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Sample records for bacteria differentially affect

  1. Distinct Gut-Derived Bacteria Differentially Affect Three Types of Antigen-Presenting Cells and Impact on NK- and T-Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Hansen, Anne Marie Valentin; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Objectives Gut bacteria are assumed essential for development and maintenance of a balanced immune system. Specifically, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by gut bacteria is important for polarisation of the immune response. This experiment was designed to reveal similarities...... and differences between the reaction patterns of three types of human APCs when stimulated with intestinal bacteria. Furthermore, the effect of these APCs on NK-cells and T-cells was examined. Methodology The APCs used in this study were blood monocytes, blood dendritic cells, and dendritic cells differentiated...... previously been examined, but this study revealed that their effect on other kinds of APCs is markedly different. When APCs matured by different bacteria were added to either NK-cells or T-cells, different APCs combined with distinct strains of bacteria caused the production of varying amounts of cytokines...

  2. Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163401.html Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk Bad 'bugs' tied ... Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain types of bacteria in a pregnant woman's cervix and vagina can ...

  3. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    . In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. Conclusion: In this study we have demonstrated that various strains of gut flora-derived lactic acid bacteria have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent...... antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...... at describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...

  4. Differential induction of systemic resistance in Arabidopsis by biocontrol bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, A.C.M. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Trijssenaar, A.; Westende, Y.A.M. van 't; Hartog, F.; Loon, L.C. van

    1997-01-01

    Differential Induction of Systemic Resistance in Arabidopsis by Biocontrol Bacteria. Saskia C. M. Van Wees (1,2), Corné M. J. Pieterse (1,2), Annemiek Trijssenaar (1), Yvonne A. M. Van 't Westende (1), Femke Hartog (1), and Leendert C. Van Loon (1,2). (1) Department of Plant Ecology and Evolutionary

  5. Do feather-degrading bacteria affect sexually selected plumage color?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Pillai, Shreekumar R.; Hill, Geoffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    Models of parasite-mediated sexual selection propose that males with more elaborate sexual traits will have fewer parasites. These models have generally been tested using metazoan or protozoan parasites of the blood, gut, or integument. Fewer studies have examined sexual ornaments in relation to bacterial infections. While most surface bacteria are harmless or beneficial, feather-degrading bacteria may have detrimental effects. In this study, we examined the relationships between overall bacterial load, feather-degrading bacterial load, and sexually selected carotenoid-based plumage color in a wild population of house finches ( Carpodacus mexicanus). We found that males with the redder plumage preferred by females had similar overall bacterial loads, but lower feather-degrading bacterial loads, than males with less red plumage. These data suggest that plumage color can signal abundance of feather-degrading bacteria to potential mates. It remains unclear whether feather-degrading bacteria directly or indirectly affect plumage color, but the observed correlations suggest that feather-degrading bacteria may play some role in sexual selection.

  6. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  7. Bacteria and protozoa in soil microhabitats as affected by earthworms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Anne; Rønn, Regin; Hendriksen, Niels B.

    1997-01-01

    , were compared. The total, viable, and culturable number of bacteria, the metabolic potentials of bacterial populations, and the number of protozoa and nematodes were determined in soil size fractions. Significant differences between soil fractions were shown by all assays. The highest number......-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolim chloride (CTC)-reducing bacteria explained a major part of the variation in the number of protozoa. High protozoan activity and predation thus coincided with high bacterial activity. In soil with elm leaves, fungal growth is assumed to inhibit bacterial and protozoan...... activity. In soil with elm leaves and earthworms, earthworm activity led to increased culturability of bacteria, activity of protozoa, number of nematodes, changed metabolic potentials of the bacteria, and decreased differences in metabolic potentials between bacterial populations in the soil fractions...

  8. Bacteria in crude oil survived autoclaving and stimulated differentially by exogenous bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Gong

    Full Text Available Autoclaving of crude oil is often used to evaluate the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of bacteria. This may be potentially useful for bioaugmentation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR. However, it is not entirely clear if "endogenous" bacteria (e.g., spores in/on crude oil survive the autoclaving process, or influence subsequent evaluation of the hydrocarbon-degradation abilities of the "exogenous" bacterial strains. To test this, we inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium with six exogenous bacterial strains (three Dietzia strains, two Acinetobacter strains, and one Pseudomonas strain. The survival of the spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus and the non-spore-forming mesophilic Pseudomonas, Dietzia, Alcaligenes, and Microbacterium was detected using a 16S rRNA gene clone library and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis. However, neither bacteria nor bacterial activity was detected in three controls consisting of non-inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium. These results suggest that detection of endogenous bacteria was stimulated by the six inoculated strains. In addition, inoculation with Acinetobacter spp. stimulated detection of Bacillus, while inoculation with Dietzia spp. and Pseudomonas sp. stimulated the detection of more Pseudomonas. In contrast, similar exogenous bacteria stimulated similar endogenous bacteria at the genus level. Based on these results, special emphasis should be applied to evaluate the influence of bacteria capable of surviving autoclaving on the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of exogenous bacteria, in particular, with regard to bioaugmentation and MEOR. Bioaugmentation and MEOR technologies could then be developed to more accurately direct the growth of specific endogenous bacteria that may then improve the efficiency of treatment or recovery of crude oil.

  9. Identifying sexual differentiation genes that affect Drosophila life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tower John

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual differentiation often has significant effects on life span and aging phenotypes. For example, males and females of several species have different life spans, and genetic and environmental manipulations that affect life span often have different magnitude of effect in males versus females. Moreover, the presence of a differentiated germ-line has been shown to affect life span in several species, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Methods Experiments were conducted to determine how alterations in sexual differentiation gene activity might affect the life span of Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila females heterozygous for the tudor[1] mutation produce normal offspring, while their homozygous sisters produce offspring that lack a germ line. To identify additional sexual differentiation genes that might affect life span, the conditional transgenic system Geneswitch was employed, whereby feeding adult flies or developing larvae the drug RU486 causes the over-expression of selected UAS-transgenes. Results In this study germ-line ablation caused by the maternal tudor[1] mutation was examined in a long-lived genetic background, and was found to increase life span in males but not in females, consistent with previous reports. Fitting the data to a Gompertz-Makeham model indicated that the maternal tudor[1] mutation increases the life span of male progeny by decreasing age-independent mortality. The Geneswitch system was used to screen through several UAS-type and EP-type P element mutations in genes that regulate sexual differentiation, to determine if additional sex-specific effects on life span would be obtained. Conditional over-expression of transformer female isoform (traF during development produced male adults with inhibited sexual differentiation, however this caused no significant change in life span. Over-expression of doublesex female isoform (dsxF during development was lethal to males, and produced a limited

  10. Budesonide and fluticasone propionate differentially affect the airway epithelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, I H; Jonker, M.R.; de Vries, M; van Oosterhout, A J M; Telenga, E; Ten Hacken, N H T; Postma, D S; van den Berge, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD patients have a higher risk of pneumonia when treated with fluticasone propionate (FP) than with placebo, and a lower risk with budesonide (BUD). We hypothesized that BUD and FP differentially affect the mucosal barrier in response to viral infection and/or cigarette smoke. METHODS:

  11. Budesonide and fluticasone propionate differentially affect the airway epithelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, I. H.; Jonker, M.R.; Vries, de Maaike; van Oosterhout, A. J. M.; Telenga, E.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Postma, D. S.; van den Berge, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: COPD patients have a higher risk of pneumonia when treated with fluticasone propionate (FP) than with placebo, and a lower risk with budesonide (BUD). We hypothesized that BUD and FP differentially affect the mucosal barrier in response to viral infection and/or cigarette smoke. Methods:

  12. Raman spectroscopic differentiation of planktonic bacteria and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusić, Dragana; Kampe, Bernd; Ramoji, Anuradha; Neugebauer, Ute; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Both biofilm formations as well as planktonic cells of water bacteria such as diverse species of the Legionella genus as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were examined in detail by Raman microspectroscopy. Production of various molecules involved in biofilm formation of tested species in nutrient-deficient media such as tap water was observed and was particularly evident in the biofilms formed by six Legionella species. Biofilms of selected species of the Legionella genus differ significantly from the planktonic cells of the same organisms in their lipid amount. Also, all Legionella species have formed biofilms that differ significantly from the biofilms of the other tested genera in the amount of lipids they produced. We believe that the significant increase in the synthesis of this molecular species may be associated with the ability of Legionella species to form biofilms. In addition, a combination of Raman microspectroscopy with chemometric approaches can distinguish between both planktonic form and biofilms of diverse bacteria and could be used to identify samples which were unknown to the identification model. Our results provide valuable data for the development of fast and reliable analytic methods based on Raman microspectroscopy, which can be applied to the analysis of tap water-adapted microorganisms without any cultivation step.

  13. Bacteria and protozoa differentially modulate the expression of Rab proteins.

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    Elsa Seixas

    Full Text Available Phagocytic cells represent an important line of innate defense against microorganisms. Uptake of microorganisms by these cells involves the formation of a phagosome that matures by fusing with endocytic compartments, resulting in killing of the enclosed microbe. Small GTPases of the Rab family are key regulators of vesicular trafficking in the endocytic pathway. Intracellular pathogens can interfere with the function of these proteins in order to subvert host immune responses. However, it is unknown if this subversion can be achieved through the modulation of Rab gene expression. We compared the expression level of 23 distinct Rab GTPases in mouse macrophages after infection with the protozoan Plasmodium berghei, and the bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. We found that P. berghei induces an increase in the expression of a different set of Rab genes than E. coli and S. enterica, which behaved similarly. Strikingly, when one of the Rab proteins whose expression was increased by P. berghei, namely Rab14, was silenced, we observed a significant increase in the phagocytosis of P. berghei, whereas Rab14 overexpression led to a decrease in phagocytosis. This suggests that the parasite might induce the increase of Rab14 expression for its own advantage. Similarly, when Rab9a, whose expression was increased by E. coli and S. enterica, was silenced, we observed an increase in the phagocytosis of both bacterial species, whereas Rab9a overexpression caused a reduction in phagocytosis. This further suggests that the modulation of Rab gene expression could represent a mechanism of immune evasion. Thus, our study analyzes the modulation of Rab gene expression induced by bacteria and protozoa and suggests that this modulation could be necessary for the success of microbial infection.

  14. Repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction to differentiate close bacteria strains in acidic sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; YIN Hua-qun; LIU Yi; LIU Jie; LIU Xue-duan

    2008-01-01

    To study the diversity of bacteria strains newly isolated from several acid mine drainage(AMD) sites in China,repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR),a well established technology for diversity analysis of closely related bacteria strains,was conducted on 30 strains of bacteria Leptospirillum ferriphilium,8 strains of bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,as well as the Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans type strain ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 23270.The results showed that,using ERIC and BOX primer sets,rep-PCR produced highly discriminatory banding patterns.Phylogenetic analysis based on ERIC-PCR banding types was made and the results indicated that rep-PCR could be used as a rapid and highly discriminatory screening technique in studying bacterial diversity,especially in differentiating bacteria within one species in AMD.

  15. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Vásquez, Edgardo; Sánchez-Osorio, Ismael; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2016-01-01

    The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  16. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Galán-Vásquez

    Full Text Available The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  17. Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-ɛ-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

  18. G protein-coupled receptor120 (GPR120) transcription in intestinal epithelial cells is significantly affected by bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredborg, M; Theil, P K; Jensen, B B; Purup, S

    2012-12-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are produced in the intestine by microbial fermentation. Recently, a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPR) acting as FFA transporters has been reported including GPR120, which is expressed by intestinal epithelial cells. The GPR120 has been reported to affect the expression of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 as well as function as a control point for anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether 12 selected intestinal bacteria, representing the 4 major phyla present in the intestine, affect intestinal epithelial cell GPR120 and GLP-1 mRNA abundance. Supernatants of the 12 bacteria were added to differentiated Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells cultured on filter inserts in concentrations corresponding to a cell:bacteria ratio of 1:200. After 4 h of incubation, changes in cellular mRNA of GLP-1 and GPR120 by bacterial supernatant were examined using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The abundance of GLP-1 mRNA decreased when cells were exposed to 4 of the 12 supernatants (P ≤ 0.05) compared with cells without bacteria added. Supernatants from 8 of the 12 bacteria analyzed increased the mRNA level of GPR120 (P ≤ 0.05) compared with cells without bacteria added. The alteration in cellular GPR120 mRNA was observed with bacteria categorized as either probiotics or bacteria capable of inducing an anti-inflammatory effect. The beneficial effect of these bacteria may very well be mediated by regulation of GPR120. The regulation of GPR120 by intestinal microbiota represents a direct signaling pathway for gut bacteria to affect host health and metabolism.

  19. A flow cytometric technique for quantification and differentiation of bacteria in bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, C.; Mathiasen, T.; Jespersen, Lene

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: The present study describes a flow cytometric technique for quantification and differentiation of bacteria in bulk tank milk according to the main cause of elevated counts. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 75 Danish bulk tank milk samples exceeding the grading level of 3.0 x 10(4) CFU ml(-1)...

  20. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

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    Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM. We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function.

  1. The Arabidopsis NIMIN proteins affect NPR1 differentially

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    Meike eHermann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1 is the central regulator of the pathogen defense reaction systemic acquired resistance (SAR. NPR1 acts by sensing the SAR signal molecule salicylic acid (SA to induce expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR genes. Mechanistically, NPR1 is the core of a transcription complex interacting with TGA transcription factors and NIM1 INTERACTING (NIMIN proteins. Arabidopsis NIMIN1 has been shown to suppress NPR1 activity in transgenic plants. The Arabidopsis NIMIN family comprises four structurally related, yet distinct members. Here, we show that NIMIN1, NIMIN2 and NIMIN3 are expressed differentially, and that the encoded proteins affect expression of the SAR marker PR-1 differentially. NIMIN3 is expressed constitutively at a low level, but NIMIN2 and NIMIN1 are both responsive to SA. While NIMIN2 is an immediate early SA-induced and NPR1-independent gene, NIMIN1 is activated after NIMIN2, but clearly before PR-1. Notably, NIMIN1, like PR-1, depends on NPR1. In a transient assay system, NIMIN3 suppresses SA-induced PR-1 expression, albeit to a lesser extent than NIMIN1, whereas NIMIN2 does not negatively affect PR-1 gene activation. Furthermore, although binding to the same domain in the C-terminus, NIMIN1 and NIMIN2 interact differentially with NPR1, thus providing a molecular basis for their opposing effects on NPR1. Together, our data suggest that the Arabidopsis NIMIN proteins are regulators of the SAR response. We propose that NIMINs act in a strictly consecutive and SA-regulated manner on the SA sensor protein NPR1, enabling NPR1 to monitor progressing threat by pathogens and to promote appropriate defense gene activation at distinct stages of SAR. In this scenario, the defense gene PR-1 is repressed at the onset of SAR by SA-induced, yet instable NIMIN1.

  2. Factors affecting population of filamentous bacteria in wastewater treatment plants with nutrients removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłobędzka, Aleksandra; Witeska, Anna; Muszyński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous population in activated sludge and key operational parameters of full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with bulking problems representative for Poland were investigated with quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Statistical analyses revealed few relationships between operational parameters and biovolume of filamentous bacteria. Sludge age was not only positively correlated with abundance of Chloroflexi (parametric correlation and principal component analysis (PCA)), but also differentiated Microthrix population (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). Phylum Chloroflexi and pH presented a negative relation during the study (PCA). ANOVA showed that pH of influent and sludge volume index (SVI) differentiated abundance of types 0803 and 1851 of Chloroflexi and candidate division TM7. SVI increased along with higher abundance of Microthrix (positive parametric and non-parametric correlations and positive relation in PCA). Biovolumes of morphotypes 0803 and 1851 of Chloroflexi were differentiated by organic matter in influent, also by nutrients in the case of Chloroflexi type 1851. Chemical and biological oxygen demands (COD and BOD5, respectively) were negatively correlated with Microthrix. COD also differentiated the abundance of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis. Results of the study can be used to prevent WWTPs from excessive proliferation of filamentous bacteria and operational problems caused by them--bulking and foaming of activated sludge.

  3. Quenching of fluorescence by crystal violet and its use to differentiate between surface-bound and internalized bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, S.; Lim, Y. C.; Kishen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Phagocytosis is a complex process involving attachment, ingestion and intracellular processing of bacteria by phagocytes. A great difficulty in the evaluation of this process is to differentiate between attachment of the particles to the cell surface and internalization of the particles by the cells. Various techniques have been used to differentiate internalized and surface-attached bacteria in cultured cells, but only a few permit differentiations between surface-bound and internalized bacteria. In this study the quenching of fluorescence by crystal violet on acridine orange stained bacterial biofilm and planktonic bacterial cells is used to differentiate between surface-bound and internalized bacteria within macrophages. Method: One week old Enterococcus faecalis biofilm was grown on perspex and glass substrates in All-Culture medium (nutrient-rich condition) and phosphate buffered saline (nutrient-deprived condition). As model systems, human monocytic (THP-1) and histiocytic (U937) cell lines were used. These cell lines were incubated with the biofilm bacteria for 4 hrs in CO II incubator at 37 °C. The cells and bacteria were stained with acridine orange and quenched with crystal violet to distinguish between surface-bound and internalized bacteria. Results: The presence of green-fluorescing internalized bacteria was detected within the macrophages under the planktonic, nutrient-rich and nutrient-deprived biofilm conditions. All infecting bacteria take up acridine orange and fluoresced green, crystal violet quenched the fluorescence of extra-cellular adhering bacteria so that only fluorescent intracellular bacteria would be visible under fluorescent light microscopy.

  4. Rat hippocampal GABAergic molecular markers are differentially affected by ageing.

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    Vela, José; Gutierrez, Antonia; Vitorica, Javier; Ruano, Diego

    2003-04-01

    We previously reported that the pharmacological properties of the hippocampal GABAA receptor and the expression of several subunits are modified during normal ageing. However, correlation between these post-synaptic modifications and pre-synaptic deficits were not determined. To address this issue, we have analysed the mRNA levels of several GABAergic molecular markers in young and old rat hippocampus, including glutamic acid decarboxylase enzymes, parvalbumin, calretinin, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). There was a differential age-related decrease in these interneuronal mRNAs that was inversely correlated with up-regulation of the alpha1 GABA receptor subunit. Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y mRNAs were most frequently affected (75% of the animals), then calretinin and VIP mRNAs (50% of the animals), and parvalbumin mRNA (25% of the animals) in the aged hippocampus. This selective vulnerability was well correlated at the protein/cellular level as analysed by immunocytochemistry. Somatostatin interneurones, which mostly innervate principal cell distal dendrites, were more vulnerable than calretinin interneurones, which target other interneurones. Parvalbumin interneurones, which mostly innervate perisomatic domains of principal cells, were preserved. This age-dependent differential reduction of specific hippocampal inteneuronal subpopulations might produce functional alterations in the GABAergic tone which might be compensated, at the post-synaptic level, by up-regulation of the expression of the alpha1 GABAA receptor subunit.

  5. Prey-predator dynamics in communities of culturable soil bacteria and protozoa: differential effects of mercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtze, M. S.; Ekelund, F.; Rasmussen, Lasse Dam

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether the prey-predator dynamics of bacteria and protozoa were affected by inorganic mercury at concentrations of 0, 3.5 and 15 mg Hg(II) kg soil(-1). The amount of bioavailable Hg was estimated using a biosensor-assay based on the mer-lux gene fusion. The numbers of bacterial...... with 1/100 TSB as growth medium were also negatively affected by Hg. The different fractions of protozoa were affected to different degrees suggesting that amoebae were less sensitive than slow-growing flagellates, which again were less sensitive than the fast-growing flagellates. In contrast, Hg did...... not induce any detectable changes in the diversity of flagellate morphotypes. In the treatment with 15 mg Hg kg(-1) a transiently increased number of bacteria was seen at day 6 probably concomitant with a decrease in the numbers of protozoa. This might indicate that Hg affected the prey-predator dynamics...

  6. Adherence and viability of intestinal bacteria to differentiated Caco-2 cells quantified by flow cytometry.

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    Grootaert, Charlotte; Boon, Nico; Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bracke, Marc; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2011-07-01

    Recent developments in host-microbe research give rise to a growing demand for rapid and accurate methods to quantify bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Here, we describe a new flow cytometric method to determine the amount and viability of gut bacteria, adhered to a monolayer of differentiated cells. The latter is a more relevant epithelium model than the suspended eukaryotic cells currently used in flow cytometric protocols. During the development of the method, we monitored the adhesion potential of six bacterial species and an intestinal microbial community to Caco-2 cells. The combination of SYBR Green I/propidium iodide was more efficient than carboxyfluorescein diacetate to stain the bacterial cells. In addition, a better separation between the Caco-2 background signal and viable and dead bacteria was obtained. A precise amount of Triton X-100 was used to detach adhered bacteria from Caco-2 cells and cell debris. Yet, a limited decrease in viability was observed for the intestinal microbial community treated with Triton X-100. The flow cytometric lower detection limit for pure bacterial cultures was 3.0-4.0log/mL, whereas a 5.0-5.5log/mL detection limit was obtained in the presence of Caco-2 cell background. The latter was sufficient to quantify adhered bacteria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a flow cytometric protocol that quantifies adhesion of both pure and mixed gut microbial cultures to a differentiated monolayer of Caco-2 cells and that allows to distinguish between viable and dead adhered bacteria.

  7. Specific Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Modulate the Profile of Adipokines In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijon-Mukdsi, María Claudia; Ross, Romina; Medina, Roxana; González, Silvia; Gauffin-Cano, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Obesity induces local/systemic inflammation accompanied by increases in macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and hormones. Previous studies have shown that probiotics could improve the intestinal dysbiosis induced by metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Microorganisms could (directly or indirectly) affect adipokine levels due to their capacity to induce translocation of several intestinal microbial antigens into systemic circulation, which could lead to metabolic endotoxemia or produce immunomodulation in different organs. The aim of the present study was to select non-inflammatory lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains with the capacity to modulate adipokine secretion by the adipose tissue. We wish to elucidate the role of potential probiotic strains in the regulation of the cross talking between immune cells such as macrophages and adipose cells. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was used for evaluating the ability of 14 LAB strains to induce cytokine production. The LAB strains were chosen based on their previously studied beneficial properties in health. Then, in murine adipocyte culture and macrophage–adipocyte coculture, we determined the ability of these strains to induce cytokines and leptin secretion. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and leptin levels were measured in cell supernatants. We also performed the detection and quantification of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) expression in macrophage cell lines stimulated by these LAB strains. Differential secretion profile of cytokines in macrophage cells induced by LAB strains was observed. Also, the levels of Ob-Rb expression diverged among different LAB strains. In LAB-stimulated coculture cells (adipocytes and macrophages), we observed differential production of leptin and cytokines. Furthermore, we detected lower production levels in single culture than

  8. Living biointerfaces based on non-pathogenic bacteria support stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jake J.; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Hassi, Karoliina; Moulisova, Vladimira; Dalby, Matthew J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis, a non-pathogenic bacteria, has been genetically engineered to express the III7–10 fragment of human fibronectin as a membrane protein. The engineered L. lactis is able to develop biofilms on different surfaces (such as glass and synthetic polymers) and serves as a long-term substrate for mammalian cell culture, specifically human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). This system constitutes a living interface between biomaterials and stem cells. The engineered biofilms remain stable and viable for up to 28 days while the expressed fibronectin fragment induces hMSC adhesion. We have optimised conditions to allow long-term mammalian cell culture, and found that the biofilm is functionally equivalent to a fibronectin-coated surface in terms of osteoblastic differentiation using bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) added to the medium. This living bacteria interface holds promise as a dynamic substrate for stem cell differentiation that can be further engineered to express other biochemical cues to control hMSC differentiation.

  9. A Hierarchical Latent Stochastic Differential Equation Model for Affective Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravecz, Zita; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Vandekerckhove, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    In this article a continuous-time stochastic model (the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) is presented to model the perpetually altering states of the core affect, which is a 2-dimensional concept underlying all our affective experiences. The process model that we propose can account for the temporal changes in core affect on the latent level. The key…

  10. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Tomas; Salamon, Achim; Adam, Stefanie; Herzmann, Nicole; Taubenheim, Jan; Peters, Kirsten

    2013-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions.

  11. Foliar bacteria and soil fertility mediate seedling performance: a new and cryptic dimension of niche differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Eric A; Traw, M Brian; Morin, Peter J; Pruitt, Jonathan N; Wright, S Joseph; Carson, Walter P

    2016-11-01

    strong positive and negative effects on seedling performance. Moreover, these effects were clearly mediated by soil resource availability. Though speculative, we suggest that foliar bacteria may interact with soil fertility to comprise an important, yet cryptic dimension of niche differentiation, which can have important implications for species coexistence.

  12. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.fiedler@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Salamon, Achim; Adam, Stefanie; Herzmann, Nicole [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Taubenheim, Jan [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: • Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. • Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. • LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  13. Factors Affecting Intervention Fidelity of Differentiated Instruction in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Elma M.; Walraven, Amber; Mooij, Ton; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings in the first phase of a design-based research project as part of a large-scale intervention study in Dutch kindergartens. The project aims at enhancing differentiated instruction and evaluating its effects on children's development, in particular high-ability children. This study investigates relevant…

  14. Factors affecting the concordance between orthologous gene trees and species tree in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Víctor

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As originally defined, orthologous genes implied a reflection of the history of the species. In recent years, many studies have examined the concordance between orthologous gene trees and species trees in bacteria. These studies have produced contradictory results that may have been influenced by orthologous gene misidentification and artefactual phylogenetic reconstructions. Here, using a method that allows the detection and exclusion of false positives during identification of orthologous genes, we address the question of whether putative orthologous genes within bacteria really reflect the history of the species. Results We identified a set of 370 orthologous genes from the bacterial order Rhizobiales. Although manifesting strong vertical signal, almost every orthologous gene had a distinct phylogeny, and the most common topology among the orthologous gene trees did not correspond with the best estimate of the species tree. However, each orthologous gene tree shared an average of 70% of its bipartitions with the best estimate of the species tree. Stochastic error related to gene size affected the concordance between the best estimated of the species tree and the orthologous gene trees, although this effect was weak and distributed unevenly among the functional categories. The nodes showing the greatest discordance were those defined by the shortest internal branches in the best estimated of the species tree. Moreover, a clear bias was evident with respect to the function of the orthologous genes, and the degree of divergence among the orthologous genes appeared to be related to their functional classification. Conclusion Orthologous genes do not reflect the history of the species when taken as individual markers, but they do when taken as a whole. Stochastic error affected the concordance of orthologous genes with the species tree, albeit weakly. We conclude that two important biological causes of discordance among

  15. Culturing aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and mammalian cells with a microfluidic differential oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Raymond H W; Kim, Min-Cheol; Thorsen, Todd

    2009-07-15

    In this manuscript, we report on the culture of anaerobic and aerobic species within a disposable multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with an integrated differential oxygenator. A gas-filled microchannel network functioning as an oxygen-nitrogen mixer generates differential oxygen concentration. By controlling the relative flow rate of the oxygen and nitrogen input gases, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in proximal microchannels filled with culture media are precisely regulated by molecular diffusion. Sensors consisting of an oxygen-sensitive dye embedded in the fluid channels permit dynamic fluorescence-based monitoring of the DO concentration using low-cost light-emitting diodes. To demonstrate the general utility of the platform for both aerobic and anaerobic culture, three bacteria with differential oxygen requirements (E. coli, A. viscosus, and F. nucleatum), as well as a model mammalian cell line (murine embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3)), were cultured. Growth characteristics of the selected species were analyzed as a function of eight discrete DO concentrations, ranging from 0 ppm (anaerobic) to 42 ppm (fully saturated).

  16. Factors affecting the numbers of expected viable lactic acid bacteria in inoculant applicator tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, M C; Kung, L

    2016-11-01

    The application of correct numbers of viable microorganisms to forages at the time of ensiling is one of the most important factors affecting the probability of a beneficial effect from an inoculant. The objective of this study was to determine relationships between numbers of expected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from silage inoculants in application tanks and various factors that might affect their viability. The pH and temperature of inoculant-water mixes were measured in applicator tanks (n=53) on farms in Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, and California during the corn harvest season of 2012. Samples were collected on-farm and plated on de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe agar to enumerate LAB and establish the number of viable LAB (cfu/mL). Expected numbers of LAB were calculated from the minimum label guarantees for viable bacteria and mixing rates with water. In addition, the pH of the inoculant-water mixes at sampling, the ambient temperature at sampling, and the length of time that the samples had been in the tank were measured and obtained. The log difference between the measured and expected numbers of LAB was calculated and expressed as ΔM - E in log scale. Ambient temperature at sampling had no relationship with time in the tank or ΔM - E. Most (83%) of the inoculants had been mixed with water in the applicator tanks for tanks and ΔM - E. The pH of the inoculant-water mixes was also negatively correlated (R(2)=0.28) with time in the applicator tank, but pH was not related to ΔM - E. The temperatures of the inoculant-water mixtures were negatively correlated with ΔM - E (R(2)=0.39). Seven of 8 samples whose ΔM - E were at least -0.95 or more lower than expected (equivalent of about 1 or more log concentration less than expected) had water temperatures above 35°C. These data support our previous laboratory findings and suggest that high temperatures of inoculant-water mixes have the potential to negatively affect the final application rate of some

  17. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  18. Modulation of cytokine release by differentiated CACO-2 cells in a compartmentalized coculture model with mononuclear leucocytes and nonpathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Haller, D.; Brinz, S.

    2004-01-01

    To further investigate the interaction between human mononuclear leucocytes [peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)] and enterocytes, the effect of a confluent layer of differentiated CACO-2 cells on cytokine kinetics during challenge with bacteria in a compartmentalized coculture model...... cells when leucocytes were stimulated directly with bacteria. This suppression was not paralleled by changes in the production of IL-10, IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. When the bacteria were applied apically to the CACO-2 cell layer, the production of TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta, IL-8...... analysis revealed that IL-8 gene expression was equally induced in both CACO-2 and PBMC after apical stimulation with bacteria. Of note, bacteria-stimulated CACO-2 cells produced little or no cytokines in the absence of leucocytes, supporting the concept of leucocyte-epithelial cell cross...

  19. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) as a Tool for the Identification and Differentiation of Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnowiec, Paulina; Lechowicz, Łukasz; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Kaca, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Methods of human bacterial pathogen identification need to be fast, reliable, inexpensive, and time efficient. These requirements may be met by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. The method that is most often used for bacterial detection and identification is Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It enables biochemical scans of whole bacterial cells or parts thereof at infrared frequencies (4,000-600 cm(-1)). The recorded spectra must be subsequently transformed in order to minimize data variability and to amplify the chemically-based spectral differences in order to facilitate spectra interpretation and analysis. In the next step, the transformed spectra are analyzed by data reduction tools, regression techniques, and classification methods. Chemometric analysis of FTIR spectra is a basic technique for discriminating between bacteria at the genus, species, and clonal levels. Examples of bacterial pathogen identification and methods of differentiation up to the clonal level, based on infrared spectroscopy, are presented below.

  20. Stress differentially affects fear conditioning in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian Josef; Wolf, Oliver Tobias; Schweckendiek, Jan; Klucken, Tim; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2013-11-01

    Stress and fear conditioning processes are both important vulnerability factors in the development of psychiatric disorders. In behavioral studies considerable sex differences in fear learning have been observed after increases of the stress hormone cortisol. But neuroimaging experiments, which give insights into the neurobiological correlates of stress × sex interactions in fear conditioning, are lacking so far. In the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we tested whether a psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test) compared to a control condition influenced subsequent fear conditioning in 48 men and 48 women taking oral contraceptives (OCs). One of two pictures of a geometrical figure was always paired (conditioned stimulus, CS+) or never paired (CS-) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus). BOLD responses as well as skin conductance responses were assessed. Sex-independently, stress enhanced the CS+/CS- differentiation in the hippocampus in early acquisition but attenuated conditioned responses in the medial frontal cortex in late acquisition. In early acquisition, stress reduced the CS+/CS- differentiation in the nucleus accumbens in men, but enhanced it in OC women. In late acquisition, the same pattern (reduction in men, enhancement in OC women) was found in the amygdala as well as in the anterior cingulate. Thus, psychosocial stress impaired the neuronal correlates of fear learning and expression in men, but facilitated them in OC women. A sex-specific modulation of fear conditioning after stress might contribute to the divergent prevalence of men and women in developing psychiatric disorders.

  1. Segmented filamentous bacteria antigens presented by intestinal dendritic cells drive mucosal Th17 cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshiyuki; Panea, Casandra; Nakato, Gaku; Cebula, Anna; Lee, Carolyn; Diez, Marta Galan; Laufer, Terri M; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Ivanov, Ivaylo I

    2014-04-17

    How commensal microbiota contributes to immune cell homeostasis at barrier surfaces is poorly understood. Lamina propria (LP) T helper 17 (Th17) cells participate in mucosal protection and are induced by commensal segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB). Here we show that MHCII-dependent antigen presentation of SFB antigens by intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) is crucial for Th17 cell induction. Expression of MHCII on CD11c(+) cells was necessary and sufficient for SFB-induced Th17 cell differentiation. Most SFB-induced Th17 cells recognized SFB in an MHCII-dependent manner. SFB primed and induced Th17 cells locally in the LP and Th17 cell induction occurred normally in mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs. The importance of other innate cells was unveiled by the finding that MHCII deficiency in group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) resulted in an increase in SFB-independent Th17 cell differentiation. Our results outline the complex role of DCs and ILCs in the regulation of intestinal Th17 cell homeostasis.

  2. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  3. Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor, differentially affects normal and malignant megakaryopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, G; Kraus, T; Ye, F; Eng, K; Crispino, J D; Hoffman, R; Iancu-Rubin, C

    2017-03-08

    Imetelstat (GRN163L) is a specific telomerase inhibitor which has demonstrated clinical activity in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and in patients with solid tumors. The antitumor effects were associated with the development of thrombocytopenia, one of the common side effects observed in patients treated with imetelstat. The events underlying these adverse effects are not apparent. In this report we investigated the potential mechanisms that account for imetelstat's beneficial effects in MPN patients and the manner by which imetelstat treatment leads to a reduction in platelet numbers. Using a well-established system of ex vivo megakaryopoiesis, we demonstrated that imetelestat treatment affects normal megakaryocyte (MK) development by exclusively delaying maturation of MK precursor cells. By contrast, additional stages along MPN MK development were affected by imetelstat resulting in reduced numbers of assayable colony-forming unit (CFU)-MK and impaired MK maturation. In addition, treatment with imetelstat inhibited the secretion of fibrogenic growth factors by malignant but not by normal MK. Our results indicate that the delay observed in normal MK maturation may account for imetelstat-induced thrombocytopenia, while the more global effects of imetelstat on several stages along the hierarchy of MPN megakaryopoiesis may be responsible for the favorable clinical outcomes reported in MPN patients.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 08 March 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.78.

  4. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H2S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H2S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW.

  5. The Effect of Differentiation Approach Developed on Creativity of Gifted Students: Cognitive and Affective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Esra; Özdemir, Ahmet S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a differentiation approach for the mathematics education of gifted middle school students and to determine the effect of the differentiation approach on creative thinking skills of gifted students based on both cognitive and affective factors. In this context, the answer to the following question was searched:…

  6. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese PCOS patients. Levels of sexual hormone binding globulin are decreased, and levels of free androgens are increased in obese PCOS patients. Weight loss treatment is important for overweight or obese PCOS patients, but not necessary for normal weight PCOS patients, who only need to avoid increasing their body weight. Obesity decreases or delays several infertility treatments. The differences in the hormonal and metabolic profile, as well as the different focus and response to treatment between obese and non obese PCOS patients suggest that obesity has to be considered as a characteristic for classification of PCOS phenotypes.

  7. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  8. DIFFERENTIAL BANDING PATTERN BASED IDENTIFICATION OF URINARY TRACT INFECTION CAUSING BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulomi Nandy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Tract Infection (UTI affects all age groups, but women are more susceptible than men. These infections are typically caused by E coli, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus fecalis and so on. Since uncultivable microbes are numerically abundant in urine samples, culture independent detection seems to be the method of choice for diagnosing UTI. This study was an attempt to design a database of banding pattern of microbial variety inhabiting normal and infected subjects. The 16S rDNA Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR product was digested with 14 different restriction enzymes and run on a 2% agarose gel. From the restriction digestion images, their banding pattern and dendogram analysis, it was possible to differentiate and distinguish between E.coli, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Staphylococcus and Enterococci genus. Most of the enzymes like XbaI, ApaI, KpnI, PstI gave similar banding patterns for Klebsiella, E.coli and Pseudomonas, which could be differentiated from the Staphylococcus members. BgII and SmaI gave similar patterns for Klebsiella and E.coli, which was in turn different from that of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus. Enzyme BamHI not only differentiated among Staphylococcus and the other three groups but was also able to show a distinct variation in banding pattern among Staphylococcus members. The database generated was used to identify pathogens from unknown patient samples without cultivating them. HindIII and HinfI can be used as two separate potential enzymes to differentiate and distinguish between the various microbes.

  9. Coliform and human pathogenic bacteria in tourism affected water bodies in North Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.

    forms of biota. Thus, bacteria as a community are useful and reliable indicators of ecosystem alterations. Through careful planning, choice, and analysis of relevant bacteriological parameters, deeper insights on quality, health, and stability of natural...

  10. Differential effects of organic compounds on cucumber damping-off and biocontrol activity of antagonistic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Ravnskov, Sabine; Guanlin, X.;

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the organic compounds tryptic soy broth, cellulose, glucose and chitosan on cucumber damping-off caused by Pythium aphanidermatum and biocontrol efficacy of the biocontrol agents (BCAs) Paenibacillus macerans and P. polymyxa were examined in a seedling emergence bioassay. Results...... showed that the organic compounds differentially affected both pathogen and BCAs. Tryptic soy broth, glucose and chitosan increased Pythium damping-off of cucumber, compared to the control treatment without organic compounds, whereas cellulose had no effect. Both Paenibacillus species had biocontrol...... effects against Pythium damping-off compared with the corresponding treatments with P. aphanidermatum alone, but the biocontrol efficacy depended on the type of organic compounds added. Both BCAs counteracted damping-off in treatments with TSB and chitosan. However, P. polymyxa counteracted damping...

  11. Soil and Waste Matrix Affects Spatial Heterogeneity of Bacteria Filtration during Unsaturated Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Unc

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous flows resulting from discrete natural rain events induce temporal and spatial variability in the transport of bacteria from organic waste through soils in which the degree of saturation varies. Transport and continuity of associated pathways are dependent on structure and stability of the soil under conditions of variable moisture and ionic strength of the soil solution. Lysimeters containing undisturbed monoliths of clay, clay loam or sandy loam soils were used to investigate transport and pathway continuity for bacteria and hydrophobic fluorescent microspheres. Biosolids, to which the microspheres were added, were surface applied and followed by serial irrigation events. Microspheres, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella spp. and Clostridium perfringens were enumerated in drainage collected from 64 distinct collection areas through funnels installed in a grid pattern at the lower boundary of the monoliths. Bacteria-dependent filtration coefficients along pathways of increasing water flux were independent of flow volume, suggesting: (1 tracer or colloid dependent retention; and (2 transport depended on the total volume of contiguous pores accessible for bacteria transport. Management decisions, in this case resulting from the form of organic waste, induced changes in tortuosity and continuity of pores and modified the effective capacity of soil to retain bacteria. Surface application of liquid municipal biosolids had a negative impact on transport pathway continuity, relative to the solid municipal biosolids, enhancing retention under less favourable electrostatic conditions consistent with an initial increase in straining within inactive pores and subsequent by limited re-suspension from reactivated pores.

  12. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemann, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.biemann@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Anne [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Alexander [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Riemann, Dagmar [Department of Immunology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Knelangen, Julia [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Blueher, Matthias [Department of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Koch, Holger [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-University Bochum (IPA), Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Bernd [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  13. Clearance of bacteria and differential involvement of mussel hyalinocytes, small and large granulocytes in antibacterial immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    Mussels are filter-feeders living in a bacteria-rich environment. We have previously found that numerous bacterial species are naturally present within the cell-free hemolymph, including several of the Vibrio genus, whereas the intra-cellular content of hemocytes was sterile. When bacteria were i...

  14. Sample handling factors affecting the enumeration of lactobacilli and cellulolytic bacteria in equine feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives were to compare media types and evaluate the effects of fecal storage time and temperature on the enumeration of cellulolytic bacteria and lactobacilli from horses. Fecal samples were collected from horses (n = 3) and transported to the lab (CO2, 37 ºC, 0.5 h). The samples were assign...

  15. Ground transport stress affects bacteria in the rumen of beef cattle: A real-time PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lixin; He, Cong; Zhou, Yanwei; Xu, Lifan; Xiong, Huijun

    2016-10-03

    Transport stress syndrome often appears in beef cattle during ground transportation, leading to changes in their capacity to digest food due to changes in rumen microbiota. The present study aimed to analyze bacteria before and after cattle transport. Eight Xianan beef cattle were transported over 1000 km. Rumen fluid and blood were sampled before and after transport. Real-time PCR was used to quantify rumen bacteria. Cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) were measured. Cortisol and ACTH were increased on day 1 after transportation and decreased by day 3. Cellulolytic bacteria (Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus flavefaciens), Ruminococcus amylophilus and Prevotella albensis were increased at 6 h and declined by 15 days after transport. There was a significant reduction in Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, Prevotella bryantii, Prevotella ruminicola and Anaerovibrio lipolytica after transport. Rumen concentration of acetic acid increased after transport, while rumen pH and concentrations of propionic and butyric acids were decreased. Body weight decreased by 3 days and increased by 15 days after transportation. Using real-time PCR analysis, we detected changes in bacteria in the rumen of beef cattle after transport, which might affect the growth of cattle after transport.

  16. Differential sensitivity of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    and Hg were less toxic to pigmented bacteria than Cd. Pigmented strains were resistant to antibiotics, particularly at higher concentrations. All the strains, irrespective of their pigments, showed multiple metal and drug resistance...

  17. Bacteria in milk from anterior and posterior mammary glands in sows affected and unaffected by postpartum dysgalactia syndrome (PPDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerjets Imke

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The performance of piglet weight gain is strongly dependent on the sow's ability to meet the demand for adequate milk. Postparturient disorders, especially those subsumed under the term postpartum dysgalactia syndrome (PPDS, can alter or reduce the milk production sensitively, resulting in starving piglets. The aim of this study was to gather further information about the prevalence of different bacterial species in the anterior and posterior mammary glands of sows with respect to the clinical appearance of PPDS. Methods In this study, the health status of 56 sows after farrowing was determined with special regard to mastitis and dysgalactia. Pooled milk samples from anterior and posterior glands were taken from both affected and non-affected animals and analysed bacteriologically for the presence of a wide spectrum of different pathogens. Results Mainly Escherichia coli, staphylococci and streptococci were detected in high percentages but without significant differences in healthy and diseased animals and anterior and posterior glands. However, the large percentages of coliform bacteria suggested a transmission route via faecal contamination. Conclusion In this study, the prevalence of different bacteria in anterior and posterior glands in PPDS positive and negative sows was analysed. No significant differences in bacteria of healthy and diseased sows were assessed. Therefore, the development of clinical PPDS and actual infection seems to be largely dependant on individual resistance in single sows.

  18. Medical Conditions Differentially Affect the Development of IADL Disability: Implications for Medical Care and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furner, Sylvia E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Determined independent effects of nine self-reported medical conditions on the likelihood of developing specific instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) disabilities at three points in time. Various medical conditions differentially affect each specific IADL disability, and each IADL disability has its own set of predictors, which, in…

  19. Cognitive and Affective Orientations and Teaching Behaviors--A Study of Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Lya

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that teachers can be differentiated by their cognitive or affective orientations, reflected in the objectives they select and in the stimuli and questions they present in the classroom. Proposes use of aptitude-treatment interactions in order to clarify the best methods to use for personalized teacher training. (JD)

  20. How does the supernatant of Lactobacillus acidophilus affect the proliferation and differentiation activities of rat bone marrow-derived stromal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadikuchaksaraei, A; Gholipourmalekabadi, M; Saberian, M; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, M; Shahidi Delshad, E

    2016-08-31

    Low proliferation rate and unwanted differentiation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (rBMSCs) during the frequent passages have limited the use of such cells in clinical cell therapy. Recently, the researchers have focused on the effects of the components produced by some bacteria on proliferation of the stem cells. In this study, we discussed the possible effects of the Lactobacillus acidophilus supernatant on proliferation and differentiation of the rBMSCs. For this aim, the cells were isolated from rat bone marrow, characterized by culturing on tissue specific differentiation media and stained. The cells (passage two) were treated with different concentrations of the L. acidophilus supernatant (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 3, 9 and 30 &mgr;l/ml) for 14 days. The proliferation and differentiation capacity of the cells were then determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT assay) and tissue specific staining. The results showed a positive effect of the supernatant on the cell proliferation in 3 and 9 &mgr;l/ml concentrations, while did not affect the differentiation capacity of the rBMSCs. The current study strongly suggests the L. acidophilus supernatant as an alternative material that could be added to the media with aim of improvement in the proliferation rate of the rBMSCs without affecting their differentiation capacity.

  1. Soil chemical properties affect the reaction of forest soil bacteria to drought and rewetting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodak, Marcin; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Morawska-Płoskonka, Justyna; Kuduk, Katarzyna; Niklińska, Maria

    Reaction of soil bacteria to drought and rewetting stress may depend on soil chemical properties. The objectives of this study were to test the reaction of different bacterial phyla to drought and rewetting stress and to assess the influence of different soil chemical properties on the reaction of soil bacteria to this kind of stress. The soil samples were taken at ten forest sites and measured for pH and the contents of organic C (Corg) and total N (Nt), Zn, Cu, and Pb. The samples were kept without water addition at 20 - 30 °C for 8 weeks and subsequently rewetted to achieve moisture equal to 50 - 60 % of their maximum water-holding capacity. Prior to the drought period and 24 h after the rewetting, the structure of soil bacterial communities was determined using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The drought and rewetting stress altered bacterial community structure. Gram-positive bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, increased in relative proportion after the stress, whereas the Gram-negative bacteria in most cases decreased. The largest decrease in relative abundance was for Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. For several phyla the reaction to drought and rewetting stress depended on the chemical properties of soils. Soil pH was the most important soil property influencing the reaction of a number of soil bacterial groups (including all classes of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, and others) to drought and rewetting stress. For several bacterial phyla the reaction to the stress depended also on the contents of Nt and Corg in soil. The effect of heavy metal pollution was also noticeable, although weaker compared to other chemical soil properties. We conclude that soil chemical properties should be considered when assessing the effect of stressing factors on soil bacterial communities.

  2. Target identification of volatile metabolites to allow the differentiation of lactic acid bacteria by gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Janneth; Arce, Cristina; Jordano, Rafael; Arce, Lourdes; Medina, Luis M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the potential of gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS) to differentiate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) through target identification and fingerprints of volatile metabolites. The LAB selected were used as reference strains for their influence in the flavour of cheese. The four strains of LAB can be distinguished by the fingerprints generated by the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted. 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified as relevant VOCs for Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei. 2-Butanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactococcus cremoris subsp. cremoris. The IMS signals monitoring during a 24-30h period showed the growth of the LAB in vitro. The results demonstrated that GC-IMS is a useful technology for bacteria recognition and also for screening the aromatic potential of new isolates of LAB.

  3. Positive and negative family emotional climate differentially predict youth anxiety and depression via distinct affective pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbe, Aaron M; Bell, Debora J

    2014-08-01

    A socioaffective specificity model was tested in which positive and negative affect differentially mediated relations of family emotional climate to youth internalizing symptoms. Participants were 134 7(th)-9(th) grade adolescents (65 girls; 86 % Caucasian) and mothers who completed measures of emotion-related family processes, experienced affect, anxiety, and depression. Results suggested that a family environment characterized by maternal psychological control and family negative emotion expressiveness predicted greater anxiety and depression, and was mediated by experienced negative affect. Conversely, a family emotional environment characterized by low maternal warmth and low positive emotion expressiveness predicted only depression, and was mediated through lowered experienced positive affect. This study synthesizes a theoretical model of typical family emotion socialization with an extant affect-based model of shared and unique aspects of anxiety and depression symptom expression.

  4. Catechins Variously Affect Activities of Conjugation Enzymes in Proliferating and Differentiated Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Lněničková

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of processes in intestinal cells is essential, as most xenobiotics come into contact with the small intestine first. Caco-2 cells are human colorectal adenocarcinoma that once differentiated, exhibit enterocyte-like characteristics. Our study compares activities and expressions of important conjugation enzymes and their modulation by green tea extract (GTE and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG using both proliferating (P and differentiated (D caco-2 cells. The mRNA levels of the main conjugation enzymes were significantly elevated after the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. However, no increase in conjugation enzymes’ activities in differentiated cells was detected in comparison to proliferating ones. GTE/EGCG treatment did not affect the mRNA levels of any of the conjugation enzymes tested in either type of cells. Concerning conjugation enzymes activities, GTE/EGCG treatment elevated glutathione S-transferase (GST activity by approx. 30% and inhibited catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT activity by approx. 20% in differentiated cells. On the other hand, GTE as well as EGCG treatment did not significantly affect the activities of conjugation enzymes in proliferating cells. Administration of GTE/EGCG mediated only mild changes of GST and COMT activities in enterocyte-like cells, indicating a low risk of GTE/EGCG interactions with concomitantly administered drugs. However, a considerable chemo-protective effect of GTE via the pronounced induction of detoxifying enzymes cannot be expected as well.

  5. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-feng Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These findings confirm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus results in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes.

  6. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-feng Jiang; Kai Yang; Xiao-qing Yang; Ying-fu Liu; Yuan-chi Cheng; Xu-yi Chen; Yue Tu

    2015-01-01

    It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron speciifc enolase, glial ifbrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunolfuorescence. Moreover, lfow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These ifndings con-ifrm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus re-sults in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes.

  7. Association with pathogenic bacteria affects life-history traits and population growth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, S Anaid; Mooring, Eric Q; Rens, Elisabeth G; Restif, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Determining the relationship between individual life-history traits and population dynamics is an essential step to understand and predict natural selection. Model organisms that can be conveniently studied experimentally at both levels are invaluable to test the rich body of theoretical literature in this area. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, despite being a well-established workhorse in genetics, has only recently received attention from ecologists and evolutionary biologists, especially with respect to its association with pathogenic bacteria. In order to start filling the gap between the two areas, we conducted a series of experiments aiming at measuring life-history traits as well as population growth of C. elegans in response to three different bacterial strains: Escherichia coli OP50, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Whereas previous studies had established that the latter two reduced the survival of nematodes feeding on them compared to E. coli OP50, we report for the first time an enhancement in reproductive success and population growth for worms feeding on S. enterica Typhimurium. Furthermore, we used an age-specific population dynamic model, parameterized using individual life-history assays, to successfully predict the growth of populations over three generations. This study paves the way for more detailed and quantitative experimental investigation of the ecology and evolution of C. elegans and the bacteria it interacts with, which could improve our understanding of the fate of opportunistic pathogens in the environment.

  8. Factors Affecting Microbial Load and Profile of Potential Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria from Household Kitchen Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranjia-Hurdoyal, Susheela; Latouche, Melissa Cathleen

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study the bacterial load and isolate potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria from kitchen tables, including preparation tables and dining tables. Methods. A total of 53 households gave their consent for participation. The samples were collected by swabbing over an area of 5 cm by 5 cm of the tables and processed for bacterial count which was read as colony forming units (CFU), followed by isolation and identification of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Result. Knowledge about hygiene was not always put into practice. Coliforms, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., and S. aureus were detected from both dining and preparation tables. The mean CFU and presence of potential pathogens were significantly affected by the hygienic practices of the main food handler of the house, materials of kitchen tables, use of plastic covers, time of sample collection, use of multipurpose sponges/towels for cleaning, and the use of preparation tables as chopping boards (p Kitchen tables could be very important source of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria causing foodborne diseases. Lack of hygiene was confirmed by presence of coliforms, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp. The use of plastic covers, multipurpose sponges, and towels should be discouraged.

  9. TRANSFORMATION AND ALLELOPATHY OF NATURAL DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND TANNIC ACID ARE AFFECTED BY SOLAR RADIATION AND BACTERIA(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nadine; Zwirnmann, Elke; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Hilt, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether abiotic and biotic factors may affect allelopathic properties. Therefore, we investigated how solar radiation and bacteria influence allelopathic effects of the plant-derived, polyphenolic tannic acid (TA) on microalgae. Using a block design, lake water samples with and without TA were exposed to solar radiation or kept in darkness with or without bacteria for 3 weeks. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific size fractions of DOC analyzed by chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), and concentrations of total phenolic compounds (TPC) were measured to follow the fate of TA in lake water with natural DOC exposed to photolytic and microbial degradation. DOC and TPC decreased in dark-incubated lake water with TA and bacteria indicating microbial degradation. In contrast, exposure to solar radiation of lake water with TA and bacteria did not decrease DOC. Chromatographic analyses documented an accumulation of DOC mean size fraction designated as humic substances (HS) in sunlit water samples with TA. The recalcitrance of the humic fraction indicates that photolytic degradation may contribute to a DOC less available for bacterial degradation. Subsequent growth tests with Desmodesmus armatus (Chodat) E. Hegewald showed low but reproducible difference in algal growth with lower algal growth rate cultured in photolytically and microbially degraded TA in lake water than cultured in respective dark treatments. This finding highlights the importance of photolytic processes and microbial degradation influencing allelopathic effects and may explain the high potential of allelochemicals for structuring the phytoplankton community composition in naturally illuminated surface waters.

  10. Differential activity of a lectin from Solieria filiformis against human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Holanda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A lectin isolated from the red alga Solieria filiformis was evaluated for its effect on the growth of 8 gram-negative and 3 gram-positive bacteria cultivated in liquid medium (three independent experiments/bacterium. The lectin (500 µg/mL stimulated the growth of the gram-positive species Bacillus cereus and inhibited the growth of the gram-negative species Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus sp, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1000 µg/mL but the lectin (10-1000 µg/mL had no effect on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and B. subtilis, or on the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The purified lectin significantly reduced the cell density of gram-negative bacteria, although no changes in growth phases (log, exponential and of decline were observed. It is possible that the interaction of S. filiformis lectin with the cell surface receptors of gram-negative bacteria promotes alterations in the flow of nutrients, which would explain the bacteriostatic effect. Growth stimulation of the gram-positive bacterium B. cereus was more marked in the presence of the lectin at a concentration of 1000 µg/mL. The stimulation of the growth of B. cereus was not observed when the lectin was previously incubated with mannan (125 µg/mL, its hapten. Thus, we suggest the involvement of the binding site of the lectin in this effect. The present study reports the first data on the inhibition and stimulation of pathogenic bacterial cells by marine alga lectins.

  11. Deriving reliable fundamental parameters of PMS-rich star clusters affected by differential reddening

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatto, Charles; Lima, Eliade F

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach that improves the search for reliable astrophysical parameters (e.g. age, mass, and distance) of differentially-reddened, pre-main sequence-rich star clusters. It involves simulating conditions related to the early-cluster phases, in particular the differential and foreground reddenings, and internal age spread. Given the loose constraints imposed by these factors, the derivation of parameters based only on photometry may be uncertain, especially for the poorly-populated clusters. We consider a wide range of cluster {\\em (i)} mass and {\\em (ii)} age, and different values of {\\em (iii)} distance modulus, {\\em (iv)} differential and {\\em (v)} foreground reddenings. Photometric errors and their relation with magnitude are also taken into account. We also investigate how the presence of unresolved binaries affect the derived parameters. For each set of {\\em (i)} - {\\em (v)} we build the corresponding model Hess diagram, and compute the root mean squared residual with respect to the observed...

  12. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M.; McDonnell, Lisa P.; Nourse, Jamison L.; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2015-02-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  13. Emotions and language about motion: Differentiating affective dominance with syntax from valence with semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freddi, Sébastien; Esteban, José; Dru, Vincent

    2015-12-15

    Motion as encoded in linguistic cues is used to differentiate affective valence and dominance. Participants were invited to rate their affective responses to different words along valence and dominance scales. The words were nouns describing static cues and verbs describing motion, connected to DOWN/UP and Avoidance/Approach cues. The results of three studies showed that valence and dominance could be differentiated through syntax and semantics of motion. On one hand, dominance feelings, compared to valence ones, are particularly influenced by motion encoded in syntactic classes (verbs vs. nouns). On the other hand, valence feelings, compared to dominance ones, are influenced by a semantics of motion through DOWN/UP and Avoidance/Approach cues, considered as polarities. A polarity correspondence effect is proposed to explain these results.

  14. Subgingival bacteria in a case of prepubertal periodontitis, before and one year after extractions of the affected primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, D; Bimstein, E

    1994-01-01

    The treatment of children with prepubertal periodontitis (PP), may be complicated by the extent of the lesions and the possibility of tetracycline stain of the developing permanent dentition. Therefore, with the purpose of preventing the infection of permanent teeth during the mixed dentition, it has been recommended that the treatment of children with PP, should include the early extraction of the primary teeth affected with alveolar bone loss (ABL). Still, there is little evidence which confirms that extraction of the affected primary teeth do in fact reduce the periodonto-pathogens load of the subgingival plaque. The present study reports values of colony forming units (CFU) of total anaerobic bacteria, Actinobacillus actynomicetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) from the subgingival plaque from a child with PP, collected immediately before and 1 year after extractions of the primary teeth affected with ABL. CFU of Aa and Pg developed only from the subgingival plaque collected before the extraction of the primary teeth affected with ABL. These findings suggest that in cases of PP, extraction of the affected primary teeth may reduce the possibility of infection of the periodontum of the permanent teeth during the mixed dentition period.

  15. Isolation and identification of associated bacteria and maggots from myiasis affected wounds of cattle and goats in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Touhidul Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to investigate the associated maggots and bacteria in myiasis affected wound in animals. Total 37 myiasis affected cattle (n=25 and goats (n=12 were examined in this study, of which 21 samples were collected from the Veterinary clinics of Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU, Mymensingh, and the remaining 16 samples were collected from Upazila Veterinary Hospital, Gouripur, Mymensingh. The maggots were collected from the wounds, and were identified under microscope. For microbial identification, samples (n=10 were collected aseptically by using sterile cotton swab. The samples were allowed to grow in media. Colony and staining characteristics were studied. Traumatic, creeping or migratory myiasis wounds were identified in the examined animals. In this study, subcutaneous wound was mostly recorded, of which 43% (n=9/21 was found at the Veterinary Clinics, BAU, and 44% (n=7/16 was found at the Upazila Veterinary Hospital, Gouripur. The maggots were identified as Chrysomya bezziana, commonly known as Old World screwworm. Occurrence of myiasis due to C. bezziana larvae was recorded as 100%. The associated bacteria were identified as Staphylococcus spp. In conclusion, the myiasis wounds are associated with both Staphylococcus spp. and larvae of C. bezziana. Preventive and control measures against the C. bezziana and Staphylococcus spp. can be undertaken to save the livestock from myiasis in Bangladesh.

  16. The Affect of Symbols: Creating the Graphic Differential through Synesthesia and Metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon James

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research with the semantic differential technique has established the cross-cultural generality of three basic affective dimensions identified as evaluation, potency, and activity. The purpose of this study is to develop a graphic equivalent of the pan-cultural short form semantic differential. This graphic differential is composed of bipolar scales made up of pictographic opposites on which subjects rate a concept by placing a check mark on the seven-point scale. Such a non-verbal instrument would be culture free and would have certain distinct advantages of the verbal semantic differential form. Data are reported for a pre-test of the graphic instrument in five language-culture communities (American English, Delhi Hindi, Finnish, German, and Japanese. The study succeeds in identifying several graphic scales that provide reliable and effective indices of the evaluation dimension of affect. These scales exhibit and conform to the symmetry law of Gestalt and could be used as a culture free attitude measure. With respect to the potency and activity dimensions, the results are less satisfactory, although some of the graphic scales can be used for this purpose when chosen indigenously (i.e. independently for each culture. Evidence of visual denotative contamination is found and discussed.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) transcription in intestinal epithelial cells is significantly affected by bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes phyla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Theil, Peter Kappel; Jensen, Bent Borg;

    2012-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are produced in the intestine by microbial fermentation. Recently, a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPR) acting as FFA transporters has been reported including GPR120, which is expressed by intestinal epithelial cells. The GPR120 has been reported to affect the expr....... The regulation of GPR120 by intestinal microbiota represents a direct signaling pathway for gut bacteria to affect host health and metabolism...... ≤ 0.05) compared with cells without bacteria added. The alteration in cellular GPR120 mRNA was observed with bacteria categorized as either probiotics or bacteria capable of inducing an anti-inflammatory effect. The beneficial effect of these bacteria may very well be mediated by regulation of GPR120...

  18. Antioxidant properties of certain cereals as affected by food-grade bacteria fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Wu, Sz-Jie; Shyu, Yuan-Tay

    2014-04-01

    The effects of fermentation by 2 food-grade bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus plantarum) on antioxidant activities and the contents of phenolics and flavonoids in 4 cereals (specifically adlay, chestnut, lotus seed, and walnut) were determined and compared with those of their non-fermented counterparts. Results showed that antioxidant properties observed in the fermented and non-fermented cereals may vary with fermented starters. Fermentation was observed to increase the phenolic and flavonoid contents of the extracts. The effects on Bacillus-fermented cereals were stronger than on Lactobacillus-fermented cereals. In IC50 values (mg/mL) of extracts, the extracts of fermented cereal showed a stronger DPPH radical scavenging and ferric-reducing activities. Fermentation did not significantly alter the Fe(2+)-chelating activity in the extracts of chestnuts and lotus seeds. All cereals were shown significantly inhibited the production of LPS-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) without creating obvious cytotoxic effects in the macrophage cells. These results suggest that the fermentation process enables cereal-based foods with enhanced antioxidant capacities to contribute to health and nutritional improvements in consumers.

  19. Maize development and grain quality are differentially affected by mycorrhizal fungi and a growth-promoting pseudomonad in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Graziella; Copetta, Andrea; Gamalero, Elisa; Bona, Elisa; Cesaro, Patrizia; Scarafoni, Alessio; D'Agostino, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) can increase the growth and yield of major crops, and improve the quality of fruits and leaves. However, little is known about their impact on seed composition. Plants were inoculated with AM fungi and/or the bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf4 and harvested after 7 months of growth in open-field conditions. Plant growth parameters were measured (biomass, length and circumference of spikes, number of grains per cob, grain yield, and grain size) and protein, lipid, and starch content in grains were determined. Plant growth and yield were increased by inoculation with the microorganisms. Moreover, spikes and grains of inoculated plants were bigger than those produced by uninoculated plants. Regarding grain composition, the bacterial strain increased grain starch content, especially the digestible components, whereas AM fungi-enhanced protein, especially zein, content. Plant inoculation with the fluorescent pseudomonad and mycorrhizal fungi resulted in additive effects on grain composition. Overall, results showed that the bacterial strain and the AM fungi promoted maize growth cultivated in field conditions and differentially affected the grain nutritional content. Consequently, targeted plant inoculation with beneficial microorganisms can lead to commodities fulfilling consumer and industrial requirements.

  20. Similarity and differentiation between bacteria associated with skin of salamanders (Plethodon jordani) and free-living assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M; Allison, Amanda L

    2014-06-01

    All animals and plants have intimate associations with microbes. Opinion has shifted from viewing microbes primarily as pathogens to the idea that healthy animals and plants carry specialized communities of coevolving microorganisms. However, the generality of this proposition is unknown because surveys rarely compare host-associated microbes with samples from relevant microhabitats. Symbiotic communities might be assembled from local environments with little evolutionary specialization. We evaluated the specificity of bacteria associated with salamander skin in comparison with surfaces in their immediate environments using 16S rRNA sequences. Host-associated and free-living samples were significantly different. However, relative abundances were strongly correlated; the most abundant taxa on salamander skin were also most abundant on moist debris on the forest floor. Thus, although bacterial assemblages on salamander skin are statistically differentiated from those on inanimate surfaces, they are not entirely 'distinct'. Candidate salamander specialists were few in number and occurred at low relative abundances. Within some OTUs, differences in allele frequency suggested genetic specialization at finer levels. Although host-associated and free-living assemblages were similar, a range of more or less specialized symbiotes was evident and bacteria on salamander skin were often specific genotypes of OTUs commonly found on other moist surfaces in the environment.

  1. CD4(+) T-cell activation is differentially modulated by bacteria-primed dendritic cells, but is generally down-regulated by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Susanne; Lund, Pia; Kjaer, Tanja M R; Straarup, Ellen M; Hellgren, Lars I; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-03-01

    Appropriate activation of CD4(+) T cells is fundamental for efficient initiation and progression of acquired immune responses. Here, we showed that CD4(+) T-cell activation is dependent on changes in membrane n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and is dynamically regulated by the type of signals provided by dendritic cells (DCs). Upon interaction with DCs primed by different concentrations and species of gut bacteria, CD4(+) T cells were activated according to the type of DC stimulus. The levels of CD80 were found to correlate to the levels of expression of CD28 and to the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, while the presence of CD40 and CD86 on DCs inversely affected inducible costimulator (ICOS) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) levels in CD4(+) T cells. For all DC stimuli, cells high in n-3 PUFAs showed reduced ability to respond to CD28 stimulation, to proliferate, and to express ICOS and CTLA-4. Diminished T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 signalling was found to be responsible for n-3 PUFA effects. Thus, the dietary fatty acid composition influences the overall level of CD4(+) T-cell activation induced by DCs, while the priming effect of the DC stimuli modulates CD80, CD86 and CD40 levels, thereby affecting and shaping activation of acquired immunity by differential regulation of proliferation and costimulatory molecule expression in CD4(+) T cells.

  2. Genome sequences of rare, uncultured bacteria obtained by differential coverage binning of multiple metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hugenholtz, Philip; Skarshewski, Adam;

    2013-01-01

    Reference genomes are required to understand the diverse roles of microorganisms in ecology, evolution, human and animal health, but most species remain uncultured. Here we present a sequence composition–independent approach to recover high-quality microbial genomes from deeply sequenced...... metagenomes. Multiple metagenomes of the same community, which differ in relative population abundances, were used to assemble 31 bacterial genomes, including rare (genomes were assembled into complete or near-complete chromosomes....... Four belong to the candidate bacterial phylum TM7 and represent the most complete genomes for this phylum to date (relative abundances, 0.06–1.58%). Reanalysis of published metagenomes reveals that differential coverage binning facilitates recovery of more complete and higher fidelity genome bins than...

  3. Differential responses of the antioxidant system of ametryn and clomazone tolerant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Leila Priscila; Carvalho, Giselle; Martins, Paula Fabiane; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Vilhena, Milca Bartz; Pileggi, Marcos; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2014-01-01

    The herbicides ametryn and clomazone are widely used in sugarcane cultivation, and following microbial degradation are considered as soil and water contaminants. The exposure of microorganisms to pesticides can result in oxidative damage due to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the response of the antioxidant systems of two bacterial strains tolerant to the herbicides ametryn and clomazone. Bacteria were isolated from soil with a long history of ametryn and clomazone application. Comparative analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain CC07 is phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and strain 4C07 to P. fulva. The two bacterial strains were grown for 14 h in the presence of separate and combined herbicides. Lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione content (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes activities were evaluated. The overall results indicated that strain 4C07 formed an efficient mechanism to maintain the cellular redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequently scavenging ROS in the presence of the herbicides. The growth of bacterium strain 4C07 was inhibited in the presence of clomazone alone, or in combination with ametryn, but increased glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, and a higher GSH concentration were detected. Meanwhile, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and GST activities and a lower concentration of GSH were detected in the bacterium strain CC07, which was able to achieve better growth in the presence of the herbicides. The results suggest that the two bacterial strains tolerate the ametryn and clomazone herbicides with distinctly different responses of the antioxidant systems.

  4. Differential responses of the antioxidant system of ametryn and clomazone tolerant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Priscila Peters

    Full Text Available The herbicides ametryn and clomazone are widely used in sugarcane cultivation, and following microbial degradation are considered as soil and water contaminants. The exposure of microorganisms to pesticides can result in oxidative damage due to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This study investigated the response of the antioxidant systems of two bacterial strains tolerant to the herbicides ametryn and clomazone. Bacteria were isolated from soil with a long history of ametryn and clomazone application. Comparative analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain CC07 is phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and strain 4C07 to P. fulva. The two bacterial strains were grown for 14 h in the presence of separate and combined herbicides. Lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione content (GSH and antioxidant enzymes activities were evaluated. The overall results indicated that strain 4C07 formed an efficient mechanism to maintain the cellular redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS and subsequently scavenging ROS in the presence of the herbicides. The growth of bacterium strain 4C07 was inhibited in the presence of clomazone alone, or in combination with ametryn, but increased glutathione reductase (GR and glutathione S-transferase (GST activities, and a higher GSH concentration were detected. Meanwhile, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and GST activities and a lower concentration of GSH were detected in the bacterium strain CC07, which was able to achieve better growth in the presence of the herbicides. The results suggest that the two bacterial strains tolerate the ametryn and clomazone herbicides with distinctly different responses of the antioxidant systems.

  5. Piper and Vismia species from Colombian Amazonia differentially affect cell proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizcano, Leandro J; Siles, Maite; Trepiana, Jenifer; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio

    2014-12-30

    There is an increasing interest to identify plant-derived natural products with antitumor activities. In this work, we have studied the effects of aqueous leaf extracts from Amazonian Vismia and Piper species on human hepatocarcinoma cell toxicity. Results showed that, depending on the cell type, the plants displayed differential effects; thus, Vismia baccifera induced the selective killing of HepG2, while increasing cell growth of PLC-PRF and SK-HEP-1. In contrast, these two last cell lines were sensitive to the toxicity by Piper krukoffii and Piper putumayoense, while the Piperaceae did not affect HepG2 growth. All the extracts induced cytotoxicity to rat hepatoma McA-RH7777, but were innocuous (V. baccifera at concentrations Piper genera with opposite effects as a model system to study the mechanisms of the antitumoral activity against different types of hepatocarcinoma.

  6. Variation of Hydroxyapatite Content in Soft Gelatin Affects Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahsai Kantawong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin is a common material used in tissue engineering and hydroxyapatite (HA has a composition and structure similar to natural bone mineral. HA is also used to increase the adhesion ability of scaffolds. The physical and mechanical properties of gelatin, together with the chemical properties of HA, can affect cell differentiation. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs upon culturing on gelatin composite with HA. Low amounts of HA were introduced into the gelatin in order to modulate properties of gelatin. Three types of hydrogel were fabricated by glutaraldehyde crosslinking before lyophilization to produce the porous 3D structure: (1 pure gelatin, (2 0.5 mg/ml HA in gelatin, and (3 1 mg/ml HA in gelatin. The fabricated hydrogels were used as scaffolds to cultivate HMSCs for two periods - 24 hours and 3 weeks. The results showed that all types of fabricated hydrogels could be used to cultivate HMSCs. Changes of gene expressions indicated that the HMSCs cultured on the 1 mg/ml HA in gelatin showed neuronal lineage-specific differentiation.

  7. Consumption of different soymilk formulations differentially affects the gut microbiomes of overweight and obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Raudales, Dina; Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Bringe, Neal A; Cox, Stephen B; Dowd, Scot E; Miller, Michael J; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    The effects of consuming foods on the intestinal microbiome of obese individuals remain unclear. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of consuming low glycinin soymilk (LGS, 49.5% β-conglycinin/6% glycinin), conventional soymilk (S, 26.5% β-conglycinin/38.7% glycinin) or bovine milk (M, 0% β-conglycinin/0% glycinin) on the intestinal microbiome in overweight and obese men. In a randomized double-blind study, participants (64 men, BMI > 25, 20-45 y old), organized in three groups, consumed 500 mL of LGS, S or M daily for 3 mo. Three fecal samples were collected before (baseline) and after 3 mo of consumption. Dietary energy and macronutrient intake were monitored monthly and remained constant throughout the study (p > 0.05). Microbial composition was analyzed with qPCR and bTEFAP. Within groups, qPCR analysis showed that the total bacteria increased in all treatments over time (p LGS and M, respectively. Bifidobacterium was significantly reduced in LGS (p = 0.003) and S (p LGS, S and M (p = 0.004, 0.005, 0.001; respectively). Unweighted UniFrac analysis revealed that the microbial communities were more similar within than between individuals. The Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio decreased in both LGS and S groups and remained relatively unchanged in the M group (Time p = 0.012; Interaction p = 0.059). Indicator analysis revealed several genera that were indicative of each treatment including Lactobacillus and Prevotella. Consumption of the three beverages differentially altered the microbiota in overweight and obese men including a potentially beneficial alteration of the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio in both soymilk groups.

  8. Differential effects of dissolved organic carbon upon re-entrainment and surface properties of groundwater bacteria and bacteria-sized microspheres during transport through a contaminated, sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Mohanram, A.; Gao, X.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Injection-and-recovery studies involving a contaminated, sandy aquifer (Cape Cod, Massachusetts) were conducted to assess the relative susceptibility for in situ re-entrainment of attached groundwater bacteria (Pseudomonas stuzeri ML2, and uncultured, native bacteria) and carboxylate-modified microspheres (0.2 and 1.0 ??m diameters). Different patterns of re-entrainment were evident for the two colloids in response to subsequent injections of groundwater (hydrodynamic perturbation), deionized water (ionic strength alteration), 77 ??M linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS, anionic surfactant), and 76 ??M Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, a very hydrophobic nonionic surfactant). An injection of deionized water was more effective in causing detachment of micrsopheres than were either of the surfactants, consistent with the more electrostatic nature of microsphere's attachment, their extreme hydrophilicity (hydrophilicity index, HI, of 0.99), and negative charge (zeta potentials, ??, of -44 to -49 mv). In contrast, Tween 80 was considerably more effective in re-entraining the more-hydrophobic native bacteria. Both the hydrophilicities and zeta potentials of the native bacteria were highly sensitive to and linearly correlated with levels of groundwater dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which varied modestly from 0.6 to 1.3 mg L-1. The most hydrophilic (0.52 HI) and negatively charged (?? -38.1 mv) indigenous bacteria were associated with the lowest DOC. FTIR spectra indicated the latter community had the highest average density of surface carboxyl groups. In contrast, differences in groundwater (DOC) had no measurable effect on hydrophilicity of the bacteria-sized microspheres and only a minor effect on their ??. These findings suggest that microspheres may not be very good surrogates for bacteria in field-scale transport studies and that adaptive (biological) changes in bacterial surface characteristics may need to be considered where there is longer

  9. Spatial segregation of BMP/Smad signaling affects osteoblast differentiation in C2C12 cells.

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    Eva Heining

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are involved in a plethora of cellular processes in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Signaling specificity is achieved by dynamic processes involving BMP receptor oligomerization and endocytosis. This allows for spatiotemporal control of Smad dependent and non-Smad pathways. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal regulation within the BMP-induced Smad transcriptional pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we discriminate between Smad signaling events that are dynamin-dependent (i.e., require an intact endocytic pathway and dynamin-independent. Inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis in fluorescence microscopy and fractionation studies revealed a delay in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation after BMP-2 stimulation of C2C12 cells. Using whole genome microarray and qPCR analysis, we identified two classes of BMP-2 induced genes that are differentially affected by inhibition of endocytosis. Thus, BMP-2 induced gene expression of Id1, Id3, Dlx2 and Hey1 is endocytosis-dependent, whereas BMP-2 induced expression of Id2, Dlx3, Zbtb2 and Krt16 is endocytosis-independent. Furthermore, we demonstrate that short term inhibition of endocytosis interferes with osteoblast differentiation as measured by alkaline phosphatase (ALP production and qPCR analysis of osteoblast marker gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates that dynamin-dependent endocytosis is crucial for the concise spatial activation of the BMP-2 induced signaling cascade. Inhibition of endocytic processes during BMP-2 stimulation leads to altered Smad1/5/8 signaling kinetics and results in differential target gene expression. We show that interfering with the BMP-2 induced transcriptional network by endocytosis inhibition results in an attenuation of osteoblast differentiation. This implies that selective sensitivity of gene expression to endocytosis provides an

  10. Biogenic amines and their metabolites are differentially affected in the Mecp2-deficient mouse brain

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    Villard Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rett syndrome (RTT, MIM #312750 is a severe neurological disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2 gene. Female patients are affected with an incidence of 1/15000 live births and develop normally from birth to 6-18 months of age before the onset of deficits in autonomic, cognitive, motor functions (stereotypic hand movements, impaired locomotion and autistic features. Studies on Mecp2 mouse models, and specifically null mice, revealed morphological and functional alterations of neurons. Several functions that are regulated by bioaminergic nuclei or peripheral ganglia are impaired in the absence of Mecp2. Results Using high performance liquid chromatography, combined with electrochemical detection (HPLC/EC we found that Mecp2-/y mice exhibit an alteration of DA metabolism in the ponto-bulbar region at 5 weeks followed by a more global alteration of monoamines when the disease progresses (8 weeks. Hypothalamic measurements suggest biphasic disturbances of norepinephrine and serotonin at pathology onset (5 weeks that were found stabilized later on (8 weeks. Interestingly, the postnatal nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficit identified previously does not parallel the reduction of the other neurotransmitters investigated. Finally, dosage in cortical samples do not suggest modification in the monoaminergic content respectively at 5 and 8 weeks of age. Conclusions We have identified that the level of catecholamines and serotonin is differentially affected in Mecp2-/y brain areas in a time-dependent fashion.

  11. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and...

  12. Inhibition of Protein Farnesylation Arrests Adipogenesis and Affects PPARγ Expression and Activation in Differentiating Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is required for the activation of multiple proteins involved in cell differentiation and function. In white adipose tissue protein, farnesylation has shown to be essential for the successful differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. We hypothesize that protein farnesylation is required for PPARγ2 expression and activation, and therefore for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes. MSCs were plated and induced to differentiate into adipocytes for three weeks. Differentiating cells were treated with either an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) or vehicle alone. The effect of inhibition of farnesylation in differentiating adipocytes was determined by oil red O staining. Cell survival was quantified using MTS Formazan. Additionally, nuclear extracts were obtained and prelamin A, chaperon protein HDJ-2, PPARγ, and SREBP-1 were determined by western blot. Finally, DNA binding PPARγ activity was determined using an ELISA-based PPARγ activation quantification method. Treatment with an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) arrests adipogenesis without affecting cell survival. This effect was concomitant with lower levels of PPARγ expression and activity. Finally, accumulation of prelamin A induced an increased proportion of mature SREBP-1 which is known to affect PPARγ activity. In summary, inhibition of protein farnesylation arrests the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and affects PPARγ expression and activity. PMID:18274630

  13. Inhibition of Protein Farnesylation Arrests Adipogenesis and Affects PPARgamma Expression and Activation in Differentiating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is required for the activation of multiple proteins involved in cell differentiation and function. In white adipose tissue protein, farnesylation has shown to be essential for the successful differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. We hypothesize that protein farnesylation is required for PPARgamma2 expression and activation, and therefore for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes. MSCs were plated and induced to differentiate into adipocytes for three weeks. Differentiating cells were treated with either an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) or vehicle alone. The effect of inhibition of farnesylation in differentiating adipocytes was determined by oil red O staining. Cell survival was quantified using MTS Formazan. Additionally, nuclear extracts were obtained and prelamin A, chaperon protein HDJ-2, PPARgamma, and SREBP-1 were determined by western blot. Finally, DNA binding PPARgamma activity was determined using an ELISA-based PPARgamma activation quantification method. Treatment with an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) arrests adipogenesis without affecting cell survival. This effect was concomitant with lower levels of PPARgamma expression and activity. Finally, accumulation of prelamin A induced an increased proportion of mature SREBP-1 which is known to affect PPARgamma activity. In summary, inhibition of protein farnesylation arrests the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and affects PPARgamma expression and activity.

  14. Essential oils affect populations of some rumen bacteria in vitro as revealed by microarray (RumenBactArray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kumar Patra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study origanum oil (ORO, garlic oil (GAO, and peppermint oil (PEO were shown to effectively lower methane production, decrease abundance of methanogens, and change abundances of several bacterial populations important to feed digestion in vitro. In this study, the impact of these essential oils (EOs, at 0.50 g/L, on the rumen bacterial community composition and population was further examined using the recently developed RumenBactArray. Species richness (expressed as number of operational taxonomic units, OTUs in the phylum Firmicutes, especially those in the class Clostridia, was decreased by ORO and GAO, but increased by PEO, while that in the phylum Bacteroidetes was increased by ORO and PEO. Species richness in the genus Butyrivibrio was lowered by all the EOs. Increases of Bacteroidetes OTUs mainly resulted from increases of Prevotella OTUs. Overall, 67 individual OTUs showed significant differences (P≤0.05 in relative abundance across the EO treatments. The predominant OTUs affected by EOs were diverse, including those related to Syntrophococcus sucromutans, Succiniclasticum ruminis, and Lachnobacterium bovis, and those classified to Prevotella, Clostridium, Roseburia, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Prevotellaceae, Bacteroidales, and Clostridiales. In total, 60 OTUs were found significantly (P≤0.05 correlated with feed degradability, ammonia concentration, and molar percentage of volatile fatty acids. Taken together, this study demonstrated extensive impact of EOs on rumen bacterial communities in an EO type-dependent manner, especially those in the predominant families Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae. The information from this study may aid in understanding the effect of EOs on feed digestion and fermentation by rumen bacteria.

  15. Neural tracking of attended versus ignored speech is differentially affected by hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Eline Borch; Wöstmann, Malte; Obleser, Jonas; Lunner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hearing loss manifests as a reduced ability to understand speech, particularly in multitalker situations. In these situations, younger normal-hearing listeners' brains are known to track attended speech through phase-locking of neural activity to the slow-varying envelope of the speech. This study investigates how hearing loss, compensated by hearing aids, affects the neural tracking of the speech-onset envelope in elderly participants with varying degree of hearing loss (n = 27, 62-86 yr; hearing thresholds 11-73 dB hearing level). In an active listening task, a to-be-attended audiobook (signal) was presented either in quiet or against a competing to-be-ignored audiobook (noise) presented at three individualized signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The neural tracking of the to-be-attended and to-be-ignored speech was quantified through the cross-correlation of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and the temporal envelope of speech. We primarily investigated the effects of hearing loss and SNR on the neural envelope tracking. First, we found that elderly hearing-impaired listeners' neural responses reliably track the envelope of to-be-attended speech more than to-be-ignored speech. Second, hearing loss relates to the neural tracking of to-be-ignored speech, resulting in a weaker differential neural tracking of to-be-attended vs. to-be-ignored speech in listeners with worse hearing. Third, neural tracking of to-be-attended speech increased with decreasing background noise. Critically, the beneficial effect of reduced noise on neural speech tracking decreased with stronger hearing loss. In sum, our results show that a common sensorineural processing deficit, i.e., hearing loss, interacts with central attention mechanisms and reduces the differential tracking of attended and ignored speech.

  16. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) affects T cell differentiation in OVA induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akirav, Eitan M; Henegariu, Octavian; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Clynes, Raphael; Herold, Kevan C

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for glycation end products (RAGE) has been previously implicated in shaping the adaptive immune response. RAGE is expressed in T cells after activation and constitutively in T cells from patients with diabetes. The effects of RAGE on adaptive immune responses are not clear: Previous reports show that RAGE blockade affects Th1 responses. To clarify the role of RAGE in adaptive immune responses and the mechanisms of its effects, we examined whether RAGE plays a role in T cell activation in a Th2 response involving ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mice. WT and RAGE deficient wild-type and OT-II mice, expressing a T cell receptor specific for OVA, were immunized intranasally with OVA. Lung cellular infiltration and T cell responses were analyzed by immunostaining, FACS, and multiplex bead analyses for cytokines. RAGE deficient mice showed reduced cellular infiltration in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and impaired T cell activation in the mediastinal lymph nodes when compared with WT mice. In addition, RAGE deficiency resulted in reduced OT-II T cell infiltration of the lung and impaired IFNγ and IL-5 production when compared with WT mice and reduced infiltration when transferred into WT hosts. When cultured under conditions favoring the differentiation of T cells subsets, RAGE deficient T cells showed reduced production of IFNγ but increased production of IL-17. Our data show a stimulatory role for RAGE in T activation in OVA-induced asthma. This role is largely mediated by the effects of RAGE on T cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings suggest that RAGE may play a regulatory role in T cell responses following immune activation.

  17. Piper and Vismia Species from Colombian Amazonia Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation of Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro J. Lizcano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest to identify plant-derived natural products with antitumor activities. In this work, we have studied the effects of aqueous leaf extracts from Amazonian Vismia and Piper species on human hepatocarcinoma cell toxicity. Results showed that, depending on the cell type, the plants displayed differential effects; thus, Vismia baccifera induced the selective killing of HepG2, while increasing cell growth of PLC-PRF and SK-HEP-1. In contrast, these two last cell lines were sensitive to the toxicity by Piper krukoffii and Piper putumayoense, while the Piperaceae did not affect HepG2 growth. All the extracts induced cytotoxicity to rat hepatoma McA-RH7777, but were innocuous (V. baccifera at concentrations < 75 µg/mL or even protected cells from basal death (P. putumayoense in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. In every case, cytotoxicity was accompanied by an intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. These results provide evidence for the anticancer activities of the studied plants on specific cell lines and suggest that cell killing could be mediated by ROS, thus involving mechanisms independent of the plants free radical scavenging activities. Results also support the use of these extracts of the Vismia and Piper genera with opposite effects as a model system to study the mechanisms of the antitumoral activity against different types of hepatocarcinoma.

  18. Fluoxetine Dose and Administration Method Differentially Affect Hippocampal Plasticity in Adult Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi L. Pawluski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications are one of the most common treatments for mood disorders. In humans, these medications are taken orally, usually once per day. Unfortunately, administration of antidepressant medications in rodent models is often through injection, oral gavage, or minipump implant, all relatively stressful procedures. The aim of the present study was to investigate how administration of the commonly used SSRI, fluoxetine, via a wafer cookie, compares to fluoxetine administration using an osmotic minipump, with regards to serum drug levels and hippocampal plasticity. For this experiment, adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided over the two administration methods: (1 cookie and (2 osmotic minipump and three fluoxetine treatment doses: 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day. Results show that a fluoxetine dose of 5 mg/kg/day, but not 10 mg/kg/day, results in comparable serum levels of fluoxetine and its active metabolite norfluoxetine between the two administration methods. Furthermore, minipump administration of fluoxetine resulted in higher levels of cell proliferation in the granule cell layer (GCL at a 5 mg dose compared to a 10 mg dose. Synaptophysin expression in the GCL, but not CA3, was significantly lower after fluoxetine treatment, regardless of administration method. These data suggest that the administration method and dose of fluoxetine can differentially affect hippocampal plasticity in the adult female rat.

  19. Prenatal ethanol exposure differentially affects hippocampal neurogenesis in the adolescent and aged brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Mohapel, J; Titterness, A K; Patten, A R; Taylor, S; Ratzlaff, A; Ratzlaff, T; Helfer, J; Christie, B R

    2014-07-25

    Exposure to ethanol in utero is associated with a myriad of sequelae for the offspring. Some of these effects are morphological in nature and noticeable from birth, while others involve more subtle changes to the brain that only become apparent later in life when the individuals are challenged cognitively. One brain structure that shows both functional and structural deficits following prenatal ethanol exposure is the hippocampus. The hippocampus is composed of two interlocking gyri, the cornu ammonis (CA) and the dentate gyrus (DG), and they are differentially affected by prenatal ethanol exposure. The CA shows a more consistent loss in neuronal numbers, with different ethanol exposure paradigms, than the DG, which in contrast shows more pronounced and consistent deficits in synaptic plasticity. In this study we show that significant deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis are apparent in aged animals following prenatal ethanol exposure. Deficits in hippocampal neurogenesis were not apparent in younger animals. Surprisingly, even when ethanol exposure occurred in conjunction with maternal stress, deficits in neurogenesis did not occur at this young age, suggesting that the capacity for neurogenesis is highly conserved early in life. These findings are unique in that they demonstrate for the first time that deficits in neurogenesis associated with prenatal ethanol consumption appear later in life.

  20. Activin Bioactivity Affects Germ Cell Differentiation in the Postnatal Mouse Testis In Vivo1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithraprabhu, Sridurga; Mendis, Sirisha; Meachem, Sarah J.; Tubino, Laura; Matzuk, Martin M.; Brown, Chester W.; Loveland, Kate L.

    2010-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta superfamily ligand activin A controls juvenile testis growth by stimulating Sertoli cell proliferation. Testicular levels are highest in the first postnatal week, when Sertoli cells are proliferating and spermatogonial stem cells first form. Levels decrease sharply as Sertoli cell proliferation ceases and spermatogenic differentiation begins. We hypothesized that changing activin levels also affect germ cell maturation. We detected an acute and developmentally regulated impact of activin on Kit mRNA in cocultures of Sertoli cells and germ cells from Day 8, but not Day 4, mice. Both stereological and flow cytometry analyses identified an elevated spermatogonium:Sertoli cell ratio in Day 7 testes from InhbaBK/BK mice, which have decreased bioactive activin, and the germ cell markers Sycp3, Dazl, and Ccnd3 were significantly elevated in InhbaBK/BK mice. The flow cytometry measurements demonstrated that surface KIT protein is significantly higher in Day 7 InhbaBK/BK germ cells than in wild-type littermates. By Day 14, the germ cell:Sertoli cell ratio did not differ between genotypes, but the transition of type A spermatogonia into spermatocytes was altered in InhbaBK/BK testes. We conclude that regulated activin signaling not only controls Sertoli cell proliferation, as previously described, but also influences the in vivo progression of germ cell maturation in the juvenile testis at the onset of spermatogenesis. PMID:20130270

  1. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Reddy, Sita, E-mail: sitaredd@usc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Comai, Lucio, E-mail: comai@usc.edu [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  2. Neural progenitor cell apoptosis and differentiation were affected by activated microglia in spinal cord slice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuqing; Chu, Tak-Ho; Su, Huanxing; Guo, Anchen; Wu, Wutian

    2014-03-01

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation offers great potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI). NPCs may replace lost neurons or oligodendrocytes and act as a source of neurotrophic factors to support survival of remaining cells. However, their efficiency was limited by poor survival after transplantation, and they tended more to differentiate into astrocytes, but not neurons and oligodendrocytes. This study investigated whether activated microglia is a factor that contributes to this phenomenon. Organotypic spinal cord slice (SCS) culture was used to mimic the local environment after SCI, and NPCs were co-cultured with them to share the culture medium. After specific depletion of microglia in the SCSs with clodronate loaded liposome, the apoptotic rate of NPCs decreased, more NPCs differentiated into neurons, and glial differentiation was impaired. This suggested that microglia may impair NPC survival, and neuronal differentiation, but improve astrocyte differentiation. In NPC transplantation strategy for SCI, microglia would be manipulated to improve the survival and neuronal differentiation of NPCs.

  3. Inhibition of Rho-kinase differentially affects axon regeneration of peripheral motor and sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Abhijeet R; Bobylev, Ilja; Zhang, Gang; Sheikh, Kazim A; Lehmann, Helmar C

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA and its down-stream effector Rho-kinase (ROCK) are important effector molecules of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Modulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway has been shown to promote axonal regeneration, however in vitro and animal studies are inconsistent regarding the extent of axonal outgrowth induced by pharmacological inhibition of ROCK. We hypothesized that injury to sensory and motor nerves result in diverse activation levels of RhoA, which may impact the response of those nerve fiber modalities to ROCK inhibition. We therefore examined the effects of Y-27632, a chemical ROCK inhibitor, on the axonal outgrowth of peripheral sensory and motor neurons grown in the presence of growth-inhibiting chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). In addition we examined the effects of three different doses of Y-27632 on nerve regeneration of motor and sensory nerves in animal models of peripheral nerve crush. In vitro, sensory neurons were less responsive to Y-27632 compared to motor neurons in a non-growth permissive environment. These differences were associated with altered expression and activation of RhoA in sensory and motor axons. In vivo, systemic treatment with high doses of Y-27632 significantly enhanced the regeneration of motor axons over short distances, while the regeneration of sensory fibers remained largely unchanged. Our results support the concept that in a growth non-permissive environment, the regenerative capacity of sensory and motor axons is differentially affected by the RhoA/ROCK pathway, with motor neurons being more responsive compared to sensory. Future treatments, that are aimed to modulate RhoA activity, should consider this functional diversity.

  4. Detecting Differential Item Functioning in the Japanese Version of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List--Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Lei, Pui-Wa; Suen, Hoi K.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the differential item functioning (DIF) of the English version and the Japanese-translated version of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List--Revised (MAACL-R) using the logistic regression (LR) procedure. The results of the LR are supplemented by multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). A total of five items are…

  5. DNA isolation protocols affect the detection limit of PCR approaches of bacteria in samples from the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.; Ben-Amor, K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Abee, T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A major concern in molecular ecological studies is the lysis efficiency of different bacteria in a complex ecosystem. We used a PCR-based 16S rDNA approach to determine the effect of two DNA isolation protocols (i.e. the bead beating and Triton-X100 method) on the detection limit of seven feces-asso

  6. Cloning of affecting pyruvate decarboxylase gene in the production bioethanol of agricultural waste in the E.coli bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masome Zeinali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethanol made by a biomass is one of the useful strategies in terms of economic and environmental and as a clean and safe energy to replace fossil fuels considered and examined. Materials and methods: In this study, key enzyme in the production of ethanol (Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis bacteria was isolated and cloned at E. coli bacteria by freeze and thaw method. For gene cloning, we used specific primers of pdc and PCR reaction and then pdc gene isolated and pET 28a plasmid double digested with (Sal I and Xho I enzymes. Digestion Products were ligated by T4 DNA ligase in 16 °C for 16 hours. Results: Results of bacteria culture showed that a few colonies containing pET 28a plasmid could grow. Result of colony pcr of pdc gene with specific primers revealed 1700 bp bands in 1% agarose gel electrophoresis. The results of PCR with T7 promotor forward primer and pdc revers primer have proved the accurate direction of integration of pdc gene into plasmid and revealed 1885 bp band. Double digestion of recombinant plasmid with SalI and XhoI enzymes revealed same bands. Finally, RT showed the expected band of 1700 bp that implies the desired gene expression in the samples. Discussion and conclusion: Due to the increased production of ethanol via pyruvate decarboxylase gene cloning in expression plasmids with a strong promoter upstream of the cloning site can conclude that, pyruvate decarboxylase cloning as a key gene would be useful and according to beneficial properties of E. coli bacteria, transfering the gene to bacteria appears to be reasonable.

  7. LMNA knock-down affects differentiation and progression of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Maresca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma (NB is one of the most aggressive tumors that occur in childhood. Although genes, such as MYCN, have been shown to be involved in the aggressiveness of the disease, the identification of new biological markers is still desirable. The induction of differentiation is one of the strategies used in the treatment of neuroblastoma. A-type lamins are components of the nuclear lamina and are involved in differentiation. We studied the role of Lamin A/C in the differentiation and progression of neuroblastoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Knock-down of Lamin A/C (LMNA-KD in neuroblastoma cells blocked retinoic acid-induced differentiation, preventing neurites outgrowth and the expression of neural markers. The genome-wide gene-expression profile and the proteomic analysis of LMNA-KD cells confirmed the inhibition of differentiation and demonstrated an increase of aggressiveness-related genes and molecules resulting in augmented migration/invasion, and increasing the drug resistance of the cells. The more aggressive phenotype acquired by LMNA-KD cells was also maintained in vivo after injection into nude mice. A preliminary immunohistochemistry analysis of Lamin A/C expression in nine primary stages human NB indicated that this protein is poorly expressed in most of these cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated for the first time in neuroblastoma cells that Lamin A/C plays a central role in the differentiation, and that the loss of this protein gave rise to a more aggressive tumor phenotype.

  8. How do leader-member exchange quality and differentiation affect performance in teams? An integrated multilevel dual process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alex Ning; Liao, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Integrating leader-member exchange (LMX) research with role engagement theory (Kahn, 1990) and role system theory (Katz & Kahn, 1978), we propose a multilevel, dual process model to understand the mechanisms through which LMX quality at the individual level and LMX differentiation at the team level simultaneously affect individual and team performance. With regard to LMX differentiation, we introduce a new configural approach focusing on the pattern of LMX differentiation to complement the traditional approach focusing on the degree of LMX differentiation. Results based on multiphase, multisource data from 375 employees of 82 teams revealed that, at the individual level, LMX quality positively contributed to customer-rated employee performance through enhancing employee role engagement. At the team level, LMX differentiation exerted negative influence on teams' financial performance through disrupting team coordination. In particular, teams with the bimodal form of LMX configuration (i.e., teams that split into 2 LMX-based subgroups with comparable size) suffered most in team performance because they experienced greatest difficulty in coordinating members' activities. Furthermore, LMX differentiation strengthened the relationship between LMX quality and role engagement, and team coordination strengthened the relationship between role engagement and employee performance. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. Potentially probiotic bacteria induce efficient maturation but differential cytokine production in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sinikka Latvala; Taija E Pietil(a); Ville Veckman; Riina A Kekkonen; Soile Tynkkynen; Riitta Korpela; Ilkka Julkunen

    2008-01-01

    MM: To analyze the ability of nine different potentially probiotic bacteria to induce maturation and cytokine production in human monocyLe-derived dendritic cells (moDCs).METHODS: Cytokine production and maturation of moDCs in response to bacterial stimulation was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometric analysis (FACS),respectively.The kinetics of mRNA expression of cytokine genes was determined by Northern blotting.The involvement of different signaling pathways in cytokine gene expression was studied using specific pharmacological signaling inhibitors.RESULTS: All studied bacteria induced the maturation of moDCs in a dose-dependent manner.More detailed analysis with S.thermophilus THS,B.breve Bb99,and L.lactis subsp,cremoris ARH74 indicated that these bacteria induced the expression of moDC maturation markers HLA class II and CD86 as efficiently as pathogenic bacteria.However,these bacteria differed in their ability to induce moDC cytokine gene expression.S.therrnophilus induced the expression of pro-inflammatory (TNF-a,IL-12,IL-6,and CCL20)and Th1 type (IL-12 and IFN-y) cytokines,while B.breve and L.lactis were also potent inducers of antiinflammatory IL-10.Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38,phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase,and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways were shown to be involved in bacteria-induced cytokine production.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that potentially probiotic bacteria are able to induce moDC maturation,but their ability to induce cytokine gene expression varies significantly from one bacterial strain to another.

  10. Cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17F, and IL-4 Differentially Affect Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela P. Bastidas-Coral

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the initial stages of bone repair, proinflammatory cytokines are released within the injury site, quickly followed by a shift to anti-inflammatory cytokines. The effect of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is controversial. Here, we investigated the effect of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17F and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells (hASCs. hASCs were treated with TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17F, or IL-4 (10 ng/mL for 72 h mimicking bone repair. TNF-α reduced collagen type I gene expression but increased hASC proliferation and ALP activity. IL-6 also strongly enhanced ALP activity (18-fold, as well as bone nodule formation by hASCs. IL-8 did not affect proliferation or osteogenic gene expression but reduced bone nodule formation. IL-17F decreased hASC proliferation but enhanced ALP activity. IL-4 enhanced osteocalcin gene expression and ALP activity but reduced RUNX2 gene expression and bone nodule formation. In conclusion, all cytokines studied have both enhancing and reducing effects on osteogenic differentiation of hASCs, even when applied for 72 h only. Some cytokines, specifically IL-6, may be suitable to induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells as a strategy for enhancing bone repair.

  11. SOX2 overexpression affects neural differentiation of human pluripotent NT2/D1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klajn, A; Drakulic, D; Tosic, M; Pavkovic, Z; Schwirtlich, M; Stevanovic, M

    2014-11-01

    SOX2 is one of the key transcription factors involved in maintenance of neural progenitor identity. However, its function during the process of neural differentiation, including phases of lineage-specification and terminal differentiation, is still poorly understood. Considering growing evidence indicating that SOX2 expression level must be tightly controlled for proper neural development, the aim of this research was to analyze the effects of constitutive SOX2 overexpression on outcome of retinoic acid-induced neural differentiation of pluripotent NT2/D1 cells. We demonstrated that in spite of constitutive SOX2 overexpression, NT2/D1 cells were able to reach final phases of neural differentiation yielding both neuronal and glial cells. However, SOX2 overexpression reduced the number of mature MAP2-positive neurons while no difference in the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes was detected. In-depth analysis at single-cell level showed that SOX2 downregulation was in correlation with both neuronal and glial phenotype acquisitions. Interestingly, while in mature neurons SOX2 was completely downregulated, astrocytes with low level of SOX2 expression were detected. Nevertheless, cells with high level of SOX2 expression were incapable of entering in either of two differentiation pathways, neurogenesis or gliogenesis. Accordingly, our results indicate that fine balance between undifferentiated state and neural differentiation depends on SOX2 expression level. Unlike neurons, astrocytes could maintain low level of SOX2 expression after they acquired glial fate. Further studies are needed to determine whether differences in the level of SOX2 expression in GFAP-positive astrocytes are in correlation with their self-renewal capacity, differentiation status, and/or their phenotypic characteristics.

  12. Mechanical stimuli on C2C12 myoblasts affect myoblast differentiation, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and galectin-1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto Blak; Lametsch, Rene; Karlsson, Anders H;

    2011-01-01

    to specific receptors on the cell surface. We showed that mechanical stimuli promote an increase of FAK phosphorylation. In order to further shed light in the process of myoblast induced differentiation by mechanical stimuli, we performed a proteomic analysis. Thirteen proteins were found to be affected...... by mechanical stimulation including Galectin-1, Annexin III, and RhoGDI. In this study we demonstrate how the combination of this method of mechanical stimuli and proteomic analysis can be a powerful tool to detect proteins that are potentially interacting in biochemical pathways or complex cellular mechanisms...... during the process of myoblast differentiation. We determined an increase in expression and changes in cellular localization of Galectin-1, in mechanically stimulated myoblasts. A potential involvement of Galectin-1 in myoblast differentiation is presented....

  13. Differential interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-23 production by human blood monocytes and dendritic cells in response to commensal enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuzak, Jennifer; Dillon, Stephanie; Wilson, Cara

    2012-08-01

    Human peripheral blood contains antigen-presenting cells (APC), including dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, that may encounter microbes that have translocated from the intestine to the periphery in disease states like HIV-1 infection and inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated the response of DC and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to a panel of representative commensal enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Bacteroides fragilis. All three bacteria induced significant upregulation of the maturation and activation markers CD40 and CD83 on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). However, only mDC produced cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p40/70, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in response to bacterial stimulation. Cytokine profiles in whole PBMC differed depending on the stimulating bacterial species: B. fragilis induced production of IL-23, IL-12p70, and IL-10, whereas E. coli and Enterococcus induced an IL-10-predominant response. mDC and monocyte depletion experiments indicated that these cell types differentially produced IL-10 and IL-23 in response to E. coli and B. fragilis. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron did not induce levels of IL-23 similar to those of B. fragilis, suggesting that B. fragilis may have unique proinflammatory properties among Bacteroides species. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to PBMC cultures stimulated with commensal bacteria abrogated the IL-23 response, whereas blocking IL-10 significantly enhanced IL-23 production, suggesting that IL-10 controls the levels of IL-23 produced. These results indicate that blood mDC and monocytes respond differentially to innate stimulation with whole commensal bacteria and that IL-10 may play a role in controlling the proinflammatory response to translocated microbes.

  14. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields affect transcript levels of neuronal differentiation-related genes in embryonic neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinlong Ma

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF can affect the processes of brain development, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. The proliferation and differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells (eNSCs is essential for brain development during the gestation period. To date, there is no report about the effects of ELF-EMF on eNSCs. In this paper, we studied the effects of ELF-EMF on the proliferation and differentiation of eNSCs. Primary cultured eNSCs were treated with 50 Hz ELF-EMF; various magnetic intensities and exposure times were applied. Our data showed that there was no significant change in cell proliferation, which was evaluated by cell viability (CCK-8 assay, DNA synthesis (Edu incorporation, average diameter of neurospheres, cell cycle distribution (flow cytometry and transcript levels of cell cycle related genes (P53, P21 and GADD45 detected by real-time PCR. When eNSCs were induced to differentiation, real-time PCR results showed a down-regulation of Sox2 and up-regulation of Math1, Math3, Ngn1 and Tuj1 mRNA levels after 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure (2 mT for 3 days, but the percentages of neurons (Tuj1 positive cells and astrocytes (GFAP positive cells were not altered when detected by immunofluorescence assay. Although cell proliferation and the percentages of neurons and astrocytes differentiated from eNSCs were not affected by 50 Hz ELF-EMF, the expression of genes regulating neuronal differentiation was altered. In conclusion, our results support that 50 Hz ELF-EMF induce molecular changes during eNSCs differentiation, which might be compensated by post-transcriptional mechanisms to support cellular homeostasis.

  15. Mango Fruit Extracts Differentially Affect Proliferation and Intracellular Calcium Signalling in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Wong Taing; Jean-Thomas Pierson; Shaw, Paul N.; Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Gidley, Michael J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of human cancer cell proliferation is a common approach in identifying plant extracts that have potential bioactive effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that methanolic extracts of peel and flesh from three archetypal mango cultivars, Irwin (IW), Nam Doc Mai (NDM), and Kensington Pride (KP), differentially affect proliferation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]I) signalling in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Man...

  16. Does Gender-Specific Differential Item Functioning Affect the Structure in Vocational Interest Inventories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinicke, Andrea; Pässler, Katja; Hell, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates consequences of eliminating items showing gender-specific differential item functioning (DIF) on the psychometric structure of a standard RIASEC interest inventory. Holland's hexagonal model was tested for structural invariance using a confirmatory methodological approach (confirmatory factor analysis and randomization…

  17. The Use of Heart Rate Variability as a Novel Method to Differentiate between Affective States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major goal of animal welfare scientists is to determine when animals are experiencing a state of good welfare or poor welfare. The goal of this research was to determine if measures of heart rate variability can be used to differentiate whether animals are experiencing ‘unpleasant’ versus ‘pleas...

  18. Temperature affect on caste differentiation and protein composition in Coptotermes formosanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caste systems, and the division of labor they make possible, are common underlying features of all social insects. In termites, multiple extrinsic factors have been shown to impact caste differentiation; for example, temperature has been shown to increase soldier production. The objective of this in...

  19. Differentiation and classification of bacteria using vancomycin functionalized silver nanorods array based surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy an chemometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intrinsic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used for differentiating and classifying bacterial species with chemometric data analysis. Such differentiation has often been conducted with an insufficient sample population and strong interference from the food matrices. To address these ...

  20. Proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory activities of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria as affected by different levels of fat, inulin and starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, Mansour; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid; Moayedi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of fat (0.5 %, 3.2 % and 5.0 %), inulin (0.0 and 1.0 %) and starter culture (0.0 %, 0.5 %, 1.0 % and 1.5 %) on the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria were assessed. Proteolytic activities of bacteria were also investigated. Yogurts were prepared either using a sole yogurt commercial culture including Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subs. bulgaricus or bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 in addition to yogurt culture. Relative degrees of proteolysis were found to be considerably higher in yogurt samples than UHT milk as the control. Both regular and probiotic yogurts showed considerable ACE-inhibitory activities. Results showed that degree of proteolysis was not influenced by different fat contents, while was increased by high concentration of starter culture (1.5 % w/w) and reduced by inulin (1 % w/w). ACE-inhibitory activities of yogurt were also negatively affected by the presence of inulin and high levels of fat (5 % w/w). Moreover, yogurt containing probiotic bacteria showed higher inhibitory against ACE in comparison to the yogurt prepared with non-probiotic strains.

  1. Lotus corniculatus condensed tannins decrease in vivo populations of proteolytic bacteria and affect nitrogen metabolism in the rumen of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B R; Attwood, G T; Reilly, K; Sun, W; Peters, J S; Barry, T N; McNabb, W C

    2002-10-01

    Condensed tannins in forage legumes improve the nutrition of sheep by reducing ruminal degradation of plant protein and increasing crude protein flow to the intestine. However, the effects of condensed tannins in forage legumes on rumen bacterial populations in vivo are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific effects of condensed tannins from Lotus corniculatus on four proteolytic rumen bacteria in sheep during and after transition from a ryegrass (Lolium perenne)-white clover (Trifolium repens) diet (i.e., low condensed tannins) to a Lotus corniculatus diet (i.e., higher condensed tannins). The bacterial populations were quantified using a competitive polymerase chain reaction. Lotus corniculatus was fed with or without ruminal infusions of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which binds to and inactivates condensed tannins, enabling the effect of condensed tannins on bacterial populations to be examined. When sheep fed on ryegrass-white clover, populations of Clostridium proteoclasticum B316T, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens C211a, Eubacterium sp. C12b, and Streptococcus bovis B315 were 1.5 x 10(8), 1.1 x 10(6), 4.6 x 10(8), and 7.1 x 10(6) mL(-1), respectively. When the diet was changed to Lotus corniculatus, the average populations (after 8-120 h) of C. proteoclasticum, B. fibrisolvens, Eubacterium sp., and S. bovis decreased (P Lotus corniculatus, the populations of C. proteoclasticum, B. fibrisolvens, Eubacterium sp., and S. bovis were higher (P Lotus corniculatus without the PEG infusion, with average populations (after 8-120 h) of 4.9 x 10(7), 3.8 x 10(5), 1.9 x 10(8), and 1.0 x 10(6), respectively. Sheep fed the Lotus corniculatus diet had lower rumen proteinase activity, ammonia, and soluble nitrogen (P Lotus corniculatus plus PEG. The Lotus corniculatus diet reduced rumen nitrogen digestibility (P Lotus corniculatus and in sheep fed Lotus corniculatus plus PEG, but nonmicrobial non-ammonia nitrogen flux to the abomasum was higher (P

  2. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Rebecca M; Bellows, Lauren E; Wood, Alison; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-03-22

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases--RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE--as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria.

  3. The progestin levonorgestrel affects sex differentiation in zebrafish at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jianghuan; Han, Jian; Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2015-09-01

    Synthetic progestins have become widespread environmental contaminants and may cause adverse effects on fish. In the present study, we investigated the effects of levonorgestrel (LNG) on sex differentiation in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Embryos were exposed to LNG at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 10, 33, and 100ng/L) and allowed to develop until sexual maturity. Histological examination at 63 days post fertilization (dpf) caused complete sex reversal and 100% males were observed in the 10, 33 and 100ng/L treatments; gross morphological and histological examination of gonads at 142dpf further confirmed 100% males at these exposure concentrations. The results indicate androgenic activity of LNG, and masculinization during zebrafish gonadal differentiation. The mRNA expression levels of genes involved in fish sex differentiation and gonadal development were examined at 28 and 42dpf. Down-regulation of the mRNA expression of aromatase (e.g., cyp19a1a, cyp19a1b), the forkhead transcription factor gene L2 (foxl2) and the Fushi tarazu factor-1d (nr5a1b) were observed. In contrast, transcription of the doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (dmrt1) gene was up-regulated. Androgen receptor (ar) mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated at 28 and 42dpf. Co-exposure to flutamide (an androgen antagonist) and LNG, led to a decrease in the sex inversion potency of LNG. Our study has demonstrated that environmentally relevant concentrations of LNG could alter sex differentiation and gonadal development in zebrafish. Our results also suggest a potentially high ecological risk of LNG to fish populations in LNG-contaminated aquatic environments.

  4. Different Culture Media Affect Proliferation, Surface Epitope Expression, and Differentiation of Ovine MSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamzyk, Carina; Emonds, Tanja; Falkenstein, Julia; Tolba, René; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Lethaus, Bernd; Neuss, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic implants including engineered bone tissue are commonly tested in sheep. To avoid rejection of heterologous or xenogeneic cells, autologous cells are preferably used, that is, ovine mesenchymal stem cells (oMSC). Unlike human MSC, ovine MSC are not well studied regarding isolation, expansion, and characterization. Here we investigated the impact of culture media composition on growth characteristics, differentiation, and surface antigen expression of oMSC. The culture media varied in fetal calf serum (FCS) content and in the addition of supplements and/or additional epidermal growth factor (EGF). We found that FCS strongly influenced oMSC proliferation and that specific combinations of supplemental factors (MCDB-201, ITS-plus, dexamethasone, and L-ascorbic acid) determined the expression of surface epitopes. We compared two published protocols for oMSC differentiation towards the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic fate and found (i) considerable donor to donor variations, (ii) protocol-dependent variations, and (iii) variations resulting from the preculture medium composition. Our results indicate that the isolation and culture of oMSC in different growth media are highly variable regarding oMSC phenotype and behaviour. Furthermore, variations from donor to donor critically influence growth rate, surface marker expression, and differentiation.

  5. Demographic changes and marker properties affect detection of human population differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanichwankul Kittipong

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentiating genetically between populations is valuable for admixture and population stratification detection and in understanding population history. This is easy to achieve for major continental populations, but not for closely related populations. It has been claimed that a large marker panel is necessary to reliably distinguish populations within a continent. We investigated whether empirical genetic differentiation could be accomplished efficiently among three Asian populations (Hmong, Thai, and Chinese using a small set of highly variable markers (15 tetranucleotide and 17 dinucleotide repeats. Results Hmong could be differentiated from Thai and Chinese based on multi-locus genotypes, but Thai and Chinese were indistinguishable from each other. We found significant evidence for a recent population bottleneck followed by expansion in the Hmong that was not present in the Thai or Chinese. Tetranucleotide repeats were less useful than dinucleotide repeat markers in distinguishing between major continental populations (Asian, European, and African while both successfully distinguished Hmong from Thai and Chinese. Conclusion Demographic history contributes significantly to robust detection of intracontinental population structure. Populations having experienced a rapid size reduction may be reliably distinguished as a result of a genetic drift -driven redistribution of population allele frequencies. Tetranucleotide markers, which differ from dinucleotide markers in mutation mechanism and rate, are similar in information content to dinucleotide markers in this situation. These factors should be considered when identifying populations suitable for gene mapping studies and when interpreting interpopulation relationships based on microsatellite markers.

  6. Different Culture Media Affect Proliferation, Surface Epitope Expression, and Differentiation of Ovine MSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Adamzyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implants including engineered bone tissue are commonly tested in sheep. To avoid rejection of heterologous or xenogeneic cells, autologous cells are preferably used, that is, ovine mesenchymal stem cells (oMSC. Unlike human MSC, ovine MSC are not well studied regarding isolation, expansion, and characterization. Here we investigated the impact of culture media composition on growth characteristics, differentiation, and surface antigen expression of oMSC. The culture media varied in fetal calf serum (FCS content and in the addition of supplements and/or additional epidermal growth factor (EGF. We found that FCS strongly influenced oMSC proliferation and that specific combinations of supplemental factors (MCDB-201, ITS-plus, dexamethasone, and L-ascorbic acid determined the expression of surface epitopes. We compared two published protocols for oMSC differentiation towards the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic fate and found (i considerable donor to donor variations, (ii protocol-dependent variations, and (iii variations resulting from the preculture medium composition. Our results indicate that the isolation and culture of oMSC in different growth media are highly variable regarding oMSC phenotype and behaviour. Furthermore, variations from donor to donor critically influence growth rate, surface marker expression, and differentiation.

  7. Methane emission and community composition patterns of rumen bacteria and methanogens in Holstein dairy cows as affected by silage type and dietary fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Højberg, Ole; Canibe, Nuria

    ) to investigate effects of silages with different methanogenic potential (early grass, late grass, and maize) combined with a CH4-reducing feed additive (crushed rapeseed) on bacterial and methanogenic communities in the rumen. Bacterial and methanogenic community patterns were evaluated by T-RFLP analysis of 16S...... rRNA and methyl co-enzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, respectively. Methanogen abundances were evaluated by qPCR using two mcrA-targeting primer sets. Silage type significantly affected CH4 emissions and rumen acetate:propionate ratios, being highest for late grass and lowest for maize. Dietary fat...... significantly reduced the gross energy lost as CH4 regardless of silage type. Silage type significantly affected the bacterial community composition pattern; the grass silages favored potential hemicellulose- and cellulose-degrading bacteria, while the maize silage mainly favored potentially starch...

  8. GENDER DIFFERENTIALS IN FACTORS AFFECTING PERFORMANCE OF SMALL-SCALE ENTERPRISES IN LAGOS STATE – NIGERIA

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    Yusuff Olabisi Sherifat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of empirical data segregation on factors affecting gender as the variable of interest. However, previous research had indicated several factors that affect business performances among small-scale enterprise owners. Using feminist theory and a descriptive survey research design, data were collected from fifty (50 small-scale enterprise owners that were purposively chosen across the study area. The findings show that the factors that were significant for female were significantly different from male. For female small scale enterprise owners, marital status (64% Age of Children (68%, Role Model/ advisors (58% were significant factors that affect their business performance. For male small-scale enterprise owners, Friends (70%, a lack of Government support (80%, inability to display innovativeness (78% and Risk-Taking (84% were significant for male. Lack of availability of capital and finances were significant for the two. Other factors that affect performance include friends, inadequate training and business location. Adequate knowledge of factors that affect gender enterprise performance will go a long way in alleviating these problems. Small-scale enterprises should be supported for poverty alleviation, especially among women and for the nation’s economic development

  9. Hypericum caprifoliatum and Hypericum connatum affect human trophoblast-like cells differentiation and Ca2+influx

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aline O da Conceio; Gilsane Lino von Poser; Benoit Barbeau; Julie Lafond

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of crude methanol and n-hexane extracts of Hypericum connatum (H. connatum) and Hypericum caprifoliatum on trophoblast-like cells. Methods: BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast-like cells were submitted to different extract concentrations (1, 5, 10 and 15 µg/mL) and evaluated in relation to cell viability and in vitro trophoblast differentiation and function. Cell viability was evaluated using WST-1 reagent. Differentiation was measured by luciferase production, hCG production/release, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway activation. The function of the trophoblast-like cells was measured by 45Ca2+influx evaluation. Results:The results showed a decrease in cell viability/proliferation. Both plants and different extracts induced a significant decrease in hCG production/release and luciferase production. H. connatum did not cause mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway disturbance;however, Hypericum caprifoliatum n-hexane extract at 15 µg/mL inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The significant increase in Ca2+influx by JEG-3 cells was seen after short and long incubation times with H. connatum methanolic extract at 15 µg/mL. Conclusions: The results indicated that these two Hypericum species extracts can interfere on trophoblast differentiation and Ca2+influx, according to their molecular diversity. Although in vivo experiments are necessary to establish their action on placental formation and function, this study suggests that attention must be paid to the potential toxic effect of these plants.

  10. Visual Cues of Object Properties Differentially Affect Anticipatory Planning of Digit Forces and Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Miller, Trevor; Marneweck, Michelle; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Studies on anticipatory planning of object manipulation showed initial task failure (i.e., object roll) when visual object shape cues are incongruent with other visual cues, such as weight distribution/density (e.g., symmetrically shaped object with an asymmetrical density). This suggests that shape cues override density cues. However, these studies typically only measured forces, with digit placement constrained. Recent evidence suggests that when digit placement is unconstrained, subjects modulate digit forces and placement. Thus, unconstrained digit placement might be modulated on initial trials (since it is an explicit process), but not forces (since it is an implicit process). We tested whether shape and density cues would differentially influence anticipatory planning of digit placement and forces during initial trials of a two-digit object manipulation task. Furthermore, we tested whether shape cues would override density cues when cues are incongruent. Subjects grasped and lifted an object with the aim of preventing roll. In Experiment 1, the object was symmetrically shaped, but with asymmetrical density (incongruent cues). In Experiment 2, the object was asymmetrical in shape and density (congruent cues). In Experiment 3, the object was asymmetrically shaped, but with symmetrical density (incongruent cues). Results showed differential modulation of digit placement and forces (modulation of load force but not placement), but only when shape and density cues were congruent. When shape and density cues were incongruent, we found collinear digit placement and symmetrical force sharing. This suggests that congruent and incongruent shape and density cues differentially influence anticipatory planning of digit forces and placement. Furthermore, shape cues do not always override density cues. A continuum of visual cues, such as those alluding to shape and density, need to be integrated.

  11. Mismatch in working hours and affective commitment : Differential relationships for distinct employee groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, I.J. Hetty van; Sanders, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – This study examined the relationship between two types of mismatch (i.e. non-correspondence between preferred and actual number of hours), and affective commitment. It was argued that specific groups of employees, i.e. women and part-time working employees, attach more importance to their

  12. The Differential Effects of Labelling: How Do "Dyslexia" and "Reading Difficulties" Affect Teachers' Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Simon; Elliott, Julian

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a survey of primary school teachers' beliefs about working with poor readers. The primary research question was "does the way difficulties with reading are labelled affect the teachers' beliefs about their ability to intervene effectively?" An opportunity sample of teachers was surveyed using 2 questionnaires. One…

  13. Bad actions or bad outcomes? Differentiating affective contributions to the moral condemnation of harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan M; Hannikainen, Ivar A; Cushman, Fiery A

    2014-06-01

    Moral condemnation of harmful behavior is influenced by both cognitive and affective processes. However, despite much recent research, the proximate source of affect remains unclear. One obvious contender is empathy; simulating the victim's pain could lead one to judge an action as wrong ("outcome aversion"). An alternative, less obvious source is one's own aversion to performing the action itself ("action aversion"). To dissociate these alternatives, we developed a scale that assessed individual aversions to (a) witnessing others experience painful outcomes (e.g., seeing someone fall down stairs); and (b) performing actions that are harmless yet aversive (e.g., stabbing a fellow actor with a fake stage knife). Across 4 experiments, we found that moral condemnation of both first-person and third-party harmful behavior in the context of moral dilemmas is better predicted by one's aversion to action properties than by an affective response to victim suffering. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated both action aversion and the degree of expected suffering across a number of actions and found that both factors make large, independent contributions to moral judgment. Together, these results suggest we may judge others' actions by imagining what it would feel like to perform the action rather than experience the consequences of the action. Accordingly, they provide a counterpoint to a dominant but largely untested assumption that empathy is the key affective response governing moral judgments of harm.

  14. Heart Rate Variability – a Tool to Differentiate Positive and Negative Affective States in Pigs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The causal neurophysiological processes, such as autonomic nervous system activity, that mediate behavioral and physiological reactivity to an environment have largely been ignored. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a clinical diagnostic tool used to assess affective states (stressful and ple...

  15. Differential Effects of Cognitive, Affective, and Proprioceptive Instructional Approaches on Vocabulary Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Ula Price; Manzo, Anthony V.

    The effectiveness of three instructional approaches was investigated in a study of how best to facilitate vocabulary acquisition. The three approaches were (1) the cognitive approach, a method employing dictionary worksheets and patterned after the most commonly used method of teaching vocabulary; (2) the affective approach, which urged students…

  16. Contrasting macrobenthic activities differentially affect nematode density and diversity in a shallow subtidal marine sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeckman, U.; van Colen, C.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Vincx, M.; Vanaverbeke, J.

    2011-01-01

    By bioturbating and bio-irrigating the sea floor, macrobenthic organisms transport organic matter and oxygen from the surface to deeper layers, thereby extending the habitat suitable for smaller infauna. Next to these engineering activities, competition, disturbance and predation may also affect the

  17. Community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rice field soil as affected by nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Ke, Xiubin; Wu, Liqin; Lu, Yahai

    2009-02-01

    Little information is available on the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in flooded rice soils. Consequently, a microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on the composition of AOB and AOA communities in rice soil by using molecular analyses of ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) fragments. Experimental treatments included three levels of N (urea) fertilizer, i.e. 50, 100 and 150 mgNkg(-1) soil. Soil samples were operationally divided into four fractions: surface soil, bulk soil deep layer, rhizosphere and washed root material. NH(4)(+)-N was the dominant form of N in soil porewater and increased with N fertilization. Cloning and sequencing of amoA gene fragments showed that the AOB community in the rice soil consisted of three major groups, i.e. Nitrosomonas communis cluster, Nitrosospira cluster 3a and cluster 3b. The sequences related to Nitrosomonas were predominant. There was a clear effect of N fertilizer and soil depth on AOB community composition based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting. Nitrosomonas appeared to be more abundant in the potentially oxic or micro-oxic fractions, including surface soil, rhizosphere and washed root material, than the deep layer of anoxic bulk soil. Furthermore, Nitrosomonas increased relatively in the partially oxic fractions and that of Nitrosospira decreased with the increasing application of N fertilizer. However, AOA community composition remained unchanged according to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses.

  18. A new class of quorum quenching molecules from Staphylococcus species affects communication and growth of gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Yun Chu

    Full Text Available The knowledge that many pathogens rely on cell-to-cell communication mechanisms known as quorum sensing, opens a new disease control strategy: quorum quenching. Here we report on one of the rare examples where Gram-positive bacteria, the 'Staphylococcus intermedius group' of zoonotic pathogens, excrete two compounds in millimolar concentrations that suppress the quorum sensing signaling and inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of Gram-negative beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. These compounds were isolated from Staphylococcus delphini. They represent a new class of quorum quenchers with the chemical formula N-[2-(1H-indol-3-ylethyl]-urea and N-(2-phenethyl-urea, which we named yayurea A and B, respectively. In vitro studies with the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL responding receptor LuxN of V. harveyi indicated that both compounds caused opposite effects on phosphorylation to those caused by AHL. This explains the quorum quenching activity. Staphylococcal strains producing yayurea A and B clearly benefit from an increased competitiveness in a mixed community.

  19. Female attractiveness affects paternal investment: experimental evidence for male differential allocation in blue tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahr Katharina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential allocation hypothesis (DAH predicts that individuals should adjust their parental investment to their current mate’s quality. Although in principle the DAH holds for both sexes, male adjustment of parental investment has only been tested in a few experimental studies, revealing contradictory results. We conducted a field experiment to test whether male blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus allocate their parental effort in relation to female ornamentation (ultraviolet colouration of the crown, as predicted by the DAH. Results We reduced the UV reflectance in a sample of females and compared parental care by their mates with that of males paired to sham-manipulated control females. As predicted by the DAH our results demonstrate that males paired with UV-reduced females invested less in feeding effort but did not defend the chicks less than males paired with control females. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies providing support for male differential allocation in response to female ornamentation.

  20. Activation of nucleus accumbens NMDA receptors differentially affects appetitive or aversive taste learning and memory

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    Luis eNuñez-Jaramillo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Taste memory depends on motivational and post-ingestional consequences; thus, it can be aversive (e.g., conditioned taste aversion, CTA if a novel, palatable taste is paired with visceral malaise, or it can be appetitive if no intoxication appears after novel taste consumption, and a taste preference is developed. The nucleus accumbens (NAc plays a role in hedonic reactivity to taste stimuli, and recent findings suggest that reward and aversion are differentially encoded by the activity of NAc neurons. The present study examined whether the requirement for NMDA receptors in the NAc core during rewarding appetitive taste learning differs from that during aversive taste conditioning, as well as during retrieval of appetitive versus aversive taste memory, using the taste preference or CTA model, respectively. Bilateral infusions of NMDA (1 μg/μl, 0.5 μl into the NAc core were performed before acquisition or before retrieval of taste preference or CTA. Activation of NMDA receptors before taste preference training or CTA acquisition did not alter memory formation. Furthermore, NMDA injections before aversive taste retrieval had no effect on taste memory; however, 24 h later, CTA extinction was significantly delayed. Also, NMDA injections, made before familiar appetitive memory retrieval, interrupted the development of taste preference and produced a preference delay 24 h later. These results suggest that memory formation for a novel taste produces neurochemical changes in the NAc core that have differential requirements for NMDA receptors during retrieval of appetitive or aversive memory.

  1. Mainstream smoke and sidestream smoke affect the cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells discriminately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Zhou, Ren; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-05-16

    Epidemiology studies suggest that maternal smoking and passive smoking have strongly resulted in the occurrence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in offspring. Cigarette smoke (CS) can be divided into mainstream smoke (MS) and sidestream smoke (SS); CS chemistry study indicates that significant differences exist in the composition of MS and SS. Therefore, MS and SS were suspected to process toxicity dissimilarly. However, much less was known about the difference in the developmental effects induced by MS and SS. In the current study, heart development was mimicked by mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation. After MS and SS exposure, by tracing the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-Smad4 signalling pathway, interruption of downstream gene expression was observed, including Gata4, Mef2c and Nkx2.5, as well as myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain. Specifically, SS caused inhibition of Gata4 expression, even at non-cytotoxic concentration. Further, SS-induced hypoacetylation in promoter regions of Gata4 reflected the orchestration of CS-gene modulation-epigenetic regulation. Even though SS induced apoptosis in ESC-derived cardiomyocytes, the partial clearance in cells with down-regulated Gata4 caused these cells to survive and undergo further differentiation, which laid potential risk for abnormal heart development. These data uncovered the difference between MS and SS on heart development preliminarily.

  2. Demographic, socio-economic, and cultural factors affecting fertility differentials in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari Ramesh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditionally Nepalese society favors high fertility. Children are a symbol of well-being both socially and economically. Although fertility has been decreasing in Nepal since 1981, it is still high compared to many other developing countries. This paper is an attempt to examine the demographic, socio-economic, and cultural factors for fertility differentials in Nepal. Methods This paper has used data from the Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS 2006. The analysis is confined to ever married women of reproductive age (8,644. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses have been performed to describe the fertility differentials. The bivariate analysis (one-way ANOVA was applied to examine the association between children ever born and women's demographic, socio-economic, and cultural characteristics. Besides bivariate analysis, the net effect of each independent variable on the dependent variable after controlling for the effect of other predictors has also been measured through multivariate analysis (multiple linear regressions. Results The mean numbers of children ever born (CEB among married Nepali women of reproductive age and among women aged 40-49 were three and five children, respectively. There are considerable differentials in the average number of children ever born according to women's demographic, socio-economic, and cultural settings. Regression analysis revealed that age at first marriage, perceived ideal number of children, place of residence, literacy status, religion, mass media exposure, use of family planning methods, household headship, and experience of child death were the most important variables that explained the variance in fertility. Women who considered a higher number of children as ideal (β = 0.03; p Conclusion The average number of children ever born is high among women in Nepal. There are many contributing factors for the high fertility, among which are age at first marriage, perceived ideal

  3. Acute stress differentially affects spatial configuration learning in high and low cortisol-responding healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Thomas; Smeets, Tom; Giesbrecht, Timo; Quaedflieg, Conny W. E. M.; Merchelbach, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress and stress hormones modulate memory formation in various ways that are relevant to our understanding of stress-related psychopathology, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Particular relevance is attributed to efficient memory formation sustained by the hippocampus and parahippocampus. This process is thought to reduce the occurrence of intrusions and flashbacks following trauma, but may be negatively affected by acute stress. Moreover, recent evidence suggests th...

  4. Storage at low temperature differentially affects the colour and carotenoid composition of two cultivars of banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facundo, Heliofabia Virginia De Vasconcelos; Gurak, Poliana Deyse; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2015-03-01

    Different storage conditions can induce changes in the colour and carotenoid profiles and levels in some fruits. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of low temperature storage on the colour and carotenoid synthesis in two banana cultivars: Prata and Nanicão. For this purpose, the carotenoids from the banana pulp were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS, and the colour of the banana skin was determined by a colorimeter method. Ten carotenoids were identified, of which the major carotenoids were all-trans-lutein, all-trans-α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene in both cultivars. The effect of the low temperatures was subjected to linear regression analysis. In cv. Prata, all-trans-α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene were significantly affected by low temperature (p0.05). The accumulation of carotenoids in this group may be because the metabolic pathways using these carotenoids were affected by storage at low temperatures. The colour of the fruits was not negatively affected by the low temperatures (p>0.05).

  5. How dietary arachidonic- and docosahexaenoic- acid rich oils differentially affect the murine hepatic transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Matthew A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Herein, we expand our previous work on the effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA on the murine hepatic transcriptome using novel statistical and bioinformatic approaches for evaluating microarray data. The analyses focuses on key differences in the transcriptomic response that will influence metabolism following consumption of FUNG (rich in 20:4n6, FISH (rich in 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 and COMB, the combination of the two. Results Using a variance-stabilized F-statistic, 371 probe sets (out of 13 K probe sets in the Affymetrix Mu11K chip set were changed by dietary treatment (P Conclusion Distinct transcriptomic, signaling cascades, and predicted affects on murine liver metabolism have been elucidated for 20:4n6-rich dietary oils, 22:6n3-rich oils, and a surprisingly distinct set of genes were affected by the combination of the two. Our results emphasize that the balance of dietary n6 and n3 LC-PUFA provided for infants and in nutritional and neutraceutical applications could have profoundly different affects on metabolism and cell signaling, beyond that previously recognized.

  6. Differential effects of single-dose escitalopram on cognitive and affective interference during Stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Gustaf Rahm

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Our aim was to study the regulatory role of serotonin (5-HT on two key nodes in the cognitive control networks - the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. We hypothesized that increasing the levels of 5-HT would preferentially modulate the activity in ACC during cognitive control during interference by negative affects compared to cognitive control during interference by a superimposed cognitive task. Methods: We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation on 11 healthy individuals, comparing the effects of the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram on brain oxygenation level dependent signals in the ACC and the DLPFC using affective and cognitive counting Stroop paradigms (aStroop and cStroop. Results: Escitalopram significantly decreased the activity in rostral ACC during aStroop compared to cStroop (p< 0.05. In the absence of escitalopram, both aStroop and cStroop significantly activated ACC and DLPFC (Z≥2.3, p< 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that escitalopram in a region and task specific manner modified the cognitive control networks and preferentially decreased activity induced by affective interference in the ACC.

  7. Estrogen Receptor β Agonists Differentially Affect the Growth of Human Melanoma Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Marzagalli

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive malignancy; its incidence is increasing worldwide and its prognosis remains poor. Clinical observations indicate that estrogen receptor β (ERβ is expressed in melanoma tissues and its expression decreases with tumor progression, suggesting its tumor suppressive function. These experiments were performed to investigate the effects of ERβ activation on melanoma cell growth.Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Cell proliferation was assessed by counting the cells by hemocytometer. ERβ transcriptional activity was evaluated by gene reporter assay. Global DNA methylation was analyzed by restriction enzyme assay and ERβ isoforms were identified by qRT-PCR. We demonstrated that ERβ is expressed in a panel of human melanoma cell lines (BLM, WM115, A375, WM1552. In BLM (NRAS-mutant cells, ERβ agonists significantly and specifically inhibited cell proliferation. ERβ activation triggered its cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of ERβ agonists was associated with an altered expression of G1-S transition-related proteins. In these cells, global DNA was found to be hypomethylated when compared to normal melanocytes; this DNA hypomethylation status was reverted by ERβ activation. ERβ agonists also decreased the proliferation of WM115 (BRAF V600D-mutant cells, while they failed to reduce the growth of A375 and WM1552 (BRAF V600E-mutant cells. Finally, we could observe that ERβ isoforms are expressed at different levels in the various cell lines. Specific oncogenic mutations or differential expression of receptor isoforms might be responsible for the different responses of cell lines to ERβ agonists.Our results demonstrate that ERβ is expressed in melanoma cell lines and that ERβ agonists differentially regulate the proliferation of these cells. These data confirm the notion that melanoma is a

  8. Sorghum and wheat differentially affect caecal microbiota and associated performance characteristics of meat chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Mark S.; Hughes, Robert J.; Moore, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the effects of wheat- and sorghum-based diets on broiler chickens. The growth performance and caecal microbial community of chickens were measured and correlations between productivity and specific gut microbes were observed. Cobb broilers 15 days of age were individually caged and two dietary treatments were used, one with a wheat-based diet (n = 48) and another one with a sorghum-based diet (n = 48). Growth performance measurements were taken over a 10 day period and samples for microbiota analysis were taken at the end of that period. Caecal microbiota was characterised by sequencing of 16S bacterial rRNA gene amplicons. Overall, the results indicated that a sorghum-based diet produced higher apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and body-weight gain (BWG) values in chickens, compared to a wheat-based diet. Nevertheless, sorghum-fed birds had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) values than wheat-fed birds, possibly because of some anti-nutritional factors in sorghum. Further analyses showed that caecal microbial community was significantly associated with AME values, but microbiota composition differed between dietary treatments. A number of bacteria were individually correlated with growth performance measurements. Numerous OTUs assigned to strains of Lactobacillus crispatus and Lachnospiraceae, which were prevalent in sorghum-fed chickens, were correlated with high AME and BWG values, respectively. Additionally, a number of OTUs assigned to Clostridiales that were prevalent in wheat-fed chickens were correlated with low FCR values. Overall, these results suggest that between-diet variations in growth performance were partly associated with changes in the caecal microbiota. PMID:28286717

  9. Environmental phosphate differentially affects virulence phenotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates causative of prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo-Puertas, M; Martínez-Zamora, MG; Rintoul, MR; Soto, SM; Rapisarda, VA

    2015-01-01

    K-12 Escherichia coli cells grown in static media containing a critical phosphate (Pi) concentration ≥25 mM maintained a high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase, impairing biofilm formation, a phenomenon that is triggered by polyP degradation. Pi concentration in human urine fluctuates according to health state. Here, the influence of environmental Pi concentration on the occurrence of virulence traits in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolated from acute prostatitis patients was evaluated. After a first screening, 3 isolates were selected according to differential biofilm formation profiles depending on media Pi concentration. For each isolate, biofilm positive and negative conditions were established. Regardless of the isolate, biofilm formation capacity was accompanied with curli and cellulose production and expression of some key virulence factors associated with adhesion. When the selected isolates were grown in their non-biofilm-forming condition, low concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin induced biofilm formation. Interestingly, similar to laboratory strains, polyP degradation induced biofilm formation in the selected isolates. Data demonstrated the complexity of UPEC responses to environmental Pi and the importance of polyP metabolism in the virulence of clinical isolates. PMID:26083279

  10. MicroRNA-199a-5p Affects Porcine Preadipocyte Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-E Shi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs, have emerged as novel and potent regulators of adipogenesis. However, few miRNAs have been fully investigated in porcine adipogenesis, given the fact that pig is not only an apropos model of human obesity research, but also a staple meat source of human diet. In this study, we showed that miRNA-199a-5p is highly expressed in porcine subcutaneous fat deposits compared to several other tissue types and organs measured alongside. Overexpression of miR-199a-5p in porcine preadipocytes significantly promoted cell proliferation while attenuating the lipid deposition in porcine adipocytes. By target gene prediction and experimental validation, we demonstrated that caveolin-1 (Cav-1 may be a bona fide target of miR-199a-5p in porcine adipocytes, accounting for some of miR-199a-5p’s functions. Taken together, our data established a role of miR-199a-5p in porcine preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation, which is at least partially played by downregulating Cav-1.

  11. The thiol compounds glutathione and homoglutathione differentially affect cell development in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Taras; Asard, Han; Potters, Geert; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important scavenger of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), precursor of metal chelating phytochelatins, xenobiotic defence compound and regulator of cell proliferation. Homoglutathione (hGSH) is a GSH homologue that is present in several taxa in the family of Fabaceae. It is thought that hGSH performs many of the stress-defence roles typically ascribed to GSH, yet little is known about the potential involvement of hGSH in controlling cell proliferation. Here we show that hGSH/GSH ratios vary across organs and cells and that these changes in hGSH/GSH ratio occur during dedifferentiation and/or cell cycle activation events. The use of a GSH/hGSH biosynthesis inhibitor resulted in impaired cytokinesis in isolated protoplasts, showing the critical importance of these thiol-compounds for cell division. However, exposure of isolated protoplasts to exogenous GSH accelerated cytokinesis, while exogenous hGSH was found to inhibit the same process. We conclude that GSH and hGSH have distinct functional roles in cell cycle regulation in Medicago sativa L. GSH is associated with meristemic cells, and promotes cell cycle activation and induction of somatic embryogenesis, while hGSH is associated with differentiated cells and embryo proliferation.

  12. Platinum-Based Drugs Differentially Affect the Ultrastructure of Breast Cancer Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adawi, Kawther; Al-Nabhani, Abdurahman; Al-Kindi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although platinum-based drugs (PBDs) are effective anticancer agents, responsive patients eventually become resistant. While resistance of some cancers to PBDs has been explored, the cellular responses of BC cells are not studied yet. Therefore, we aim to assess the differential effects of PBDs on BC ultrastructure. Three representative cells were treated with different concentrations and timing of Cisplatin, Carboplatin, and Oxaliplatin. Changes on cell surface and ultrastructure were detected by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In SEM, control cells were semiflattened containing microvilli with extending lamellipodia while treated ones were round with irregular surface and several pores, indicating drug entry. Prolonged treatment resembled distinct apoptotic features such as shrinkage, membrane blebs, and narrowing of lamellipodia with blunt microvilli. TEM detected PBDs' deposits that scattered among cellular organelles inducing structural distortion, lumen swelling, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. Deposits were attracted to fat droplets, explained by drug hydrophobic properties, while later they were located close to cell membrane, suggesting drug efflux. Phagosomes with destructed organelles and deposits were detected as defending mechanism. Understanding BC cells response to PBDs might provide new insight for an effective treatment.

  13. Differential Muscle Involvement in Mice and Humans Affected by McArdle Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L;

    2016-01-01

    , variations in fiber size, vacuoles, and some internal nuclei associated with cytosolic glycogen accumulation and ongoing regeneration; structural damage was seen only in a minority of human patients. Neither liver nor brain isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase were upregulated in muscles, thus providing...... no substitution for the missing muscle isoform. In the mice, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were invariably more damaged than the quadriceps muscles. This may relate to a 7-fold higher level of myophosphorylase in TA compared to quadriceps in wild-type mice and suggests higher glucose turnover in the TA. Thus......McArdle disease (muscle glycogenosis type V) is caused by myophosphorylase deficiency, which leads to impaired glycogen breakdown. We investigated how myophosphorylase deficiency affects muscle physiology, morphology, and glucose metabolism in 20-week-old McArdle mice and compared the findings...

  14. Daytime and nighttime wind differentially affects hydraulic properties and thigmomorphogenic response of poplar saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Wan, Xianchong; Lieffers, Victor J

    2016-05-01

    This study tested how wind in daytime and nighttime affects hydraulic properties and thigmomorphogenic response of poplar saplings. It shows that wind in daytime interrupted water balance of poplar plants by aggravating cavitation in the stem xylem under high xylem tension in the daytime, reducing water potential in midday and hence reducing gas exchange, including stomatal conductance and CO2 assimilation. The wind blowing in daytime significantly reduced plant growth, including height, diameter, leaf size, leaf area, root and whole biomass, whereas wind blowing in nighttime only caused a reduction in radial and height growth at the early stage compared with the control but decreased height:diameter ratios. In summary, the interaction between wind loading and xylem tension exerted a negative impact on water balance, gas exchanges and growth of poplar plants, and wind in nighttime caused only a small thigmomorphogenic response.

  15. Ozone Differentially Affects Perception of Plant Volatiles in Western Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötterl, Stefan; Vater, Marina; Rupp, Thomas; Held, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Floral scents play a key role in mediating plant-pollinator interactions. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by flowers are used by flower visitors as olfactory cues to locate flowers, both from a distance and at close range. More recently it has been demonstrated that reactive molecules such as ozone can modify or degrade VOCs, and this may impair the communication between plants and their pollinators. However, it is not known whether such reactive molecules also may affect the olfactory system of pollinators, and thus not only influence signal transmission but perception of the signal. In this study, we used electroantennographic measurements to determine the effect of increased levels of ozone on antennal responses in western honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Linalool and 2-phenylethanol, both known to be involved in location of flowers by the bees, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, a widespread green leaf volatile also detected by bees, were used. The results showed that ozone affected antennal responses to the different substances differently. Ozone decreased antennal responses to (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, whereas responses to linalool and 2-phenylethanol were not influenced by ozone. Overall, the study does not provide evidence that pollination by honey bees is impaired by damage in the olfactory system of the bees caused by increased levels of ozone, at least when linalool and 2-phenylethanol are the attractive signals. However, the results also suggest that ozone can change the overall perception of an odor blend. This might have negative effects in pollination systems and other organismic interactions mediated by specific ratios of compounds.

  16. Postnatal Hyperoxia Exposure Differentially Affects Hepatocytes and Liver Haemopoietic Cells in Newborn Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Guya Diletta; Zara, Susi; De Colli, Marianna; Di Valerio, Valentina; Rapino, Monica; Zaramella, Patrizia; Dedja, Arben; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele; Porzionato, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Premature newborns are frequently exposed to hyperoxic conditions and experimental data indicate modulation of liver metabolism by hyperoxia in the first postnatal period. Conversely, nothing is known about possible modulation of growth factors and signaling molecules involved in other hyperoxic responses and no data are available about the effects of hyperoxia in postnatal liver haematopoiesis. The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of hyperoxia in the liver tissue (hepatocytes and haemopoietic cells) and to investigate possible changes in the expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α), endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), and Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB). Experimental design of the study involved exposure of newborn rats to room air (controls), 60% O2 (moderate hyperoxia), or 95% O2 (severe hyperoxia) for the first two postnatal weeks. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed. Severe hyperoxia increased hepatocyte apoptosis and MMP-9 expression and decreased VEGF expression. Reduced content in reticular fibers was found in moderate and severe hyperoxia. Some other changes were specifically produced in hepatocytes by moderate hyperoxia, i.e., upregulation of HIF-1α and downregulation of eNOS and NF-kB. Postnatal severe hyperoxia exposure increased liver haemopoiesis and upregulated the expression of VEGF (both moderate and severe hyperoxia) and eNOS (severe hyperoxia) in haemopoietic cells. In conclusion, our study showed different effects of hyperoxia on hepatocytes and haemopoietic cells and differential involvement of the above factors. The involvement of VEGF and eNOS in the liver haemopoietic response to hyperoxia may be hypothesized. PMID:25115881

  17. GHB differentially affects morphine actions on motor activity and social behaviours in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, C; Rodriíuez-Arias, M; Aguilar, M A; Miñarro, J

    2003-09-01

    There are several reports suggesting that gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) influences the endogenous opioid system. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of GHB on motor and social activities and to examine its influence on morphine's actions on these behaviours. In a first experiment, several doses of GHB were studied but only the highest (200 and 400 mg/kg) produced a decrease in spontaneous motor activity measured in an actimeter cage. When hyperactivity induced by injecting 50 mg/kg of morphine was evaluated, all the GHB doses efficiently counteracted this morphine action. Using the paradigm of isolation-induced aggression, administration of 200 mg/kg of GHB significantly decreased threat and attack without impairing motor activity and, in addition, increased time spent in social contact. GHB increased morphine's suppression of threat or nonsocial exploratory behaviours. In conclusion, the interaction between GHB and the opioid systems was confirmed, with the drug having an additive effect on morphine-affected social behaviours but counteracting morphine-induced increases in motor activity.

  18. Morphogenesis in Mucor mucedo: mutations affecting gamone response and organ differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, T; Jockusch, H

    1978-02-27

    Mutants of Mucor mucedo minus strain that are affected in their trisporic acid (TA) mediated zygophore formation have been isolated. We have found mutants with cold sensitive (cs), with temperature sensitive (ts) and without zygophore formation as well as mutants with unstable zygophores (Zst-). From the appearence of certain pleiotropic phenotypes we deduce a one-dimensional sequence of states of competence of the mycelium to form different organs. TA appears to be a growth substance for zygophores acting on one transient state of competence. The fact that all isolates with lowered response to TA also have a lowered response to the mating type specific TA-precursor P strongly suggests that P has to be converted into TA before inducing zygophore growth. Furthermore, one mutant with lowered sensitivity to TA exhibits an excess zygophore formation in the presence of high TA-concentrations, while high concentrations of P cause a depressed zygophore formation (Fig. 6). Our interpretation of this behaviour is that P acts as an antagonist to TA in the regulation of zygophore growth.

  19. Ageing differentially affects neural processing of different conflict types – an fMRI study

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    Margarethe eKorsch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference control and conflict resolution is affected by ageing. There is increasing evidence that ageing does not compromise interference control in general but rather shows distinctive effects on different components of interference control. Different conflict types, (e.g. stimulus-stimulus (S-S or stimulus-response (S-R conflicts trigger different cognitive processes and thus activate different neural networks. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we used a combined Flanker and Stimulus Response Conflict (SRC task to investigate the effect of ageing on S-S and S-R conflicts. Behavioral data analysis revealed larger SRC effects in elderly. fMRI Results show that both age groups recruited similar regions (caudate nucleus, cingulate gyrus and middle occipital gyrus during Flanker conflict processing. Furthermore, elderly show an additional activation pattern in parietal and frontal areas. In contrast, no common activation of both age groups was found in response to the SRC. These data suggest that ageing has distinctive effects on S-S and S-R conflicts.

  20. Schistosomiasis differentially affects vasoconstrictor responses: up-regulation of 5-HT receptor-mediated aorta contraction

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    Suellen D'Arc dos Santos Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, classified by the World Health Organization as a neglected tropical disease, is an intravascular parasitic disease associated to a chronic inflammatory state. Evidence implicating inflammation in vascular dysfunction continues to mount, which, broadly defined, reflects a failure in the control of intracellular Ca2+ and consequently, vascular contraction. Therefore, we measured aorta contraction induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and endothelin-1 (ET-1, two important regulators of vascular contraction. Isometric aortic contractions were determined in control and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice. In the infected animals, 5-HT induced a 50% higher contraction in relation to controls and we also observed an increased contraction in response to Ca2+ mobilisation from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Nevertheless, Rho kinase inhibition reduced the contraction in response to 5-HT equally in both groups, discarding an increase of the contractile machinery sensitivity to Ca2+. Furthermore, no alteration was observed for contractions induced by ET-1 in both groups. Our data suggest that an immune-vascular interaction occurs in schistosomiasis, altering vascular contraction outside the mesenteric portal system. More importantly, it affects distinct intracellular signalling involved in aorta contraction, in this case increasing 5-HT receptor signalling.

  1. Field establishment and grain yield of maize affected by hydro-priming of differentially aged seeds

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    Kazem Ghassemi-Golezani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A sub-sample of maize seeds (cv. SC-AR68 with a 100% germination was kept as control, and two other sub-samples were artificially deteriorated at 40 °C for 2 and 3 days, reducing normal germination to 98% and 93%, respectively. Consequently, three seed lots of maize with different levels of vigor were provided. Each seed lot was then divided into four sub-samples, one unprimed and the other three lots were primed in distilled water at 15 °C for 7, 14 and 21 hours, and then dried back to initial moisture content (about 20% at a room temperature of 20–22 °C for 24 hours. The field experiment was arranged as factorial based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Although germination percentage of seed lots was not significantly affected by hydro-priming, germination rate and seedling dry weight were considerably enhanced as a result of seed priming. Hydro-priming for 21 hours enhanced seedling emergence rate of all seed lots with different levels of vigor. This hydro-priming duration also increased grain yield of maize by about 32%, although this superiority was not statistically significant. This advantage in grain yield of plants from primed seeds was related with rapid germination and seedling growth and early emergence in the field.

  2. The diageotropica gene differentially affects auxin and cytokinin responses throughout development in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, C; Lomax, T L

    1998-05-01

    The interactions between the plant hormones auxin and cytokinin throughout plant development are complex, and genetic investigations of the interdependency of auxin and cytokinin signaling have been limited. We have characterized the cytokinin sensitivity of the auxin-resistant diageotropica (dgt) mutant of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) in a range of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated responses. Intact, etiolated dgt seedlings showed cross-resistance to cytokinin with respect to root elongation, but cytokinin effects on hypocotyl growth and ethylene synthesis in these seedlings were not impaired by the dgt mutation. Seven-week-old, green wild-type and dgt plants were also equally sensitive to cytokinin with respect to shoot growth and hypocotyl and internode elongation. The effects of cytokinin and the dgt mutation on these processes appeared additive. In tissue culture organ regeneration from dgt hypocotyl explants showed reduced sensitivity to auxin but normal sensitivity to cytokinin, and the effects of cytokinin and the mutation were again additive. However, although callus induction from dgt hypocotyl explants required auxin and cytokinin, dgt calli did not show the typical concentration-dependent stimulation of growth by either auxin or cytokinin observed in wild-type cells. Cross-resistance of the dgt mutant to cytokinin thus was found to be limited to a small subset of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated growth processes affected by the dgt mutation, indicating that auxin and cytokinin regulate plant growth through both shared and separate signaling pathways.

  3. Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Harini C; Noakes, Eric J; Lyons, Lisa C

    2016-10-01

    The induction, formation and maintenance of memory represent dynamic processes modulated by multiple factors including the circadian clock and sleep. Chronic sleep restriction has become common in modern society due to occupational and social demands. Given the impact of cognitive impairments associated with sleep deprivation, there is a vital need for a simple animal model in which to study the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, with its simple nervous system, nocturnal sleep pattern and well-characterized learning paradigms, to assess the effects of two chronic sleep restriction paradigms on short-term (STM) and long-term (LTM) associative memory. The effects of sleep deprivation on memory were evaluated using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible, in which the animal associates a specific netted seaweed with failed swallowing attempts. We found that two nights of 6h sleep deprivation occurring during the first or last half of the night inhibited both STM and LTM. Moreover, the impairment in STM persisted for more than 24h. A milder, prolonged sleep deprivation paradigm consisting of 3 consecutive nights of 4h sleep deprivation also blocked STM, but had no effect on LTM. These experiments highlight differences in the sensitivity of STM and LTM to chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, these results establish Aplysia as a valid model for studying the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and associative memory paving the way for future studies delineating the mechanisms through which sleep restriction affects memory formation.

  4. Vanillin differentially affects azoxymethane-injected rat colon carcinogenesis and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ket Li; Chong, Pei Pei; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-12-01

    Vanillin is the substance responsible for the flavor and smell of vanilla, a widely used flavoring agent. Previous studies reported that vanillin is a good antimutagen and anticarcinogen. However, there are also some contradicting findings showing that vanillin was a comutagen and cocarcinogen. This study investigated whether vanillin is an anticarcinogen or a cocarcinogen in rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Rats induced with AOM will develop aberrant crypt foci (ACF). AOM-challenged rats were treated with vanillin orally and intraperitoneally at low and high concentrations and ACF density, multiplicity, and distribution were observed. The gene expression of 14 colorectal cancer-related genes was also studied. Results showed that vanillin consumed orally had no effect on ACF. However, high concentrations (300 mg/kg body weight) of vanillin administered through intraperitoneal injection could increase ACF density and ACF multiplicity. ACF were mainly found in the distal colon rather than in the mid-section and proximal colon. The expression of colorectal cancer biomarkers, protooncogenes, recombinational repair, mismatch repair, and cell cycle arrest, and tumor suppressor gene expression were also affected by vanillin. Vanillin was not cocarcinogenic when consumed orally. However, it was cocarcinogenic when being administered intraperitoneally at high concentration. Hence, the use of vanillin in food should be safe but might have cocarcinogenic potential when it is used in high concentration for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Thermal processing differentially affects lycopene and other carotenoids in cis-lycopene containing, tangerine tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperstone, Jessica L; Francis, David M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2016-11-01

    Tangerine tomatoes, unlike red tomatoes, accumulate cis-lycopenes instead of the all-trans isomer. cis-Lycopene is the predominating isomeric form of lycopene found in blood and tissues. Our objective was to understand how thermal processing and lipid concentration affect carotenoid isomerisation and degradation in tangerine tomatoes. We conducted duplicated factorial designed experiments producing tangerine tomato juice and sauce, varying both processing time and lipid concentration. Carotenoids were extracted and analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. Phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, tetra-cis-lycopene, all-trans-lycopene and other-cis-lycopenes were quantified. Tetra-cis-lycopene decreased with increasing heating time and reached 80% of the original level in sauce after processing times of 180min. All-trans-lycopene and other-cis-lycopenes increased with longer processing times. Total carotenoids and total lycopene decreased with increased heating times while phytoene and phytofluene were unchanged. These data suggest limiting thermal processing of tangerine tomato products if delivery of tetra-cis-lycopene is desirable.

  6. Brivaracetam Differentially Affects Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents Without Impairing Sustained Repetitive Firing in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; André, Véronique Marie; Leclère, Nathalie; Hanon, Etienne; Ghisdal, Philippe; Wolff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Brivaracetam (BRV) is an antiepileptic drug in Phase III clinical development. BRV binds to synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) protein and is also suggested to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). To evaluate whether the effect of BRV on VGSCs represents a relevant mechanism participating in its antiepileptic properties, we explored the pharmacology of BRV on VGSCs in different cell systems and tested its efficacy at reducing the sustained repetitive firing (SRF). Methods Brivaracetam investigations on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) were performed in N1E-155 neuroblastoma cells, cultured rat cortical neurons, and adult mouse CA1 neurons. SRF was measured in cultured cortical neurons and in CA1 neurons. All BRV (100–300 μM) experiments were performed in comparison with 100 μM carbamazepine (CBZ). Results Brivaracetam and CBZ reduced INa in N1E-115 cells (30% and 40%, respectively) and primary cortical neurons (21% and 47%, respectively) by modulating the fast-inactivated state of VGSCs. BRV, in contrast to CBZ, did not affect INa in CA1 neurons and SRF in cortical and CA1 neurons. CBZ consistently inhibited neuronal SRF by 75–93%. Conclusions The lack of effect of BRV on SRF in neurons suggests that the reported inhibition of BRV on VGSC currents does not contribute to its antiepileptic properties. PMID:25444522

  7. Differential effects of acute and regular physical exercise on cognition and affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, M E; Davis, F C; Vantieghem, M R; Whalen, P J; Bucci, D J

    2012-07-26

    The effects of regular exercise versus a single bout of exercise on cognition, anxiety, and mood were systematically examined in healthy, sedentary young adults who were genotyped to determine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) allelic status (i.e., Val-Val or Val66Met polymorphism). Participants were evaluated on novel object recognition (NOR) memory and a battery of mental health surveys before and after engaging in either (a) a 4-week exercise program, with exercise on the final test day, (b) a 4-week exercise program, without exercise on the final test day, (c) a single bout of exercise on the final test day, or (d) remaining sedentary between test days. Exercise enhanced object recognition memory and produced a beneficial decrease in perceived stress, but only in participants who exercised for 4 weeks including the final day of testing. In contrast, a single bout of exercise did not affect recognition memory and resulted in increased perceived stress levels. An additional novel finding was that the improvements on the NOR task were observed exclusively in participants who were homozygous for the BDNF Val allele, indicating that altered activity-dependent release of BDNF in Met allele carriers may attenuate the cognitive benefits of exercise. Importantly, exercise-induced changes in cognition were not correlated with changes in mood/anxiety, suggesting that separate neural systems mediate these effects. These data in humans mirror recent data from our group in rodents. Taken together, these current findings provide new insights into the behavioral and neural mechanisms that mediate the effects of physical exercise on memory and mental health in humans.

  8. Acute stress differentially affects spatial configuration learning in high and low cortisol-responding healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Meyer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress and stress hormones modulate memory formation in various ways that are relevant to our understanding of stress-related psychopathology, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Particular relevance is attributed to efficient memory formation sustained by the hippocampus and parahippocampus. This process is thought to reduce the occurrence of intrusions and flashbacks following trauma, but may be negatively affected by acute stress. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that the efficiency of visuo-spatial processing and learning based on the hippocampal area is related to PTSD symptoms. Objective: The current study investigated the effect of acute stress on spatial configuration learning using a spatial contextual cueing task (SCCT known to heavily rely on structures in the parahippocampus. Method: Acute stress was induced by subjecting participants (N = 34 to the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST. Following a counterbalanced within-subject approach, the effects of stress and the ensuing hormonal (i.e., cortisol activity on subsequent SCCT performance were compared to SCCT performance following a no-stress control condition. Results: Acute stress did not impact SCCT learning overall, but opposing effects emerged for high versus low cortisol responders to the MAST. Learning scores following stress were reduced in low cortisol responders, while high cortisol-responding participants showed improved learning. Conclusions: The effects of stress on spatial configuration learning were moderated by the magnitude of endogenous cortisol secretion. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which cortisol responses serve an adaptive function during stress and trauma, and this may prove to be a promising route for future research in this area.

  9. Anabolic androgenic steroids differentially affect social behaviors in adolescent and adult male Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Ramirez, Kaliris Y; Montalto, Pamela R; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2008-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone used by over half a million adolescents in the United States for their tissue-building potency and performance-enhancing effects. AAS also affect behavior, including reports of heightened aggression and changes in sexual libido. The expression of sexual and aggressive behaviors is a function of complex interactions among hormones, social context, and the brain, which is extensively remodeled during adolescence. Thus, AAS may have different consequences on behavior during adolescence and adulthood. Using a rodent model, these studies directly compared the effects of AAS on the expression of male sexual and aggressive behaviors in adolescents and adults. Male Syrian hamsters were injected daily for 14 days with either vehicle or an AAS cocktail containing testosterone cypionate (2 mg/kg), nandrolone decanoate (2 mg/kg), and boldenone undecylenate (1 mg/kg), either during adolescence (27-41 days of age) or in adulthood (63-77 days of age). The day after the last injection, males were tested for either sexual behavior with a receptive female or agonistic behavior with a male intruder. Adolescent males treated with AAS showed significant increases in sexual and aggressive behaviors relative to vehicle-treated adolescents. In contrast, AAS-treated adults showed significantly lower levels of sexual behavior compared with vehicle-treated adults and did not show heightened aggression. Thus, adolescents, but not adults, displayed significantly higher behavioral responses to AAS, suggesting that the still-developing adolescent brain is more vulnerable than the adult brain to the adverse consequences of AAS on the nervous system and behavior.

  10. Postural threat differentially affects the feedforward and feedback components of the vestibular-evoked balance response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Callum J; Tersteeg, M C A; Reynolds, Raymond F; Loram, Ian D

    2013-10-01

    Circumstances may render the consequence of falling quite severe, thus maximising the motivation to control postural sway. This commonly occurs when exposed to height and may result from the interaction of many factors, including fear, arousal, sensory information and perception. Here, we examined human vestibular-evoked balance responses during exposure to a highly threatening postural context. Nine subjects stood with eyes closed on a narrow walkway elevated 3.85 m above ground level. This evoked an altered psycho-physiological state, demonstrated by a twofold increase in skin conductance. Balance responses were then evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation. The sway response, which comprised a whole-body lean in the direction of the edge of the walkway, was significantly and substantially attenuated after ~800 ms. This demonstrates that a strong reason to modify the balance control strategy was created and subjects were highly motivated to minimise sway. Despite this, the initial response remained unchanged. This suggests little effect on the feedforward settings of the nervous system responsible for coupling pure vestibular input to functional motor output. The much stronger, later effect can be attributed to an integration of balance-relevant sensory feedback once the body was in motion. These results demonstrate that the feedforward and feedback components of a vestibular-evoked balance response are differently affected by postural threat. Although a fear of falling has previously been linked with instability and even falling itself, our findings suggest that this relationship is not attributable to changes in the feedforward vestibular control of balance.

  11. Postlearning stress differentially affects memory for emotional gist and detail in naturally cycling women and women on hormonal contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Ahmed, Imran; Cahill, Larry

    2014-08-01

    Sex differences in emotional memory have received increasing interest over the past decade. However, to date, no work has explored how a postlearning stressor might modulate the influence of sex hormone status on memory for gist and peripheral detail in an emotional versus neutral context. Here, we tested 3 predictions. First, compared with naturally cycling (NC) women in the luteal phase, women on hormonal contraception (HC) would have significantly blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal reactivity to physical stress. Second, postlearning stress would enhance detail and gist memory from an emotional story in NC women, and finally, postlearning stress would not affect emotional memory for details or gist in HC women. Healthy NC and HC women viewed a brief, narrated story containing neutral or emotionally arousing elements. Immediately after, cold pressor stress (CPS) or a control procedure was administered. One week later, participants received a surprise free recall test for story elements. NC women exhibited significantly greater cortisol increases to CPS compared with HC women. NC women who viewed the emotional story and were administered CPS recalled the most peripheral details overall and more gist from the emotional compared with the neutral story. In HC women, however, the postlearning cortisol release did not affect memory for gist or peripheral details from the emotional or neutral story in any way. Additionally, NC and HC women performed similarly on measures of attention and arousal. These findings suggest that in women, postlearning stress differentially affects memory for emotional information depending on their hormonal contraceptive status.

  12. Differentiation of oral bacteria in in vitro cultures and human saliva by secondary electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregy, Lukas; Müggler, Annick R.; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; García-Gómez, Diego; Suter, Yannick; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Kohler, Malcolm; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-10-01

    The detection of bacterial-specific volatile metabolites may be a valuable tool to predict infection. Here we applied a real-time mass spectrometric technique to investigate differences in volatile metabolic profiles of oral bacteria that cause periodontitis. We coupled a secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) source to a commercial high-resolution mass spectrometer to interrogate the headspace from bacterial cultures and human saliva. We identified 120 potential markers characteristic for periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (n = 13), Porphyromonas gingivalis (n = 70), Tanerella forsythia (n = 30) and Treponema denticola (n = 7) in in vitro cultures. In a second proof-of-principle phase, we found 18 (P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola) of the 120 in vitro compounds in the saliva from a periodontitis patient with confirmed infection with P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola with enhanced ion intensity compared to two healthy controls. In conclusion, this method has the ability to identify individual metabolites of microbial pathogens in a complex medium such as saliva.

  13. Glutamine synthetase I-deficiency in Mesorhizobium loti differentially affects nodule development and activity in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungopast, Sirinapa; Thapanapongworakul, Pilunthana; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Van Dao, Tan; Asahi, Toshimasa; Tada, Kuninao; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Nomura, Mika

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of glutamine synthetase (GSI) activity in Mesorhizobium loti on the symbiosis between the host plant, Lotus japonicus, and the bacteroids. We used a signature-tagged mutant of M. loti (STM30) with a transposon inserted into the GSI (mll0343) gene. The L. japonicus plants inoculated with STM30 had significantly more nodules, and the occurrence of senesced nodules was much higher than in plants inoculated with the wild-type. The acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per nodule inoculated with STM30 was lowered compared to the control. Also, the concentration of chlorophyll, glutamine, and asparagine in leaves of STM30-infected plants was found to be reduced. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GSI deficiency in M. loti differentially affects legume-rhizobia symbiosis by modifying nodule development and metabolic processes.

  14. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G M; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Tijssen, Henk J; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Koenen, Hans J P M; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+)CD141(+)DC-SIGN(+) DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+) subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, migration of immature CD14(+) DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  15. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

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    Jelle J Lindenberg

    Full Text Available In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+CD141(+DC-SIGN(+ DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+ subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+ T cells, migration of immature CD14(+ DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  16. Melatonin-receptor-1-deficiency affects neurogenic differentiation factor immunoreaction in pancreatic islets and enteroendocrine cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalabi, Andree; Fischer, Claudia; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of neurons and in the control of energy balance and metabolism. It plays a key role in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is an important rhythmic endocrine signal within the circadian system of mammals and modulates insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. In the mouse pars tuberalis, NeuroD mRNA levels show day/night variation, which is independent of the molecular clock gene mPER1 but depends on the functional melatonin receptor 1 (MT1). So far, little is known about the effect of melatonin on NeuroD synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, NeuroD protein levels and cellular localization were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pancreatic islets and duodenal enteroendocrine cells of MT1- and mPER1-deficienct mice. In addition, the localization of NeuroD-positive cells was analyzed by double-immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. In duodenal enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic islets of WT and PER1-deficient mice, NeuroD immunoreaction showed a peak during the early subjective night. In contrast, this peak was absent in MT1-deficent mice. These data suggest that melatonin, by acting on MT1 receptors, affects NeuroD expression in the gastrointestinal tract and thus might contribute to circadian regulation in metabolic functions.

  17. Family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence: a view from the Addiction Severity Index in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Nagisa; Haraguchi, Ayako; Ogai, Yasukazu; Senoo, Eiichi; Higuchi, Susumu; Umeno, Mitsuru; Aikawa, Yuzo; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the differential influence of family dysfunction on alcohol and methamphetamine dependence in Japan using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), a useful instrument that multilaterally measures the severity of substance dependence. The participants in this study were 321 male patients with alcohol dependence and 68 male patients with methamphetamine dependence. We conducted semi-structured interviews with each patient using the ASI, which is designed to assess problem severity in seven functional domains: Medical, Employment/Support, Alcohol use, Drug use, Legal, Family/Social relationships, and Psychiatric. In patients with alcohol dependence, bad relationships with parents, brothers and sisters, and friends in their lives were related to current severe psychiatric problems. Bad relationships with brothers and sisters and partners in their lives were related to current severe employment/support problems, and bad relationships with partners in their lives were related to current severe family/social problems. The current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of drug use and family/social problems in patients with alcohol dependence. Patients with methamphetamine dependence had difficulty developing good relationships with their father. Furthermore, the current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of medical, employment/support, and family/social problems in patients with methamphetamine dependence. The results of this study suggest that family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence. Additionally, family relationships may be particularly related to psychiatric problems in these patients, although the ASI was developed to independently evaluate each of seven problem areas.

  18. Differential responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to long-term fertilization in a New England salt marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Yando, Erik; Hildebrand, Erica; Dwyer, Courtney; Kearney, Anne; Waciega, Alex; Valiela, Ivan; Bernhard, Anne E

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), new questions have arisen about population and community dynamics and potential interactions between AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). We investigated the effects of long-term fertilization on AOA and AOB in the Great Sippewissett Marsh, Falmouth, MA, USA to address some of these questions. Sediment samples were collected from low and high marsh habitats in July 2009 from replicate plots that received low (LF), high (HF), and extra high (XF) levels of a mixed NPK fertilizer biweekly during the growing season since 1974. Additional untreated plots were included as controls (C). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the amoA genes revealed distinct shifts in AOB communities related to fertilization treatment, but the response patterns of AOA were less consistent. Four AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs) predictably and significantly responded to fertilization, but only one AOA OTU showed a significant pattern. Betaproteobacterial amoA gene sequences within the Nitrosospira-like cluster dominated at C and LF sites, while sequences related to Nitrosomonas spp. dominated at HF and XF sites. We identified some clusters of AOA sequences recovered primarily from high fertilization regimes, but other clusters consisted of sequences recovered from all fertilization treatments, suggesting greater physiological diversity. Surprisingly, fertilization appeared to have little impact on abundance of AOA or AOB. In summary, our data reveal striking patterns for AOA and AOB in response to long-term fertilization, and also suggest a missing link between community composition and abundance and nitrogen processing in the marsh.

  19. Differential responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to long-term fertilization in a New England salt marsh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng ePeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, new questions have arisen about population and community dynamics and potential interactions between AOA and ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB. We investigated the effects of long-term fertilization on AOA and AOB in the Great Sippewissett Marsh, Falmouth, MA, USA to address some of these questions. Sediment samples were collected from low and high marsh habitats in July 2009 from replicate plots that received low (LF, high (HF, and extra high (XF levels of a mixed NPK fertilizer biweekly during the growing season since 1974. Additional untreated plots were included as controls (C. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the amoA genes revealed distinct shifts in AOB communities related to fertilization treatment, but the response patterns of AOA were less consistent. Four AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs predictably and significantly responded to fertilization, but only one AOA OTU showed a significant pattern. Betaproteobacterial amoA gene sequences within the Nitrosospira-like cluster dominated at C and LF sites, while sequences related to Nitrosomonas spp. dominated at HF and XF sites. We identified some clusters of AOA sequences recovered primarily from high fertilization regimes, but other clusters consisted of sequences recovered from all fertilization treatments, suggesting greater physiological diversity. Surprisingly, fertilization appeared to have little impact on abundance of AOA or AOB. In summary, our data reveal striking patterns for AOA and AOB in response to long-term fertilization, and also suggest a missing link between community composition and abundance and nitrogen processing in the marsh.

  20. Hypoxic preconditioning differentially affects GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal cells in the injured cerebellum of the neonatal rat.

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    Sergio G Benitez

    Full Text Available In this study we examined cerebellar alterations in a neonatal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury with or without hypoxic preconditioning (Pc. Between postnatal days 7 and 15, the cerebellum is still undergoing intense cellular proliferation, differentiation and migration, dendritogenesis and synaptogenesis. The expression of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD67 and the differentiation factor NeuroD1 were examined as markers of Purkinje and granule cells, respectively. We applied quantitative immunohistochemistry to sagittal cerebellar slices, and Western blot analysis of whole cerebella obtained from control (C rats and rats submitted to Pc, hypoxia-ischemia (L and a combination of both treatments (PcL. We found that either hypoxia-ischemia or Pc perturbed the granule cells in the posterior lobes, affecting their migration and final placement in the internal granular layer. These effects were partially attenuated when the Pc was delivered prior to the hypoxia-ischemia. Interestingly, whole nuclear NeuroD1 levels in Pc animals were comparable to those in the C rats. However, a subset of Purkinje cells that were severely affected by the hypoxic-ischemic insult--showing signs of neuronal distress at the levels of the nucleus, cytoplasm and dendritic arborization--were not protected by Pc. A monoclonal antibody specific for GAD67 revealed a three-band pattern in cytoplasmic extracts from whole P15 cerebella. A ∼110 kDa band, interpreted as a potential homodimer of a truncated form of GAD67, was reduced in Pc and L groups while its levels were close to the control animals in PcL rats. Additionally we demonstrated differential glial responses depending on the treatment, including astrogliosis in hypoxiated cerebella and a selective effect of hypoxia-ischemia on the vimentin-immunolabeled intermediate filaments of the Bergmann glia. Thus, while both glutamatergic and GABAergic cerebellar neurons are compromised by the hypoxic-ischemic insult

  1. A French Translation of the Pleasure Arousal Dominance (PAD Semantic Differential Scale for the Measure of Affect and Drive

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    Sandrine Detandt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate studies have repeatedly confirmed that three basic dimensions of human emotional behavior, called 'pleasure' (P, 'arousal' (A and 'dominance '(D are persistent in organizing human judgments for a wide range of perceptual and symbolic stimuli. The Mehrabian and Russell’s PAD semantic differential scale is a well-established tool to measure these categories, but no standardized French translation is available for research. The aim of this study was to validate a French version of the PAD. For this purpose, (1 Mehrabian and Russell’s PAD was trans- lated through a process of translations and back-translations and (2 this French PAD was tested in a population of 111 French-speaking adults on 21 images of the International Affective Picture System (IAPS. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed the expected three-factor structure; the French PAD also distributed the images in the affective space according to the expected boomerang-shape. The present version of PAD is thus a valid French translation of Mehrabian and Russell’s original PAD.

  2. Minimal Phenotypic Test for Simple Differentiation of Xanthomonas Campestris from other Yellow-Pigmented Bacteria Isolated from Soil

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    MR Soudi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Isolation of Xanthomonas campestris from soil has a wide range of applications from monitoring of phytopathogenic populations in soil to screening of improved xanthan-producing strains. Identification of Xanthomonas campestris and its pathovars requires pathogenicity tests in addition to phenotypic and molecular characterization.Materials and Methods: Thirty phenotypic tests were carried out on 57 yellow-pigmented bacterial isolates obtained from soil of cabbage farms after screening on Selective Xanthomonas (SX agar and transferring on Yeast Malt agar. Absorption spectra of pigments and capability of biopolymer production were determined for the isolates. Some characteristics of the biopolymer produced and presence of a X. campestris-specific gene marker were investigated for nine putative X. campestris isolates.Results: The present study introduces a set of simple phenotypic tests including urease, acid production from sucrose, mucoid growth on 5% sucrose, starch hydrolysis, growth in 4% NaCl, motility and utilization of asparagine as sole carbon and nitrogen source for quick and inexpensive tentative identification of Xanthomonas campestris. Validation of these tests was confirmed in 100% of the cases by characterization of bacterial exopolysaccharide as xanthan and production of genus-specific xanthomonadin pigment. Moreover, tracking of hrc gene among putative X. campestris isolates gave positive results in 80% of cases.Conclusion: The Minimal simple phenotypic tests facilitate the screening and differentiation of putative X. campestris isolates from other false bacterial strains isolated from soil on semiselective SX agar.

  3. Aspergillus asexual reproduction and sexual reproduction are differentially affected by transcriptional and translational mechanisms regulating stunted gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Miller, B L

    1997-10-01

    The Stunted protein (StuAp) is a member of a family of transcription factors that regulate fungal development and cell cycle progression. Regulated stuA gene expression is required for correct cell pattern formation during asexual reproduction (conidiation) and for initiation of the sexual reproductive cycle in Aspergillus nidulans. Transcriptional initiation from two different promoters yields overlapping mRNAs (stuA alpha and stuAbeta) that upon translation yield the same protein. Here we show that multiple regulatory mechanisms interact to control (i) developmental competence-dependent expression of both transcripts and (ii) induction-dependent expression of stuA alpha, but not stuAbeta, by the conidiation-specific Bristle (BrlAp) transcriptional activator. Quantitative levels of both mRNAs are further modulated by (i) an activator(s) located at a far-upstream upstream activation sequence, (ii) feedback regulation by StuAp, and (iii) positive translational regulation that requires the peptide product of a micro-open reading frame unique to the stuA alpha mRNA 5' untranslated region. Gradients in stuA alpha expression were most important for correct cell and tissue type development. Threshold requirements were as follows: metula-phialide differentiation < ascosporogenesis < cleistothecial shell-Hülle cell differentiation. Altered stuA expression affected conidiophore morphology and conidial yields quantitatively but did not alter the temporal development of cell types or conidiophore density. By contrast, the sexual cycle showed both temporal delay and quantitative reduction in the number of cleistothecial initials but normal morphogenesis of tissue types.

  4. Family Dysfunction Differentially Affects Alcohol and Methamphetamine Dependence: A View from the Addiction Severity Index in Japan

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    Kazutaka Ikeda

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the differential influence of family dysfunction on alcohol and methamphetamine dependence in Japan using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI, a useful instrument that multilaterally measures the severity of substance dependence. The participants in this study were 321 male patients with alcohol dependence and 68 male patients with methamphetamine dependence. We conducted semi-structured interviews with each patient using the ASI, which is designed to assess problem severity in seven functional domains: Medical, Employment/Support, Alcohol use, Drug use, Legal, Family/Social relationships, and Psychiatric. In patients with alcohol dependence, bad relationships with parents, brothers and sisters, and friends in their lives were related to current severe psychiatric problems. Bad relationships with brothers and sisters and partners in their lives were related to current severe employment/support problems, and bad relationships with partners in their lives were related to current severe family/social problems. The current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of drug use and family/social problems in patients with alcohol dependence. Patients with methamphetamine dependence had difficulty developing good relationships with their father. Furthermore, the current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of medical, employment/support, and family/social problems in patients with methamphetamine dependence. The results of this study suggest that family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence. Additionally, family relationships may be particularly related to psychiatric problems in these patients, although the ASI was developed to independently evaluate each of seven problem areas.

  5. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

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    Marie S A Palmnäs

    Full Text Available Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat and further into ad libitum water control (W or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment. Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05. Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  6. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (Paspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  7. PRENATAL HYPOXIA IN DIFFERENT PERIODS OF EMBRYOGENESIS DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS CELL MIGRATION, NEURONAL PLASTICITY AND RAT BEHAVIOR IN POSTNATAL ONTOGENESIS

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    Dmitrii S Vasilev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term effects of prenatal hypoxia on embryonic days E14 or E18 on the number, type and localization of cortical neurons, density of labile synaptopodin-positive dendritic spines and parietal cortex-dependent behavioral tasks were examined in the postnatal ontogenesis of rats. An injection of 5’ethynyl-2’deoxyuridine to pregnant rats was used to label neurons generated on E14 or E18 in the fetuses. In control rat pups a majority of cells labeled on E14 were localized in the lower cortical layers V-VI while the cells labeled on E18 were mainly found in the superficial cortical layers II-III. It was shown that hypoxia both on E14 and E18 results in disruption of neuroblast generation and migration but affects different cell populations. In rat pups subjected to hypoxia on E14, the total number of labeled cells in the parietal cortex was decreased while the number of labeled neurons scattered within the superficial cortical layers was increased. In rat pups subjected to hypoxia on E18, the total number of labeled cells in the parietal cortex was also decreased but the number of scattered labeled neurons was higher in the lower cortical layers. It can be suggested that prenatal hypoxia both on E14 and E18 causes a disruption in neuroblast migration but with a different outcome. Only in rats subjected to hypoxia on E14 did we observe a reduction in the total number of pyramidal cortical neurons and the density of labile synaptopodin-positive dendritic spines in the molecular cortical layer during the first month after birth which affected development of the cortical functions. As a result, rats subjected to hypoxia on E14, but not on E18, had impaired development of the whisker-placing reaction and reduced ability to learn reaching by a forepaw. The data obtained suggest that hypoxia on E14 in the period of generation of the cells, which later differentiate into the pyramidal cortical neurons of the V-VI layers and form cortical minicolumns

  8. Differential susceptibility of C57BL/6NCr and B6.Cg-Ptprca mice to commensal bacteria after whole body irradiation in translational bone marrow transplant studies

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    Toubai Tomomi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse is an important and widely utilized animal model for bone marrow transplant (BMT translational studies. Here, we document the course of an unexpected increase in mortality of congenic mice that underwent BMT. Methods Thirty five BMTs were analyzed for survival differences utilizing the Log Rank test. Affected animals were evaluated by physical examination, necropsy, histopathology, serology for antibodies to infectious disease, and bacterial cultures. Results Severe bacteremia was identified as the main cause of death. Gastrointestinal (GI damage was observed in histopathology. The bacteremia was most likely caused by the translocation of bacteria from the GI tract and immunosuppression caused by the myeloablative irradiation. Variability in groups of animals affected was caused by increased levels of gamma and X-ray radiation and the differing sensitivity of the two nearly genetically identical mouse strains used in the studies. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis of thirty five murine BMTs performed in three different laboratories, identified C57BL/6NCr (Ly5.1 as being more radiation sensitive than B6.Cg-Ptprca/NCr (Ly5.2. This is the first report documenting a measurable difference in radiation sensitivity and its effects between an inbred strain of mice and its congenic counterpart eventually succumbing to sepsis after BMT.

  9. The Langerhans islet cells of female rabbits are differentially affected by hypothyroidism depending on the islet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castelán, J; Nicolás, L; Morimoto, S; Cuevas, E

    2015-04-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin levels are controversial, and its impact on the Langerhans islet morphology of adult subjects has been poorly addressed. In spite of hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus are more frequent in females than in males, most studies using animal models have been done in males. The effect of hypothyroidism on the immunolabeling of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) of islet cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin concentrations, morphometry of islets, and immunostaining of TRs α1-2 and β1 and TSHR of islet cells in female rabbits. Control and hypothyroid (0.02% of methimazole for 30 days) animals were used to quantify blood levels of glucose and insulin, density of islets, cross-sectional area (CSA) of islets, number of cells per islet, cell proliferation, and the immunolabeling of TRs α1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR. Student's t or Mann-Whitney-U tests, two-way ANOVAs, and Fischer's tests were applied. Concentrations of glucose and insulin, as well as the insulin resistance were similar between groups. Hypothyroidism did not affect the density or the CSA of islets. The analysis of islets by size showed that hypothyroidism reduced the cell number in large and medium islets, but not in small ones. In small islets, cell proliferation was increased. The immunoreactivity of TRα1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR was increased by hypothyroidism in all islet sizes. Our results show that hypothyroidism affects differentially the islet cells depending on the size of islets.

  10. True or false? Memory is differentially affected by stress-induced cortisol elevations and sympathetic activity at consolidation and retrieval.

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    Smeets, Tom; Otgaar, Henry; Candel, Ingrid; Wolf, Oliver T

    2008-11-01

    Adrenal stress hormones released in response to acute stress may yield memory-enhancing effects when released post-learning and impairing effects at memory retrieval, especially for emotional memory material. However, so far these differential effects of stress hormones on the various memory phases for neutral and emotional memory material have not been demonstrated within one experiment. This study investigated whether, in line with their effects on true memory, stress and stress-induced adrenal stress hormones affect the encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of emotional and neutral false memories. Participants (N=90) were exposed to a stressor before encoding, during consolidation, before retrieval, or were not stressed and then were subjected to neutral and emotional versions of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott word list learning paradigm. Twenty-four hours later, recall of presented words (true recall) and non-presented critical lure words (false recall) was assessed. Results show that stress exposure resulted in superior true memory performance in the consolidation stress group and reduced true memory performance in the retrieval stress group compared to the other groups, predominantly for emotional words. These memory-enhancing and memory-impairing effects were strongly related to stress-induced cortisol and sympathetic activity measured via salivary alpha-amylase levels. Neutral and emotional false recall, on the other hand, was neither affected by stress exposure, nor related to cortisol and sympathetic activity following stress. These results demonstrate the importance of stress-induced hormone-related activity in enhancing memory consolidation and in impairing memory retrieval, in particular for emotional memory material.

  11. Charge and geometry of residues in the loop 2 β hairpin differentially affect agonist and ethanol sensitivity in glycine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Daya I; Trudell, James R; Asatryan, Liana; Davies, Daryl L; Alkana, Ronald L

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of loop 2 of α1 glycine receptors (GlyRs) in the propagation of ligand-binding energy to the channel gate. Mutations that changed polarity at position 52 in the β hairpin of loop 2 significantly affected sensitivity to ethanol. The present study extends the investigation to charged residues. We found that substituting alanine with the negative glutamate at position 52 (A52E) significantly left-shifted the glycine concentration response curve and increased sensitivity to ethanol, whereas the negative aspartate substitution (A52D) significantly right-shifted the glycine EC₅₀ but did not affect ethanol sensitivity. It is noteworthy that the uncharged glutamine at position 52 (A52Q) caused only a small right shift of the glycine EC₅₀ while increasing ethanol sensitivity as much as A52E. In contrast, the shorter uncharged asparagine (A52N) caused the greatest right shift of glycine EC₅₀ and reduced ethanol sensitivity to half of wild type. Collectively, these findings suggest that charge interactions determined by the specific geometry of the amino acid at position 52 (e.g., the 1-Å chain length difference between aspartate and glutamate) play differential roles in receptor sensitivity to agonist and ethanol. We interpret these results in terms of a new homology model of GlyR based on a prokaryotic ion channel and propose that these mutations form salt bridges to residues across the β hairpin (A52E-R59 and A52N-D57). We hypothesize that these electrostatic interactions distort loop 2, thereby changing agonist activation and ethanol modulation. This knowledge will help to define the key physical-chemical parameters that cause the actions of ethanol in GlyRs.

  12. Factors affecting the production of folic acid by lactic acid bacteria%乳酸菌发酵代谢合成叶酸的影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘友群; 周方; 赵宏飞; 展海宁; 张柏林

    2011-01-01

    对嗜酸乳杆菌以及乳酸乳球菌发酵合成叶酸的影响因素进行了研究.结果表明,乳酸菌代谢合成叶酸的产率为17~100μg/L,菌种、培养时间、pH值、对氨基苯甲酸(PABA)质量浓度会影响乳酸菌合成叶酸的产量.与乳酸乳球菌乳酸亚种相比,嗜酸乳杆菌CH-2生成的叶酸产量要高.不同菌株生成叶酸的能力与pH值有关,嗜酸乳杆菌在pH值为4.2叶酸产率明显下降,乳酸乳球菌乳酸亚种产叶酸的能力则不受pH值影响.添加PABA可以显著提高乳酸菌的叶酸产率.选择适宜的乳酸菌菌株,优化发酵工艺参数可以提高乳及相关食品中叶酸的质量浓度,达到生物方式强化叶酸的效果.%The factors affecting the synthesis of folic acid by Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp.lactis were studied. Lactic acid bacteria produced folate of 17~100 μg/L by fermentation, depending on strains, fermentation time, pH and para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). L. acidophilus strain CH-2 produced more folic acid than L. lactis subsp. lactis did. L. acidophilus CH-2 significantly had a low folate yield as pH in media decreased to 4.2, whereas the level of folic acid produced by L.lactis subsp.lactis might be pH-independent. Addition of PABA to media significantly improved the yields of folic acids formed by two lactic acid bacteria. The present study means that use of folateproducing strains, in combination with good fermentation, can fortify the contents of folic acid from milk or related foods.

  13. Validation of RAPID E. coli 2 for enumeration and differentiation of Escherichia coli and other coliform bacteria in selected foods--Performance-Tested Method 050601.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Wendy F; Martinez, Frederic L; Patel, Asmita

    2007-01-01

    RAPID'E. coli 2 agar (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA) is a chromogenic medium for differentiation and enumeration of E. coli and non-E. coli coliform bacteria in food. The principle of RAPID'E. coli 2 medium relies on simultaneous detection of 2 enzymatic activities, P-D-glucuronidase (GLUC) and beta-D-galactosidase (GAL). Coliforms, other than E. coli (GAL+/GLUC-), form blue to green colonies, whereas, specifically, E. coli (GAL+/GLUC+) form violet colonies. Eleven foods (raw ground beef, raw boneless pork, fermented sausage, processed ham, processed turkey, frozen turkey breast, raw ground chicken, cottage cheese, ricotta cheese, raw milk, and dry infant formula) were validated, comparing the performance of RAPID'E. coli 2 agar to the reference method AOAC 966.24. Two sample incubation temperatures were evaluated, 37 and 44 degrees C, testing a mixture of naturally and artificially contaminated foods. If naturally contaminated food was not available, the matrix was artificially inoculated with one E. coli strain and one non-E. coli coliform strain. Method comparison studies demonstrated some statistical differences between the 2 methods, which are expected when a plating method is compared to a most probable number method. Inclusivity and exclusivity rates of the medium were 99 and 94%, respectively. The RAPID'E. coli 2 method was shown to be stable when minor variations were introduced.

  14. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Zakharova, Anna N.; Kabachkova, Anastasia V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  15. Mango Fruit Extracts Differentially Affect Proliferation and Intracellular Calcium Signalling in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Wong Taing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of human cancer cell proliferation is a common approach in identifying plant extracts that have potential bioactive effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that methanolic extracts of peel and flesh from three archetypal mango cultivars, Irwin (IW, Nam Doc Mai (NDM, and Kensington Pride (KP, differentially affect proliferation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK activity, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]I signalling in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Mango flesh extracts from all three cultivars did not inhibit cell growth, and of the peel extracts only NDM reduced MCF-7 cell proliferation. Mango cultivar peel and flesh extracts did not significantly change ERK phosphorylation compared to controls; however, some reduced relative maximal peak [Ca2+]I after adenosine triphosphate stimulation, with NDM peel extract having the greatest effect among the treatments. Our results identify mango interfruit and intrafruit (peel and flesh extract variability in antiproliferative effects and [Ca2+]I signalling in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and highlight that parts of the fruit (such as peel and flesh and cultivar differences are important factors to consider when assessing potential chemopreventive bioactive compounds in plants extracts.

  16. Drosophila insulin-producing cells are differentially modulated by serotonin and octopamine receptors and affect social behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangnan Luo

    Full Text Available A set of 14 insulin-producing cells (IPCs in the Drosophila brain produces three insulin-like peptides (DILP2, 3 and 5. Activity in IPCs and release of DILPs is nutrient dependent and controlled by multiple factors such as fat body-derived proteins, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides. Two monoamine receptors, the octopamine receptor OAMB and the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A, are expressed by the IPCs. These receptors may act antagonistically on adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the action of the two receptors on activity in and output from the IPCs. Knockdown of OAMB by targeted RNAi led to elevated Dilp3 transcript levels in the brain, whereas 5-HT1A knockdown resulted in increases of Dilp2 and 5. OAMB-RNAi in IPCs leads to extended survival of starved flies and increased food intake, whereas 5-HT1A-RNAi produces the opposite phenotypes. However, knockdown of either OAMB or 5-HT1A in IPCs both lead to increased resistance to oxidative stress. In assays of carbohydrate levels we found that 5-HT1A knockdown in IPCs resulted in elevated hemolymph glucose, body glycogen and body trehalose levels, while no effects were seen after OAMB knockdown. We also found that manipulations of the two receptors in IPCs affected male aggressive behavior in different ways and 5-HT1A-RNAi reduced courtship latency. Our observations suggest that activation of 5-HT1A and OAMB signaling in IPCs generates differential effects on Dilp transcription, fly physiology, metabolism and social interactions. However the findings do not support an antagonistic action of the two monoamines and their receptors in this particular system.

  17. Explicit and implicit second language training differentially affect the achievement of native-like brain activation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Short, Kara; Steinhauer, Karsten; Sanz, Cristina; Ullman, Michael T

    2012-04-01

    It is widely believed that adults cannot learn a foreign language in the same way that children learn a first language. However, recent evidence suggests that adult learners of a foreign language can come to rely on native-like language brain mechanisms. Here, we show that the type of language training crucially impacts this outcome. We used an artificial language paradigm to examine longitudinally whether explicit training (that approximates traditional grammar-focused classroom settings) and implicit training (that approximates immersion settings) differentially affect neural (electrophysiological) and behavioral (performance) measures of syntactic processing. Results showed that performance of explicitly and implicitly trained groups did not differ at either low or high proficiency. In contrast, electrophysiological (ERP) measures revealed striking differences between the groups' neural activity at both proficiency levels in response to syntactic violations. Implicit training yielded an N400 at low proficiency, whereas at high proficiency, it elicited a pattern typical of native speakers: an anterior negativity followed by a P600 accompanied by a late anterior negativity. Explicit training, by contrast, yielded no significant effects at low proficiency and only an anterior positivity followed by a P600 at high proficiency. Although the P600 is reminiscent of native-like processing, this response pattern as a whole is not. Thus, only implicit training led to an electrophysiological signature typical of native speakers. Overall, the results suggest that adult foreign language learners can come to rely on native-like language brain mechanisms, but that the conditions under which the language is learned may be crucial in attaining this goal.

  18. Biotic interactions and sunlight affect persistence of fecal indicator bacteria and microbial source tracking genetic markers in the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanitary quality of recreational waters is assessed by enumerating fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (Escherichia coli and enterococci); organisms present in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many other animals, hence providing no information about the pollution source. Micro...

  19. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, D.; Holt, L.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that non-pathogenic Gram negative bacteria induce RelA phosphorylation, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism...... of immune-epithelial cell cross-talk on Gram-negative enteric bacteria-induced NF-kappaB signalling and pro-inflammatory gene expression in IEC using HT-29/MTX as well as CaCO-2 transwell cultures Interestingly, while differentiated HT-29/MTX cells are unresponsive to non-pathogenic Gram negative bacterial...... in the presence of PBMC. Interestingly, B. vulgatus- and E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharide-induced similar IL-8 mRNA expression in epithelial cells after basolateral stimulation of HT-29/PBMC cocultures. Although luminal enteric bacteria have adjuvant and antigenic properties in chronic intestinal inflammation...

  20. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, D.; Holt, L.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2004-01-01

    of immune-epithelial cell cross-talk on Gram-negative enteric bacteria-induced NF-kappaB signalling and pro-inflammatory gene expression in IEC using HT-29/MTX as well as CaCO-2 transwell cultures Interestingly, while differentiated HT-29/MTX cells are unresponsive to non-pathogenic Gram negative bacterial......-kappaB signalling and IL-8 gene expression in IEC cocultured with immune cells and suggests the presence of mechanisms that assure hyporesponsiveness of the intestinal epithelium to certain commensally enteric bacteria.......We have previously shown that non-pathogenic Gram negative bacteria induce RelA phosphorylation, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism...

  1. Cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17F, and IL-4 differentially affect osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Bastidas-Coral; A.D. Bakker; B. Zandieh-Doulabi; C.J. Kleverlaan; N. Bravenboer; T. Forouzanfar; J. Klein-Nulend

    2016-01-01

    During the initial stages of bone repair, proinflammatory cytokines are released within the injury site, quickly followed by a shift to anti-inflammatory cytokines. The effect of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is controversial. Here, we i

  2. The use of differential scintigraphy in the clinical diagnosis of osseous and soft tissue changes affecting the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, H.J.; Jacobs, A.M.; Oloff, L.; Drago, J.J.

    Prompt recognition of cellulitis, osteomyelitis, diabetic osteolysis, Charcot neuroarthropathy, septic synovitis, and deep plantar abscesses in the diabetic foot is essential because the therapy is drastically different. Differential diagnosis has been greatly facilitated by recently developed scanning techniques.

  3. Proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory activities of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria as affected by different levels of fat, inulin and starter culture

    OpenAIRE

    Shakerian, Mansour; Razavi,Seyed Hadi; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid; Moayedi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of fat (0.5 %, 3.2 % and 5.0 %), inulin (0.0 and 1.0 %) and starter culture (0.0 %, 0.5 %, 1.0 % and 1.5 %) on the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria were assessed. Proteolytic activities of bacteria were also investigated. Yogurts were prepared either using a sole yogurt commercial culture including Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subs. bulgaricus or bifidobacterium ani...

  4. Differential antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles to bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, and toxicity to crop plant Zea mays and beneficial B. subtilis-inoculated Z. mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Michael A.; Wang, Dengjun; Bais, Harsh P.; Jin, Yan

    2016-10-01

    As silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become increasingly used in commercial antimicrobial agents and industrial and military products, concerns are increasing over their broad environmental and health impacts and risks because they are finding their way to the environment. This study was designed to quantify the antimicrobial activity of citrate-coated AgNPs (c-AgNPs; transmission electron microscope size of 44.9 ± 7.2 nm) to two species of bacteria, i.e., Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and toxicity to a major crop plant Zea mays and beneficial bacteria-inoculated plant (i.e., B. subtilis-inoculated Z. mays symbiont). Our results reveal that the exposure of c-AgNPs significantly inhibited bacteria growth and altered their growth kinetics. Z. mays experienced significant sublethal effects including reduced root length and biomass, and hyper-accumulation of Ag in roots. The beneficial interactions between B. subtilis and Z. mays were weakened as well because both species suffered sublethal effects. Potential mechanisms leading to the antimicrobial activity and toxicity of c-AgNPs to the bacteria, plant, and plant-bacteria symbiont examined in this study were discussed. Taken together, our findings advance the current knowledge of AgNPs antimicrobial property or toxicity to bacteria, crop plant, and beneficial plant-bacteria symbiotic interaction, which is a critical component for NPs environmental impact and risk assessment.

  5. Isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria from genital tract of the Arabian mares affected with genital tract infection and antimicrobial sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. AL-Abidy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for isolation and identification of the pathogenic bacteria presented in the genital tract infectionof the Arabian mares, and shows the anti microbial sensitivity. The study included 75 samples taken from infected maressuffering from genital tract infection diagnosed on the basis of case history and clinical signs which included bloody purulentdischarge ranched from yellow to green in colure, fetid oder with congested and oedematous vagina and from some abortioncases, and from mares suffered from tetanus disease symptoms during the period between October 2007 to April 2008 in studfarms breeding mares in Mosul. The samples were collected by swabs from the clitoris, clitorial fossa and the vagina. Isolationof bacteria was performed using aerobic and anaerobic culture techniques. Results of the present study showed a total ofisolation 75% from all samples taken with a high percentage isolation of Clostridium tetani (16.6%, followed by Archanobacterium pyogenes (10.6%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8%, (6.7% for each Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiellapneumonia, Streptococcus dysagalactiae subsp equisimilis, and (5.3% for each bacteria Actinobacillus equilli, Streptococcuszooepidemicus, Staphylococcus aureus, then Proteus vulgaris (2.6%, and Escherichia coli (1.3%. The most bacterial isolateswere resistant to amoxicillin (100%, ampicillin (90.9 %, and erythromycin (65.9%, while the most isolates were sensitive tokanamycin (70.4%. It could be concluted that the most important bacteria causing genital tract infection of mares could beClostridium tetani and Archanobacterium pyogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The most bacterial isolates were resistant toamoxicillin, ampicillin and erythromycin.

  6. Feeding of the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 differentially affects shedding of enteric viruses in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuzer Susanne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Effects of probiotic bacteria on viral infections have been described previously. Here, two groups of sows and their piglets were fed with or without feed supplementation of the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415. Shedding of enteric viruses naturally occurring in these pigs was analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. No differences between the groups were recorded for hepatitis E virus, encephalomyocarditis virus and norovirus. In contrast, astrovirus was exclusively detected in the non-supplemented control group. Rotavirus was shedded later and with lower amounts in the probiotic piglet group (p p p p p p 

  7. Primary root protophloem differentiation requires balanced phosphatidylinositol-4,5-biphosphate levels and systemically affects root branching.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Villalon, A.; Gujas, B.; van Wijk, R.; Munnik, T.; Hardtke, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    Protophloem is a specialized vascular tissue in growing plant organs, such as root meristems. In Arabidopsis mutants with impaired primary root protophloem differentiation, brevis radix (brx) and octopus (ops), meristematic activity and consequently overall root growth are strongly reduced. Second s

  8. Different patterns of amygdala priming differentially affect dentate gyrus plasticity and corticosterone, but not CA1 plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose-Marie eVouimba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced activation of the amygdala is involved in the modulation of memory processes in the hippocampus. However, stress effects on amygdala and memory remain complex. The activation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA was found to modulate plasticity in other brain areas, including the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated a differential effect of BLA priming on LTP in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG. While BLA priming suppressed long term potentiation (LTP in CA1, it was found to enhance it in the DG. However, since the amygdala itself is amenable to experience-induced plasticity it is thus conceivable that when activity within the amygdala is modified this will have impact on the way the amygdala modulates activity and plasticity in other brain areas. In the current study we examined the effects of different patterns of BLA activation on the modulation of LTP in the DG and CA1, as well as on serum corticosterone (CORT. In CA1, BLA priming impaired LTP induction as was reported before. In contrast, in the DG, varying BLA stimulation intensity and frequency resulted in differential effects on LTP, ranging from no effect to strong impairment or enhancement. Varying BLA stimulation patterns resulted in also differential alterations in Serum CORT, leading to higher CORT levels being positively correlated with LTP magnitude in DG but not in CA1.The results support the notion of a differential role for the DG in aspects of memory, and add to this view the possibility that DG-associated aspects of memory will be enhanced under more emotional or stressful conditions. It is interesting to think of BLA patterns of activation and the differential levels of circulating CORT as two arms of the emotional and stress response that attempt to synchronize brain activity to best meet the challenge. It is foreseeable to think of abnormal such synchronization under extreme conditions, which would lead to the development of maladaptive behavior.

  9. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Durkin

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α, RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2, ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt. A PCR-probe (39F/R amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1-5 minisatellites with 1-12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported.

  10. HIV-1 and recombinant gp120 affect the survival and differentiation of human vessel wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquinelli Gianandrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection elicits the onset of a progressive immunodeficiency and also damages several other organs and tissues such as the CNS, kidney, heart, blood vessels, adipose tissue and bone. In particular, HIV infection has been related to an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and derangement in the structure of blood vessels in the absence of classical risk factors. The recent characterization of multipotent mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall, involved in regulating cellular homeostasis, suggests that these cells may be considered a target of HIV pathogenesis. This paper investigated the interaction between HIV-1 and vascular wall resident human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Results MSCs were challenged with classical R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains demonstrating that these strains are able to enter and integrate their retro-transcribed proviral DNA in the host cell genome. Subsequent experiments indicated that HIV-1 strains and recombinant gp120 elicited a reliable increase in apoptosis in sub-confluent MSCs. Since vascular wall MSCs are multipotent cells that may be differentiated towards several cell lineages, we challenged HIV-1 strains and gp120 on MSCs differentiated to adipogenesis and endotheliogenesis. Our experiments showed that the adipogenesis is increased especially by upregulated PPARγ activity whereas the endothelial differentiation induced by VEGF treatment was impaired with a downregulation of endothelial markers such as vWF, Flt-1 and KDR expression. These viral effects in MSC survival and adipogenic or endothelial differentiation were tackled by CD4 blockade suggesting an important role of CD4/gp120 interaction in this context. Conclusions The HIV-related derangement of MSC survival and differentiation may suggest a direct role of HIV infection and gp120 in impaired vessel homeostasis and in genesis of vessel damage observed in HIV-infected patients.

  11. The DCR protein TTC3 affects differentiation and Golgi compactness in neurons through specific actin-regulating pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Elena Berto

    Full Text Available In neuronal cells, actin remodeling plays a well known role in neurite extension but is also deeply involved in the organization of intracellular structures, such as the Golgi apparatus. However, it is still not very clear which mechanisms may regulate actin dynamics at the different sites. In this report we show that high levels of the TTC3 protein, encoded by one of the genes of the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DCR, prevent neurite extension and disrupt Golgi compactness in differentiating primary neurons. These effects largely depend on the capability of TTC3 to promote actin polymerization through signaling pathways involving RhoA, ROCK, CIT-N and PIIa. However, the functional relationships between these molecules differ significantly if considering the TTC3 activity on neurite extension or on Golgi organization. Finally, our results reveal an unexpected stage-dependent requirement for F-actin in Golgi organization at different stages of neuronal differentiation.

  12. Alcohol and cannabinoids differentially affect HIV infection and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela eAgudelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC. However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%, THC (5 and 10 uM, or JWH-015 (5 and 10 uM for 4-7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV+EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV+JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV+THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection.

  13. Family Dysfunction Differentially Affects Alcohol and Methamphetamine Dependence: A View from the Addiction Severity Index in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kazutaka Ikeda; Yuzo Aikawa; Mitsuru Umeno; Susumu Higuchi; Eiichi Senoo; Ayako Haraguchi; Yasukazu Ogai; Nagisa Sugaya

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the differential influence of family dysfunction on alcohol and methamphetamine dependence in Japan using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), a useful instrument that multilaterally measures the severity of substance dependence. The participants in this study were 321 male patients with alcohol dependence and 68 male patients with methamphetamine dependence. We conducted semi-structured interviews with each patient using the ASI, which is designed to assess problem severity in...

  14. HMGB4 is expressed by neuronal cells and affects the expression of genes involved in neural differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhiainen, Ari; Zhao, Xiang; Vanttola, Päivi; Qian, Kui; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Gransalke, Kathleen; Grönholm, Mikaela; Unni, Emmanual; Meistrich, Marvin; Tian, Li; Auvinen, Petri; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-09-01

    HMGB4 is a new member in the family of HMGB proteins that has been characterized in sperm cells, but little is known about its functions in somatic cells. Here we show that HMGB4 and the highly similar rat Transition Protein 4 (HMGB4L1) are expressed in neuronal cells. Both proteins had slow mobility in nucleus of living NIH-3T3 cells. They interacted with histones and their differential expression in transformed cells of the nervous system altered the post-translational modification statuses of histones in vitro. Overexpression of HMGB4 in HEK 293T cells made cells more susceptible to cell death induced by topoisomerase inhibitors in an oncology drug screening array and altered variant composition of histone H3. HMGB4 regulated over 800 genes in HEK 293T cells with a p-value ≤0.013 (n = 3) in a microarray analysis and displayed strongest association with adhesion and histone H2A -processes. In neuronal and transformed cells HMGB4 regulated the expression of an oligodendrocyte marker gene PPP1R14a and other neuronal differentiation marker genes. In conclusion, our data suggests that HMGB4 is a factor that regulates chromatin and expression of neuronal differentiation markers.

  15. Distribución Diferencial de Bacterias con Potencial Biocontrolador de Spongospora subterranea en Plantas de Papa (Solanum tuberosum cv. Diacol Capiro Differential Distrubution of Candidadate Biocontrol Bacteria against Spongospora subterranea in Potato Plants (Solanum tuberosum cv. Diacol Capiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Soler Arango

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. La búsqueda de microorganismos promisorios para biocontrol de patógenos de plantas en el suelo con frecuencia se ha orientado a la detección de productores de hormonas y enzimas líticas, condiciones asociadas a su capacidad para promover crecimiento vegetal. Sin embargo, el suelo es altamente variable en escalas pequeñas y se conoce poco sobre la distribución espacial de microorganismos que expresan esas funciones. Este estudio determinó la capacidad de producción de indoles totales y quitinasas en bacterias cultivables aisladas del interior de la raíz, la rizósfera, la superficie de los tubérculos o suelo de un cultivo de papa (Solanum tuberosum variedad Diacol Capiro. Las muestras se obtuvieron en un campo comercial en el municipio de la Unión en el departamento de Antioquia, Colombia, en plantas que presentaban síntomas de infección por Spongospora subterranea. Se encontró una producción diferencial de indoles o quitinasas según el sitio de aislamiento de las bacterias. No se encontró una alta producción de ambas actividades en un sólo aislamiento, la mayor producción de indoles totales y quitinasas se encontró en bacterias aisladas a partir de raíz y rizósfera, comparada con las aisladas de tubérculos y suelo. Estos resultados sugieren que en el suelo no es aleatoria la distribución de funciones deseables en controladores biológicos. Con estos resultados es posible orientar su búsqueda para optimizar el uso de recursos y el desarrollo de nuevos bioproductos.Abstract. Searching for promising microorganisms to biocontrol soil-borne plant pathogens has been often focused on producers of hormone and lytic enzymes, since these traits are linked to plant growth promotion. However, the environment from inner roots to bulk soil is quite variable, and little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms expressing these desirable traits. Using potato plants (Solanum tuberosum var. Diacol Capiro from a

  16. Identification of the active components in Shenmai injection that differentially affect Cyp3a4-mediated 1'-hydroxylation and 4-hydroxylation of midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Caiwen; He, Fang; Xia, Chunhua; Zhang, Hong; Xiong, Yuqing

    2013-04-01

    Shenmai injection (SMI) is a popular herbal preparation that is widely used for the treatment of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease and viral myocarditis. In our previous study, SMI was shown to differentially affect CYP3A4-mediated 1'-hydroxylation and 4-hydroxylation of midazolam (MDZ). The present study was conducted to identify the active components in SMI responsible for the differential effects on MDZ metabolism, using in vitro incubation systems (rat and human liver microsomes and a recombinant CYP3A4 system) to measure 1'-hydroxylation and 4-hydroxylation of MDZ. First, different fractions of SMI were obtained by gradient elution on an solid phase extraction system and individually tested for their effects on MDZ metabolism. The results demonstrated that lipid-soluble constituents were likely to be the predominant active components of SMI. Second, the possible active components were gradually separated on an high-performance liquid chromatography system under different conditions and individually tested in vitro for their effects on MDZ metabolism. Third, the active component obtained in the above experiment was collected and subjected to structural analysis, and identified as panaxytriol (PXT). Finally, it was validated that PXT had significant differential effects on 1'-hydroxylation and 4-hydroxylation of MDZ in various in vitro systems that were similar to those of SMI. We conclude that PXT is the constituent of SMI responsible for the differential effects on CYP3A4-mediated 1'-hydroxylation and 4-hydroxylation of MDZ.

  17. Methyl jasmonate differentially affects tocopherol content and tyrosine amino transferase activity in cultured cells of Amaranthus caudatus and Chenopodium quinoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognoni, F; Faudale, M; Poli, F; Biondi, S

    2009-03-01

    Tocopherols are lipid-soluble compounds synthesised exclusively by photosynthetic organisms. In this study, in vitro callus cultures were established from two plants that are naturally rich in tocopherols, Amaranthus caudatus and Chenopodium quinoa, in order to examine whether callus cultures were able to produce these compounds at levels comparable to those observed in planta. In both species, cotyledon explants produced the best callus induction and, once established, callus cultures were grown under two different hormonal treatments to check for effects of growth and to induce chloroplast differentiation in the cells. A rapid differentiation of chloroplasts occurred only in C. quinoa cell aggregates grown in the presence of benzyladenine, leading to the production of a homogeneous green callus. In both species, only alpha-tocopherol was produced by callus cultures, although levels were much lower than in planta, and the production was not influenced by the hormonal conditions. Interestingly, cell cultures of the two species responded in different ways to methyl jasmonate (MJ). In A. caudatus cultures, treatment with 100 mum MJ increased the production of alpha-tocopherol up to fivefold, and the inductive effect was influenced by the hormonal composition of the medium. This increase in alpha-tocopherol was associated with a proportional increase in tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) activity, one of the key enzymes involved in tocopherol biosynthesis. By contrast, in C. quinoa cultures, elicitation with MJ did not have any effect, neither on tocopherol production, nor on TAT activity. These results are discussed in relation to chloroplast differentiation and the interplay between jasmonates and phytohormones.

  18. A proteome study of secreted prostatic factors affecting osteoblastic activity: galectin-1 is involved in differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Jensen, Ole N; Moiseeva, Elena P

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone causing a predominantly osteosclerotic response. It has been shown that cells from the human prostate cancer cell line PC3 secrete factors that influence the behavior of osteoblast-like cells. Some of these factors with mitogenic activity have been found...... to 58 +/- 4%, 30 +/- 12, 72 +/- 9%, and 86 +/- 4%. In conclusion, galectin-1 modulated osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation. These effects were affected by IGF-I. Thus, galectin-1 is likely be involved in the osteoblastic response, caused by prostate cancer cells metastasizing into bone....../ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). One of these spots was identified as galectin-1. We examined whether PC3 CM, recombinant galectin-1 alone, or combined with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) had any effects on the proliferation or differentiation of human bone marrow stromal (h...

  19. Lipogems Product Treatment Increases the Proliferation Rate of Human Tendon Stem Cells without Affecting Their Stemness and Differentiation Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Menon, Alessandra; Ragone, Vincenza; Creo, Pasquale; Bergante, Sonia; Randelli, Filippo; De Girolamo, Laura; Alfieri Montrasio, Umberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Cabitza, Paolo; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the success rate of rotator cuff healing remains tremendous challenge. Among many approaches, the possibility of activating resident stem cells in situ, without the need to isolate them from biopsies, could represent valuable therapeutic strategy. Along this line, it has been recently demonstrated that lipoaspirate product, Lipogems, contains and produces growth-factors that may activate resident stem cells. In this study, human tendon stem cells (hTSCs) from the rotator cuff were cocultured in a transwell system with the Lipogems lipoaspirate product and compared to control untreated cells in terms of cell proliferation, morphology, stem cell marker and VEGF expression, and differentiation and migration capabilities. Results showed that the Lipogems product significantly increases the proliferation rate of hTSCs without altering their stemness and differentiation capability. Moreover, treated cells increase the expression of VEGF, which is crucial for the neovascularization of the tissue during the healing process. Overall, this study supports that directly activating hTSCs with the Lipogems lipoaspirate could represent a new practical therapeutic approach. In fact, obtaining a lipoaspirate is easier, safer, and more cost-effective than harvesting cells from tendon or bone marrow biopsies, expanding them in GMP facility and then reinjecting them in the patient.

  20. Ectopic expression a tomato KNOX Gene Tkn4 affects the formation and the differentiation of meristems and vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Hu, Guojian; Ren, Zhenxin; Deng, Wei; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-12-01

    The KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN genes are involved in maintenance of the shoot apical meristem which produces the whole above-ground body of vascular plants. In this report, a tomato homolog gene, named as Tkn4 (a nucleus targeted transcription factor) was identified and characterized. By performing RT-PCR, the transcript level of Tkn4 was separately found in stem, root, stamen, stigma, fruit and sepal but hardly visible in the leaf. Besides, Tkn4 was induced by a series of plant hormones. Overexpression of Tkn4 gene in tomato resulted in dwarf phenotype and strongly repressed the formation of shoot apical meristem, lateral meristem and cambiums in transgenic lines. The transgenic lines had wrinkled leaves and anatomic analysis showed that there was no obvious palisade tissues in the leaves and the layer of cells changed in vascular tissue (xylem and phloem). To explore the regulation network of Tkn4, RNA-sequencing was performed in overexpression lines and wild type plants, by which many genes related to the synthesis and the signal transduction of cytokinin, auxin, gibberellin, ethylene, abscisic acid, and tracheary element differentiation or extracellular matrix synthesis were significantly regulated. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Tkn4 plays important roles in regulating the biosynthesis and signal transduction of diverse plant hormones, and the formation and differentiation of meristems and vasculature in tomato.

  1. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment.

  2. Lipogems Product Treatment Increases the Proliferation Rate of Human Tendon Stem Cells without Affecting Their Stemness and Differentiation Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Randelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the success rate of rotator cuff healing remains tremendous challenge. Among many approaches, the possibility of activating resident stem cells in situ, without the need to isolate them from biopsies, could represent valuable therapeutic strategy. Along this line, it has been recently demonstrated that lipoaspirate product, Lipogems, contains and produces growth-factors that may activate resident stem cells. In this study, human tendon stem cells (hTSCs from the rotator cuff were cocultured in a transwell system with the Lipogems lipoaspirate product and compared to control untreated cells in terms of cell proliferation, morphology, stem cell marker and VEGF expression, and differentiation and migration capabilities. Results showed that the Lipogems product significantly increases the proliferation rate of hTSCs without altering their stemness and differentiation capability. Moreover, treated cells increase the expression of VEGF, which is crucial for the neovascularization of the tissue during the healing process. Overall, this study supports that directly activating hTSCs with the Lipogems lipoaspirate could represent a new practical therapeutic approach. In fact, obtaining a lipoaspirate is easier, safer, and more cost-effective than harvesting cells from tendon or bone marrow biopsies, expanding them in GMP facility and then reinjecting them in the patient.

  3. Lipogems Product Treatment Increases the Proliferation Rate of Human Tendon Stem Cells without Affecting Their Stemness and Differentiation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Menon, Alessandra; Ragone, Vincenza; Creo, Pasquale; Bergante, Sonia; Randelli, Filippo; De Girolamo, Laura; Alfieri Montrasio, Umberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Cabitza, Paolo; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the success rate of rotator cuff healing remains tremendous challenge. Among many approaches, the possibility of activating resident stem cells in situ, without the need to isolate them from biopsies, could represent valuable therapeutic strategy. Along this line, it has been recently demonstrated that lipoaspirate product, Lipogems, contains and produces growth-factors that may activate resident stem cells. In this study, human tendon stem cells (hTSCs) from the rotator cuff were cocultured in a transwell system with the Lipogems lipoaspirate product and compared to control untreated cells in terms of cell proliferation, morphology, stem cell marker and VEGF expression, and differentiation and migration capabilities. Results showed that the Lipogems product significantly increases the proliferation rate of hTSCs without altering their stemness and differentiation capability. Moreover, treated cells increase the expression of VEGF, which is crucial for the neovascularization of the tissue during the healing process. Overall, this study supports that directly activating hTSCs with the Lipogems lipoaspirate could represent a new practical therapeutic approach. In fact, obtaining a lipoaspirate is easier, safer, and more cost-effective than harvesting cells from tendon or bone marrow biopsies, expanding them in GMP facility and then reinjecting them in the patient. PMID:27057170

  4. RpoS differentially affects the general stress response and biofilm formation in the endophytic Serratia plymuthica G3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yuanyuan; Xu, Fang; Halliday, Nigel; Gao, Kexiang; Chan, Kok Gan; Cámara, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The σ(S) subunit RpoS of RNA polymerase functions as a master regulator of the general stress response in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. RpoS has been reported to modulate biocontrol properties in the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica IC1270. However, the role of RpoS in the stress response and biofilm formation in S. plymuthica remains largely unknown. Here we studied the role of RpoS from an endophytic S. plymuthica G3 in regulating these phenotypes. Mutational analysis demonstrated that RpoS positively regulates the global stress response to acid or alkaline stresses, oxidative stress, hyperosmolarity, heat shock and carbon starvation, in addition to proteolytic and chitinolytic activities. Interestingly, rpoS mutations resulted in significantly enhanced swimming motility, biofilm formation and production of the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which may contribute to competitive colonization and environmental fitness for survival. These findings provide further insight into the strain-specific role of RpoS in the endophytic strain G3 of S. plymuthica, where it confers resistance to general stresses encountered within the plant environment. The heterogeneous functionality of RpoS in rhizosphere and endophytic S. plymuthica populations may provide a selective advantage for better adaptation to various physiological and environmental stresses.

  5. Total and differential white blood cell counts, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the metabolic syndrome in non-affective psychoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian J; Mellor, Andrew; Buckley, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia, and is associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation. Schizophrenia is also associated with increased inflammation, including aberrant blood levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts, hsCRP, and the metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia and related non-affective psychoses. Fifty-nine inpatients and outpatients age 18-70 with non-affective psychotic disorders and 22 controls participated in this cross-sectional study. Subjects had a fasting blood draw between 8 and 9 am for glucose, lipids, total and differential WBC counts, and hsCRP. Vital signs and anthropometric measures were obtained. Patients with non-affective psychosis and the metabolic syndrome had significantly higher total WBC counts, monocytes, and hsCRP levels than patients without the metabolic syndrome (p≤0.04 for each). In binary logistic regression analyses, after controlling for potential confounding effects of age, race, sex, age at first hospitalization for psychosis, parental history of diabetes, smoking, and psychotropic medications, total WBC count, monocytes, and hsCRP were significant predictors of metabolic syndrome in patients (p≤0.04 for each). hsCRP was also a significant predictor of increased waist circumference and triglycerides in patients (p≤0.05 for each). Our findings suggest that measurement of total and differential WBC counts and hsCRP blood levels may be germane to the clinical care of patients with schizophrenia and related disorders, and support an association between inflammation and metabolic disturbance in these patients.

  6. Two strains of Pseudomonas fluorscens bacteria differentially affect survivorship of waxworm (Galleria mellonella) larvae exposed to an arthropod fungal pathogen, Beauveria bassiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were found contaminating a biopesticide used in a previous study against Varroa destructor infestations in honey bee hives. In the aforementioned study the biopesticide, a formulation of the arthropod pathogen Beauveria bassiana, failed to have any impact on t...

  7. Intermediate and long-term memories of associative learning are differentially affected by transcription versus translation blockers in Lymnaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Susan; Scheibenstock, Andi; McComb, Chloe; Lukowiak, Ken

    2003-05-01

    Aerial respiratory behaviour in the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, can be operantly conditioned. This associative learning then undergoes consolidation into a long-lasting memory which, depending on the training procedure used, causes intermediate-term memory (ITM; lasting 3 h) or long-term memory (LTM; lasting >6 h) to be formed. We determined the differential susceptibility of these two forms of memory to translation and transcription blockers. The injection of a translation blocker, Anisomycin, 2.5 h before training prevents the establishment of both ITM and LTM. On the other hand, injection of the transcription blocker Actinomycin D, 2.5 h before training, did not prevent the establishment of ITM, but did, however, prevent LTM formation. Thus in Lymnaea, following associative learning, both ITM and LTM are dependent on new protein synthesis. ITM appears to be dependent on protein synthesis from preexisting transcription factors, whilst LTM is dependent on protein synthesis from new transcription messages.

  8. Violent and nonviolent video games differentially affect physical aggression for individuals high vs. low in dispositional anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Christopher R; Bartholow, Bruce D; Saults, J Scott

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous experiments have shown that exposure to violent video games (VVG) causes increases in aggression, relatively few studies have investigated the extent to which this effect differs as a function of theoretically relevant individual difference factors. This study investigated whether video game content differentially influences aggression as a function of individual differences in trait anger. Participants were randomly assigned to play a violent or nonviolent video game before completing a task in which they could behave aggressively. Results showed that participants high in trait anger were the most aggressive, but only if they first played a VVG. This relationship held while statistically controlling for dimensions other than violent content on which game conditions differed (e.g. frustration, arousal). Implications of these findings for models explaining the effects of video games on behavior are discussed.

  9. Chondrogenic differentiation of human subchondral progenitor cells is affected by synovial fluid from donors with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Jan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfracture is a first-line treatment option for cartilage repair. In microfracture, subchondral mesenchymal cortico-spongious progenitor cells (CSP enter the defect and form cartilage repair tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of joint disease conditions on the in vitro chondrogenesis of human CSP. Methods CSP were harvested from the subchondral bone marrow. CSP characterization was performed by analysis of cell surface antigen pattern and by assessing the chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential, histologically. To assess the effect of synovial fluid (SF on chondrogenesis of CSP, micro-masses were stimulated with SF from healthy (ND, osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis donors (RA without transforming growth factor beta 3. Results CSP showed the typical cell surface antigen pattern known from mesenchymal stem cells and were capable of osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. In micro-masses stimulated with SF, histological staining as well as gene expression analysis of typical chondrogenic marker genes showed that SF from ND and OA induced the chondrogenic marker genes aggrecan, types II and IX collagen, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and link protein, compared to controls not treated with SF. In contrast, the supplementation with SF from RA donors decreased the expression of aggrecan, type II collagen, COMP and link protein, compared to CSP treated with SF from ND or OA. Conclusion These results suggest that in RA, SF may impair cartilage repair by subchondral mesenchymal progenitor cells in microfracture, while in OA, SF may has no negative, but a delaying effect on the cartilage matrix formation.

  10. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  11. Hormonal status and age differentially affect tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC on learning in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Winsauer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hormone status and age on the development of tolerance to D9-THC were assessed in sham-operated (intact or ovariectomized (OVX female rats that received either intraperitoneal saline or 5.6 mg/kg of D9-THC daily from postnatal day (PD 75 to 180 (early adulthood onward or PD 35 to 140 (adolescence onward. During this time, the 4 groups for each age (i.e., intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline, and OVX/THC were trained in a learning and performance procedure and dose-effect curves were established for D9-THC (0.56-56 mg/kg and the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R antagonist rimonabant (0.32-10 mg/kg. Despite the persistence of small rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in intact and OVX females from both ages during chronic D9-THC, all of the D9-THC groups developed tolerance. However, the magnitude of tolerance, as well as the effect of hormone status, varied with the age at which chronic D9-THC was initiated. There was no evidence of dependence in any of the groups. Hippocampal protein expression of CB1R, AHA1 (a co-chaperone of CB1R and HSP90β (a molecular chaperone modulated by AHA-1 was affected more by OVX than chronic D9-THC; striatal protein expression was not consistently affected by either manipulation. Hippocampal BDNF expression varied with age, hormone status, and chronic treatment. Thus, hormonal status differentially affects the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (D9-THC on learning and performance behavior in adolescent, but not adult, female rats. These factors and their interactions also differentially affect cannabinoid signaling proteins in the hippocampus and striatum, and ultimately, neural plasticity.

  12. Estradiol differentially affects auditory recognition and learning according to photoperiodic state in the adult male songbird, European starling (Sturnus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Calisi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in hormones can affect many types of learning in vertebrates. Adults experience fluctuations in a multitude of hormones over a temporal scale, from local, rapid action to more long-term, seasonal changes. Endocrine changes during development can affect behavioral outcomes in adulthood, but how learning is affected in adults by hormone fluctuations experienced during adulthood is less understood. Previous reports have implicated the sex steroid hormone estradiol (E2 in both male and female vertebrate cognitive functioning. Here, we examined the effects of E2 on auditory recognition and learning in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. European starlings are photoperiodic, seasonally breeding songbirds that undergo different periods of reproductive activity according to annual changes in day length. We simulated these reproductive periods, specifically 1. photosensitivity, 2. photostimulation, and 3. photorefractoriness in captive birds by altering day length. During each period, we manipulated circulating E2 and examined multiple measures of learning. To manipulate circulating E2, we used subcutaneous implants containing either 17-β E2 and/or fadrozole (FAD, a highly specific aromatase inhibitor that suppresses E2 production in the body and the brain, and measured the latency for birds to learn and respond to short, male conspecific song segments (motifs. We report that photostimulated birds given E2 had higher response rates and responded with better accuracy than those given saline controls or FAD. Conversely, photosensitive, animals treated with E2 responded with less accuracy than those given FAD. These results demonstrate how circulating E2 and photoperiod can interact to shape auditory recognition and learning in adults, driving it in opposite directions in different states.

  13. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  14. Water deficit alters differentially metabolic pathways affecting important flavor and quality traits in grape berries of Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deluc Laurent G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water deficit has significant effects on grape berry composition resulting in improved wine quality by the enhancement of color, flavors, or aromas. While some pathways or enzymes affected by water deficit have been identified, little is known about the global effects of water deficit on grape berry metabolism. Results The effects of long-term, seasonal water deficit on berries of Cabernet Sauvignon, a red-wine grape, and Chardonnay, a white-wine grape were analyzed by integrated transcript and metabolite profiling. Over the course of berry development, the steady-state transcript abundance of approximately 6,000 Unigenes differed significantly between the cultivars and the irrigation treatments. Water deficit most affected the phenylpropanoid, ABA, isoprenoid, carotenoid, amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways. Targeted metabolites were profiled to confirm putative changes in specific metabolic pathways. Water deficit activated the expression of numerous transcripts associated with glutamate and proline biosynthesis and some committed steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway that increased anthocyanin concentrations in Cabernet Sauvignon. In Chardonnay, water deficit activated parts of the phenylpropanoid, energy, carotenoid and isoprenoid metabolic pathways that contribute to increased concentrations of antheraxanthin, flavonols and aroma volatiles. Water deficit affected the ABA metabolic pathway in both cultivars. Berry ABA concentrations were highly correlated with 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED1 transcript abundance, whereas the mRNA expression of other NCED genes and ABA catabolic and glycosylation processes were largely unaffected. Water deficit nearly doubled ABA concentrations within berries of Cabernet Sauvignon, whereas it decreased ABA in Chardonnay at véraison and shortly thereafter. Conclusion The metabolic responses of grapes to water deficit varied with the cultivar and fruit pigmentation

  15. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutrand LB

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laetitia-Barbollat Boutrand,1 Amélie Thépot,2 Charlotte Muther,3 Aurélie Boher,2 Julie Robic,4 Christelle Guéré,4 Katell Vié,4 Odile Damour,5 Jérôme Lamartine1,3 1Departement de Biologie, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, 2LabSkinCreations, 3CNRS UMR5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et d’Ingénierie Thérapeutique (LBTI, Lyon, 4Laboratoires Clarins, Cergy-Pontoise, 5Banque de Tissus et Cellules, Hospices Civiles de Lyon, Lyon, France Abstract: Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH] or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing

  16. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization.

  17. In ovo exposure to o,p -DDE affects sexual development but not sexual differentiation in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulias, D.M.; Villalobos, Sergio A.; Meadows, J.; Noltie, Douglas B.; Giesy, J.P.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Despite being banned in many countries, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) continue to be found in fish tissues at concentrations of concern. Like o,p -DDT, o,p -DDE is estrogenic and is believed to exert its effects through binding to the estrogen receptor. The limited toxicologic data for o,p -DDE suggest that it decreases fecundity and fertility of fishes. We conducted an egg injection study using the d-rR strain of medaka and environmentally relevant concentrations of o,p -DDE to examine its effects on sexual differentiation and development. The gonads of exposed fish showed no evidence of sex reversal or intersex. However, other gonad abnormalities occurred in exposed individuals. Females exhibited few vitellogenic oocytes and increased atresia. Male testes appeared morphologically normal but were very small. Gonadosomatic index values for both sexes were lower for exposed fish. Our observations of abnormal female and very small male gonads after in ovo o,p -DDE exposure may be indicative of effects on early endocrine processes important for normal ovarian and testicular development.

  18. Tail-pinch stress and REM sleep deprivation differentially affect sensorimotor gating function in modafinil-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yia-Ping; Tung, Che-Se; Chuang, Chia-Hsin; Lo, Shih-Mao; Ku, Yu-Chi

    2011-05-16

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is a phenomenon in which a mild stimulus attenuates a cross-modality startle response to later intense stimulation. PPI is thought to index the central inhibitory mechanism through which behavioural responses are filtered. The present study compared the effects of two stress paradigms on the acoustic startle response (ASR) and on PPI in a rat model. The tail-pinch (TP) method produces an acute and immediate stressful condition, whereas rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) leads to a more persistent and long-term stress. Our results demonstrated that in rats, TP stress reduced the size of the ASR, and REMSD impaired PPI. The wake-promoting agent modafinil (MOD) had no effect on PPI if given alone. However, MOD reduced the ASR and PPI under TP stress, whereas only PPI was reduced by MOD after 96 h of REMSD. These results suggest that distinct stress paradigms differentially mediated sensorimotor gating abilities in terms of either responsiveness to the stimulus or information-filtering capabilities.

  19. Microtubule Destabilizer KIF2A Undergoes Distinct Site-Specific Phosphorylation Cascades that Differentially Affect Neuronal Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayuki Ogawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons exhibit dynamic structural changes in response to extracellular stimuli. Microtubules (MTs provide rapid and dramatic cytoskeletal changes within the structural framework. However, the molecular mechanisms and signaling networks underlying MT dynamics remain unknown. Here, we have applied a comprehensive and quantitative phospho-analysis of the MT destabilizer KIF2A to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of MT dynamics within neurons in response to extracellular signals. Interestingly, we identified two different sets of KIF2A phosphorylation profiles that accelerate (A-type and brake (B-type the MT depolymerization activity of KIF2A. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates PAK1 and CDK5 kinases, which decrease the MT depolymerizing activity of KIF2A through B-type phosphorylation, resulting in enhanced outgrowth of neural processes. In contrast, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA induces ROCK2 kinase, which suppresses neurite outgrowth from round cells via A-type phosphorylation. We propose that these two mutually exclusive forms of KIF2A phosphorylation differentially regulate neuronal morphogenesis during development.

  20. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the Streptococcus thermophilus histamine biosynthesis gene cluster: factors that affect differential hdcA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calles-Enríquez, Marina; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Andersen, Pia Skov;

    2010-01-01

    Histamine, a toxic compound that is formed by the decarboxylation of histidine through the action of microbial decarboxylases, can accumulate in fermented food products. From a total of 69 Streptococcus thermophilus strains screened, two strains, CHCC1524 and CHCC6483, showed the capacity...... to produce histamine. The hdc clusters of S. thermophilus CHCC1524 and CHCC6483 were sequenced, and the factors that affect histamine biosynthesis and histidine-decarboxylating gene (hdcA) expression were studied. The hdc cluster began with the hdcA gene, was followed by a transporter (hdcP), and ended...... acquisition through a horizontal transfer mechanism. Transcriptional analysis of the hdc cluster revealed the existence of a polycistronic mRNA covering the three genes. The histidine-decarboxylating gene (hdcA) of S. thermophilus demonstrated maximum expression during the stationary growth phase, with high...

  1. Objectification in Virtual Romantic Contexts: Perceived Discrepancies between Self and Partner Ideals Differentially affect Body Consciousness in Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Nicole M; Quinn, Diane M; Marsh, Kerry L

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined whether exposure to sexually objectifying images in a potential romantic partner's virtual apartment affects discrepancies between people's perception of their own appearance (i.e., self-perceptions) and their perception of the body ideal that is considered desirable to a romantic partner (i.e., partner-ideals). Participants were 114 heterosexual undergraduate students (57 women and 57 men) from a northeastern U.S. university. The study used a 2 (Participant Gender) x 2 (Virtual Environment: Sexualized vs. Non-Sexualized) between-subjects design. We predicted that women exposed to sexually objectifying images in a virtual environment would report greater discrepancies between their self-perceptions and partner-ideals than men, which in turn would contribute to women's body consciousness. Findings support this hypothesis and show that perceived discrepancies account for the relationship between exposure to sexually objectifying images and body consciousness for women but not men. We also found gender asymmetries in objectification responses when each component of perceived discrepancies, i.e., self-perceptions versus perceptions of a romantic partner's body ideal, were examined separately. For men, exposure to muscular sexualized images was significantly associated with their self-perceptions but not their perceptions of the body size that is considered desirable to a romantic partner. For women, exposure to thin sexualized images was significantly associated with their perceptions that a romantic partner preferred a woman with a smaller body size. However, exposure to these images did not affect women's self-perceptions. Implications for gender asymmetries in objectification responses and perceived discrepancies that include a romantic partner's perceptions are discussed.

  2. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-08-15

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways.

  3. Diet- and Genetically-Induced Obesity Differentially Affect the Fecal Microbiome and Metabolome in Apc1638N Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Pfalzer

    Full Text Available Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC, and alterations in the colonic microbiome and metabolome may be mechanistically involved in this relationship. The relative contribution of diet and obesity per se are unclear. We compared the effect of diet- and genetically-induced obesity on the intestinal microbiome and metabolome in a mouse model of CRC. Apc1638N mice were made obese by either high fat (HF feeding or the presence of the Leprdb/db (DbDb mutation. Intestinal tumors were quantified and stool microbiome and metabolome were profiled. Genetic obesity, and to a lesser extent HF feeding, promoted intestinal tumorigenesis. Each induced distinct microbial patterns: taxa enriched in HF were mostly Firmicutes (6 of 8 while those enriched in DbDb were split between Firmicutes (7 of 12 and Proteobacteria (5 of 12. Parabecteroides distasonis was lower in tumor-bearing mice and its abundance was inversely associated with colonic Il1b production (p<0.05. HF and genetic obesity altered the abundance of 49 and 40 fecal metabolites respectively, with 5 in common. Of these 5, adenosine was also lower in obese and in tumor-bearing mice (p<0.05 and its concentration was inversely associated with colonic Il1b and Tnf production (p<0.05. HF and genetic obesity differentially alter the intestinal microbiome and metabolome. A depletion of adenosine and P.distasonis in tumor-bearing mice could play a mechanistic role in tumor formation. Adenosine and P. distasonis have previously been shown to be anti-inflammatory in the colon and we postulate their reduction could promote tumorigenesis by de-repressing inflammation.

  4. Physical Activity Differentially Affects the Cecal Microbiota of Ovariectomized Female Rats Selectively Bred for High and Low Aerobic Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tzu-Wen; Park, Young-Min; Holscher, Hannah D; Padilla, Jaume; Scroggins, Rebecca J; Welly, Rebecca; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Swanson, Kelly S

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is considered a relevant factor in obesity and associated metabolic diseases, for which postmenopausal women are particularly at risk. Increasing physical activity has been recognized as an efficacious approach to prevent or treat obesity, yet the impact of physical activity on the microbiota remains under-investigated. We examined the impacts of voluntary exercise on host metabolism and gut microbiota in ovariectomized (OVX) high capacity (HCR) and low capacity running (LCR) rats. HCR and LCR rats (age = 27 wk) were OVX and fed a high-fat diet (45% kcal fat) ad libitum and housed in cages equipped with (exercise, EX) or without (sedentary, SED) running wheels for 11 wk (n = 7-8/group). We hypothesized that increased physical activity would hinder weight gain, increase metabolic health and shift the microbiota of LCR rats, resulting in populations more similar to that of HCR rats. Animals were compared for characteristic metabolic parameters including body composition, lipid profile and energy expenditure; whereas cecal digesta were collected for DNA extraction. 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon Illumina MiSeq sequencing was performed, followed by analysis using QIIME 1.8.0 to assess cecal microbiota. Voluntary exercise decreased body and fat mass, and normalized fasting NEFA concentrations of LCR rats, despite only running one-third the distance of HCR rats. Exercise, however, increased food intake, weight gain and fat mass of HCR rats. Exercise clustered the gut microbial community of LCR rats, which separated them from the other groups. Assessments of specific taxa revealed significant (p<0.05) line by exercise interactions including shifts in the abundances of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Relative abundance of Christensenellaceae family was higher (p = 0.026) in HCR than LCR rats, and positively correlated (p<0.05) with food intake, body weight and running distance. These findings demonstrate that exercise differentially impacts

  5. Ivabradine and metoprolol differentially affect cardiac glucose metabolism despite similar heart rate reduction in a mouse model of dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Fanny; Lauzier, Benjamin; Ruiz, Matthieu; Shi, Yanfen; Lachance, Dominic; Rivard, Marie-Eve; Bolduc, Virginie; Thorin, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2016-10-01

    While heart rate reduction (HRR) is a target for the management of patients with heart disease, contradictory results were reported using ivabradine, which selectively inhibits the pacemaker If current, vs. β-blockers like metoprolol. This study aimed at testing whether similar HRR with ivabradine vs. metoprolol differentially modulates cardiac energy substrate metabolism, a factor determinant for cardiac function, in a mouse model of dyslipidemia (hApoB(+/+);LDLR(-/-)). Following a longitudinal study design, we used 3- and 6-mo-old mice, untreated or treated for 3 mo with ivabradine or metoprolol. Cardiac function was evaluated in vivo and ex vivo in working hearts perfused with (13)C-labeled substrates to assess substrate fluxes through energy metabolic pathways. Compared with 3-mo-old, 6-mo-old dyslipidemic mice had similar cardiac hemodynamics in vivo but impaired (P ivabradine-treated hearts displayed significantly higher stroke volume values and glycolysis vs. their metoprolol-treated counterparts ex vivo, values for the ivabradine group being often not significantly different from 3-mo-old mice. Further analyses highlighted additional significant cardiac alterations with disease progression, namely in the total tissue level of proteins modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), whose formation is governed by glucose metabolism via the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which showed a similar pattern with ivabradine vs. metoprolol treatment. Collectively, our results emphasize the implication of alterations in cardiac glucose metabolism and signaling linked to disease progression in our mouse model. Despite similar HRR, ivabradine, but not metoprolol, preserved cardiac function and glucose metabolism during disease progression.

  6. CaMKII binding to GluN2B is differentially affected by macromolecular crowding reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayton J Goodell

    Full Text Available Binding of the Ca2+/calmodulin(CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII to the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR subunit GluN2B controls long-term potentiation (LTP, a form of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie learning and memory. Regulation of this interaction is well-studied biochemically, but not under conditions that mimic the macromolecular crowding found within cells. Notably, previous molecular crowding experiments with lysozyme indicated an effect on the CaMKII holoenzyme conformation. Here, we found that the effect of molecular crowding on Ca2+/CaM-induced CaMKII binding to immobilized GluN2B in vitro depended on the specific crowding reagent. While binding was reduced by lysozyme, it was enhanced by BSA. The ATP content in the BSA preparation caused CaMKII autophosphorylation at T286 during the binding reaction; however, enhanced binding was also observed when autophosphorylation was blocked. Importantly, the positive regulation by nucleotide and BSA (as well as other macromolecular crowding reagents did not alleviate the requirement for CaMKII stimulation to induce GluN2B binding. The differential effect of lysozyme (14 kDa and BSA (66 kDa was not due to size difference, as both dextran-10 and dextran-70 enhanced binding. By contrast, crowding with immunoglobulin G (IgG reduced binding. Notably, lysozyme and IgG but not BSA directly bound to Ca2+/CaM in an overlay assay, suggesting a competition of lysozyme and IgG with the Ca2+/CaM-stimulus that induces CaMKII/GluN2B binding. However, lysozyme negatively regulated binding even when it was instead induced by CaMKII T286 phosphorylation. Alternative modes of competition would be with CaMKII or GluN2B, and the negative effects of lysozyme and IgG indeed also correlated with specific or non-specific binding to the immobilized GluN2B. Thus, the effect of any specific crowding reagent can differ, depending on its additional direct effects on CaMKII/GluN2B binding. However, the

  7. Physical Activity Differentially Affects the Cecal Microbiota of Ovariectomized Female Rats Selectively Bred for High and Low Aerobic Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Wen Liu

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is considered a relevant factor in obesity and associated metabolic diseases, for which postmenopausal women are particularly at risk. Increasing physical activity has been recognized as an efficacious approach to prevent or treat obesity, yet the impact of physical activity on the microbiota remains under-investigated. We examined the impacts of voluntary exercise on host metabolism and gut microbiota in ovariectomized (OVX high capacity (HCR and low capacity running (LCR rats. HCR and LCR rats (age = 27 wk were OVX and fed a high-fat diet (45% kcal fat ad libitum and housed in cages equipped with (exercise, EX or without (sedentary, SED running wheels for 11 wk (n = 7-8/group. We hypothesized that increased physical activity would hinder weight gain, increase metabolic health and shift the microbiota of LCR rats, resulting in populations more similar to that of HCR rats. Animals were compared for characteristic metabolic parameters including body composition, lipid profile and energy expenditure; whereas cecal digesta were collected for DNA extraction. 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon Illumina MiSeq sequencing was performed, followed by analysis using QIIME 1.8.0 to assess cecal microbiota. Voluntary exercise decreased body and fat mass, and normalized fasting NEFA concentrations of LCR rats, despite only running one-third the distance of HCR rats. Exercise, however, increased food intake, weight gain and fat mass of HCR rats. Exercise clustered the gut microbial community of LCR rats, which separated them from the other groups. Assessments of specific taxa revealed significant (p<0.05 line by exercise interactions including shifts in the abundances of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Relative abundance of Christensenellaceae family was higher (p = 0.026 in HCR than LCR rats, and positively correlated (p<0.05 with food intake, body weight and running distance. These findings demonstrate that exercise differentially

  8. Health care workers and AIDS: a differential study of beliefs and affects associated with accidental exposure to blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosa Rodrigues Rissi

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze affective and cognitive determinants of the professional work of individuals caring for patients with HIV/AIDS, in view of the risk and/or experience of accidental exposure to blood. We drew on the theoretical-methodological references of Fishbein & Ajzen and Maslow's theory. Fifty health care workers were evaluated using an attitudes questionnaire and a needs and motivations instrument. The research verified differences between answers by health care workers who had never suffered accidents and those who had already experienced accidental exposure to blood. Health care workers did their work activities motivated by the need for self-fulfillment and valued their own performance when they were able to meet the patients' emotional needs. Among health professionals who had never experienced accidental exposure to blood, the predominant beliefs was that patients feel remorse over having expose themselves to HIV. Accidental exposure to blood raises difficulties in personal life. Technical aspects are also associated with the possibility of accidental exposure to blood.

  9. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Peng, E-mail: peng-ji@fsm.northwestern.edu [Department of Pathology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Lodish, Harvey F. [Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankyrin and band 3 are not required for erythroblasts enucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ankyrin does not affect erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of band 3 influences erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. -- Abstract: During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  10. ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases affect Ras-dependent cell signaling differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonini Chiara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases p44ERK1 and p42ERK2 are crucial components of the regulatory machinery underlying normal and malignant cell proliferation. A currently accepted model maintains that ERK1 and ERK2 are regulated similarly and contribute to intracellular signaling by phosphorylating a largely common subset of substrates, both in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Results Here, we show that ablation of ERK1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells by gene targeting and RNA interference results in an enhancement of ERK2-dependent signaling and in a significant growth advantage. By contrast, knockdown of ERK2 almost completely abolishes normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of ERK1 but not of ERK2 in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits oncogenic Ras-mediated proliferation and colony formation. These phenotypes are independent of the kinase activity of ERK1, as expression of a catalytically inactive form of ERK1 is equally effective. Finally, ectopic expression of ERK1 but not ERK2 is sufficient to attenuate Ras-dependent tumor formation in nude mice. Conclusion These results reveal an unexpected interplay between ERK1 and ERK2 in transducing Ras-dependent cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas ERK2 seems to have a positive role in controlling normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation, ERK1 probably affects the overall signaling output of the cell by antagonizing ERK2 activity.

  11. Health care workers and AIDS: a differential study of beliefs and affects associated with accidental exposure to blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, Maria Rosa Rodrigues; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio de Castro

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze affective and cognitive determinants of the professional work of individuals caring for patients with HIV/AIDS, in view of the risk and/or experience of accidental exposure to blood. We drew on the theoretical-methodological references of Fishbein & Ajzen and Maslow's theory. Fifty health care workers were evaluated using an attitudes questionnaire and a needs and motivations instrument. The research verified differences between answers by health care workers who had never suffered accidents and those who had already experienced accidental exposure to blood. Health care workers did their work activities motivated by the need for self-fulfillment and valued their own performance when they were able to meet the patients' emotional needs. Among health professionals who had never experienced accidental exposure to blood, the predominant beliefs was that patients feel remorse over having expose themselves to HIV. Accidental exposure to blood raises difficulties in personal life. Technical aspects are also associated with the possibility of accidental exposure to blood.

  12. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Viruses are Differentially Affected by Parasitoids Depending on the Mode of Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Viñuela

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between agents in multitrophic systems are complex and very specific. Insect-transmitted plant viruses are completely dependent on the behaviour and distribution patterns of their vectors. The presence of natural enemies may directly affect aphid behaviour and spread of plant viruses, as the escape response of aphids might cause a potential risk for virus dispersal. The spatio-temporal dynamics of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV, transmitted by Aphis gossypii in a non-persistent and persistent manner, respectively, were evaluated at short and long term in the presence and absence of the aphid parasitoid, Aphidius colemani. SADIE methodology was used to study the distribution patterns of both the virus and its vector, and their degree of association. Results suggested that parasitoids promoted aphid dispersion at short term, which enhanced CMV spread, though consequences of parasitism suggest potential benefits for disease control at long term. Furthermore, A. colemani significantly limited the spread and incidence of the persistent virus CABYV at long term. The impact of aphid parasitoids on the dispersal of plant viruses with different transmission modes is discussed.

  13. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  14. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  15. Avermectins differentially affect ethanol intake and receptor function: implications for developing new therapeutics for alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Liana; Yardley, Megan M; Khoja, Sheraz; Trudell, James R; Hyunh, Nhat; Louie, Stan G; Petasis, Nicos A; Alkana, Ronald L; Davies, Daryl L

    2014-06-01

    Our laboratory is investigating ivermectin (IVM) and other members of the avermectin family as new pharmaco-therapeutics to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Earlier work found that IVM significantly reduced ethanol intake in mice and that this effect likely reflects IVM's ability to modulate ligand-gated ion channels. We hypothesized that structural modifications that enhance IVM's effects on key receptors and/or increase its brain concentration should improve its anti-alcohol efficacy. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the abilities of IVM and two other avermectins, abamectin (ABM) and selamectin (SEL), to reduce ethanol intake in mice, to alter modulation of GABAARs and P2X4Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes and to increase their ability to penetrate the brain. IVM and ABM significantly reduced ethanol intake and antagonized the inhibitory effects of ethanol on P2X4R function. In contrast, SEL did not affect either measure, despite achieving higher brain concentrations than IVM and ABM. All three potentiated GABAAR function. These findings suggest that chemical structure and effects on receptor function play key roles in the ability of avermectins to reduce ethanol intake and that these factors are more important than brain penetration alone. The direct relationship between the effect of these avermectins on P2X4R function and ethanol intake suggest that the ability to antagonize ethanol-mediated inhibition of P2X4R function may be a good predictor of the potential of an avermectin to reduce ethanol intake and support the use of avermectins as a platform for developing novel drugs to prevent and/or treat AUDs.

  16. Differential S1P Receptor Profiles on M1- and M2-Polarized Macrophages Affect Macrophage Cytokine Production and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Macrophages are key players in complex biological processes. In response to environmental signals, macrophages undergo polarization towards a proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that acts via 5 G-protein coupled receptors (S1P1–5) in order to influence a broad spectrum of biological processes. This study assesses S1P receptor expression on macrophages before and after M1 and M2 polarization and performs a comparative analysis of S1P signalling in the two activational states of macrophages. Methods. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) from C57 BL/6 mice were cultured under either M1- or M2-polarizing conditions. S1P-receptor expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Influence of S1P on macrophage activation, migration, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion was assessed in vitro. Results. All 5 S1P receptor subclasses were expressed in macrophages. Culture under both M1- and M2-polarizing conditions led to significant downregulation of S1P1. In contrast, M1-polarized macrophages significantly downregulated S1P4. The expression of the remaining three S1P receptors did not change. S1P increased expression of iNOS under M2-polarizing conditions. Furthermore, S1P induced chemotaxis in M1 macrophages and changed cytokine production in M2 macrophages. Phagocytosis was not affected by S1P-signalling. Discussion. The expression of different specific S1P receptor profiles may provide a possibility to selectively influence M1- or M2-polarized macrophages.

  17. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroni, Paola [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Brini, Anna Teresa [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Arrigoni, Elena [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Girolamo, Laura de [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Niada, Stefania [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina, E-mail: a.desiderio@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  18. Differential neural processing of unpleasant haptic sensations in somatic and affective partitions of the insula in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonenberger, Martina; Plener, Paul L; Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Grön, Georg; Abler, Birgit

    2015-12-30

    Altered perception and neural processing of pain have been observed during non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Evidence suggests that this phenomenon could be associated with the affective rather than the somatosensory dimension of pain. Sub-partitions of the insula have been suggested to process these different aspects differentially. In the present study, activation within the posterior, middle, and anterior partitions of the insula upon unpleasant electric stimulation was compared between subjects with a history of NSSI and healthy controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated a sample of 30 subjects, 14 of them with a lifetime history of NSSI. Unpleasant electric stimulation to the dorsum of the non-dominant hand was performed at four levels of increasing intensity. Significantly increasing posterior insula activation, which is likely to reflect the somatosensory aspects of unpleasant haptic sensations, was found upon parametrically increasing electric stimulation in both groups. By contrast, activation of the anterior insula, rather related to the more affective aspects of distressing stimuli, was significantly modulated only in the control group, but not in subjects with NSSI. These findings may support present hypotheses of altered processing of the more affective aspects of unpleasant or distressing experiences in NSSI, as a putatively relevant factor for understanding the etiology of this behavior.

  19. Prenatal Valproate Exposure Differentially Affects Parvalbumin-Expressing Neurons and Related Circuits in the Cortex and Striatum of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Emanuel; Filice, Federica; Schwaller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a number of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental diseases characterized by core behavioral symptoms in the domains of social interaction, language/communication and repetitive or stereotyped patterns of behavior. In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) has evolved as a highly recognized rodent ASD model due to the robust behavioral phenotype observed in the offspring and the proven construct-, face- and predictive validity of the model. The number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV+) GABAergic interneurons has been consistently reported to be decreased in human ASD subjects and in ASD animal models. The presumed loss of this neuron subpopulation hereafter termed Pvalb neurons and/or PV deficits were proposed to result in an excitation/inhibition imbalance often observed in ASD. Importantly, loss of Pvalb neurons and decreased/absent PV protein levels have two fundamentally different consequences. Thus, Pvalb neurons were investigated in in utero VPA-exposed male (“VPA”) mice in the striatum, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and somatosensory cortex (SSC), three ASD-associated brain regions. Unbiased stereology of PV+ neurons and Vicia Villosa Agglutinin-positive (VVA+) perineuronal nets, which specifically enwrap Pvalb neurons, was carried out. Analyses of PV protein expression and mRNA levels for Pvalb, Gad67, Kcnc1, Kcnc2, Kcns3, Hcn1, Hcn2, and Hcn4 were performed. We found a ∼15% reduction in the number of PV+ cells and decreased Pvalb mRNA and PV protein levels in the striatum of VPA mice compared to controls, while the number of VVA+ cells was unchanged, indicating that Pvalb neurons were affected at the level of the transcriptome. In selected cortical regions (mPFC, SSC) of VPA mice, no quantitative loss/decrease of PV+ cells was observed. However, expression of Kcnc1, coding for the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.1 specifically expressed in Pvalb neurons, was decreased by ∼40% in forebrain lysates of VPA mice

  20. Ecological factors differentially affect mercury levels in two species of sympatric marine birds of the North Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hipfner, J.M., E-mail: mark.hipfner@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, RR 1 5421 Robertson Road, Delta, BC, V4K 3N2 (Canada); Hobson, K.A., E-mail: keith.hobson@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK, S7N 3H5 (Canada); Elliott, J.E., E-mail: john.elliot@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, RR 1 5421 Robertson Road, Delta, BC, V4K 3N2 (Canada)

    2011-03-01

    factors that might affect mercury burdens in marine predators. - Research Highlights: {yields} We measured mercury levels in two seabirds across two entire breeding seasons. {yields} Levels in rhinoceros auklets varied among years and foraging habitats, and peaked prior to laying. {yields} Levels in Cassin's auklets were much more constant. {yields} Lack of consistency within and between species accords with disparate results of earlier studies.

  1. Extract of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs 7630) displays anti-infective properties by enhanced phagocytosis and differential modulation of host-bacteria interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Andreas; Frank, Uwe

    2008-05-01

    EPs 7630 is an aqueous-ethanolic extract of the roots of PELARGONIUM SIDOIDES that displays well-documented benefits in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). IN VITRO and animal investigations have revealed various anti-infective properties of EPs 7630. The present review sums up recently published IN VITRO investigations that have shown positive effects on the activity of human peripheral blood phagocytes (PBP) and differential modulation of the interactions between group A streptococci and the host's epithelial barrier.

  2. Maternal postpartum corticosterone and fluoxetine differentially affect adult male and female offspring on anxiety-like behavior, stress reactivity, and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobinath, Aarthi R; Workman, Joanna L; Chow, Carmen; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects approximately 15% of mothers, disrupts maternal care, and can represent a form of early life adversity for the developing offspring. Intriguingly, male and female offspring are differentially vulnerable to the effects of PPD. Antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, are commonly prescribed for treating PPD. However, fluoxetine can reach offspring via breast milk, raising serious concerns regarding the long-term consequences of infant exposure to fluoxetine. The goal of this study was to examine the long-term effects of maternal postpartum corticosterone (CORT, a model of postpartum stress/depression) and concurrent maternal postpartum fluoxetine on behavioral, endocrine, and neural measures in adult male and female offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley dams were treated daily with either CORT or oil and fluoxetine or saline from postnatal days 2-23, and offspring were weaned and left undisturbed until adulthood. Here we show that maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis negative feedback in adult male, but not female, offspring. Furthermore, maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased the density of immature neurons (doublecortin-expressing) in the hippocampus of adult male offspring but decreased the density of immature neurons in adult female offspring. Maternal postpartum CORT blunted HPA axis negative feedback in males and tended to increase density of immature neurons in males but decreased it in females. These results indicate that maternal postpartum CORT and fluoxetine can have long-lasting effects on anxiety-like behavior, HPA axis negative feedback, and adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that adult male and female offspring are differentially affected by these maternal manipulations.

  3. Can Indigenous and Introduced Bacteria Affect the Performance of an Engineered Barrier System in the Designated Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.; Dias, V.; Carrillo, C.; van Buuren, N.; Horn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been tasked with establishing a high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV and assessing the effects of long-term storage of the waste. Studies are being performed to identify the role of microorganisms, both indigenous and introduced during the construction phase, to waste package material corrosion. Some microorganisms produce by-products that may be deleterious to waste package materials, such as bacteria that produce hydrogen and mineral acids, or reduce sulfate, and fungi that produce organic acids. Long-term and accelerated tests in continuous flow reactors were conducted to assess the biogenic effects on waste package materials, and batch tests were implemented to identify corrosion products and biochemical changes to ground water chemistry. Surfacial and gravimetric analyses of the metal samples coupled with water chemistry analysis allow us to determine the overall contribution that organisms may make to waste package corrosion. Metal samples were periodically removed from the reactors and examined with scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Effluent samples were also collected and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. Sterile controls were run in parallel to understand abiotic contributions to metals corrosion. In addition, we have characterized the microbial community at Yucca Mountain in order to define the physiological potential of the organisms extant at the site and evaluate the conditions required for growth (we have determined that water availability will be the major limiting factor). Analysis of the fluids from batch tests containing the Alloy 22 (Ni-Cr-Mo alloy) metal suggest the solubilization of Mo, albeit in very low concentrations. Because we did not observe the solubilization of other metal components, it is unclear whether selective solubilization or dealloying is occurring. Endpoint analysis of precipitated particles in the

  4. 感染松萎蔫病的葡萄牙海岸松中内生细菌的分离%Endophytic bacteria isolated from pine wilt-affected Pinus pinaster trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vieira dos Santos M C; Proenca D A N; Fonseca L; Abrantes I M de O; Morais P V

    2011-01-01

    The characteristic rapid death of maritime pine, Pinus pinaster, after infection by the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, suggests the involvement of other organisms in pine wilt disease (PWD) . Endophytic bacteria are ubiquitous in nature and colonize a broad spectrum of plant species. They colonize plants internally without harming them and although they have been reported to promote plant growth and stimulate plant defence mechanisms. Although such bacteria may be involved in improving plant health, they have also been seen as a potential cause of the low regeneration capacity of mature trees. The bacteria carried out by the PWN throughout pine trees may also contribute to the rapid wilting of the maritime pine trees. This study was made to assess the endophytic microbial community structure of pine wilt affected and non-affected P. pinaster, based on culture isolates, amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophorosis (DGGE) profiling, and to relate the results to a possible association between the characteristics and bacteria associated with the PWN. The microbial community from trees and PWNs included strains from Beta and Gammaproteobacteria, but Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were only found in the endophytic community whereas Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were only found to be associated with the nematode. ARDRA and DGGE profiles showed differences in the diversity of the endophytic microbial community that may be related to the presence of the PWN. Those differences seem to be associated with the number of strains of the genera Burkholderia, Pseudomonas and Luteibacter. Isolates belonging to the species Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum, P. lutea and Dyella yeojuensis were isolated from trees and were associated with the PWN. This research documents the presence of bacteria associated with the PWN by molecular methods and the impact of the nematode in the plant endophytic microbial

  5. Establishment and analysis of specific DNA patterns in 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer regions for differentiating different bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚世强; 付君芬; 董关萍; 洪文澜; 杜立中; 俞锡林

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish the specific 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer regions in different bacteria using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), DNA cloning and sequences analysis. Methods A pair of primers were selected from highly conserved sequences adjacent to the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region. Bacterial DNA from sixty-one strains of standard bacteria and corresponding clinical isolates representative of 20 genera and 26 species was amplified by PCR, and further analyzed by RFLP, DNA cloning and sequences analysis. Furthermore, all specimens were examined by bacterial culturing and PCR-RFLP analysis. The evaluation of these assays in practical clinic practice was also discussed.Results Restriction enzyme analysis revealed one, two or three bands or more observed among the 26 different standard strains. The sensitivity of PCR reached 2.5 colony-forming unit (CFU), and there was no cross reaction with human genomic DNA, fungus or virus. Fourteen species could be distinguished immediately by PCR, while another 10 species were further identified by Hinf Ⅰ or Alu Ⅰ digestion. The only difference between K.pneumoniae and E.durans was located at the site of the 779th nucleotide according to the sequence analysis and only XmaⅢ digestion could distinguish one from another. Of 42 specimens from septicemic neonates, 15 were identified as positive by blood culture at a rate of 35.7%. However, 27 specimens identified as positive by PCR, with a rate of 64.2%, a method significantly more effective than blood culture (P<0.01). Of 6 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens, one tested positive for S.epidermidis was also positive by PCR, two culture negative were positive by PCR and diagnosed as S.epidermidis according to the DNA pattern. One positive for C.neoformans was negative by PCR. The other two specimens were negative by both PCR and culture.Conclusions The method of detecting bacterial 16S-23S rRNA spacer regions using PCR

  6. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism differentially affects performance on subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Yvette N; Thompson, Christopher S; McKay, Nicole S; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene influence brain structure and function, as well as cognitive abilities. They are most influential in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC), respectively. Recall and recognition are forms of memory proposed to have different neural substrates, with recall having a greater dependence on the PFC and hippocampus. This study aimed to determine whether the BDNF val(66)met or COMT val(158)met polymorphisms differentially affect recall and recognition, and whether these polymorphisms interact. A sample of 100 healthy adults was assessed on recall and familiarity-based recognition using the Faces and Family Pictures subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III). COMT genotype did not affect performance on either task. The BDNF polymorphism (i.e., met carriers relative to val homozygotes) was associated with poorer recall ability, while not influencing recognition. Combining subscale scores in memory tests such as the WMS might obscure gene effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing between recall and familiarity-based recognition in neurogenetics research.

  7. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF val66met polymorphism differentially affects performance on subscales of the Wechsler memory scale – third edition (WMS-III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Nicole Lamb

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene influence brain structure and function, as well as cognitive abilities. They are most influential in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC, respectively. Recall and recognition are forms of memory proposed to have different neural substrates, with recall having a greater dependence on the PFC and hippocampus. This study aimed to determine whether the BDNF val66met or COMT val158met polymorphisms differentially affect recall and recognition, and whether these polymorphisms interact. A sample of 100 healthy adults was assessed on recall and familiarity-based recognition using the Faces and Family Pictures subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale – Third Edition (WMS-III. COMT genotype did not affect performance on either task. The BDNF polymorphism (i.e. met carriers relative to val homozygotes was associated with poorer recall ability, while not influencing recognition. Combining subscale scores in memory tests such as the WMS might obscure gene effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing between recall and familiarity-based recognition in neurogenetics research.

  8. A new QRT-PCR assay designed for the differentiation between elements provided from Agrobacterium sp. in GMOs plant events and natural Agrobacterium sp. bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Nesrine; Chaouachi, Maher; Zellama, Mohamed Salem; Ben Hafsa, Ahmed; Mrabet, Besma; Saïd, Khaled; Fathia, Harzallah Skhiri

    2016-04-01

    The question asked in the present work was how to differentiate between contamination of field samples with and GM plants contained sequences provided from this bacterium in order to avoid false positives in the frame of the detection and the quantification of GMO. For this, new set of primers and corresponding TaqMan Minor Groove Binder (MGB) probes were designed to target Agrobacterium sp. using the tumor-morphology-shooty gene (TMS1). Final standard curves were calculated for each pathogen by plotting the threshold cycle value against the bacterial number (log (colony forming units) per milliliter) via linear regression. The method designed was highly specific and sensitive, with a detection limit of 10CFU/ml. No significant cross-reaction was observed. Results from this study showed that TaqMan real-time PCR, is potentially an effective method for the rapid and reliable quantification of Agrobacterium sp. in samples containing GMO or non GMO samples.

  9. An in vitro model of the horse gut microbiome enables identification of lactate-utilizing bacteria that differentially respond to starch induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S Biddle

    Full Text Available Laminitis is a chronic, crippling disease triggered by the sudden influx of dietary starch. Starch reaches the hindgut resulting in enrichment of lactic acid bacteria, lactate accumulation, and acidification of the gut contents. Bacterial products enter the bloodstream and precipitate systemic inflammation. Hindgut lactate levels are normally low because specific bacterial groups convert lactate to short chain fatty acids. Why this mechanism fails when lactate levels rapidly rise, and why some hindgut communities can recover is unknown. Fecal samples from three adult horses eating identical diets provided bacterial communities for this in vitro study. Triplicate microcosms of fecal slurries were enriched with lactate and/or starch. Metabolic products (short chain fatty acids, headspace gases, and hydrogen sulfide were measured and microbial community compositions determined using Illumina 16S rRNA sequencing over 12-hour intervals. We report that patterns of change in short chain fatty acid levels and pH in our in vitro system are similar to those seen in in vivo laminitis induction models. Community differences between microcosms with disparate abilities to clear excess lactate suggest profiles conferring resistance of starch-induction conditions. Where lactate levels recover following starch induction conditions, propionate and acetate levels rise correspondingly and taxa related to Megasphaeraelsdenii reach levels exceeding 70% relative abundance. In lactate and control cultures, taxa related to Veillonellamontpellierensis are enriched as lactate levels fall. Understanding these community differences and factors promoting the growth of specific lactate utilizing taxa may be useful to prevent acidosis under starch-induction conditions.

  10. Impaired SLAM-SLAM homotypic interaction between invariant NKT cells and dendritic cells affects differentiation of IL-4/IL-10-secreting NKT2 cells in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, Denis V; Caielli, Simone; Ronchi, Francesca; Coccia, Margherita; Facciotti, Federica; Nichols, Kim E; Falcone, Marika

    2008-07-15

    The regulatory function of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells for tolerance induction and prevention of autoimmunity is linked to a specific cytokine profile that comprises the secretion of type 2 cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10 (NKT2 cytokine profile). The mechanism responsible for iNKT cell differentiation toward a type 2 phenotype is unknown. Herein we show that costimulatory signals provided by the surface receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) to iNKT cells is crucial for NKT2 orientation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the impaired acquisition of an NKT2 cytokine phenotype in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes is due to defective SLAM-induced signals generated by NOD mDC. Mature mDC of C57BL/6 mice express SLAM and induce C57BL/6 or NOD iNKT cells to acquire a predominant NKT2 cytokine phenotype in response to antigenic stimulation with the iNKT cell-specific Ag, the alpha-galactosylceramide. In contrast, mature NOD mDC express significantly lower levels of SLAM and are unable to promote GATA-3 (the SLAM-induced intracellular signal) up-regulation and IL-4/IL-10 production in iNKT cells from NOD or C57BL/6 mice. NOD mice carry a genetic defect of the Slamf1 gene that is associated with reduced SLAM expression on double-positive thymocytes and altered iNKT cell development in the thymus. Our data suggest that the genetic Slamf1 defect in NOD mice also affects SLAM expression on other immune cells such as the mDC, thus critically impairing the peripheral differentiation of iNKT cells toward a regulatory NKT2 type.

  11. Selective serotonin receptor stimulation of the medial nucleus accumbens differentially affects appetitive motivation for food on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Wayne E; Schall, Megan A; Choi, Eugene

    2012-03-09

    Previously, we reported that stimulation of selective serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens shell differentially affected consumption of freely available food. Specifically, activation of 5-HT(6) receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in food intake, while the stimulation of 5-HT(1/7) receptor subtypes decreased feeding [34]. The current experiments tested whether similar pharmacological activation of nucleus accumbens serotonin receptors would also affect appetitive motivation, as measured by the amount of effort non-deprived rats exerted to earn sugar reinforcement. Rats were trained to lever press for sugar pellets on a progressive ratio 2 schedule of reinforcement. Across multiple treatment days, three separate groups (N=8-10) received bilateral infusions of the 5-HT(6) agonist EMD 386088 (at 0.0, 1.0 and 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), the 5-HT(1/7) agonist 5-CT (at 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), or the 5-HT(2C) agonist RO 60-0175 fumarate (at 0, 2.0, or 5.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) into the anterior medial nucleus accumbens prior to a 1-h progressive ratio session. Stimulation of 5-HT(6) receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in motivation as assessed by break point, reinforcers earned, and total active lever presses. Stimulation of 5-HT(1/7) receptors increased lever pressing at the 0.5 μg dose of 5-CT, but inhibited lever presses and break point at 4.0 μg/side. Injection of the 5-HT(2C) agonist had no effect on motivation within the task. Collectively, these experiments suggest that, in addition to their role in modulating food consumption, nucleus accumbens 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(1/7) receptors also differentially regulate the appetitive components of food-directed motivation.

  12. [THE ROLE OF (p)ppGpp MOLECULES IN FORMATION OF "STRICT RESPONSE" IN BACTERIA AND BIOSYNTHESIS OF ANTIBIOTICS AND MORPHOLOGICAL DIFFERENTIATION IN ACTINOMYCETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymyshin, D; Stephanyshyn, O; Fedorenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Strict response is a pleiotropic physiological response of cells caused by lack of aminoacetylated tRNAs. Experimentally, this response occurs due to the lack of amino acids in the environment and the limitation of tRNA aminoacylation even in the presence of the corresponding amino acids in the cell. Many features of this response indicate its dependence on the accumulation of ppGpp molecules. There is a correlation between the growth rate of actinomycetes and biosynthesis of their secondary metabolites. Introduction of additional relA gene copies of ppGpp synthetase can affect the production of antibiotics in streptomycetes. The article presents the authors' own experimental data, dedicated to the influence of heterologous relA gene expression in Streptomyces nogalater cells.

  13. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquifino, A.I. [Dept. de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular III, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A. [Lab. de Toxicologia, Universidad de Vigo, Orense (Spain)

    2001-05-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  14. Pre-learning stress differentially affects long-term memory for emotional words, depending on temporal proximity to the learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Clark, Brianne; Warnecke, Ashlee; Smith, Lindsay; Tabar, Jennifer; Talbot, Jeffery N

    2011-07-06

    Stress exerts a profound, yet complex, influence on learning and memory and can enhance, impair or have no effect on these processes. Here, we have examined how the administration of stress at different times before learning affects long-term (24-hr) memory for neutral and emotional information. Participants submerged their dominant hand into a bath of ice cold water (Stress) or into a bath of warm water (No stress) for 3 min. Either immediately (Exp. 1) or 30 min (Exp. 2) after the water bath manipulation, participants were presented with a list of 30 words varying in emotional valence. The next day, participants' memory for the word list was assessed via free recall and recognition tests. In both experiments, stressed participants exhibited greater blood pressure, salivary cortisol levels, and subjective pain and stress ratings than non-stressed participants in response to the water bath manipulation. Stress applied immediately prior to learning (Exp. 1) enhanced the recognition of positive words, while stress applied 30 min prior to learning (Exp. 2) impaired free recall of negative words. Participants' recognition of positive words in Experiment 1 was positively associated with their heart rate responses to the water bath manipulation, while participants' free recall of negative words in Experiment 2 was negatively associated with their blood pressure and cortisol responses to the water bath manipulation. These findings indicate that the differential effects of pre-learning stress on long-term memory may depend on the temporal proximity of the stressor to the learning experience and the emotional nature of the to-be-learned information.

  15. Germinação e vigor de sementes de arroz inoculadas com bactérias diazotróficas Rice seed germination and vigour as affected by the inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Edilson da Silva Araújo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar a germinação e o vigor das sementes de arroz inoculadas com bactérias diazotróficas. Foram instalados dois experimentos, sendo que no primeiro o delineamento experimental adotado foi o inteiramente casualizado em esquema fatorial, com dois lotes de sementes arroz da cultivar IC4440 x 10 tratamentos, com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos foram representados pela inoculação com oito estirpes de bactérias diazotróficas (AR1122, M130, BF1358, ZAE94, AR3122, AR2112, CD e BR2113, bem como pelo recobrimento das sementes com a turfa umedecida com o meio de cultivo esterilizado e pelas sementes não inoculadas. No segundo experimento, o delineamento experimental adotado foi o inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial, com dois lotes de sementes recém-colhidas das cultivares IR42 e Zebu Branco x oito tratamentos, com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos foram representados pela inoculação das sementes com seis estirpes de bactérias diazotróficas (BF1358, AR3122, AR1122, ZAE94, M130 e AR2112, bem como pelo recobrimento das sementes com a turfa umedecida com o meio de cultivo esterilizado e pela não realização do procedimento de inoculação. As bactérias AR1122, M130, BF1358, ZAE94 e AR3112 podem ser selecionadas para formular inoculante para sementes de arroz. A inoculação com as bactérias diazotróficas aumenta a velocidade de germinação das sementes das cultivares IR42 e Zebu Branco, com menor contaminação por fungos.The objective of this work was to evaluate the germination and vigour of rice seeds affected by inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria. Two experiments were conduced. In the first one, a completely randomized design with four replications arranged in a factorial scheme (2 lots x 10 treatments was used. For this, rice seeds of cultivar IC4440 were inoculated with eight strains of diazotrophic (AR1122, M130, BF1358, ZAE94, AR3122, AR2112, CD e BR2113, submitted to coating with

  16. Rhizosphere Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Feoktistova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the analysis of modern literature data on rhizosphere bacteria and their role in plant life. The structure of rhizosphere has been characterized. The role of plants as the centers of formation of microbial communities has been shown. Data on the main groups of microorganisms inhabiting the rhizosphere have been provided. The associative relationship between rhizobacteria and partner plants has been investigated. The modern concept of holobiont defined as the whole host plant organism and microorganisms associated with it has been reviewed. The role of rhizobacteria in the processes of nitrogen fixation has been discussed in detail. The mechanisms of direct stimulation of plant growth by biosynthesis of phytohormones, improvement of phosphorus and nitrogen nutrition, increase in resistance to stress, and stimulation mediated by antagonism against pathogenic microorganisms have been analyzed. The criteria for selection of rhizobacteria for practical purposes have been discussed.

  17. Optimal strategy for competence differentiation in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scott Wylie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetically diverse subset of bacterial species are naturally competent for transformation by DNA. Transformation entails recombination of genes between different lineages, representing a form of bacterial sex that increases standing genetic variation. We first assess whether homologous recombination by transformation is favored by evolution. Using stochastic population genetic computer simulations in which beneficial and deleterious mutations occur at many loci throughout the whole genome, we find that transformation can increase both the rate of adaptive evolution and the equilibrium level of fitness. Secondly, motivated by experimental observations of Bacillus subtilis, we assume that competence additionally entails a weak persister phenotype, i.e., the rates of birth and death are reduced for these cells. Consequently, persisters evolve more slowly than non-persisters. We show via simulation that strains which stochastically switch into and out of the competent phenotype are evolutionarily favored over strains that express only a single phenotype. Our model's simplicity enables us to derive and numerically solve a system of finite- deterministic equations that describe the evolutionary dynamics. The observed tradeoff between the benefit of recombination and the cost of persistence may explain the previously mysterious observation that only a fractional subpopulation of B. subtilis cells express competence. More generally, this work demonstrates that population genetic forces can give rise to phenotypic diversity even in an unchanging and homogeneous environment.

  18. Molecular and chemical dialogues in bacteria-protozoa interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, C.; Mazzola, M.; Cheng, X.; Oetjen, J.; Alexandrov, T.; Dorrestein, P.; Watrous, J.; Voort, van der M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Protozoan predation of bacteria can significantly affect soil microbial community composition and ecosystem functioning. Bacteria possess diverse defense strategies to resist or evade protozoan predation. For soil-dwelling Pseudomonas species, several secondary metabolites were proposed to provide p

  19. The conditioned medium from osteo-differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells affects the viability of triple negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Mariangela; Tobiasch, Edda; Luparello, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of conditioned media (CM) from osteo-differentiating and adipo-differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from lipoaspirates of healthy female donors on the viability of triple-negative breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. The CM of undifferentiated and differentiating MSCs were collected after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of culture. The effects of MSC CM on cell proliferation were assessed using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay after 24 h. The effects of osteo-differentiating cell CM on apoptotic promotion, cell cycle impairment, mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation, production of reactive oxygen species and autophagosome accumulation were analysed by flow cytometry and Western blot. MTT assay showed that only CM collected from osteo-induced cells at day 28 (d28O-CM) reduced tumour cell viability. Treatment with d28O-CM restrained cell cycle progression through G2 phase, elicited a caspase-8-driven apoptotic effect already after 5 h of culture, and down-regulated autophagosome accumulation and beclin-1 expression. The finding that factor(s) secreted by osteo-differentiating MSCs shows properties of an apoptotic inducer and autophagy inhibitor on triple-negative breast cancer cells may have an important applicative potential that deserves further investigation.

  20. Differential associations between infant affective and cortisol responses during the still face paradigm among infants born very low birth weight versus full-term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sarah J; Maclean, Peggy; Qualls, Clifford; Lowe, Jean R

    2013-06-01

    Psychological stress responses may have both emotional and cortisol reactivity correlates, but there are limited data addressing the association between generalized negative and positive emotional states and cortisol reactivity to a psychological stressor among infants born very low birth weight (VLBW; cortisol) responses may provide insight into the nature of regulation difficulties identified in infants born VLBW. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between infant affective and cortisol responses to the Still Face paradigm (SF) in a cohort of six- to eight-month old infants born VLBW compared with infants born full-term (N=53 total; N=29 and N=24, respectively). Infant affect was coded in 1-s intervals while mother-infant dyads participated in the SF paradigm, and percent positive affect and percent negative affect were calculated separately for each SF episode. We had hypothesized that because infants born VLBW are at increased risk for dysregulation, they would show, compared to full-term controls, greater dysregulation in the form of less synchrony (i.e., less correlated affective and cortisol responses) across the two SF stressors (episodes 2 and 4). This hypothesis was largely supported: the associations between affective and cortisol responses were different for the two groups across the two stressors for percent positive affect (both stressor episodes 2 and 4) and percent negative affect (episode 4 only). For the full-term group, follow up correlations revealed significant negative associations between percent positive affective and cortisol responses for both stressors. Mothers' responsiveness did not explain the term group association differences between infant affective and cortisol responses across stressors. The (lack of) association of stress reactivity systems may index dysregulation or dysregulation correlates in preterm children. Understanding how this lack of coordination among stress systems relates to greater dysregulation

  1. Differentiating anxious and depressive self-statements in youth: factor structure of the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire among youth referred to an anxiety disorders clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, J; Safren, S A; Henin, A; Warman, M; Heimberg, R G; Kendall, P C

    1999-03-01

    Conducted a factor analysis on the items from the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire (NASSQ; Ronan, Kendall, & Rowe, 1994). This analysis yielded 4 factors (Depressive Self-Statements, Anxiety/Somatic Self-Statements, Negative Affect Self-Statements, and Positive Affect Self-Statements) broadly consistent with both the content-specificity hypothesis (Beck & Clark, 1988) and L. A. Clark and Watson's (1991b) tripartite model of anxiety and depression. The association between children's self-talk and measures of trait anxiety and depression was also examined. Self-statements with content theoretically specific to depression were the best predictors of self-reported depressive symptoms, but the results were less clear for trait anxiety. Overall, these results provide evidence for the discriminability of anxious and depressive self-talk in youth and for the utility of the NASSQ as a cognitive assessment instrument.

  2. Differential methylation status of IGF2-H19 locus does not affect the fertility of crossbred bulls but some of the CTCF binding sites could be potentially important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Subas C; Kumar, Sandeep; Rajput, Sandeep; Roy, Bhaskar; Verma, Arpana; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Mohanty, Tushar K; De, Sachinandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Datta, Tirtha K

    2014-04-01

    Associations between abnormal methylation of spermatozoan DNA with male infertility have been sought in recent years to identify a molecular explanation of differential spermatozoan function. The present work was undertaken to investigate the methylation profile of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the IGF2-H19 locus of Bos taurus X Bos indicus crossbred bull spermatozoa. Bulls having more than at least 100 insemination records over a period of 12 years were classified into two groups of five bulls each belonging to low- and high-fertility groups. The IGF2 and H19 DMR sequences in B. indicus cattle were observed to be in absolute homology with B. taurus cattle. The DNA of crossbred bull spermatozoa was isolated, bisulfite treated, and amplified for specific DMR regions using methylation-change-specific primers. The overall degree of methylation at IGF2-H19 DMRs was not found to be significantly different among two groups of bulls. The sixth CTCF binding site (CCCTC) identified in H19 DMR, however, had a significant methylation difference between the high- and low-fertility bulls. It was concluded that alteration of the methylation levels at IGF2-H19 DMRs might not be responsible for the fertility difference of crossbred bulls, although the role played by the specific CTCF binding sites at this locus, which could influence IGF2 expression during spermatogenesis and early embryonic development, deserves further attention.

  3. Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Affecting Factors on QuaI ity of Wine Vinegar%醋酸菌及其酒醋质量的影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚国利; 张甜

    2015-01-01

    醋的生产主要是依靠醋酸菌的氧化过程,酒醋作为副产品是生产醋的不完全发酵而产生的,由于其独特的风味使得近年来人们对它的生产工艺的优化有进一步的研究。醋酸菌种决定醋的质量,但是醋的最终质量是工艺方法、木材接触和熟化合并的结果。综述了近年来醋酸菌的研究进展以及酒醋的生产工艺、化学特性和感官品质的影响因素。%The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria.However,the characterization of wine vinegar as a byproduct means that its production is often inadequately performed.Its unique flavor makes further research in recent years to optimize its production process.The acetic acid bacteria determine the quality of vinegar,but the final quality of vinegar is combined result of technological process,wood contact,and aging.This paper reviews the recent research progress of acetic acid bacteria, the production process, chemical properties and sensory quality of wine vinegar.

  4. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Scardigli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane receptors belonging to the Frizzled family, several other molecules have been described which share homology in the CRD domain and lack the putative trans-membrane domain, such as sFRP molecules (soluble Frizzled Related Protein. Among them, sFRP-3 was originally isolated from bovine articular cartilage and also as a component of the Spemann organizer. sFRP-3 blocks Wnt-8 induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and binds to the surface of cells expressing a membrane-anchored form of Wnt-1. Injection of sFRP-3 mRNA blocks expression of XMyoD mRNA and leads to embryos with enlarged heads and shortened trunks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that sFRP-3 specifically blocks EGF-induced fibroblast proliferation and foci formation. Over-expression of sFRP-3 reverts EGF-mediated inhibition of hair follicle development in the mouse ectoderm while its ablation in Xenopus maintains EGF-mediated inhibition of ectoderm differentiation. Conversely, over-expression of EGF reverts the inhibition of somitic myogenesis and axis truncation in Xenopus and mouse embryos caused by sFRP-3. In vitro experiments demonstrated a direct binding of EGF to sFRP-3 both on heparin and on the surface of CHO cells where the molecule had been membrane anchored. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: sFRP-3 and EGF reciprocally inhibit their effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis and indeed are expressed in contiguous domains of the embryo, suggesting that in

  5. Estimated lean mass and fat mass differentially affect femoral bone density and strength index but are not FRAX independent risk factors for fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Orwoll, Eric S; Nielson, Carrie M; Morin, Suzanne N; Majumdar, Sumit R; Johansson, Helena; Odén, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V; Kanis, John A

    2014-11-01

    Although increasing body weight has been regarded as protective against osteoporosis and fractures, there is accumulating evidence that fat mass adversely affects skeletal health compared with lean mass. We examined skeletal health as a function of estimated total body lean and fat mass in 40,050 women and 3600 men age ≥50 years at the time of baseline dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) testing from a clinical registry from Manitoba, Canada. Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD), strength index (SI), cross-sectional area (CSA), and cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI) were derived from DXA. Multivariable models showed that increasing lean mass was associated with near-linear increases in femoral BMD, CSA, and CSMI in both women and men, whereas increasing fat mass showed a small initial increase in these measurements followed by a plateau. In contrast, femoral SI was relatively unaffected by increasing lean mass but was associated with a continuous linear decline with increasing fat mass, which should predict higher fracture risk. During mean 5-year follow-up, incident major osteoporosis fractures and hip fractures were observed in 2505 women and 180 men (626 and 45 hip fractures, respectively). After adjustment for fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) scores (with or without BMD), we found no evidence that lean mass, fat mass, or femoral SI affected prediction of major osteoporosis fractures or hip fractures. Findings were similar in men and women, without significant interactions with sex or obesity. In conclusion, skeletal adaptation to increasing lean mass was positively associated with BMD but had no effect on femoral SI, whereas increasing fat mass had no effect on BMD but adversely affected femoral SI. Greater fat mass was not independently associated with a greater risk of fractures over 5-year follow-up. FRAX robustly predicts fractures and was not affected by variations in body composition.

  6. Traits across the personality hierarchy differentially relate to positive and negative affect: Evidence for the predictive validity of empirically derived meta-traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengartner, Michael P; Graf, Markus; Schreiber, Marc

    2017-02-06

    There is increasing interest in the construct validity of higher-order domains of the Big Five personality traits. A total of 831 persons from the Swiss population completed the International Personality Item Pool and an adaptation of the Positive and Negative Affect Scales. Using Goldberg's bass-ackwards method, we found evidence for the general factor of personality (GFP) and the two meta-traits of positive emotionality (blend of low neuroticism and high extraversion) and constraint (blend of high agreeableness and conscientiousness). In association with positive affect, the explanatory power of the GFP (r = 0.43) and positive emotionality (r = 0.37) was largely superior to extraversion (r = 0.24), conscientiousness (r = 0.18), agreeableness (r = 0.09) and openness (r = 0.04), although not neuroticism (r = -0.34). In association with negative affect, neuroticism (r = 0.41), the GFP (r = -0.36) and positive emotionality (r = -0.35) were the most powerful single predictors. We conclude that the higher-order structure of personality is best explained by the meta-traits of positive emotionality and constraint, which correspond closely to the well-established superfactors of internalizing and externalizing. We further demonstrate that these have substantial criterion validity when broad positive and negative affect is the outcome of interest. These findings help to relate Big Five meta-traits to pathological personality. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Administration of a multistrain probiotic product (VSL#3) to women in the perinatal period differentially affects breast milk beneficial microbiota in relation to mode of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, Paola; Capobianco, Daniela; Miccheli, Alfredo; Praticò, Giulia; Campagna, Giuseppe; Laforgia, Nicola; Capursi, Teresa; Baldassarre, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation to a mother during the perinatal period can have a positive impact on the breast milk composition. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, during late pregnancy and lactation, on breast milk levels of beneficial bacteria and some functional components (oligosaccharides and lactoferrin) potentially able to have a positive influence on the microbiota. Breast milk microbiota was analyzed by conventional and quantitative real-time PCR. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, 66 women took daily either the probiotic (n=33) or a placebo (n=33). Intergroup analysis demonstrated that the amounts of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were significantly higher in the colostrum and mature milk of the mothers taking VSL#3 in comparison to those taking placebo. The analysis of bacterial strains and species present in breast milk of VSL#3 supplemented mothers indicated that the administered probiotic microorganisms did not pass from maternal gut to mammary gland. In women with vaginal delivery, significantly higher amounts of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were detected in colostrum and mature milk of probiotic treated group in comparison to placebo group, whereas no significant difference was observed between groups in women who had caesarean section, neither in colostrum nor in mature milk. Milk levels of oligosaccharides and lactoferrin were similar in placebo and probiotic supplemented groups at all timepoints and regardless of the mode of delivery. Our results indicate a probiotic-dependent modulation of breast milk microbiota in vaginally delivering women, possibly exerted through a systemic effect.

  8. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  9. Exposure to altered gravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects growth, development, the cerebellum and motor functions in male and female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  10. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  11. Birth Origin Differentially Affects Depressive-Like Behaviours: Are Captive-Born Cynomolgus Monkeys More Vulnerable to Depression than Their Wild-Born Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Sandrine MJ.; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse early-life experience might lead to the expression of abnormal behaviours in animals and the predisposition to psychiatric disorder (e.g. major depressive disorder) in Humans. Common breeding processes employ weaning and housing conditions different from what happens in the wild. Methods The present study, therefore, investigated whether birth origin impacts the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 captive-born and 40 wild-born socially-housed cynomolgus macaques in farming conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses. Results We identified 10 distinct profiles (groups A to J) that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, distances between individuals and locations in the cage. Data suggest that 4 captive-born and 1 wild-born animals (groups G and J) present depressive-like symptoms, unnatural early life events thereby increasing the risk of developing pathological symptoms. General differences were also highlighted between the captive- and wild-born populations, implying the expression of differential coping mechanisms in response to the same captive environment. Conclusions Birth origin thus impacts the development of atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups. PMID:23861787

  12. Birth origin differentially affects depressive-like behaviours: are captive-born cynomolgus monkeys more vulnerable to depression than their wild-born counterparts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine M J Camus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adverse early-life experience might lead to the expression of abnormal behaviours in animals and the predisposition to psychiatric disorder (e.g. major depressive disorder in Humans. Common breeding processes employ weaning and housing conditions different from what happens in the wild. METHODS: The present study, therefore, investigated whether birth origin impacts the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 captive-born and 40 wild-born socially-housed cynomolgus macaques in farming conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses. RESULTS: We identified 10 distinct profiles (groups A to J that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, distances between individuals and locations in the cage. Data suggest that 4 captive-born and 1 wild-born animals (groups G and J present depressive-like symptoms, unnatural early life events thereby increasing the risk of developing pathological symptoms. General differences were also highlighted between the captive- and wild-born populations, implying the expression of differential coping mechanisms in response to the same captive environment. CONCLUSIONS: Birth origin thus impacts the development of atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups.

  13. Glycidol induces axonopathy and aberrations of hippocampal neurogenesis affecting late-stage differentiation by exposure to rats in a framework of 28-day toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akane, Hirotoshi; Shiraki, Ayako; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Itahashi, Megu; Abe, Hajime; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-01-30

    Developmental exposure to glycidol induces aberrations of late-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring, whereas maternal animals develop axonopathy. To investigate the possibility whether similar effects on adult neurogenesis could be induced by exposure in a framework of 28-day toxicity study, glycidol was orally administered to 5-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage at 0, 30 or 200 mg/kg for 28 days. At 200 mg/kg, animals revealed progressively worsening gait abnormalities as well as histopathological and immunohistochemical changes suggestive of axonal injury as evidenced by generation of neurofilament-L(+) spheroids in the cerebellar granule layer and dorsal funiculus of the medulla oblongata, central chromatolysis in the trigeminal nerve ganglion cells and axonal degeneration in the sciatic nerves. At the same dose, animals revealed aberrations in neurogenesis at late-stage differentiation as evidenced by decreases of both doublecortin(+) and dihydropyrimidinase-like 3(+) cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ) and increased reelin(+) or calbindin-2(+) γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons and neuron-specific nuclear protein(+) mature neurons in the dentate hilus. These effects were essentially similar to that observed in offspring after maternal exposure to glycidol. These results suggest that glycidol causes aberrations in adult neurogenesis in the SGZ at the late stage involving the process of neurite extension similar to the developmental exposure study in a standard 28-day toxicity study.

  14. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel extract fractions from different cultivars differentially affect lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, Meng-Wong; Pierson, Jean-Thomas; Shaw, Paul N; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Gidley, Michael J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-02-26

    Plant phytochemicals are increasingly recognised as sources of bioactive molecules which may have potential benefit in many health conditions. In mangoes, peel extracts from different cultivars exhibit varying effects on adipogenesis in the 3T3-L1 adipocyte cell line. In this study, the effects of preparative HPLC fractions of methanol peel extracts from Irwin, Nam Doc Mai and Kensington Pride mangoes were evaluated. Fraction 1 contained the most hydrophilic components while subsequent fractions contained increasingly more hydrophobic components. High content imaging was used to assess mango peel fraction effects on lipid accumulation, nuclei count and nuclear area in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. For all three mango cultivars, the more hydrophilic peel fractions 1-3 inhibited lipid accumulation with greater potency than the more hydrophobic peel fractions 4. For all three cultivars, the more lipophilic fraction 4 had concentrations that enhanced lipid accumulation greater than fractions 1-3 as assessed by lipid droplet integrated intensity. The potency of this fraction 4 varied significantly between cultivars. Using mass spectrometry, five long chain free fatty acids were detected in fraction 4; these were not present in any other peel extract fractions. Total levels varied between cultivars, with Irwin fraction 4 containing the highest levels of these free fatty acids. Lipophilic components appear to be responsible for the lipid accumulation promoting effects of some mango extracts and are the likely cause of the diverse effects of peel extracts from different mango cultivars on lipid accumulation.

  15. Homologous and homeologous intermolecular gene conversion are not differentially affected by mutations in the DNA damage or the mismatch repair genes RAD1, RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, PMS1 and MSH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad{sup +} vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. 67 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Repeated forced swim stress differentially affects formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour and the endocannabinoid system in stress normo-responsive and stress hyper-responsive rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elaine M; Okine, Bright N; Olango, Weredeselam M; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to a homotypic stressor such as forced swimming enhances nociceptive responding in rats. However, the influence of genetic background on this stress-induced hyperalgesia is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of repeated forced swim stress on nociceptive responding in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats versus the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strain, a genetic background that is susceptible to stress, negative affect and hyperalgesia. Given the well-documented role of the endocannabinoid system in stress and pain, we investigated associated alterations in endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and amygdala. In SD rats, repeated forced swim stress for 10 days was associated with enhanced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour, compared with naive, non-stressed SD controls. In contrast, WKY rats exposed to 10 days of swim stress displayed reduced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour. Swim stress increased levels of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA in the ipsilateral side of the dorsal spinal cord of SD rats, an effect not observed in WKY rats. In the amygdala, swim stress reduced anandamide (AEA) levels in the contralateral amygdala of SD rats, but not WKY rats. Additional within-strain differences in levels of CB1 receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA and levels of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) were observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the dorsal horn and/or amygdala. These data indicate that the effects of repeated stress on inflammatory pain-related behaviour are different in two rat strains that differ with respect to stress responsivity and affective state and implicate the endocannabinoid system in the spinal cord and amygdala in these differences.

  17. Task-based and questionnaire measures of inhibitory control are differentially affected by acute food restriction and by motivationally salient food stimuli in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savani Bartholdy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive eating behaviors are dependent on an interaction between motivational states (e.g., hunger and the ability to control one’s own behavior (inhibitory control. Indeed, behavioral paradigms are emerging that seek to train inhibitory control to improve eating behavior. However, inhibitory control is a multifaceted concept, and it is not yet clear how different types (e.g., reactive motor inhibition, proactive motor inhibition, reward-related inhibition are affected by hunger. Such knowledge will provide insight into the contexts in which behavioral training paradigms would be most effective. The present study explored the impact of promoting a need state (hunger together with motivationally salient distracting stimuli (food/non-food images on inhibitory control in 46 healthy adults. Participants attended two study sessions, once after eating breakfast as usual and once after acute food restriction on the morning of the session. In each session, participants completed questionnaires on hunger, mood and inhibitory control, and undertook task-based measures of inhibitory control, and had physiological measurements (height, weight and blood glucose obtained by a researcher. Acute food restriction influenced task-based assessments but not questionnaire measures of inhibitory control, suggesting that hunger affects observable behavioral control but not self-reported inhibitory control. After acute food restriction, participants showed greater temporal discounting (devaluation of future rewards, and subjective hunger and these were inversely correlated with stop accuracy on the stop signal task. Finally, participants generally responded faster when food-related distractor images were presented, compared to non-food images, independent of state. This suggests that although food stimuli motivate approach behavior, stimulus relevance does not impact inhibitory control in healthy individuals, nor interact with motivational state. These findings may

  18. Task-Based and Questionnaire Measures of Inhibitory Control Are Differentially Affected by Acute Food Restriction and by Motivationally Salient Food Stimuli in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Savani; Cheng, Jiumu; Schmidt, Ulrike; Campbell, Iain C; O'Daly, Owen G

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive eating behaviors are dependent on an interaction between motivational states (e.g., hunger) and the ability to control one's own behavior (inhibitory control). Indeed, behavioral paradigms are emerging that seek to train inhibitory control to improve eating behavior. However, inhibitory control is a multifaceted concept, and it is not yet clear how different types (e.g., reactive motor inhibition, proactive motor inhibition, reward-related inhibition) are affected by hunger. Such knowledge will provide insight into the contexts in which behavioral training paradigms would be most effective. The present study explored the impact of promoting a "need" state (hunger) together with motivationally salient distracting stimuli (food/non-food images) on inhibitory control in 46 healthy adults. Participants attended two study sessions, once after eating breakfast as usual and once after acute food restriction on the morning of the session. In each session, participants completed questionnaires on hunger, mood and inhibitory control, and undertook task-based measures of inhibitory control, and had physiological measurements (height, weight, and blood glucose) obtained by a researcher. Acute food restriction influenced task-based assessments but not questionnaire measures of inhibitory control, suggesting that hunger affects observable behavioral control but not self-reported inhibitory control. After acute food restriction, participants showed greater temporal discounting (devaluation of future rewards), and subjective hunger and these were inversely correlated with stop accuracy on the stop signal task. Finally, participants generally responded faster when food-related distractor images were presented, compared to non-food images, independent of state. This suggests that although food stimuli motivate approach behavior, stimulus relevance does not impact inhibitory control in healthy individuals, nor interact with motivational state. These findings may provide some

  19. Task-Based and Questionnaire Measures of Inhibitory Control Are Differentially Affected by Acute Food Restriction and by Motivationally Salient Food Stimuli in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Savani; Cheng, Jiumu; Schmidt, Ulrike; Campbell, Iain C.; O'Daly, Owen G.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive eating behaviors are dependent on an interaction between motivational states (e.g., hunger) and the ability to control one's own behavior (inhibitory control). Indeed, behavioral paradigms are emerging that seek to train inhibitory control to improve eating behavior. However, inhibitory control is a multifaceted concept, and it is not yet clear how different types (e.g., reactive motor inhibition, proactive motor inhibition, reward-related inhibition) are affected by hunger. Such knowledge will provide insight into the contexts in which behavioral training paradigms would be most effective. The present study explored the impact of promoting a “need” state (hunger) together with motivationally salient distracting stimuli (food/non-food images) on inhibitory control in 46 healthy adults. Participants attended two study sessions, once after eating breakfast as usual and once after acute food restriction on the morning of the session. In each session, participants completed questionnaires on hunger, mood and inhibitory control, and undertook task-based measures of inhibitory control, and had physiological measurements (height, weight, and blood glucose) obtained by a researcher. Acute food restriction influenced task-based assessments but not questionnaire measures of inhibitory control, suggesting that hunger affects observable behavioral control but not self-reported inhibitory control. After acute food restriction, participants showed greater temporal discounting (devaluation of future rewards), and subjective hunger and these were inversely correlated with stop accuracy on the stop signal task. Finally, participants generally responded faster when food-related distractor images were presented, compared to non-food images, independent of state. This suggests that although food stimuli motivate approach behavior, stimulus relevance does not impact inhibitory control in healthy individuals, nor interact with motivational state. These findings may provide

  20. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  1. Thyroid active agents T3 and PTU differentially affect immune gene transcripts in the head kidney of rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-García, Alba; Encinas, Paloma; Valdehita, Ana; Baumann, Lisa; Segner, Helmut; Coll, Julio M; Navas, José M

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, numerous reports describe an immunomodulating effect of thyroid-active compounds. In contrast, only few reports have been published on this subject in fish. We previously demonstrated that immune cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) possess thyroid hormone receptors (THRs) and that exposure of trout to the thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) or the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil (PTU) alters immune cell transcript levels of THR and several immune genes. The present study aims to further characterize the immunomodulating action of thyroid-active compounds in trout immune cells. We report here the use of a custom-designed 60-mer oligo immune-targeted microarray for rainbow trout to analyze the gene expression profiles induced in the head kidney by T3 and PTU. Morphometric analyses of the thyroid showed that PTU exposure increased the size of the epithelial cells, whereas T3 induced no significant effects. Both T3 and PTU had diverse and partly contrasting effects on immune transcript profiles. The strongest differential effects of T3 and PTU on gene expressions were those targeting the Mitogen Associated Protein Kinase (MAPK), NFkB, Natural Killer (NK) and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) pathways, a number of multipath genes (MPG) such as those encoding pleiotropic transcription factors (atf1, junb, myc), as well as important pro-inflammatory genes (tnfa, tnf6, il1b) and interferon-related genes (ifng, irf10). With these results we show for the first time in a fish species that the in vivo thyroidal status modulates a diversity of immune genes and pathways. This knowledge provides the basis to investigate both mechanisms and consequences of thyroid hormone- and thyroid disruptor-mediated immunomodulation for the immunocompetence of fish.

  2. Short-term testosterone manipulations do not affect cognition or motor function but differentially modulate emotions in young and older male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian; Maguire-Herring, Vanessa; Rose, Christian M; Gore, Heather E; Ferrigno, Stephen; Novak, Melinda A; Lacreuse, Agnès

    2014-11-01

    Human aging is characterized by declines in cognition and fine motor function as well as improved emotional regulation. In men, declining levels of testosterone (T) with age have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes. However, studies examining the effects of T replacement on cognition, emotion and fine motor function in older men have not provided consistent results. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are excellent models for human cognitive aging and may provide novel insights on this issue. We tested 10 aged intact male rhesus monkeys (mean age=19, range 15-25) on a battery of cognitive, motor and emotional tasks at baseline and under low or high T experimental conditions. Their performance was compared to that of 6 young males previously tested in the same paradigm (Lacreuse et al., 2009; Lacreuse et al., 2010). Following a 4-week baseline testing period, monkeys were treated with a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (Depot Lupron, 200 μg/kg) to suppress endogenous T and were tested on the task battery under a 4-week high T condition (injection of Lupron+T enanthate, 20 mg/kg, n=8) or 4-week low T condition (injection of Lupron+oil vehicle, n=8) before crossing over to the opposite treatment. The cognitive tasks consisted of the Delayed Non-Matching-to-Sample (DNMS), the Delayed Response (DR), and the Delayed Recognition Span Test (spatial-DRST). The emotional tasks included an object Approach-Avoidance task and a task in which monkeys were played videos of unfamiliar conspecifics in different emotional context (Social Playbacks). The fine motor task was the Lifesaver task that required monkeys to remove a Lifesaver candy from rods of different complexity. T manipulations did not significantly affect visual recognition memory, working memory, reference memory or fine motor function at any age. In the Approach-Avoidance task, older monkeys, but not younger monkeys, spent more time in proximity of novel objects in the high T condition

  3. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS.

  4. Differential expression profiles of microRNA in the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) associated with white nose syndrome affected and unaffected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, D.D.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Hitt, N.P.; King, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    First documented in New York State in 2006, white nose syndrome (WNS) quickly became the leading cause of mortality in hibernating bat species in the United States. WNS is caused by a psychrophilic fungus, Geomyces destructans. Clinical signs of this pathogen are expressed as a dusty white fungus predominately around the nose and on the wings of affected bats. Relatively new biomarkers, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) are being targeted as markers to predict the syndrome prior to the clinical manifestation. The primary objective of this study was to identify miRNAs that could serve as biomarkers and proxies of little brown bat health. Bats were collected from hibernacula that had tested positive and negative for WNS. Genetic sequencing was completed using the Ion Torrent platform. A number of miRNAs were identified from the liver as putative biomarkers of WNS. However, given the small sample size for each treatment, this data set has only coarsely identified miRNAs indicative of WNS, and further validation is required.

  5. Plant assemblage composition and soil P concentration differentially affect communities of AM and total fungi in a semi-arid grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabi, Rim; Bell, Terrence H; Hamel, Chantal; Iwaasa, Alan; Schellenberg, Mike; Raies, Aly; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Adding inorganic P- and N-fixing legumes to semi-arid grasslands can increase forage yield, but soil nutrient concentrations and plant cover may also interact to modify soil fungal populations, impacting short- and long-term forage production. We tested the effect of plant assemblage (seven native grasses, seven native grasses + the domesticated N-fixing legume Medicago sativa, seven native grasses + the native N-fixing legume Dalea purpurea or the introduced grass Bromus biebersteinii + M. sativa) and soil P concentration (addition of 0 or 200 P2O5 kg ha(-1) at sowing) on the diversity and community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and total fungi over two consecutive years, using 454-pyrosequencing of 18S rDNA and ITS amplicons. Treatment effects were stronger in the wet year (2008) than the dry year (2009). The presence of an N-fixing legume with native grasses generally increased AM fungal diversity, while the interaction between soil P concentration and plant assemblage modified total fungal community structure in 2008. Excluding interannual variations, which are likely driven by moisture and plant productivity, AM fungal communities in semi-arid grasslands appear to be primarily affected by plant assemblage composition, while the composition of other fungi is more closely linked to soil P.

  6. The Analysis of Different Culture Time Affect Test Results of Coliform Bacteria Primary Fermentation%不同培养时间对大肠菌群初发酵检测结果的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋昌彦; 盛满钰

    2012-01-01

    为了了解不同培养时间对大肠菌群初发酵检测结果的影响,为大肠菌群检测方法、卫生标准的修订及食源性疾病的预防和控制提供科学依据。在同一品牌快餐店随机采集具有代表性的6大类342件样品进行大肠菌群检测,得到有效样品数为254件。依照国家标准进行检验和结果评价,并将初发酵培养时间为(24±2)h和(48±2)h的检测结果进行比较。结果表明,样品经(48±2)h初发酵培养的大肠菌群检出率及LST肉汤阳性率均高于(24±2)h,其差异均具有统计学意义Co〈o.01)。因此,大肠菌群迟缓发酵现象普遍存在。适当延长初发酵培养时间将有利于提高大肠菌群的检出率,从而更真实的反映食品的卫生质量状况。2010年6月正式实施的GB4789.3—2010,与2003版相比其结果表达发生了变化,而相应的很多产品卫生标准仍未同时更新。%In order to understand what effect on the different culture period of coliform bacteria cause on the test result of coliforms primary fermentation, provide the scientific proof for coliform bacteria detection methods, and revise health standard and prevention and control of food-borne disease, a total of 342 representative samples of six main categories were randomly collected in various chain stores of the same brand fast-food restaurant for coliform bacteria testing. Finally, 254 effective samples were got. In accordance with national standards for testing and evaluation of results, and to compare test results between (24~:2) h and (48~2) h on the coliforms primary fermentation time, according to results of the comparison view, the sample after (48h:k2) h primary fermentation coliform .detection rate and positive rate of LST broth were higher than the (24+2) h, the differences are statistically significant (p〈0.01). Therefore, coliform slow fermentation is widespread and ubiquity. Extend the time of primary

  7. A High-Fat Diet Differentially Affects the Gut Metabolism and Blood Lipids of Rats Depending on the Type of Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Jurgoński

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this model study was to investigate how selected gut functions and serum lipid profile in rats on high-fat diets differed according to the type of fat (saturated vs. unsaturated and carbohydrate (simple vs. complex. The experiment was conducted using 32 male Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups of 8 animals each. For 4 weeks, the animals were fed group-specific diets that were either rich in lard or soybean oil (16% of the diet as the source of saturated or unsaturated fatty acids, respectively; further, each lard- and soybean oil-rich diet contained either fructose or corn starch (45.3% of the diet as the source of simple or complex carbohydrates, respectively. Both dietary factors contributed to changes in the caecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, especially to the butyrate concentration, which was higher in rats fed lard- and corn starch-rich diets compared to soybean oil- and fructose-rich diets, respectively. The lowest butyrate concentration was observed in rats fed the soybean oil- and fructose-rich diet. On the other hand, the lard- and fructose-rich diet vs. the other dietary combinations significantly increased serum total cholesterol concentration, to more than two times serum triglyceride concentration and to more than five times the atherogenic index. In conclusion, a high-fat diet rich in fructose can unfavorably affect gut metabolism when unsaturated fats are predominant in the diet or the blood lipids when a diet is rich in saturated fats.

  8. Hypoxaemia affects male reproduction: a case study of how to differentiate between primary and secondary hypoxic testicular toxicity due to chemical exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomhard, Ernst M; Gelbke, Heinz-Peter

    2013-07-01

    Classification for fertility is based on two conditions, namely on evidence of an adverse effect on sexual function and fertility and that the effect is not secondary to other toxic effects. To decide on an adverse effect is a relatively simple day-to-day decision in toxicology but whether this effect is secondary often leads to serious controversy. As the seminiferous epithelium operates on the verge of hypoxia, oxygen deficit can lead to secondary impairment of testicular function. This is well known from healthy mountaineers exposing themselves to high altitude. They have reduced blood oxygen content that goes in parallel with impairment of testicular function and this effect remains for some time in spite of a compensatory polycythaemia. Similar findings are described for experimental animals exposed to hypobaric oxygen/high altitude. In addition, testicular function is affected in severe diseases in humans associated with systemic oxygen deficit like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sickle cell disease or beta-thalassaemia as well as in transgenic animals simulating haemolytic anaemia or sickle cell disease. The problem of insufficient oxygen supply as the underlying cause for testicular impairment has received relatively little attention in toxicology, mainly because blood oxygen content is generally not measured in these animal experiments. The difficulties associated with the decision whether testicular toxicity is primary or secondary to hypoxia are exemplified by the results of inhalation studies with nickel subsulphide and gallium arsenide (GaAs). Both of these particulate substances lead to severe lung toxicity that might impair oxygen uptake, but testicular toxicity is only observed with GaAs. This may first be explained by different effects on the blood: nickel subsulphide inhalation leads to a compensatory erythropoiesis that may mitigate pulmonary lack of oxygen uptake. In contrast, GaAs exposure is associated with microcytic haemolytic

  9. Ground-level ozone differentially affects nitrogen acquisition and allocation in mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, R B; Häberle, K H; Millard, P; Metzger, U; Ritter, W; Blaschke, H; Göttlein, A; Matyssek, R

    2012-10-01

    Impacts of elevated ground-level ozone (O(3)) on nitrogen (N) uptake and allocation were studied on mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) in a forest stand, hypothesizing that: (i) chronically elevated O(3) limits nutrient uptake, and (ii) beech responds more sensitively to elevated O(3) than spruce, as previously found for juvenile trees. Tree canopies were exposed to twice-ambient O(3) concentrations (2 × O(3)) by a free-air fumigation system, with trees under ambient O(3) serving as control. After 5 years of O(3) fumigation, (15)NH(4)(15)NO(3) was applied to soil, and concentrations of newly acquired N (N(labelled)) and total N (N(total)) in plant compartments and soil measured. Under 2 × O(3), N(labelled) and N(total) were increased in the bulk soil and tended to be lower in fine and coarse roots of both species across the soil horizons, supporting hypothesis (i). N(labelled) was reduced in beech foliage by up to 60%, and by up to 50% in buds under 2 × O(3). Similarly, N(labelled) in stem bark and phloem was reduced. No such reduction was observed in spruce, reflecting a stronger effect on N acquisition in beech in accordance with hypothesis (ii). In spruce, 2 × O(3) tended to favour allocation of new N to foliage. N(labelled) in beech foliage correlated with cumulative seasonal transpiration, indicating impaired N acquisition was probably caused by reduced stomatal conductance and, hence, water transport under elevated O(3). Stimulated fine root growth under 2 × O(3) with a possible increase of below-ground N sink strength may also have accounted for lowered N allocation to above-ground organs. Reduced N uptake and altered allocation may enhance the use of stored N for growth, possibly affecting long-term stand nutrition.

  10. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  11. Differential impact of simultaneous migration on coevolving hosts and parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Pascua Laura DC

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of antagonistic host-parasite coevolution are believed to be crucially dependent on the rate of migration between populations. We addressed how the rate of simultaneous migration of host and parasite affected resistance and infectivity evolution of coevolving meta-populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and a viral parasite (bacteriophage. The increase in genetic variation resulting from small amounts of migration is expected to increase rates of adaptation of both host and parasite. However, previous studies suggest phages should benefit more from migration than bacteria; because in the absence of migration, phages are more genetically limited and have a lower evolutionary potential compared to the bacteria. Results The results supported the hypothesis: migration increased the resistance of bacteria to their local (sympatric hosts. Moreover, migration benefited phages more than hosts with respect to 'global' (measured with respect to the whole range of migration regimes patterns of resistance and infectivity, because of the differential evolutionary responses of bacteria and phage to different migration regimes. Specifically, we found bacterial global resistance peaked at intermediate rates of migration, whereas phage global infectivity plateaued when migration rates were greater than zero. Conclusion These results suggest that simultaneous migration of hosts and parasites can dramatically affect the interaction of host and parasite. More specifically, the organism with the lower evolutionary potential may gain the greater evolutionary advantage from migration.

  12. Nesfatin-130−59 Injected Intracerebroventricularly Differentially Affects Food Intake Microstructure in Rats Under Normal Weight and Diet-Induced Obese Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Philip; Teuffel, Pauline; Lembke, Vanessa; Kobelt, Peter; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Hofmann, Tobias; Rose, Matthias; Klapp, Burghard F.; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Nesfatin-1 is well-established to induce an anorexigenic effect. Recently, nesfatin-130−59, was identified as active core of full length nesfatin-11−82 in mice, while its role in rats remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of nesfatin-130−59 injected intracerebroventricularly (icv) on the food intake microstructure in rats. To assess whether the effect was also mediated peripherally we injected nesfatin-130−59 intraperitoneally (ip). Since obesity affects the signaling of various food intake-regulatory peptides we investigated the effects of nesfatin-130−59 under conditions of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male Sprague–Dawley rats fed ad libitum with standard diet were icv cannulated and injected with vehicle (5 μl ddH2O) or nesfatin-130−59 at 0.37, 1.1, and 3.3 μg (0.1, 0.3, 0.9 nmol/rat) and the food intake microstructure assessed using a food intake monitoring system. Next, naïve rats were injected ip with vehicle (300 μl saline) or nesfatin-130−59 (8.1, 24.3, 72.9 nmol/kg). Lastly, rats were fed a high fat diet for 10 weeks and those developing DIO were icv cannulated. Nesfatin-1 (0.9 nmol/rat) or vehicle (5 μl ddH2O) was injected icv and the food intake microstructure assessed. In rats fed standard diet, nesfatin-130−59 caused a dose-dependent reduction of dark phase food intake reaching significance at 0.9 nmol/rat in the period of 4–8 h post injection (−29%) with the strongest reduction during the fifth hour (−75%), an effect detectable for 24 h (−12%, p < 0.05 vs. vehicle). The anorexigenic effect of nesfatin-130−59 was due to a reduction in meal size (−44%, p < 0.05), while meal frequency was not altered compared to vehicle. In contrast to icv injection, nesfatin-130−59 injected ip in up to 30-fold higher doses did not alter food intake. In DIO rats fed high fat diet, nesfatin-130−59 injected icv reduced food intake in the third hour post injection (−71%), an effect due to a reduced meal frequency (

  13. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  14. Root Associated Bacteria – Friends or Enemies? A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Mihalache

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots, due to their exudates, represent important ecological niches for bacteria, which can influence the plant growth by their both beneficial and deleterious effects. The positive effects of bacteria interaction with the plants roots consist in facilitating the nutrient uptake (N, P, producing phytohormones, enhancing their resistance to biotic and abiotic factors such as pathogenic fungi and bacteria, extreme temperatures, heavy metals, salinity. Regarding the harmful effects of bacteria on plants growth, production of phytotoxins, competition for nutrients or inducing diseases or even plants death represents examples of mechanisms by which bacteria can affect in a negative manner the growth of the plants.

  15. Mycoplasma and associated bacteria isolated from ovine pink-eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, E V

    1971-01-01

    A mycoplasma was recovered from the untreated conjunctival membranes of nine sheep affected by Pink-eye. It was neither isolated from the conjunctiva of treated animals which were affected nor from the conjunctiva of normal animals either in contact or not in contact with affected animals. Bacteria found on normal conjunctival membranes were Neisseria ovis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermididis, Streptococcus and Bacillus spp. Bacteria found in clinical cases of Pink-eye were N. ovis, E. coli, a Streptococcus and Pseudomonas spp.

  16. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.S. Kwakman; A.A. te Velde; L. de Boer; D. Speijer; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S.A.J. Zaat

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria t

  17. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  18. Metallization of bacteria cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎向锋; 李雅芹; 蔡军; 张德远

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria cells with different standard shapes are well suited for use as templates for the fabrication of magnetic and electrically conductive microstructures. In this paper, metallization of bacteria cells is demonstrated by an electroless deposition technique of nickel-phosphorus initiated by colloid palladium-tin catalyst on the surfaces of Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus. The activated and metallized bacteria cells have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that both Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus had no deformation in shape after metallization; the metallized films deposited on the surfaces of bacteria cells are homogeneous in thickness and noncrystalline in phase structure. The kinetics of colloid palladium-tin solution and electroless plating on bacteria cells is discussed.

  19. Dextromethorphan differentially affects opioid antinociception in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Opioid drugs such as morphine and meperidine are widely used in clinical pain management, although they can cause some adverse effects. A number of studies indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may play a role in the mechanism of morphine analgesia, tolerance and dependence. Being an antitussive with NMDA antagonist properties, dextromethorphan (DM) may have some therapeutic benefits when coadministered with morphine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of DM on th...

  20. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  1. The new direction of functional lactic acid bacteria (LAB)——the differentiation strategy%功能性乳酸菌研究的最新动态——菌株差异化策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马凯; 何方

    2012-01-01

    本文回顾了益生菌从早期发现和功能相关性研究、功能研究范式形成到肠道微生物群体与人体健康相关研究等益生菌研究模式的转变.重点介绍在肠道微生物群体研究的背景下,益生菌研究的差异化研究策略,双歧杆菌复合菌株对于过敏反应调节作用的优势、婴儿型双歧杆菌和成人型双歧杆菌功能的差别以及益生菌粘附性和血型关系等人群差异化益生菌研发策略.益生菌差异化策略的深入必将带来范式的转变,同时为人群细分策略提供科学依据.%The article aimed at the review of probiotics from original isolation and functional research and the R & D paradigm establishment to the relationship of intestinal microbes and human body health. We focused on differentiation strategy of R & D based on the intestinal flora research, such as the priority of complex Bifidobacterium strains to the allergies , the functional differentiation of infant - type and adult - type and the relationship of ABO blood type and LAB adhesion. The deepening of the differentiation strategy will promote to the paradigm shift and provide the scientific evidence for probiotics human group subdivision.

  2. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  3. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vassoler Serrato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2 is transformed into ammonia (NH3 by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS, anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  4. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  5. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  6. Molecular Detection of Endophytic Bacteria on Plantlet Tissue of Sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIWIK EKO WIDAYATI

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria live in plant host tissues without causing any symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the indigenous endophytic bacteria on sugarcane plantlets produced from the young leaf cells by using tissue culture techniques. To detect the existence of endophytic bacteria in the plantlet tissue, a series of molecular method based on PCR were applied by using ribosomal intergenic spacer (RIS primer followed by 16S rDNA partial sequence and single strand conformation polymorphism (SCCP. The results showed that the molecular method could detect the existence of bacteria in the tissues. Using the same methods, the bacteria were also found in other developmental stages of sugarcane (explants, differentiated tissues and callus.

  7. Maternal exposure to 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile targets late-stage differentiation of hippocampal granule cell lineages to affect brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling and interneuron subpopulations in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, Megu; Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Kikuchihara, Yoh; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    3,3'-Iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) causes neurofilament (NF)-filled swellings in the proximal segments of many large-caliber myelinated axons. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to IDPN on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 67 or 200 ppm IDPN in drinking water from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, female offspring subjected to analysis had decreased parvalbumin(+), reelin(+) and phospho-TrkB(+) interneurons in the dentate hilus at 200 ppm and increased granule cell populations expressing immediate-early gene products, Arc or c-Fos, at ≥  67 ppm. mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus examined at 200 ppm decreased with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and very low density lipoprotein receptor. Immunoreactivity for phosphorylated NF heavy polypeptide decreased in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum radiatum of the cornu ammonis (CA) 3, portions showing axonal projections from mossy cells and pyramidal neurons, at 200 ppm on PND 21, whereas immunoreactivity for synaptophysin was unchanged in the dentate gyrus. Observed changes all disappeared on PND 77. There were no fluctuations in the numbers of apoptotic cells, proliferating cells and subpopulations of granule cell lineage in the subgranular zone on PND 21 and PND 77. Thus, maternal IDPN exposure may reversibly affect late-stage differentiation of granule cell lineages involving neuronal plasticity as evident by immediate-early gene responses to cause BDNF downregulation resulting in a reduction in parvalbumin(+) or reelin(+) interneurons and suppression of axonal plasticity in the mossy cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons.

  8. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in an interspecific F1 poplar cross and differential expression of genes in ectomycorrhizas of the two parents: Populus deltoides and Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Jorge, Veronique [INRA, Nancy, France; Vion, Patrice [INRA, Nancy, France; Marcais, Benoit [INRA, Nancy, France; Bastien, Catherine [INRA, Orleans, France; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France

    2011-01-01

    A Populus deltoides Populus trichocarpa F1 pedigree was analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting ectomycorrhizal development and for microarray characterization of gene networks involved in this symbiosis. A 300 genotype progeny set was evaluated for its ability to form ectomycorrhiza with the basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The percentage of mycorrhizal root tips was determined on the root systems of all 300 progeny and their two parents. QTL analysis identified four significant QTLs, one on the P. deltoides and three on the P. trichocarpa genetic maps. These QTLs were aligned to the P. trichocarpa genome and each contained several megabases and encompass numerous genes. NimbleGen whole-genome microarray, using cDNA from RNA extracts of ectomycorrhizal root tips from the parental genotypes P. trichocarpa and P. deltoides, was used to narrow the candidate gene list. Among the 1,543 differentially expressed genes (p value 0.05; 5.0-fold change in transcript level) having different transcript levels in mycorrhiza of the two parents, 41 transcripts were located in the QTL intervals: 20 in Myc_d1, 14 in Myc_t1, and seven in Myc_t2, while no significant differences among transcripts were found in Myc_t3. Among these 41 transcripts, 25 were overrepresented in P. deltoides relative to P. trichocarpa; 16 were overrepresented in P. trichocarpa. The transcript showing the highest overrepresentation in P. trichocarpa mycorrhiza libraries compared to P. deltoides mycorrhiza codes for an ethylene-sensitive EREBP-4 protein which may repress defense mechanisms in P. trichocarpa while the highest overrepresented transcripts in P. deltoides code for proteins/genes typically associated with pathogen resistance.

  9. Lanthanum Affects Bell Pepper Seedling Quality Depending on the Genotype and Time of Exposure by Differentially Modifying Plant Height, Stem Diameter and Concentrations of Chlorophylls, Sugars, Amino Acids, and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jiménez, Atonaltzin; Gómez-Merino, Fernando C; Tejeda-Sartorius, Olga; Trejo-Téllez, Libia I

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanum (La) is considered a beneficial element, capable of inducing hormesis. Hormesis is a dose-response relationship phenomenon characterized by low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Herein we tested the effect of 0 and 10 μM La on growth and biomolecule concentrations of seedlings of four sweet bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) varieties, namely Sven, Sympathy, Yolo Wonder, and Zidenka. Seedling evaluations were performed 15 and 30 days after treatment applications (dat) under hydroponic greenhouse conditions. Seedling height was significantly increased by La, growing 20% taller in Yolo Wonder plants, in comparison to the control. Similarly, La significantly enhanced shoot diameter, with increases of 9 and 9.8% in measurements performed 15 and 30 dat, respectively, as compared to the control. Likewise, La-treated seedlings had a higher number of flower buds than the control. An increase in the number of leaves because of La application was observed in Yolo Wonder seedlings, both 15 and 30 dat, while leaf area was augmented in this variety only 30 dat. Nevertheless, La did not affect dry biomass accumulation. La effects on biomolecule concentration were differential over time. In all varieties, La stimulated the biosynthesis of chlorophyll a, b and total 15 dat, though 30 dat only the varieties Sympathy and Yolo Wonder showed enhanced concentrations of these molecules because of La. Total soluble sugars increased in La-treated seedlings 30 dat. Interestingly, while most varieties exposed to La showed a reduction in amino acid concentration 15 dat, the opposite trend was observed 30 dat. Importantly, in all varieties evaluated, La stimulated soluble protein concentration 30 dat. It is important to note that while chlorophyll concentrations increased in all varieties exposed to La, both 15 and 30 dat, those of soluble sugars and proteins consistently increased only 30 dat, but not 15 dat. Our results confirm that La may improve seedling quality by

  10. Mycophagous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Soil microorganisms evolved several strategies to compete for limited nutrients in soil. Bacteria of the genus Collimonas developed a way to exploit fungi as a source of organic nutrients. This strategy has been termed “mycophagy&r

  11. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  12. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  13. Differential characters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Providing a systematic introduction to differential characters as introduced by Cheeger and Simons, this text describes important concepts such as fiber integration, higher dimensional holonomy, transgression, and the product structure in a geometric manner. Differential characters form a model of what is nowadays called differential cohomology, which is the mathematical structure behind the higher gauge theories in physics.  

  14. DO AUTOCHTHONOUS BACTERIA AFFECT GIARDIA CYST SURVIVAL IN NATURAL WATERS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardia lamblia survives in and is transmitted to susceptible human and animal populations via water, where it is present in an environmentally resistant cyst form. Previous research has highlighted the importance of water temperature in cyst survival, and has also suggested the ...

  15. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play, expe...... affects can be choreographed and designed intentionally or whether it arises from unpredictable circumstances within urbanity itself....

  16. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  17. Interaction of the bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila (Enterobactericeae) and Bacillus subtilis (Bacillaceae) with the hemocytes of larval Malacosoma disstria (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Paschalis; Brooks, Cory L; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A; Niven, Donald F; Zakarian, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Malacosoma disstria larvae are a pest of deciduous trees. Little is known on the interaction of bacteria with the immediate hemocytic antimicrobial responses of these insects. Incubating dead Xenorhabdus nematophila and Bacillus subtilis with a mixture of serum-free granular cells and plasmatocytes in vitro revealed differential bacterial-hemocyte adhesion and differential discharge of lysozyme and phenoloxidase but not total protein. Although active phenoloxidase adhered equally to both bacterial species, X. nematophila limited enzyme activation whereas B. subtilis enhanced activation. Serum with active phenoloxidase (as opposed to tropolone-inhibited phenoloxidase) and purified insect lysozyme increased bacterial-hemocyte adhesion of both bacterial species. An apolipophorin-III-like protein when incubated with hemocytes, limited their responses to glass slides and bacterial adhesion. However, initial binding of the protein to both bacteria increased granular cell levels with bacteria while lowering the plasmatocyte levels with adhering procaryotes. The protein also increased lysozyme and phenoloxidase activities. Although B. subtilis in vivo elicited a nodulation-based decline in total hemocyte counts and did not affect hemocyte viability, dead X. nematophila elevated hemocyte counts and damaged the hemocytes as lipopolysaccharide levels increased and X. nematophila emerged into the hemolymph. Apolipophorin-III-like protein once bound to the bacteria slowed their removal from the hemolymph.

  18. Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162067.html Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria? Study in New York City found most of ... keypads in New York City were covered in bacteria, researchers reported, with most of the microbes coming ...

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans genomic response to soil bacteria predicts environment-specific genetic effects on life history traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Coolon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available With the post-genomic era came a dramatic increase in high-throughput technologies, of which transcriptional profiling by microarrays was one of the most popular. One application of this technology is to identify genes that are differentially expressed in response to different environmental conditions. These experiments are constructed under the assumption that the differentially expressed genes are functionally important in the environment where they are induced. However, whether differential expression is predictive of functional importance has yet to be tested. Here we have addressed this expectation by employing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for the interaction of native soil nematode taxa and soil bacteria. Using transcriptional profiling, we identified candidate genes regulated in response to different bacteria isolated in association with grassland nematodes or from grassland soils. Many of the regulated candidate genes are predicted to affect metabolism and innate immunity suggesting similar genes could influence nematode community dynamics in natural systems. Using mutations that inactivate 21 of the identified genes, we showed that most contribute to lifespan and/or fitness in a given bacterial environment. Although these bacteria may not be natural food sources for C. elegans, we show that changes in food source, as can occur in environmental disturbance, can have a large effect on gene expression, with important consequences for fitness. Moreover, we used regression analysis to demonstrate that for many genes the degree of differential gene expression between two bacterial environments predicted the magnitude of the effect of the loss of gene function on life history traits in those environments.

  20. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  1. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  2. Exopolysaccharides from Marine Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Zhenming; FANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives,textiles, pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria,including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  3. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the fre...

  4. Investigating typographic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie; Dyson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Text designers are likely to benefit from guidance on how to use typographic differentiation for emphasis. Three experiments use purposely-designed fonts to explore the size and nature of differences in the stylistic characteristics of fonts (weight, width, contrast, italic) which affect letter...

  5. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  6. Mitochondria: a target for bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Elodie; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Arnould, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed strategies to detect and eradicate infections. The innate immune system, which is the first line of defence against invading pathogens, relies on the recognition of molecular patterns conserved among pathogens. Pathogen associated molecular pattern binding to pattern recognition receptor triggers the activation of several signalling pathways leading to the establishment of a pro-inflammatory state required to control the infection. In addition, pathogens evolved to subvert those responses (with passive and active strategies) allowing their entry and persistence in the host cells and tissues. Indeed, several bacteria actively manipulate immune system or interfere with the cell fate for their own benefit. One can imagine that bacterial effectors can potentially manipulate every single organelle in the cell. However, the multiple functions fulfilled by mitochondria especially their involvement in the regulation of innate immune response, make mitochondria a target of choice for bacterial pathogens as they are not only a key component of the central metabolism through ATP production and synthesis of various biomolecules but they also take part to cell signalling through ROS production and control of calcium homeostasis as well as the control of cell survival/programmed cell death. Furthermore, considering that mitochondria derived from an ancestral bacterial endosymbiosis, it is not surprising that a special connection does exist between this organelle and bacteria. In this review, we will discuss different mitochondrial functions that are affected during bacterial infection as well as different strategies developed by bacterial pathogens to subvert functions related to calcium homeostasis, maintenance of redox status and mitochondrial morphology.

  7. Differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinski, Antoni A

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of differential topology form the center of many mathematical disciplines such as differential geometry and Lie group theory. Differential Manifolds presents to advanced undergraduates and graduate students the systematic study of the topological structure of smooth manifolds. Author Antoni A. Kosinski, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University, offers an accessible approach to both the h-cobordism theorem and the classification of differential structures on spheres.""How useful it is,"" noted the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, ""to have a single, sho

  8. Persistence of bacteria and phages in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hal L; Thieme, Horst R

    2012-05-01

    The model of bacteriophage predation on bacteria in a chemostat formulated by Levin et al. (Am Nat 111:3-24, 1977) is generalized to include a distributed latent period, distributed viral progeny release from infected bacteria, unproductive adsorption of phages to infected cells, and possible nutrient uptake by infected cells. Indeed, two formulations of the model are given: a system of delay differential equations with infinite delay, and a more general infection-age model that leads to a system of integro-differential equations. It is shown that the bacteria persist, and sharp conditions for persistence and extinction of phages are determined by the reproductive ratio for phage relative to the phage-free equilibrium. A novel feature of our analysis is the use of the Laplace transform.

  9. Emerging roles of immunostimulatory oral bacteria in periodontitis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yizu; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Inohara, Naohiro

    2014-03-01

    Periodontitis is a common dental disease which results in irreversible alveolar bone loss around teeth, and subsequent tooth loss. Previous studies have focused on bacteria that damage the host and the roles of commensals to facilitate their colonization. Although some immune responses targeting oral bacteria protect the host from alveolar bone loss, recent studies show that particular host defense responses to oral bacteria can induce alveolar bone loss. Host-damaging and immunostimulatory oral bacteria cooperatively induce bone loss by inducing gingival damage followed by immunostimulation. In mouse models of experimental periodontitis induced by either Porphyromonas gingivalis or ligature, γ-proteobacteria accumulate and stimulate host immune responses to induce host damage. Here we review the differential roles of individual bacterial groups in promoting bone loss through the induction of host damage and immunostimulation.

  10. NSAID enteropathy and bacteria: a complicated relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syer, Stephanie D; Blackler, Rory W; Martin, Rebeca; de Palma, Giada; Rossi, Laura; Verdu, Elena; Bercik, Premek; Surette, Michael G; Aucouturier, Anne; Langella, Philippe; Wallace, John L

    2015-04-01

    The clinical significance of small intestinal damage caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remains under-appreciated. It occurs with greater frequency than the damage caused by these drugs in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but is much more difficult to diagnose and treat. Although the pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy remains incompletely understood, it is clear that bacteria, bile, and the enterohepatic circulation of NSAIDs are all important factors. However, they are also interrelated with one another. Bacterial enzymes can affect the cytotoxicity of bile and are essential for enterohepatic circulation of NSAIDs. Gram-negative bacteria appear to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy, possibly through release of endotoxin. Inhibitors of gastric acid secretion significantly aggravate NSAID enteropathy, and this effect is due to significant changes in the intestinal microbiome. Treatment with antibiotics can, in some circumstances, reduce the severity of NSAID enteropathy, but published results are inconsistent. Specific antibiotic-induced changes in the microbiota have not been causally linked to prevention of intestinal damage. Treatment with probiotics, particularly Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Faecalibacteriaum prausnitzii, has shown promising effects in animal models. Our studies suggest that these beneficial effects are due to colonization by the bacteria, rather than to products released by the bacteria.

  11. Oropharyngeal carriage of respiratory bacteria among military conscripts

    OpenAIRE

    Jounio, U. (Ulla)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this work were to study the carriage of respiratory bacteria and to identify risk factors affecting pharyngeal colonisation by these pathogens among young Finnish men during military service, and also to investigate the role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and MBL2 gene polymorphisms in the carriage of respiratory bacteria. A total of 892 military recruits entering the Kainuu Brigade, including 224 men with asthma, were followed up prospectively to ...

  12. Brotes germinados y bacterias

    OpenAIRE

    García Olmedo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Ante la confusión y el revuelo asociados al último incidente causado por una cepa de la bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) en Alemania, tal vez no esté de más esta carta para recordar y actualizar escritos míos anteriores aparecidos en Revista de Libros sobre los riesgos alimentarios en general y sobre los peligros de dicho microorganismo en particular. 1 . Aunque es cierto que la proporción de cepas peligrosas de E. coli es quizás inferior a la de delincuentes entre los humanos, exi...

  13. Differential meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; A. Ponse

    2008-01-01

    A meadow is a zero totalised field (0^{-1}=0), and a cancellation meadow is a meadow without proper zero divisors. In this paper we consider differential meadows, i.e., meadows equipped with differentiation operators. We give an equational axiomatization of these operators and thus obtain a finite b

  14. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a comprehensive treatment of ordinary differential equations, concisely presenting basic and essential results in a rigorous manner. Including various examples from physics, mechanics, natural sciences, engineering and automatic theory, Differential Equations is a bridge between the abstract theory of differential equations and applied systems theory. Particular attention is given to the existence and uniqueness of the Cauchy problem, linear differential systems, stability theory and applications to first-order partial differential equations. Upper undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and systems theory with a background in advanced calculus will find this book particularly useful. Supplementary topics are covered in an appendix enabling the book to be completely self-contained.

  15. 影响降解菌W2修复异噁草酮污染土壤的三种因子的优化%Optimization of three factors affecting clomazone degradation in contaminated soils by degrading bacteria W2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亚光; 刘蕊; 唐广顺

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To optimize the conditions for clomazone degradation in contaminated soils by degrading bacteria W2. [Method] Three factors affecting degradation rate were studied, including the soil moisture content,the amount of inoculation and fertilizer used. Based on the bioassay method, the degradation rates of bacteria W2 under different conditions were compared by using orthogonally rotational combination design. [Result] Mathematical regression model for clomazone degradation was established as follows: y= 62. 363 9 + 5. 872 8 × C1 —4.494 1 × C2 C3 — 1.262 1× C12 —4. 076 7 × C22. The results demonstrated that the significance order affecting degradation rate was: the soil moisture content, the amount of fertilize used and the amount of inoculation. [Conclusion] When the amount of inoculation ranged from 8.19 mL/kg to 11.81 mL/kg, soil moisture content ranged from 18.6% to 20.84%, and the amount of fertilizer used ranged from 1.83 g/kg to 2.52 g/kg, the degradation rate was above 60% in air-dried soils containing 500 μg/kg clomazone after 30 days, close to the highest degradation rate 65.56%.%[目的]确定降解菌W2对土壤中异噁草酮的最优生物修复条件.[方法]采用3因素5水平正交旋转组合设计,室外盆栽生物测定方法,研究降解菌W2接种量、土壤含水量和肥料添加量3种田间可控因子对降解菌W2修复异噁草酮污染土壤效果的影响.[结果]确定修复条件的优化数学回归模型为:y=62.3639+5.8728×C1-4.4941×C2C3-1.2621×C(2)1-4.0767×C(2)2,不同因子对土壤修复影响大小顺序依次为土壤含水量、肥料添加量、降解菌W2接种量.[结论]降解菌W2对土壤中异噁草酮的最优生物修复条件为:降解菌W2接种量8.19~11.81mL/㎏(A650=0.4),土壤含水量18.6%~20.84%,肥料添加量1.83~2.52g/㎏.在此范围内降解菌W2对异噁草酮有效成分浓度为500μg/㎏的风干土壤30d后的降解率可达60%以上,可接近

  16. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Smith, Mark B.; Perrotta, Allison R.; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities—believed to be the therapeutic agent—can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium monoazide (PMA) to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii—an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease—decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material. PMID:28125667

  17. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  18. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny.

  19. Chemical communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  20. Predominant bacteria diversity in Chinese traditional sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohua; He, Guoqing

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major bacteria in Chinese traditional sourdough (CTS). Five CTS samples (Hn-87, Sx-91, Gs-107, Hf-112, and Hr-122) were collected from different Chinese steamed breads shops or private households. The total bacterial DNA was extracted from sourdough samples and sequenced using Illumina Hiseq 2000 system. Illumina tags were assigned to BLASTN server based on 16S rRNA libraries to reveal a genetic profile. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the bacteria in traditional sourdough samples were dominated by the genera Leuconostoc and Lactobacillus. Beta diversity analysis, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis compared the bacterial differences in traditional sourdough samples. The results showed that Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella were the predominant genera among the 5 samples. This differentiated the sourdoughs into 3 typologies, namely, 1) Gs-107 and Sx-91, 2) Hr-122 and Hn-87, and 3) Hf-112. This study identified 3 unique major bacteria genus in CTS bread ecosystems.

  1. Differential games

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This volume lays the mathematical foundations for the theory of differential games, developing a rigorous mathematical framework with existence theorems. It begins with a precise definition of a differential game and advances to considerations of games of fixed duration, games of pursuit and evasion, the computation of saddle points, games of survival, and games with restricted phase coordinates. Final chapters cover selected topics (including capturability and games with delayed information) and N-person games.Geared toward graduate students, Differential Games will be of particular interest

  2. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria...... with bacteria, and the cytokine pattern induced by specific bacteria resembled the pattern induced in MoDC, except for TNF-alpha and IL-6, which were induced in response to different bacteria in blood DC/monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Autologous NK cells produced IFN-gamma when cultured with blood DC......, monocytes and monocyte-derived DC and IL-12-inducing bacteria, whereas only DC induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic T cells. In vitro-generated DC is a commonly used model of tissue DC, but they differ in certain aspects from intestinal DC, which are in direct contact with the intestinal microbiota...

  3. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  4. Affective Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Dean

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  5. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Amiya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a systematic and comprehensive account of the theory of differentiable manifolds and provides the necessary background for the use of fundamental differential topology tools. The text includes, in particular, the earlier works of Stephen Smale, for which he was awarded the Fields Medal. Explicitly, the topics covered are Thom transversality, Morse theory, theory of handle presentation, h-cobordism theorem, and the generalised Poincaré conjecture. The material is the outcome of lectures and seminars on various aspects of differentiable manifolds and differential topology given over the years at the Indian Statistical Institute in Calcutta, and at other universities throughout India. The book will appeal to graduate students and researchers interested in these topics. An elementary knowledge of linear algebra, general topology, multivariate calculus, analysis, and algebraic topology is recommended.

  6. Interaction between Chlorella vulgaris and bacteria:interference and resource competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Liang; WANG Renjun; ZHAO Peng; CHEN Ruinan; ZHOU Wenli; TANG Liuqing; TANG Xuexi

    2014-01-01

    Research of interaction mechanism between Chlorella vulgaris and two bacterial strains (Z-QD08 and Z-QS01) were conducted under laboratory conditions. Growth rates of bacteria and C. vulgaris were tested under co-culture conditions to evaluate the effects of concentrations of C. vulgaris and bacteria on their interactions. To test whether the availability of inorganic nutrients, vitamins and trace metals affects the interactions between C. vulgaris and bacteria, experiments were performed with or without the culture medium filtrate of C. vulgaris or bacteria. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was promot-ed at low concentrations of bacteria (5×106 cells/ml), and expressed a positive correlation with the bacteria density, whereas opposite trend was observed for treatments with high bacteria density (10×106 cells/ml and 20×106 cells/ml). The growth rate of bacteria decreased with the increasing concentrations of C. vul-garis. The growth of bacteria Z-QD08 was inhibited by C. vulgaris through interference competition, while the mechanism for interaction between bacteria Z-QS01 and C. vulgaris was resource competition. The influence of cell density on the interaction between microalgae and bacteria was also discussed. These ex-periments confirm some elements of published theory on interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae and suggest that heterotrophic bacteria play an important role in the development of blooms in natural waters.

  7. A strategy for isolation of cDNAs encoding proteins affecting human intestinal epithelial cell growth and differentiation: characterization of a novel gut-specific N-myristoylated annexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wice, B M; Gordon, J I

    1992-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is rapidly and perpetually renewed as the descendants of multipotent stem cells located in crypts undergo proliferation, differentiation, and eventual exfoliation during a very well organized migration along the crypt to villus axis. The mechanisms that establish and maintain this balance between proliferation and differentiation are largely unknown. We have utilized HT-29 cells, derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma, as a model system for identifying gene products that may regulate these processes. Proliferating HT-29 cells cultured in the absence of glucose (e.g., using inosine as the carbon source) have some of the characteristics of undifferentiated but committed crypt epithelial cells while postconfluent cells cultured in the absence of glucose resemble terminally differentiated enterocytes or goblet cells. A cDNA library, constructed from exponentially growing HT-29 cells maintained in inosine-containing media, was sequentially screened with a series of probes depleted of sequences encoding housekeeping functions and enriched for intestine-specific sequences that are expressed in proliferating committed, but not differentiated, epithelial cells. Of 100,000 recombinant phage surveyed, one was found whose cDNA was derived from an apparently gut-specific mRNA. It encodes a 316 residue, 35,463-D protein that is a new member of the annexin/lipocortin family. Other family members have been implicated in regulation of cellular growth and in signal transduction pathways. RNA blot and in situ hybridization studies indicate that the gene encoding this new annexin exhibits region-specific expression along both axes of the human gut: (a) highest levels of mRNA are present in the jejunum with marked and progressive reductions occurring distally; (b) its mRNA appears in crypt-associated epithelial cells and increases in concentration as they exit the crypt. Villus-associated epithelial cells continue to transcribe this gene during their

  8. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  9. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  10. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  11. Differential Krull dimension in differential polynomial extensions

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnov, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the differential Krull dimension of differential polynomials over a differential ring. We prove a differential analogue of Jaffard's Special Chain Theorem and show that differential polynomial extensions of certain classes of differential rings have no anomaly of differential Krull dimension.

  12. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeted against the type II sub. beta. regulatory subunit mRNA of protein kinase inhibits cAMP-induced differentiation in HL-60 leukemia cells without affecting phorbol ester effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, G.; Clair, T.; Cho-Chung, Y.S. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The type II{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII{sub {beta}}) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII{sub {beta}} antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII{sub {beta}} antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. This loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII{sub {beta}} protein. Exposure to RII{sub {beta}} sense, RI{sub {alpha}} and RII{sub {alpha}} antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells.

  13. T cells and intestinal commensal bacteria--ignorance, rejection, and acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jiani N; Zhou, You W; Hsieh, Chyi-Song

    2014-11-17

    Trillions of commensal bacteria cohabit our bodies to mutual benefit. In the past several years, it has become clear that the adaptive immune system is not ignorant of intestinal commensal bacteria, but is constantly interacting with them. For T cells, the response to commensal bacteria does not appear uniform, as certain commensal bacterial species appear to trigger effector T cells to reject and control them, whereas other species elicit Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells to accept and be tolerant of them. Here, we review our current knowledge of T cell differentiation in response to commensal bacteria, and how this process leads to immune homeostasis in the intestine.

  14. Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miransari, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    The soil environment is interesting and complicated. There are so many interactions taking place in the soil, which determine the properties of soil as a medium for the growth and activities of plants and soil microorganisms. The soil fungi, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), are in mutual and beneficial symbiosis with most of the terrestrial plants. AM fungi are continuously interactive with a wide range of soil microorganisms including nonbacterial soil microorganisms, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, mycorrhiza helper bacteria and deleterious bacteria. Their interactions can have important implications in agriculture. There are some interesting interactions between the AM fungi and soil bacteria including the binding of soil bacteria to the fungal spore, the injection of molecules by bacteria into the fungal spore, the production of volatiles by bacteria and the degradation of fungal cellular wall. Such mechanisms can affect the expression of genes in AM fungi and hence their performance and ecosystem productivity. Hence, consideration of such interactive behavior is of significance. In this review, some of the most important findings regarding the interactions between AM fungi and soil bacteria with some new insights for future research are presented.

  15. Ecophysiology of the anammox bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, Mustafa Boran

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor. These bacteria are the key players in the global nitrogen cycle, responsible for the most of nitrogen production in natural ecosystems. The anammox process is also a cost-effecti

  16. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  17. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  18. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...... with a highly variable speed of 0.50.3 ms1 (meanstandard deviation) and time between reversals of 155108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic......-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment....

  19. Bacteria in the injection water differently impacts the bacterial communities of production wells in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan eRen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Water flooding is widely used for oil recovery. However, how the introduction of bacteria via water flooding affects the subsurface ecosystem remains unknown. In the present study, the distinct bacterial communities of an injection well and 6 adjacent production wells were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and pyrosequencing. All sequences of the variable region 3 of the 16S rRNA gene retrieved from pyrosequencing were divided into 543 operational taxonomic units (OTUs based on 97% similarity. Approximately 13.5% of the total sequences could not be assigned to any recognized phylum. The Unifrac distance analysis showed significant differences in the bacterial community structures between the production well and injection water samples. However, highly similar bacterial structures were shown for samples obtained from the same oil-bearing strata. More than 69% of the OTUs detected in the injection water sample were absent or detected in low abundance in the production wells. However, the abundance of two OTUs reached as high as 17.5% and 26.9% in two samples of production water, although the OTUs greatly varied among all samples. Combined with the differentiated water flow rate measured through ion tracing, we speculated that the transportation of injected bacteria was impacted through the varied permeability from the injection well to each of the production wells. Whether the injected bacteria predominate the production well bacterial community might depend both on the permeability of the strata and the reservoir conditions.

  20. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graustein, William C

    2006-01-01

    This first course in differential geometry presents the fundamentals of the metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces in a Euclidean space of three dimensions. Written by an outstanding teacher and mathematician, it explains the material in the most effective way, using vector notation and technique. It also provides an introduction to the study of Riemannian geometry.Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, the text presupposes a knowledge of calculus. The first nine chapters focus on the theory, treating the basic properties of curves and surfaces, the mapping of

  1. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    , under the assumption that the original constraint-based approach has these properties. Practically, as a concrete case study, we have integrated this technique into OFMC, a state-of-the-art model-checker for security protocol analysis, and demonstrated its effectiveness by extensive experimentation. Our......We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...

  2. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenheimer, Heinrich W

    1977-01-01

    This is a text of local differential geometry considered as an application of advanced calculus and linear algebra. The discussion is designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate study, and presumes of readers only a fair knowledge of matrix algebra and of advanced calculus of functions of several real variables. The author, who is a Professor of Mathematics at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, begins with a discussion of plane geometry and then treats the local theory of Lie groups and transformation groups, solid differential geometry, and Riemannian geometry, leading to a

  3. Motility of Electric Cable Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces with a highly variable speed of 0.5 ± 0.3 μm s−1 (mean ± standard deviation) and time between reversals of 155 ± 108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed ...

  4. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We

  5. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That the Specific Methyltransferases Txr1p and Ezl2p Differentially Affect the Mono-, Di- and Trimethylation States of Histone H3 Lysine 27 (H3K27)*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunchao; Molascon, Anthony J.; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yifan; Andrews, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear DNA in eukaryotic cells is assembled into the hierarchical chromatin structure via a process that is dynamically affected by the combinatorial set of post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones in a dynamic manner responsive to physiological and environmental changes. The precise quantification of these complex modifications is challenging. Here we present a robust MS-based quantitative proteomics method for studying histone PTMs using 15N metabolically labeled histones as the...

  6. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Mega

  7. Short-term overt hypothyroidism affect on lipids after thyroxine-withdrawal in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma%骨巨细胞瘤软组织内复发两例报道及文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Wu; Shuyao Zuo; Chao Ma; Bin Liu; Fengyu Wu; Simin Liu; Qin Zhang; Xifu Lan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of short-term overt hypothyroidism on lipids after thyroxine-withdrawal in patients with iatrogenically induced hypothyroidism before radioiodine treatment for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Methods: Thirty patients with a history of differentiated thyroid carcinoma on thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-suppressive thyroxine replacement therapy were studied. Blood sample were taken before and 4 weeks after withdrawal of thyroxine substitution. Venous blood was drawn after an overnight fast and analyzed for serum free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceddes (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB). Fifty healthy people matched for age and gender were controls. Their blood samples were taken only once. Results: After thyroxine-withdrawal, the patients presented with increased serum TSH and low serum FT4 and FT3 levels compared with controls. Serum TG, TC, LDL, HDL, APOB and Lp(a) increased after thyroxine withdrawal, reaching statistical significant dif-ferences with previous evaluation. However, when compared to euthyroid controls, only TC, LDL and ApoB were increased when patients were hypothyroidism. No changes were observed in ApoA1 in patients dudng thyroxine withdrawal, or when comparing the values observed in patients to those of euthyroid controls. Conclusion: TG, TC, LDL, HDL, APO8 and Lp(a) were increased during short-term overt hypothyroidism.

  8. Volatile-mediated interactions between phylogenetically different soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.; Hordijk, C.; Gerards, S.; Boer, de W.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that organic volatiles play an important role in interactions between micro-organisms in the porous soil matrix. Here we report that volatile compounds emitted by different soil bacteria can affect the growth, antibiotic production and gene expression of the soil bacteri

  9. Immune system responses and fitness costs associated with consumption of bacteria in larvae of Trichoplusia ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckel David G

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects helped pioneer, and persist as model organisms for, the study of specific aspects of immunity. Although they lack an adaptive immune system, insects possess an innate immune system that recognizes and destroys intruding microorganisms. Its operation under natural conditions has not been well studied, as most studies have introduced microbes to laboratory-reared insects via artificial mechanical wounding. One of the most common routes of natural exposure and infection, however, is via food; thus, the role of dietary microbial communities in herbivorous insect immune system evolution invites study. Here, we examine the immune system response and consequences of exposing a lepidopteran agricultural pest to non-infectious microorganisms via simple oral consumption. Results Immune system response was compared between Trichoplusia ni larvae reared on diets with or without non-pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus. Two major immune response-related enzymatic activities responded to diets differently – phenoloxidase activity was inhibited in the bacteria-fed larvae, whereas general antibacterial activity was enhanced. Eight proteins were highly expressed in the hemolymph of the bacteria fed larvae, among them immune response related proteins arylphorin, apolipophorin III and gloverin. Expression response among 25 putative immune response-related genes were assayed via RT-qPCR. Seven showed more than fivefold up regulation in the presence of bacterial diet, with 22 in total being differentially expressed, among them apolipophorin III, cecropin, gallerimycin, gloverin, lysozyme, and phenoloxidase inhibiting enzyme. Finally, potential life-history trade-offs were studied, with pupation time and pupal mass being negatively affected in bacteria fed larvae. Conclusion The presence of bacteria in food, even if non-pathogenic, can trigger an immune response cascade with life history tradeoffs. Trichoplusia ni

  10. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Margalef-Roig, J

    1992-01-01

    ...there are reasons enough to warrant a coherent treatment of the main body of differential topology in the realm of Banach manifolds, which is at the same time correct and complete. This book fills the gap: whenever possible the manifolds treated are Banach manifolds with corners. Corners add to the complications and the authors have carefully fathomed the validity of all main results at corners. Even in finite dimensions some results at corners are more complete and better thought out here than elsewhere in the literature. The proofs are correct and with all details. I see this book as a reliable monograph of a well-defined subject; the possibility to fall back to it adds to the feeling of security when climbing in the more dangerous realms of infinite dimensional differential geometry. Peter W. Michor

  11. Bacteria, some permanent tenants Space Station; Bacteria, unos inquilinos permanentes de la estacion espacial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, B.

    2015-07-01

    Vacuum cleaners to operate the vacuum or rags with ethanol they are the products of cleaning of the astronauts. Is there tight spaces fully sterilized? It seems not, even in the Space Station International (ISS). When it comes to bacteria, they are able to travel more than 400 kilometers housed in costumes, bodies and interior of the astronauts themselves and settle in a enclosed space where-unlike in a {sup c}leanroom 'terrestre- the air is not recycled. A NASA study has found an abundance of bacteria 'opportunists' which, although harmless on Earth, they might derivasen cause infections in inflammations or skin irritations. Not forgetting those fungi that could damage or affect the infrastructure equipment space. (Author)

  12. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreyszig, Erwin

    1991-01-01

    An introductory textbook on the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, presented in its simplest, most essential form, but with many explanatory details, figures and examples, and in a manner that conveys the theoretical and practical importance of the different concepts, methods and results involved. With problems at the end of each section, and solutions listed at the end of the book. Includes 99 illustrations.

  13. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  14. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  15. A comparative effect of 3 disinfectants on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The disinfection effect of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in circulating cooling water was studied. The results of the test indicated that high purity chlorine dioxide was the most effective biocide in the 3 disinfectants, and with a dosage of 0.5mg/L, chlorine dioxide could obtain perfect effect. High purity chloride dioxide could have the excellent effect with the pH value of 6 to 10, and could keep it within 72 h. Chlorine and their mixture couldn't reach the effect of chlorine dioxide.

  16. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  17. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Youngblood, T. [Frisby Technologies, Aiken, SC (United States); Lamothe, D. [American Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States). Ordnance/Explosives Environmental Services Div.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  18. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage.

  19. Methylprednisolone inhibits the proliferation and affects the differentiation of rat spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells cultured in low oxygen conditions by inhibiting HIF-1α and Hes1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Peng; Li, Shiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liang, Xinjun; Tang, Yong; Li, Yuxi; Yang, Rui; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-09-01

    Although there is much controversy over the use of methylprednisolone (MP), it is one of the main drugs used in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). The induction of the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is considered a promising mode of treatment for SCI. However, the effects of MP on spinal cord-derived endogenous NPCs in a low oxygen enviroment remain to be delineated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of MP on NPCs cultured under low oxygen conditions in vitro and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. Fetal rat spinal cord-derived NPCs were harvested and divided into 4 groups: 2 groups of cells cultured under normal oxygen conditions and treated with or without MP, and 2 groups incubated in 3% O2 (low oxygen) treated in a similar manner. We found that MP induced suppressive effects on NPC proliferation even under low oxygen conditions (3% O2). The proportion of nestin-positive NPCs decreased from 51.8±2.46% to 36.17±3.55% following the addition of MP and decreased more significantly to 27.20±2.68% in the cells cultured in 3% O2. In addition, a smaller number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells and a greater number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive cells was observed following the addition of MP under both normal (normoxic) and low oxygen (hypoxic) conditions. In response to MP treatment, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the Notch signaling pathway downstream protein, Hes1, but not the upstream Notch-1 intracelluar domain (NICD), were inhibited. After blocking NICD with a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) MP still inhibited the expression of Hes1. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the MP-induced inhibition of proliferation and its effects on differentiation and suggest that HIF-1α and Hes1 play an important role in this effect.

  20. 夹层杯集菌离心涂片法检测抗酸杆菌及影响检出率的因素分析%Detection of Acid-fast Bacilli by Sandwich Cup Collecting Bacteria and Smear method and Analysis of Factors Affecting the Detection Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱志斌; 张吉波; 雷鸣; 孙庆华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value of sandwich cup collecting bacteria and smear method (sandwich cup method) in detecting acid- fast bacilli and to explore the factors affecting the detection rate of the acid - fast bacilli in sputum specimens. Methods Sputum specimens of 735 inpatients with confirmed diagnosis of tuberculosis were collected. Sputum specimens of each patient included morning sputum, night sputum and random sputum. Each sputum specimen was subjected to sandwich cup method and improved Lowenstein Jensen culture (L - J culture). The positive detection rates of acid - fast bacilli were compared between the two detection methods and among sputum specimens of different natures and collected at different time. Results The positive rates of the sandwich cup method and the L - J culture in 2,205 sputum specimens were 28.9 % and 32.1% respectively, which were significantly different(χ2 =54.744,P<0.001). Having the L-J culture as the standard method, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the sandwich cup method were 89.39 %, 99.53 %, 98.90 % and 95.21 %, respectively. The detection rates of acid - fast bacilli by the sandwich cup method in purulent sputum, bloody sputum, mucous sputum and saliva were 53. 3%,48.5%,9.9% and 3. 7%, respectively. TheL —J culture also had the highest detection rate in purulent sputum(54. 8%), followed by bloody sputum(51. 3%), mucous sputum (13.5%)and saliva (8.8%). For sputum samples collected at different time, the detection rates by both methods were the highest in the morning sputum. Conclusions Sandwich cup collecting bacteria and smear method is simple, time- saving, with high detection rate and more favorable to be standardized. It shows a good coincidence with the L- J culture. It can be used as a valuable detection method for acid- fast bacillus and can be popularized. Both methods have high detection rates in morning sputum, purulent sputum and bloody sputum

  1. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dragiša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The baking of sourdough breads represents one of the oldest biotechnological processes. Despite traditionality, sourdough bread has great potential because of its benefits. Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water that is dominated by a complex microflora composed of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria that are crucial in the preparation of bread dough. Lactic acid bacteria cause acidification by producing lactic acid that increases the shelf life of bread by preventing the growth of undesirable microorganisms and affects the nutritional value of bread by increasing the availability of minerals. In addition to these advantages, the use of sourdough fermentation also improves dough machinability, breadcrumb structure and the characteristic flavour of bread. Lactic acid bacteria in sourdough fermentation are well known representing both homofermentative and heterofermentative bacteria. They may originate from selected natural contaminants in the flour or from a starter culture containing one or more known species of lactic acid bacteria. Sourdough can be cultivated in bakeries or obtained from commercial suppliers. However, many bakeries in Europe still use spontaneously fermented sourdoughs, which have been kept metabolically active for decades by the addition of flour and water at regular intervals. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation and their influence on dough and bread quality was discussed on the basis of research and literature data.

  2. Diversity of root nodule bacteria from leguminous crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a total of 353 nodule-associated bacteria were isolated from 220 legume plant samples belonging to Cicer arietinum (85, Glycine max (74, Vigna radiata (21 and Cajanus cajan (40. A total of 224 bacteria were identified as fast-growing Rhizobium spp. on the basis of differential staining (Gram staining and carbol fuchsin staining and biochemical tests. All the isolates were tested for indole acetic acid production (IAA, phosphate solubilization and siderophore production on plate assay. To examine the effect of volatile organic metabolites (VOM and water soluble soil components (WSSC on nodule bacteria, culture conditions were optimized by observing the effects of various parameters such as pH, salt content and temperatures on the growth of bacteria. Selected rhizobia were subjected to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA analysis to identify their species. On the basis of RAPD and ARDRA, 10 isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, Rhizobium GO4, G16, G20, G77, S43, S81, M07, M37, A15 and A55 were observed as the best candidates among the tested bacteria and can be further used as potent bioinoculants.

  3. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  4. Associations of Europium(III) with gram-negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kimura, T. [Department of Materials Science, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739- 8526 (Japan); Francis, A.J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Migration of radionuclides in the environment is greatly affected by bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment and can preferentially bind radionuclides because of the presence of the cell envelop consisting of two membrane bilayers with an intervening thin peptidoglycan layer, where carboxyl and phosphate functional groups are mainly involved in metal cation adsorption. In this study, we investigated the association of Eu(III) with four Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens, Alcaligenes faecalis, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Paracoccus denitrificans. Europium(III) is a good analogue of Am(III) and Cm(III). The association of Eu(III) with the bacteria were determined by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The kinetics study showed that the Eu(III) adsorption on the bacteria proceeded rapidly. The Eu(III) adsorption on P. fluorescens at pH 3, A. faecalis and P. denitrificans at pHs 3, 4, and 5, and S. putrefaciens at pHs 4 and 5 reached a maximum within 5 minutes after contact. For P. denitrificans, the percent adsorption of Eu(III) decreased after the maximum percent adsorption was attained, which suggests the existence of exudates with an affinity with Eu(III). TRLFS showed that the coordination of Eu(III) on these bacteria is multi-dentate through an inner-spherical process. The ligand field of Eu(III) on P. denitrificans was as strong as the ones observed for halo-philic microorganisms, while that of P. fluorescens, A. faecalis, and S. putrefaciens was the typical one observed for non-halo-philic microorganisms. The coordination environment of Eu(III) on the bacteria differed from each other, though they are categorized as Gram-negative bacteria with the similar cell wall components. (authors)

  5. The Oncogenic Fusion Proteins SET-Nup214 and Sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-Nup214 Form Dynamic Nuclear Bodies and Differentially Affect Nuclear Protein and Poly(A)+ RNA Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Sarah A; Mendes, Adélia; Valkova, Christina; Spillner, Christiane; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Kaether, Christoph; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2016-10-28

    Genetic rearrangements are a hallmark of several forms of leukemia and can lead to oncogenic fusion proteins. One example of an affected chromosomal region is the gene coding for Nup214, a nucleoporin that localizes to the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We investigated two such fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and SQSTM1 (sequestosome)-Nup214, both containing C-terminal portions of Nup214. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies containing the nuclear export receptor CRM1 were observed in the leukemia cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL. Overexpression of SET-Nup214 in HeLa cells leads to the formation of similar nuclear bodies that recruit CRM1, export cargo proteins, and certain nucleoporins and concomitantly affect nuclear protein and poly(A)(+) RNA export. SQSTM1-Nup214, although mostly cytoplasmic, also forms nuclear bodies and inhibits nuclear protein but not poly(A)(+) RNA export. The interaction of the fusion proteins with CRM1 is RanGTP-dependent, as shown in co-immunoprecipitation experiments and binding assays. Further analysis revealed that the Nup214 parts mediate the inhibition of nuclear export, whereas the SET or SQSTM1 part determines the localization of the fusion protein and therefore the extent of the effect. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies are highly mobile structures, which are in equilibrium with the nucleoplasm in interphase and disassemble during mitosis or upon treatment of cells with the CRM1-inhibitor leptomycin B. Strikingly, we found that nucleoporins can be released from nuclear bodies and reintegrated into existing NPC. Our results point to nuclear bodies as a means of preventing the formation of potentially insoluble and harmful protein aggregates that also may serve as storage compartments for nuclear transport factors.

  6. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, FG

    2013-01-01

    Based on his extensive experience as an educator, F. G. Tricomi wrote this practical and concise teaching text to offer a clear idea of the problems and methods of the theory of differential equations. The treatment is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students and addresses only questions that can be resolved with rigor and simplicity.Starting with a consideration of the existence and uniqueness theorem, the text advances to the behavior of the characteristics of a first-order equation, boundary problems for second-order linear equations, asymptotic methods, and diff

  7. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  8. Obesity and NAFLD: the role of bacteria and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duseja, Ajay; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    There are trillions of microorganisms in the human intestine collectively called gut microbiota. Obesity may be affected by the gut microbiota through energy harvesting and fat storage by the bacteria. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is also responsible for endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and its consequences including obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Relationship between gut microbiota and NAFLD is also dependent on altered choline and bile acid metabolism and endogenous alcohol production by gut bacteria. Further evidence linking gut microbiota with obesity and NAFLD comes from studies showing usefulness of probiotics in animals and patients with NAFLD. This article reviews the relationship among gut microbiota, obesity, and NAFLD.

  9. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations.

  10. 木薯叶片愈伤组织诱导与分化影响因子研究%Study on Factors Affecting Inducement and Differentiation of Leaf Callus in Cassava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩美丽; 陆荣生; 霍秀娟; 覃建林; 马跃峰

    2012-01-01

    The top young leaves of test - tube plantlets of cassava were used as explants, the effects of different types and concentrations of hormone on the inducement and differentiation of callus, as well as the rooting of adventitious bud were studied, and the method for alleviating callus browning during its browning progress was explored. The results showed that the best medium for the inducement of callus was the modified MS medium with 0.5-1.0 mg/L 2,4 -D, and the rale of cullus inducement was 73. 33% -89.44%. The proliferation rate of eallus was raised and the callus browning was alleviated when 200 - 300 mg/L PVP was added into the subculture medium for callus. Hie best hormone condition for the inducement of adventitious bud was the modified MS medium supplemented with 0.75 -1.00 mg/L ZT. The rooting rate of the twigs from adventitious buds reached 81.13% -90.63% when they were cultivated in the 1/2MS medium with 0.25-0.50 mg/L IBA.%以木薯试管苗顶部1~3处的幼叶为外植体,研究不同激素种类、浓度对愈伤组织的诱导、分化、不定芽生根的影响,并探讨了愈伤组织褐化过程中减轻褐化的方法.结果表明:在含0.5~1.0mg/L2,4-D的改良MS培养基上,可诱导木薯叶片产生愈伤组织,其愈伤诱导率为73.33%~ 89.44%;在愈伤组织的继代过程中,添加了200 ~ 300 mg/L PVP的处理可减轻愈伤褐化和提高愈伤增殖率;产生不定芽的最适激素条件是在改良MS培养基中添加0.75 ~1.00 mg/L ZT;不定芽产生的嫩枝在1/2MS基本培养基中添加0.25 ~0.50 mg/L IBA的条件下,其生根率达81.13% ~90.63%.

  11. Investigating typographic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Text designers are likely to benefit from guidance on how to use typographic differentiation for emphasis. Three experiments use purposely-designed fonts to explore the size and nature of differences in the stylistic characteristics of fonts (weight, width, contrast, italic) which affect letter...... identification. Results indicate that words set in bold and expanded fonts, when alternated with words set in a Neutral test font, may impair performance, whereas changing to italic does not. Possible explanations are explored through measuring the physical and perceptual similarities of the test fonts...

  12. High dietary fat-induced obesity in Wistar rats and type 2 diabetes in nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rats differentially affect retinol binding protein 4 expression and vitamin A metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Tomomi; Shichi, Yuta; Sato, Miyuki; Tanioka, Yuri; Furusho, Tadasu; Ota, Toru; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which is caused mainly by insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the only specific transport protein for retinol in the serum. RBP4 level is increased in the diabetic state and high-fat condition, indicating that retinol metabolism may be affected under these conditions. However, the precise effect of diabetes and high fat-induced obesity on retinol metabolism is unknown. In this study, we examined differences in retinol metabolite levels in rat models of diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes (Goto-Kakizaki [GK] rat). Four-week-old male Wistar and GK rats were given either a control diet (AIN-93G) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% fat kJ). After 15 weeks of feeding, the RBP4 levels increased by 2-fold in the serum of GK rats but not HFD-fed rats. The hepatic retinol concentration of HFD-fed rats was approximately 50% that of the controls (P retinol concentrations of GK rats increased by 70% (P retinol metabolism differently, and the effects were different in different peripheral tissues. The impact of HFD may be limited to the storage of hepatic vitamin A as retinyl palmitate. In particular, our data indicate that renal retinoic acid production might represent an important target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. IL-6 Impairs Myogenic Differentiation by Downmodulation of p90RSK/eEF2 and mTOR/p70S6K Axes, without Affecting AKT Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Pelosi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-6 is a multifaceted pleiotropic cytokine, which is produced by a variety of cell types and targets different cells and tissues. In physiological conditions, IL-6 can be locally and transiently produced by skeletal muscle and plays an important role in muscle homeostasis. Circulating IL-6 levels are normally very low or undetectable but are dramatically increased in several pathologic conditions. In this study, we aimed to define the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of IL-6 on myogenic program. We explored the molecular mechanisms through which exogenous IL-6, or the conditioned medium from the murine C-26 adenocarcinoma cells (a cellular model that secretes high levels of IL-6 and induces cancer cachexia in mice, interferes with the myogenic program. Our study revealed that IL-6 induces the activation of the Stat3 signaling and promotes the downmodulation of the p90RSK/eEF2 and mTOR/p70S6K axes, while it does not affect the activation of AKT. We thus identified potential molecular mediators of the inhibitory effects of IL-6 on myogenic program.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bacteria in latex paint were demonstrated.

  15. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  16. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  17. Affective Understanding and the Reading of Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Harold A., Jr.

    This investigation was designed to shed light on the study of literature by focusing on the reader's affective understandings and by using the semantic differential (S.D.) to measure affective meaning. Initially, an experimental group of 49 advanced senior high school students and a comparison group of 53 average senior high students used the S.D.…

  18. Transstadial and horizontal transfer of bacteria within a colony of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) and oviposition response to bacteria-containing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, J M; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Faye, I

    2008-09-01

    In a paratransgenic approach, genetically modified bacteria are utilized to kill the parasite in the vector gut. A critical component for paratransgenics against malaria is how transgenic bacteria can be introduced and then kept in a mosquito population. Here, we investigated transstadial and horizontal transfer of bacteria within an Anopheles gambiae mosquito colony with the focus on spiked breeding sites as a possible means of introducing bacteria to mosquitoes. A Pantoea stewartii strain, previously isolated from An. gambiae, marked with a green fluorescent protein (GFP), was introduced to mosquitoes in different life stages. The following life stages or older mosquitoes in the case of adults were screened for bacteria in their guts. In addition to P. stewartii other bacteria were isolated from the guts: these were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis and temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). Bacteria were transferred from larvae to pupae but not from pupae to adults. The mosquitoes were able to take up bacteria from the water they emerged from and transfer the same bacteria to the water they laid eggs in. Elizabethkingia meningoseptica was more often isolated from adult mosquitoes than P. stewartii. A bioassay was used to examine An. gambiae oviposition responses towards bacteria-containing solutions. The volatiles emitted from the solutions were sampled by headspace-solid phase microextraction (SPME) and identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. P. stewartii but not E. meningoseptica mediated a positive oviposition response. The volatiles emitted by P. stewartii include indole and 3-methyl-1-butanol, which previously have been shown to affect An. gambiae mosquito behaviour. E. meningoseptica emitted indole but not 3-methyl-1-butanol, when suspended in saline. Taken together, this indicates that it may be possible to create attractive breeding sites for distribution of genetically modified bacteria in the

  19. C/EBP-β Is Differentially Affected by PPARα Agonists Fenofibric Acid and GW7647, But Does Not Change Apolipoprotein A-I Production During ER-Stress and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krieken, Sophie E; Popeijus, Herman E; Konings, Maurice; Dullens, Stefan P J; Mensink, Ronald P; Plat, Jogchum

    2017-04-01

    Increasing apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I) production may be anti-atherogenic. Thus, there is a need to identify regulatory factors involved. Transcription of apoA-I involves peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-alpha (PPARα) activation, but endoplasmic reticulum (ER) -stress and inflammation also influence apoA-I production. To unravel why PPARα agonist GW7647 increased apoA-I production compared to PPARα agonist fenofibric acid (FeAc) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (CaCo-2) cells, gene expression profiles were compared. Microarray analyses suggested CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta (C/EBP-β) involvement in the FeAc condition. Therefore, C/EBP-β silencing and isoform-specific overexpression experiments were performed under ER-stressed, inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions. mRNA expression of C/EBP-β, ATF3, NF-IL3 and GDF15 were upregulated by FeAc compared to GW7647 in both cell lines, while DDIT3 and DDIT4 mRNA were only upregulated in HepG2 cells. This ER-stress related signature was associated with decreased apoA-I secretion. After ER-stress induction by thapsigargin or FeAc addition, intracellular apoA-I concentrations decreased, while ER-stress marker expression (CHOP, XBP1s, C/EBP-β) increased. Cytokine addition increased intracellular C/EBP-β levels and lowered apoA-I concentrations. Although a C/EBP binding place is present in the apoA-I promoter, C/EBP-β silencing or isoform-specific overexpression did not affect apoA-I production in inflammatory, non-inflammatory and ER-stressed conditions. Therefore, C/EBP-β is not a target to influence hepatic apoA-I production. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 754-763, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Administration of a Multi-Strain Probiotic Product to Women in the Perinatal Period Differentially Affects the Breast Milk Cytokine Profile and May Have Beneficial Effects on Neonatal Gastrointestinal Functional Symptoms. A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisabetta Baldassarre

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic supplementation to women during pregnancy and lactation can modulate breast milk composition, with immune benefits being transferred to their infants. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of high-dose probiotic supplementation to women during late pregnancy and lactation on cytokine profile and secretory IgA (sIgA in breast milk and thus to study if differences in breast milk composition can affect lactoferrin and sIgA levels in stool samples of newborns. The safety of maternal probiotic administration on neonatal growth pattern and gastrointestinal symptoms were also evaluated. Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, 66 women took either the probiotic (n = 33 or a placebo (n = 33 daily. Levels of interleukins (IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1β, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and sIgA in breast milk; and the level of sIgA and lactoferrin in newborn stool samples were analyzed at birth and then again at one month of life. Antropometrical evaluation and analysis of gastrointestinal events in newborns was also performed. Results: Probiotic maternal consumption had a significant impact on IL6 mean values in colostrum and on IL10 and TGF-β1 mean values in mature breast milk. Fecal sIgA mean values were higher in newborns whose mothers took the probiotic product than in the control group. Probiotic maternal supplementation seems to decrease incidence of infantile colic and regurgitation in infants. Conclusion: High-dose multi-strain probiotic administration to women during pregnancy influences breast milk cytokines pattern and sIgA production in newborns, and seems to improve gastrointestinal functional symptoms in infants.

  1. Differential Responses of Nitrifier and Denitrifier to Dicyandiamide in Short-and Long-Term Intensive Vegetable Cultivation Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi; YANG Yang; QIN Hong-ling; ZHU Yi-jun; WEI Wen-xue

    2014-01-01

    Nitriifcation inhibitors, such as dicyandiamide (DCD), have been shown to decrease leaching from urea- and ammonium-based fertilizers in agricultural soils. The effect of nitriifcation inhibitors on nitriifer and denitriifer in short-and long-term intensive vegetable cultivation soils was poorly understood. In this study, the pot trial was conducted to investigate the differential responses of nitriifer (amoA-containing bacteria) and denitriifer (nirK-containing bacteria) to DCD in short-(soil S) and long-term (soil L) intensive vegetable cultivation soils. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) were employed to detect the abundance and composition of amoA-and nirK-containing communities. The results indicated that application of DCD led to a consistently higher NH4+-N concentration during the whole incubation in soil L, while it was quickly decreased in soil S after 21 days. Furthermore, DCD induced more severe decrease of the abundance of amoA-containing bacteria in soil L than in soil S. However, the abundance of the nirK-containing community was not signiifcantly affected by DCD in both soils. Long-term vegetable cultivation resulted in a super-dominant amoA-containing bacteria group and less divergence in soil L compared with soil S, and DCD did not cause obvious shifts of the composition of ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB). On the contrary, both amoA-and nirK-containing bacterial compositions were inlfuenced by DCD in soil S. The results suggested that long-term intensive vegetable cultivation with heavy nitrogen fertilization resulted in signiifcant shifts of AOB community, and this community was sensitive to DCD, but denitriifers were not clearly affected by DCD.

  2. Spore-forming bacteria and their utilisation as probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, J; Albin, A; Stahl, U

    2012-03-01

    In this review article, the beneficial application of bacterial spore formers as probiotics in the food industry is discussed based on the knowledge gleaned from current publications. The summary of new scientific results provides evidence of the advantages of the utilisation of Bacillus or Clostridium strains in the food industry. Both bacteria are able to produce a very stable duration form: the endospore. Compared to the widely used lactic acid bacteria, bacterial spores offer the advantage of a higher survival rate during the acidic stomach passage and better stability during the processing and storage of the food product. In many food products, germination of the spores does not occur. Hence the product quality of the food is not affected because of their inactive metabolism. Besides the possible utilisation and functional properties, an overview of the fast-developing knowledge about the mechanisms of the beneficial health effects of spore-forming bacteria is provided.

  3. Effect of calcifying bacteria on permeation properties of concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, V; Mukherjee, A; Reddy, M S

    2011-09-01

    Microbially enhanced calcite precipitation on concrete or mortar has become an important area of research regarding construction materials. This study examined the effect of calcite precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii (Bp M-3) on parameters affecting the durability of concrete or mortar. An inexpensive industrial waste, corn steep liquor (CSL), from starch industry was used as nutrient source for the growth of bacteria and calcite production, and the results obtained with CSL were compared with those of the standard commercial medium. Bacterial deposition of a layer of calcite on the surface of the specimens resulted in substantial decrease of water uptake, permeability, and chloride penetration compared with control specimens without bacteria. The results obtained with CSL medium were comparable to those obtained with standard medium, indicating the economization of the biocalcification process. The results suggest that calcifying bacteria play an important role in enhancing the durability of concrete structures.

  4. Biodegradation of crude oil dispersions by marine bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Fernandez, Vicente; Stocker, Roman

    2016-11-01

    Dispersants are used to break up marine oil slicks and increase the available surface area for bacteria to degrade oil hydrocarbons. However, this common view neglects key elements of the microscale interactions between bacteria and oil droplets, namely encounters and growth. Utilizing experimental observations of bacteria colonizing oil droplets, we model the interactions affecting hydrocarbon consumption between a collection of oil droplets with varying sizes and a single bacterial pool. The results show that degradation time is minimized for intermediate droplet sizes and that reducing droplet size too much can lead to years in increased degradation time. This mechanical model provides a baseline for understanding oil biodegradation and mitigation strategies in open marine systems.

  5. Adaptation, Bacteria and Maxwell's Demons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galajda, Peter; Keymer, Juan E.; Austin, Robert H.

    2007-03-01

    We propose a method to study the adaptation of bacterial populations with an asymmetric wall of Maxwell Demon openings. A Maxwell Demon opening is a funnel which is easier to enter than to leave. The interaction of swimming cells with such a Maxwell Demon Wall results in a population density separation, in apparent (but not real) violation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, as we will show. Bacteria can be exposed to spatial challenges in order to move to e. g. higher food levels. The question we address in these experiments is: do the bacteria adapt and overcome the Maxwell Demon Wall?

  6. Bacteria survival probability in bactericidal filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur-Azzam, Nura; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Woo, Su Gyeong; Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2014-05-01

    Bactericidal filter papers offer the simplicity of gravity filtration to simultaneously eradicate microbial contaminants and particulates. We previously detailed the development of biocidal block copolymer micelles that could be immobilized on a filter paper to actively eradicate bacteria. Despite the many advantages offered by this system, its widespread use is hindered by its unknown mechanism of action which can result in non-reproducible outcomes. In this work, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which a certain percentage of Escherichia coli cells survived when passing through the bactericidal filter paper. Through the process of elimination, the possibility that the bacterial survival probability was controlled by the initial bacterial load or the existence of resistant sub-populations of E. coli was dismissed. It was observed that increasing the thickness or the number of layers of the filter significantly decreased bacterial survival probability for the biocidal filter paper but did not affect the efficiency of the blank filter paper (no biocide). The survival probability of bacteria passing through the antibacterial filter paper appeared to depend strongly on the number of collision between each bacterium and the biocide-loaded micelles. It was thus hypothesized that during each collision a certain number of biocide molecules were directly transferred from the hydrophobic core of the micelle to the bacterial lipid bilayer membrane. Therefore, each bacterium must encounter a certain number of collisions to take up enough biocide to kill the cell and cells that do not undergo the threshold number of collisions are expected to survive.

  7. Exopolysaccharides from sourdough lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Sandra; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-01-01

    The use of sourdough improves the quality and increases the shelf life of bread. The positive effects are associated with metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) during sourdough fermentation, including organic acids, exopolysaccharides (EPS), and enzymes. EPS formed during sourdough fermentation by glycansucrase activity from sucrose influence the viscoelastic properties of the dough and beneficially affect the texture and shelf life (in particular, starch retrogradation) of bread. Accordingly, EPS have the potential to replace hydrocolloids currently used as bread improvers and meet so the consumer demands for a reduced use of food additives. In this review, the current knowledge about the functional aspects of EPS formation by sourdough LAB especially in baking applications is summarized.

  8. Magnetotactic bacteria. Magnetic navigation on the microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2016-11-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are aquatic microorganisms with the ability to swim along the field lines of a magnetic field, which in their natural environment is provided by the magnetic field of the Earth. They do so with the help of specialized magnetic organelles called magnetosomes, vesicles containing magnetic crystals. Magnetosomes are aligned along cytoskeletal filaments to give linear structures that can function as intracellular compass needles. The predominant viewpoint is that the cells passively align with an external magnetic field, just like a macroscopic compass needle, but swim actively along the field lines, propelled by their flagella. In this minireview, we give an introduction to this intriguing bacterial behavior and discuss recent advances in understanding it, with a focus on the swimming directionality, which is not only affected by magnetic fields, but also by gradients of the oxygen concentration.

  9. Water quality indicators: bacteria, coliphages, enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Johnson; Ganesh, Atheesha

    2013-12-01

    Water quality through the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms may affect human health. Coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and coliphages are normally used as indicators of water quality. However, the presence of above-mentioned indicators do not always suggest the presence of human enteric viruses. It is important to study human enteric viruses in water. Human enteric viruses can tolerate fluctuating environmental conditions and survive in the environment for long periods of time becoming causal agents of diarrhoeal diseases. Therefore, the potential of human pathogenic viruses as significant indicators of water quality is emerging. Human Adenoviruses and other viruses have been proposed as suitable indices for the effective identification of such organisms of human origin contaminating water systems. This article reports on the recent developments in the management of water quality specifically focusing on human enteric viruses as indicators.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF TOFU PRODUCTION METHOD WITH PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ADDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Zielińska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a production method for tofu with probiotic bacteria under laboratory conditions. The works included: selection of a strain and tofu production conditions, and a storage test of the manufactured product. It was concluded that the sensory quality of tofu with the addition of different probiotic cultures did not differ significantly (p>0.01, depending on used strains and their mixtures, and the sample quality was comparable to the commercial product. It was observed that the number of Lactobacillus bacteria in study samples was the factor determining the palatability of tofu (r= 0.75. On the other hand, the sensory quality of products was significantly affected by the production method of tofu with the addition of probiotic bacteria. It was concluded that the formation of curds from soy beverage by the addition of CaSO4, followed by inoculation with Lactobacillus casei ŁOCK 0900 at the amount of 9.26 log CFU/g and incubation at temp. of 37C for 2h as well as for 20h are methods recommended for production tofu with regard to sensory qualities of the final product among all tested methods. The number of lactic acid bacteria in studied tofu samples was maintained at the high level (109-1010 CFU/g, and the number of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp lactis BB-12 bacteria did not exceed 103 CFU/g, whereas the number of Lactobacillus bacteria was equal to 108-109 CFU/g. For the period of 15 days of storage of tofu with probiotic bacteria at the temperature of 4C the number of lactic acid bacteria was maintained at the constant level of approx. 109 CFU/g. It was concluded that it is possible to produce tofu with probiotic bacteria that has acceptable sensory characteristics and a high number of lactic acid bacteria, therefore the product could be considered as a functional one.

  11. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  12. Deodorant bacteria; Des bacteries desodorisantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanlo, J.L. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 30 - Ales (France)

    1998-02-01

    Purifying bacteria: if this concept is not new, its application to gases cleansing has only been developed recently. This method allows to eliminate the volatile organic compounds and the gaseous effluents odors which come from industrial sites. Three bioreactors types exist at the present time. Their principles are explained. (O.M.) 6 refs.

  13. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  14. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  15. Synthetic Biology in Streptomyces Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer . Genome sequencing has revealed that

  16. SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IN STREPTOMYCES BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Voigt, C

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer. Genome sequencing has revealed that t

  17. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...

  19. ENDOSPORES OF THERMOPHILIC FERMENTATIVE BACTERIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volpi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    solely based on endospores of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which presumably constitute only a small fraction of the total thermophilic endospore community reaching cold environments. My PhD project developed an experimental framework for using thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) to trace...

  20. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  1. [Comparative studies of fresh and seawater for the determination of total coliform and fecal coliform bacteria according to the European Economic Community guideline 76/160 (bathing water) by the use of the most-probable-number method with BRILA-MUG broth and differentiation according to the drinking water ordinance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havemeister, G; Aleksic, S; Bockemühl, J; Heinemeyer, E A; Müller, H E; Von Pritzbuer, E

    1991-05-01

    During the summer season of 1989 about 222 samples of bathing water (Northsea, Baltic Sea and inland waters) were investigated, i.e. 2 times 1998 dilution tubes (1501 positive) were tested. Results with BRILA-MUG and lactose-bouillon were compared and additional 97 samples were tested with one respectively three colonies by confirmative tests. -- The BRILA-MUG one-tube-test (gas, fluorescence and indol) has as expected larger numbers of total coliforms (GC) and faecal coliforms (FC) in comparison with corresponding numbers for E. coli and coliform bacteria according to German law for drinking water (TrinkwV). -- BRILA-MUG and lactose-bouillon with the same identification mode according to "TrinkwV" has corresponding results concerning E. coli and coliform bacteria. -- Following the identification mode according to "TrinkwV" the total coliforms (GC/gas in BRILA-MUG) depending on the origin proved 60-80% as coliform bacteria. Additional API-tests showed that the other bacteria are coliform bacteria too or bacteria which can be considered as indicators for water pollution. -- Faecal coliforms (FC/fluorescence and indol-positive) depending on the origin proved 70-90% as E. coli, if following the identification mode according to "TrinkwV". Using 3 instead of 1 colony per positive dilution tube for identification the positive results increased approximately by 9%. 15% of negative results with the identification mode according to "TrinkwV" proved as E. coli-positive with identification according to API-system, i.e. the corresponding rate of E. coli-positive tubes will therefore be higher than shown above. The BRILA-MUG one-tube-test in connection with the MPN-method can be used successfully to determine the number of total and faecal coliforms according to the EEC-directive for bathing waters. The test needs only a minimum of material and also a minimum of laboratory staff. Differences between this test and other more extensive tests with several biochemical

  2. Two Sinorhizobium meliloti glutaredoxins regulate iron metabolism and symbiotic bacteroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamina, Sofiane M; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Couturier, Jérémy; Chibani, Kamel; Hopkins, Julie; Bekki, Abdelkader; de Lajudie, Philippe; Rouhier, Nicolas; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Alloing, Geneviève; Puppo, Alain; Frendo, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Legumes interact symbiotically with bacteria of the Rhizobiaceae to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We investigated the contribution of the three glutaredoxin (Grx)-encoding genes present in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome to this symbiosis. SmGRX1 (CGYC active site) and SmGRX3 (CPYG) recombinant proteins displayed deglutathionylation activity in the 2-hydroethyldisulfide assay, whereas SmGRX2 (CGFS) did not. Mutation of SmGRX3 did not affect S. meliloti growth or symbiotic capacities. In contrast, SmGRX1 and SmGRX2 mutations decreased the growth of free-living bacteria and the nitrogen fixation capacity of bacteroids. Mutation of SmGRX1 led to nodule abortion and an absence of bacteroid differentiation, whereas SmGRX2 mutation decreased nodule development without modifying bacteroid development. The higher sensitivity of the Smgrx1 mutant strain as compared with wild-type strain to oxidative stress was associated with larger amounts of glutathionylated proteins. The Smgrx2 mutant strain displayed significantly lower levels of activity than the wild type for two iron-sulfur-containing enzymes, aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase. This lower level of activity could be associated with deregulation of the transcriptional activity of the RirA iron regulator and higher intracellular iron content. Thus, two S. meliloti Grx proteins are essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, playing independent roles in bacterial differentiation and the regulation of iron metabolism.

  3. Differentiating intracellular from extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in soil by sonication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Qin

    Full Text Available Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio  =  1/8 (w/v and power density  =  15 watt ml(-1], the activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (phosphatase in a Haplic Cambisol soil increased with sonication time in two distinct steps. A first plateau of enzyme activity was reached between 60 and 100 s, and a second higher plateau after 300 s. We also found that sonication for 100 s under optimal conditions activated most (about 80% of the alkaline phosphatase that was added to an autoclaved soil, while total bacteria number was not affected. Sonication for 300 s reduced the total bacteria number by three orders of magnitude but had no further effects on enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the first plateau of alkaline phosphatase activity was derived from extracellular enzymes attached to soil particles, and the second plateau to the combination of extracellular and intracellular enzymes after cell lysis. We conclude that our adjusted sonication method may be an alternative to the currently used physiological and chloroform-fumigation methods for differentiating intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Further testing is needed to find out whether this holds for other soil types.

  4. Differentiating intracellular from extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in soil by sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuping; Hu, Chunsheng; Oenema, Oene

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio  =  1/8 (w/v) and power density  =  15 watt ml(-1)], the activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (phosphatase) in a Haplic Cambisol soil increased with sonication time in two distinct steps. A first plateau of enzyme activity was reached between 60 and 100 s, and a second higher plateau after 300 s. We also found that sonication for 100 s under optimal conditions activated most (about 80%) of the alkaline phosphatase that was added to an autoclaved soil, while total bacteria number was not affected. Sonication for 300 s reduced the total bacteria number by three orders of magnitude but had no further effects on enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the first plateau of alkaline phosphatase activity was derived from extracellular enzymes attached to soil particles, and the second plateau to the combination of extracellular and intracellular enzymes after cell lysis. We conclude that our adjusted sonication method may be an alternative to the currently used physiological and chloroform-fumigation methods for differentiating intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Further testing is needed to find out whether this holds for other soil types.

  5. Diversity of Denitrifying Bacteria in the San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, A.; Lee, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    We compared the diversity of communities of denitrifying bacteria from the San Francisco Bay to investigate whether environmental factors affect diversity. To do this, we studied the sequence diversity of the marker gene nirK. nirK codes for the enzyme nitrite reductase which helps reduce nitrite to nitric oxide, an important step in denitrification. Sediment samples were collected spatially from five different locations and temporally during the four different seasons along a salinity gradient in the bay. After collecting samples and extracting DNA from them, we used PCR to amplify our gene of interest, created clone libraries for sequencing, and compared phylogenetic trees from the different communities. Based on several phylogenetic analyses on our tree and environments, we saw that denitrifying bacteria from the North and Central Bay form distinct spatial clusters; Central Bay communities are very similar to each other, while communities from the North Bay are more distinct from each other and from communities in the Central Bay. Bacteria from site 8.1M (Carquinez Strait) showed the most cm-scale spatial diversity, and there was the most species richness during the winter. All this suggests that diversity of communities of denitrifying bacteria may be affected by spatial and temporal environmental factors.

  6. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  7. Development of a new differential extensometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chongwu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new differential extensometer, which has a baseline rod in suspension with both ends free, and some preliminary test results. compared with a traditional differential extensometer, which has one end of the baseline rod fixed to the ground, this instrument is less affected by commonly encountered interferences, including environment vibration, momentary power failure, and power noise.

  8. Characteristics of airborne bacteria in Mumbai urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangamma, S

    2014-08-01

    Components of biological origin constitute small but a significant proportion of the ambient airborne particulate matter (PM). However, their diversity and role in proinflammatory responses of PM are not well understood. The present study characterizes airborne bacterial species diversity in Mumbai City and elucidates the role of bacterial endotoxin in PM induced proinflammatory response in ex vivo. Airborne bacteria and endotoxin samples were collected during April-May 2010 in Mumbai using six stage microbial impactor and biosampler. The culturable bacterial species concentration was measured and factors influencing the composition were identified by principal component analysis (PCA). The biosampler samples were used to stimulate immune cells in whole blood assay. A total of 28 species belonging to 17 genera were identified. Gram positive and spore forming groups of bacteria dominated the airborne culturable bacterial concentration. The study indicated the dominance of spore forming and human or animal flora derived pathogenic/opportunistic bacteria in the ambient air environment. Pathogenic and opportunistic species of bacteria were also present in the samples. TNF-α induction by PM was reduced (35%) by polymyxin B pretreatment and this result was corroborated with the results of blocking endotoxin receptor cluster differentiation (CD14). The study highlights the importance of airborne biological particles and suggests need of further studies on biological characterization of ambient PM.

  9. Quorum quenching is an antivirulence strategy employed by endophytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusari, Parijat; Kusari, Souvik; Lamshöft, Marc; Sezgin, Selahaddin; Spiteller, Michael; Kayser, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    Bacteria predominantly use quorum sensing to regulate a plethora of physiological activities such as cell-cell crosstalk, mutualism, virulence, competence, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance. In this study, we investigated how certain potent endophytic bacteria harbored in Cannabis sativa L. plants use quorum quenching as an antivirulence strategy to disrupt the cell-to-cell quorum sensing signals in the biosensor strain, Chromobacterium violaceum. We used a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-HRMS(n)) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging high-resolution mass spectrometry (MALDI-imaging-HRMS) to first quantify and visualize the spatial distribution of the quorum sensing molecules in the biosensor strain, C. violaceum. We then showed, both quantitatively and visually in high spatial resolution, how selected endophytic bacteria of C. sativa can selectively and differentially quench the quorum sensing molecules of C. violaceum. This study provides fundamental insights into the antivirulence strategies used by endophytes in order to survive in their ecological niches. Such defense mechanisms are evolved in order to thwart the plethora of pathogens invading associated host plants in a manner that prevents the pathogens from developing resistance against the plant/endophyte bioactive secondary metabolites. This work also provides evidence towards utilizing endophytes as tools for biological control of bacterial phytopathogens. In continuation, such insights would even afford new concepts and strategies in the future for combating drug resistant bacteria by quorum-inhibiting clinical therapies.

  10. Lactic acid bacteria found in fermented fish in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Okada, Sanae; Komagata, Kazuo

    1998-06-01

    Forty-seven strains of homofermentative rod-shaped and 5 heterofermentative sphere-shaped lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 4 kinds of fermented fish (pla-ra, pla-chom, kung-chom, and hoi-dong) in Thailand. These bacteria were separated into four groups by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, including fluorometric DNA-DNA hybridization. Five strains (Group I) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall. Four strains were identified as Lactobacillus pentosus, and one strain was L. plantarum. Tested strains of this group produced DL-lactic acid. The rest of the rod-shaped bacteria, 23 strains (Group II) and 19 strains (Group III), lacked meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall and were identified as L. farciminis and Lactobacillus species, respectively. The tested strains of these groups produced L-lactic acid. The amount of cellular fatty acids of C16:0 and C18:1, and the DNA base compositions were significant for differentiating the strains in Groups II and III. Five strains of cocci in chains (Group IV) produced gas from glucose. The tested strains of this group produced d-lactic acid. They were identified as a Leuconostoc species. The distribution of these bacteria in fermented fish in Thailand is discussed.

  11. On differential characteristic classes

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Man-Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give explicit formulas of differential characteristic classes of principal $G$-bundles with connections and prove their expected properties. In particular, we obtain explicit formulas for differential Chern classes, differential Pontryagin classes and differential Euler class. Furthermore, we show that the differential Chern class is the unique natural transformation from (Simons-Sullivan) differential $K$-theory to (Cheeger-Simons) differential characters that is compatible ...

  12. Multiparametric flow cytometry allows rapid assessment and comparison of lactic acid bacteria viability after freezing and during frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Aline; Béal, Catherine; Ghorbal, Sarrah; Ogier, Jean-Claude; Bouix, Marielle

    2007-08-01

    Freezing is widely used for the long-term preservation of lactic acid bacteria, but often affects their viability and technological properties. Different methods are currently employed to determine bacterial cryotolerance, but they all require several hours or days before achieving results. The aim of this study was to establish the advantages of multiparametric flow cytometry by using two specific fluorescent probes to provide rapid assessment of the viability of four strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii after freezing and during frozen storage. The relevance of carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide to quantify bacterial viability was proven. When bacterial suspensions were simultaneously stained with these two fluorescent probes, three major subpopulations were identified: viable, dead and injured cells. The cryotolerance of four L. delbrueckii strains was evaluated by quantifying the relative percentages of each subpopulation before and after freezing, and throughout one month of storage at -80 degrees C. Results displayed significant differences in the resistance to freezing and frozen storage of the four strains when they were submitted to the same freezing and storage procedures. Whereas resistant strains displayed less than 10% of dead cells after one month of storage, one sensitive strain exhibited more than 50% of dead cells, together with 14% of stressed cells after freezing. Finally, this study proved that multiparametric flow cytometry was a convenient and rapid tool to evaluate the viability of lactic acid bacteria, and was well correlated with plate count results. Moreover, it made it possible to differentiate strains according to their susceptibility to freezing and frozen storage.

  13. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs.

  14. The effects of T4 and A3R bacteriophages on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bocian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages (phages are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7 and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205. By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs.

  15. Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160769.html Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria Infections, diarrhea and vomiting are possible consequences, FDA ... products can harbor several species of potentially harmful bacteria, researchers warn. Two types in particular -- Bacillus licheniformis ...

  16. Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162249.html Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria Study of Washington farm workers finds alterations persist ... News) -- Pesticide exposure may change the makeup of bacteria in the mouths of farm workers, a new ...

  17. Molecular characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from industrially fermented Greek table olives

    OpenAIRE

    Doulgeraki, Agapi; Pramateftaki, Paraskevi; Argyri, Anthoula; Nychas, George John; Tassou, Chrysoula; Panagou, Efstathios

    2012-01-01

    A total of 145 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates have been recovered from fermented table olives and brine and characterized at strain level with molecular tools. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) of ApaI macrorestriction fragments was applied for strain differentiation. Species differentiation was based either on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) (black olives) or on restriction analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene (PCR-ARDRA) (brine and green olives). Species ide...

  18. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  19. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  20. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  1. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsimring, L S; Aranson, I S; Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Shochet, O; Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is explained as being due the variation of the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a non-motile phase.

  2. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  3. Compartmentalization of bacteria in microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Judith; Heunis, Tiaan; Harmzen, Elrika; Dicks, Leon M T; Meuldijk, Jan; Klumperman, Bert

    2014-12-18

    Lactobacillus plantarum strain 423 was encapsulated in hollow poly(organosiloxane) microcapsules by templating water-in-oil Pickering emulsion droplets via the interfacial reaction of alkylchlorosilanes. The bacteria were suspended in growth medium or buffer to protect the cells against pH changes during the interfacial reactions with alkylchlorosilanes. The results of this work open up novel avenues for the encapsulation of microbial cells.

  4. 454 Transcriptome sequencing suggests a role for two-component signalling in cellularization and differentiation of barley endosperm transfer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Thiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell specification and differentiation in the endosperm of cereals starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the endosperm transfer cells (ETCs. Besides the importance in assimilate transfer, ETCs are proposed to play an essential role in the regulation of endosperm differentiation by affecting development of proximate endosperm tissues. We attempted to identify signalling elements involved in early endosperm differentiation by using a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and 454 transcriptome sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 454 sequencing of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial state until functionality in transfer processes captured a high proportion of novel transcripts which are not available in existing barley EST databases. Intriguingly, the ETC-transcriptome showed a high abundance of elements of the two-component signalling (TCS system suggesting an outstanding role in ETC differentiation. All components and subfamilies of the TCS, including distinct kinds of membrane-bound receptors, have been identified to be expressed in ETCs. The TCS system represents an ancient signal transduction system firstly discovered in bacteria and has previously been shown to be co-opted by eukaryotes, like fungi and plants, whereas in animals and humans this signalling route does not exist. Transcript profiling of TCS elements by qRT-PCR suggested pivotal roles for specific phosphorelays activated in a coordinated time flow during ETC cellularization and differentiation. ETC-specificity of transcriptionally activated TCS phosphorelays was assessed for early differentiation and cellularization contrasting to an extension of expression to other grain tissues at the beginning of ETC maturation. Features of candidate genes of distinct phosphorelays and transcriptional activation of genes putatively implicated in hormone signalling pathways hint at a crosstalk of hormonal influences, putatively ABA and ethylene, and

  5. Characterization of Mediterranean Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of motile prokaryotes that are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats and cosmopolitan in distribution. In this study, we collected magnetotactic bacteria from the Mediterranean Sea. A remarkable diversity of morphotypes was observed, including muiticellular types that seemed to differ from those previously found in North and South America. Another interesting organism was one with magnetosomes arranged in a six-stranded bundle which occupied one third of the cell width. The magnetosome bundle was evident even under optic microscopy. These cells were connected together and swam as a linear entire unit. Magnetosomes did not always align up to form a straight linear chain. A chain composed of rectangle magnetosomes bent at a position with an oval crystal. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the crystal at the pivotal position suggested uncompleted formation of the crystal. This is the first report of Mediterranean magnetotactic bacteria, which should be useful for studies of biogeochemical cycling and geohistory of the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Contribution of midgut bacteria to blood digestion and egg production in aedes aegypti (diptera: culicidae (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimenta Paulo FP

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insect gut harbors a variety of microorganisms that probably exceed the number of cells in insects themselves. These microorganisms can live and multiply in the insect, contributing to digestion, nutrition, and development of their host. Recent studies have shown that midgut bacteria appear to strengthen the mosquito's immune system and indirectly enhance protection from invading pathogens. Nevertheless, the physiological significance of these bacteria for mosquitoes has not been established to date. In this study, oral administration of antibiotics was employed in order to examine the contribution of gut bacteria to blood digestion and fecundity in Aedes aegypti. Results The antibiotics carbenicillin, tetracycline, spectinomycin, gentamycin and kanamycin, were individually offered to female mosquitoes. Treatment of female mosquitoes with antibiotics affected the lysis of red blood cells (RBCs, retarded the digestion of blood proteins and reduced egg production. In addition, antibiotics did not affect the survival of mosquitoes. Mosquito fertility was restored in the second gonotrophic cycle after suspension of the antibiotic treatment, showing that the negative effects of antibiotics in blood digestion and egg production in the first gonotrophic cycle were reversible. Conclusions The reduction of bacteria affected RBC lysis, subsequently retarded protein digestion, deprived mosquito from essential nutrients and, finally, oocyte maturation was affected, resulting in the production of fewer viable eggs. These results indicate that Ae. aegypti and its midgut bacteria work in synergism to digest a blood meal. Our findings open new possibilities to investigate Ae. aegypti-associated bacteria as targets for mosquito control strategies.

  7. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  8. Ecology of mycophagous collimonas bacteria in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höppener-Ogawa, Sachie

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Collimonas consist of soil bacteria that can grow at expense of living fungal hyphae i.e. they are mycophagous. This PhD studies deals with the ecology of mycophagous bacteria in soil using collimonads as model organisms. Collimonads were found to be widely distribut

  9. Current strategies for improving food bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, O P; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Novel concepts and methodologies are emerging that hold great promise for the directed improvement of food-related bacteria, specifically lactic acid bacteria. Also, the battle against food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria can now be fought more effectively. Here we describe recent advances in micro

  10. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic bact

  11. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  12. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in common that

  13. Cryptic microsporidian parasites differentially affect invasive and native Artemia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Nicolas O; Lievens, Eva J P; Segard, Adeline; Flaven, Elodie; Jabbour-Zahab, Roula; Lenormand, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the host specificity of two cryptic microsporidian species (Anostracospora rigaudi and Enterocytospora artemiae) infecting invasive (Artemia franciscana) and native (Artemia parthenogenetica) hosts in sympatry. Anostracospora rigaudi was on average four times more prevalent in the native host, whereas E. artemiae was three times more prevalent in the invasive host. Infection with An. rigaudi strongly reduced female reproduction in both host species, whereas infection with E. artemiae had weaker effects on female reproduction. We contrasted microsporidian prevalence in native A. franciscana populations (New World) and in both invaded and non-invaded Artemia populations (Old World). At a community level, microsporidian prevalence was twice as high in native compared with invasive hosts, due to the contrasting host-specificity of An. rigaudi and E. artemiae. At a higher biogeographical level, microsporidian prevalence in A. franciscana did not differ between the invaded populations and the native populations used for the introduction. Although E. artemiae was the only species found both in New and Old World populations, no evidence of its co-introduction with the invasive host was found in our experimental and phylogeographic tests. These results suggest that the success of A. franciscana invasion is probably due to a lower susceptibility to virulent microsporidian parasites rather than to decreased microsporidian prevalence compared with A. parthenogenetica or to lower microsporidian virulence in introduced areas.

  14. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Inge; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2015-02-15

    An important function of eating is ingesting energy. Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three stimuli in two motivational states (hunger and satiety) while their brain responses were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a randomized crossover design. Stimuli were solutions of sucralose (sweet, no energy), maltodextrin (non-sweet, energy) and sucralose+maltodextrin (sweet, energy). We found no main effect of energy content and no interaction between energy content and sweetness. However, there was an interaction between hunger state and energy content in the median cingulate (bilaterally), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula and thalamus. This indicates that the anterior insula and thalamus, areas in which hunger state and taste of a stimulus are integrated, also integrate hunger state with caloric content of a taste stimulus. Furthermore, in the median cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, tasting energy resulted in more activation during satiety compared to hunger. This finding indicates that these areas, which are known to be involved in processes that require approach and avoidance, are also involved in guiding ingestive behavior. In conclusion, our results suggest that energy sensing is a hunger state dependent process, in which the median cingulate, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula and thalamus play a central role by integrating hunger state with stimulus relevance.

  15. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Inge; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three stimuli in two motivational states (hunger and satiet

  16. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van I.; Graaf, de C.; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    An important function of eating is ingesting energy. Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three

  17. Effect of three nematicides on the growth of some phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khadem, M; Mehiar, F; Embabi, M S

    1977-01-01

    The effect of three nematicides, aldicarb, fensulfothion, and phenamiphos at four concentrations (1, 5, 25, and 125 ppm) was tested on the growth of five bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Corynebacterium fascians, Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Streptomyces scabies and four fungi, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotium bataticola. Of the bacteria, P. solanacearum was most affected by the chemicals at all concentrations, while E. carotovora was least affected. Fensulfothion was generally the most effective nematicide on the bacteria tested, while phenamiphos was the least effective. Similarly, the effect of the chemicals on the fungi tested varied greatly. F. solani and R. solani were generally most affected, followed by F. oxysporum, while S. bataticola was least affected. Of the chemicals tested, phenamiphos was generally the most effective, followed by fensulfothion, while aldicarb was the least effective.

  18. Isolation and identification of thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from shrimp paste "Terasi"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murwani, R.; Supriyadi, Subagio, Trianto, A.; Ambariyanto

    2015-12-01

    Terasi is a traditional product generally made of fermented shrimp. There were many studies regarding lactic acid bacteria of terasi but none regarding proteolitic bacteria. This study was conducted to isolate and identify the thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from terasi. In addition, the effect of different salt concentrations on the growth of the isolated proteolytic bacteria with the greatest proteolytic activity was also studied. Terasi samples were obtained from the Northern coast region of Java island i.e. Jepara, Demak and Batang. The study obtained 34 proteolytic isolates. Four isolates were identified as Sulfidobacillus, three isolates as Vibrio / Alkaligenes / Aeromonas, two isolates as Pseudomonas, 21 isolates as Bacillus, three isolates as Kurthia/ Caryophanon and one isolates as Amphibacillus. The growth of proteolytic bacteria was affected by salt concentration. The largest growth was found at 0 ppm salt concentrations and growth was declined as salt concentration increased. Maximum growth at each salt concentration tested was found at 8 hours incubation.

  19. Toxicity assessment of SiC nanofibers and nanorods against bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szala, Mateusz; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, evidence of the antibacterial effects of silicon carbide (SiC) nanofibers (NFSiC) and nanorods (NRSiC) obtained by combustion synthesis has been presented. It has been shown that the examined bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, could bind to the surface of the investigated SiC nanostructures. The results of respiration measurements, dehydrogenase activity measurements, and evaluation of viable bacteria after incubation with NFSiC and NRSiC demonstrated that the nanostructures of SiC affect the growth and activity of the bacteria examined. The direct count of bacteria stained with propidium iodide after incubation with SiC nanostructures revealed that the loss of cell membrane integrity could be one of the main effects leading to the death of the bacteria.

  20. Variability in the concentration of indicator bacteria in landfill leachate--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Muhammad; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian

    2015-03-01

    Leachate collected from the collection ponds of four landfill sites was investigated and compared for total coliforms and E. coli concentration as representatives of fecal pollution. Concentration of total coliforms and E. coli was comparable for leachate obtained from Kulim Landfill Site (KLS) and Ampang Landfill Site (ALS) with little variations. However, the level of indicator bacteria was significantly lower for Kuala Sepetang Landfill Site (KSLS), whereas Pulau Burung Landfill Site (PBLS) had the lowest concentration for both total coliforms and E. coli. Considering the landfills are currently operational, with the exception of ALS, the presence of indicator bacteria implies their inactivation prior to discharge. High concentration of indicator bacteria in ALS is attributed to the run-off entering the leachate pond. Greater concentration of ammonia and salinity level were partly responsible for lower concentration of indicator bacteria in leachate from KSLS and PBLS, indicating that salinty and ammonia could significantly affect the survival of indicator bacteria.

  1. The prey’s scent – Volatile organic compound mediated interactions between soil bacteria and their protist predators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, K.B.; Geisen, Stefan; Wubs, E.R.J.; Song, C.; Boer, de W.; Garbeva, Paolina

    2016-01-01

    Protists are major predators of bacteria in soils. However, it remains unknown how protists sense their prey in this highly complex environment. Here, we investigated whether volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of six phylogenetic distinct soil bacteria affect the performance of three different soil p

  2. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  3. Experiencing affective interactive art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2010-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective move

  4. [Affective disorders and eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakra, Eric; Belzeaux, R; Azorin, J M; Adida, M

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a frequent co-occurence of affective and eating disorders. The incidence of one disorder in patients suffering from the other disorder is well over the incidence in the general population. Several causes could explain this increased comorbidity. First, the iatrogenic origin is detailed. Indeed, psychotropic drugs, and particularly mood stabilizers, often lead to modification in eating behaviors, generally inducing weight gain. These drugs can increase desire for food, reduce baseline metabolism or decrease motor activity. Also, affective and eating disorders share several characteristics in semiology. These similarities can not only obscure the differential diagnosis but may also attest of conjoint pathophysiological bases in the two conditions. However, genetic and biological findings so far are too sparse to corroborate this last hypothesis. Nonetheless, it is noteworthy that comorbidity of affective and eating disorders worsens patients'prognosis and is associated with more severe forms of affective disorders characterized by an earlier age of onset in the disease, higher number of mood episodes and a higher suicidality. Lastly, psychotropic drugs used in affective disorders (lithium, antiepileptic mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants) are reviewed in order to weigh their efficacy in eating disorders. This could help establish the best therapeutic option when confronted to comorbidity.

  5. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional changes induced by phagocytosis or growth on bacteria in Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peracino Barbara

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis plays a major role in the defense of higher organisms against microbial infection and provides also the basis for antigen processing in the immune response. Cells of the model organism Dictyostelium are professional phagocytes that exploit phagocytosis of bacteria as the preferred way to ingest food, besides killing pathogens. We have investigated Dictyostelium differential gene expression during phagocytosis of non-pathogenic bacteria, using DNA microarrays, in order to identify molecular functions and novel genes involved in phagocytosis. Results The gene expression profiles of cells incubated for a brief time with bacteria were compared with cells either incubated in axenic medium or growing on bacteria. Transcriptional changes during exponential growth in axenic medium or on bacteria were also compared. We recognized 443 and 59 genes that are differentially regulated by phagocytosis or by the different growth conditions (growth on bacteria vs. axenic medium, respectively, and 102 genes regulated by both processes. Roughly one third of the genes are up-regulated compared to macropinocytosis and axenic growth. Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes with different tools revealed that phagocytosis induces profound changes in carbohydrate, aminoacid and lipid metabolism, and in cytoskeletal components. Genes regulating translation and mitochondrial biogenesis are mostly up-regulated. Genes involved in sterol biosynthesis are selectively up-regulated, suggesting a shift in membrane lipid composition linked to phagocytosis. Very few changes were detected in genes required for vesicle fission/fusion, indicating that the intracellular traffic machinery is mostly in common between phagocytosis and macropinocytosis. A few putative receptors, including GPCR family 3 proteins, scaffolding and adhesion proteins, components of signal transduction and transcription factors have been identified, which could

  7. Transcriptome analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti nodule bacteria in nifA mutant background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhexian; WANG Yiping; ZOU Huasong; LI Jian; ZHANG Yuantao; LIU Ying; YU Guanqiao; ZHU Jiabi; R(U)BERG Silvia; BECKER Anke

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 nifA mutant and wild type nodule bacteria were compared using whole genome microarrays. The results revealed a large scale alteration of gene expression (601 genes) in the nifA minus background. The loss of NifA altered the expression of many functional groups of genes (macromolecular metabolism, TCA cycle and respiration,nodulation and nitrogen fixation) and may lead to quite different life stages of the nodule bacteria.Upregulation of fixK and its associated genes was observed in the nifA mutant nodule bacteria. Additional quantitative real-time PCR experiments revealed that the transcript levels of fixLJ were significantly upshifted in the nifA mutant nodule bacteria.Putative NifA binding sites were predicted by a statistical method in the upstream sequences of 13 differentially regulated genes from the nifA- transcriptome.

  8. Antibacterial and bioiflm inhibitory activities of bacteria associated with polychaetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sathianeson Satheesh; Nadarajan Viju

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the antibacterial and antibiofilm activities expressed by epibiotic bacteria associated with the polychaetes Platynereis dumerilii and Syllis sp. Methods:A total of 32 cultivable bacterial strains were isolated from the two polychaete species. The crude extracts were tested for antibacterial activity and biofilm inhibitory activity against pathogenic and biofilm-forming bacterial strains. Extracts of the strains which showed strong activity were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and the bacterial strains were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results:Extracts of 13 bacterial strains showed inhibitory activity against pathogenic and biofilm-forming bacteria. The crude extracts also affected the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity of the Alteromonas sp. isolated from marine biofilm. The adhesion of Alteromonas sp. on glass surface showed significant variation between surface-associated bacterial crude extract treatment and control groups. Among the 13 bacteria, two strains PA8 and PA19 were further analyzed for bioactive fractions. Thin-layer chromatography indicated the presence of a single active fraction in the crude extract of both the bacterial strains. The epibiotic bacterial strains P8 and P19 were identified as Exiguobacterium sp. and Actinobacterium sp. respectively based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Conclusions:The present study indicates that bacteria associated with marine invertebrates inhabiting the coastal waters could be used as a potential source for the isolation of bioactive metabolites.

  9. The effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacteria on pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Dahm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ecomycorrhizal fungi (Hebelon crustuliniforme(Bull.: Fr. Quél. 5392 and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers. Coker et Couch 5335 and bacteria (Bacillus polymyxa and Azospirillum brasilense. associated with mycorrhizas on the growth of pine seedligs was investigated. In addition the influence of bacteria on fungal biomass production and the relationship between ectomycorrhizal fungi and fungi pathogenic to root of pine seedlings were determined. In general, the shoot/root ratio was higher in plants inoculated with Hebeloma crustuliniforme and bacteria than in the control seedlings (grown only under sterile conditions. In non-sterile substrate the root/shoot ratio of the mycorrhizal seedlings was lower as compared to the control. Similar phenomenon was noted in plants inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinetorius. The bacteria used as well as the time of introduction of these organisms into the cultures of mycorrhiza fungi affected the production of fungal biomass. Hebeloma crustuliniforme and Pisolithus tinctorius inhibited the growth of Rizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum fungi pathogenic to pine seedlings.

  10. Antibacterial and biofilm inhibitory activities of bacteria associated with polychaetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellamnadar Vaikundavasagom Sunjaiy Shankar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the antibacterial and antibiofilm activities expressed by epibiotic bacteria associated with the polychaetes Platynereis dumerilii and Syllis sp. Methods: A total of 32 cultivable bacterial strains were isolated from the two polychaete species. The crude extracts were tested for antibacterial activity and biofilm inhibitory activity against pathogenic and biofilm-forming bacterial strains. Extracts of the strains which showed strong activity were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC and the bacterial strains were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Extracts of 13 bacterial strains showed inhibitory activity against pathogenic and biofilm-forming bacteria. The crude extracts also affected the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity of the Alteromonas sp. isolated from marine biofilm. The adhesion of Alteromonas sp. on glass surface showed significant variation between surface-associated bacterial crude extract treatment and control groups. Among the 13 bacteria, two strains PA8 and PA19 were further analyzed for bioactive fractions. Thinlayer chromatography indicated the presence of a single active fraction in the crude extract of both the bacterial strains. The epibiotic bacterial strains P8 and P19 were identified as Exiguobacterium sp. and Actinobacterium sp. respectively based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Conclusions: The present study indicates that bacteria associated with marine invertebrates inhabiting the coastal waters could be used as a potential source for the isolation of bioactive metabolites.

  11. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I; Mitchell, James G; Stocker, Roman

    2016-02-09

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These "phycospheres" may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean.

  12. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-09

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways.

  13. Bioretention column study of bacteria community response to salt-enriched artificial stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreny, Theodore; Burke, David J; Burchhardt, Kathleen M; Fabian, Mark W; Kretzer, Annette M

    2012-01-01

    Cold climate cities with green infrastructure depend on soil bacteria to remove nutrients from road salt-enriched stormwater. Our research examined how bacterial communities in laboratory columns containing bioretention media responded to varying concentrations of salt exposure from artificial stormwater and the effect of bacteria and salt on column effluent concentrations. We used a factorial design with two bacteria treatments (sterile, nonsterile) and three salt concentrations (935, 315, and 80 ppm), including a deionized water control. Columns were repeatedly saturated with stormwater or deionized and then drained throughout 5 wk, with the last week of effluent analyzed for water chemistry. To examine bacterial communities, we extracted DNA from column bioretention media at time 0 and at week 5 and used molecular profiling techniques to examine bacterial community changes. We found that bacterial community taxa changed between time 0 and week 5 and that there was significant separation between taxa among salt treatments. Bacteria evenness was significantly affected by stormwater treatment, but there were no differences in bacterial richness or diversity. Soil bacteria and salt treatments had a significant effect on the effluent concentration of NO, PO, Cu, Pb, and Zn based on ANOVA tests. The presence of bacteria reduced effluent NO and Zn concentrations by as much as 150 and 25%, respectively, while having a mixed effect on effluent PO concentrations. Our results demonstrate how stormwater can affect bacterial communities and how the presence of soil bacteria improves pollutant removal by green infrastructure.

  14. Raingarden Soil Bacteria Community Response to Lab Simulated Salt-Enriched Artificial Stormwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreny, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cold climate cities with green infrastructure depend on soil bacteria to remove nutrients from road salt-enriched stormwater. Our research examined how bacterial communities in laboratory columns containing bioretention media responded to varying concentrations of salt exposure from artificial stormwater and the effect of bacteria and salt on column effluent concentrations. We used a factorial design with two bacteria treatments (sterile, nonsterile) and three salt concentrations (935, 315, and 80 ppm), including a deionized water control. Columns were repeatedly saturated with stormwater or deionized and then drained throughout 5 wk, with the last week of effluent analyzed for water chemistry. To examine bacterial communities, we extracted DNA from column bioretention media at time 0 and at week 5 and used molecular profiling techniques to examine bacterial community changes. We found that bacterial community taxa changed between time 0 and week 5 and that there was significant separation between taxa among salt treatments. Bacteria evenness was significantly affected by stormwater treatment, but there were no differences in bacterial richness or diversity. Soil bacteria and salt treatments had a significant effect on the effluent concentration of NO3, PO4, Cu, Pb, and Zn based on ANOVA tests. The presence of bacteria reduced effluent NO3 and Zn concentrations by as much as 150 and 25%, respectively, while having a mixed effect on effluent PO4 concentrations. Our results demonstrate how stormwater can affect bacterial communities and how the presence of soil bacteria improves pollutant removal by green infrastructure.

  15. Role of Natural Killer and Dendritic Cell Crosstalk in Immunomodulatio