

  2. Stability data of FlgD from Helicobacter pylori and structural comparison with other homologs

    OpenAIRE

    Pulić, Ivana; Cendron, Laura; Salamina, Marco; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia; Matković-Čalogović, Dubravka; Zanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin component D (FlgD) from Helicobacter pylori is involved in the assembly of the hook of flagella, helical tubular structures that provide motility in non-filamentous bacteria. Data provided in this article refer to HpFlgD from strains 26695 (HpFlgD_26695) and G27 (HpFlgD_G27). Within this article, information on the secondary structure content and different type of interfaces found in the two crystal forms of HpFlgD (monoclinic, HpFlgD_m and tetragonal, HpFlgD_t) are provided, as wel...

  3. Implicaciones clínicas asociadas a las infecciones provocadas por helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesta López, María de los Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori fue redescubierta en 1983 por los patólogos Warren y Marshall, tras demostrar su presencia en la mucosa gástrica inflamada, úlcera duodenal y gástrica. Es una bacteria Gram negativa, helicoidal y con flagelos en uno de sus extremos, lo que le confiere movilidad. La infección por H. pylori constituye una de las infecciones bacterianas del tracto gastroduodenal más prevalentes, afectando a casi el 50% de la población mundial. La transmisión se produce fundamentalmente d...

  4. Did transmission of Helicobacter pylori from humans cause a disease outbreak in a colony of Stripe-faced Dunnarts (Sminthopsis macroura?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Every Alison L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery that Helicobacter pylori causes a range of pathologies in the stomachs of infected humans, it has become apparent that Helicobacters are found in a diverse range of animal species where they are frequently associated with disease. In 2003 and 2004, there were two outbreaks of increased mortality associated with gastric bleeding and weight-loss in a captive colony of the Australian marsupial, the Stripe-faced Dunnart (Sminthopsis macroura. The presence of gastric pathology led to an investigation of potential Helicobacter pathogenesis in these animals. Histological examination revealed the presence of gastritis, and PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Helicobacter infection in the stomachs of these marsupials. Surprisingly, sequencing of 16S rRNA from these bacteria identified the species as H. pylori and PCR confirmed the strain to be positive for the important pathogenesis factor, cagA. We therefore describe, for the first time, an apparent reverse zoonotic infection of Stripe-faced Dunnarts with H. pylori. Already prone to pathological effects of stress (as experienced during breeding season, concomitant H. pylori infection appears to be a possible essential but not sufficient co-factor in prototypic gastric bleeding and weight loss in these marsupials. The Stripe-faced Dunnart could represent a new model for investigating Helicobacter-driven gastric pathology. Infections from their human handlers, specifically of H. pylori, may be a potential risk to captive colonies of marsupials.

  5. Relationship between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the correlation between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods: A total of 80 children with asthma who were treated in our hospital from May 2012 to May 2015 were selected as the research subjects, and 40 cases of healthy children were selected as control group, the Helicobacter pylori infection of the two groups of patients were compared, the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the serum Helicobacter pylori-IgG, Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG, IL-4, Helicobacter pylori, IFN-γ and IL-1β, etc., and the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma was analyzed. Results: The positive rates of Helicobacter pylori infection in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly higher than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05. The positive rates of serum Helicobacter pylori-IgG and Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05. The serum levels of IFN-γ in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage, IL-4 and IL-1β levels in the former were significantly higher than those in the latter (P<0.05. Helicobacter pylori infection positive had significant positive correlation with IL-1β concentration (r=0.75, P<0.05. Conclusions: Helicobacter pylori infection in children has significant positive correlation with the incidence of asthma, suggesting that Helicobacter pylori infection has a certain protective effect on childhood asthma, but persistent Helicobacter pylori infection in children with asthma can aggravate the immune disorder, which is the main reason for the difficulty of treatment of asthma.

  6. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burucoa, Christophe; Axon, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    The study of Helicobacter pylori genetic variability brought us interesting data on the history of mankind. Based on multilocus sequence typing and more recently on whole-genome sequencing, paleomicrobiology still attracts the attention of global researchers in relation to its ancestor roots and coexistence with humans. Three studies determining the prevalence of virulence factors illustrates the controversial results obtained since 30 years by studies trying to associate prevalence of different virulence markers and clinical outcomes of H. pylori infection. Three articles analyzed the prevalence and risk of multiple (genetically distinct isolates) and mixed (susceptible and resistant isolates) infections. A number of studies confirm that H. pylori prevalence is falling worldwide especially in the developed world and in children but that the level of infection is higher in certain ethnic minorities and in Migrants. There is little new in identifying the mode of H. pylori transmission though intrafamilial spread appears to be important. There have, however, been some interesting papers on the presence of the organism in food, water, and the oral cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  8. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  9. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Burkitt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems.

  10. Meta-analysis: Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Yang, Huazhen; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Jiang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    The results from observational studies on the relationship between helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and Parkinson's disease remain controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between helicobacter pylori infection and Parkinson's disease. A comprehensive literature search was performed on relevant studies published from January 1983 to January 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE databases. The fixed or random effects model was used to pool the odds ratio with 95% confidence interval from individual studies. Publication bias was estimated by Egger's test and the funnel plot. Eight eligible studies involving 33 125 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the no helicobacter pylori infected person, the pooled odds ratio of Parkinson's disease in helicobacter pylori infected person was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.37-1.85). In subgroup analyzes, the combined odds ratios were 1.96 (1.23-3.12) in Asia, 1.55 (1.32-1.82) in Europe, 1.59 (1.35-1.88) in case-control studies, 1.56 (1.01-2.39) in cross-sectional studies, 1.56 (1.32-1.85) in studies with confounders adjusted, and 1.71 (1.21-2.43) in studies with no confounder adjusted, respectively. This meta-analysis indicated that H. pylori infection might be associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Gastric Autoantigenic Proteins in Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sook; Lee, Su-Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo; Yeom, Jeongsuk; Park, Eun-Sil; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Jun, Jin-Su; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study tried to identify novel gastric autoimmune antigens that might be involved in aggravating the atrophic gastritis among patients with Helicobacter pylori infection using two-dimensional immunoblotting analysis. Materials and Methods Proteins from gastric mucosal antrectomy specimens and AGS cells (gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines derived from a Caucasian patient who had received no prior therapy) were 2-dimensionally immunoblotted separately with a pool of 300 sera from H. pylroi-infected patients at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Results Thirty-eight autoantigenic proteins including alcohol dehydrogenase [NADP+], alpha enolase, gastrokine-1, gastric triacylglycerol lipase, heat shock 70 kDa protein 1, and peroxiredoxin-2 were identified in the gastric mucosal tissue. Fourteen autoantigenic proteins including programmed cell death 6-interacting protein, serum albumin and T-complex protein 1 subunit gamma were identified in the AGS cells. Albumin, alpha-enolase, annexin A3, cytoplasmic actin 1, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein and leukocyte elastase inhibitor were commonly observed autoantigenic proteins in both gastric mucosal tissue and AGS cells. Alpha-enolase, glutathione S-transferase P, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, heat shock 70 kDa protein 1, human mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATP) subunit beta, mitochondrial 60 kDa heat shock protein, peroxiredoxin-2, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein precursor, tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 11 and Tryptophan-Aspartic acid (WD) repeat-containing protein 1 showed 60% or higher amino acid positivity. Conclusion These newly identified gastric autoimmune antigens might be useful in the control and prevention of gastroduodenal disorders, and might be valuable in breaking the vicious circle that exists in gastroduodenal disorders if their pathophysiological roles could be understood in the progress of chronic atrophic gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers, intestinal

  12. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: a distinct entity unrelated to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, R M; Sonnenberg, A

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis is diagnosed when no organisms are detected in a gastric mucosa with typical features of Helicobacter gastritis (Hp-gastritis). If Helicobacter-negative gastritis consisted mostly of 'missed' Helicobacter infections, its prevalence should represent a constant percentage of these infections in a population, and their clinico-epidemiological features would overlap. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of Hp-positive and Hp-negative gastritis. From a pathology database, we extracted demographic, clinical and histopathological data from patients with gastric biopsies (1.2008-12.2013). We allocated patients to high (≥12%) and low (≤6%) H. pylori prevalence regions defined by ZIP code-based data. The prevalence of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis by sex, age and state were expressed as a per cent of the total study population stratified accordingly. Of 895 323 patients, 10.6% had Hp-gastritis and 1.5% Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Hp-gastritis, but not Helicobacter-negative gastritis, was more common in males than females (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.19). While Hp-gastritis was more prevalent in high than in low-prevalence areas (OR 3.65, 95% CI: 3.57-3.74), Helicobacter-negative gastritis was only minimally affected by the underlying H. pylori prevalence (1.7% vs. 1.5%). The age-specific prevalence of Hp-gastritis peaked in the 4th to 5th decades; Helicobacter-negative gastritis exhibited a low and relatively flat pattern. The geographic distribution of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis showed no significant correlation. Intestinal metaplasia was found in 13.0% of patients with Hp-gastritis and in 6.1% of those with Helicobacter-negative gastritis (OR 0.43, 95% CI: 0.40-0.47). These data suggest that Helicobacter-negative gastritis is, in the vast majority of cases, a nosologically and epidemiologically distinct entity that deserves further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Molecular assessment of clarithromycin resistant Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular assessment of clarithromycin resistant Helicobacter pylori strains using rapid and accurate PCR-RFLP method in gastric specimens in Iran. ... Thirty nine (39) (23/78%) clarithromycin-resistant strains were detected which were identified as 15 (9.15%) A2143G, 15 (9.15%) A2142G and 9 (5.49%) mix strains.

  14. ( Asteraceae ) methanol extracts against Helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol vehicle did not affect H. pylori growth. Conclusion: The observed antibacterial effect of G. glutinosum extracts may be of benefit as an adjuvant treatment of diseases caused by H. pylori. Key words: Gymnosperma glutinosum, Helicobacter pylori, methanol extract, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC).

  15. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was seen. Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  16. Helicobacter Pylori : Serological Testing and Treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with dyspepsia and eradication of H. pylori after a non-invasive testing is an integral part of most management guidelines. This study evaluated the benefit of serological testing and treatment of H. pylori in Nigerian patients presenting with uninvestigated dyspepsia.

  17. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study assessed the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies among Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It also examines whether anti H. pylori seroprevalence was associated with the severity of the HIV infection or the antiretroviral treatment. Material and Methods: ...

  18. Helicobacter pylori and upper digestive diseases - diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with various upper gastrointestinal problems was 84.7%. The use of medication that can reduce the H. pylori density was common among the infected patients, as history of antibiotics use, acid suppressant use and medications for eradication treatment were ...

  19. Magnitude of Helicobacter pylori among Dyspeptic patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is predominantly acquired in childhood from family members. The infection can cause dypepepsia, chronic and acute gastritis and gastric cancer. Dyspepsia is the most common illness in the Ethiopian population visiting outpatient department of health facilities, and it has ...

  20. Geographic pathology of Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yi; Ponsioen, Cyriel I. J.; Xiao, Shu-Dong; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aim. Helicobacter pylori is etiologically associated with gastritis and gastric cancer. There are significant geographical differences between the clinical manifestation of H. pylori infections. The aim of this study was to compare gastric mucosal histology in relation to age among H.

  1. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal

  2. Seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection among children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection occurs worldwide with higher seroprevalence rates in the childhood populations of developing countries. In Nigeria, there is a dearth of information concerning its occurrence in children and infection enhancing factors. A prospective seroepidemiologic survey to determine the ...

  3. HELICOBACTER PYLORI SEROLOGY AND EVALUATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been strongly associated with various gastroduodenal diseases worldwide with only a few studies emanating from developing countries. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of serum Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and underlying gastroduodenal pathology in Nigerian ...

  4. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...

  6. Effects of Community Screening for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, Maria; Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication improves the prognosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), dyspepsia, and possibly gastric cancer. Hp screening tests are accurate and eradication therapy is effective. Hp population screening seems attractive. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori related gastritis is a major health ailment in developing nations. There is high morbidity and mortality ranging from chronic gastritis to gastric malignancies. Prevalence of H. pylori infection varies markedly from country to country and in a country, region to region. Aim: To study the prevalence ...

  8. Efecto del tratamiento erradicador para Helicobacter pylori en pacientes con dispepsia funcional Effect to Helicobacter pylori eradication on patients with functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. de Artaza Varasa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: este estudio ha tenido un doble objetivo: por un lado, evaluar el efecto del tratamiento erradicador para Helicobacter pylori en la respuesta sintomática de pacientes diagnosticados de dispepsia funcional y, por otro, determinar si los hallazgos histológicos podían servir como predictor de la efectividad de la terapia. En particular, se trató de averiguar si la presencia de gastritis antral (la que se asocia a la enfermedad ulcerosa péptica podría predecir una mayor respuesta sintomática al tratamiento erradicador en los pacientes con dispepsia funcional e infección por Helicobacter pylori. Pacientes y métodos: estudio prospectivo, monocéntrico y aleatorizado, que incluyó a 48 pacientes con dispepsia funcional e infección por Helicobacter pylori (27 mujeres y 21 hombres, con edad media de 37 ± 13,5 años. Veintisiete pacientes recibieron el tratamiento erradicador (rabeprazol, claritromicina y amoxicilina durante 10 días, seguido de 20 mg/día de rabeprazol 3 meses y 21 el tratamiento control (20 mg/día de rabeprazol 3 meses. Los pacientes fueron seguidos durante un año. Todos rellenaron el Cuestionario de calidad de vida asociada a dispepsia, que evalúa cuatro apartados: intensidad de los síntomas habituales, intensidad del dolor de estómago, incapacidad debida al dolor y satisfacción con la salud. Resultados: existió una mejoría significativa (p Objective: this study evaluated Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in terms of symptomatic response in patients with functional dyspepsia. On the other hand, we analyzed the importance of histologic findings as a predictor of treatment response. In particular, we studied whether antral gastritis (which is associated with peptic ulcer may predict a greater symptomatic response to Helicobacter pylori eradication in functional dyspepsia. Patients and methods: this prospective, randomized, single-center trial included 48 patients with functional dyspepsia and

  9. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  10. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  11. Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference Update: Infections in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference took place in April 1997. The initial recommendations of the conference were published in early 1998. An update meeting was held in June 1998, and the present paper updates and complements the earlier recommendations. Key changes included the following: the recommendation for testing and treating H pylori infection in patients with known peptic ulcer disease was extended to testing and treating patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia; it was decided that the urea breath test (not serology should be used for routine diagnosis of H pylori infection unless endoscopy is indicated for another reason; and recommended therapies were a twice daily, seven-day regimen of a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, pantoprazole 40 mg or ranitidine bismuth citrate 400 mg, plus clarithromycin 500 mg and amoxicillin 1000 mg, or plus clarithromycin 500 or 250 mg and metronidazole 500 mg. The need was reiterated to have funding for readily accessible, accurate testing for H pylori infection with the urea breath test. It was strongly recommended that regional centres be established to monitor the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant H pylori infections. The initial consensus document referred to pediatric issues that were not addressed in this update but were the subject of a subsequent Canadian Helicobacter Study Group meeting, and will be published later in 1999.

  12. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in patients with hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Mona M; Kandil, Hisham O; Elshafei, Arwa H

    2014-02-01

    Nausea and vomiting during pregnancy are the most common conditions affecting pregnancy, occurring in about 80% of all pregnancies and always disappearing on the 16th to 18th weeks of gestation. This may be mild and it does not affect the general condition of the patient (the condition is called emesis gravidarum), or it may be severe enough to affect the patient physically and psychologically, causing intractable vomiting, electrolyte imbalance, weight loss >5%, impairment of liver and kidney functions and dehydration. Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common bacterium affecting humans. It is a gram-negative helix-shaped microaerophilic bacterium transmitted by the oro-oral or feco-oral route. It is more prevalent in developing countries and affects young children. Acute infection manifests as acute gastritis and stomach pain, whereas chronic infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, 2% of which may develop into stomach cancer. The authors tried to investigate the association between H pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum. Fifty patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and 50 patients with normal pregnancy were included in the study. H pylori infection was determined using a 1-step H pylori test device (serum/plasma), which is a qualitative membrane-based immunoassay. Regarding maternal age, gestational age and socioeconomic status, there is no statistical difference between both groups. There is a marked statistical difference between both groups in terms of Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and frequency of vomiting. There is a powerful correlation between H pylori and hyperemesis gravidarum.

  13. Epidemiologic effects on helicobacter spp. infections of dogs in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gombač Mitja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of our study were to determinate the prevalence of helicobacter in a population of Slovenian dogs, to characterize the intensity of infection and to find out if the epidemiological parameters i. e. age, feeding regimen, gender, breed, location and indoor/outdoor living conditions have any influence on infection and the intensity of infection. A total of 185 randomly chosen dogs from all parts of Slovenia, at ages from 9 days to 15 years, of both genders and 44 different breeds, without any gastrointestinal disorders, were included in our study. Helicobacter were detected in stomachs of 92.4% of dogs. We determined a mild infection in 17.3% of dogs, a moderate infection in 48.1%, and a strong infection in 27% of dogs. Studying epidemiological parameters and their effects on infection we concluded that age and feeding regimen affect the infection and the intensity of infection, whereas gender, breed, location and indoor/ outdoor living conditions do not.

  14. [Effect of alcohol and cirrhosis on the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateron, D; Fabre, M; Ink, O; Cherif, F; Hagege, H; Foissy, P; Ducreux, M; Benamouzig, R; Buffet, C

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there was any relationship between alcohol consumption, cirrhosis and Helicobacter pylori associated antral gastritis. One hundred and forty-four patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were prospectively included and classified in four groups. The first group of 23 patients had cirrhosis and an alcohol consumption below 80 g per day. The second group of 31 patients had cirrhosis and an alcohol consumption over 80 g per day. The third group of 34 patients had an alcohol consumption over 80 g per day without cirrhosis. The fourth group of 56 patients had an alcohol consumption below 80 g per day without any preexisting liver disease and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for non specific digestive symptoms. The diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori was made at histological examination using the hematoxylin and eosin stain and the Whartin-Starry stain in each case. Histopathological results were confirmed by a bacteriological study in 15 cases. One hundred and twelve of 144 patients (78 percent) had gastritis. Gastritis was more frequent (p less than 0.01) when Helicobacter pylori was present than when it was not (90 percent vs 68 percent). Gastritis was more frequent when alcohol consumption was high (86 percent vs 72 percent). Helicobacter pylori was found in 26 percent of the first group, 48 percent of the second group, 65 percent of the third group and 45 percent of the fourth group. These differences were significantly different (p less than 0.05). A statistically significant relationship between high alcohol consumption and the presence of Helicobacter pylori was noted, even in the presence of cirrhosis (p less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  16. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Julie Y; Goers Sweeney, Emily; Guillemin, Karen; Amieva, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori's ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria's response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD) are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD's colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium.

  17. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Y Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori's ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria's response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD's colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium.

  18. Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Resistance: Trends Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond G Lahaie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antibiotics can be a major problem in the treatment of bacterial infections. As the use of antibiotics increases, bacterial resistance to these agents is rising and in many cases is responsible for the failure of treatment regimens. Although the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection requires the use of more than one antibiotic to obtain adequate eradication rates, the efficacy of the currently used antibiotic combinations has been shown to be decreased by resistance to one of the antibiotics. The use of antibiotics in regimens for the treatment of H pylori is increasing in many countries, including Canada. This increase is both in the use of these antibiotics alone for the treatment of nongastrointestinal infections and in their use in association with proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of H pylori infection. In several European and Asian countries, where resistance to antibiotics is being monitored, it has been demonstrated that H pylori resistance to metronidazole and to clarithromycin increased throughout the 1990s. Thus far, the data available in Canada do not show increased resistance to either of these antibiotics. As for other antibiotics used in the treatment of H pylori infection, such as tetracycline and amoxicillin, the rate of resistance to these agents is still very low and does not constitute a significant problem. Because the efficacy of the regimens used in the treatment of H pylori infection is compromised by resistance to the antibiotics used, it is important that H pylori resistance rates in Canada and throughout the world continue to be monitored. Only with such reliable data can the most optimal regimens be recommended.

  19. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  1. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration

  2. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  3. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Lacrimal Gland: Sustained Remission after Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hasosah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma is the third most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and it is strongly associated with helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach. MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland usually presents as a localized disease process in extranodal tissues. The treatment options of MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland chiefly include radiation of the tumor, chemotherapy, surgical removal, or a combination of these strategies. We report a case of localized MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland, with prolonged sustained remission after eradication of gastric Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori infection. He sustains in remission of lacrimal MALT lymphoma for four years without chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

  4. Helicobacter pylori gene silencing in vivo demonstrates urease is essential for chronic infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Senta M.; Liao, Tingting; Stubbs, Keith A.; Marshall, Barry J.; Fulurija, Alma; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic active gastritis that after many years of infection can develop into peptic ulceration or gastric adenocarcinoma. The bacterium is highly adapted to surviving in the gastric environment and a key adaptation is the virulence factor urease. Although widely postulated, the requirement of urease expression for persistent infection has not been elucidated experimentally as conventional urease knockout mutants are incapable of colonization. To overcome this constraint, conditional H. pylori urease mutants were constructed by adapting the tetracycline inducible expression system that enabled changing the urease phenotype of the bacteria during established infection. Through tight regulation we demonstrate that urease expression is not only required for establishing initial colonization but also for maintaining chronic infection. Furthermore, successful isolation of tet-escape mutants from a late infection time point revealed the strong selective pressure on this gastric pathogen to continuously express urease in order to maintain chronic infection. In addition to mutations in the conditional gene expression system, escape mutants were found to harbor changes in other genes including the alternative RNA polymerase sigma factor, fliA, highlighting the genetic plasticity of H. pylori to adapt to a changing niche. The tet-system described here opens up opportunities to studying genes involved in the chronic stage of H. pylori infection to gain insight into bacterial mechanisms promoting immune escape and life-long infection. Furthermore, this genetic tool also allows for a new avenue of inquiry into understanding the importance of various virulence determinants in a changing biological environment when the bacterium is put under duress. PMID:28644872

  5. Correlation between virulence markers of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity and gastric biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Lucrecia MEDINA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with virulence factors. The presence of these factors is useful as molecular markers in the identification of the high risk for developing severe gastric pathologies. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the presence of virulence markers cagA and bab2A of H. pylori in oral and gastric biopsy samples. METHODS: An observational, prospective, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was carried out between September 2011 and September 2012. Patients suffering dyspepsia with indication for upper gastrointestinal video endoscopy who attended the Gastroenterology Service of the Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando were included. Epidemiological investigation was completed. To detect the bacteria and their virulence genes, samples of saliva, dental plaque and gastric biopsy were taken and processed by PCR. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were selected for this study (30 women and 31 men. H. pylori was detected in 31 gastric biopsies and 31 oral samples. Significant difference between oral and gastric samples was found in cagA genotype. Agreement between oral and gastric genotypes was found in 38.7% of samples from the same patient. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in provide information about the genotypes of the Argentinean Northeast H. pylori strains. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection, the most of patients had less virulent genotypes in oral cavity and gastric tissue. The cagA / babA2 combination was not frequent in the samples studied. There was not a statistical correlation between the virulence genes and gastroduodenal or oral diseases. Although in some patients the same genotype was found both in oral and gastric samples, it cannot be ensure that they corresponding to the same strain because a DNA sequencing was not performed.

  6. Helicobacter pylori gene silencing in vivo demonstrates urease is essential for chronic infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra W Debowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic active gastritis that after many years of infection can develop into peptic ulceration or gastric adenocarcinoma. The bacterium is highly adapted to surviving in the gastric environment and a key adaptation is the virulence factor urease. Although widely postulated, the requirement of urease expression for persistent infection has not been elucidated experimentally as conventional urease knockout mutants are incapable of colonization. To overcome this constraint, conditional H. pylori urease mutants were constructed by adapting the tetracycline inducible expression system that enabled changing the urease phenotype of the bacteria during established infection. Through tight regulation we demonstrate that urease expression is not only required for establishing initial colonization but also for maintaining chronic infection. Furthermore, successful isolation of tet-escape mutants from a late infection time point revealed the strong selective pressure on this gastric pathogen to continuously express urease in order to maintain chronic infection. In addition to mutations in the conditional gene expression system, escape mutants were found to harbor changes in other genes including the alternative RNA polymerase sigma factor, fliA, highlighting the genetic plasticity of H. pylori to adapt to a changing niche. The tet-system described here opens up opportunities to studying genes involved in the chronic stage of H. pylori infection to gain insight into bacterial mechanisms promoting immune escape and life-long infection. Furthermore, this genetic tool also allows for a new avenue of inquiry into understanding the importance of various virulence determinants in a changing biological environment when the bacterium is put under duress.

  7. Brain-gut axis in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, Jacek; Kłopocka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main pathogenic factor for upper digestive tract organic diseases. In addition to direct cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, H. pylori infection may also induce abnormalities indirectly by affecting the brain-gut axis, similar to other microorganisms present in the alimentary tract. The brain-gut axis integrates the central, peripheral, enteric and autonomic nervous systems, as well as the endocrine and immunological systems, with gastrointestinal functions and environmental stimuli, including gastric and intestinal microbiota. The bidirectional relationship between H. pylori infection and the brain-gut axis influences both the contagion process and the host’s neuroendocrine-immunological reaction to it, resulting in alterations in cognitive functions, food intake and appetite, immunological response, and modification of symptom sensitivity thresholds. Furthermore, disturbances in the upper and lower digestive tract permeability, motility and secretion can occur, mainly as a form of irritable bowel syndrome. Many of these abnormalities disappear following H. pylori eradication. H. pylori may have direct neurotoxic effects that lead to alteration of the brain-gut axis through the activation of neurogenic inflammatory processes, or by microelement deficiency secondary to functional and morphological changes in the digestive tract. In digestive tissue, H. pylori can alter signaling in the brain-gut axis by mast cells, the main brain-gut axis effector, as H. pylori infection is associated with decreased mast cell infiltration in the digestive tract. Nevertheless, unequivocal data concerning the direct and immediate effect of H. pylori infection on the brain-gut axis are still lacking. Therefore, further studies evaluating the clinical importance of these host-bacteria interactions will improve our understanding of H. pylori infection pathophysiology and suggest new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24833851

  8. Functional identification of HugZ, a heme oxygenase from Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Bin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is recognized as an important trace element, essential for most organisms including pathogenic bacteria. HugZ, a protein related to heme iron utilization, is involved in bacterial acquisition of iron from the host. We previously observed that a hugZ homologue is correlated with the adaptive colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, a major gastro-enteric pathogen. However, its exact physiological role remains unclear. Results A gene homologous to hugZ, designated hp0318, identified in H. pylori ATCC 26695, exhibits 66% similarity to cj1613c of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168. Soluble 6 × His fused-HugZ protein was expressed in vitro. Hemin-agrose affinity analysis indicated that the recombinant HugZ protein can bind to hemin. Absorption spectroscopy at 411 nm further revealed a heme:HugZ binding ratio of 1:1. Enzymatic assays showed that purified recombinant HugZ protein can degrade hemin into biliverdin and carbon monoxide in the presence of either ascorbic acid or NADPH and cytochrome P450 reductase. The biochemical and enzymatic characteristics agreed closely with those of Campylobacter jejuni Cj1613c protein, implying that hp0318 is a functional member of the HugZ family. A hugZ deletion mutant was obtained by homologous recombination. This mutant strain showed poor growth when hemoglobin was provided as the source of iron, partly because of its failure to utilize hemoglobin efficiently. Real-time quantitative PCR also confirmed that the expression of hugZ was regulated by iron levels. Conclusion These findings provide biochemical and genetic evidence that hugZ (hp0318 encodes a heme oxygenase involved in iron release/uptake in H. pylori.

  9. Brain-gut axis in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, Jacek; Kłopocka, Maria

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main pathogenic factor for upper digestive tract organic diseases. In addition to direct cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, H. pylori infection may also induce abnormalities indirectly by affecting the brain-gut axis, similar to other microorganisms present in the alimentary tract. The brain-gut axis integrates the central, peripheral, enteric and autonomic nervous systems, as well as the endocrine and immunological systems, with gastrointestinal functions and environmental stimuli, including gastric and intestinal microbiota. The bidirectional relationship between H. pylori infection and the brain-gut axis influences both the contagion process and the host's neuroendocrine-immunological reaction to it, resulting in alterations in cognitive functions, food intake and appetite, immunological response, and modification of symptom sensitivity thresholds. Furthermore, disturbances in the upper and lower digestive tract permeability, motility and secretion can occur, mainly as a form of irritable bowel syndrome. Many of these abnormalities disappear following H. pylori eradication. H. pylori may have direct neurotoxic effects that lead to alteration of the brain-gut axis through the activation of neurogenic inflammatory processes, or by microelement deficiency secondary to functional and morphological changes in the digestive tract. In digestive tissue, H. pylori can alter signaling in the brain-gut axis by mast cells, the main brain-gut axis effector, as H. pylori infection is associated with decreased mast cell infiltration in the digestive tract. Nevertheless, unequivocal data concerning the direct and immediate effect of H. pylori infection on the brain-gut axis are still lacking. Therefore, further studies evaluating the clinical importance of these host-bacteria interactions will improve our understanding of H. pylori infection pathophysiology and suggest new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Riddell

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paediatric population, the associations of Helicobacter pylori with gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenitis and duodenal ulcer, and with duodenal gastric surface metaplasia and disorders of the D cell-G cell axis resulting in hypergastrinemia, are well established and in many ways resemble their counterparts in adults. Eradication of H pylori invariably results in the reversal of these diseases with time. There are also suggestions that gastric surface metaplasia is more extensive in children with H pylori, and may be the site of duodenal H pylori infection and associated duodenal erosions or ulcers. There is no consensus as to whether H pylori in children is more or less severe than in adults. In one paediatric cohort, H pylori was associated with increased intensity of inflammation, while other studies suggest that acute inflammation may be less intense in children overall but that chronic inflammation may be increased in intensity, including lymphoid hyperplasia, which in turn may correlate with endoscopic nodularity. Lymphoid hyperplasia and nodular gastritis appear to be more frequent in children than in adults and usually regress following H pylori eradication. However, in children, other diseases or morphological abnormalities, including some loss of glands (atrophy, occasionally intestinal metaplasia, lymphoproliferative diseases including low grade mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, lymphocytic gastritis and hypertrophic gastritis/Menetrier’s disease, are much less frequently associated with H pylori than in adults. Other associations are rarely seen in children, primarily because the time required for these to develop takes the individual to adulthood; for example, while intestinal metaplasia occurs in the pediatric population, the complications of adenoma/dysplasia and carcinoma are rare. In adults, inflammatory and hyperplastic polyps, atrophic gastritis and pernicious anemia, and in some patients granulomas

  11. Serologic host response to Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni in socially housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienesberger Sabine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori are successful colonizers of the human gastric mucosa. Colonization increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease and adenocarcinoma. However, potential benefits of H. pylori colonization include protection against early-onset asthma and against gastrointestinal infections. Campylobacter jejuni are a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea and complications include Guillain-Barré syndrome. Here, we describe the development of reliable serological assays to detect antibodies against those two bacteria in Rhesus macaques and investigated their distribution within a social group of monkeys. Methods Two cohorts of monkeys were analyzed. The first cohort consisted of 30 monkeys and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for H. pylori antibodies detection. To evaluate colonization of those macaques, stomach biopsies were collected and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by histology and culture. C. jejuni ELISAs were established using human serum with known C. jejuni antibody status. Next, plasma samples of the 89 macaques (Cohort 2 were assayed for antibodies and then statistically analyzed. Results An H. pylori IgG ELISA, which was 100% specific and 93% sensitive, was established. In contrast, the IgA ELISA was only 82% specific and 61% sensitive. The CagA IgG assay was 100% sensitive and 61% of the macaques were positive. In cohort 2, 62% macaques were H. pylori sero-positive and 52% were CagA positive. The prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG increased with monkey age as described for humans. Of the 89 macaques 52% showed IgG against C. jejuni but in contrast to H. pylori, the sero-prevalence was not associated with increasing age. However, there was a drop in the IgG (but not in IgA mean values between infant and juvenile macaques, similar to trends described in humans. Conclusions Rhesus macaques have widespread exposure to H. pylori and C. jejuni, reflecting their social

  12. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  14. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces...... the activation of a complex and fascinating cytokine and chemokine network in the gastric mucosa. Different bacterial and environmental factors, other concomitant infections, and host genetics may influence the balance between mucosal tolerance and inflammation in the course of H. pylori infection. An inverse...... association between H. pylori prevalence and the frequencies of asthma and allergies was demonstrated, and the neutrophil activating protein of H. pylori was shown to inhibit the allergic inflammation of bronchial asthma. During the last year, significant progress was made on the road to the first efficient...

  15. Rapid evolution of distinct Helicobacter pylori subpopulations in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, Kaisa; Yahara, Koji; Berthenet, Elvire; Lawson, Daniel J; Mikhail, Jane; Kato, Ikuko; Mendez, Alfonso; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Bravo, María Mercedes; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Torres, Javier; Sheppard, Samuel K; Falush, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    For the last 500 years, the Americas have been a melting pot both for genetically diverse humans and for the pathogenic and commensal organisms associated with them. One such organism is the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is highly prevalent in Latin America where it is a major current public health challenge because of its strong association with gastric cancer. By analyzing the genome sequence of H. pylori isolated in North, Central and South America, we found evidence for admixture between H. pylori of European and African origin throughout the Americas, without substantial input from pre-Columbian (hspAmerind) bacteria. In the US, strains of African and European origin have remained genetically distinct, while in Colombia and Nicaragua, bottlenecks and rampant genetic exchange amongst isolates have led to the formation of national gene pools. We found three outer membrane proteins with atypical levels of Asian ancestry in American strains, as well as alleles that were nearly fixed specifically in South American isolates, suggesting a role for the ethnic makeup of hosts in the colonization of incoming strains. Our results show that new H. pylori subpopulations can rapidly arise, spread and adapt during times of demographic flux, and suggest that differences in transmission ecology between high and low prevalence areas may substantially affect the composition of bacterial populations.

  16. Rapid evolution of distinct Helicobacter pylori subpopulations in the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Thorell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For the last 500 years, the Americas have been a melting pot both for genetically diverse humans and for the pathogenic and commensal organisms associated with them. One such organism is the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is highly prevalent in Latin America where it is a major current public health challenge because of its strong association with gastric cancer. By analyzing the genome sequence of H. pylori isolated in North, Central and South America, we found evidence for admixture between H. pylori of European and African origin throughout the Americas, without substantial input from pre-Columbian (hspAmerind bacteria. In the US, strains of African and European origin have remained genetically distinct, while in Colombia and Nicaragua, bottlenecks and rampant genetic exchange amongst isolates have led to the formation of national gene pools. We found three outer membrane proteins with atypical levels of Asian ancestry in American strains, as well as alleles that were nearly fixed specifically in South American isolates, suggesting a role for the ethnic makeup of hosts in the colonization of incoming strains. Our results show that new H. pylori subpopulations can rapidly arise, spread and adapt during times of demographic flux, and suggest that differences in transmission ecology between high and low prevalence areas may substantially affect the composition of bacterial populations.

  17. Does Helicobacter pylori exhibit corkscrew motion while swimming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Maira; Hardcastle, Joseph; Bansil, Rama

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral shaped bacterium associated with ulcers, gastric cancer, gastritis among other diseases. In order to colonize the harsh acidic environment of the stomach H. pylori has to go across the viscoelastic mucus layer of the stomach. Many studies have been conducted on the swimming of H. pylori in viscous media however none have taken into account the influence of cell-body shape on the trajectory. We present an experimental study of the effects of body shape in the swimming trajectory of H. pylori in viscous media by a quantitative analysis of the bacterium rotation and translation in gels using phase contrast microscopy and particle tracking techniques. Preliminary microscopic tracking measurements show very well defined helical trajectories in the spiral-shaped wild type H. pylori. These helical trajectories are not seen in rod-shaped mutants which sometimes display whirling motion about one end acting as a hinge. We will present an analysis of the different trajectories for bacteria swimming in media with different viscoelastic parameters. Supported by the National Science Foundation PHY PoLS.

  18. Elimination of Helicobacter pylori under treatment with omeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, M; Bethke, B

    1990-06-01

    Biopsies from the stomachs (antrum and corpus) of 201 patients with peptic ulcers or reflux oesophagitis were retrospectively investigated for the effect of treatment with omeprazole on the elimination of Helicobacter pylori (HP) and on gastritis. Of 64 patients without gastritis two (3.1%) developed gastritis during treatment. Among 134 patients with HP gastritis undergoing treatment, 48 (35.8%) experienced no HP elimination, in 41 (30.6%) there was HP elimination from the antrum, but HP persistence in the corpus, while in 45 (33.6%) HP was eliminated from both antrum and corpus. HP elimination led to a reduction in the degree and activity of gastritis under omeprazole treatment. Only eight patients were examined after completion of treatment, and in three in whom HP had been eliminated, recolonization was found to have occurred. The disappearance of HP in Type A gastritis coupled with the fact that HP is highly sensitive to contamination with other bacteria--as observed in the laboratory--suggests that this now partially established elimination of HP under the strongly acid-inhibiting omeprazole therapy can be traced back to a bacterial overgrowth of the gastric mucosa.

  19. Investigating the Role of Helicobacter pylori PriA Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aparna; Blaskovic, Dusan; Joo, Jungsoo; Yang, Zhen; Jackson, Sharon H; Coleman, William G; Yan, Ming

    2016-08-01

    In bacteria, PriA protein, a conserved DEXH-type DNA helicase, plays a central role in replication restart at stalled replication forks. Its unique DNA binding property allows it to recognize and stabilize stalled forks and the structures derived from them. PriA plays a very critical role in replication fork stabilization and DNA repair in E. coli and N. gonorrhoeae. In our in vivo expression technology screen, priA gene was induced in vivo when Helicobacter pylori infects mouse stomach. We decided to elucidate the role of H. pylori PriA protein in survival in mouse stomach, survival in gastric epithelial cells and macrophage cells, DNA repair, acid stress, and oxidative stress. The priA null mutant strain was unable to colonize mice stomach mucosa after long-term infections. Mouse colonization was observed after 1 week of infection, but the levels were much lower than the wild-type HpSS1 strain. PriA protein was found to be important for intracellular survival of epithelial cell-/macrophage cell-ingested H. pylori. Also, a priA null mutant was more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents and was much more sensitive to acid and oxidative stress as compared to the wild-type strain. These data suggest that the PriA protein is needed for survival and persistence of H. pylori in mice stomach mucosa. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity.

  1. Dormant phages of Helicobacter pylori reveal distinct populations in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, F F; Vadivelu, J; Oleastro, M; Breurec, S; Engstrand, L; Perets, T T; Mégraud, F; Lehours, P

    2015-09-21

    Prophages of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium known to co-evolve in the stomach of its human host, were recently identified. However, their role in the diversity of H. pylori strains is unknown. We demonstrate here and for the first time that the diversity of the prophage genes offers the ability to distinguish between European populations, and that H. pylori prophages and their host bacteria share a complex evolutionary history. By comparing the phylogenetic trees of two prophage genes (integrase and holin) and the multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-based data obtained for seven housekeeping genes, we observed that the majority of the strains belong to the same phylogeographic group in both trees. Furthermore, we found that the Bayesian analysis of the population structure of the prophage genes identified two H. pylori European populations, hpNEurope and hpSWEurope, while the MLST sequences identified one European population, hpEurope. The population structure analysis of H. pylori prophages was even more discriminative than the traditional MLST-based method for the European population. Prophages are new players to be considered not only to show the diversity of H. pylori strains but also to more sharply define human populations.

  2. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative urease-producing bacterium causally linked with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is more frequent and acquired at an earlier age in developing countries compared to European populations. The incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection ...

  3. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with peptic ulcer disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection has been identified as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and is probably the most important cause of relapse in those previously treated for peptic ulcer disease. The aim of this study was to determine the association of Helicobacter pylori infection as ...

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future | Jemilohun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future. ... The discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by Warren and Marshall in 1982 was preceded by nearly a hundred year of inconspicuous publications in ... A major challenge is the absence of a specific antibiotic monotherapy for effective treatment of the infection.

  5. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... Helicobacter pylori is necessary, because of high prevalence of the infection (25 to 90%). ... immunoinformatics tools would be valuable for developing new immuoprophylatic strategy against H. pylori infection. Key words: Helicobacter pylori, catalase, epitopes. ..... tuberculosis epitopes by HLA alleles.

  6. Investigation of association of Helicobacter pylori and simple nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate a possible contribution of Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) in the etiopathogenesis of simple nasal polyps. Study Design: Prospective clinical trial. Methods: Twenty five patients with simple nasal polyps underwent nasal polypectomy were studied. Helicobacter pylori DNA was investigated for ...

  7. Diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori infection correlation between clotest

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are few histopathologists in West African region. Histology results on gastric mucosal biopsies for Helicobacter pylori (HP) usually take between one to two weeks to be out. On the other hand, clo-test results for Helicobacter pylori can be read between 5 minutes to 24 hours. Is one justified to commence ...

  8. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    OpenAIRE

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermato...

  9. Heterogeneity in susceptibility to metronidazole among Helicobacter pylori isolates from patients with gastritis or peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, J. F.; van der Hulst, R. W.; Gerrits, Y.; Tytgat, G. N.; van der Ende, A.; Dankert, J.

    1996-01-01

    Combination therapies that include metronidazole (MTZ) are the most successful therapies used in eradicating Helicobacter pylori. In this study, the prevalence and the relevance of heterogeneity in susceptibility to MTZ among H. pylori populations of 156 patients were evaluated. The results of this

  10. A influência dos procedimentos endoscópicos na contaminação de culturas de Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Marcelo L.; Godoy, Anita P.O.; Benvengo, Yune H. B.; Ecclissato, Christina C.; Mendonça, Sergio; Pedrazzoli Jr, José

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the various diagnostic methods for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, histological examination and microbiological processing of gastric biopsy samples are assumed to be the gold standard techniques. AIMS: Since H. pylori culture can be affected by the presence of non-H. pylori bacteria, we evaluated the efficacy of endoscope disinfection and the influence of endoscopic procedures on culture contamination. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The procedures used during the fir...

  11. Immunohistochemical testing for Helicobacter Pylori existence in neoplasms of the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Nurgul

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a common pathogen, and its prevalence varies with socioeconomic conditions (10–80%. It has recently been recognized as a class I carcinogen in relation to gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in neoplasms of the colon by immunohistochemical methods. Methods The polypectomy materials of 51 patients (19 male and 32 female who had undergone colonoscopic polypectomy were retrieved for retrospective examination. The endoscopic size and colonic localization of the polyps were recorded. Hematoxylin and eosin stains were evaluated according to histological type and grade of dysplasia. Biopsy stains were immunohistochemically treated with Helicobacter pylori antibodies by the streptavidine-biotin immunoperoxidase technique. Helicobacter pylori staining in the gastric mucosa was used as the control for the immunohistochemical method. Specimens were classified according to the presence of Helicobacter pylori under an optical microscope, and Helicobacter pylori positive specimens were stratified according to the respective staining pattern. Results Mean age was 61.88 ± 10.62 (40–82 years. Polyp sizes were 1.45 ± 0.92 (1–4 cm; and 25.5% of polyps were localized in the right colon, 68.6% in the left colon and 5.9% in the transverse colon. Presence of Helicobacter pylori was not correlated with localization (p > 0.05 or size of the polyps (p > 0.05. Eleven (21.6% of all specimens included in the study were Helicobacter pylori positive by immunohistochemical methods. Of the Helicobacter pylori positive specimens, the staining pattern was diffuse: Equivocal in 90.9%, nonspecific with a finely granular type concentrated on the luminal surface in 90.9%, dot-like granular in 54.5%, and spiral in 9.1%. Of the tubular polyps, 17.9% were H. pylori positive, and the staining pattern was equivocal in 100%, luminal in 85.7%, and dot-like granular in 57.1%. Of the

  12. Helicobacter pylori: comparative genomics and structure-function analysis of the flagellum biogenesis protein HP0958

    OpenAIRE

    de Lacy Clancy, Ceara A.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen which infects ~50% of the global population and can lead to the development of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and carcinoma. Genome sequencing of H. pylori revealed high levels of genetic variability; this pathogen is known for its adaptability due to mechanisms including phase variation, recombination and horizontal gene transfer. Motility is essential for efficient colonisation by H. pylori. The flagellum is a complex nanomachine which has b...

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Superficial Gastritis, Erosive Gastritis and Gastric Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Albertus, Jacobus; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Simadibrata, Marcellus; Abdullah, Murdani; Syam, Ari Fahrial

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to inflammation of the gastric mucosa. It damages the gastric epithelium and related to the risk of developing gastric cancer. Over time, it may develop into the development of glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. This study was aimed to evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including H. pylori infection in patients with endoscopically found superficial gastritis, erosive gastritis and gastric ulcer. Method: ...

  14. Isolation of Helicobacter canis from a Colony of Bengal Cats with Endemic Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Janet E.; Marks, Stanley L.; Munson, Linda; Melli, Ann; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Yu, Shilu; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of biochemical, phenotypic, and 16S rRNA analyses, Helicobacter canis was isolated from Bengal cats with and without chronic diarrhea. Because the cats were coinfected with other potential pathogens, including Campylobacter helveticus, and because H. canis was isolated from nondiarrheic cats, the causal role of H. canis in producing the diarrhea could not be proven. Histologically, the colons of the four affected cats were characterized by mild to moderate neutrophilic, plasmacyt...

  15. Recent Advances in Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: From the Petri Dish to the Playgound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Yuan Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired in childhood, plays a causative role in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is associated with the development of gastric cancer. The present review focuses on recent advances in the scientific knowledge of H pylori infection in children, including clinical sequelae, diagnosis and treatment. In addition, recent insights regarding both bacterial and host factors that mediate human diseases associated with H pylori infection are discussed.

  16. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Diseases and Non-Ulcer Dyspepsia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyo Rang; Han, Ki Soo; Yoo, Byung Chul; Park, Sill Moo; Cha, Young Joo

    1993-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is known to be a cause of active chronic gastritis and has been proposed as an etiologic factor in the development of peptic ulcer disease, but controversy continues regarding the pathogenic importance and mechanism. We examined the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcers and non-ulcer dyspepsia. Method: 749 patients (373 with duodenal ulcer, 303 with gastric ulcer, 73 with non-ulcer dyspepsia) were included. Endoscopic mucosal biopsies...

  17. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors in patients with benign peptic ulcer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Depender Kumar Timshina; Pankaja SS; Himagirish K Rao; Vikram Kate

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the risk factors in patients with benign gastric and duodenal ulcers and to correlate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in benign peptic ulcer disease. Methods: A total of 30 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer disease were included in this study after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Their clinical profile and endoscopic findings were noted. Antral biopsies were subjected to histopathological examination and urease...

  18. Chronic idiophatic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori: a specific pattern of gastritis and urticaria remission after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persechino, S; Annibale, B; Caperchi, C; Persechino, F; Narcisi, A; Tammaro, A; Milione, M; Corleto, V

    2012-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined as the occurrence of spontaneous wheals for a duration of more than 6 weeks and is the most frequent skin disease, with prevalence ranging between 15 and 25%, and is a seriously disabling condition, with social isolation and mood changes causing a significant degree of dysfunction and quality of life impairment to many patients. The main clinical features of CU are the repeated occurrence of transient eruptions of pruritic wheals or patchy erythema on the skin that last less than 24 hours and disappear without sequelae. CU is often defined as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) because the causes of CU remain unknown in the great majority (70-95%) of patients. Drugs, food, viruses, alimentary conservative substances or inhalant substances often seem to be involved in determining CIU skin flare. Despite a general agreement that bacteria infections and parasitic infestations can be involved in the pathogenesis of CIU, proven evidence of these relationships is lacking. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, and the extension and severity of gastritis in a group of CIU patients compared to controls and to evaluate the effectiveness of eradication of Hp on the CIU symptomatology, and the role of Hp infection in pathogenesis of CIU.

  19. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  20. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrese, Michael; Kristen, Holger; Rautenberg, Peter; Laue, Christiane; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    To investigate matrix-specifity of probiotic effects and particularly of the reduction of antibiotics-associated diarrhea, a controlled, randomized, double-blind study was performed, in which 88 Helicobacter pylori-infected but otherwise healthy subjects were given for eight weeks either a) a probiotic fruit yoghurt "mild" containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, n = 30), b) the same product but pasteurized after fermentation (n = 29) or c) milk acidified with lactic acid (control, n = 29). During week five, a Helicobacter eradication therapy was performed. Helicobacter activity was measured via 13C-2-urea breath tests and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal complaints were recorded by validated questionnaires. In intervention group a, b and c the mean number of days with diarrhoea was 4, 10 and 10 (Pprobiotic bacteria but (rather) to components of acidified milk (most probably lactic acid). Fruit-yogurt-like fermented milk products with living probiotic bacteria significantly shorten the duration of antibiotics-associated diarrhoea and improve gastrointestinal complaints. Fruit yogurt-like fermented milk is a matrix suitable for probiotic bacteria.

  1. Treatment of children with (Helicobacter pylori) infection and malabsorption syndromes with probiotics comparison with conventional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, P.F.; De Maio, G.; Andriulli, A.; Ghoos, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is very high in the developing world where primary infection is acquired in early infancy. It may play a role as aggravating factor of malnutrition. This prevalence is decreasing in industrialised countries. In more cases symptomatology include recurrent abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. Endoscopy in children is not always available in developing countries. The non-invasive 13 CO 2 Urea Breath Test is particularly indicated in these cases and has been validated as a reliable diagnostic and follow-up tool. The main problem in some countries is to find the good antibiotics without resistance. In this project the authors aim at long-term studying the relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection and nutritional status in young children of developing countries. The conditions of infection as well as absorption and pre- and post treatment period will be monitored by 13 CO 2 Urea Breath Tests. (author)

  2. Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Carrara, Elena; Savoldi, Alessia; Harbarth, Stephan; Mendelson, Marc; Monnet, Dominique L; Pulcini, Céline; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Kluytmans, Jan; Carmeli, Yehuda; Ouellette, Marc; Outterson, Kevin; Patel, Jean; Cavaleri, Marco; Cox, Edward M; Houchens, Chris R; Grayson, M Lindsay; Hansen, Paul; Singh, Nalini; Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Magrini, Nicola

    2018-03-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a substantial threat to morbidity and mortality worldwide. Due to its large public health and societal implications, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has been long regarded by WHO as a global priority for investment in new drugs. In 2016, WHO was requested by member states to create a priority list of other antibiotic-resistant bacteria to support research and development of effective drugs. We used a multicriteria decision analysis method to prioritise antibiotic-resistant bacteria; this method involved the identification of relevant criteria to assess priority against which each antibiotic-resistant bacterium was rated. The final priority ranking of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria was established after a preference-based survey was used to obtain expert weighting of criteria. We selected 20 bacterial species with 25 patterns of acquired resistance and ten criteria to assess priority: mortality, health-care burden, community burden, prevalence of resistance, 10-year trend of resistance, transmissibility, preventability in the community setting, preventability in the health-care setting, treatability, and pipeline. We stratified the priority list into three tiers (critical, high, and medium priority), using the 33rd percentile of the bacterium's total scores as the cutoff. Critical-priority bacteria included carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and carbapenem-resistant and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. The highest ranked Gram-positive bacteria (high priority) were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Of the bacteria typically responsible for community-acquired infections, clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori, and fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter spp, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Salmonella typhi were included in the high-priority tier. Future development strategies should focus on

  3. No Helicobacter pylori, no Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all duodenal ulcers (DUs) and the vast majority of gastric ulcers (GUs) are the consequence of Helicobacter pylori-associated inflammation. In DUs, the inflammation is maximal in the antrum and is associated with gastric metaplasia in the bulb. Gastrin homeostasis is disturbed by H. pylori

  4. Occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Kik, Marja; Timmerman, Arjen J; Severs, Tim T; Kusters, Johannes G; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species have been isolated from many vertebrate hosts, including birds, mammals, and reptiles. Multiple studies have focused on the prevalence of these Epsilonproteobacteria genera in avian and mammalian species. However, little focus has been given to the presence within reptiles, and their potential zoonotic and pathogenic roles. In this study, occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria were determined for a large variety of reptiles. From 2011 to 2013, 444 cloacal swabs and fecal samples originating from 417 predominantly captive-held reptiles were screened for Epsilonproteobacteria. Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter genus specific PCRs were performed directly on all samples. All samples were also cultured on selective media and screened for the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria. Using a tiered approach of AFLP, atpA, and 16S rRNA sequencing, 432 Epsilonproteobacteria isolates were characterized at the species level. Based on PCR, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter were detected in 69.3% of the reptiles; 82.5% of the chelonians, 63.8% of the lizards, and 58.0% of the snakes were positive for one or more of these genera. Epsilonproteobacteria were isolated from 22.1% of the reptiles and were isolated most frequently from chelonians (37.0%), followed by lizards (19.6%) and snakes (3.0%). The most commonly isolated taxa were Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter skirrowii, reptile-associated Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum, and a putative novel Campylobacter taxon. Furthermore, a clade of seven related putative novel Helicobacter taxa was isolated from lizards and chelonians. This study shows that reptiles carry various intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria taxa, including several putative novel taxa.

  5. Occurrence, Diversity, and Host Association of Intestinal Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J.; Kik, Marja; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Severs, Tim T.; Kusters, Johannes G.; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species have been isolated from many vertebrate hosts, including birds, mammals, and reptiles. Multiple studies have focused on the prevalence of these Epsilonproteobacteria genera in avian and mammalian species. However, little focus has been given to the presence within reptiles, and their potential zoonotic and pathogenic roles. In this study, occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria were determined for a large variety of reptiles. From 2011 to 2013, 444 cloacal swabs and fecal samples originating from 417 predominantly captive-held reptiles were screened for Epsilonproteobacteria. Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter genus specific PCRs were performed directly on all samples. All samples were also cultured on selective media and screened for the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria. Using a tiered approach of AFLP, atpA, and 16S rRNA sequencing, 432 Epsilonproteobacteria isolates were characterized at the species level. Based on PCR, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter were detected in 69.3% of the reptiles; 82.5% of the chelonians, 63.8% of the lizards, and 58.0% of the snakes were positive for one or more of these genera. Epsilonproteobacteria were isolated from 22.1% of the reptiles and were isolated most frequently from chelonians (37.0%), followed by lizards (19.6%) and snakes (3.0%). The most commonly isolated taxa were Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter skirrowii, reptile-associated Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum, and a putative novel Campylobacter taxon. Furthermore, a clade of seven related putative novel Helicobacter taxa was isolated from lizards and chelonians. This study shows that reptiles carry various intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria taxa, including several putative novel taxa. PMID:24988130

  6. Oxygen reactivity of PutA from Helicobacter species and proline-linked oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F

    2006-02-01

    Proline is converted to glutamate in two successive steps by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme in gram-negative bacteria. PutA contains a proline dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidation of proline to delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and a P5C dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of P5C to glutamate. Here, we characterize PutA from Helicobacter hepaticus (PutA(Hh)) and Helicobacter pylori (PutA(Hp)) to provide new insights into proline metabolism in these gastrointestinal pathogens. Both PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) lack DNA binding activity, in contrast to PutA from Escherichia coli (PutA(Ec)), which both regulates and catalyzes proline utilization. PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) display catalytic activities similar to that of PutA(Ec) but have higher oxygen reactivity. PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) exhibit 100-fold-higher turnover numbers (approximately 30 min(-1)) than PutA(Ec) (PutA(Hh) forms a reversible FAD-sulfite adduct. The significance of increased oxygen reactivity in PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) was probed by oxidative stress studies in E. coli. Expression of PutA(Ec) and PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which exhibit low oxygen reactivity, does not diminish stress survival rates of E. coli cell cultures. In contrast, PutA(Hp) and PutA(Hh) expression dramatically reduces E. coli cell survival and is correlated with relatively lower proline levels and increased hydrogen peroxide formation. The discovery of reduced oxygen species formation by PutA suggests that proline catabolism may influence redox homeostasis in the ecological niches of these Helicobacter species.

  7. Electron microscopic, genetic and protein expression analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis strains from a Bengal tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Rivas Traverso, Francisco; Rohde, Manfred; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Lehn, Norbert; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Ferrero, Richard L; Fox, James G; Berg, Douglas E; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5-6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections.

  8. Electron microscopic, genetic and protein expression analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis strains from a Bengal tiger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Tegtmeyer

    Full Text Available Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5-6 µm and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections.

  9. Electron Microscopic, Genetic and Protein Expression Analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis Strains from a Bengal Tiger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Rivas Traverso, Francisco; Rohde, Manfred; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Lehn, Norbert; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Ferrero, Richard L.; Fox, James G.; Berg, Douglas E.; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5–6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections. PMID:23940723

  10. In Vivo Analysis of the Viable Microbiota and Helicobacter pylori Transcriptome in Gastric Infection and Early Stages of Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, Kaisa; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Liu, Oscar Hsin-Fu; Palacios Gonzales, Reyna Victoria; Nookaew, Intawat; Rabeneck, Linda; Paszat, Lawrence; Graham, David Y; Nielsen, Jens; Lundin, Samuel B; Sjöling, Åsa

    2017-10-01

    Emerging evidence shows that the human microbiota plays a larger role in disease progression and health than previously anticipated. Helicobacter pylori , the causative agent of gastric cancer and duodenal and gastric ulcers, was early associated with gastric disease, but it has also been proposed that the accompanying microbiota in Helicobacter pylori -infected individuals might affect disease progression and gastric cancer development. In this study, the composition of the transcriptionally active microbial community and H. pylori gene expression were determined using metatranscriptomic RNA sequencing of stomach biopsy specimens from individuals with different H. pylori infection statuses and premalignant tissue changes. The results show that H. pylori completely dominates the microbiota not only in infected individuals but also in most individuals classified as H. pylori uninfected using conventional methods. Furthermore, H. pylori abundance is positively correlated with the presence of Campylobacter , Deinococcus , and Sulfurospirillum Finally, we quantified the expression of a large number of Helicobacter pylori genes and found high expression of genes involved in pH regulation and nickel transport. Our study is the first to dissect the viable microbiota of the human stomach by metatranscriptomic analysis, and it shows that metatranscriptomic analysis of the gastric microbiota is feasible and can provide new insights into how bacteria respond in vivo to variations in the stomach microenvironment and at different stages of disease progression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Investigation of the effect of recombinant Neutrophil activating protein (Hp-NapA of helicobacter pylori on proliferation and viability by peritoneal macrophage from BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP of Helicobacter pylori is a protective antigen and a major virulence factor of this bacteria. Stimulating the immune system for helicobacter infection treatment could have an important role. The aim of study is to assess the effect of recombinant Neutrophil activating protein (Hp-NapA of helicobacter pylori on proliferation and viability of peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, recombinant Hp-NapA of helicobacter pylori was produced in vitro. Mice peritoneal macrophages were purified and cultured. Different concentrations of recombinant Hp-NapA was used for macrophages stimulation. MTT assay was performed to assess the viability and proliferation of macrophages. Results: The results elucidated that the increasing effect of stimulation with recombinant Hp-NapA was significant at the dose of 30 µg/ml(p=0.01. The rate of viabitity was significantly higher than control group at the doses of 30 and 60 µg/ml and in the concurrency series of recombinant protein with lipopolysaccharid, there was a statistically significarit increase in proliferation at just these doses. Conclusion: According to our findings, recombinant Hp-NapA has a positive effect on proliferation, viability and function of peritoneal macrophages. Therefore, it is proposed that recombinant Hp-NapA can be studied as an immunomodulator for immunotherapy.

  12. Expression of Helicobacter pylori hspA Gene in Lactococcus lactis NICE System and Experimental Study on Its Immunoreactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Juan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to develop an oral Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Methods. After L. lactis NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA was constructed, growth curves were plotted to study whether the growth of recombinant L. lactis was affected after hspA was cloned into L. lactis and whether the growth of empty bacteria, empty plasmid bacteria, and recombinant L. lactis was affected by different concentrations of Nisin; SDS-PAGE and Western blot were adopted, respectively, to detect the HspA expressed by recombinant L. lactis and its immunoreactivity. Results. There was no effect observed from the growth curve after exogenous gene hspA was cloned into L. lactis NZ3900; different concentrations of Nisin did not affect the growth of NZ3900 and NZ3900/pNZ8110, while different concentrations of Nisin inhibited the growth of NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA except 10 ng/mL Nisin. No HspA strip was observed from SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis showed that HspA expressed by recombinant bacteria had favorable immunoreactivity. Conclusion. The growth of recombinant L. lactis was suppressed even though a small amount of HspA had been induced to express. Therefore recombinant L. lactis only express HspA which was not suitable to be oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori.

  13. Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zare Javid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic organism that colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic-active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancers, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach and MALT (mucosal-associated lymphoid tumor lymphomas. H. pylori colonizes the stomach of over 50 % the world’s human population, primarily those who reside in developing nations. Infection is generally first acquired in children, who may be entirely asymptomatic, and then persists for life, unless specific eradication therapy is initiated. All infected individuals have mucosal inflammation in the stomach in response to the organism, but only a subset will develop disease complications, such as an ulcer in the stomach or proximal duodenum and cancer in either the body or the antrum of the stomach. It is estimated that the lifetime risk of developing peptic ulceration is roughly 15%. However, this is an exceedingly important disease, because it has serious morbidity and mortality. Eradication of H. pylori infection is not successful when using antibiotics as monotherapy or dual therapy using combinations of an acid-suppressing agent and an antibiotic or two antibiotics without acid blockage. Multiple studies show that some probiotic strains can inhibit the growth of H. pylori. To date, probiotics do not appear to have a role as sole therapy for use in the prevention or treatment of H. pylori infection. However, there is increasing evidence that a variety of probiotic agents are useful as adjunctive therapy, which can both enhance the success of eradicating the gastric pathogen while, reduce the frequency and severity of adverse effects arising from the other agents that are employed in current combination treatment regimens. Future studies should assess the role of prebiotics and synbiotics and products derived from probiotics as additional options for use in the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection

  14. Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy: getting research into practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer (DU). Guidelines recommend that all patients with DU be considered for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy (HPET). However, the proportion of patients with DU on long term anti-ulcer medication receiving HPET is small. This study examined the effectiveness of the continuing medical education (CME) network of the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) in promoting best practice in DU treatment among GPs in an eastern region of Ireland. Ninty eight GPs recruited from the CME network of the ICGP were randomised in two cohorts. Cohort 1 received an (early) intervention; GPs were asked to identify their patients with DU receiving long term anti-ulcer medication and prescribe HPET according to defined criteria. Cohort 2 received the intervention later. Prescribing of HPET was monitored using routine prescribing data. Twenty per cent (286\\/1,422) of patients in cohort 1 and 19.2% (127\\/661) in cohort 2 had a DU. After exclusions, 53% (152\\/286) in cohort 1 and 30.7% (39\\/127) in cohort 2, were eligible for HPET. A significantly higher proportion of patients in cohort 1 received HPET compared with cohort 2 during the early intervention period (13.8% vs 0.0%, p<0.05). Reasons for not prescribing HPET included concurrent illness in patients, failure to comply with treatment. Best practice guidelines on HPET treatment of DU can be successfully applied using CME networks. This model could be repeated in another therapeutic area where established research is not yet current practice.

  15. The Association of Helicobacter pylori Infection with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alsadat Salami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD are multifactorial conditions that result from genetic predisposition in combination with environmental risk factors. Helicobacter pylori infection as an environmental risk factor has been proposed to imitate the antigenic components of the thyroid cell membrane and may play a leading role in the onset of the autoimmune diseases, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT. The participants in this case-control study included 43 patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 40 healthy individuals without history of autoimmune disease as the control group. Anti HP IgG and anti-TPO antibodies were determined using ELISA method. Results were considered positive when the IgG anti-HP value was higher than 30 IU/ml and the anti-TPO autoantibody value was higher than 75 IU/ml. The mean TSH level was 18.3±16.8 IU/ml for patients and 2.8±1.2 IU/ml for the control group (P<0.001. 46.5% of the patient group and 10.8% of the control group were infected with HP. The association between HP and Hashimoto's thyroiditis was statistically significant (Odds Ratio=7.2, 95%, Confidence Interval: 2.0- 28.8, P<0.001. The findings show that, there is an association between HP and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. To establish a definite correlation between them, more detailed studies with a more specialized examination and precise consideration regarding species of HP, genetic polymorphism of the host and investigation of environmental factors are needed.

  16. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in autoimmune systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Mislav

    2014-09-28

    The relationship between infection and autoimmunity has been increasingly defined over the last 20 years. The systemic rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to self-antigen. The exact etiology for the majority of these diseases is unknown; however, a complex combination of host and environmental factors are believed to play a pivotal role. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widely studied infectious agents proposed as agents triggering autoimmune response. The persistent presence of H. pylori in the gastric mucosa results in chronic immune system activation with ongoing cytokine signaling, infiltration of gastric mucosa by neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes, as well as production of antibodies and effector T-cells. Various mechanisms have been proposed in an attempt to explain the extra-intestinal manifestations of H. pylori infections. These include: molecular mimicry, endothelial cell damage, superantigens and microchimerism. I performed a systematic literature review using the keywords "rheumatoid arthritis", "Sjögren's syndrome", "systemic sclerosis", "systemic lupus erythematosus", "Helicobacter pylori" and "pathogenesis". A systematic literature search was carried out in MEDLINE; EMBASE; Cochrane Library and ACR/EULAR meeting abstracts. In systemic rheumatic diseases H. pylori infection prevalence alone should not be expected to provide sufficient evidence for or against a pathologic role in the disease. In this article I review studies examining the potential involvement of H. pylori infection in autoimmune systemic rheumatic diseases. Further studies of the immunological response to H. pylori and its role in the pathogenesis of systemic rheumatic diseases are warranted.

  17. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Soud, W.; Bennedsen, M.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2003-01-01

    bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products (similar to400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results...

  18. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Northern Jordan: Endoscopy based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bani-Hani, Kamal E.; Hammouri, Shadi M.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is considered the most common infection worldwide and is associated with many other disorders. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of this infection among patients undergoing endoscopy in Northern Jordan. Between November 1998 and September 2000, all patients referred from the Gastro-esophageal Clinic to the Endoscopy Unit at Princess Basma Teaching Hospital, Irbid, Northern Jordan were enrolled in this prospective study. For each patient clinical and epidemiological data was collected and endoscopy was performed. At least 3 antral biopsies were obtained from each patient, and these were examined histologically for the presence of gastritis and stained for Helicobacter pylori using modified Giemsa stain. A total of 197 consecutive patients (113 females) with a mean age of 40.2 years (range 15-91 years) were studied. Abdominal pain was the highest presenting symptom. Gastritis 91% and esophagitis 42% were the most frequent endoscopic findings. Gastritis was documented histologically in 183 (93%) of patients. Helicobacter pylori was found in 161 patients (82%), with all of these having histological gastritis. The 11 patients with gastric ulcer, compared to the 51 out of the 59 (86%) patients with duodenal ulcer, showed Helicobacter pylori in their biopsies. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients subjected to an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Jordan is high. This study confirms that Helicobacter pylori is significantly associated with gastritis and peptic ulcer. Further studies are needed to determine the types of Helicobacter pylori strains present in Jordan. (author)

  19. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  20. Estudio del perfil de anticuerpos contra Helicobacter pylori producidos por pacientes con diferentes patologías gastroduodenales

    OpenAIRE

    Spinel Clara; Bravo María Mercedes; Bermúdez Olga María

    2004-01-01

    La colonización de la mucosa gástrica con Helicobacter pylori causa la infección bacteriana más frecuente a nivel mundial que es la mayor causa de enfermedades gastrointestinales en humanos. Con el objetivo de examinar el reconocimiento de antígenos de dos cepas de la bacteria en
    150 pacientes infectados y con inflamación (30 de gastritis crónica no atrófica G), úlcera duodenal (30 UD), patologías preneoplásicas (30 de gastritis atrófica GA y 30 de metaplasia intestinal MI) y adeno...

  1. Dual Nuclease and Helicase Activities of Helicobacter pylori AddAB Are Required for DNA Repair, Recombination, and Mouse Infectivity*

    OpenAIRE

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Fero, Jutta; Salama, Nina R.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the human stomach is associated with disease-causing inflammation that elicits DNA damage in both bacterial and host cells. Bacteria must repair their DNA to persist. The H. pylori AddAB helicase-exonuclease is required for DNA repair and efficient stomach colonization. To dissect the role of each activity in DNA repair and infectivity, we altered the AddA and AddB nuclease (NUC) domains and the AddA helicase (HEL) domain by site-directed mutagenesis. Extracts...

  2. Money and transmission of bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gedik, H.; Voss, T.A.; Voss, A.

    2013-01-01

    Money is one of the most frequently passed items in the world. The aim of this study was to ascertain the survival status of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Vancomycin- Resistant Enterococci (VRE) on banknotes from different countries and the transmission of bacteria

  3. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Asymptomatic Children in Birjand, Eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokab Namakin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori is the cause of serious diseases including gastric cancer and gastric mucosa–associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.50% of world population is infected by this microorganism and it -based on epidemiologic studies - is mainly acquired during childhood . there is not enough evidence about prevalence of this infection in children and its risk factors so encourage us to study on it.Method : we tested 282 apparently healthy 9-12 year old students in a population based cross sectional study for Helicobacter pylori colonization using H pylori Antigen EIA Test Kit (ACON company.a short socio demographic questionnaire was used to assess risk factors.Findings: the overall prevalence of H pylori colonization in 282 students is 13.1%. we found statistically significant relationship between H pylori colonization and sex, duration of breast feeding, and family crowding but there is not significant relationship with age , family history of dyspepsia , number of days in week consuming yogurt and economically stratified living region in present study.Conclusion: Helicobacter Pylori is a big concern even in young asymptomatic children and it needs to be further studied about its potential risk factors and how to manage them for the goal of prevention.

  4. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ESOPHAGITIS GRADES AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Patrícia Fernanda Saboya; Kubrusly, Luiz Fernandao; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Ribeiro, Irma Cláudia Saboya; Bertoldi, Andressa de Souza; Batistão, Venessa Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori infection (HP) is related to the development of gastric lesions and lymphoma; however, it is not known if there is a relation with gastroesophageal reflux disease and reflux esophagitis. To evaluate HP's relationship with esophagitis in patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Observational, retrospective and cross-sectional study, being evaluated 9576 patients undergoing outpatient endoscopic examination during the period between January and December 2015. Were included patients with any esophageal alteration at the examination; greater than 18; of both genders; independent of the complaint or the reason for the examination, illness or drug use. Were excluded those with active bleeding during the examination and in use of anticoagulants. The variables gender, age, esophagitis and result of the urease test, were studied. For statistical analysis was used the Epi Info software 7.1.5.2. Most of the samples consisted of women and the overall average age was 46.54±16.32 years. The presence of infection was balanced for gender: 1204 (12.56%) women and 952 (13.92%) men. Relating degree of esophagitis HP- and HP+ was observed that the type A was the most common (58.79%, n=1460); 604 (24.32%) had grade B; 334 (13.45%) grade C, and 85 (3.42%) grade D. In the relation between the grade of esophagitis with gender, esophagitis A was predominant in women and present in 929 (63.33%), followed by type B, 282 (46.68%), 136 C (40.71%) and D 30 (35.29%). In men 531 (36.36%) showed type A, 322 (53.31%) B, 198 (59.28%) C, and 55 (64.70%) D. Among the groups 40-50 and over 60 years there was a significant difference in whether have or not have HP+. There is no significant difference between HP infection and the different grades of esophagitis. A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (HP) é relacionada com o desenvolvimento de lesões e linfoma gástricos; porém, ainda não se sabe ao certo se há relação dele com a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e esofagite

  5. Helicobacter pylori y dispepsia, un problema de salud comunitario

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual; Ludmila Concepción Izaguirre

    2002-01-01

    Mientras la relación causal entre el Helicobacter pylori y la gastritis crónica, así como la importante conexión entre esta infección, la úlcera gastroduodenal y el cáncer gástrico han sido bien establecidas, la asociación entre la infección por Helicobacter pylori y la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" es un problema que dista mucho de estar esclarecido. Hay autores que no dudan en utilizar tratamiento de erradicación en la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" con Helicobacter pylori, pero existen enfoques alterna...

  6. [Latin American contribution to the study of Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Ramos, Alberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Rolando

    2009-09-01

    We have reviewed Lilacs, PubMed and Google searching for original articles related to Helicobacter pylori published by Latin American investigators from 2003 to 2008. Contributions in the following fields by countries are: Molecular biology: Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Peru y Venezuela. Argentina, Brasil, Colombia, Cuba, Peru y Venezuela. Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Mexico, Peru y Venezuela. Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal diseases: Brasil, Cuba, Peru y Venezuela. Helicobacter pylori and extra digestive diseases: Brasil, Colombia and Venezuela. Pediatrics: Brasil, Cuba y Venezuela. Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru y Venezuela.

  7. Stability data of FlgD from Helicobacter pylori and structural comparison with other homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Pulić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Flagellin component D (FlgD from Helicobacter pylori is involved in the assembly of the hook of flagella, helical tubular structures that provide motility in non-filamentous bacteria. Data provided in this article refer to HpFlgD from strains 26695 (HpFlgD_26695 and G27 (HpFlgD_G27. Within this article, information on the secondary structure content and different type of interfaces found in the two crystal forms of HpFlgD (monoclinic, HpFlgD_m and tetragonal, HpFlgD_t are provided, as well as the list of the hydrogen bonds between monomers that are relevant for their assembly into a tetramer. Additionally, data involving investigation of the size of HpFlgD in the solution and the crystallized HpFlgD are presented, “Crystal structure of truncated FlgD from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori” [1]. The superposition of the different domains of HpFlgD (Fn-III and tudor domains with the similar domains found in other species is shown, as well as the superposition of HpFlgD and modeled HpFlgE (flagellar hook protein.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...... with a rapid urease test. Proton pump inhibitor therapy should be stopped at least 1 week prior to Hp testing. All infected patients should be offered Hp eradication therapy. First-line treatment is 7-day triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and clarithromycine in combination with metronidazole...

  9. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Coliform Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about coliform bacteria. Including sections about what coliform bacteria is, how it enters drinking water, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, and how to treat drinking water that contains coliforms.

  10. Helicobacter pylori colonization and obesity - A Mendelian randomization study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. den Hollander (Wouter); L. Broer (Linda); C. Schurmann (Claudia); D. Meyre (David); C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); J. Mayerle (Julia); Hofman, A. (Albert); G. Homuth (Georg); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Lerch, M.M. (Markus M.); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObesity is associated with substantial morbidity, costs, and decreased life expectancy, and continues to rise worldwide. While etiological understanding is needed for prevention, epidemiological studies indicated that colonization with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) may affect body mass

  11. Helicobacter Pylori – A Moving Target | Lambiotte | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pylori) continues to grow. Testing is also now advised for patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura, unexplained vitamin B12 or iron deficiency anemia. Despite the indications for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection widening, definitive ...

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in children by noninvasive stool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in children by noninvasive stool Antigen Enzyme Immunoassay. Augustine O. Ebonyi, Emeka Ejeliogu, Stanley T. Odigbo, Martha Omoo Ochoga, Stephen Oguche, Anejo-Okopi A. Joseph ...

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection in Africa: Pathology and microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    alkalinization (McNamara and ..... pylori from gastric biopsy specimens, saliva, faeces and archival specimens (Smith et al., 2002; .... (2003). Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in normal or asymptomatic patients. Tunis. Med.

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and risk factors among dyspepsia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori antibody conjugated with colloid gold nitrocellulose membrane strip and a structured face-to-face interview was also administered to assess risk factors for H. pylori infection. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Logistic ...

  15. NF-κB activation and severity of gastritis in Helicobacter pylori-infected children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontems, Patrick; Aksoy, Ezra; Burette, Alain; Segers, Valérie; Deprez, Carine; Mascart, Françoise; Cadranel, Samy

    2014-06-01

    In contrast to adults, Helicobacter pylori gastritis in children is reported as milder and ulcer disease as uncommon, but unequivocal data are lacking. To compare the frequency of gastro-duodenal ulcers in children and adults as well as the proportion of Helicobacter pylori infection in these patients and to study the effect of chronological age on NF-κB activation and on severity of gastritis. Patients referred in one pediatric and one adult facility for upper GI endoscopy were included. Gastric biopsies were obtained in consecutive Helicobacter pylori-infected patients and age-matched negative controls for immunohistochemistry and electrophoresis mobility shift assay. Three age groups were defined: younger than 8 years, 8-17 years, and adults. Peptic ulcer disease was less frequent in children and less frequently associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. When comparing infected subjects to controls, densities of neutrophils and CD20 cells in the lamina propria increased in all age groups, CD3 cells increasing only in patients older than 8 years and CD8 cells only in adults. NF-κB-p65-positive cells were also increased only in infected adults as well as NF-κB-binding activity. A positive correlation was found between age and densities of neutrophils and CD3, but not of CD8 or CD20 cells. Peptic ulcer disease was less frequent in children and less frequently caused by Helicobacter pylori infection. The different clinical outcome of the infection in children can be the consequence of the lower mucosal immune response. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaridou E

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Lazaridou,1 Chrysovalantis Korfitis,2 Christina Kemanetzi,1 Elena Sotiriou,1 Zoe Apalla,1 Efstratios Vakirlis,1 Christina Fotiadou,1 Aimilios Lallas,1 Demetrios Ioannides1 1First Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Dermatology, 401 General Army Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. Keywords: eradication, Helicobacter pylori, pathogenesis, rosacea

  17. Newer agents for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricci C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Giulia Fiorini,1 Angelo Zullo,2 Luigi Gatta,3 Valentina Castelli,1 Chiara Ricci,3 Francesca Cassol,4 Dino Vaira11Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bologna, Italy; 2Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, 'Nuovo Regina Margherita' Hospital, Rome, Italy; 3Versilia Hospital, Lido di Camaiore, Italy; 4School of Gastroenterology, University of Ferrera, Ferrera, ItalyAbstract: Helicobacter pylori infection remains widespread internationally, with a definite morbidity and mortality. The efficacy of standard 7–14 day triple therapies is decreasing, mainly due to increasing primary bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Currently, the most effective treatments are either the sequential regimen or the concomitant therapy. Different patents have been registered showing high bactericidal effects in vitro, some of which are active against clarithromycin- and metronidazole-resistant strains, even at low pH values. Among these novel molecules, benzimidazole-derivatives, polycyclic compounds, pyloricidin, and arylthiazole analogues seem to be the more promising. The identification of essential genes for either bacterial colonization or growth represents a route for potential target therapies in the near future.Keywords: Helicobacter pylori therapy, new antibiotic agents

  18. Helicobacter pylori: Beginning the Second Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Matisko

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Beginning the Second Decade’ - a recent international meeting on Helicobacter pylori - was held in conjunction with the VIIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and H pylori and with the meeting of the European Helicobacter pylori Study Group in Houston, Texas from September 30 to October 1, 1994. A menu of 476 abstracts, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology (1994;89:8, highlighted the explosion of advances in this area. The Houston meeting was followed by the Tenth World Congresses of Gastroenterology from October 2 to 7, 1994 in Los Angeles, California, again with scores of presentations and posters on topics ranging from the epidemiology of H pylori infection to steps towards the development of a human vaccine. All this was in addition to important new work presented earlier in 1994 in New Orleans during Digestive Diseases Week. In this digest of these important meetings, the authors will not regurgitate what the informed reader already knows, but will instead focus on the recent developments in important areas, providing selected key published references for background, and referring to this new work in abstract form which is at the cutting edge of “yesterday’s tomorrow today”.

  19. Radio-iodine therapy and Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, A.; Mirpour, S.; Saghari, M.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Pourmoslemi, A.; Yarmand, S.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most important cause of gastritis and related morbidities. Following consumption, radioactive iodine accumulates considerably in the stomach. On the basis of this observation, we decided to determine whether the high radiation induced by radio-iodine in the stomach is effective in the eradication of this infection. All consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, who were referred for radio-iodine therapy [dose 117.1±24.4 mCi (4.3±0.9 GBq), range 100-200 mCi (3.7-7.4 GBq)], were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urease breath test (UBT) was performed 1-2 h before radio-iodine consumption and the test was repeated 2 months later. Of 88 patients, 71 had pre-treatment positive UBT. Of these, 23 patients had negative post-treatment result, which means a significant reduction (26.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 16.8-35.5%) in the number of positive UBT results in our treated population (32.4% of UBT-positive cases became UBT-negative). Considering the high prevalence of reinfection in developing countries, the therapeutic benefit would have been more considerable if the second UBT had been done with a lag time of less than 2 months. Although radio-iodine therapy is not a logical method for the treatment of patients suffering from H. pylori, our finding provides indirect evidence about the radiosensitivity of bacteria, the future clinical applications of which need to be further evaluated. Also this finding can be useful for the food industry, where radiation is used widely to sterilize food. Regarding the possibility of H. pylori suppression, we recommend not using UBT for screening for the infection for at least within 2 months following radio-iodine therapy. (author)

  20. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of six Iranian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariman, Farahnaz; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Habibi, Zohreh; Falsafi, Tahereh

    2004-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastrointestinal infections in adults and children. Antibiotic therapy and a combination of two or three drugs have been widely used to eradicate these infections. However, development of drug resistance in bacteria calls for new sources of drugs, and plants seem to be a logical source of new antibacterial compounds. The anti-H. pylori activities of six native Iranian plants (Glycyrrhiza aspera, Juglans regia, Ligustrum vulgare, Thymus kotschyanus, Trachyspermum copticum and Xanthium brasilicum) and seven antibiotics were determined against 70 clinical isolates from children using the disk susceptibility assay. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were also measured for the biologically active extracts. One extract with the best anti-H. pylori activity was fractionated by silica gel and thin layer chromatography and the active compounds were identified by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR) spectroscopy. All plant extracts showed anti-H. pylori activity by the disk sensitivity method, but the most active extracts were those from X. brasilicum and T. copticum. In fact, the anti-H. pylori activities of the two extracts were superior to the disk antibiotic susceptibility profile. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the range of 31.25-250 micro g/ml. Fractionation and chemical identification of the extract from X. brasilicum showed the presence of two substances, a flavonoid and a xanthanolide. Due to the rise in antibiotic resistance, new sources of anti-H. pylori drugs are needed. The use of medicinal plants and/or their chemical components may have potential benefit in eradicating such problems.

  1. Age of the Association between Helicobacter pylori and Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Robert P.; Nieuwoudt, Martin; Soodyall, Himla; Schlebusch, Carina M.; Bernhöft, Steffi; Hale, James; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Mugisha, Lawrence; van der Merwe, Schalk W.; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    When modern humans left Africa ca. 60,000 years ago (60 kya), they were already infected with Helicobacter pylori, and these bacteria have subsequently diversified in parallel with their human hosts. But how long were humans infected by H. pylori prior to the out-of-Africa event? Did this co-evolution predate the emergence of modern humans, spanning the species divide? To answer these questions, we investigated the diversity of H. pylori in Africa, where both humans and H. pylori originated. Three distinct H. pylori populations are native to Africa: hpNEAfrica in Afro-Asiatic and Nilo-Saharan speakers, hpAfrica1 in Niger-Congo speakers and hpAfrica2 in South Africa. Rather than representing a sustained co-evolution over millions of years, we find that the coalescent for all H. pylori plus its closest relative H. acinonychis dates to 88–116 kya. At that time the phylogeny split into two primary super-lineages, one of which is associated with the former hunter-gatherers in southern Africa known as the San. H. acinonychis, which infects large felines, resulted from a later host jump from the San, 43–56 kya. These dating estimates, together with striking phylogenetic and quantitative human-bacterial similarities show that H. pylori is approximately as old as are anatomically modern humans. They also suggest that H. pylori may have been acquired via a single host jump from an unknown, non-human host. We also find evidence for a second Out of Africa migration in the last 52,000 years, because hpEurope is a hybrid population between hpAsia2 and hpNEAfrica, the latter of which arose in northeast Africa 36–52 kya, after the Out of Africa migrations around 60 kya. PMID:22589724

  2. Dos décadas de Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cava

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades bacterianas son generalmente consideradas como problemas sanitarios serios, sin embargo, pueden a menudo solucionarse mediante una simple terapia antibiótica. Mucho más complicada es la curación de enfermedades fúngicas y virales. Muchos cánceres se pueden curar si el diagnóstico es temprano, pero la mayoría tienen un remedio casi tan perjudicial como la misma enfermedad. Otras enfermedades como las autoinmunes o las que afectan el corazón, simplemente son controladas, tratando de paliar los síntomas con medicamentos normalmente muy costosos. Por tanto, tenemos que comprender la sorpresa de la comunidad médica, cuando una enfermedad por mucho tiempo pensada incurable aunque controlable, se vio que estaba causada por una bacteria. Más aún, cuando desde siempre se había pensado que el microambiente del estómago era demasiado extremo como para albergar vida microbiana. Helicobacter pylori es la principal responsable de la formación de úlceras en la población mundial. Su capacidad de colonización y adaptación a ambientes hostiles le ha permitido sobrevivir y crecer en las condiciones adversas que ofrece el estómago. En esta revisión se resumen brevemente aspectos importantes de la historia del descubrimiento de tan relevante microorganismo, así como algunas características moleculares y clínicas de la patología que causa.

  3. Chronic gastritis in tigers associated with Helicobacter acinonyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H D; Ludwig, C; Jakob, W; Reischl, U; Stolte, M; Lehn, N

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori-like organisms (HPLOs) were isolated from the gastric mucosa of two Sumatran tigers and identified by polymerase chain reaction analysis as Helicobacter acinonyx. At histological examination, both tigers revealed a chronic gastritis associated with HPLOs as demonstrated by immunolabelling and electron microscopy. This is the first isolation of H. acinonyx from tigers, in which, as previously reported in cheetahs, it may be a cause of gastritis.

  4. Characterization of Patients with Helicobacter pylori-Negative Peptic Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Hernández Conde; Guillermo Noa Pedroso; Carlos Domínguez Álvarez; Isabel Mora Díaz; Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola; Yagén Pomares Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Background: the rate of Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers is increasing. Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other ulcerogenic drugs plays a significant role.Objective: to characterize patients with Helicobacter pylori-negative peptic ulcer. Methods: a case series study of patients attended by the Gastroenterology Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital was conducted in the year 2009. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical, endoscopic and histological variables were ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  6. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Various Types of Vegetables and Salads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapoor, Shahrzad; Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2014-05-01

    There is a possibility for the presence of Helicobacter pylori in vegetables due to their close contact with polluted water, soil and feces. This study was carried out to detect the presence of H. pylori in vegetables and salads in Iran. In total, 460 vegetable and salad samples were collected and transferred immediately to the laboratory. All samples were cultured and tested for the presence of H. pylori using the Polymerase Chain Reaction technique. The results showed that 44 of 460 samples (9.56%) were positive for H. pylori using the culture method. The Polymerase Chain Reaction technique showed that 50 of 460 samples (10.86%) were positive for H. pylori. Un-washed leek, traditional salad, un-washed basil and un-washed lettuce were the most commonly contaminated samples. The presence of the bacteria in various vegetables was statistically significant (P Vegetables are a new source of H. pylori and accurate washing of vegetables improves such contaminations.

  7. [The IgG antibody response in patients colonized by Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, G; Acuña, R; Jashés, M; Troncoso, M; Toledo, M S; Arellano, L

    1990-11-01

    The IgG antibody response specific to Helicobacter pylori was evaluated through ELISA in a group of 92 gastric patients colonized by this bacteria. 74 had gastritis and 19 gastroduodenal ulcer. Three control groups were studied in a similar way: normal adult volunteers (n = 17), adults with E coli or S typhi bacteremia (n = 30) and normal infants (n = 30). IgG antibody response to H pylori was demonstrated in 98% of colonized patients and 0% of infants. Asymptomatic individuals and those with bacteremia had high rates of antibody response (76 and 90% respectively), although this rate and also the titers of antibody response were significantly lower than that of colonized patients (p pylori in the majority of colonized gastric patients and asymptomatic adults suggests that this infection is very common in our population.

  8. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid...... mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe) have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical...... permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus...

  9. Oxidative Stress Resulting From Helicobacter pylori Infection Contributes to Gastric CarcinogenesisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay D. Butcher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that infects the stomach and can lead to, among other disorders, the development of gastric cancer. The inability of the host to clear the infection results in a chronic inflammatory state with continued oxidative stress within the tissue. Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by the immune and epithelial cells damage the host cells and can result in DNA damage. H pylori has evolved to evoke this damaging response while blunting the host’s efforts to kill the bacteria. This long-lasting state with inflammation and oxidative stress can result in gastric carcinogenesis. Continued efforts to better understand the bacterium and the host response will serve to prevent or provide improved early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. Keywords: AP Endonuclease, DNA Damage, H pylori, Gastric Cancer, Oxidative Stress

  10. Primary Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is the most important factor leading to the failure of eradication regimens; thus, it is important to obtain regional antibiotic resistance information. This review focuses on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone in China. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biomedical databases from the earliest date of each database to October 2016. The search terms included the following: H. pylori, antibiotic (including clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone) resistance with or without China or different regions of China. The data analysis was performed using MedCalc 15.2.2. Each article was weighted according to the number of isolated H. pylori strains. A pooled proportion analysis was performed. Twenty-three studies (14 studies in English and 9 in Chinese) were included in this review. A total of 6274, 6418, 3921, 5468, 2802, and 275 H. pylori strains were included in this review to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone, respectively. Overall, the primary resistance rates of clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were 28.9, 63.8, 28.0, 3.1, 3.9, and 1.7%, respectively. In China, the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was high and increased over time, whereas the resistance rates to amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were low and stable over time.

  11. Helicobacter suis causes severe gastric pathology in mouse and mongolian gerbil models of human gastric disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Flahou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: "Helicobacter (H. heilmannii" type 1 is the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter species in humans suffering from gastric disease. It has been shown to be identical to H. suis, a bacterium which is mainly associated with pigs. To obtain better insights into the long-term pathogenesis of infections with this micro-organism, experimental infections were carried out in different rodent models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mongolian gerbils and mice of two strains (BALB/c and C57BL/6 were infected with H. suis and sacrificed at 3 weeks, 9 weeks and 8 months after infection. Gastric tissue samples were collected for PCR analysis, histological and ultrastructural examination. In gerbils, bacteria mainly colonized the antrum and a narrow zone in the fundus near the forestomach/stomach transition zone. In both mice strains, bacteria colonized the entire glandular stomach. Colonization with H. suis was associated with necrosis of parietal cells in all three animal strains. From 9 weeks after infection onwards, an increased proliferation rate of mucosal epithelial cells was detected in the stomach regions colonized with H. suis. Most gerbils showed a marked lymphocytic infiltration in the antrum and in the forestomach/stomach transition zone, becoming more pronounced in the course of time. At 8 months post infection, severe destruction of the normal antral architecture at the inflamed sites and development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma-like lesions were observed in some gerbils. In mice, the inflammatory response was less pronounced than in gerbils, consisting mainly of mononuclear cell infiltration and being most severe in the fundus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. suis causes death of parietal cells, epithelial cell hyperproliferation and severe inflammation in mice and Mongolian gerbil models of human gastric disease. Moreover, MALT lymphoma-like lesions were induced in H. suis-infected Mongolian gerbils

  12. Helicobacter suis causes severe gastric pathology in mouse and mongolian gerbil models of human gastric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahou, Bram; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; D'Herde, Katharina; Driessen, Ann; Van Deun, Kim; Smet, Annemieke; Duchateau, Luc; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard

    2010-11-22

    "Helicobacter (H.) heilmannii" type 1 is the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter species in humans suffering from gastric disease. It has been shown to be identical to H. suis, a bacterium which is mainly associated with pigs. To obtain better insights into the long-term pathogenesis of infections with this micro-organism, experimental infections were carried out in different rodent models. Mongolian gerbils and mice of two strains (BALB/c and C57BL/6) were infected with H. suis and sacrificed at 3 weeks, 9 weeks and 8 months after infection. Gastric tissue samples were collected for PCR analysis, histological and ultrastructural examination. In gerbils, bacteria mainly colonized the antrum and a narrow zone in the fundus near the forestomach/stomach transition zone. In both mice strains, bacteria colonized the entire glandular stomach. Colonization with H. suis was associated with necrosis of parietal cells in all three animal strains. From 9 weeks after infection onwards, an increased proliferation rate of mucosal epithelial cells was detected in the stomach regions colonized with H. suis. Most gerbils showed a marked lymphocytic infiltration in the antrum and in the forestomach/stomach transition zone, becoming more pronounced in the course of time. At 8 months post infection, severe destruction of the normal antral architecture at the inflamed sites and development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma-like lesions were observed in some gerbils. In mice, the inflammatory response was less pronounced than in gerbils, consisting mainly of mononuclear cell infiltration and being most severe in the fundus. H. suis causes death of parietal cells, epithelial cell hyperproliferation and severe inflammation in mice and Mongolian gerbil models of human gastric disease. Moreover, MALT lymphoma-like lesions were induced in H. suis-infected Mongolian gerbils. Therefore, the possible involvement of this micro-organism in human gastric disease

  13. EVALUATION OF HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN CLASS I AND II ANTIGENS IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI-POSITIVE PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE GASTRITIS AND DUODENAL ULCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, Sevim; Sari, Sinan; Kandur, Yaşar; Dalgiç, Buket; Söylemezoğlu, Oğuz

    2017-12-01

    As being the first bacteria determined to be carcinogenic, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen localized in the stomach in more than half of the world population. Some earlier studies have found a relation between tissue histocompatibility antigens and gastric cancers depending on the regions. The present study aimed to determine the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II antigens in H. pylori-positive pediatric patients with active gastritis and duodenal ulcer, excluding cancer cases, in our center. The study included 40 patients diagnosed with H. pylori-positive active gastritis and duodenal ulcer and 100 controls consisting of healthy donor candidates. The HLA class I and class II antigens were studied in the isolated DNA samples using the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. The frequency of HLA-B*51 antigen was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (40% vs 17%; P=0.003). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the frequencies of HLA-A, HLA-C, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ antigens. It was determined that HLA-B*51 plays a critical role in H. pylori infection.

  14. EVALUATION OF HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN CLASS I AND II ANTIGENS IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI-POSITIVE PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE GASTRITIS AND DUODENAL ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim GÖNEN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: As being the first bacteria determined to be carcinogenic, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a pathogen localized in the stomach in more than half of the world population. Some earlier studies have found a relation between tissue histocompatibility antigens and gastric cancers depending on the regions. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to determine the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II antigens in H. pylori-positive pediatric patients with active gastritis and duodenal ulcer, excluding cancer cases, in our center. METHODS: The study included 40 patients diagnosed with H. pylori-positive active gastritis and duodenal ulcer and 100 controls consisting of healthy donor candidates. The HLA class I and class II antigens were studied in the isolated DNA samples using the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. RESULTS: The frequency of HLA-B*51 antigen was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (40% vs 17%; P=0.003. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the frequencies of HLA-A, HLA-C, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ antigens. CONCLUSION: It was determined that HLA-B*51 plays a critical role in H. pylori infection.

  15. Impacto Social de la infección por Helicobacter Pylori en Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelayo Correa

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduccion
    La infección humana por Helicobacter pylori fue descrita hace mas de un siglo (1 pero fue ignorada por la literatura médica hasta 1983, cuando Warren y Marshall la “re-descubrieron”(2. Desde entonces, el número de publicaciones sobre el tema ha crecido de una manera exponencial y se han postulado hipótesis patogénicas que continúan siendo motivo de discusión científica.

    A pesar de su reciente reconocimiento como patógeno, la bacteria ha infectado el estómago humano por milenios y muy probablemente por millones de años. Estudios recientes en momias precolombinos de la región peruano-chilena de Tarapacá, han documentado la presencia de antígenos de Helicobacter en las materias fecales de momias hasta de 3000 años de antigüedad.(3 Hay claras indicaciones de que las manifestaciones de la infección han variado a través de los tiempos. Las poblaciones actuales en distintas partes del mundo representan diferentes cuadros patogénicos que reflejan distintos tipos de adaptación mutua del hombre y la bacteria.

    Manifestaciones clínico patológicas
    El espectro nosológico de la infección por Helicobacter pylori es muy amplio. Se han descrito variadas manifestaciones de la infección, en distintos grados de documentación científica en cuanto a su asociación causal. Existen todavía muchos interrogantes por aclarar. La siguiente es una lista parcial de las asociaciones descritas
    1. Gastritis (dispepsia no ulcerosa

    No atróficas
    Atróficas

    2. Ulcera Péptica

    Gástrica
    Duodenal

    3. Carcinoma gástrico
    4. Linfoma (maltoma gástrico
    5. Extra-digestivos

    Vasculares (coronaria? Raynaud?
    Autoinmune (Sjoegren? Urticaria?
    Rosácea
    Otros

    6. Niños

    Diarrea?
    Anemia ferropénica?
    Retraso de crecimiento ...

  16. Helicobacter Pylori infection of the gallbladder and the risk of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Li; Pan, Jiaqi; Zhou, Boyan; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming; Chen, Weixing; Shen, Zhe

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is coexisted with various diseases, including chronic gastritis, ulcer, and gastric cancer. Besides, chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis are extremely widespread over the world, which are considered as high health-care cost burdens of digestive diseases. Epidemiologic evidence on Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder increasing the risk of biliary diseases has been contradictory. Conduct a meta-analysis of overall studies and investigate an association between Helicobacter pylori infection of the gallbladder with chronic cholecystitis/cholelithiasis. We used PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases to identify all published studies before August 2017. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using the random effects model. Heterogeneity, sensitivity, and stratified analyses were also performed. Eighteen studies involving 1544 participants and 1061 biliary cases with chronic cholecystitis/cholelithiasis were included. Helicobacter pylori infection of the gallbladder was significantly associated with an increased risk of chronic cholecystitis and cholecystitis (OR = 3.022; 95% CI, 1.897-4.815; I 2  = 20.1%). In addition, country-based subgroup analysis also showed a positive association between Helicobacter pylori positivity and chronic cholecystitis/cholelithiasis risk. The ORs (95% CIs) for Asian and non-Asian region studies were 3.75 (1.83-7.71) and 2.25 (1.29-3.89), respectively. This meta-analysis suggests that infection of the gallbladder with Helicobacter pylori is closely related to an increased risk of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The distribution of cagA and dupA genes in Helicobacter pylori strains in Kurdistan region, northern Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Azad M; Goreal, Amer; Hussein, Nawfal R; Abdullah, Shahla M; Hawrami, Khidir; Assafi, Mahde

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacteria that causes peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma. H pylori virulence factors, such as cagA and dupA, are important to study in populations as they contribute to disease risk. This study aimed to look at the distribution of the cagA and dupA genes in H pylori strains isolated from patients suffering from gastroduodenal diseases in Kurdistan region, Iraq. A cross-sectional study conducted between June 2011 and January 2012. Biopsies were collected from the Endoscopy Department in Duhok and Sulaimania hospitals, Kurdistan region, northern Iraq. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy examination was performed and 4 gastric biopsies (2 from the antrum and 2 from the corpus) were obtained from 204 patients. H pylori positivity was examined by CLO test; then the association between disease status and virulence factors was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. 154 (75%) of our samples were found to be H pylori + by CLO test. Endoscopic diagnoses for those who were positive were as follows: peptic ulcer disease (PUD) including duodenal ulcer, 45; gastric ulcer, 23; and no ulcer (NPUD), 86. The overall prevalence rates of cagA and dupA were 72.7% and 18.8%, respectively. While a significant association between cagA and PUD was observed (P. ≤.017; OR=0.4; CI=0.18–0.85), no relationship between dupA and PUD could be seen. These data suggested that the presence of cagA may be a predictor of clinical outcome in Kurdistan region, northern Iraq.

  18. Stimulation of growth of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori by atmospheric level of oxygen under high carbon dioxide tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Na

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a human pathogen that is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer, has been considered a microaerophile, but there is no general consensus about its specific O2 requirements. A clear understanding of Hp physiology is needed to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism(s of Hp infection. Results We cultured Hp under a range of O2 levels with or without 10% CO2 and evaluated growth profiles, morphology, intracellular pH, and energy metabolism. We found that, in the presence of 10% CO2, the normal atmospheric level of O2 inhibited Hp growth at low density but stimulated growth at a higher density. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of Hp cells cultured under 20% O2 tension revealed live spiral-shaped bacteria with outer membrane vesicles on a rugged cell surface, which became smooth during the stationary phase. Fermentation products including acetate, lactate, and succinate were detected in cell culture media grown under microaerobic conditions, but not under the aerobic condition. CO2 deprivation for less than 24 h did not markedly change cytoplasmic or periplasmic pH, suggesting that cellular pH homeostasis alone cannot account for the capnophilic nature of Hp. Further, CO2 deprivation significantly increased intracellular levels of ppGpp and ATP but significantly decreased cellular mRNA levels, suggesting induction of the stringent response. Conclusions We conclude, unlike previous reports, that H. pylori may be a capnophilic aerobe whose growth is promoted by atmospheric oxygen levels in the presence of 10% CO2. Our data also suggest that buffering of intracellular pH alone cannot account for the CO2 requirement of H. pylori and that CO2 deprivation initiates the stringent response in H. pylori. Our findings may provide new insight into the physiology of this fastidious human pathogen.

  19. Five-day bismuth-free triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and reduction of duodenal ulcer relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, L.G.; Passos, M.C.; Chausson, Y.; Castro L de, P.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a significant reduction of the rate of duodenal ulcer (DU) relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of a bismuth-free triple therapy on the eradication of H. pylori and reduction of DU relapse. After informed consent, 61 patients with endoscopically proven DU and H. pylori infection detected on 14C-urea breath test (BT) were included in the study. All patients received a combination of furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole, three times a day, for 5 days, in addition to eventual classical antiulcer agents prescribed by their attending physicians. BT was repeated after an interval of at least 60 days to evaluate H. pylori eradication. Endoscopy and another BT were performed again at 6.5 months after therapy to detect possible recurrences. Forty-eight patients completed the trial: 26 (54%) patients were negative for H. pylori at 6.5 months after the end of treatment, and 22 (46%) persisted H. pylori positive. Ninety-two percent of the patients in whom the bacteria were eradicated showed endoscopically healed ulcers and were asymptomatic, and two that were symptomatic presented only occasional pain not requiring therapy. Among the 22 patients who persisted H. pylori positive, six (27%) showed endoscopically active ulcers (p = 0.012) and eight (36%) patients continued to be symptomatic (p less than 0.01), and were still using antiulcer drugs (p = 0.002) 6.5 months after treatment. It is concluded that combined treatment with furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole for 5 days represents a well-tolerated, inexpensive, and effective therapeutic regime for the eradication of H. pylori and abolition of DU relapse in more than 50% of the patients during a follow-up period of 6.5 months

  20. Five-day bismuth-free triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and reduction of duodenal ulcer relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, L.G.; Passos, M.C.; Chausson, Y.; Castro L de, P. (Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Digestive Surgery Unit, University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil))

    1991-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a significant reduction of the rate of duodenal ulcer (DU) relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of a bismuth-free triple therapy on the eradication of H. pylori and reduction of DU relapse. After informed consent, 61 patients with endoscopically proven DU and H. pylori infection detected on 14C-urea breath test (BT) were included in the study. All patients received a combination of furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole, three times a day, for 5 days, in addition to eventual classical antiulcer agents prescribed by their attending physicians. BT was repeated after an interval of at least 60 days to evaluate H. pylori eradication. Endoscopy and another BT were performed again at 6.5 months after therapy to detect possible recurrences. Forty-eight patients completed the trial: 26 (54%) patients were negative for H. pylori at 6.5 months after the end of treatment, and 22 (46%) persisted H. pylori positive. Ninety-two percent of the patients in whom the bacteria were eradicated showed endoscopically healed ulcers and were asymptomatic, and two that were symptomatic presented only occasional pain not requiring therapy. Among the 22 patients who persisted H. pylori positive, six (27%) showed endoscopically active ulcers (p = 0.012) and eight (36%) patients continued to be symptomatic (p less than 0.01), and were still using antiulcer drugs (p = 0.002) 6.5 months after treatment. It is concluded that combined treatment with furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole for 5 days represents a well-tolerated, inexpensive, and effective therapeutic regime for the eradication of H. pylori and abolition of DU relapse in more than 50% of the patients during a follow-up period of 6.5 months.

  1. Multidimensional effects of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma A549 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Han, Jae Woong; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are prominent group of nanomaterials and are recognized for their diverse applications in various health sectors. This study aimed to synthesize the AgNPs using the leaf extract of Artemisia princeps as a bio-reductant. Furthermore, we evaluated the multidimensional effect of the biologically synthesized AgNPs in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma (A549) cells. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy confirmed the synthesis of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the AgNPs are specifically indexed to a crystal structure. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicate that biomolecules are involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the average size distribution of the particle between 10 and 40 nm, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with an average size of 20 nm. AgNPs caused dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and biofilm formation and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA fragmentation in H. pylori and H. felis. Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells. The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells. This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells. We believe that biologically synthesized AgNPs will open a new avenue towards various biotechnological and biomedical applications in the near future.

  2. Relationship Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Seif-Rabiei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between H. pylori and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In a case-control study, 90 patients with COPD and 90 age- and sex- matched control subjects were included. Serum samples were tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA IgG by ELISA. A physician completed a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, habitual history, and spirometric findings for each patient. Of 90 patients with COPD 66 (51% had mild, 31 (34.4% moderate, and 13 (14.4% sever disease. There was no significant association between H. pylori IgG seropositivity and COPD. Serum levels of anti-CagA IgG were significantly higher in patients with COPD than in the control subjects (P < 0.001. No association was observed between H. pylori infection and severity of COPD. The results suggest that there is an association between CagA-positive H. pylori infections and COPD. Further studies should be planned to investigate the potential pathogenic mechanisms that might underlie these associations.

  3. Oligotrophic bacteria isolated from clinical materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, Y; Ihmori, M; Yamaguchi, J

    1995-01-01

    Oligotrophic bacteria (oligotrophs) are microorganisms that grow in extremely nutritionally deficient conditions in which the concentrations of organic substances are low. Many oligotrophic bacteria were isolated from clinical materials including urine, sputum, swabbings of the throat, vaginal discharges, and others. Seventy-seven strains of oligotrophic bacteria from 871 samples of clinical material were isolated. A relatively higher frequency of isolation of oligotrophic bacteria was shown ...

  4. [Gastritis: immunohistochemical detection of specific and nonspecific immune response to Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenkopf, C; Steininger, H; Weineck, G; Meyer, M

    1990-07-01

    Granulocyte infiltration was studied in 88 biopsies of antrum mucosa from patients with B-gastritis. Evidence of IgA-, IgG- and IgM-antibodies as well as of lysozyme in the mucosa was demonstrated by immunohistochemical methods. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is coated by antibodies and a significant correlation between extent of opsonisation and number of plasma cells in the connective tissue of the lamina propria could be stated. Thus, the infiltration of plasma cells is a specific immune response against Hp. In the depths of gastric pits the antibody-coating of bacteria is faint. Instead, lysozyme and lactoferrin are produced there. By means of a Cross-sectional study a model is developed which characterizes B-gastritis as a dynamic process. Lagging behind, the inflammation follows the motile bacteria resulting in a patchy distribution of inflamed areas in the mucosa. At the peak of these local inflammation-waves the production of antibodies and lysozyme is intensified. Coating the bacteria with IgG and IgM results in complement activation liberating chemotaxin C5a. Consequently, there is a massive granulocyte infiltration leading to local reduction or eradication of Hp.

  5. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    as a result of normal shedding of the epithelium. This implies that detection of these antigens is a direct test ... for diagnosing H. pylori include stool PCR, Urine antibody test (urinelisa) and Saliva antibody test (Miwa ... urea to produce ammonia that increases the pH of the medium which leads to a colour change. RUTs have.

  6. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparative genomics and proteomics of Helicobacter mustelae, an ulcerogenic and carcinogenic gastric pathogen

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Paul W

    2010-03-10

    Abstract Background Helicobacter mustelae causes gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer in ferrets and other mustelids. H. mustelae remains the only helicobacter other than H. pylori that causes gastric ulceration and cancer in its natural host. To improve understanding of H. mustelae pathogenesis, and the ulcerogenic and carcinogenic potential of helicobacters in general, we sequenced the H. mustelae genome, and identified 425 expressed proteins in the envelope and cytosolic proteome. Results The H. mustelae genome lacks orthologs of major H. pylori virulence factors including CagA, VacA, BabA, SabA and OipA. However, it encodes ten autotransporter surface proteins, seven of which were detected in the expressed proteome, and which, except for the Hsr protein, are of unknown function. There are 26 putative outer membrane proteins in H. mustelae, some of which are most similar to the Hof proteins of H. pylori. Although homologs of putative virulence determinants of H. pylori (NapA, plasminogen adhesin, collagenase) and Campylobacter jejuni (CiaB, Peb4a) are present in the H. mustelae genome, it also includes a distinct complement of virulence-related genes including a haemagglutinin\\/haemolysin protein, and a glycosyl transferase for producing blood group A\\/B on its lipopolysaccharide. The most highly expressed 264 proteins in the cytosolic proteome included many corresponding proteins from H. pylori, but the rank profile in H. mustelae was distinctive. Of 27 genes shown to be essential for H. pylori colonization of the gerbil, all but three had orthologs in H. mustelae, identifying a shared set of core proteins for gastric persistence. Conclusions The determination of the genome sequence and expressed proteome of the ulcerogenic species H mustelae provides a comparative model for H. pylori to investigate bacterial gastric carcinogenesis in mammals, and to suggest ways whereby cag minus H. pylori strains might cause ulceration and cancer. The genome sequence was

  8. Coinfection of Schistosoma (Trematoda) with bacteria, protozoa and helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruzzi, Amy; Fried, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    This review examines coinfection of selected species of Schistosoma with bacteria, protozoa and helminths and focuses on the effects of the coinfection on the hosts. The review is based mainly on tables that contain the salient information on the coinfecting organisms in vertebrate hosts. Further explanation and clarification of the tables are given in the text. A table is also provided that gives synoptic information on the 37 species in the 19 genera considered in this review. Coinfection studies with Schistosoma species and the other organisms were considered in six tables plus the accompanying text. Considerations of the Schistosoma interactions with another species of organism include studies on coinfection with Plasmodium, with protozoa other than Plasmodium; with Salmonella, with bacteria other than Salmonella; and with Fasciola, with helminths other than Fasciola. Numerous factors were found to influence the effects of coinfection on the vertebrate host, including organisms and hosts used in the studies, order and time interval between the first and the second infection, studies on natural versus experimental hosts, dosage of the infectious agents, strains and pedigrees of the parasites, age of hosts at time of exposure to the infectious agents and age of hosts at the time of necropsy. Overall, a prior infection with Schistosoma, particularly a patent infection, often has an effect on the subsequent infection by a protozoan, bacterium or other helminth. In relatively few cases, a prior infection with Schistosoma decreased the severity of the subsequent infection as with Helicobacter pylori, Fasciola hepatica, Echinostoma or Plasmodium, the latter only exhibiting this behaviour when coinfected with Schistosoma haematobium. More often, however, a prior infection with Schistosoma increased the severity of the second infection as with Leishmania, Toxoplasma gondii, Entamoeba histolytica, Staphylococcus aureus or Salmonella. In some of these coinfection studies

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection: a simplified diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti-Nibali, S; Sferlazzas, C; Fera, M T; Saitta, G; Tedeschi, A; Magazzù, G

    1990-12-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic finding of nodular antritis and rapid urease test (RUT) in order to simplify the approach to the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Forty-four consecutive patients (mean age 7.9 yr, range 6-13 yr) referred because of recurrent abdominal pain as the main symptom, were prospectively investigated for the presence of H. pylori. H. pylori positivity or negativity was defined as the concordance of two of the following tests: RUT, microbiologic culture, and histologic examination on bioptic samples. RUT sensitivity was 100%, whereas specificity was 87.5%. The presence of nodular antritis had a sensitivity of 96.4% and specificity of 87.5% in H. pylori infection diagnosis. The predictivity value of combined RUT and nodular antritis, whether positive or negative, was 100%. Only in case of discordance do we suggest the utilization of other expensive tools for diagnosis of H. pylori infection.

  10. In vitro selection of resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, C E; Nix, D E; Schentag, J J

    1990-09-01

    Four strains of Helicobacter pylori were subjected to an in vitro serial passage technique to compare the propensity of the organisms to develop resistance to seven classes of antibacterial agents. The passages were made on serially doubling concentrations of antibacterial agents incorporated into agar starting at one-half the base-line MIC. The frequency of spontaneous resistance was also determined for each strain at four and eight times the MIC of each antibacterial agent. Strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, erythromycin, and tobramycin were isolated. The experiments failed to select organisms resistant to bismuth subsalicylate, furazolidone, or amoxicillin, although the MIC of amoxicillin was increased 4- to 16-fold. With the exception of erythromycin, organisms with the selected resistance were stable after at least three passages on antibacterial agent-free medium. Spontaneous resistance rates were generally of a low magnitude and were not predictive of the serial passage results.

  11. Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Toxin and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Mark S.; Beckett, Amber C.; Cover, Timothy L.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori VacA is a channel-forming toxin unrelated to other known bacterial toxins. Most H. pylori strains contain a vacA gene, but there is marked variation among strains in VacA toxin activity. This variation is attributable to strain-specific variations in VacA amino acid sequences, as well as variations in the levels of VacA transcription and secretion. In this review, we discuss epidemiologic studies showing an association between specific vacA allelic types and gastric cancer, as well as studies that have used animal models to investigate VacA activities relevant to gastric cancer. We also discuss the mechanisms by which VacA-induced cellular alterations may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:29023421

  12. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Elizabeth; Korfitis, Chrysovalantis; Kemanetzi, Christina; Sotiriou, Elena; Apalla, Zoe; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Fotiadou, Christina; Lallas, Aimilios; Ioannides, Demetrios

    2017-01-01

    Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. PMID:28848358

  13. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18......-88 in the German National Health and Nutrition Survey. Detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits was obtained in personal interviews using a standardized food frequency questionnaire. Serum samples were analyzed for H. pylori immunoglobulin G antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall...... prevalence of H. pylori infection was 39.2%. There was a clear inverse dose-response-relation between reported alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection. The relation persisted after control for potential confounding factors. The adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) for H. pylori infection...

  14. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  15. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...... prevalence of H. pylori infection was 39.2%. There was a clear inverse dose-response-relation between reported alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection. The relation persisted after control for potential confounding factors. The adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) for H. pylori infection...... among persons who consumed up to 10, 10 to 20, and more than 20 gm of alcohol per day compared with non-drinkers were 0.93 (0.77-1.13), 0.82 (0.65-1.04), and 0.71 (0.55-0.92). The inverse relation between alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection was even stronger when individuals with an indication...

  16. Invasive Tests for Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien Q Huynh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary indications for upper gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy in children is the presence of persistent and severe upper abdominal symptoms. Upper GI endoscopies are performed to allow the physician to confirm or rule out upper GI pathology. Additionally, upper GI endoscopies with mucosal biopsies are the gold standard for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and its complications in children. The gastric biopsies can be used for the rapid urease test, histological examination and bacterial culture to determine antibiotic sensitivity. DNA extracted in these biopsies can also be subjected to genotyping using molecular methods to determine the presence of H pylori infection, antibiotic resistance mutations and H pylori virulence factors.

  17. Direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation (MALDI) Mass-Spectrometry Bacteria Profiling for Identifying and Characterizing Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, E N

    2009-04-01

    This study examines the features and limitations of direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation (MALDI) mass-spectrometry profiling of bacterial cells for investigating a microbial population. The optimal laboratory protocol, including crude bacteria lyses by a solution of 50% acetonitrile, 2.5% trifluoroacetic acid, and using α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid as the MALDI matrix, has been developed. Two different bacteria species were under investigation, and representative mass spectra from 278 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and 22 strains of Helicobacter pylori have been analyzed. It's known that both bacteria demonstrate a variable degree of polymorphism. For N. gonorrhoeae, the MALDI mass spectra that was collected possessed about 70 peaks, 20 of which were good reproducible ones. In spite of the fact that three peaks were found with differing spectra in some strains, little diversity in the N. gonorrhoeae population was revealed. This fact indicates the prospects in using direct MALDI mass-spectrometry profiling for gonococcus identification. In the case of H. pylori strains, the variety in the collected mass-spectra was shown to be essential. Only five peaks were present in more than 70% of strains, and a single mass value was common for all spectra. While these data call into question the possibility of the reliable species identification of H. pylori using this approach, the intraspecies differentiation of strains was offered. Good association between MALDI profile distributions and the region of strain isolation have been found. Thus, the suggested direct MALDI mass-spectrometry profiling strategy, coupled with special analysis software, seems promising for the species identification of N. gonorrhoeae but is assumed insufficient for H. pylori species determination. At the same time, this would create a very good chance for an epidemiological study of such variable bacteria as H. pylori.

  18. Implications of Helicobacter pylori infection for stomach cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Karen J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has implicated Helicobacter pylori, an established cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, in the etiology of gastric cancer. Control of this infection would reduce the occurrence of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and might substantially lower the risk of stomach cancer as well. The public health impact of this infectious agent warrants efforts to identify preventive measures. This paper reviews the evidence linking H. pylori infection to gastric cancer and evaluates the potential for control in high-risk populations. Current obstacles to H. pylori control are discussed, including the link to poor socioeconomic conditions, difficulty in identifying incident cases, lack of natural immunity to reinfection, limited effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in high-prevalence populations, and incomplete knowledge regarding the reservoir of infection, mode of transmission, host susceptibility factors, and the potential for developing an effective vaccine. Worthwhile avenues of research include studies designed to identify modifiable risk factors for acquisition of the infection, modifiable host factors that may increase resistance to chronic infection, more effective antibiotic therapies, and effective vaccines.

  19. Genetic signatures for Helicobacter pylori strains of West African origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennady K Bullock

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse bacterial species that colonizes the stomach in about half of the human population. Most persons colonized by H. pylori remain asymptomatic, but the presence of this organism is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Multiple populations and subpopulations of H. pylori with distinct geographic distributions are recognized. Genetic differences among these populations might be a factor underlying geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence. Relatively little is known about the genomic features of African H. pylori strains compared to other populations of strains. In this study, we first analyzed the genomes of H. pylori strains from seven globally distributed populations or subpopulations and identified encoded proteins that exhibited the highest levels of sequence divergence. These included secreted proteins, an LPS glycosyltransferase, fucosyltransferases, proteins involved in molybdopterin biosynthesis, and Clp protease adaptor (ClpS. Among proteins encoded by the cag pathogenicity island, CagA and CagQ exhibited the highest levels of sequence diversity. We then identified proteins in strains of Western African origin (classified as hspWAfrica by MLST analysis with sequences that were highly divergent compared to those in other populations of strains. These included ATP-dependent Clp protease, ClpS, and proteins of unknown function. Three of the divergent proteins sequences identified in West African strains were characterized by distinct insertions or deletions up to 8 amino acids in length. These polymorphisms in rapidly evolving proteins represent robust genetic signatures for H. pylori strains of West African origin.

  20. [Triple-therapy treatment during 1 month versus 2 weeks in gastroduodenal disease due to Helicobacter pylori in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilleruelo Pascual, M L; Urruzuno Tellería, P; Román Riechman, E; Medina Benítez, E; Manzanares López-Manzanares, J; Echávarri Olavarría, F; Molina Arias, M

    1996-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of two different durations of triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pylori infection. We established two treatment groups: 1) Short treatment, including 2 week of bismuth subcitrate, amoxycillin and metronidazole treatment (n = 21) and 2) Long treatment, which included the same therapy for two weeks plus bismuth subcitrate alone for two weeks more (n = 26). We found no difference between the short and long treatments. The infection remained in 14% and 19%, respectively. In both groups, we observed children (19%) with persistent abdominal pain in spite of Helicobacter pylori eradication and gastritis healing. We conclude that it is not necessary to prolong triple therapy more than 2 weeks in order to have therapeutic success.

  1. Review on SERS of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela A. Mosier-Boss

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS spectra of bacteria. The kinds of SERS substrates employed to obtain SERS spectra are discussed as well as how bacteria interact with silver and gold nanoparticles. The roll of capping agents on Ag/Au NPs in obtaining SERS spectra is examined as well as the interpretation of the spectral data.

  2. Is raised helicobacter pylori antibody titre enough to decide retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Ahmed, W.; Arif, A.; Alam, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection causes a rise in its antibodies which take almost a year to come to baseline following successful eradication treatment. Checking these values in between a year may give falsely high values and many patients may thus be over treated. Aims: To serially determine Helicobacter pylori antibody titres in patients after giving them triple therapy for H. pylori eradication and see how these values drop over time. Study type, Settings and duration: Longitudinal study conducted in Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pakistan Medical Research Council, Research Centre, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from May 2006 to April 2010. Subjects and Methods: Over the period of four years, 186 patients who were found positive for campylobacter like organism test during endoscopy were further tested for anti H. pylori IgG titre before being treated for H. pylori. Patients were given triple therapy comprising of Omeprazole (20 mg twice daily), Amoxicillin (1 gm twice daily) and Clarythromycin (500 mg twice daily) for a week and were followed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months to check symptomatic relief and they were tested again for H.Pylori antibody titres. Data was collected on pre-designed proforma which included patient's demography, symptoms and diagnosis. Results: Out of 186 patients who had a positive campylobacter like organism test, 173 patients consented to participate in the study. Serology for H.Pylori was positive in 119(68%) cases. A decline in mean antibody titres was observed as 11%, 21.5%, 54.7% and 59.2% at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Conclusions: Sensitivity of serology for diagnosing H. pylori infection is good but using these as a tool for monitoring response to treatment is doubtful. A slow drop in H.pylori antibodies was seen over 12 months and therefore, physicians are cautioned not to retreat the already treated cases till about one year post treatment. Policy message: H. pylori antibodies should

  3. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  4. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Canada’s Arctic: Searching for the Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cheung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian North Helicobacter pylori (CANHelp working group is a team composed of investigators, health officials and community leaders from Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The group’s initial goals are to investigate the impact of H pylori infection on Canada’s Arctic communities; subsequent goals include identifying treatment strategies that are effective in this region and developing recommendations for health policy aimed at management of H pylori infection. The team’s investigations have begun with the Aklavik H pylori Project in the Aboriginal community of Aklavik, Northwest Territories.

  5. First case of Helicobacter pylori infection resistant to seven antibiotics in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi Bezmin Abadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with common antibiotics is typically recommended for several digestive conditions, including peptic ulcers. However, reports of resistant H. pylori isolates are increasing, and unfortunately, these do not respond to currently available therapeutic regimens. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with two peptic ulcers in the duodenal antrum. An H. pylori strain was isolated, and tested for antibiotic resistance using agar dilution and disk diffusion. The isolated strain was found to be resistant to all seven antibiotics that were tested. Therefore, constant monitoring for antibiotic resistance should be performed prior to initiating antibiotic therapy.

  6. Rapid improvement of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Ulas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are one of the most common bacterial infections, seen in humans, worldwide and their possible relationships to different diseases are a focus of attention nowadays. H. pylori may cause some extra intestinal manifestations some of which are dermatological conditions, including Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis. We describe a 49-year-old man who presented with HSP triggered by gastric H. pylori infection. Treatment of H. Pylori infection was accompanied by prompt resolution of the gastrointestinal manifestations and purpuric rashes. These findings suggest a causative role for H. pylori in the occurrence of HSP.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance in Helicobacter pylori: current situation and management strategy in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Trung Nam; Tran, Van Huy; Tran, Thi Nhu Hoa; Le, Van An; Santona, Antonella; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-07-04

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance to key antibiotics in Helicobacter pylori has become a main cause of treatment failures in many countries, including Vietnam. For this reason it is advisable to perform antimicrobial sensitivity tests to provide more focused regimens for H. pylori eradication. However, this approach is generally unavailable for H. pylori in Vietnam and the selection of treatment regimens is mainly based on the trend of antibiotic use in the population, resistance development in the region, and history of H. pylori eradication of patients. The aim of this review is to examine the current situation of antimicrobial resistance in Vietnam and suggest management strategies for treatment selection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Anemia in Taiwanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Yao Shih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA are common in adults. Although the most common causes of IDA usually arise from the gastrointestinal tract, the association between chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia remains unclear. Aim. To evaluate the association of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and IDA. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 882 patients from January 2010 to April 2013. The status of Helicobacter pylori (H.p infection was confirmed and blood samples from the same participants were taken on the same day to check the level of hemoglobin, serum iron, ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC. Results. No significant difference was noted from the demographic data. The average level of hemoglobin (Hb was not different between negative and positive groups, pos 13.57 g/dL versus neg 13.65 g/dL (P=0.699. Although the levels of serum IDA related parameters were expected in positive group (lower serum iron and ferritin and higher TIBC these differences did not reach statistical significance (P=0.824 for iron, P=0.360 for ferritin, and P=0.252 for TIBC. Conclusion. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is not attributed to IDA. The levels of hemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin, and TIBC remain unaffected after chronic H.p infection. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to prove the association.

  9. Detection of high titers of antibody against Helicobacter cysteine-rich proteins A, B, C, and E in Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittl, Peer R E; Lüthy, Lucas; Reinhardt, Christoph; Joller, Hellen

    2003-07-01

    The family of Helicobacter cysteine-rich proteins (Hcp) constitutes one of the largest protein families that are specific for proteobacteria from the delta/epsilon subgroup. Most of the proteins belonging to this family have so far only been recognized on the genome level. To investigate the expression of Hcp proteins in vivo we analyzed titers of antibody against HcpA (HP0211), HcpB (HP0336), HcpC (HP1098), and HcpE (HP0235) in sera from 30 Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals and in a control group of six H. pylori-negative individuals. Significantly higher titers of antibody were observed for H. pylori-positive individuals (P HcpE immunoglobulin G titers in H. pylori-positive individuals (correlation > 0.7), but there is only a weak correlation for HcpB (correlation HcpE are present in the genomes of strains 26695 and J99, whereas HcpB is absent from most strains. Since Hcp proteins are specific for H. pylori, immunological assays including Hcp proteins might be of value to detect H. pylori infection and perhaps to distinguish among different groups of H. pylori-positive patients.

  10. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 (DsbK): role in disulfide bond formation, redox homeostasis and production of Helicobacter cystein-rich protein HcpE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jeffrey; Kichler, Sari; Oickle, Brandon; Fairweather, Spencer; Oberc, Alexander; Chahal, Jaspreet; Ratnayake, Dinath; Creuzenet, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen that colonizes ∼ 50% of the world's population. It can cause gastritis, gastric or duodenal ulcers and also gastric cancer. The numerous side effects of available treatments and the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains are severe concerns that justify further research into H. pylori's pathogenic mechanisms. H. pylori produces secreted proteins that may play a role in virulence, including the Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein HcpE (aka HP0235). We demonstrate herein that HcpE is secreted in the culture supernatant both as a soluble protein and in association with outer membrane vesicles. We show that the structure of HcpE comprises an organized array of disulfide bonds. We identify DsbK (aka HP0231) as a folding factor necessary for HcpE production and secretion in H. pylori and show that recombinant DsbK can interact with and refold unprocessed, reduced HcpE in vitro. These experiments highlight the first biologically relevant substrate for DsbK. Furthermore, we show that DsbK has disulfide bond (Dsb) forming activity on reduced lysozyme and demonstrate a DsbA-type of activity for DsbK upon expression in E. coli, despite its similarity with DsbG. Finally, we show a role of DsbK in maintaining redox homeostasis in H. pylori. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Phytopathogenic Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Boer, de S.H.

    2015-01-01

    A few hundred bacterial species, belonging to the Proteobacteria, Mollecutes and Actinomycetes cause a large number of different plant diseases, some of which are devastating for agricultural crops. Symptoms of bacterial plant diseases are diverse and include necrosis, tissue maceration, wilting,

  12. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in newly diagnosed children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roka, Kleoniki; Roubani, Aikaterini; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Panayotou, Ioanna; Roma, Eleftheria; Chouliaras, Giorgos

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are less likely to be infected with Helicobacter pylori compared with non-IBD patients. We aimed to study the prevalence of H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative gastritis in newly diagnosed children with IBD in comparison to those with non-IBD in Greece. All children who underwent first esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy between 2002 and 2011 were retrospectively included. Four groups were studied: patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), IBD unclassified (IBDU), and non-IBD individuals (non-IBD). Helicobacter pylori infection was defined by positive culture or by positive histology and CLO test. Those children with negative or not available culture and only one positive test (histology or CLO) were further evaluated by urea breath test, and the positives were also included in the infected group. We studied 159 patients with IBD (66 CD, 34 UC, and 59 IBDU) and 1209 patients in non-IBD individuals. Helicobacter pylori gastritis was less frequent in the IBD group (3.8% vs 13.2% in the control group, p pylori-negative gastritis were 3.3 times more likely to belong in the IBD group compared with H. pylori-positive patients (p = .006). Occurrence of H. pylori gastritis is less frequent in children with IBD compared with controls. Our study confirms an inverse association between H. pylori and IBD. Future studies are needed to distinguish between a true protective role of H. pylori and a confounding effect due to previous antibiotic use in children with IBD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Controversies in the Helicobacter pylori/duodenal ulcer story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobsley, Michael; Tovey, Frank I; Holton, John

    2008-12-01

    In patients with Helicobacter pylori-positive duodenal ulcer (DU), the organism must be eradicated to achieve rapid, stable healing. However, evidence is against much else that is commonly accepted. (1) Does H. pylori cause the ulcer? Evidence against includes archaeopathology, geographical prevalence, temporal relationships and H. pylori-negative DU patients. DU can recur after eradication of H. pylori infection, and DUs may remain healed after reduction of acid secretion despite persistent infection. The faster healing of ulcers when H. pylori has been eradicated is due to the organism's interference with neoangiogenesis and the healing of wounded epithelial cells. (2) Does H. pylori infection persist until pharmacologically eradicated? Studies based on current infection show that H. pylori infection is a labile state that can change in 3 months. High rates of gastric acid secretion result in spontaneous cure, whereas low rates permit re-infection. Hydrochloric acid, necessary for producing a DU, is strongly associated with the likelihood of an ulcer. At the start, patients owe their ulcer to gastric hypersecretion of hydrochloric acid; approximately 60% may be H. pylori-negative. If acid is suppressed, the less acid milieu encourages invasion by H. pylori, especially if the strain is virulent.

  14. Pylera for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saleem, Aamir

    2012-02-01

    An ideal antibiotic regimen for Helicobacter pylori should achieve eradication rates of approximately 90%. Current 7-day triple therapy is successful in about two-thirds of patients. A novel treatment is required to achieve higher eradication with minimal induction of bacterial resistance. The aim of this article is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single triple capsule (Pylera) containing bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline, given with omeprazole for the eradication of H. pylori infection. Extensive literature searches were conducted using PubMed data from 1982 to 2007. This search included headings of H. pylori, bismuth and eradication therapy. The triple capsule Pylera, when given with omeprazole, achieved eradication rates ranging between 84 and 97%. Eradication rates were similar for clarithromycin- and metronidazole-resistant strains. Eradication rates with an omeprazole, bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline regimen appeared comparable for metronidazole-resistant and -sensitive strains. This effect is not seen with the use of triple therapy in cases of clarithromycin resistance. Clinical trials did not report any serious side effects from bismuth-based regimens and compliance was similar to standard triple therapy. Bismuth-based triple therapy using Pylera is a simplified, effective and well-tolerated regimen achieving cure rates of above 90%.

  15. Immune Evasion Strategies and Persistence of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Gerhard, Markus

    Helicobacter pylori infection is commonly acquired during childhood, can persist lifelong if not treated, and can cause different gastric pathologies, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and eventually gastric cancer. H. pylori has developed a number of strategies in order to cope with the hostile conditions found in the human stomach as well as successful mechanisms to evade the strong innate and adaptive immune responses elicited upon infection. Thus, by manipulating innate immune receptors and related signaling pathways, inducing tolerogenic dendritic cells and inhibiting effector T cell responses, H. pylori ensures low recognition by the host immune system as well as its persistence in the gastric epithelium. Bacterial virulence factors such as cytotoxin-associated gene A, vacuolating cytotoxin A, or gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase have been extensively studied in the context of bacterial immune escape and persistence. Further, the bacterium possesses other factors that contribute to immune evasion. In this chapter, we discuss in detail the main evasion and persistence strategies evolved by the bacterium as well as the specific bacterial virulence factors involved.

  16. Role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ghada M; Nashaat, Ehab H

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) and the value of adding a non teratogenic regimen for its treatment in intractable cases. Eighty hyperemesis gravidarum cases were recruited from Ain Shams University out patient clinics. A complete history was taken including history of medical disorders and chronic medications intake as non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After general and local examination, ultrasound was done for all cases to exclude obstetric causes of hyperemesis. Eighty normal pregnant women acted as control. Serum test for H. pylori IgG antibody titre was done for all patients and controls. Seventy-one cases among the 80 HG cases and twenty-four out of the 80 controls were H. pylori positive. Eight HG cases developed severe intractable vomiting. Three of them developed attacks of hematemesis. Gastroscopy done for the eight cases revealed antral gastritis and duodenitis. Gastric and duodenal erosions were found in two cases. The eight patients received a non teratogenic regimen for treatment. Attacks of vomiting decreased and pregnancy continued till delivery of healthy newborns. Screening for H. pylori should be added to the investigations of hyperemesis gravidarum cases. Non teratogenic treatment can be considered in intractable cases.

  17. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  18. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  19. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  20. Disappearance of Helicobacter without Antibiotics in 12 Patients with Gastritis

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    Hugh James Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Helicobacter pylori in endoscopic gastric biopsies has been associated with a variety of diseases, including ulcers and gastritis. Although the natural history of H pylori in the gastric mucosa is unknown, antibiotic regimens have been used for eradication. Gastric biopsies from 6050 endoscopic procedures done by a single gastroenterologist from 1981 to 1994 were evaluated. Of these, 2860 from April 1, 1991 to September 30, 1994 had silver-stained biopsies to facilitate H pylori detection, and at least two upper endoscopic procedures were done with gastric biopsies in 188 patients. Twelve of the 188 patients with an initially positive H pylori gastric biopsy became H pylori-negative without antibiotic treatment for H pylori or other infection; 10 received omeprazole and two received no drug treatment. In two of the 12 patients recurrent H pylori in the gastric mucosa was also documented. These findings indicate that H pylori may disappear and reappear in the gastric mucosa with no specific antibiotic eradication regimen, although omeprazole may eradicate H pylori in vivo in some patients. The natural history of H pylori in gastric biopsies is poorly understood. Improved understanding, especially regarding the pathogenesis of upper gastrointestinal ulcerative and inflammatory disease processes, is essential before recommendations for specific antibiotic eradication regimens can be made.

  1. Methods for detecting the environmental coccoid form of Helicobacter pylori

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    Mahnaz eMazaheri Assadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is recognized as the most common pathogen to cause gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. The organisms are found in two forms: 1 spiral-shaped bacillus and 2 coccoid. H. pylori coccoid form, generally found in the environment, is the transformed form of the normal spiral-shaped bacillus after exposed to water or adverse environmental conditions such as exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents. The putative infectious capability and the viability of H. pylori under environmental conditions are controversial. This disagreement is partially due to the fact of lack in detecting the coccoid form of H. pylori in the environment. Accurate and effective detection methods of H. pylori will lead to rapid treatment and disinfection, and less human health damages and reduction in health care costs. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to H. pylori environmental coccoid forms, their transmission and detection methods. We further discuss the use of these detection methods including their accuracy and efficiency.

  2. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Farshad, Shohreh

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative motile bacterium causative agent of acute and chronic digestive and extra-digestive human infections. According to different reports worldwide, H. pylori symptomatic and asymptomatic infections are a global problem. The statistical investigations show a percentage of 50 for people who are involved in H. pylori acute/chronic digestive and/or extra-digestive infections around the world. This review focuses on digestive and extra-digestive diseases caused by H. pylori, the related virulence factors, diagnostic techniques including non-invasive and invasive diagnostics and treatment. There is an abundance of diagnostics for detection and identification of H. pylori. The availability, cost, and the condition of test performance may differ from place to place. To increase the level of reliability in association with diagnostic tools for detecting H. pylori, several techniques must be applied at once as multi-diagnostic technique. Furthermore, there are several pharmacotherapies which can be used for complete eradication of H. pylori infection.

  3. Receptores tipo Toll, patogénesis y respuesta inmune a Helicobacter pylori Toll-like receptors, pathogenesis and immune response to Helicobacter pylori

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    Norma Angélica Sánchez-Zauco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori coloniza el epitelio gástrico y la mayoría de las personas infectadas es asintomática, de 10 al 20% desarrolla gastritis atrófica, úlcera péptica, y menos de 3% genera cáncer gástrico. Estas patologías están determinadas por la relación entre los factores de virulencia de la bacteria y los factores del hospedero como predisposición genética y respuesta inmune. La inmunidad innata, representada principalmente por los receptores tipo Toll y tipo Nod, reconocen a sus ligandos específicos y activan factores de transcripción como NF-kB, AP-1, CREB-1, induciendo la producción de citocinas inflamatorias como IL-8, IL-12, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-18 y TNF-α, e IL-10. La inflamación crónica favorece los cambios de morfología gástrica, evita la apoptosis y favorece la angiogénesis, ocasionando lesiones neoplásicas y cáncer. El objetivo de esta revisión es analizar los mecanismos propuestos a la fecha de la respuesta inmune innata y adaptativa, involucrados en la infección por H. pylori, y se puntualiza en los mecanismos de eliminación o persistencia de la infección.Helicobacter pylori colonize the gastric epithelial, most infected people are asymptomatic, 10 to 20% develop atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer and less than 3% gastric cancer. These diseases are determined by the relationship between virulence factors of bacteria, host factors such as, genetic predisposition, and immune response. The innate immune response mainly represented by Toll-like receptors and Nod-like receptors that recognize their specific ligands, activate transcription factors as NF-kB, AP-1, CREB-1, inducing production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL -8, IL-12, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-10. Chronic inflammation promotes gastric morphological changes, prevents apoptosis and allows angiogenesis generating neoplasic lesions and cancer. The aim of this review is to analyze the mechanisms proposed to date of the innate and adaptative

  4. Primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains among adults and children in a tertiary referral centre in Lithuania

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    Dargiene, Gintare; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluated primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori within the period 2013-2015 and trends of antibiotic consumption over the last decade in Lithuania; 242 adults and 55 children were included in the study. E-tests were performed for amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin......, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. The presence of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance was additionally tested by PCR. Helicobacter pylori culture was positive in 67 of 242 (28%) adult and in 12 of 55 (21.8%) children samples. Resistance rates among adults by E-tests were as follows: metronidazole...... and ciprofloxacin - 0%. Accumulated clarithromycin resistance rates by E-tests and PCR were 8.2% (95% CI: 4.1-16.0%) in adults and 17.7% (95% CI: 6.2-41.0%) in children. Total use of macrolides and lincosamides in Lithuania increased from 1.26 to 1.86 defined daily dose (DDD)/1000 inhabitants/day among adults...

  5. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  6. Biotherapy for and protection against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections via action of probiotic bacteria

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    Mongkol Thirabunyanon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota in the human intestine play an important function in human health and disease. Gastrointestinal infections by foodborne pathogens are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such infections can be caused by contaminated foods or other sources which come in contact with human intestinal epithelial cells. In recent years, probiotics have been recommended as alternative biotherapeutic agents against intestinal pathogenic infections. Two genera of probiotics, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, are commercially valuable applications, several forms of which are available as capsules or in functional food products such as yogurt, fermented juices and sausages. Probiotics protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infection via several mechanisms. These include production of antimicrobial substances, competition for nutrient substrates, competitive exclusion, enhancement of intestinal barrier function, and immunomodulation. Probiotic bacteria have been documented as being effective in biotherapeutic applications against gastrointestinal pathogens, e.g. Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and rotaviruses. This alternative therapeutic application of probiotics to protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections may be of great importance for future medicinal use.

  7. The 30th Anniversary of Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms Workshops – What Have We Learned In Three Decades?

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    Christine M Szymanski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms (CHRO workshops with this special Frontiers edition, we look back upon three decades of research and provide some highlights from the 16th International CHRO meeting. As Martin Skirrow noted, Elizabeth King was the first to isolate campylobacters in the 1950’s, although Escherich himself provided drawings of these fecal organisms back in the 1880’s. Helicobacter is a more recent organism, first described to be the causative agent of stomach ulcers at a CHRO meeting by Barry Marshall and Robin Warren – who then later received the Nobel Prize for their findings that bacteria could cause diseases previously believed to be caused by human factors. Studies of the intersection of host microbial ecology and pathogen infection have been pioneered by scientists such as Brett Finlay, who described his current work on this topic. And as general antibiotics are routinely administered, we see a rise in bacterial antibiotic resistance. Julian Davies emphasized that there is a growing need for the development of new bioactive compounds on the horizon as we advance our knowledge on these pathogens. The first genome of C. jejuni was published in 2000; now one decade later we have 30 Campyobacter taxa sequenced, and this number continues to rise quickly. However, we continue to obtain unexpected results as a pioneer in CHRO research, Martin Blaser explained – i.e., although H. pylori is now classified as a level I carcinogen, there may be benefits to carrying this organism as part of your normal flora. Other findings indicate that Campylobacters and Helicobacters do not follow classic paradigms of other well-characterized gastrointestinal pathogens. And we are learning that there is a whole world of interesting related organisms beyond C. jejuni and H. pylori. This review summarizes some of the history of CHRO research and the exciting directions ahead.

  8. Proposal to consistently apply the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) to names of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria), including those validly published under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN)/International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN), and proposal to change Principle 2 of the ICNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinevich, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    This taxonomic note was motivated by the recent proposal [Oren & Garrity (2014) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 64, 309-310] to exclude the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) from the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which entails unilateral coverage of these prokaryotes by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; formerly the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, ICBN). On the basis of key viewpoints, approaches and rules in the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of prokaryotes it is reciprocally proposed to apply the ICNP to names of cyanobacteria including those validly published under the ICBN/ICN. For this purpose, a change to Principle 2 of the ICNP is proposed to enable validation of cyanobacterial names published under the ICBN/ICN rules. © 2015 IUMS.

  9. The occupational risk of Helicobacter pylori infection among gastroenterologists and their assistants

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    Costa José

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a widely spread bacterium that mainly inhabits the gastric mucosa and can lead to serious illnesses such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The oral-oral route seems to be the main transmission route. The fact that endoscopes are contaminated after being used to perform a gastroscopy leads one to question whether gastroenterologists and endoscopy nurses and assistants run a higher risk of infection. Methods A systematic search for literature was conducted in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and further publications were found in reference lists of relevant articles. Epidemiological studies on the occupational exposure of endoscopy personnel were collected and their quality was assessed. Pooled effect estimates were identified in a meta-analysis. Results Of the 24 studies included in the analysis, 15 were considered to be methodologically good. Of these 15 studies, eight single studies showed a statistically significant increased risk of infection for gastroenterologists, and five for their assistants. Meta-analysis across all methodologically good studies found a statistically significant risk of 1.6 (95%CI 1.3-2.0 for doctors. The pooled effect estimates also indicated a statistically significant risk of Helicobacter pylori infection (RR 1.4; 95%CI 1.1-1.8 for assistants too. When studies are stratified by medical and non-medical control groups, statistically significant risks can only be recognised in the comparison with non-medical controls. Conclusions In summary, our results demonstrated an increased risk of Helicobacter pylori infection among gastroenterological personnel. However, the choice of control group is important for making a valid assessment of occupational exposure risks.

  10. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  11. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, Timothy Nii Akushe; Asmah, Richard Harry; Wiredu, Edwin Kwame; Gyasi, Richard Kwasi; Nkrumah, Kofi Nyaako; Rajakumar, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative urease-producing bacterium causally linked with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is more frequent and acquired at an earlier age in developing countries compared to European populations. The incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients was 75.4%. However, epidemiological factors associated with infection vary across populations. This study used a cross-sectional design to consecutively sample dyspeptic patients at the Endoscopy Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra between 2010 and 2012. The study questionnaire elicited their epidemiological clinical characteristics. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by rapid-urease examination of antral biopsies at upper Gastro-intestinal endoscopy. The sample population of dyspeptic patients attending the Endoscopy Unit for upper GI endoscopy yielded 242 patients of which 47.5% were females. The age distribution of H. pylori-infection was even across most age - groups, ranging from 69.2% (61 - 70) years to 80% (21 - 30) years. Helicobacter pylori prevalence decreased across areas mapping to the three residential classes in accordance with increasing affluence with rural areas having the highest prevalence. The unemployed and patients in farming had relatively high Helicobacter pylori infection rates of 92.3% and 91.7% respectively. Helicobacter pylori is endemic in Ghana but the persistently high prevalence across age groups despite significant community anti-microbial use suggests likely recrudescence or re-infection from multiple sources in a developing country. Socio-cultural factors such as residential class and farming may be facilitating factors for its continued prevalence.

  12. PANORAMA ACTUAL DEL ESTUDIO DE LAS PLANTAS CON ACTIVIDAD ANTI-Helicobacter pylori

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    FRANCISCO PALACIOS-ESPINOSA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La bacteria Helicobacter pylori es reconocida como el principal agente causal de la gastritis crónica activa, de la úlcera péptica, así como un factor de predisposición del carcinoma gástrico. Se estima que más del 50% de la población mundial está infectada por esta bacteria y, en el caso de México, se reporta una seroprevalencia del 66%. La terapia empleada para la erradicación de la bacteria falla en más del 20%, principalmente por la generación de resistencia a los antibióticos comerciales. De tal manera, es importante controlar estas enfermedades, buscando nuevos tratamientos y/o compuestos que sean más específicos, menos tóxicos y de fácil acceso a la población. Los productos naturales vegetales constituyen potenciales fuentes para el descubrimiento y esarrollo de nuevos agentes efectivos contra la infección de esta bacteria. En este trabajo se presenta la perspectiva actual a nivel mundial, acerca de las investigaciones que se están llevando a cabo en este campo. Se tratan temas como la evaluación preliminar de extractos de una cantidad considerable de plantas, el aislamiento de compuestos puros a partir de los extractos bioactivos, la elucidación del probable mecanismo de acción, estudios integrales que evalúan propiedades antiinflamatorias y gastroprotectoras y, por último, la modificación química de compuestos prototipo.

  13. Gastric epithelium in the duodenum: its association with Helicobacter pylori and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J I; Rathbone, B J; Sobala, G M; Shallcross, T; Heatley, R V; Axon, A T; Dixon, M F

    1990-12-01

    Duodenal biopsy specimens from 471 adults and 47 children were examined to determine the prevalence and distribution of gastric epithelium in the duodenal bulb in relation to age, gender, gastroduodenal inflammation, smoking, alcohol and consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Gastric metaplasia was present in the anterior wall duodenal biopsy specimen in 31%, was significantly less common in patients under 17 than in adults, and was more common in males than females. In sixty two adults who underwent multiple radial duodenal biopsy gastric metaplasia was randomly distributed around the duodenal circumference; sixty three per cent of the patients with gastric metaplasia found on multiple biopsy were detected by just the anterior biopsy. Gastric metaplasia was not obviously associated with alcohol, cigarette, or NSAID consumption. While the presence of gastric metaplasia was associated with adulthood, male sex, and low fasting gastric juice pH, its extent was associated with active duodenitis and Helicobacter-associated gastritis. On logistic regression, gastric metaplasia in the duodenum and gastric Helicobacter pylori were independent predictors of active duodenitis, but were not significantly associated with inactive duodenal inflammation. H pylori was observed in duodenal biopsy specimens from 32 patients, all with active duodenitis; bacteria were present only on foci of gastric metaplasia, and were more likely to be seen when the metaplasia was extensive. It is proposed that inflammatory injury to the duodenal mucosa by H pylori may stimulate the development of further gastric metaplasia, and that the area of duodenum susceptible to colonisation with H pylori may therefore increase progressively until mucosal integrity is compromised and ulceration supervenes.

  14. Glycophenotypic alterations induced by Pteridium aquilinum in mice gastric mucosa: synergistic effect with Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Joana Gomes

    Full Text Available The bracken fern Pteridium aquilinum is a plant known to be carcinogenic to animals. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between bracken fern exposure and gastric cancer development in humans. The biological effects of exposure to this plant within the gastric carcinogenesis process are not fully understood. In the present work, effects in the gastric mucosa of mice treated with Pteridium aquilinum were evaluated, as well as molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic role with Helicobacter pylori infection. Our results showed that exposure to Pteridium aquilinum induces histomorphological modifications including increased expression of acidic glycoconjugates in the gastric mucosa. The transcriptome analysis of gastric mucosa showed that upon exposure to Pteridium aquilinum several glycosyltransferase genes were differently expressed, including Galntl4, C1galt1 and St3gal2, that are mainly involved in the biosynthesis of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens. Concomitant treatment with Pteridium aquilinum and infection with Helicobacter pylori also resulted in differently expressed glycosyltransferase genes underlying the biosynthesis of terminal sialylated Lewis antigens, including Sialyl-Lewis(x. These results disclose the molecular basis for the altered pattern of glycan structures observed in the mice gastric mucosa. The gene transcription alterations and the induced glycophenotypic changes observed in the gastric mucosa contribute for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Pteridium aquilinum in the gastric carcinogenesis process.

  15. Glycophenotypic alterations induced by Pteridium aquilinum in mice gastric mucosa: synergistic effect with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Carvalho, Ana S; Hernandez, Gilberto E; Papp, Suzanne L; Head, Steven R; Michel, Valérie; David, Leonor; Gärtner, Fátima; Touati, Eliette; Reis, Celso A

    2012-01-01

    The bracken fern Pteridium aquilinum is a plant known to be carcinogenic to animals. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between bracken fern exposure and gastric cancer development in humans. The biological effects of exposure to this plant within the gastric carcinogenesis process are not fully understood. In the present work, effects in the gastric mucosa of mice treated with Pteridium aquilinum were evaluated, as well as molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic role with Helicobacter pylori infection. Our results showed that exposure to Pteridium aquilinum induces histomorphological modifications including increased expression of acidic glycoconjugates in the gastric mucosa. The transcriptome analysis of gastric mucosa showed that upon exposure to Pteridium aquilinum several glycosyltransferase genes were differently expressed, including Galntl4, C1galt1 and St3gal2, that are mainly involved in the biosynthesis of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens. Concomitant treatment with Pteridium aquilinum and infection with Helicobacter pylori also resulted in differently expressed glycosyltransferase genes underlying the biosynthesis of terminal sialylated Lewis antigens, including Sialyl-Lewis(x). These results disclose the molecular basis for the altered pattern of glycan structures observed in the mice gastric mucosa. The gene transcription alterations and the induced glycophenotypic changes observed in the gastric mucosa contribute for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Pteridium aquilinum in the gastric carcinogenesis process.

  16. BLEEDING PEPTIC ULCER, NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED, RANDOMIZED STUDY

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    Pavel Skok

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The explanation of peptic ulcer etiology has changed significantly in the past decade after the clarification of the significance of Helicobacter pylori infection.Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with hemorrhaging peptic ulcer and patients with peptic ulcer without complications.Study ethics. The study was approved in 1998 by the Medical Ethics Committee of the Republic of Slovenia (No. 90/09/98.Type of study. Prospective, controlled and randomized study, carried out between 1998–2000.Patients and methods. The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22– 80 in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. In all cases endoscopic hemostasis was performed: injection sclerotherapy with diluted adrenalin 1:10,000 and 1% polidocanol or argon plasma coagulation. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. Infection was confirmed by a rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group, in the control group it was 91.3% (p > 0.05. In 6 patients (7.5%, 6/ 80 from the study group and in 7 (8.8%, 7/80 from the control group we introduced a replacement treatment

  17. Helicobacter heilmannii-associated Gastritis: Clinicopathologic Findings and Comparison with Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Ji Eun; Chang, Sun Hee; Kim, Hanseong; Chi, Je G.; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Yang, Jeon Ho; Lee, June Sung; Moon, Young-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinicopathologic features of Helicobacter heilmannii-associated gastritis and to compare H. heilmannii-associated gastritis with H. pylori-associated gastritis. We reviewed 5,985 consecutive gastric biopsy specimens. All cases of chronic gastritis with Helicobacter infection were evaluated with the Updated Sydney System, and the grades of all gastritis variables were compared between H. heilmannii-associated gastritis and H. pylori-associated gastritis groups. There were 10 cases of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis (0.17%) and 3,285 cases of H. pylori-associated gastritis (54.9%). The organisms were superficially located within the mucous layer without adhesion to epithelial cells. Interestingly, in one case many intracytoplasmic H. heilmannii organisms were observed in parietal cells with cell damage. A case of low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma concomitant with H. heilmannii infection was detected. Compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis, H. heilmannii-associated gastritis showed less severe neutrophilic activity (pgastritis devoid of erosion or ulcer (p=0.0309). In conclusion, we present the detailed clinicopathologic findings of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis. H. heilmannii-associated gastritis is uncommon and milder than H. pylori-associated gastritis, however it may be noteworthy with respect to the development of MALT lymphoma. PMID:17297253

  18. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

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    Rita S Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA/2’-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical barriers—the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus, while remaining capable of diffusing through the mucus and delivering these nucleic acid mimics directly into the bacteria.

  19. Investigation of the structure and localization of the urease of Helicobacter pylori using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawtin, P R; Stacey, A R; Newell, D G

    1990-10-01

    The urease of Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori) has been partly purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. This material contained 10 nm doughnut-like structures when examined by electron microscopy and comprised three major polypeptides (61 kDa, 56 kDa and 28 kDa). Only two of these polypeptides (61 kDa and 28 kDa) were observed in urease-containing material isolated by preparative non-denatured PAGE. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced which were directed against two of these polypeptides (56 kDa and 28 kDa). Only mAbs directed against the 28 kDa polypeptide inhibited or captured urease activity. These results suggest that the 56 kDa polypeptide is not essential for enzyme activity. Anti-urease mAbs were used in an indirect immunogold technique to localize the enzyme at the ultrastructural level. In both prefixed bacteria and ultrathin cryosectioned bacteria the enzyme was located on the cell surface and in material apparently shed from that surface.

  20. General prevalence of helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic population of islamabad, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, T.Z.; Saleem, K.; Zafar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori was known as campylobacter pyloridis in the beginning of the twentieth century. Doenges was the first to find this bacterium in the autopsy specimens of stomach using haematoxylin and eosin Stains. In 1940 Freedburg and Baron carried out a study on 35 partial gastrectomy specimens and found spirochetes in 37% after a long search. A major breakthrough occurred with the advent of fibroptic biopsy technique permitting the biopsy of stomach. Then in 1975 Steer and Colin Jones observed gram negative bacilli in 80% of patients with gastric ulcer. The bacterium was closely associated with the surface epithelium, both within and between pits. These microorganisms were poorly stained by haematoxylin and eosin stains but could be seen easily with Warthin Starry silver stain. Later on, a heavy growth of campylobacter like organism was found on non-selective culture media and so the first culture of helicobacter pylori was achieved in April 1982. Since then eight other helicobacter species have been found, one in man and the remainder in other animals including birds. The organism may remain silent for years or produce serious gastric disorders in the beginning. Many studies have been conducted on asymptomatic healthy individuals but its presence in dyspeptic patients has always been ignored and dyspepsia has been treated as a result of over acid production This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of helicobacter pylori (hp) infection in dyspeptic population of Islamabad using /sup 13/C urea breath test, and to find the possible role of water in bug transmission. We have also tried to assess the type of gastric pathology resulted by bacterial colonization in stomach. A total of 278 individuals were studied. Out of these 115 who had serious complaints/symptoms were sent for endoscopy to get the antral biopsy sample. Breath samples of dyspeptic individuals were sent to Isotope Application Division, PINSTECH for /sup 13/C//sup 12/C isotope ratio

  1. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

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    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  2. The Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

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    Marija Gubina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to Helicobacter pylori involves different mechanisms that are both protective and damaging to the host. The innate and the adaptive immune responses lead to inflammatory as well as anti-inflammatory responses, allowing for persistence of many infections. Thus, developing new therapeutics and effective vaccines against H. pylori has proven to be arduous. Despite many immunisation experiments, using various routes of immunisation with classical as well as recombinant H. pylori vaccines (urease, CagA, HP-NAP, HspA, DNA, chimeric molecules, live vectors, microspheres, no effective vaccine is currently available for humans. New directions for successful vaccine construction should follow a profound knowledge of immunopathological events during natural H. pylori infection and factors leading to resolution of infection: mandatory is a new knowledge about the interplay of the innate response to H. pylori, mucosal inflammation, H. pylori virulence factors inducing immune responses, regulation of the adaptive responses to H. pylori as well as construction of novel vaccine platforms for achieving a broad immune response, leading to a sterilizing immunity.

  3. Helicobacter pylori: a poor man's gut pathogen?

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    Khalifa Mohammed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is one of the human pathogens with highest prevalence around the world; yet, its principal mode of transmission remains largely unknown. The role of H. pylori in gastric disease and cancer has not been established until the end of the 20th century. Since then, its epidemiology has been extensively studied, and an accruing body of literature suggests that not all humans are equally at risk of infection by this gut pathogen. Here, we briefly review the different epidemiological aspects of H. pylori infection with emphasis on those factors related to human poverty. The epidemiology of H. pylori infection is characterized by marked differences between developing and developed countries, notably among children. In addition, congruent lines of evidence point out to socioeconomic factors and living standards as main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. These data are alarming in the light of the changing global climate and birth rate, which are expected to change the demography of our planet, putting more children at risk of H. pylori and its complications for years to come.

  4. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

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    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  5. Rescue Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection 2012

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    Javier P. Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After 30 years of experience in H. pylori treatment, however, the ideal regimen to treat this infection has still to be found. Nowadays, apart from having to know well first-line eradication regimens, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. In designing a treatment strategy, we should not only focus on the results of primary therapy alone but also on the final—overall—eradication rate. The choice of a “rescue” treatment depends on which treatment is used initially. If a first-line clarithromycin-based regimen was used, a second-line metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy may be used afterwards, and then a levofloxacin-based combination would be a third-line “rescue” option. Alternatively, it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based “rescue” therapy constitutes an encouraging 2nd-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, with the advantage of efficacy, simplicity and safety. In this case, quadruple regimen may be reserved as a 3rd-line “rescue” option. Even after two consecutive failures, several studies have demonstrated that H. pylori eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several “rescue” therapies are consecutively given.

  6. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

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    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  7. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

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    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  8. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood.

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    Thomas, J E; Whatmore, A M; Barer, M R; Eastham, E J; Kehoe, M A

    1990-12-01

    Sera from 100 children (ages, 6 to 16 years) presenting with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were examined for antibodies to Helicobacter pylori by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on crude, loosely cell-associated antigens and a partially purified urease antigen preparation. All children underwent endoscopy, and 20 children were shown to have H. pylori infection by histology or direct culture. Serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels (crude antigen) were clearly raised in the infected group, particularly after preabsorption of sera against a Campylobacter jejuni antigen preparation, while IgM and IgA ELISA determinations did not discriminate between infected and H. pylori-negative patients. Only 14 children in the infected group had raised anti-urease IgG levels. Two patients in whom the organism was not demonstrated or cultured had raised specific IgG levels against both crude and urease antigens and pathological features consistent with H. pylori disease. Immunoblotting studies did not reveal any single protein antigen or simple combination of antigens that could be considered as a candidate for a more defined serodiagnostic reagent. Anti-H. pylori antibody determinations (crude antigen) performed on posttreatment samples from children in whom the organism could no longer be demonstrated suggested that sustained IgG levels may not be a reliable index of treatment failure. An IgG ELISA based on crude, loosely cell-associated antigens of H. pylori can be used for the serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in childhood.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and associated duodenal ulcer.

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    Yeung, C K; Fu, K H; Yuen, K Y; Ng, W F; Tsang, T M; Branicki, F J; Saing, H

    1990-11-01

    Twenty three children with coexistent duodenal ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection were treated with either two weeks of amoxycillin (25 mg/kg/day) in addition to six weeks of cimetidine, or cimetidine alone. Endoscopy with antral and duodenal biopsies for urease test, microaerophilic culture, and histological studies were performed at entry, six weeks, 12 weeks, and at six months. Children with persistent H pylori infection at six weeks were given a further two weeks' course of amoxycillin. H pylori persisted in all children not receiving amoxycillin treatment but cleared in six of the 13 children (46%) treated with amoxycillin. With failure of H pylori clearance at six months, only two out of six (33%) ulcers had healed and 50% of patients had experienced ulcer recurrence. In contrast, when H pylori remained cleared all ulcers healed and no ulcer recurred. Persistent H pylori infection was associated with persistent gastritis and duodenitis despite endoscopic evidence of ulcer healing. Detection and eradication of H pylori deserves particular attention in the routine management of duodenal ulceration in children.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

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    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

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    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

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    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed. PMID:26814181

  13. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

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    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  14. Living Conditions and Helicobacter pylori in Adults

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    Odete Amaral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infection by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is transmissible and is considered a public health issue which affects people of all ages. The objective of this study was to identify factors (lifestyles, dietary factors, and hygiene conditions related to the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Methods. We carried out an observational cross-sectional study with a community sample of adults from the municipalities of Viseu and Sátão, Portugal. The final sample resulted in 166 adults. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire with questions regarding sociodemographic aspects and lifestyles. H. pylori infection was identified using the 13C-urea breath test. Results. No association was found between the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the use of tobacco, alcohol, or coffee or dietary factors. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in adults who reported higher consumption of fried food and lower consumption of vegetables and fruit. H. pylori infection was significant for the variables of lower frequency of handwashing before going to the bathroom (p=0.02 and well water consumption (p=0.05. Conclusion. A significant association was found for H. pylori infection with the lower frequency of handwashing before going to the bathroom and the consumption of well water.

  15. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection 2013.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    This review summarizes important studies regarding Helicobacter pylori therapy published from April 2012 up to March 2013. To begin with, the updated European Consensus Guidelines were published last year, highlighting the role of bismuth and nonbismuth quadruple regimen as first-line treatments. Cure rates for standard triple therapy remain acceptable in quite a few settings nowadays, and some reports on innovative triple therapies look promising. One study evaluating bismuth quadruple therapy as first-line therapy was reported. Regarding nonbismuth quadruple regimens, there is a trend of superiority emerging for the "concomitant" therapy over the "sequential" regimen. "Hybrid" therapy, a combination of sequential and concomitant therapy, has also shown advantage over sequential therapy. Levofloxacin-based therapies appear to be useful and versatile in second- and third-line therapies, with interesting results for newer generation quinolones, which may partially overcome antibiotic resistance. Some promising works have been reported for bismuth-based rescue therapy, using individualized therapies upon antimicrobial information, as well as for rifabutin fourth-line therapy. Probiotics appear to have an effect in terms of reducing side effects and improving compliance, but data on improvement of eradication rates remain controversial.

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in hyperemesis

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    hosein Khedmat

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vomiting is one of the most common problems during pregnancy periods which happens in 50% of the pregnant women. Hyperemesis gravidarum is a rare status that 1 out of 500 pregnant women suffer from it. Although the reason of HG is unknown, but several studies indicate a relationship between HG and helicobacter pylori . So the aim of this study was to assess the relation between H.pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum and to compare it with healthy ones. Materials and Methods : In this case control study 100 pregnant women with HG and 100 pregnant controls , at the same gestational weeks , referred to the city clinics were studied. Then H.pylori serum immunoglobulin IgG concentration was determined in the case and control groups by ELIZA method and serologic tests and analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: Results showed that the prevalence of H.pylori infection was significantly higher in patients with HG (79.8% than in controls (46.8% with a P<0.001 . There were no significant differences in maternal age , gestational age and social economic status between case and control groups . Conclusion : Results of this study indicate that H. pylori can play an important role for etiology of hyperemesis gravidarum.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance. PMID:25071324

  18. Clinicopathological characteristics of invasive gastric Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Jonathan; Wieczorek, Tad; Selig, Martin; Cheung, Hoiwan; Shen, Jeanne; Odze, Robert; Deshpande, Vikram; Zukerberg, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori organisms have been observed deep within the stomach mucosa with an "intracellular" appearance, although the clinicopathological characteristics of such cases remain poorly understood. We analyzed 18 cases of deep mucosal H pylori and associated clinical (sex, age, history of H pylori infection, or proton pump inhibitor [PPI] use, medications, smoking, alcohol use, comorbidities, treatment response) and pathological (presence of lymphoid aggregates, intestinal metaplasia, PPI effect, active and/or chronic inflammation, quantity of invasive versus surface H pylori) characteristics. Electron microscopy was performed on 6 cases with the highest burden of invasive H pylori. Within our sample, 3 of 16 had a history of H pylori infection, 10 of 15 were receiving PPIs at the time of biopsy, and 12 of 13 had a negative posttreatment follow-up. Histology revealed that invasive H pylori were more commonly associated with chronic inflammation, in both the antrum (15/15 chronic, 8/15 acute) and fundus (17/18 chronic, 8/18 acute). Electron microscopy showed organisms within intercellular and luminal spaces, but no intracellular organisms. Deep mucosal H pylori often have an intracellular appearance but are contained within intercellular and luminal spaces and are responsive to standard therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in Omani children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sinani, Siham; Sharef, Sharef W; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Sharji, Hyatt

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the most common chronic bacterial infection in humans. Its prevalence in Omani adults and children is not known. To report histology-based H. pylori infection prevalence in Omani children. A retrospective study of biopsy proven H. pylori infection in children over a 3 year period in a single center. Age, gender, indication for endoscopy, history of recurrent abdominal pain, and anemia were compared between H. pylori-positive and negative children. Of 143 patients who underwent endoscopy, gastric biopsies were available on 112. The overall prevalence of biopsy proven H. pylori infection was 25%. The prevalence in children with recurrent abdominal pain was 30% compared to 22% in children who underwent endoscopy for other indications (p = .382). The prevalence increased from 7% in children aged pylori infection in Omani children. H. pylori infection prevalence is 25%, is lower than regional and many Arab countries. The prevalence appears to increase till age of 5 years. There was no significant association between H. pylori and recurrent abdominal pain, gender, or anemia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pullorum infections in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Liesbeth M; Decostere, Annemie; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Maes, Dominiek; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2007-05-10

    Four groups of 23 one-day-old broiler chickens were each inoculated by gavage with a different Helicobacter pullorum strain isolated from humans or poultry. As a control, a fifth group of eight animals was inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Faecal samples were collected weekly and tested for the presence of H. pullorum DNA using PCR. At 1, 8, 15, 22 and 42 days postinoculation, birds were euthanized and samples from the liver and intestinal tract were histologically, immunohistochemically and bacteriologically examined. The samples were also tested for the presence of H. pullorum DNA by PCR. All animals remained clinically healthy throughout the experiment although mild lesions in the caeca were present in animals inoculated with H. pullorum. In all H. pullorum-inoculated groups, DNA of this bacterium was detected in faecal samples until 42 days postinoculation. The main site of colonization was the caecum. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the bacterium was closely associated with the caecal epithelial cells. It was concluded that H. pullorum may colonize the caecum of broilers and is excreted in their faeces until slaughter age. This implies that chicken meat might constitute a source of infection for human beings.

  1. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori with triple therapy regimen (omeprazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin in children for seven days (A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Najafi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Successful treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection causes not only eradication of pathogen, but also prevents the associated diseases such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma and lymphoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 7 days triple therapy as a lowest drug resistance, shortest duration and fewer numbers of drugs in children. Materials and Method: The target population was 22 children <15 years with peptic disease complaints. The inclusion criteria were: positive endoscopic finding, inflammatory evidence in gastric biopsy and presence of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa. Two pieces from incisura and body of gastric mucosa were taken and stained with Gimsa. Helicobacter pylori positive patients were treated with omeprazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin for 7 days. One month later, all cases were evaluated by repeated endoscopy or Urea Breath Test and H pylori eradication were assessed. Data was gathered and analyzed with SPSS software, and McNamara's and Chi-Square test were performed. Results: Nineteen patients were studied including twelve boys, 26.3% 2-6 years and the rest older than 6 years. The most common clinical presentations and endoscopic findings were chronic abdominal pain (74% and nodularity (47.4%, respectively. The per-protocol and intention-to-treat H. pylori eradication rates were 84.2% and 76%, respectively in seven days triple therapy regimen. Conclusion: Seven days triple therapy successfully eradicated H pylori in children

  2. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia may differ according to age and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunsung; Park, Jae Jun; Park, Yoo Mi; Baik, Su Jung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jung, Da Hyun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2018-03-29

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) remains controversial. This study aimed to clarify the association between H. pylori infection and ACN according to age groups. We retrospectively analyzed the association between H. pylori infection and ACN in patients aged Helicobacter pylori positivity was determined by the results of serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G or rapid urease test, if the anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G was in the borderline range. Among the 19 337 patients who were included, 56.2% and 3.4% were positive for H. pylori and ACN, respectively. Helicobacter pylori infection independently increased the risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and ACN was affected by smoking history. When stratified by age and smoking history, H. pylori infection conferred an increased risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and a history of smoking than in those without (69.3% vs 54.4%, respectively; P = .031). Helicobacter pylori infection confers an increased risk of ACN, but the association may differ according to age and smoking history. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of Helicobacter pylori infection in asymptomatic Chinese children: a prospective, cross-sectional, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Z; Zhao, S; Gong, S; Li, Z; Mao, M; Xu, X; Zhou, L

    2015-10-01

    Limited research has been published on current Helicobacter pylori infection rate in asymptomatic children in China. To assess current Helicobacter pylori infection rate, distribution characteristics and risk factors in Chinese asymptomatic children. A prospective, cross-sectional, population-based study was performed from 2009 to 2011 in three cities of China. Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed by a stool antigen test. Multi-stage cluster random sampling was used to select asymptomatic children including neonates. Socioeconomic details were obtained through a standardised questionnaire. Among total of 3491 children (0-18 years), the global infection rate was 6.8% and there were no significant differences between genders. Age specific infection rate between regions was significantly different (P history of gastrointestinal disease were significantly associated with the risk of infection (OR 1.200, 1.965, 2.002, 1.071 and 2.093 respectively). Helicobacter pylori infection rate increases with age in Chinese asymptomatic children and is common after 10 years of age. The rate of infection is related to socioeconomic status. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Helicobacter pylori Homolog of Eukaryotic Flotillin Is Involved in Cholesterol Accumulation, Epithelial Cell Responses and Host Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Hutton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori acquires cholesterol from membrane raft domains in eukaryotic cells, commonly known as “lipid rafts.” Incorporation of this cholesterol into the H. pylori cell membrane allows the bacterium to avoid clearance by the host immune system and to resist the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. The presence of cholesterol in H. pylori bacteria suggested that this pathogen may have cholesterol-enriched domains within its membrane. Consistent with this suggestion, we identified a hypothetical H. pylori protein (HP0248 with homology to the flotillin proteins normally found in the cholesterol-enriched domains of eukaryotic cells. As shown for eukaryotic flotillin proteins, HP0248 was detected in detergent-resistant membrane fractions of H. pylori. Importantly, H. pylori HP0248 mutants contained lower levels of cholesterol than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.01. HP0248 mutant bacteria also exhibited defects in type IV secretion functions, as indicated by reduced IL-8 responses and CagA translocation in epithelial cells (P < 0.05, and were less able to establish a chronic infection in mice than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.05. Thus, we have identified an H. pylori flotillin protein and shown its importance for bacterial virulence. Taken together, the data demonstrate important roles for H. pylori flotillin in host-pathogen interactions. We propose that H. pylori flotillin may be required for the organization of virulence proteins into membrane raft-like structures in this pathogen.

  5. Prediagnostic Helicobacter pylori Antibodies and Colorectal Cancer Risk in an Elderly, Caucasian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blase, Jennifer L; Campbell, Peter T; Gapstur, Susan M; Pawlita, Michael; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Teras, Lauren R

    2016-12-01

    Study results on overall seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori and colorectal cancer risk have been inconsistent. However, one study found positive associations with antibodies to specific H. pylori proteins. To follow up on those findings, we assessed associations of 15 H. pylori specific proteins with colorectal cancer incidence in the prospective Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Participants in this nested case-control study included 392 cases and 774 controls who were predominantly elderly (median age at blood draw: 71 years) and Caucasian (98%). Seroreactivity against 15 H. pylori proteins was assessed by fluorescent bead-based multiplex serology and associations with colorectal cancer were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Helicobacter pylori serostatus was not associated with colorectal cancer incidence (odds ratio (OR), 1.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.91-1.50). Among individual antigens, GroEl serostatus was associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.32, 95% CI: 1.03-1.70), whereas CagM was associated with colon cancer risk only (OR, 1.35, 95% CI: 1.01-1.80). No dose-response relationships were observed for any of the antigens, including GroEl and CagM. The results of our study do not support an association between H. pylori infection and colorectal cancer risk in this elderly, mostly Caucasian population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Genetic determinants and clinico-pathological outcomes of helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwasola, A O

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral Gram-negative bacterium with a relatively small genome and is known to be the most common human bacterial infection worldwide, infecting about half of the world's population. The bacterium represents one of the most successful human pathogens, inducing severe clinical symptoms only in a small subset of individuals, thus signifying a highly balanced degree of co-evolution of H. pylori and humans. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection varies greatly among countries and among population groups within the same country, but is falling in most developed countries. The clinical course of H. pylori infection is highly variable and is influenced by both microbial and host factors including genetic susceptibility while the pattern and distribution of inflammation correlate strongly with the risk of clinical sequelae, namely duodenal or gastric ulcers, mucosal atrophy, gastric carcinoma, or gastric lymphoma. Cytokine gene polymorphisms directly influence inter-individual variation in the magnitude of cytokine response, and this clearly contributes to an individual's ultimate clinical outcome. Polymorphisms in genes coding for innate immune factors have also been incriminated in the pathogenesis of H. pylori related disease, while promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is considered an important factor in carcinogenesis and known to be present in H. pylori associated gastric tumors. Functional genomics may fill many of the gaps in our understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection and accelerate the development of novel therapies, including H. pylori specific antimicrobial agents.

  7. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer Detecção do Helicobacter pylori no câncer gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Paredes Leite de Barros PEREIRA

    2001-10-01

    present a significant difference in relation to the macroscopic aspect of the tumor either intestinal or diffuse histological types. Conclusions - These data suggest the presence of the bacteria is predominant in the antral region and it does not show relation with the macroscopic types or histological intestinal or diffuse types of gastric carcinoma.Racional e Objetivos — Considerando a elevada prevalência de câncer gástrico na região norte do Brasil e a conhecida relação entre a inflamação por gastrite crônica causada pelo Helicobacter pylori e seu potencial carcinogênico, os objetivos deste estudo foram detectar a presença do microorganismo nas apresentações macro e microscópicas da neoplasia nas diferentes regiões do estômago, e nas lesões não-malignas concomitantes ao adenocarcinoma, em doentes oriundos da área metropolitana de Belém (Estado do Pará, Brasil. Método - Foram examinados 172 doentes divididos em dois grupos: grupo I, constituído por 75 enfermos com carcinoma gástrico e grupo II composto por 97 doentes com gastrite enantemática leve, considerado grupo controle. Os diagnósticos foram obtidos por meio de exame endoscópico e respectiva biopsia. As neoplasias gástricas foram classificadas macroscopicamente de acordo com a classificação de Borrmann e microscopicamente de acordo com a classificação de Laurén. No grupo I, 54 doentes eram do sexo masculino e 21 do sexo feminino. No grupo II, 22 enfermos eram masculinos e 75 femininos. A média de idade no grupo I foi de 61,2 anos (27 a 86 anos e a do grupo II foi de 37,5 anos (16 a 69 anos. As lâminas foram preparadas e coradas pelo método da hematoxilina e eosina, utilizando-se o método de Gram modificado na pesquisa do H.pylori. A análise estatística foi realizada com os testes do chi ², teste de Mann Whitney e teste exato de Fisher. Resultados - A detecção do H.pylori foi significativamente maior nos doentes com gastrite enantemática leve do que nos enfermos com

  8. Helicobacter pylori dwelling on the apical surface of gastrointestinal epithelium damages the mucosal barrier through direct contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Hongyu; Yu, Lu; Cao, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Epithelial junctions and mucins compose a major portion of the mucosal barrier. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections induce alterations of the tight junctions and adherens junctions in epithelial cells, although the precise mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. The expression of adhesion molecules and MUC1 was systematically investigated in gastrointestinal epithelial cells infected with H. pylori in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we developed several new in vitro methods to study the relationships between the bacterium and the dysfunction of tight junctions using Boyden Chambers. The expression of a series of junctional molecules and MUC1 decreased in the cultured cells that were infected with H. pylori. According to the degree of damage at the tight junctions, direct contact of H. pylori with the apical membrane of the cells resulted in the greatest increase in permeability compared to basal membrane binding or non-binding of H. pylori to the cells. Similarly, we noted that H. pylori infection could reduce the expression and glycosylation of MUC1. Helicobacter pylori dwelling on the apical surface of the gastrointestinal epithelium could directly induce serious injury of the mucosal barrier, and the new methods outlined here, based on the Boyden Chamber system, could be very useful for studying the relationships between bacteria and their target cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  10. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Jahanarah; Rai, Ravi Prakash; Prasad, Kashi Nath

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is highly prevalent in human, affecting nearly half of the world’s population; however, infection remains asymptomatic in majority of population. During its co-existence with humans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies to maintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune response of host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is also associated with increased risk for the development of various gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC). A complex combination of host genetics, environmental agents, and bacterial virulence factors are considered to determine the susceptibility as well as the severity of outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of the most common cancers and considered as the third most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Many studies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factor in the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H. pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trends in the developed world, they still remain a major threat to human population in the developing countries. The current review attempts to highlight recent progress in the field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aims to provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis, the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori that modulates the host environment and transform the normal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This review also emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding of how colonization and various virulence attributes of H. pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immune responses modulate the diverse signaling pathways that leads to different disease outcomes including GC. PMID:26909129

  11. Screening for Helicobacter pylori in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Lung Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, Michael; Kirsten, Detlef; Bahmer, Thomas; Penzel, Roland; Claussen, Martin; Ehlers-Tenenbaum, Svenja; Muley, Thomas; Palmowski, Karin; Eichinger, Monika; Leider, Marta; Herth, Felix J F; Rabe, Klaus F; Bittmann, Iris; Warth, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a role of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) pathogenesis. Recently, an association between serum Helicobacter pylori (HP) antibody positivity and more severe disease was described, but HP has not been directly analysed in lung tissue so far. To investigate the presence of HP in the lung tissue of IPF patients. Two tertiary interstitial lung disease care centre databases were screened for available lung biopsy material from IPF patients. Clinical and radiological data, including presence of GER and antiacid medication, were evaluated. HP-specific PCR was carried out on the IPF lung biopsy specimens. A total of 39 IPF patients were included, of whom 85% were male. The patients' median age was 66 years, their vital capacity was 79% predicted, and their diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide was 53% predicted. In all, 82% of the lung biopsies were surgical and 18% transbronchial. Comorbidities were GER disease in 23% (n = 9), sleep apnoea in 13% (n = 5) and hiatal hernia in 38% of the cases (n = 15). Proton pump inhibitors were prescribed at the time of biopsy in 21% of the cases (n = 9). After a median follow-up of 25 months (range 6-69), there were 1 death, 1 lung transplantation and 8 acute exacerbations without relevant differences between the GER and non-GER subgroups. HP DNA was not detected in any of the lung tissue samples. The fact that no HP DNA was detected in the lung tissues calls into question the proposed relevance of HP to the direct pathogenesis of IPF. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer: characteristics and endoscopic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yorimasa; Fujisaki, Junko; Omae, Masami; Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) leads to chronic gastritis and eventually causes gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is gradually decreasing with improvement of living conditions and eradication therapy. However, some reports have described cases of H. pylori-negative gastric cancers (HpNGC), and the prevalence was 0.42-5.4% of all gastric cancers. Diagnostic criteria of HpNGC vary among the different reports; thus, they have not yet been definitively established. We recommend negative findings in two or more methods that include endoscopic or pathological findings or serum pepsinogen test, and negative urease breath test or serum immunoglobulin G test and no eradication history the minimum criteria for diagnosis of HpNGC. The etiology of gastric cancers, excluding H. pylori infection, is known to be associated with several factors including lifestyle, viral infection, autoimmune disorder and germline mutations, but the main causal factor of HpNGC is still unclear. Regarding the characteristics of HpNGC, the undifferentiated type (UD-type) is more frequent than the differentiated type (D-type). The UD-type is mainly signet ring-cell carcinoma that presents as a discolored lesion in the lower or middle part of the stomach in relatively young patients. The gross type is flat or depressed. The D-type is mainly gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type that presents as a submucosal tumor-like or flat or depressed lesion in the middle and upper part of the stomach in relatively older patients. Early detection of HpNGC enables minimally invasive treatment which preserves the patient's quality of life. Endoscopists should fully understand the characteristics and endoscopic findings of HpNGC. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  13. Regression of gastric intestinal metaplasia after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in a hospital in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Sánchez-Cuén

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal metaplasia is a precursor lesion of gastric cancer. Infection by Helicobacter pylori is the principal cause of metaplasia. While evidence of the regression of metaplasia after treatment to eradicate this infection has been demonstrated, controversy remains with regard to this subject. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of the regression of gastric intestinal metaplasia one year after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Methods: A prospective longitudinal designed study was carried out. The population studied in this research consisted of patients attending the Endoscopy Unit to undergo an upper endoscopy, in whom various symptoms indicated intestinal metaplasia associated with Helicobacter pylori, and who received standard empiric triple therapy to eradicate the bacteria. An upper endoscopy was performed in which four gastric biopsy samples were taken (two from the antrum and two from the body before and after the eradicating treatment, with the endoscopic and histological findings studied after one year of monitoring. The statistical analysis was conducted using the Fisher's exact test and the McNemar's test. Results: Forty-six patients were studied, of whom 20 (43.5% were men and 26 (56.5% were women, with an average age of 58.9 (DE 11.2. Intestinal metaplasia was found in 46 (100% patients before treatment and in 21 (45.7% patients post-eradication. Complete intestinal metaplasia (type I was found in 35 patients (76.1% before treatment and in 11 (23.9% patients post-eradication (p = 0.000, while incomplete intestinal metaplasia (type II was found in 10 (21.7% patients before treatment and in 10 (21.7% patients post-eradication. Non-atrophic chronic gastritis was found in 35 (76.1% patients before treatment and in 32 (69.6% patients post-eradication. Conclusions: In this study, gastric intestinal metaplasia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection showed a regression of 54

  14. Regression of gastric intestinal metaplasia after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in a hospital in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Cuén, Jaime Alberto; Irineo Cabrales, Ana Bertha; Bernal Magaña, Gregorio; Peraza Garay, Felipe

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal metaplasia is a precursor lesion of gastric cancer. Infection by Helicobacter pylori is the principal cause of metaplasia. While evidence of the regression of metaplasia after treatment to eradicate this infection has been demonstrated, controversy remains with regard to this subject. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of the regression of gastric intestinal metaplasia one year after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. A prospective longitudinal designed study was carried out. The population studied in this research consisted of patients attending the Endoscopy Unit to undergo an upper endoscopy, in whom various symptoms indicated intestinal metaplasia associated with Helicobacter pylori, and who received standard empiric triple therapy to eradicate the bacteria. An upper endoscopy was performed in which four gastric biopsy samples were taken (two from the antrum and two from the body) before and after the eradicating treatment, with the endoscopic and histological findings studied after one year of monitoring. The statistical analysis was conducted using the Fisher's exact test and the McNemar's test. Forty-six patients were studied, of whom 20 (43.5%) were men and 26 (56.5%) were women, with an average age of 58.9 (DE 11.2). Intestinal metaplasia was found in 46 (100%) patients before treatment and in 21 (45.7%) patients post-eradication. Complete intestinal metaplasia (type I) was found in 35 patients (76.1%) before treatment and in 11 (23.9%) patients post-eradication (p = 0.000), while incomplete intestinal metaplasia (type II) was found in 10 (21.7%) patients before treatment and in 10 (21.7%) patients post-eradication. Non-atrophic chronic gastritis was found in 35 (76.1%) patients before treatment and in 32 (69.6%) patients post-eradication. In this study, gastric intestinal metaplasia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection showed a regression of 54.3% one year after the eradication of this microorganism. This

  15. A cultured strain of "Helicobacter heilmannii," a human gastric pathogen, identified as H-bizzozeronii: Evidence for zoonotic potential of Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalava, K.; On, Stephen L.W.; Harrington, Clare S.

    2001-01-01

    We compared the characteristics of a cultured human "Helicobacter heilmannii" isolate with those of other helicobacters found in animals. Phenotypic, protein profile, 16S rDNA sequence, and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses identified the human strain as H. bizzozeronii, a species frequently found...

  16. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  17. Routine histologic demonstration of helicobacter pylori in gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine histologic demonstration of helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies: should immunohistochemistry replace giemsa stain? ... Method: Thirty-five consecutive endoscopic gastric biopsies obtained from dyspeptic patients, having a histological diagnosis of chronic gastritis were reviewed. Giemsa and IHC were applied ...

  18. Is Helicobacter Pylori a Possible Etiopathogenic Factor in Chronic Tonsillitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmas Ozgun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the major gastric pathogen which has an important role in the etiopathogenesis of chronic gastritis. We investigated the presence of Helicobacter pylori as an extragastric reservoir in the tonsillectomy specimens to display if it is an etiologic factor in the development of chronic tonsilitis. Material and Method: In the current study, 100 cases with chronic tonsilitis were examined in bilateral tonsillectomy specimens. The colonization of the microorganism have been evaluated with hematoxylin-eosin and giemsa stains under the light microscope.Results: Helicobacter pylori has been detected in 33 cases (33% on one side of the bilateral tonsillectomy specimens while it has been seen in 15 cases (15% on both sides which demonstrated positivity in 48 cases (48% in total. No colonization has been observed in the remaining 52 cases (52%. Discussion: Due to the considerable positivity in our study, the histopathologic evaluation of tonsillary Helicobacter pylori colonization may be instrumental in the etiologic association with chronic tonsillitis.

  19. The story so far: Helicobacter pylori and gastric autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, Mathijs P.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Appelmelk, Ben J.; D'Elios, Mario M.; Amedei, Amedeo; Azzurri, Annalisa; Benagiano, Marisa; del Prete, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    The gastric mucosal pathogen Helicobacter pylori induces autoantibodies directed against the gastric proton pump H+,K+-ATPase in 20-30% of infected patients. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with severity of gastritis, increased atrophy, and apoptosis in the corpus mucosa, and

  20. Review article: Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leerdam, M. E.; Tytgat, G. N. J.

    2002-01-01

    In this overview, medical advice for routine clinical practice regarding peptic ulcer haemorrhage (PUH) is given, based on the extensive literature about Helicobacter pylori and the controversial results about the interaction of H. pylori infection and nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

  1. Serum bactericidal activity against Helicobacter pylori in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desar, I.M.E.; Deuren, M. van; Sprong, T.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Namavar, F.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2009-01-01

    The two major primary antibody deficiency disorders are X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). CVID patients have an elevated risk for gastric cancer and extra-nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Both diseases are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  2. Serum bactericidal activity against Helicobacter pylori in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desar, I. M. E.; van Deuren, M.; Sprong, T.; Jansen, J. B. M. J.; Namavar, F.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M.; van der Meer, J. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    The two major primary antibody deficiency disorders are X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). CVID patients have an elevated risk for gastric cancer and extra-nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Both diseases are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  3. the effect of some nigerian local herbs on helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE EFFECT OF SOME NIGERIAN LOCAL HERBS ON HELICOBACTER PYLORI. S. I. Smith, K.S. Oyedeji, B. Opere, B. A. Iwalokun, E. A. Omonigbehin. Abstract. Four Nigerian medicinal plants commonly used in the treatment of bacterial infections were tested for antimicrobial activity against twenty local strains of ...

  4. Helicobacter pylori prevalence in dyspeptic patients in the Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence in dyspeptic patients in the Eastern Cape province – race and disease status. ... Fisher's exact test was used to assess the univariate association between H. pylori infection and the possible risk factors. ... Gender, antibiotic treatment and alcohol consumption may be risk factors for infection.

  5. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: A review of current trends ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the formation of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa‑associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. Eradication of H. Pylori has been recommended as treatment and prevention for these complications. This review is based on a search of Medline, the ...

  6. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic spiral or motile rod that infects about half the world's population with a very high prevalence in the developing world. It is an important aetiological factor in the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric atrophy and B cell mucosa associated lymphoid tissue ...

  7. 49 Marked susceptibility of South African Helicobacter pylori strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Helicobacter pylori-associated infection is common in South Africa, as in other developing countries. Antibiotic resistance is recognised as a major cause of treatment failure. We studied the susceptibility and resistance patterns of H. pylori to guide empiric treatment and prevent the emergence of resistance.

  8. (Nutmeg) on Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis in albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activities of dichloromethane and methanol extracts of Myristica fragrans Houtt. seed (nutmeg) was studied to authenticate ... Analysis of variance (ANOVA) tested the effect of the groups on the treatment days and revealed a significant difference between the treatments at p< 0.05.

  9. Empiric treatment based on Helicobacter Pylori serology cannont ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence that chronic gastric Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is an aetiological factor in dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and lymphoma has led to the suggestion that all serologically positive dyspeptic patients should be treated empirically with antibiotics to eradicate the infection, without ...

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis | Ebule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. Objectives: To determine the ...

  11. Helicobacter Pylori –Infected Patients | Eltayeb | Sudan Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The role of Helicobacter pylori on gastric carcinogenesis is still unclear but it is considered to predispose carriers to gastric cancer. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the extent of DNA damage of normal gastric epithelial cells and H. Pylori positive & negative gastritis ...

  12. Helicobacter pylori and histopathological changes of gastric mucosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori and histopathological changes of gastric mucosa in Uganda population with varying prevalence of stomach cancer. ... Results: The severity of gastritis correlated with the presence of H. pylori in Ganda and Nyarwanda but not in Nkole. Intestinal metaplasia (IM) was observed in Nyarwanda and Nkole and ...

  13. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugano (Kentaro); J. Tack (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); D.Y. Graham (David Y.); E. El-Omar; S. Miura (Soichiro); K. Haruma (Ken); M. Asaka (Masahiro); N. Uemura (Naomi); P. Malfertheiner

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate

  14. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... basis of novel low cost, efficient, large-scale and alternative/complementary solutions with minimal side effects to decrease or eradicate ... Key words: Helicobacter pylori, treatment regimen, factors affecting treatment, alternative approaches, .... treatment for H. pylori infection has been fraught with difficulty.

  15. Helicobacter urease: Niche construction at the single molecule level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    each of Helicobacter and E. coli. In addition to the structural subunits; urease activity is dependent on additional proteins that either transport its co-factor, the metal ion nickel; its substrate, urea, or mediate its assembly. Their genes are organized in operons. Shift to acid pH increases transcription from some operons and ...

  16. Therapeutic options after failed Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. W.; Weel, J. F.; van der Ende, A.; ten Kate, F. J.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many of the currently used Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens fail to cure 5-20% of the patients. Those patients will remain at risk of developing a potentially fatal complication of peptic ulcer disease. Therefore, a new attempt to cure H. pylori infection after initial failure of

  17. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori from dental plaques in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majmudar, P; Shah, S M; Dhunjibhoy, K R; Desai, H G

    1990-10-01

    The presence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) was looked for in dental plaques of 40 healthy volunteers by CLO test, culture and smear stained with Warthin-Starry stain. H pylori was found to be present in the dental plaques of all 40 volunteers. The dental plaque is an important reservoir of H pylori.

  18. Unsaturated fatty acids and viability of Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazell, S L; Graham, D Y

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori was found to be sensitive to the toxic effects of an unsaturated fatty acid (arachidonic acid). Data are presented that support the hypothesis that exogenous catalase added to basal media enhances the growth of H. pylori by preventing the formation of toxic peroxidation products from long-chain unsaturated fatty acids.

  19. Correlation of Serum Anti- Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin A (IGA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies has been reported to vary among populations and in relation to strains of Helicobacter pylori bacterium. However, there has been conflicting reports on the association between IgA serological status and the histological variables of chronic gastritis. This study ...

  20. Pattern of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach causes chronic active gastritis. The pattern of gastritis is related to the disease outcome. This study aimed to determine the predominant gastritis pattern in Nigerian dyspeptic patients with a view to predicting gastroduodenal disease outcomes. Methods: Patients referred ...

  1. Enhancement of Amoxicillin Resistance after Unsuccessful Helicobacter pylori Eradication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Muraoka, Hiroe; Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Hirata, Kenro; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2011-01-01

    A high rate of resistance (49.5 to 72.7%) to amoxicillin (AMX) was observed in Helicobacter pylori after two or three unsuccessful eradication attempts. Unsuccessful eradication regimens significantly increase resistance to not only clarithromycin (CLR) and metronidazole (MNZ) but also AMX. PMID:21486961

  2. Enhancement of Amoxicillin Resistance after Unsuccessful Helicobacter pylori Eradication▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Muraoka, Hiroe; Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Hirata, Kenro; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2011-01-01

    A high rate of resistance (49.5 to 72.7%) to amoxicillin (AMX) was observed in Helicobacter pylori after two or three unsuccessful eradication attempts. Unsuccessful eradication regimens significantly increase resistance to not only clarithromycin (CLR) and metronidazole (MNZ) but also AMX.

  3. Enhancement of amoxicillin resistance after unsuccessful Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Muraoka, Hiroe; Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Hirata, Kenro; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2011-06-01

    A high rate of resistance (49.5 to 72.7%) to amoxicillin (AMX) was observed in Helicobacter pylori after two or three unsuccessful eradication attempts. Unsuccessful eradication regimens significantly increase resistance to not only clarithromycin (CLR) and metronidazole (MNZ) but also AMX.

  4. [Helicobacter pylori, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and gastroduodenal changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, A V

    1995-09-01

    The author discusses the possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) which may play an important role in the unleashing of gastroduodenal lesions. To our knowledge, AINEs have no influence on the prevalence of infection by Hp and the latter does not seem to influence the development and intensity of the lesions caused by NSAIDs.

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and endoscopic findings in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients frequently experience upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptoms that cause considerable morbidity and are due to multiple aetiologies. The role of Helicobacter pylori gastric mucosal infection in HIV related upper GIT morbidity is unclear. No data exist ...

  6. Anti- Helicobacter pylori Effects Of The Methanol Extracts Of Allium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bulb is of considerable importance in African cooking and in salads . Various species have been reported to have anti-diabetic, hypocholesterolaemic, fibrinolytic, anti-ulcer and diuretic potentials. Crude methanol extracts of Allium ascalonicum bulb was screened against three strains of Helicobacter pylori (UCH 97001, ...

  7. Influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori infection is widespread in our environment. However, whether this fact has any bearing on the prevalence and pattern of symptoms referable to the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system in our population of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients has not been much studied. Aim: We ...

  8. Advancement of scientific research on Helicobacter pylori in humans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) has been associated with humans for millions of years and its association wih gastroduodenal diseases has well been established. Research explosion has added vastly to the current dimensions. The new and unusual pattern of involvement in the form of diffuse duodenal nodular lymphoid ...

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on deep vein thrombosis seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the role of homocysteine metabolism due to Helicobacter pylori infection on the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with Behcet's disease (BD). Design: Prospective clinical study. Setting: Teaching hospital. Subject: Fifty-five patients with BD divided into groups, with DVT and ...

  10. Helicobacter pylori infections and gastric cancer: The West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori (Hp) in West Africa is high and infection occurs early in childhood but there are very few studies on association of Hp with GC. Despite the high prevalence of Hp, gastric cancer incidence is low and precancerous lesions are rare. Although most strains of Hp are positive for the virulent ...

  11. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  12. Helicobacter pylori as an occupational hazard in the endoscopy room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It remains controversial whether or not healthcare workers on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy teams are at risk of Helicobacter pylori infection. An association between occupational exposure and an increased risk of infection has been shown in a number of studies, while such a risk was not confirmed in ...

  13. Clinical correlates of helicobacter pylori infection in children seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is the commonest global chronic human bacterial infection. Data from developed countries show that acquisition occurs in childhood but manifestation of chronic gastroduodenal diseases occur more commonly in adulthood. H. pylori infection has however been associated ...

  14. Association of specific haplotype of TNFα with Helicobacter pylori ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 87; Issue 3. Association of specific haplotype of TNF with Helicobacter pylori-mediated duodenal ulcer in eastern Indian population. Meenakshi Chakravorty Dipanjana Datta De Abhijit Choudhury Amal Santra Susanta Roychoudhury. Research Note Volume 87 Issue 3 ...

  15. correlation of serum anti-helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin a (iga)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. It is now established that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which is believed to be the commonest bacterial infection of man, is the major causative agent of chronic gastritis.1 This chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa which is histologically characterized by mucosal infiltration by plasma cells has been ...

  16. effect of helicobacter pylori infection on deep vein thrombosis seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Objective: To investigate the role of homocysteine metabolism due to Helicobacter pylori infection on the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with Behcet's disease (BD). Design: Prospective clinical study. Setting: Teaching hospital. Subject: Fifty-five patients with BD divided into groups, with DVT and ...

  17. Changing patterns of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) discovered in 1982, has strongly been associated with multiple clinical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. This study described the prevalence of H. pylori among large numbers of patients over two different time periods in Accra, Ghana. Methods: It was a retrospective records ...

  18. Endoscopic Findings And The Frequency Of Helicobacter Pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the types of upper gastrointestinal lesions and the frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection among dyspeptic patients in Maiduguri. Methods: Three hundred and thirty (330) dyspeptic patients undergoing endoscopy at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital were prospectively studied. Gastric ...

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by